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Sample records for cd55 protects neuronal

  1. Distinct CD55 Isoform Synthesis and Inhibition of Complement-Dependent Cytolysis by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Chan; Kim, Hangeun; Meyer, Keith; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Ray, Ranjit

    2016-08-15

    CD55/DAF, one of the regulators of complement activation, is known to limit excess complement activation on the host cell surface by accelerating the decay of C3 convertase. We reported previously that hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection or virus core protein expression upregulates CD55 expression. CD55 associates with HCV particles, potentially protecting HCV from lysis in circulation. An increase in CD55 on the surface of HCV-infected cells may inhibit complement-mediated cell killing. In this study, we show that Abs against cancer cell surface proteins induce complement-dependent cytolysis or Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity of immortalized human hepatocytes in the presence of CD55-blocking Ab. CD55 has a secreted isoform (sCD55) that is generated by alternative splicing. We observed that sCD55 is induced in HCV-infected or HCV replicon-harboring cells, as well as in liver biopsy samples from chronically HCV-infected patients. Conditioned medium from HCV-infected hepatoma cells (Huh7.5 cells) or immortalized human hepatocytes inhibited C3 convertase activity and complement-dependent cytolysis of sheep blood erythrocytes. Chronically HCV-infected patient sera inhibited C3 convertase activity, further implicating HCV-specific impairment of complement function in infected humans. CD55-blocking Ab inhibited erythrocyte lysis by conditioned medium, suggesting that CD55/sCD55 impairs convertase activity. Together, our data show that HCV infection induces sCD55 expression in HCV-infected cell culture-conditioned medium and inhibits C3 convertase activity. This may have implications for modulating complement-mediated immune function in the microenvironment and on HCV-harboring cells. PMID:27357152

  2. Identification of human CD55 displayed on the surface of yeast%酵母表面呈现的人CD55的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭波; 谢佩蓉; 邹强; 郑萍; 杨劲

    2001-01-01

    目的 鉴定酵母细胞表面呈现的人CD55,探讨诱导时间对呈现的影响。方法 PCR从CD55-pBluescriptM13质粒扩增出全长的CD55cDNA,酶切后克隆到酵母表面呈现载体pYD1,构建CD55-pYD1重组质粒后,转化酵母细胞。抗CD55单抗间接荧光标记染色法检测所呈现CD55的免疫学活性。通过FACS检测人血清处理后酵母表面C5b-9的沉积探讨CD55的生物学活性。同时还用FACS检测了不同诱导时间呈现CD55的细胞的百分率。结果 酵母表面呈现的CD55分子能与抗CD55不同表位的单抗结合,并且能减少细胞表面C5b-9的沉积。在诱导20h左右表面呈现CD55的细胞百分率达最高。结论 在酵母细胞表面呈现的CD55分子具有免疫学和生物学活性,对酵母呈现CD55的最佳诱导时间为20h。

  3. Adiponectin protects rat hippocampal neurons against excitotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, Guang; Wan, Ruiqian; Hu, Jingping; Mattson, Mark P.; Spangler, Edward; Liu, Shan; Yau, Suk-yu; Lee, Tatia M. C.; Gleichmann, Marc; Ingram, Donald K.; So, Kwok-Fai; Zou, Sige

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin exerts multiple regulatory functions in the body and in the hypothalamus primarily through activation of its two receptors, adiponectin receptor1 and adiponectin receptor 2. Recent studies have shown that adiponectin receptors are widely expressed in other areas of the brain including the hippocampus. However, the functions of adiponectin in brain regions other than the hypothalamus are not clear. Here, we report that adiponectin can protect cultured hippocampal neurons against ka...

  4. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

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    Jing-ru Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson′s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5-30 μM elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson′s disease.

  5. Lithium protects ethanol-induced neuronal apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium is widely used for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Recent studies have demonstrated its neuroprotective effect. Ethanol is a potent neurotoxin that is particularly harmful to the developing nervous system. In this study, we evaluated lithium's neuroprotection against ethanol-induced apoptosis. Transient exposure of infant mice to ethanol caused apoptotic cell death in brain, which was prevented significantly by administering a low dose of lithium 15 min later. In cultured cerebellar granule neurons, ethanol-induced apoptosis and activation of caspase-3/9, both of which were prevented by lithium. However, lithium's protection is not mediated by its commonly known inhibition of glycogen synthase3β, because neither ethanol nor lithium has significant effects on the phosphorylation of Akt (ser473) or GSK3β (ser9). In addition, the selective GSK-3β inhibitor SB-415286 was unable to prevent ethanol-induced apoptosis. These data suggest lithium may be used as a potential preventive measure for ethanol-induced neurological deficits

  6. Rhynchophylline Protects Cultured Rat Neurons against Methamphetamine Cytotoxicity

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    Dan Dan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhynchophylline (Rhy is an active component isolated from species of the genus Uncaria which has been used for the treatment of ailments to the central nervous system in traditional Chinese medicine. Besides acting as a calcium channel blocker, Rhy was also reported to be able to protect against glutamate-induced neuronal death. We thus hypothesize that Rhy may have neuroprotective activity against methamphetamine (MA. The primary neurons were cultured directly from the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats, acting as in vitro model in the present study. The neurotoxicity of MA and the protective effect of Rhy were evaluated by MTT assay. The effects of MA, Rhy or their combination on intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i were determined in individual neocortical neurons by the Fluo-3/AM tracing method. The MTT assay demonstrated that MA has a dose-dependent neurotoxicity in neuronal cultures. The addition of Rhy prior to the exposure to MA prevented neuronal death. Time course studies with the Fluo-3/AM probe showed that Rhy significantly decreased neuronal [Ca2+]i which was elevated by the exposure to MA. Our results suggested that Rhy can protect the neuronal cultures against MA exposure and promptly attenuate intracellular calcium overload triggered by MA challenge. This is the first report demonstrating an inhibitory effect of Rhy against MA impairment in cultured neurons in vitro.

  7. Neuron-derived IgG protects neurons from complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

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    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Li, Bingjie; McNutt, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Passive immunity of the nervous system has traditionally been thought to be predominantly due to the blood-brain barrier. This concept must now be revisited based on the existence of neuron-derived IgG. The conventional concept is that IgG is produced solely by mature B lymphocytes, but it has now been found to be synthesized by murine and human neurons. However, the function of this endogenous IgG is poorly understood. In this study, we confirm IgG production by rat cortical neurons at the protein and mRNA levels, with 69.0 ± 5.8% of cortical neurons IgG-positive. Injury to primary-culture neurons was induced by complement leading to increases in IgG production. Blockage of neuron-derived IgG resulted in more neuronal death and early apoptosis in the presence of complement. In addition, FcγRI was found in microglia and astrocytes. Expression of FcγR I in microglia was increased by exposure to neuron-derived IgG. Release of NO from microglia triggered by complement was attenuated by neuron-derived IgG, and this attenuation could be reversed by IgG neutralization. These data demonstrate that neuron-derived IgG is protective of neurons against injury induced by complement and microglial activation. IgG appears to play an important role in maintaining the stability of the nervous system.

  8. Role of CD97stalk and CD55 as molecular markers for prognosis and therapy of gastric carcinoma patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yong; CHEN Li; PENG Shu-you; CHEN Zhou-xun; HOANG-VU C

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the mechanism of development and aggressiveness in gastric carcinomas by investigating the expression and role of CD97 and its cellular ligand CD55 in gastric carcinomas. Methods: Tumor and corresponding normal mucosal tissue, collected from 39 gastric carcinoma patients, were examined by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR for the expression of CD97 and CD55. Results: CD97stalk was strongly stained on scattered tumor cells or small tumor cell clusters at the invasion front of gastric carcinomas. The expression of CD97stalk was frequently observed in tumors of stage Ⅰ and T1 gastric carcinoma patients. The expression of CD97stalk between Stage Ⅰ and Stage Ⅱ, Ⅲ, Ⅳ specimens showed significant difference (P<0.05), between T1 and T2, T3, T4 specimens also showed significant difference (P<0.05). Specimens with tumor invasion depth limited in mucosa of T 1 specimens showed higher positive CD55 expression than specimens with the same tumor invasion depth in T2, T3, T4 specimens, the expression of CD55 between T1 and T2, T3, T4 specimens was significantly different (P<0.05).There was strong correlation between the distribution patterns of CD97stalk and CD55 on tumor tissues (r=0.73, P<0.05). Signet ring cell carcinomas frequently contained strong CD97stalk and CD55-staining. Conclusions: Our results suggest that CD97stalk is probably involved in the growth, invasion and aggressiveness of gastric carcinomas by binding its cellular ligand CD55. CD97stalk and CD55 could be useful as molecular markers for prognosis and therapy of gastric carcinoma patients.

  9. Stearic acid protects primary cultured cortical neurons against oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze-jian WANG; Cui-ling LIANG; Guang-mei LI; Cai-yi YU; Ming YIN

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To observe the effects of stearic acid against oxidative stress in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods: Cortical neurons were exposed to glutamate,hydrogen peroxide (H202), or NaN3 insult in the presence or absence of stearic acid. Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by MTT assay and LDH release. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes activity[superoxide dismutases (SOD),glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT)] and lipid peroxidation in cultured cortical neurons were evaluated using commercial kits. {3-[1(p-chloro-benzyl)-5-(isopropyl)-3-t-butylthiondol-2-yl]-2,2-dimethylpropanoic acid, Na}[MK886; 5 pmol/L; a noncompetitive inhibitor of proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR)α], bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE; 100 μmol/L; an antagonist of PPARγ), and cycloheximide (CHX; 30 μmol/L, an inhibitor of protein synthesis)were tested for their effects on the neuroprotection afforded by stearic acid.Western blotting was used to determine the PPARγ protein level in cortical neurons.Results: Stearic acid dose-dependently protected cortical neurons against glutamate or H202 injury and increased glutamate uptake in cultured neurons.This protection was concomitant to the inhibition of lipid peroxidation and to the promotion activity of Cu/Zn SOD and CAT in cultured cortical neurons. Its neuroprotective effects were completely blocked by BADGE and CHX. After incubation with H2O2 for 24 h, the expression of the PPARγ protein decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the inhibitory effect of H2O2 on the expression of PPARγ can be attenuated by stearic acid. Conclusion: Stearic acid can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by boosting the internal antioxidant enzymes.Its neuroprotective effect may be mainly mediated by the activation of PPARγ and new protein synthesis in cortical neurons.

  10. Engrailed Homeoprotein Protects Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

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    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Fuchs, Julia; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Prochiantz, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Engrailed homeoproteins are expressed in adult dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In Engrailed1 heterozygous mice, these neurons start dying at 6 weeks, are more sensitive to oxidative stress, and progressively develop traits similar to those observed following an acute and strong oxidative stress inflected to wild-type neurons. These changes include DNA strand breaks and the modification (intensity and distribution) of several nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks. Engrailed1 and Engrailed2 are biochemically equivalent transducing proteins previously used to antagonize dopaminergic neuron death in Engrailed1 heterozygous mice and in mouse models of Parkinson disease. Accordingly, we show that, following an acute oxidative stress, a single Engrailed2 injection restores all nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks, decreases the number of DNA strand breaks, and protects dopaminergic neurons against apoptosis. PMID:26411690

  11. Production of multiple transgenic Yucatan miniature pigs expressing human complement regulatory factors, human CD55, CD59, and H-transferase genes.

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    Young-Hee Jeong

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to generate transgenic pigs coexpressing human CD55, CD59, and H-transferase (HT using an IRES-mediated polycistronic vector. The study focused on hyperacute rejection (HAR when considering clinical xenotransplantation as an alternative source for human organ transplants. In total, 35 transgenic cloned piglets were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT and were confirmed for genomic integration of the transgenes from umbilical cord samples by PCR analysis. Eighteen swine umbilical vein endothelial cells (SUVEC were isolated from umbilical cord veins freshly obtained from the piglets. We observed a higher expression of transgenes in the transgenic SUVEC (Tg SUVEC compared with the human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC. Among these genes, HT and hCD59 were expressed at a higher level in the tested Tg organs compared with non-Tg control organs, but there was no difference in hCD55 expression between them. The transgenes in various organs of the Tg clones revealed organ-specific and spatial expression patterns. Using from 0 to 50% human serum solutions, we performed human complement-mediated cytolysis assays. The results showed that, overall, the Tg SUVEC tested had greater survival rates than did the non-Tg SUVEC, and the Tg SUVEC with higher HT expression levels tended to have more down-regulated α-Gal epitope expression, resulting in greater protection against cytotoxicity. By contrast, several Tg SUVEC with low CD55 expression exhibited a decreased resistance response to cytolysis. These results indicated that the levels of HT expression were inversely correlated with the levels of α-Gal epitope expression and that the combined expression of hCD55, hCD59, and HT proteins in SUVECs markedly enhances a protective response to human serum-mediated cytolysis. Taken together, these results suggest that combining a polycistronic vector system with SCNT methods provides a fast and efficient alternative

  12. Curcumin protects against intracellular amyloid toxicity in rat primary neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Jelina; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether curcumin is protective against intracellular amyloid β (Aβ) toxicity, different concentrations of curcumin were applied to with intracellular Aβ in rat primary hippocampal neurons in culture. We find that at low dosages, curcumin effectively inhibits intracellular Aβ toxicity. Reactive oxidative species (ROS) is involved in mediating intracellular Aβ toxicity and possibly curcumin protection. Our results indicate that oxidative stress may mediate cell death induced by i...

  13. Curcumin protects against intracellular amyloid toxicity in rat primary neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, Jelina; Zhang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether curcumin is protective against intracellular amyloid beta (A beta) toxicity, different concentrations of curcumin were applied to with intracellular A beta in rat primary hippocampal neurons in culture. We find that at low dosages, curcumin effectively inhibits intracellular A

  14. Glimepiride protects neurons against amyloid-β-induced synapse damage.

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    Osborne, Craig; West, Ewan; Nolan, William; McHale-Owen, Harriet; Williams, Alun; Bate, Clive

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease is associated with the accumulation within the brain of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides that damage synapses and affect memory acquisition. This process can be modelled by observing the effects of Aβ on synapses in cultured neurons. The addition of picomolar concentrations of soluble Aβ derived from brain extracts triggered the loss of synaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synapsin-1 and cysteine string protein from cultured neurons. Glimepiride, a sulphonylurea used for the treatment of diabetes, protected neurons against synapse damage induced by Aβ. The protective effects of glimepiride were multi-faceted. Glimepiride treatment was associated with altered synaptic membranes including the loss of specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins including the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) that acts as a receptor for Aβ42, increased synaptic gangliosides and altered cell signalling. More specifically, glimepiride reduced the Aβ-induced increase in cholesterol and the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in synapses that occurred within cholesterol-dense membrane rafts. Aβ42 binding to glimepiride-treated neurons was not targeted to membrane rafts and less Aβ42 accumulated within synapses. These studies indicate that glimepiride modified the membrane micro-environments in which Aβ-induced signalling leads to synapse damage. In addition, soluble PrP(C), released from neurons by glimepiride, neutralised Aβ-induced synapse damage. Such observations raise the possibility that glimepiride may reduce synapse damage and hence delay the progression of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26432105

  15. Leptin protects hippocampal CA1 neurons against ischemic injury

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    Feng ZHANG; Chen, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Leptin is an adipose hormone with well characterized roles in regulating food intake and energy balance. A novel neuroprotective role for leptin has recently been discovered; however, the underlying mechanisms are not clearly defined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether leptin protects against delayed neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 following transient global cerebral ischemia in rats and to study the signaling mechanism responsible for the neuroprotective effects of lep...

  16. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

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    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection.

  17. Increased deposition of C3b on red cells with low CR1 and CD55 in a malaria-endemic region of western Kenya: Implications for the development of severe anemia

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    Odera Michael M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe anemia due to Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a major cause of mortality among young children in western Kenya. The factors that lead to the age-specific incidence of this anemia are unknown. Previous studies have shown an age-related expression of red cell complement regulatory proteins, which protect erythrocytes from autologous complement attack and destruction. Our primary objective was to determine whether in a malaria-endemic area red cells with low levels of complement regulatory proteins are at increased risk for complement (C3b deposition in vivo. Secondarily, we studied the relationship between red cell complement regulatory protein levels and hemoglobin levels. Methods Three hundred and forty-two life-long residents of a malaria-holoendemic region of western Kenya were enrolled in a cross-sectional study and stratified by age. We measured red cell C3b, CR1, CD55, and immune complex binding capacity by flow cytometry. Individuals who were positive for malaria were treated and blood was collected when they were free of parasitemia. Analysis of variance was used to identify independent variables associated with the %C3b-positive red cells and the hemoglobin level. Results Individuals between the ages of 6 and 36 months had the lowest red cell CR1, highest %C3b-positive red cells, and highest parasite density. Malaria prevalence also reached its peak within this age group. Among children ≤ 24 months of age the %C3b-positive red cells was usually higher in individuals who were treated for malaria than in uninfected individuals with similarly low red cell CR1 and CD55. The variables that most strongly influenced the %C3b-positive red cells were age, malaria status, and red cell CD55 level. Although it did not reach statistical significance, red cell CR1 was more important than red cell CD55 among individuals treated for malaria. The variables that most strongly influenced the hemoglobin level were age, the %C3b

  18. Pramipexole protects dopaminergic neurons through paraplegin against 6-hydroxydopamine.

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    Kim, Mun Ki; Park, Hyeon Soo; Cho, Jea Hyeon; Kim, Gon Sup; Won, Chungkil

    2015-01-21

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) regulates various physiological and psychological functions, such as movement, motivation, behavior, and learning. DA exerts its function through DA receptors and a series of studies have reported the role of DAergic receptors in preventing DAergic neuronal degeneration. Here, we studied the DA receptor-mediated neuroprotective effect of the D2-like receptor agonists against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced DAergic neurodegeneration. D2-like receptor agonists were administered in the substantia nigra in vivo and to primary cultured neurons. Treatment of 6-OHDA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and paraplegin (mitochondrial regulation protein) immunoreactivity, whereas pretreatment with quinpirole (a full D2-like receptor agonist) preserved TH and paraplegin reactivity. This led us to test which DA receptors were necessary for the neuroprotective effect and whether paraplegin can be regulated by D2 or D3 receptor agonists. Pretreatment with the D2 receptor selective agonist, sumanirole, did not preserve TH and paraplegin reactivity from 6-OHDA. However, the D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole, protected TH reactivity and restored paraplegin expression to the control level in the presence of 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pretreatment with the D3 receptor antagonist GR103691 reduced TH and paraplegin expression levels. These results suggest that the D3 receptor agonist may protect DA neurons from the effect of 6-OHDA through the modulation of the mitochondrial regulation protein paraplegin. PMID:25514384

  19. Protective effects of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunqi Zhu; Yanli Li; Jingyi Liu; Xiaorong Yang; Ce Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Humanin is a 24-amino acid peptide isolated from the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. Several studies have indicated that Humanin can protect cells against cytotoxicity induced by various insults.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective role of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death, and to determine the most appropriate therapeutic concentration of Humanin.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuropathophysiological, randomized, controlled experiment, conducted at the Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, between March 2007 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Newborn Wistar rats, 5,5',6,6' tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl- benzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1, USA), calcein-acetoxymethylester (calcein-AM, USA), and Humanin (Shanghai, China) were used in this study. METHODS: Primary cortical neurons were cultured with dulbecco's modified eagle's medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum. Cultures were divided into three groups: control, hypoxia, and hypoxia + Humanin. Various concentrations of Humanin (1, 10, and 20 μmol/L) were added to the cultures 16 hours prior to hypoxia induction. For hypoxic conditions, cells were maintained at 37 ℃ within an incubator chamber filled with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 24 hours. Cells in the control group were cultured in normal oxygen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell viability was determined through the use of the vital dye calcein-AM, and the number of live cells was determined. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was assessed using the fluorescent probe JC-1. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was determined with calcein-AM in the presence of cobalt chloride.RESULTS: (1) Cell viability: Hypoxia for 24 hours induced death in a large number of neurons. Pretreatment with 10 μmol/L and 20 μmol/L Humanin, 16 hours prior to hypoxia, protected cells against hypoxia. However, 1 μmol/L Humanin provided little protection. (2) ΔΨm: ΔΨm was reduced after 24-hour hypoxia

  20. CD55 is a key complement regulatory protein that counteracts complement-mediated inactivation of Newcastle Disease Virus.

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    Rangaswamy, Udaya S; Cotter, Christopher R; Cheng, Xing; Jin, Hong; Chen, Zhongying

    2016-08-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is being developed as an oncolytic virus for virotherapy. In this study we analysed the regulation of complement-mediated inactivation of a recombinant NDV in different host cells. NDV grown in human cells was less sensitive to complement-mediated virus inactivation than NDV grown in embryonated chicken eggs. Additionally, NDV produced from HeLa-S3 cells is more resistant to complement than NDV from 293F cells, which correlated with higher expression and incorporation of complement regulatory proteins (CD46, CD55 and CD59) into virions from HeLa-S3 cells. Further analysis of the recombinant NDVs individually expressing the three CD molecules showed that CD55 is the most potent in counteracting complement-mediated virus inactivation. The results provide important information on selecting NDV manufacture substrate to mitigate complement-mediated virus inactivation.

  1. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  2. Triggering of the dsRNA sensors TLR3, MDA5, and RIG-I induces CD55 expression in synovial fibroblasts.

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    Olga N Karpus

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD55 (decay-accelerating factor is a complement-regulatory protein highly expressed on fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS. CD55 is also a ligand for CD97, an adhesion-type G protein-coupled receptor abundantly present on leukocytes. Little is known regarding the regulation of CD55 expression in FLS. METHODS: FLS isolated from arthritis patients were stimulated with pro-inflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands. Transfection with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C and 5'-triphosphate RNA were used to activate the cytoplasmic double-stranded (dsRNA sensors melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 and retinoic acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I. CD55 expression, cell viability, and binding of CD97-loaded beads were quantified by flow cytometry. RESULTS: CD55 was expressed at equal levels on FLS isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA, osteoarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis. CD55 expression in RA FLS was significantly induced by IL-1β and especially by the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C. Activation of MDA5 and RIG-I also enhanced CD55 expression. Notably, activation of MDA5 dose-dependently induced cell death, while triggering of TLR3 or RIG-I had a minor effect on viability. Upregulation of CD55 enhanced the binding capacity of FLS to CD97-loaded beads, which could be blocked by antibodies against CD55. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of dsRNA sensors enhances the expression of CD55 in cultured FLS, which increases the binding to CD97. Our findings suggest that dsRNA promotes the interaction between FLS and CD97-expressing leukocytes.

  3. Curcumin protects against staurosporine toxicity in rat neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Qin; Ji-Hui Lv; Jia Cui; Xue Fang; Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Curcumin is extracted from the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa Linn.) and is widely used as a food additive and traditional medicine.The present study investigated the activity of curcumin against staurosporine (STS) toxicity in cell culture.Methods Rat hippocampal neurons in primary culture were exposed to STS (20 μmol/L) and treated with curcumin (20 μmol/L).Cell viability was tested by MTT assay and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured using the MitoSOXTM red mitochondrial superoxide indicator.Western blot was used to assess changes in the levels of caspasc-3 (Csp3),heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Akt.Results The results showed that curcumin protects against STS-induced cytotoxicity in rat hippocampal neurons.Csp3,Hsp70,Akt and ROS activation may be involved in this protection.Conclusion Curcumin could be a potential drug for combination with STS in cancer treatment to reduce the unwanted cytotoxicity of STS.

  4. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Dianxiu Wu; Rui Li; Xiaojuan Zhu; Shusen Cui

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dis-solved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C 5-T 1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to in-vestigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration fol owing brachial plexus root avulsion.

  5. Protective effect of parvalbumin on excitotoxic motor neuron death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, L.; Schwaller, B.; Vleminckx, V.;

    2002-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin...

  6. Ginkgolides protects cultured cortical neurons against excitotoxic and oxidative insults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYu-Yang; YUQing-Hai; YOUSong; SHENGLi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The neurotoxicity of glutamate is associated with neurological disorders including hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Studies using cultured cortical neurons have demonstrated that exposure to glutamate produced delayed degeneration of mature neurons. Oxygen free radicals generated during injury have been postulated to be a major cause of neuronal cell

  7. The Expression and Action of Decay-Accelerating Factor (CD55 in Human Malignancies and Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Henrik Mikesch

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55 is physiologically acting as an inhibitor of the complement system, but is also broadly expressed in malignant tumours. Here DAF seems to exert different functions beyond its immunological role such as e.g. promotion of tumorigenesis, decrease of complement mediated tumor cell lysis, autocrine loops for cell rescue and evasion of apoptosis, neoangiogenesis, invasiveness, cell motility, and metastasis via oncogenic tyrosine kinase pathways and specific seven-span transmembrane receptors (CD97 binding. Therefore, DAF has already become a target for therapy. In this paper we review the role of DAF in human malignancies as described in different basic, diagnostic and experimental therapeutic studies.

  8. Recombinant AAV-mediated Expression of Human BDNF Protects Neurons against Cell Apoptosis in Aβ-induced Neuronal Damage Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhaohui; MA Dongliang; FENG Gaifeng; MA Yanbing; HU Haitao

    2007-01-01

    The human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (hBDNF) gene was cloned by polymerase chain reaction and the recombinant adeno-associated viral vector inserted with hBDNF gene (AAV-hBDNF) was constructed. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were treated with Aβ25-35 and serued as the experimental Aβ-induced neuronal damage model (AD model), and the AD model was infected with AAV-hBDNF to explore neuroprotective effects of expression of BDNF. Cell viability was assayed by MTT. The expression of bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was detected by immunocytochemical staining. The change of intracellular free Ca ion ([Ca2+]i) was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results showed that BDNF had protective effects against Aβ-induced neuronal damage. The expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein was raised significantly and the balance of [Ca2+]i was maintained in the AAV-hBDNF treatment group as compared with AD model group. These data suggested that recombinant AAV mediated a stable expression of hBDNF in cultured hippocampal neurons and resulted in significant neuron protective effects in AD model. The BDNF may reduce neuron apoptosis through increasing the expression of the bcl-2 anti-apoptosis protein and inhibiting intracellular calcium overload. The viral vector-mediated gene expression of BDNF may pave the way of a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Mattson, Mark P. [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Camandola, Simonetta, E-mail: camandolasi@mail.nih.gov [Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  10. Expression of membrane complement regulators, CD46, CD55 and CD59, in mesothelial cells of patients on peritoneal dialysis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sei, Yumi; Mizuno, Masashi; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Imai, Masaki; Higashide, Keiko; Harris, Claire L; Sakata, Fumiko; Iguchi, Daiki; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Shoichi; Matsuo, Seiichi; Ito, Yasuhiko

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expression of membrane complement regulators (CRegs), CD46, CD55 and CD59 in human mesothelial cells, and correlated with clinical background and level of complement (C) activation products in peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluids (PDF) to clarify influence of the C activation system in PD patients. Expression of CRegs was assessed on primary cultures of mesothelial cells (HPMC) harvested from PD fluid of 31 PD patients. Because expression of CD55 but not CD46 and CD59 in mesothelial cells was significantly correlated to value of dialysate-to-plasma creatinine concentration ratio (D/P Cre) (p<0.005) as an indicator of peritoneal function, we focused on analysis of CD55 expression of HPMCs in comparison with levels of C activation products in the PDF of the PD patients, and their background factors. When comparing expression of the CRegs between systemic neutrophils and HPMC, no correlation was observed, supporting that change of CRegs' expression in HPMC was independently occurring in the peritoneum. Expression of CD55 protein in HPMC was closely correlated with expression at the mRNA level (p<0.0001) and was inversely correlated with levels of sC5b-9 (p<0.05), but not C3, C4, IL6 and CA125 in the PDF. Complications of diabetes, usage of icodextrin and residual renal function were not correlated with change of CD55 expression in HPMCs. Our data show that the process of PD therapy modifies expression of CD55 on peritoneal mesothelium and triggers local C activation. These findings support efforts to modify PD therapy to limit effects on activation and regulation of the C system.

  11. Protective effects of berberine against amyloid beta-induced toxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Yanjun Zhang; Shuai Du; Mixia Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Berberine, a major constituent of Coptidis rhizoma, exhibits neural protective effects. The present study analyzed the potential protective effect of berberine against amyloid G-induced cytotoxicity in rat cerebral cortical neurons. Alzheimer's disease cell models were treated with 0.5 and 2 μmol/Lberberine for 36 hours to inhibit amyloid G-induced toxicity. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining results showed that berberine significantly increased cell viability and reduced cell apoptosis in primary cultured rat cortical neurons. In addition, western blot analysis revealed a protective effect of berberine against amyloid β-induced toxicity in cultured cortical neurons, which coincided with significantly decreased abnormal up-regulation of activated caspase-3. These results showed that berberine exhibited a protective effect against amyloid 13-induced cytotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons.

  12. Decreased expression of complement regulatory proteins, CD55 and CD59, on peripheral blood leucocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes and macrovascular diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xi-wen; CHANG Zhi-wen; QIN Ming-zhao; SUN Ying; HUANG Hui-lian; HE Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Macro- and microvascular diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetic patients, but their mechanisms remain unclear. Recent reports provide evidence that the levels of CD55 and CD59 are decreased in diabetic microvascular diseases. However, very little is known about the levels of CD55 and CD59, the relationship between them and carotid artery intima-media thickness, and the effects of statins on CD55 and CD59 in diabetic macrovascular diseases.Methods The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of CD55 and CD59 expression on peripheral blood leucocyte subsets (lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils) was studied using flow cytometry, and carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured using B-mode ultrasonography in 23 healthy subjects (controls), 19 patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and 43 patients with type 2 diabetes and macrovascular diseases (T2DM-M). The patients with T2DM-M were assigned to two subgroups based on whether statins were used: group with statins (n=23) and group without statins (n=20).Results Compared with the controls and T2DM, the MFI of CD55 positive neutrophils was significantly lower in T2DM-M (P=0.049 vs controls and P=0.033 vs T2DM); similarly, the MFI of CD59 positive monocytes was also lower in T2DM-M (P=0.038 vs controls and P=0.043 vs T2DM). The MFI of CD59 positive neutrophils in T2DM-M was lower than in T2DM (P=0.032). The levels of CD55 and CD59 were negatively associated with age and blood pressure (r=-0.245--0.352, P=0.041-0.003), but not acute-phase reactants and carotid artery intima-media thickness. The levels of CD55 and CD59 increased after treatment with statins, but the results were not significantly different (P >0.05).Conclusions CD55 and CD59 expressions on peripheral blood leucocytes are decreased in T2DM patients with macrovascular diseases. The results suggest that the decreased levels of complement regulatory proteins might play an important role in diabetic macrovascular

  13. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Alun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD. Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF.

  14. MAPK SIGNALING IS CRITICAL TO ESTRADIOL PROTECTION OF CA1 NEURONS IN GLOBAL ISCHEMIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jover-Mengual, Teresa; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Etgen, Anne M.

    2006-01-01

    The importance of hormone therapy in affording protection against the sequelae of global ischemia in postmenopausal women remains controversial. Global ischemia arising during cardiac arrest or cardiac surgery causes highly selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons. Exogenous estradiol ameliorates global ischemia-induced neuronal death and cognitive impairment in male and female rodents. However, the molecular mechanisms by which estrogens intervene in global ischemia-induced apopto...

  15. Protective Effect of Interleukin-1β on Motor Neurons after Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁雨雄; 巴拉特; 洪光祥; 王发斌; 陈振斌; 黄启顺

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Protective effect of interleukin-lβ (IL-1β) on motor neurons was studied after peripheral nerve injury. Twenty Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups randomly. The right sciatic nerve of each rat was resected. After silicon tubulization of sciatic nerve in rat, 15 μl 1 ng/ml IL-1β and PBS solution were injected into the silicon capsule respectively. Enzyme histochemistry was performed to show acetyle cholesterase (AchE) and nitric oxide staining (NOS) activity of spinal a motor neurons in spinal segments 2 weeks later. Neurons were counted and the diameter and cross sectional (c/s) area of neurons were analyzed by using computer image analysis system. The results showed that as compared with the normal side, both enzyme activities significantly changed in motor neurons in PBS group. The diameter and c/s area of both neurons changed significantly too (P<0.01). These results suggest that exogenous IL-1β protects a-motor neurons from degeneration and necrosis after peripheral nerve injury.

  16. Neuro-protective effects of CNTF on hippocampal neurons via an unknown signal transduction pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In our previous study, we proposed that there may be an unknown pathway in the upper stream of the known signal transduction pathway of Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) that mediates the neuro-protective function of CNTF. In the present experiment, we observed that the neuro-protective function of the non-classic signal transduction pathway in a L-NMDA (a glutamic acid ion type receptor atagonist) induced hippocampal neuron injury model, using primary culture rat hippocampal neurons, continuous photography and gp130 immunohistochemical assay. The results showed that L-NMDA induced injurious reaction of hippocampal neurons, and CNTF was able to inhibit the toxic action of L-NMDA on hippocampal neurons. Additionally, when JAK/STATs in the known classic signal transduction pathway of CNTF were blocked by PTPi-2, the protective effect of CNTF against L-NMDA injury still existed. L-NMDA caused a rapid increase in the concentration of hippocampal intracellular free [Ca2+]i. CNTF was able to attenuate L-NMDA-induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, and blocking JAK/STATs in the known classic signal trans- duction pathway of CNTF did not affect L-NMDA- induced elevation of [Ca2+]i, indicating that, apart from the known classic signal transduction pathway, there may be some other transduction pathways for CNTF to exert the protective effect on hippocampal neurons, and this pathway is related to [Ca2+].

  17. O papel das proteínas reguladoras do complemento CD55/CD59 em células de sangue periférico de pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico The role of CD55/CD59 complement regulatory proteins on peripheral blood cells of systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Alegretti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available CD55 e CD59 são proteínas de membrana ancoradas por glicosilfosfatidilinositol que apresentam propriedades reguladoras da ativação da cascata do complemento. Essa regulação ocorre através da inibição da C3 convertase pelo CD55 e prevenção da etapa final de polimerização do complexo de ataque à membrana pelo CD59. Deficiência na expressão dessas proteínas pode estar associada a uma maior ativação do sistema complemento, inclusive do complexo de ataque à membrana, levando à morte celular. Pacientes com lúpus eritematoso sistêmico, com anemia hemolítica e linfopenia, parecem apresentar uma deficiência adquirida de CD55 e CD59. Contudo, os mecanismos que modulam essa diminuída expressão continuam desconhecidos e o seu impacto nas manifestações do lúpus eritematoso sistêmico precisa ser mais bem estudado.CD55 and CD59 are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins with regulatory properties on the activating cascades of the complement system. This regulation occurs through inhibition of the C3-convertase formation by CD55, and prevention of the terminal polymerization of the membrane attack complex by CD59. Deficiency in the expression of these proteins can be associated with increased susceptibility to complement-mediated cell death. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients with hemolytic anemia and lymphopenia seem to have an acquired deficiency of CD55 and CD59 proteins. However, the mechanisms involved in this deficiency and its impact on the clinical manifestation of SLE needs to be further investigated.

  18. Ginseng Rb fraction protects glia, neurons and cognitive function in a rat model of neurodegeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangning Xu

    Full Text Available The loss and injury of neurons play an important role in the onset of various neurodegenerative diseases, while both microgliosis and astrocyte loss or dysfunction are significant causes of neuronal degeneration. Previous studies have suggested that an extract enriched panaxadiol saponins from ginseng has more neuroprotective potential than the total saponins of ginseng. The present study investigated whether a fraction of highly purified panaxadiol saponins (termed as Rb fraction was protective for both glia and neurons, especially GABAergic interneurons, against kainic acid (KA-induced excitotoxicity in rats. Rats received Rb fraction at 30 mg/kg (i.p., 40 mg/kg (i.p. or saline followed 40 min later by an intracerebroventricular injection of KA. Acute hippocampal injury was determined at 48 h after KA, and impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory as well as delayed neuronal injury was determined 16 to 21 days later. KA injection produced significant acute hippocampal injuries, including GAD67-positive GABAergic interneuron loss in CA1, paralbumin (PV-positive GABAergic interneuron loss, pyramidal neuron degeneration and astrocyte damage accompanied with reactive microglia in both CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. There was also a delayed loss of GAD67-positive interneurons in CA1, CA3, hilus and dentate gyrus. Microgliosis also became more severe 21 days later. Accordingly, KA injection resulted in hippocampus-dependent spatial memory impairment. Interestingly, the pretreatment with Rb fraction at 30 or 40 mg/kg significantly protected the pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons against KA-induced acute excitotoxicity and delayed injury. Rb fraction also prevented memory impairments and protected astrocytes from KA-induced acute excitotoxicity. Additionally, microglial activation, especially the delayed microgliosis, was inhibited by Rb fraction. Overall, this study demonstrated that Rb fraction protected both

  19. Bimatoprost protects retinal neuronal damage via Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Norihito; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Yuta; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-02-28

    Worldwide, prostaglandin analogs, such as bimatoprost, have become the major therapeutic class for medical treatment of glaucoma because of their efficacy and generally well tolerated systemic safety profile. However, the detailed mechanism of the direct action of bimatoprost on retinal ganglion cells (RGC) has rarely been understood. Thus, in this study, we elucidated the mechanism of the protective effects of bimatoprost on RGC against oxidative stress. To examine the protective effects of bimatoprost, cultured RGC with various concentrations of bimatoprost (in both free acid and amide form) were exposed to l-buthionin-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) plus glutamate or serum depletion in vitro and intravitreal injection of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) was used to induce retinal damage in vivo. To elucidate the protective mechanism of bimatoprost, we used western blot analysis to investigate the phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Bimatoprost significantly reduced BSO plus glutamate- and serum deprivation-induced death in concentration-dependent manners. Bimatoprost induced activation of Akt and ERK, and a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002, attenuated the protective effect of bimatoprost. On the other hand, a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor, U0126, exhibited protective effect unexpectedly. Moreover, ERK was more phosphorylated by attenuation of Akt activity in cultured RGC. In an in vivo study, bimatoprost reduced NMDA-induced RGC death. Taken together, these findings indicate that bimatoprost has protective effects on in vitro and in vivo retinal damage, suggesting that the mechanism underlying may be via the Akt pathway, which may modulate the ERK pathway.

  20. Clinacanthus nutans Protects Cortical Neurons Against Hypoxia-Induced Toxicity by Downregulating HDAC1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Da; Wu, Jui-Sheng; Kao, Mei-Han; Chen, Jin-Jer; Sun, Grace Y; Ong, Wei-Yi; Lin, Teng-Nan

    2016-09-01

    Many population-based epidemiological studies have unveiled an inverse correlation between intake of herbal plants and incidence of stroke. C. nutans is a traditional herbal medicine widely used for snake bite, viral infection and cancer in Asian countries. However, its role in protecting stroke damage remains to be studied. Despite of growing evidence to support epigenetic regulation in the pathogenesis and recovery of stroke, a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still lacking. In the present study, primary cortical neurons were subjected to in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD)-reoxygenation and hypoxic neuronal death was used to investigate the interaction between C. nutans and histone deacetylases (HDACs). Using pharmacological agents (HDAC inhibitor/activator), loss-of-function (HDAC siRNA) and gain-of-function (HDAC plasmid) approaches, we demonstrated an early induction of HDAC1/2/3/8 and HDAC6 in neurons after OGD insult. C. nutans extract selectively inhibited HDAC1 and HDAC6 expression and attenuated neuronal death. Results of reporter analysis further revealed that C. nutans suppressed HDAC1 and HDAC6 transcription. Besides ameliorating neuronal death, C. nutans also protected astrocytes and endothelial cells from hypoxic-induced cell death. In summary, results support ability for C. nutans to suppress post-hypoxic HDACs activation and mitigate against OGD-induced neuronal death. This study further opens a new avenue for the use of herbal medicines to regulate epigenetic control of brain injury. PMID:27165113

  1. Neuropeptide Y protects cerebral cortical neurons by regulating microglial immune function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qijun Li; Changzheng Dong; Wenling Li; Wei Bu; Jiang Wu; Wenqing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y has been shown to inhibit the immunological activity of reactive microglia in the rat cerebral cortex, to reduce N-methyl-D-aspartate current (INMDA) in cortical neurons, and protect neurons. In this study, after primary cultured microglia from the cerebral cortex of rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the cell culture medium increased, and mRNA expression of these cytokines also increased. After primary cultured cortical neurons were incubated with the lipopolysaccharide-treated microg-lial conditioned medium, peak INMDA in neurons increased. These effects of lipopolysaccharide were suppressed by neuropeptide Y. After addition of the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antago-nist BIBP3226, the effects of neuropeptide Y completely disappeared. These results suggest that neuropeptide Y prevents excessive production of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α by inhibiting microglial reactivity. This reduces INMDA in rat cortical neurons, preventing excitotoxic-ity, thereby protecting neurons.

  2. Oenanthe Javanica Extract Protects Against Experimentally Induced Ischemic Neuronal Damage via its Antioxidant Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae-Chul Lee; Bai Hui Chen; Bich-Na Shin

    2015-01-01

    Background:Water dropwort (Oenanthejavanica) as a popular traditional medicine in Asia shows various biological properties including antioxidant activity.In this study,we firstly examined the neuroprotective effect of Oenanthejavanica extract (OJE) in the hippocampal cornus ammonis 1 region (CA1 region) of the gerbil subjected to transient cerebral ischemia.Methods:Gerbils were established by the occlusion of common carotid arteries for 5 min.The neuroprotective effect of OJE was estimated by cresyl violet staining.In addition,4 antioxidants (copper,zinc superoxide dismutase [SOD],manganese SOD,catalase,and glutathione peroxidase) immunoreactivities were investigated by immunohistochemistry.Results:Pyramidal neurons in the CA1 region showed neuronal death at 5 days postischemia;at this point in time,all antioxidants immunoreactivities disappeared in CA1 pyramidal neurons and showed in many nonpyramidal cells.Treatment with 200 mg/kg,not 100 mg/kg,OJE protected CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic damage.In addition,200 mg/kg OJE treatment increased or maintained antioxidants immunoreactivities.Especially,among the antioxidants,glutathione peroxidase immunoreactivity was effectively increased in the CA1 pyramidal neurons of the OJE-treated sham-operated and ischemia-operated groups.Conclusion:Our present results indicate that treatment with OJE can protect neurons from transient ischemic damage and that the neuroprotective effect may be closely associated with increased or maintained intracellular antioxidant enzymes by OJE.

  3. Parkin protects dopaminergic neurons from excessive Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawal, Nina [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Corti, Olga [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Sacchetti, Paola [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Ardilla-Osorio, Hector [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Sehat, Bita [Cancer Center Karolinska, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Brice, Alexis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CRICM UMR-S975, Inserm, U975 (France); CNRS, UMR 7225, Paris (France); Department of Genetics and Cytogenetics, AP-HP, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Arenas, Ernest, E-mail: Ernest.Arenas@ki.se [Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, MBB, DBRM, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-10-23

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is caused by degeneration of the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the substantia nigra but the molecular mechanisms underlying the degenerative process remain elusive. Several reports suggest that cell cycle deregulation in post-mitotic neurons could lead to neuronal cell death. We now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase linked to familial PD, regulates {beta}-catenin protein levels in vivo. Stabilization of {beta}-catenin in differentiated primary ventral midbrain neurons results in increased levels of cyclin E and proliferation, followed by increased levels of cleaved PARP and loss of DA neurons. Wnt3a signaling also causes death of post-mitotic DA neurons in parkin null animals, suggesting that both increased stabilization and decreased degradation of {beta}-catenin results in DA cell death. These findings demonstrate a novel regulation of Wnt signaling by Parkin and suggest that Parkin protects DA neurons against excessive Wnt signaling and {beta}-catenin-induced cell death.

  4. Astrocytes Surviving Severe Stress Can Still Protect Neighboring Neurons from Proteotoxic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleixner, Amanda M; Posimo, Jessica M; Pant, Deepti B; Henderson, Matthew P; Leak, Rehana K

    2016-09-01

    Astrocytes are one of the major cell types to combat cellular stress and protect neighboring neurons from injury. In order to fulfill this important role, astrocytes must sense and respond to toxic stimuli, perhaps including stimuli that are severely stressful and kill some of the astrocytes. The present study demonstrates that primary astrocytes that managed to survive severe proteotoxic stress were protected against subsequent challenges. These findings suggest that the phenomenon of preconditioning or tolerance can be extended from mild to severe stress for this cell type. Astrocytic stress adaptation lasted at least 96 h, the longest interval tested. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was raised in stressed astrocytes, but inhibition of neither Hsp70 nor Hsp32 activity abolished their resistance against a second proteotoxic challenge. Only inhibition of glutathione synthesis abolished astrocytic stress adaptation, consistent with our previous report. Primary neurons were plated upon previously stressed astrocytes, and the cocultures were then exposed to another proteotoxic challenge. Severely stressed astrocytes were still able to protect neighboring neurons against this injury, and the protection was unexpectedly independent of glutathione synthesis. Stressed astrocytes were even able to protect neurons after simultaneous application of proteasome and Hsp70 inhibitors, which otherwise elicited synergistic, severe loss of neurons when applied together. Astrocyte-induced neuroprotection against proteotoxicity was not elicited with astrocyte-conditioned media, suggesting that physical cell-to-cell contacts may be essential. These findings suggest that astrocytes may adapt to severe stress so that they can continue to protect neighboring cell types from profound injury. PMID:26374549

  5. Protective effect of astrocyte-conditioned medium on neurons following hypoxia and mechanical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Ji-wen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the protec-tive effect of mouse astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM on hypoxic and mechanically injured neurons by a cell model in vitro, and to explore the possible mechanism. Methods: The model of hypoxic neuronal injury was caused by 3% O 2 in three-gas incubator. Neurons were cul-tured with ordinary medium or 20% ACM respectively and randomly divided into hypoxic group (hypoxia for 4, 8, 24 h and marked as H4R0, H8R0, H24R0 and hypoxia reoxygenation group (H4R24, H8R24, H24R24. Mechanical injury model was developed by scratching neurons cultured in 20% ACM or ordinary medium to different degrees. Neu-rons in both medium were divided into normal control group, mild, moderate and severe injury groups. The 20% ACM was added 24 h before hypoxia/reoxygenation or mechanical injury. The morphology and survival of neurons were observed and counted by trypan blue staining. The concentration of NO, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and membrane ATPase activity were detected by corresponding kits. Results: It was showed that 20% ACM can obviously promote the survival rate of hypoxia/reoxygenated neurons and scratched neurons as well. The morphology and num-ber of neurons exposed to hypoxia or scratch injury showed great difference between groups with or without ACM treatment. Compared with control group, the concentration of NO and LDH was much lower in hypoxic/reoxygenated neurons treated with 20% ACM, and the ATPase activity was higher. For the mechanical injury model, neurons with moderate injury also revealed a lower NO and LDH concen-tration than the control group. All the differences were sta-tistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: ACM can promote the survival and func-tional recovery of neurons following hypoxia or scratching to a certain degree. The mechanism may be associated with reducing the synthesis and release of NO and LDH as well as increasing the activity of membrane ATPase. Key words: Glial cell line

  6. Phosphatidylcholine protects neurons from toxic effects of amyloid β-protein in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Mihee; Hattori, Toshihide; Abdullah, Mohammad; Gong, Jian-Sheng; Yamane, Tsuneo; Michikawa, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is the major component of extracellular plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. It has been suggested that the interaction of Aβ with membrane cholesterol is essential for Aβ to exert neurotoxicity; however, the effect of phospholipids, another major membrane lipid component, on Aβ-induced neurotoxicity remains unclarified. Here we report the protective effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC) on primary cultured neurons against Aβ1-42-induced damage. Aβ1-42 caused neuronal death as demonstrated by lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) release, which was completely prevented by a pretreatment with PC in a dose-dependent manner. PC containing unsaturated long-chain acyl groups, 1,2-dioleoyl-PC (DOPC), also prevented neuronal death caused by Aβ1-42. The oleic acid ethyl-ester (OAEE) partially prevented Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. Neurons that were pretreated with DOPC or OAEE for 24h, washed out, and exposed to Aβ1-42 in the absence of either of these reagents, were still resistant to Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, treatment with phosphotidylserine (PS) or docosahexaenoic acid etyl-ester (DHAEE) had no protective effect on neurons against Aβ1-42-induced damage. These results suggest that the control of cellular PC content, not PS content, may prove useful in the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27086970

  7. Effects of amlodipine on expression of CD55 and CD59 on aorta in streptozotocin-induced diabetic apoE-knock out mice%氨氯地平对糖尿病载脂蛋白E基因敲除小鼠CD55和CD59表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马西文; 秦明照; 赵焕英; 常志文; 张勇; 宋爱丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the levels of CD55 and CD59 expression on aortas, and the effects of amlodipine on diabetic atherosclerotic mice. Methods Thirty-two male apoE-knock out mice were obtained at 6 weeks of age. After 1 week of acclimatization,animals were divided into three groups atherosclerotic (AS) group(n= 10) , diabetic atherosclerotic(D-AS) group(n=12), and amlodipine(D-AM)group(n=10). Venous bloods were collected for analysis of glucose and lipids, and aortas were prepared for atherosclerotic plaques, immunofluorescence and real-time PCR. Results Compared with AS group,the body weight was decreased,and glucose,TCLDL-C and atherosclerotic plaques were increased in D-AS group ( P< 0. 01). Compared with D-AS group,the body weight was increased,and atherosclerotic plaques were decreased in D-AM group (P<0. 01). Immunofluorescence showed that expression of CD55 and CD59 was lower in D-AS group than that in AS group,and was higher in D-AM group than that in D-AS group. Conclusions The protein expression levels of CD55 and CD59 on aortas in diabetic apoE-knock out mice might be lower than that in apoE-knock out mice. After treatment with amlodipine, protein expression of CD55 and CD59 could be upregulated, independent of the effect on blood pressure in diabetic apoE-knock out mice.%目的 观察糖尿病载脂蛋白E基因敲除小鼠主动脉组织中CD55、CD59表达变化及氨氯地平对其表达的影响.方法 32只雄性6周龄载脂蛋白E基因敲除小鼠随机分为动脉粥样硬化(AS)组10只、糖尿病AS组(D-AS组)12只、氨氯地平干预组(D-AM组)10只.监测生化指标,测量AS斑块面积;采用免疫荧光和实时定量PCR法检测蛋白和mRNA的变化,观察氨氯地平对CD55和CD59表达的影响.结果 与AS组比较,D-AS组体重明显下降,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),血糖、TC及LDL-C明显升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01),平均AS斑块面积增加,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).与D-AS组比较,D-AM

  8. Protective effect of astrocyte-conditioned medium on neurons following hypoxia and mechanical injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ji-wen; TAN Tong-yan; HUANG Qi-lin

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of mouse astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM)on hypoxic and mechanically injured neurons by a cell model in vitro,and to explore the possible mechanism.Methods:The model of hypoxic neuronal injury was caused by 3% O2 in three-gas incubator.Neurons were cultured with ordinary medium or 20% ACM respectively and randomly divided into hypoxic group (hypoxia for 4,8,24 h and marked as H4R0,H8R0,H24R0) and hypoxia reoxygenation group (H4R24,HSR24,H24R24).Mechanical injury model was developed by scratching neurons cultured in 20% ACM or ordinary medium to different degrees.Neurons in both medium were divided into normal control group,mild,moderate and severe injury groups.The 20% ACM was added 24 h before hypoxia/reoxygenation or mechanical injury.The morphology and survival of neurons were observed and counted by trypan blue staining.The concentration of NO,lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and membrane ATPase activity were detected by corresponding kits.Results:It was showed that 20% ACM can obviously promote the survival rate of hypoxia/reoxygenated neurons and scratched neurons as well The morphology and number of neurons exposed to hypoxia or scratch injury showed great difference between groups with or without ACM treatment.Compared with control group,the concentration of NO and LDH was much lower in hypoxic/reoxygenated neurons treated with 20% ACM,and the ATPase activity was higher.For the mechanical injury model,neurons with moderate injury also revealed a lower NO and LDH concentration than the control group.All the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05).Conclusion:ACM can promote the survival and functional recovery of neurons following hypoxia or scratching to a certain degree.The mechanism may be associated with reducing the synthesis and release of NO and LDH as well as increasing the activity of membrane ATPase.

  9. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  10. Engrailed protects mouse midbrain dopaminergic neurons against mitochondrial complex I insults

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez-Fischer, Daniel; Fuchs, Julia; Castagner, François; Stettler, Olivier; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Moya, Kenneth L.; Bouillot, Colette; Wolfgang H Oertel; Lombès, Anne; Faigle, Wolfgang; Joshi, Rajiv L.; Hartmann, Andreas; Prochiantz, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mice heterozygous for homeobox gene Engrailed-1 display progressive loss of mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons. We report that exogenous Engrailed-1 and Engrailed-2 (collectively Engrailed) protect mDA neurons from 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), a mitochondrial complex I toxin used to model PD in animals. Engrailed enhances the translation of nuclear-encoded mRNAs for two key complex I subunits, Ndufs1 and Ndufs3, and increases complex I activit...

  11. Green tea polyphenols protect spinal cord neurons against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Zhao; Shiqiang Fang; Yajiang Yuan; Zhanpeng Guo; Jinhao Zeng; Yue Guo; Peifu Tang; Xifan Mei

    2014-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are strong antioxidants and can reduce free radical damage. To investigate their neuroprotective potential, we induced oxidative damage in spinal cord neurons using hy-drogen peroxide, and applied different concentrations (50-200 µg/mL) of green tea polyphenol to the cell medium for 24 hours. Measurements of superoxide dismutase activity, malondial-dehyde content, and expression of apoptosis-related genes and proteins revealed that green tea polyphenol effectively alleviated oxidative stress. Our results indicate that green tea polyphenols play a protective role in spinal cord neurons under oxidative stress.

  12. Role of carotid body for neuronal protection in experimental subarachnoid haemorrhage

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    Mehmet Dumlu Aydın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Carotid bodies are known as main arterialchemoregulatory units. Despite well known that carotidbodies have an important role in cerebral circulation andblood pH regulation, their roles has not been investigatedin subarachnoid haemorrhage. We investigated whetherthere is neuroprotective effect of neuron density of carotidbodies on the brain in subarachnoid haemorrhage.Methods: Twenty hybrid rabbits were studied. Four ofthem were used as reference group (n=4 and the remainingwas obliged to subarachnoid haemorrhage by injectingautologous blood into their cisterna magna (n=16and sacrificed after one month. All carotid bodies andbrains examined histopathologically using by stereologicmethods. The relationship between the neuronal densityof carotid body and degenerated neuron density of thehippocampus were compared statistically.Results: Five rabbits with subarachnoid haemorrhagedead during the follow-up time (n=5. The average neuronaldensity of carotid body was 4500±500 cells/mm3and of hippocampus 170.000±17.000 cell/mm3 in normalrabbit family. The degenerated neuron density ofthe hippocampus was 20.000±3.000 cells/mm3 in rabbitswith have high neuron density of carotid body and was65.000±8.000 cells/mm3 in rabbits with low neuron densityof carotid body. The differences between the neuronaldensity of carotid body and the degenerated neuron numbersof the hippocampus were significant.Conclusion: The neuron density of carotid body mayplay an important role on the protection of brain in subarachnoidhaemorrhage.Key words: Subarachnoid haemorrhage, carotid body,hippocampus, neurodegeneration, cerebral ischemia

  13. Amentolfavone protects hippocampal neurons:anti-inlfammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Zhang; Tao Sun; Jian-guo Niu; Zhen-quan He; Yang Liu; Feng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inlfammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentolfavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nu-clear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentolfavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy micevia anti-inlfammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then ef-fectively prevented the occurrence of seizures.

  14. Gentianine protects hippocampal neurons in a rat model of recurrent febrile convulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewei Liu; Shumin Liu; Na Wang; Fang Lu; Min Cao

    2011-01-01

    Gentianine has been shown to have a protective effect on hippocampal CA1 neurons in rats subjected to recurrent febrile convulsion (FC).The present study sought to explore the possible mechanism of gentianine by intraperitoneally injecting gentianine into rats with warm water-induced FC.The results revealed that neuronal organelle injury was slightly ameliorated in the hippocampal CA1 region.The level of glutamate was decreased,but the level of γ-aminobutyric acid was increased,as detected by ninhydrin staining.In addition,glutamate acid decarboxylase expression in hippocampal CA1 was increased,as determined by immunohistochemistry.The results demonstrated that gentianine can ameliorate FC-induced neuronal injury by enhancing glutamate acid decarboxylase activity,decreasing glutamate levels and increasing γ-aminobutyric acid levels.

  15. Protection of neuronal cells against reactive oxygen species by carnosine and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, Alexander; Bulygina, Elena; Leinsoo, Toomas; Petrushanko, Irina; Tsubone, Shiori; Abe, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    Carnosine and related compounds were compared in terms of their abilities to decrease the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in suspensions of isolated neurons activated by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) using both stationary fluorescence measurements and flow cytometry. Carnosine was found to suppress the fluorescent signal induced by ROS production and decreased the proportion of highly fluorescent neurons, while histidine showed opposite effects. N-Acetylated derivatives of both carnosine and histidine demonstrated weak (statistically indistinguishable) suppressive effects on the ROS signal. N-Methylated derivatives of carnosine suppressed intracellular ROS generation to the same extent as carnosine. This rank of effectiveness is distinct from that previously obtained for the anti-radical ability of CRCs (anserine>carnosine>ophidine). These differences suggest that the similar ability of carnosine and its N-methylated derivatives to protect neuronal cells against the excitotoxic effect of NMDA is not solely related to the antioxidant properties of these compounds. PMID:14698913

  16. Amentoflavone protects hippocampal neurons: anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antiapoptotic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amentoflavone is a natural biflavone compound with many biological properties, including anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and neuroprotective effects. We presumed that amentoflavone exerts a neuroprotective effect in epilepsy models. Prior to model establishment, mice were intragastrically administered 25 mg/kg amentoflavone for 3 consecutive days. Amentoflavone effectively prevented pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in a mouse kindling model, suppressed nuclear factor-κB activation and expression, inhibited excessive discharge of hippocampal neurons resulting in a reduction in epileptic seizures, shortened attack time, and diminished loss and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. Results suggested that amentoflavone protected hippocampal neurons in epilepsy mice via anti-inflammation, antioxidation, and antiapoptosis, and then effectively prevented the occurrence of seizures.

  17. Berberine protects against neuronal damage via suppression of glia-mediated inflammation in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Cheng Chen

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI triggers a series of neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to evolution of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects and anti-inflammatory actions of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, in both in vitro and in vivo TBI models. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with berberine (10 mg·kg(-1 or vehicle 10 min after injury. In addition to behavioral studies and histology analysis, blood-brain barrier (BBB permeability and brain water content were determined. Expression of PI3K/Akt and Erk signaling and inflammatory mediators were also analyzed. The protective effect of berberine was also investigated in cultured neurons either subjected to stretch injury or exposed to conditioned media with activated microglia. Berberine significantly attenuated functional deficits and brain damage associated with TBI up to day 28 post-injury. Berberine also reduced neuronal death, apoptosis, BBB permeability, and brain edema at day 1 post-injury. These changes coincided with a marked reduction in leukocyte infiltration, microglial activation, matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity, and expression of inflammatory mediators. Berberine had no effect on Akt or Erk 1/2 phosphorylation. In mixed glial cultures, berberine reduced TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling. Berberine also attenuated neuronal death induced by microglial conditioned media; however, it did not directly protect cultured neurons subjected to stretch injury. Moreover, administration of berberine at 3 h post-injury also reduced TBI-induced neuronal damage, apoptosis and inflammation in vivo. Berberine reduces TBI-induced brain damage by limiting the production of inflammatory mediators by glial cells, rather than by a direct neuroprotective effect.

  18. Protective effects of icariin on neurons injured by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; ZHOU Qi-xin; SHI Jing-shan

    2005-01-01

    Background It is very important to search for novel anti-ischemia/reperfusion neuroprotective drugs for prevention or treatment of cerebrovascular diseases. Icariin, the major active component of traditional Chinese herb Yinyanghuo, may have a beneficial role for neurons in cerebral ischemia/reperfusion caused by accident. However, it was not clear yet. In this study, we observed the protective effects of icariin on neurons injured by ischemia/reperfusion in vitro and in vivo and investigated its protective mechanism.Methods Cerebral cortical neurons of Wistar rats in primary culture were studied during the different periods of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion with oxygen and glucose. Cell viability was determined by methyl thiazoleterazolium (MTT) assay. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leaked from neurons, cell apoptosis and the concentration of intracellular free calcium were measured respectively. On the other hand, the mice model of transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was made by bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries and ischemic hypotension/reperfusion. The mice were divided into several groups at random: sham operated group, model group and icariin preventive treatment group. The changes of mice behavioral, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured, respectively. Results Treatment with icariin (final concentration 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/L) during ischemia/reperfusion-mimetic incubation in vitro concentration-dependently attenuated neuronal damage with characteristics of increasing injured neuronal absorbance of MTT, decreasing LDH release, decreasing cell apoptosis, and blunting elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. And in vivo the learning and memory abilities significantly decreased,activities of SOD were diminished and MDA level increased obviously in model group,compared with that in sham operated group. But pre-treatment of model mice with icariin (10, 30

  19. Protective effect of melatonin on neurons after oxidative-stress injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ximing Wang; Zhiqiang Lu; Qiuhong Duan; Tao Lu; Shanshu He

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that melatonin(MT) can protect secondary neuronal injury.However,the protective effect of MT on neuronal injury in ischemia/reperfusion models in vitro still has not been proved.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the protective effect of MT on central ischemic injury of nerve cells and analyze its possible mechanism.DESIGN: Contrast observational study.SETTING: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Tongji Medical College,Huazhong University of Science and Technology.MATERIALS: Rats aged 7-8 days and weighing 10-12g were provided by Medical Experimental Animal Center,Tongji Medical College,Huazhong University of Science and Technology,MT was provided by Sigma Company,USA.METHODS:The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Tongji Hospital,Huazhong University of Science and Technology from October 2002 to March 2004.The effects of MT on the neurodegeneration induced by oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) were tested in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.Neuron damage was quantitatively assessed by Typan Blue exclusion and MTT assay at different time points after oxygen-glucose-deprivation(90 minutes).DNA gel electrophoresis and acridine orange stain were performed to determine the nature of cell damage.And fluorescence spectrophotometer was used for quantification of intracellular malondialdehyde(MDA)at various time intervals.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Correlation between degrees of neuronal injury and reperfusion times,apoptosis,and production of MDA in cells.RESULTS:①The neuron injury was aggravated with reperfusion time.②The protective effect of MT was time-and dose-dependent when its concentration was not higher than 10 μmol/L.⑧When neurons were exposed to OGD for 90 minutes.part of the cells exhibited typical features of apoptosis:internucleosomal DNA condensation and DNA ladder on agarose gel electrophoresis.MT added to cells recovering from OGD exerted neuroprotective action

  20. pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell to protect injured spinal neurons in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 高立达; 朴永旭; 毛伯镛; 曾凡俊

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the protective effect of pSVPoMcat (myelin basic protein microgene)modifying Schwann cell on injured spinal neurons.Methods: A model of rat spinal cord injured by hemisection was used. One hundred and twenty healthy SD rats of both sexes weighing 250-300 g were divided into three groups: Group A (n=40, treated with implantation of pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell), Group B (n= 40, treated with implantation of Schwann cell only) and Group C (n=400, treated with sham operation as the control). One week after operation the rat functional recovery was observed dynamically by using combined behavioral score (CBS) and cortical somatasensory evoked potentials, the spinal cord sections were stained by Nissl, acid phosphatase enzyme histochemistry and cell apoptosis was examined by methye green, terminal deoxynucleotidyl and the dUTP Nick end labeling technique. Quantitative analysis was done by computer image analysis system.Results: In Group A the injured neurons recovered well morphologically. The imaging analysis showed a result of Group A>Group B>Group C in the size of the neurons (P<0.01). The percentage of ACP (acid phosphatase) stained area and the rate of apoptosis sequence were groups Aprotective effect on injured spinal neurons and promotes recovery of injured spinal cord function in rats.

  1. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, So Young; Lee, Kang-Woo; Choi, Sun-Mi; Yang, Eun Jin

    2015-09-01

    Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV) extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A₂. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death. PMID:26402700

  2. Bee Venom Protects against Rotenone-Induced Cell Death in NSC34 Motor Neuron Cells

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    So Young Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is known to elevate mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and induce apoptosis via activation of the caspase-3 pathway. Bee venom (BV extracted from honey bees has been widely used in oriental medicine and contains melittin, apamin, adolapin, mast cell-degranulating peptide, and phospholipase A2. In this study, we tested the effects of BV on neuronal cell death by examining rotenone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. NSC34 motor neuron cells were pretreated with 2.5 μg/mL BV and stimulated with 10 μM rotenone to induce cell toxicity. We assessed cell death by Western blotting using specific antibodies, such as phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, and cleaved capase-3 and performed an MTT assay for evaluation of cell death and mitochondria staining. Pretreatment with 2.5 μg/mL BV had a neuroprotective effect against 10 μM rotenone-induced cell death in NSC34 motor neuron cells. Pre-treatment with BV significantly enhanced cell viability and ameliorated mitochondrial impairment in rotenone-treated cellular model. Moreover, BV treatment inhibited the activation of JNK signaling and cleaved caspase-3 related to cell death and increased ERK phosphorylation involved in cell survival in rotenone-treated NSC34 motor neuron cells. Taken together, we suggest that BV treatment can be useful for protection of neurons against oxidative stress or neurotoxin-induced cell death.

  3. Curcumin protects mitochondria from oxidative damage and attenuates apoptosis in cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-gui ZHU; Xiao-chun CHEN; Zhi-zhe CHEN; Yu-qi ZENG; Guang-bin SHI; Yan-hua SU; Xu PENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of curcumin on tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced oxidative damage in rat cortical neurons and to explore the possible mechanism. METHODS: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were performed in vitro and cell viability was measured by MTT assay. DNA fragmentation was used to evaluate cell apoptosis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential (△ψm) was determined by flow cytometric assay. Cellular glutathione (GSH) content was measured by spectrophotometer. Bcl-2family proteins, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were detected by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure of tBHP 100μmol/L to neurons for 60 min resulted in Aψm loss and cytochrome c release from mitochondria and subsequent activation of caspase-3 and PARP cleavation, and cell apoptosis.After removal of tBHP and then further treatment with curcumin (2.5-20μmol/L) for 18 h, curcumin abrogated △ψm loss and cytochrome c release, blocked activation of caspase 3, and altered the expression of Bcl-2 family.Further curcumin treatment also prevented cellular GSH and decreased intracellular ROS generation markedly.Curcumin eventually attenuated tBHP-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. CONCLUSION: Curcumin may attenuate oxidative damages in cortical neurons by reducing intracellular production of ROS and protecting mitochondria from oxidative damage.

  4. γ-Tocotrienol does not substantially protect DS neurons from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative injury

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    Then Sue-Mian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS neurons are more susceptible to oxidative stress and previous studies have shown that vitamin E was able to reduce oxidative stress and improve DS neurons' viability. Therefore, this study was done to investigate the protective role of γ-tocotrienol (γT3 in DS neurons from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 -induced oxidative stress. The pro-apoptosis tendency of γT3 was compared to α-tocopherol (αT in non-stress condition as well. Methods Primary culture of DS and euploid neurons were divided into six groups of treatment: control, H2O2, γT3 pre-treatment with H2O2, γT3 only, αT pre-treatment with H2O2 and αT only. The treatments were assessed by MTS assay and apoptosis assay by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA apoptosis ELISA assay, Hoechst and Neu-N immunofluorescence staining. The cellular uptake of γT3 and αT was determined by HPLC while protein expressions were determined by Western blot. Comparison between groups was made by the Student's t test, one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni adjustment as well as two-way ANOVA for multiple comparisons. Results One day incubation of γT3 was able to reduced apoptosis of DS neurons by 10%, however γT3 was cytotoxic at longer incubation period (14 days and at concentrations ≥ 100 μM. Pre-treatment of αT and γT3 only attenuate apoptosis and increase cell viability in H2O2-treated DS and euploid neurons by 10% in which the effects were minimal to maintain most of the DS cells' morphology. γT3 act as a free radical scavenger by reducing ROS generated by H2O2. In untreated controls, DS neurons showed lower Bcl-2/Bax ratio and p53 expression compared to normal neurons, while cPKC and PKC-δ expressions were higher in DS neurons. On the other hand, pre-treatment of γT3 in H2O2-treated DS neurons have reduced Bcl-2/Bax ratio, which was not shown in euploid neurons. This suggests that pre-treatment of γT3 did not promote DS cell survival. Meanwhile γT3 and αT treatments

  5. FDA-approved drugs that protect mammalian neurons from glucose toxicity slow aging dependent on cbp and protect against proteotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Lublin

    Full Text Available Screening a library of drugs with known safety profiles in humans yielded 30 drugs that reliably protected mammalian neurons against glucose toxicity. Subsequent screening demonstrated that 6 of these 30 drugs increase lifespan in C. elegans: caffeine, ciclopirox olamine, tannic acid, acetaminophen, bacitracin, and baicalein. Every drug significantly reduced the age-dependent acceleration of mortality rate. These protective effects were blocked by RNAi inhibition of cbp-1 in adults only, which also blocks protective effects of dietary restriction. Only 2 drugs, caffeine and tannic acid, exhibited a similar dependency on DAF-16. Caffeine, tannic acid, and bacitracin also reduced pathology in a transgenic model of proteotoxicity associated with Alzheimer's disease. These results further support a key role for glucose toxicity in driving age-related pathologies and for CBP-1 in protection against age-related pathologies. These results also provide novel lead compounds with known safety profiles in human for treatment of age-related diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and diabetic complications.

  6. pSVPoMcat modifying Schwann cell to protect injured spinal neurons in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈礼刚; 高立达; 等

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the protective effect of pSVPoMcat(myelin basic protein microgene)modifying Schwann cell on injured spinal neurons.Methods;A model of rat spinal cord injured by hemisection was used.One hundred and twenty healthy SD rats of both sexes weighing 250-300g were divided into three groups:GroupA(n=40,treated with implantation of pSPVoMcat modifying Schwann cell),GroupB(n=40,treated with implantation of Schwann cell only)and GroupC(n=400,treated with sham operation as the control).One week after operation the rat functional recovery was observed dynamically by using combined behavioral score(CBS)and cortical somatasensory evoked potentials,the spinal cord sections were stained by Nissl,acid phosphatase enzyme histochemistry and cell apoptosis was examined by metye green,terminal deoxynucleotidyl and the dUTP Nick end labeling technique.Quantitative analysis was done by computer image analysis system.Results:In Group A the injured neurons recovered well morphologically.The imaging analysis showed a result of GroupA>GroupB>Group Cin the size of the neurons (P<0.01),The percentage of ACP(acid phosphatase) stained area and the rate of apoptosis sequence were groupsAprotective effect on injured spinal neurons and promotes recovery of injured spinal cord function in rats.

  7. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor protects neurons from GdCl3-induced impairment in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gadolinium (Gd3+) complexes are important contrast agents in medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and of great potential value in brain research. In order to better understand the mechanisms of the action of Gd3+ on neurons in the complex central nervous system (CNS), the neurotoxic actions of GdCl3 have been investigated in both neuron monoculture and astrocyte-neuron co-culture systems. Measurements of lactate dehydrogenase release showed that GdCl3 causes significant cell death of monocultured neurons as a result of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, GdCl3 does not affect the viability and BDNF expression of astrocytes. Both co-culturing of neurons with astrocytes and addition of BDNF ameliorated GdCl3-induced neurotoxicity by decreasing ROS generation and facilitating recovery of BDNF levels. The results obtained suggest that astrocytes in the CNS may protect neurons from GdCl3-induced impairment through secreting BDNF and thus up-regulating BDNF expression and interfering with Gd3+-induced cell signaling in neurons. A possible molecular mechanism is suggested which should be helpful in understand- ing the neurotoxic actions of gadolinium probes .

  8. Tetraspanin (TSP-17 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurodegeneration in C. elegans.

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    Neda Masoudi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, is linked to the gradual loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Disease loci causing hereditary forms of PD are known, but most cases are attributable to a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. Increased incidence of PD is associated with rural living and pesticide exposure, and dopaminergic neurodegeneration can be triggered by neurotoxins such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. In C. elegans, this drug is taken up by the presynaptic dopamine reuptake transporter (DAT-1 and causes selective death of the eight dopaminergic neurons of the adult hermaphrodite. Using a forward genetic approach to find genes that protect against 6-OHDA-mediated neurodegeneration, we identified tsp-17, which encodes a member of the tetraspanin family of membrane proteins. We show that TSP-17 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons and provide genetic, pharmacological and biochemical evidence that it inhibits DAT-1, thus leading to increased 6-OHDA uptake in tsp-17 loss-of-function mutants. TSP-17 also protects against toxicity conferred by excessive intracellular dopamine. We provide genetic and biochemical evidence that TSP-17 acts partly via the DOP-2 dopamine receptor to negatively regulate DAT-1. tsp-17 mutants also have subtle behavioral phenotypes, some of which are conferred by aberrant dopamine signaling. Incubating mutant worms in liquid medium leads to swimming-induced paralysis. In the L1 larval stage, this phenotype is linked to lethality and cannot be rescued by a dop-3 null mutant. In contrast, mild paralysis occurring in the L4 larval stage is suppressed by dop-3, suggesting defects in dopaminergic signaling. In summary, we show that TSP-17 protects against neurodegeneration and has a role in modulating behaviors linked to dopamine signaling.

  9. Aged garlic extract and its components protect cultured rat hippocampal neurons from amyloid β—protein—in—duced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ItoY; KosuY

    2002-01-01

    Aged garlic extract and its components such as S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) and sllixin have been shown to possess various biological effects including neurotrophic activity.We characterized the neuronal death induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ),4-hydroxynoenal (HNE),tunicamycin(TM),and trophic factor-deprivation (TFD),and ivestigated whether these garlic compounds could prevent this in cultured PC12 cells and rat hippocampal neurons.Treatment with SAC protected these cells against Aβ- and TM-induced neuronal death.SAC also attenuated the processing of procaspase-12 induced by Aβ25-35 or TM.In contrast,allixin and its analogue,DHP,afforded no protection against Aβ-induced cell death.SAC afforded no protection against HNE- and TFD-induced cell death,which has been shown to be mediated by caspase-3 dependent pathway.These results suggest that SAC protect against the neuronal cell death that is triggered by ER dysfunction.

  10. Protective roles of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chunxu; WANG Hanxing

    2007-01-01

    The effects of heat stress on the neurons in hippocampal CA1 region of brain ischemia/reperfusion were explored.The mice were pretreated with heat stress followed by ischemia/reperfusion by clipping bilateral cervical common arteries for 7 min.Mice were divided randomly into four groups as follows:(1)normal control group;(2)heat stress pretreated subsequent to ischemia/reperfusion group (HS/IR);(3)ischemia/reperfusion group(IR);and(4)heat stress group(HS).Animals in the last three groups were subdivided into three subgroups:1 d,4 d,14 d respectively.The Morris water maze was used to test the ability of learning and memorizing,Nissl staining was used to count the average number of survived neurons in hippocampal CA1 region,and immunohistochemistry combined with image analysis system to detect the changes of Microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2)expression.The results showed that mice in IR group exhibited increased escape latency when compared with that of normal,HS and HS/IR groups(P<0.01),and the mice in IR group adopted an inefficient search strategy,major in circling and restricted searching manners.Nissl staining results showed a significant reduction in the number of pyramidal neurons in hippocampal CA1 regions in HS/IR and IR groups,with a decrease in IR group(P<0.01).Compared with normal group,the expression of MAP-2 in hippocampal CA1 region obviously decreased in IR group(P<0.05).The present results indicate that heat stress pretreatment can improve the spatial learning and memorizing function through protection to hippocampal neurons.

  11. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs

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    Xingtao Wang

    2016-04-01

    , our data demonstrate for the first time that HSYA protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxic damage through the inhibition of NMDARs. This novel finding indicates that HSYA may be a promising pharmacological candidate for the treatment of brain ischemia.

  12. Protective effects of plant seed extracts against amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons

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    Yoshinori Okada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Alzheimer′s disease (AD is characterized by large deposits of amyloid β (Aβ peptide. Aβ is known to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS production in neurons, leading to cell death. In this study, we screened 15 plant seeds′ aqueous extracts (PSAE for inhibitory effects on Aβ (25-35-induced cell death using hippocampus neurons (HIPN. Materials and Methods: Fifteen chosen plants were nine medical herbs (Japanese honeywort, luffa, rapeseed, Chinese colza, potherb mustard, Japanese radish, bitter melon, red shiso, corn, and kaiware radish and six general commercial plants (common bean, komatsuna, Qing geng cai, bell pepper, kale, and lettuce. PSAE were measured for total phenolic content (TPC with the Folin-Ciocalteu method, and the 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging effect of each seed extract was measured. To find a protectant against Aβ-induced oxidative stress, we screened 15 PSAE using a 2′, 7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay. To further unravel the anti-inflammatory effects of PSAE on Aβ-induced inflammation, PSAE were added to HIPN. The neuroprotective effects of the PSAE were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, measuring the cell viability in Aβ-induced HIPN. Results: TPC of 15 PSAE was in the range of 0.024-1.96 mg of chlorogenic acid equivalents/gram. The aqueous extracts showed antioxidant activities. Furthermore, intracellular ROS accumulation resulting from Aβ treatment was reduced when cells were treated with some PSAE. Kale, bitter melon, kaiware radish, red shiso, and corn inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion by the Aβ-stimulated neurons and all samples except Japanese honeywort showed enhancement of cell survival. Conclusion: From these results, we suggest that some plant seed extracts offer protection against Aβ-mediated cell death.

  13. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD. PMID:27444386

  14. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  15. Protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning on hippocampal neurons in rats with status epilepticus

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    Yi ZHANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the protective effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress preconditioning induced by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG on hippocampal neurons of rats with status epilepticus (SE and the possible mechanism.  Methods Ninety Sprague-Dawley (SD rats were randomly enrolled into preconditioning group (N = 30, SE group (N = 30 and control group (N = 30. Each group was divided into 6 subsets (N = 5 according to six time points (before seizure, 6 h, 12 h, 1 d, 2 d and 7 d after seizure. The preconditioning group was administered 2-DG intraperitoneally with a dose of 150 mg/kg for 7 days, and the lithium-pilocarpine induced SE rat model was established on both preconditioning group and SE group. The rats were sacrificed at the above six time points, and the brains were removed to make paraffin sections. Nissl staining was performed by toluidine blue to evaluate the hippocampal neuronal damage after seizure, and the number of survival neurons in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions of the rats were counted. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect the expressions of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region of the rats.  Results The number of survival neurons in preconditioning group was much more than that in SE group at 7 d after seizure (t = 5.353, P = 0.000, and was more obvious in CA1 region. There was no significant hippocampal neuronal damage in control group. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in CA3 region of hippocampus in SE group at 6 h after seizure were significantly higher than that in control group (P = 0.000, and then kept increasing until reaching the peak at 2 d (P = 0.000, for all. The expressions of GRP78 and XBP-1 in hippocampal CA3 region in preconditioning group were significantly higher than that in control group before seizure (P = 0.000, for all. The level of GRP78 maintained the highest at 24 h and 2 d after seizure (P = 0.000, for all, while the XBP-1 level

  16. Autophagy Constitutes a Protective Mechanism against Ethanol Toxicity in Mouse Astrocytes and Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pla, Antoni; Pascual, María; Guerri, Consuelo

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol induces brain damage and neurodegeneration by triggering inflammatory processes in glial cells through activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. Recent evidence indicates the role of protein degradation pathways in neurodegeneration and alcoholic liver disease, but how these processes affect the brain remains elusive. We have demonstrated that chronic ethanol consumption impairs proteolytic pathways in mouse brain, and the immune response mediated by TLR4 receptors participates in these dysfunctions. We evaluate the in vitro effects of an acute ethanol dose on the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) on WT and TLR4-/- mouse astrocytes and neurons in primary culture, and how these changes affect cell survival. Our results show that ethanol induces overexpression of several autophagy markers (ATG12, LC3-II, CTSB), and increases the number of lysosomes in WT astrocytes, effects accompanied by a basification of lysosomal pH and by lowered phosphorylation levels of autophagy inhibitor mTOR, along with activation of complexes beclin-1 and ULK1. Notably, we found only minor changes between control and ethanol-treated TLR4-/- mouse astroglial cells. Ethanol also triggers the expression of the inflammatory mediators iNOS and COX-2, but induces astroglial death only slightly. Blocking autophagy by using specific inhibitors increases both inflammation and cell death. Conversely, in neurons, ethanol down-regulates the autophagy pathway and triggers cell death, which is partially recovered by using autophagy enhancers. These results support the protective role of the ALP against ethanol-induced astroglial cell damage in a TLR4-dependent manner, and provide new insight into the mechanisms that underlie ethanol-induced brain damage and are neuronal sensitive to the ethanol effects.

  17. Ketogenic diet protects against epileptogenesis as well as neuronal loss in amygdaloid-kindling seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Ding, Yao; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Man-Man; Wen, Shu-Qun; Ding, Mei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    Ketogenic diets (KD) have shown beneficial effects in terms of anticonvulsant and anti-epileptogenic properties in several experimental models. However, few studies have investigated the consequences of KD with regards to the anti-epileptogenic and neuroprotective effects in kindling-induced seizures. Here, postnatal day 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats received one of two experimental diets for 4 weeks: (a) a 'classic' 4:1 KD; and (b) a normal regular rodent chow diet (ND). Fully-kindled seizures were achieved by daily electrical stimulation in the amygdala. Seizure stage and after-discharge duration (ADD) were assessed daily. The after-discharge threshold (ADT) was measured every 5 days. The effects of the two diets on neuronal loss were observed before kindling and 20 days after stimulation by Nissl staining. We found that the progression of seizure stage and ADD was delayed by KD. KD prevented the ADT decrease on day 5. The incidence of generalized seizures was lower in the KD group compared to the ND group. The neuronal density was decreased in the ipsilateral hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 area, as well as the contralateral CA1 area before kindling in the KD group. However, KD prevented neuronal loss in the ipsilateral CA1 area 20 days after stimulation. Our data suggest that KD can protect against epileptogenesis by preventing both after-discharge generation and propagation in kindling seizures. In addition, KD also possesses a neuroprotective function during kindling although it changes hippocampal development in early life.

  18. Phenolic Compounds Protect Cultured Hippocampal Neurons against Ethanol-Withdrawal Induced Oxidative Stress

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    Marianna E. Jung

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol withdrawal is linked to elevated oxidative damage to neurons. Here we report our findings on the contribution of phenolic antioxidants (17β-estradiol, p-octyl-phenol and 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol to counterbalance sudden ethanol withdrawal-initiated oxidative events in hippocampus-derived cultured HT-22 cells. We showed that ethanol withdrawal for 4 h after 24-h ethanol treatment provoked greater levels of oxidative damage than the preceding ethanol exposure. Phenolic antioxidant treatment either during ethanol exposure or ethanol withdrawal only, however, dose-dependently reversed cellular oxidative damage, as demonstrated by the significantly enhanced cell viability, reduced malondialdehyde production and protein carbonylation, compared to untreated cells. Interestingly, the antioxidant treatment schedule had no significant impact on the observed neuroprotection. In addition, the efficacy of the three phenolic compounds was practically equipotent in protecting HT-22 cells in spite of predictions based on an in silico study and a cell free assay of lipid peroxidation. This finding implies that free-radical scavenging may not be the sole factor responsible for the observed neuroprotection and warrants further studies to establish, whether the HT-22 line is indeed a suitable model for in vitro screening of antioxidants against EW-related neuronal damage.

  19. Mushroom extract protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced toxicity in hepatic and neuronal human cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizani, Nejib; Waly, Mostafa I

    2012-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide is an oxidative stress agent that is associated with depletion of intracellular glutathione and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes in different cell lines. Consumption of antioxidant-rich foods reduces cellular oxidative stress and its related health problems. This study aimed to assess the antioxidant properties of mushroom, Agaricus bisporous cultivar extract, against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in cultured human hepatic (HepG2) and neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells. In this study, hydrogen peroxide caused significant oxidative stress in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cells as demonstrated by glutathione depletion, impairment of total antioxidant capacity and inhibition of antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase). Agaricusbisporous extract ameliorated the observed hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular insult as indicated by restoring the activity of glutathione and the assayed antioxidant enzymes to control levels. The results suggest that mushroom extract as antioxidant properties and protects against the oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide-in cultured human hepatic and neuronal cells. PMID:24261122

  20. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  1. Remote limb preconditioning protects against ischemia-induced neuronal death through ameliorating neuronal oxidative DNA damage and parthanatos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wei; Xu, Wei; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Shi, Lei; Ren, Chuancheng

    2016-07-15

    Remote limb preconditioning (RPC) ameliorates ischemia-induced cerebral infarction and promotes neurological function recovery; however, the mechanism of RPC hasn't been fully understood, which limits its clinical application. The present study aimed at exploring the underlying mechanism of RPC through testing its effects on neuronal oxidative DNA damage and parthanatos in a rat focal cerebral ischemia model. Infarct volume was investigated by 2, 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining, and neuronal survival was evaluated by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage was investigated via analyzing the expression of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Besides, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated-dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and DNA laddering were utilized to evaluate neuronal DNA fragmentation. Moreover, we tested whether RPC regulated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer (PAR) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) pathway; thus, PAR expression, AIF translocation and AIF/histone H2AX (H2AX) interaction were investigated. The results showed that RPC exerted neuroprotective effects by ameliorating oxidative DNA damage and neuronal parthanatos; additionally, RPC suppressed PAR/AIF pathway through reducing AIF translocation and AIF/H2AX interaction. The present study further exposed neuroprotective mechanism of RPC, and provided new evidence for the research on RPC and ICS. PMID:27288768

  2. Tat-NOL3 protects against hippocampal neuronal cell death induced by oxidative stress through the regulation of apoptotic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Eun Jeong; Shin, Min Jea; Eum, Won Sik; Kim, Dae Won; Yong, Ji In; Ryu, Eun Ji; Park, Jung Hwan; Cho, Su Bin; Cha, Hyun Ju; Kim, Sang Jin; Yeo, Hyeon Ji; Yeo, Eun Ji; Choi, Yeon Joo; Im, Seung Kwon; Kweon, Hae Young; Kim, Duk-Soo; Yu, Yeon Hee; Cho, Sung-Woo; Park, Meeyoung; Park, Jinseu; Cho, Yong-Jun; Choi, Soo Young

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is associated with neuronal cell death and ischemia. The NOL3 [nucleolar protein 3 (apoptosis repressor with CARD domain)] protein protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death. However, the protective mechanism responsible for this effect as well as the effects of NOL3 against oxidative stress in ischemia remain unclear. Thus, we examined the protective effects of NOL3 protein on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and the mechanism responsible for these effects in hippocampal neuronal HT22 cells and in an animal model of forebrain ischemia using Tat-fused NOL3 protein (Tat-NOL3). Purified Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the H2O2-exposed HT22 cells and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). In addition, Tat-NOL3 prevented neuronal cell death through the regulation of apoptotic signaling pathways including Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-2, -3 and -8, PARP and p53. In addition, Tat-NOL3 protein transduced into the animal brains and significantly protected against neuronal cell death in the CA1 region of the hippocampus by regulating the activation of microglia and astrocytes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tat-NOL3 protein protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death by regulating oxidative stress and by acting as an anti-apoptotic protein. Thus, we suggest that Tat-NOL3 represents a potential therapeutic agent for protection against ischemic brain injury. PMID:27221790

  3. 14,15-EET promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and protects cortical neurons against oxygen/glucose deprivation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lai; Chen, Man; Yuan, Lin; Xiang, Yuting [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zheng, Ruimao, E-mail: rmzheng@pku.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China); Zhu, Shigong, E-mail: sgzhu@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • 14,15-EET inhibits OGD-induced apoptosis in cortical neurons. • Mitochondrial biogenesis of cortical neurons is promoted by 14,15-EET. • 14,15-EET preserves mitochondrial function of cortical neurons under OGD. • CREB mediates effect of 14,15-EET on mitochondrial biogenesis and function. - Abstract: 14,15-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (14,15-EET), a metabolite of arachidonic acid, is enriched in the brain cortex and exerts protective effect against neuronal apoptosis induced by ischemia/reperfusion. Although apoptosis has been well recognized to be closely associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and function, it is still unclear whether the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET is mediated by promotion of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in cortical neurons under the condition of oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD). In this study, we found that 14,15-EET improved cell viability and inhibited apoptosis of cortical neurons. 14,15-EET significantly increased the mitochondrial mass and the ratio of mitochondrial DNA to nuclear DNA. Key makers of mitochondrial biogenesis, peroxisome proliferator activator receptor gamma-coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α), nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), were elevated at both mRNA and protein levels in the cortical neurons treated with 14,15-EET. Moreover, 14,15-EET markedly attenuated the decline of mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced ROS, while increased ATP synthesis. Knockdown of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) by siRNA blunted the up-regulation of PGC-1α and NRF-1 stimulated by 14,15-EET, and consequently abolished the neuroprotective effect of 14,15-EET. Our results indicate that 14,15-EET protects neurons from OGD-induced apoptosis by promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function through CREB mediated activation of PGC-1α and NRF-1.

  4. Antioxidant and neuronal cell protective effects of columbia arabica coffee with different roasting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ji Hee; Jeong, Hee Rok; Jo, Yu Na; Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Uk; Heo, Ho Jin

    2013-03-01

    In vitro antioxidant activities and neuronal cell protective effects of ethanol extract from roasted coffee beans were investigated. Colombia arabica coffee (Coffea arabica) green beans were roasted to give medium (230°C, 10 min), city (230°C, 12 min) and french (230°C, 15 min) coffee beans. Total phenolics in raw green beans, medium, city and french-roasted beans were 8.81±0.05, 9.77±0.03, 9.92±0.04 and 7.76±0.01 mg of GAE/g, respectively. The content of 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, the predominant phenolic, was detected higher in medium-roasted beans than others. In addition, we found that extracts from medium-roasted beans particularly showed the highest in vitro antioxidant activity on ABTS radical scavenging activity and FRAP assays. To determine cell viability using the MTT assay, extracts from medium-roasted beans showed higher protection against H2O2-induced neurotoxicity than others. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage was also inhibited by the extracts due to prevention of lipid peroxidation using the malondialdehyde (MDA) assay from mouse whole brain homogenates. These data suggest that the medium-roasting condition to making tasty coffee from Columbia arabica green beans may be more helpful to human health by providing the most physiological phenolics, including 5-O-caffeoylquinic acids. PMID:24471107

  5. Basic fibroblast growth factor protects auditory neurons and hair cells from noise exposure and glutamate neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翟所强; 王大君; 王嘉陵

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine protectivie effects of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on cochlear neurons and hair cells in vitro and in vivo. In experiment I, cultured spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) prepared from P3 mice were exposed to 20mM glutamate for 2 hours before the culture medium was replaced with fresh medium containing 0, 25, 50, and 100 ng/ml bFGF, respectively. Fourteen days later, all cultures were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and stained with 1% toluidine blue. The number of surviving SGNs were counted and the length of SGNs neurites were measured. Exposure to 20 mM glutamate for 24 hours resulted in an inhibition on neurite outgrowth of SGNs and elevated cell death. Treatment of the cultures with bFGF led to promotion of neurite outgrowth and elevated number of surviving SGNs. Effects of bFGF were dose dependent with the highest potency at 100 ng/ml. In experiment Ⅱ, in vivo studies were carried out with guinea pigs in which bFGF or artificial perilymph was perfused into the cochlea to assess possible protective effects of bFGF on cochlear hair cells and compound action potentials(CAP). The CAPs were measured before, immediatly and 48 hours after exposure to noise. Significant differences in CAP were observed (p<0. 05 ) among the bFGF perfused group, control group(t =3. 896 ) and artificial perilymph perfused group (t =2. 520) at 48 hours after noise exposure, Cochleae were removed and hair cell Loss was analyzed in surface preparations prepared from all experimental animals. Acoustic trauma caused loss of 651 and 687 inner hair cells in the control and artificial perilymph perfused group, respectively. In sharp contrast, only 31 inner hair cells were lost in the bFGF perfused ears. Similarly, more outer hair cells died in the control and perilymph perfuesed group (41830 and 41968, respectively) than in the group treated with bFGF (34258). Our results demonstrate that bFGF protected SGNs against glutmate

  6. Role of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in the protective effects of heat shock factor 1 on working memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Peng; Xiongzhao Zhu; Ming Cheng; Xiangyi Chen; Shuqiao Yao

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that heat shock factor 1 exerts endogenous protective effects on working memory under conditions of chronic psychological stress. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined the protective factors affecting working memory in heat shock transcription factor 1 gene knockout mice. The results indicated that the number of correct T maze alternations decreased following mild chronic psychological stress in knockout mice. This change was accompanied by a decrease in neurogenesis and an increase in neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The number of correct T maze alternations was positively correlated with neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus, and negatively correlated with neuronal apoptosis. In wild type mice, no significant difference was detected in the number of correct T maze alternations or neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results indicate that the heat shock factor 1 gene has an endogenous protective role in working memory during mild chronic psychological stress associated with dentate gyrus neuronal apoptosis.Moreover, dentate gyrus neurogenesis appears to participate in the protective mechanism.

  7. Delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR in glutamate stimulated neurons allows late protection by 9-cis retinoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, Gro H.; Fallgren, Asa B.; Strom, Bjorn O.; Boldingh Debernard, Karen A.; Mohebi, Beata U. [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Paulsen, Ragnhild E., E-mail: r.e.paulsen@farmasi.uio.no [Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1068, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} NGFI-B and RXR translocate out of the nucleus after glutamate treatment. {yields} Arresting NGFI-B/RXR in the nucleus protects neurons from excitotoxicity. {yields} Late protection by 9-cis RA is possible due to a delayed translocation of NGFI-B/RXR. -- Abstract: Nuclear receptor and apoptosis inducer NGFI-B translocates out of the nucleus as a heterodimer with RXR in response to different apoptosis stimuli, and therefore represents a potential pharmacological target. We found that the cytosolic levels of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha} were increased in cultures of cerebellar granule neurons 2 h after treatment with glutamate (excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, involved in stroke). To find a time-window for potential intervention the neurons were transfected with gfp-tagged expressor plasmids for NGFI-B and RXR. The default localization of NGFI-Bgfp and RXRgfp was nuclear, however, translocation out of the nucleus was observed 2-3 h after glutamate treatment. We therefore hypothesized that the time-window between treatment and translocation would allow late protection against neuronal death. The RXR ligand 9-cis retinoic acid was used to arrest NGFI-B and RXR in the nucleus. Addition of 9-cis retinoic acid 1 h after treatment with glutamate reduced the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-B and RXR{alpha}, the cytosolic translocation of NGFI-Bgfp observed in live neurons, as well as the neuronal death. However, the reduced translocation and the reduced cell death were not observed when 9-cis retinoic acid was added after 3 h. Thus, late protection from glutamate induced death by addition of 9-cis retinoic acid is possible in a time-window after apoptosis induction.

  8. Protective effect of Angelica sinensis on cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuling Wu; Hongxian Zhao; Hong Yu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The enhanced expression of c-Fos protein in nerve cells after hypoxia is the marker for converting extracellular hypoxia information to intracellular changes at hypoxia, and it is suspected that the increase of c-Fos protein can lead to the synthesis and excretion of related neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor. However, it is still unclear what functional changes of nerve cells are induced by the increase of c-Fos protein at hypoxia, and whether it is good for the survival of damaged neurons.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of c-Fos in the cerebral neurons from embryos of rats with hypoxia in uterus, and investigate the pathway for the protective effect of Angelica sinensis injection on the cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia.DESIGN: A completely randomized controlled study.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twelve female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male adult Wistar rat with body mass of 220 to 250 g were selected. Rabbit-anti-rat neuro-specific enolase (NSE) and rabbit-anti-rat c-Fos were purchased from Wuhan Boster Biological Technology Co., Ltd.; Double-staining kit was bought from Beijing Zhongshan Golden Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Angelica sinensis injection was produced by the Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Hubei Medical University.METHODS: The experiments were completed in the experimental animal center and the Department of Histology and Embryology of Luzhou Medical College from December 2004 to December 2005. ① Twelve adult female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male Wistar rat were housed in one rearing cage. The appearance of vaginal embolus at 8:00 in the next morning was recorded as 0 day of pregnancy and the rats were recorded for 15 days, and they were divided randomly into three groups, control group (n =4), hypoxia group (n =4)and Angelica group (n =4). The pregnant rats in the hypoxia group were firstly injected with saline (8 m

  9. Estrogen protects neuronal cells from amyloid beta-induced apoptosis via regulation of mitochondrial proteins and function

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    Iwamoto Sean

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease is associated with increased apoptosis and parallels increased levels of amyloid beta, which can induce neuronal apoptosis. Estrogen exposure prior to neurotoxic insult of hippocampal neurons promotes neuronal defence and survival against neurodegenerative insults including amyloid beta. Although all underlying molecular mechanisms of amyloid beta neurotoxicity remain undetermined, mitochondrial dysfunction, including altered calcium homeostasis and Bcl-2 expression, are involved in neurodegenerative vulnerability. Results In this study, we investigated the mechanism of 17β-estradiol-induced prevention of amyloid beta-induced apoptosis of rat hippocampal neuronal cultures. Estradiol treatment prior to amyloid beta exposure significantly reduced the number of apoptotic neurons and the associated rise in resting intracellular calcium levels. Amyloid beta exposure provoked down regulation of a key antiapoptotic protein, Bcl-2, and resulted in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, a protein known to promote cell death, and subsequent release of cytochrome c. E2 pretreatment inhibited the amyloid beta-induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and subsequent release of cytochrome c. Further implicating the mitochondria as a target of estradiol action, in vivo estradiol treatment enhanced the respiratory function of whole brain mitochondria. In addition, estradiol pretreatment protected isolated mitochondria against calcium-induced loss of respiratory function. Conclusion Therefore, we propose that estradiol pretreatment protects against amyloid beta neurotoxicity by limiting mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  10. Potential protection of green tea polyphenols against 1800 MHz electromagnetic radiation-induced injury on rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Li; Wen, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2011-10-01

    Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) are harmful to public health, but the certain anti-irradiation mechanism is not clear yet. The present study was performed to investigate the possible protective effects of green tea polyphenols against electromagnetic radiation-induced injury in the cultured rat cortical neurons. In this study, green tea polyphenols were used in the cultured cortical neurons exposed to 1800 MHz EMFs by the mobile phone. We found that the mobile phone irradiation for 24 h induced marked neuronal cell death in the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) and TUNEL (TdT mediated biotin-dUTP nicked-end labeling) assay, and protective effects of green tea polyphenols on the injured cortical neurons were demonstrated by testing the content of Bcl-2 Assaciated X protein (Bax) in the immunoprecipitation assay and Western blot assay. In our study results, the mobile phone irradiation-induced increases in the content of active Bax were inhibited significantly by green tea polyphenols, while the contents of total Bax had no marked changes after the treatment of green tea polyphenols. Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons.

  11. Existence of glia mitigated ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in neuron-glia mixed cultures of neonatal rat cortex and the glia-mediated protective effect of 2-PMPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Chengna; Li, Zengqiang; Lin, Li; Duan, Zhenfang; Qi, Huan; Li, Lin; Sun, Feng; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    The present study compared ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the neuron-glia mixed cultures and neuronal cultures and further explored the neuroprotective effect of the NAAG peptidase inhibitor 2-(phosphonomethyl) pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA). Firstly, Rosenfeld's staining and immunofluorescence staining of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to address the difference of morphology in the mixed cultures and neuronal cultures. Our results showed that neurons and astrocytes grew in good conditions. The ratio of neurons and astrocytes in the mixed cultures was around 1:1, and the purity of neurons in the neuronal cultures is 91.3%. Furthermore, ketamine was used to test the hypothesis that the presence of a higher proportion of glia in the mixed cultures would be protective against ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in the mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. The results showed that ketamine-induced morphological changes, cell viability decrease and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels increase were significantly mitigated in neuron-glia mixed cultures compared with neuronal cultures. Furthermore, 2-PMPA was included to further explore efficient protective drug for ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. Our results showed that 2-PMPA reduced ketamine-induced decrease of cell viability and increase of LDH levels in the mixed cultures but not in the neuronal cultures. Further morphological changes of neurons and astrocytes also indicated that 2-PMPA could improve ketamine damaged neurons in the mixed cultures instead of neuronal cultures. These results indicate that glia protect neurons from ketamine-induced neurotoxicity. These data further suggest that glia mediate the neuroprotective effect of 2-PMPA and 2-PMPA has the potential to treat ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Delineating the mechanisms underlying the communication between neurons and glia and the neuroprotective effects of 2-PMPA in the mixed

  12. Protection of neuronal cells from excitotoxicity by disrupting nNOS-PSD95 interaction with a small molecule SCR-4026.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Shi-Fu; Liao, Gao-Yong; Yang, Jie; Wang, Meng-Yu; Hu, Yang; Lian, Guo-Ning; Kong, Ling-Dong; Zhao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Coupling of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) plays an important part in neuronal damage caused by stroke. Recent studies suggest the possibility of alleviating post ischemia neuron damage by blocking ischemia-induced nNOS-PSD-95 association. Here, we report a small-molecular inhibitor of nNOS-PSD-95 interaction, SCR-4026, which exhibits neuroprotective activities in NMDA-induced or Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in primary cortical neurons cultures, and ameliorated focal cerebral ischemic damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. Furthermore, we found that SCR-4026 was also able to promote neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons-like cells, which is potentially of great significance for neural protection. Taken together, SCR-4026 is identified as a novel small molecule that shows great potential in treating stroke. PMID:27421179

  13. Protection of neuronal cells from excitotoxicity by disrupting nNOS-PSD95 interaction with a small molecule SCR-4026.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Shi-Fu; Liao, Gao-Yong; Yang, Jie; Wang, Meng-Yu; Hu, Yang; Lian, Guo-Ning; Kong, Ling-Dong; Zhao, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is a major public health problem leading to high rates of death and disability in adults. Coupling of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) plays an important part in neuronal damage caused by stroke. Recent studies suggest the possibility of alleviating post ischemia neuron damage by blocking ischemia-induced nNOS-PSD-95 association. Here, we report a small-molecular inhibitor of nNOS-PSD-95 interaction, SCR-4026, which exhibits neuroprotective activities in NMDA-induced or Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD)-induced neuronal damage in primary cortical neurons cultures, and ameliorated focal cerebral ischemic damage in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and reperfusion. Furthermore, we found that SCR-4026 was also able to promote neural stem cells to differentiate into neurons-like cells, which is potentially of great significance for neural protection. Taken together, SCR-4026 is identified as a novel small molecule that shows great potential in treating stroke.

  14. Underlying mechanism of protection from hypoxic injury seen with n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L. in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Qin; Lingzhi Li; Qi Lv; Baoguo Yu; Shuwang Yang; Tao He; Yongliang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The alcohol and n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.significantly protects myocardium from acute ischemic injury.However,its effects on rat hippocampal neurons and the mechanism of protection remain unclear.In this study,primary cultured hippocampal neurons from neonatal rats were incubated in 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 4 hours.Results indicated that hypoxic injury decreased the viability of neurons,increased the expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,and Caspase-3 protein.Pretreatment with 0.25,0.0625,0.0156 mg/mL n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.led to a significant increase in cell viability.Expression levels of caspase-9 and caspase-3 mRNA,as well as cytochrome c,Caspase-9,andCaspase-3 protein,were attenuated.The neuroprotective effect of n-butanol extract of Potentillaanserine L.was equivalent to tanshinone IIA.Our data suggest that the n-butanol extract of Potentilla anserine L.could protect primary hippocampal neurons from hypoxic injury by deactivating mitochondrial cell death.

  15. THE PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF THE TOTAL SAPONIN OF DIPSACUS ASPEROIDES ON THE APOPTOSIS OF HIPPOCAMPAL NEURONS INDUCED BY β-AMYLOID PROTEIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱亦华; 杨杰; 胡海涛; 刘勇; 杨广德; 曹云新; 任惠民

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of the total saponin of Dipsacus asperoides (tSDA) and ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) on the apoptosis of primary cultured hippocampal neurons induced by β-amyloid protein (Aβ). Methods Primary cultured hippocampal neurons, the cultures were pretreated with tSDA and GRb1 on 10d for 24 hours respectively. Then the cultures were treated with 35μmol·L-1 Aβ25-35 for 24 hours, observed the changing of survival rate of neurons and the apoptosis of neurons with biochemical analysis combining immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining technique. Results Hippocampal neurons were treated with 35μmol*L-1 Aβ for 24 hours, and survival rate of neurons downed to 52.6%. When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, survival rate of neurons increased 11% to 15%. The findings of immunofluorescent cytochemical double-staining indicated that apoptotic neurons were obviously more than that of the blank group, reaching 43.9%.When neurons were pretreated by tSDA and GRb1, apoptotic neurons were downed to 16.6%, 10.8% respectively. Conclusion tSDA had the same effects as GRb1, protecting the neurons, antagonizing neurotoxicity of Aβ, increasing survival rate of neurons, and reducing apoptotic neurons induced by Aβ.

  16. Astrocytes protect neurons against methylmercury via ATP/P2Y(1 receptor-mediated pathways in astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Noguchi

    Full Text Available Methylmercury (MeHg is a well known environmental pollutant that induces serious neuronal damage. Although MeHg readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, and should affect both neurons and glial cells, how it affects glia or neuron-to-glia interactions has received only limited attention. Here, we report that MeHg triggers ATP/P2Y1 receptor signals in astrocytes, thereby protecting neurons against MeHg via interleukin-6 (IL-6-mediated pathways. MeHg increased several mRNAs in astrocytes, among which IL-6 was the highest. For this, ATP/P2Y1 receptor-mediated mechanisms were required because the IL-6 production was (i inhibited by a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, (ii abolished in astrocytes obtained from P2Y1 receptor-knockout mice, and (iii mimicked by exogenously applied ATP. In addition, (iv MeHg released ATP by exocytosis from astrocytes. As for the intracellular mechanisms responsible for IL-6 production, p38 MAP kinase was involved. MeHg-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM showed neuro-protective effects against MeHg, which was blocked by anti-IL-6 antibody and was mimicked by the application of recombinant IL-6. As for the mechanism of neuro-protection by IL-6, an adenosine A1 receptor-mediated pathway in neurons seems to be involved. Taken together, when astrocytes sense MeHg, they release ATP that autostimulates P2Y1 receptors to upregulate IL-6, thereby leading to A1 receptor-mediated neuro-protection against MeHg.

  17. Stem cell factor protects against neuronal apoptosis by activating AKT/ERK in diabetic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-W. Li

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal apoptosis occurs in the diabetic brain due to insulin deficiency or insulin resistance, both of which reduce the expression of stem cell factor (SCF. We investigated the possible involvement of the activation of the MAPK/ERK and/or AKT pathways in neuroprotection by SCF in diabetes. Male C57/B6 mice (20-25 g were randomly divided into four groups of 10 animals each. The morphology of the diabetic brain in mice treated or not with insulin or SCF was evaluated by H&E staining and TUNEL. SCF, ERK1/2 and AKT were measured by Western blotting. In diabetic mice treated with insulin or SCF, there was fewer structural change and apoptosis in the cortex compared to untreated mice. The apoptosis rate of the normal group, the diabetic group receiving vehicle, the diabetic group treated with insulin, and the diabetic group treated with SCF was 0.54 ± 0.077%, 2.83 ± 0.156%, 1.86 ± 0.094%, and 1.78 ± 0.095% (mean ± SEM, respectively. SCF expression was lower in the diabetic cortex than in the normal cortex; however, insulin increased the expression of SCF in the diabetic cortex. Furthermore, expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and AKT was decreased in the diabetic cortex compared to the normal cortex. However, insulin or SCF could activate the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and AKT in the diabetic cortex. The results suggest that SCF may protect the brain from apoptosis in diabetes and that the mechanism of this protection may, at least in part, involve activation of the ERK1/2 and AKT pathways. These results provide insight into the mechanisms by which SCF and insulin exert their neuroprotective effects in the diabetic brain.

  18. Curcumin Protects Neurons from Glutamate-Induced Excitotoxicity by Membrane Anchored AKAP79-PKA Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Now stimulation of AMPA receptor as well as its downstream pathways is considered as potential central mediators in antidepressant mechanisms. As a signal integrator which binds to AMPA receptor, A-kinase anchoring protein 79-(AKAP79- PKA complex is regarded as a potential drug target to exert neuroprotective effects. A well-tolerated and multitarget drug curcumin has been confirmed to exert antidepressant-like effects. To explore whether AKAP79-PKA complex is involved in curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity, we detected calcium signaling, subcellular location of AKAP79-PKA complex, phosphorylation of glutamate receptor, and ERK and AKT cascades. In this study, we found that curcumin protected neurons from glutamate insult by reducing Ca2+ influx and blocking the translocation of AKAP79 from cytomembrane to cytoplasm. In parallel, curcumin enhanced the phosphorylation of AMPA receptor and its downstream pathways in PKA-dependent manner. If we pretreated cells with PKA anchoring inhibitor Ht31 to disassociate PKA from AKAP79, no neuroprotective effects were observed. In conclusion, our results show that AKAP79-anchored PKA facilitated the signal relay from AMPA receptor to AKT and ERK cascades, which may be crucial for curcumin-mediated antiexcitotoxicity.

  19. BMP9 protects septal neurons from axotomy-evoked loss of cholinergic phenotype.

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    Ignacio Lopez-Coviella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cholinergic projection from the septum to the hippocampus is crucial for normal cognitive function and degeneration of cells and nerve fibers within the septohippocampal pathway contributes to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP 9 is a cholinergic differentiating factor during development both in vivo and in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To determine whether BMP9 could protect the adult cholinergic septohippocampal pathway from axotomy-evoked loss of the cholinergic phenotype, we performed unilateral fimbria-fornix transection in mice and treated them with a continuous intracerebroventricular infusion of BMP9 for six days. The number of choline acetyltransferase (CHAT-positive cells was reduced by 50% in the medial septal nucleus ipsilateral to the lesion as compared to the intact, contralateral side, and BMP9 infusion prevented this loss in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, BMP9 prevented most of the decline of hippocampal acetylcholine levels ipsilateral to the lesion, and markedly increased CHAT, choline transporter CHT, NGF receptors p75 (NGFR-p75 and TrkA (NTRK1, and NGF protein content in both the lesioned and unlesioned hippocampi. In addition, BMP9 infusion reduced bilaterally hippocampal levels of basic FGF (FGF2 protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that BMP9 administration can prevent lesion-evoked impairment of the cholinergic septohippocampal neurons in adult mice and, by inducing NGF, establishes a trophic environment for these cells.

  20. Ganoderma lucidum Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration through Inhibition of Microglial Activation

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    Ruiping Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence has suggested that neuroinflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. The emerging evidence has supported that microglia may play key roles in the progressive neurodegeneration in PD and might be a promising therapeutic target. Ganoderma lucidum (GL, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has been shown potential neuroprotective effects in our clinical trials that make us to speculate that it might possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of GL and possible underlying mechanism of action through protecting microglial activation using co-cultures of dopaminergic neurons and microglia. The microglia is activated by LPS and MPP+-treated MES 23.5 cell membranes. Meanwhile, GL extracts significantly prevent the production of microglia-derived proinflammatory and cytotoxic factors [nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interlukin 1β (IL-1β] in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulate the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions on mRNA level as well. In conclusion, our results support that GL may be a promising agent for the treatment of PD through anti-inflammation.

  1. Protective effects of Purendan superfine powder on retinal neuron apoptosis in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhijun Dong; Xiangyi Tao; Xiaoxiao Fu; Haibin Wang; Donghua Wang; Tiemin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of Purendan superfine powder comprised of Momordica charantia, Radix Ginseng, and Radix Salviae Miltiorrhiae on neuronal apoptosis and expression of bcl-2, bax, and caspase-3, which are retinal apoptosis-associated factors in rats with diabetes mellitus induced by continuous intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. The results showed that Purendan superfine powder could upregulate the expression of bcl-2 protein and mRNA, and downregulate the expression of bax and caspase-3 in the retina of diabetes mellitus rats. In addition, Purendan superfine powder was shown to reduce the number of apoptotic neurons. Our experimental findings indicate that Purendan superfine powder can inhibit neuronal apoptosis in the retina of diabetes mellitus rats and has protective effects on diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Protective effects of Ginkgo biloba extract 761 against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in cultured retinal neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yun-song; XU Liang; MA Ke; WANG Shuang; WANG Jin-jin

    2005-01-01

    @@ A large part of neuronal death is the result of episodes of anoxia and ischaemia in the retina and other eye diseases, such as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, glaucoma. The neuronal death is due to the accumulation of glutamate in the extracellular space. Glutamate is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina. However, excessive overactivation of glutamate receptors leads to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. Glutamate induces cell death by increasing the levels of intracellular Ca2+ in neurons, thereby leading to generation of free radicals and activation proteases, as well as transcriptional activation of specific cell death programs. Glutamate excitoxicity can also cause neuronal mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) loss, which is associated with changes in mitochondrial function leading to a neuronal dysfunction.

  3. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p 2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 μM) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F2-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 μg/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F2-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional dopaminergic transmission and slowing of the progression of Mn-induced neurodegenerative

  4. Protective effects of antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents against manganese-induced oxidative damage and neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milatovic, Dejan, E-mail: dejan.milatovic@vanderbilt.edu [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Gupta, Ramesh C. [Murray State University, Breathitt Veterinary Center, Hopkinsville, KY (United States); Yu, Yingchun; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Aschner, Michael [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Pharmacology and the Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels leads to neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, which resembles Parkinson's disease (PD). Manganism is caused by neuronal injury in both cortical and subcortical regions, particularly in the basal ganglia. The basis for the selective neurotoxicity of Mn is not yet fully understood. However, several studies suggest that oxidative damage and inflammatory processes play prominent roles in the degeneration of dopamine-containing neurons. In the present study, we assessed the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Results from our in vitro study showed a significant (p < 0.01) increase in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs), as well as the depletion of ATP in primary rat cortical neurons following exposure to Mn (500 {mu}M) for 2 h. These effects were protected when neurons were pretreated for 30 min with 100 of an antioxidant, the hydrophilic vitamin E analog, trolox (6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid), or an anti-inflammatory agent, indomethacin. Results from our in vivo study confirmed a significant increase in F{sub 2}-IsoPs levels in conjunction with the progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of the striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of mice exposed to Mn (100 mg/kg, s.c.) 24 h. Additionally, pretreatment with vitamin E (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or ibuprofen (140 {mu}g/ml in the drinking water for two weeks) attenuated the Mn-induced increase in cerebral F{sub 2}-IsoPs? and protected the MSNs from dendritic atrophy and dendritic spine loss. Our findings suggest that the mediation of oxidative stress/mitochondrial dysfunction and the control of alterations in biomarkers of oxidative injury, neuroinflammation and synaptodendritic degeneration may provide an effective, multi-pronged therapeutic strategy for protecting dysfunctional

  5. The effect of deafness duration on neurotrophin gene therapy for spiral ganglion neuron protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Andrew K; Tu, Tian; Atkinson, Patrick J; Flynn, Brianna O; Sgro, Beatrice E; Hume, Cliff; O'Leary, Stephen J; Shepherd, Robert K; Richardson, Rachael T

    2011-08-01

    A cochlear implant can restore hearing function by electrically exciting spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the deaf cochlea. However, following deafness SGNs undergo progressive degeneration ultimately leading to their death. One significant cause of SGN degeneration is the loss of neurotrophic support that is normally provided by cells within the organ of Corti (OC). The administration of exogenous neurotrophins (NTs) can protect SGNs from degeneration but the effects are short-lived once the source of NTs has been exhausted. NT gene therapy, whereby cells within the cochlea are transfected with genes enabling them to produce NTs, is one strategy for providing a cellular source of NTs that may provide long-term support for SGNs. As the SGNs normally innervate sensory cells within the OC, targeting residual OC cells for gene therapy in the deaf cochlea may provide a source of NTs for SGN protection and targeted regrowth of their peripheral fibers. However, the continual degeneration of the OC over extended periods of deafness may deplete the cellular targets for NT gene therapy and hence limit the effectiveness of this method in preventing SGN loss. This study examined the effects of deafness duration on the efficacy of NT gene therapy in preventing SGN loss in guinea pigs that were systemically deafened with aminoglycosides. Adenoviral vectors containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) with or without genes for Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and Neurotrophin-3 (NT3) were injected into the scala media (SM) compartment of cochleae that had been deafened for one, four or eight weeks prior to the viral injection. The results showed that viral transfection of cells within the SM was still possible even after severe degeneration of the OC. Supporting cells (pillar and Deiters' cells), cells within the stria vascularis, the spiral ligament, endosteal cells lining the scala compartments and interdental cells in the spiral limbus were transfected. However, the

  6. Magnolol protects neurons against ischemia injury via the downregulation of p38/MAPK, CHOP and nitrotyrosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiann-Hwa [Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Emergency Medicine, Cathay General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Hsing-Chun [Institute of Nursing and Department of Nursing, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chronic Diseases and Health Promotion Research Center, CGUST, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lee, Kam-Fai [Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Tung-Hu, E-mail: thtsai@ym.edu.tw [Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-15

    Magnolol is isolated from the herb Magnolia officinalis, which has been demonstrated to exert pharmacological effects. Our aim was to investigate whether magnolol is able to act as an anti-inflammatory agent that brings about neuroprotection using a global ischemic stroke model and to determine the mechanisms involved. Rats were treated with and without magnolol after ischemia reperfusion brain injury by occlusion of the two common carotid arteries. The inflammatory cytokine production in serum and the volume of infarction in the brain were measured. The proteins present in the brains obtained from the stroke animal model (SAM) and control animal groups with and without magnolol treatment were compared. Magnolol reduces the total infarcted volume by 15% and 30% at dosages of 10 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, compared to the untreated SAM group. The levels of acute inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-6 were attenuated by magnolol. Magnolol was also able to suppress the production of nitrotyrosine, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), various phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and various C/EBP homologues. Furthermore, this modulation of ischemia injury factors in the SAM model group treated with magnolol seems to result from a suppression of reactive oxygen species production and the upregulation of p-Akt and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB). These findings confirm the anti-oxidative properties of magnolol, including the inhibition of ischemic injury to neurons; this protective effect seems to involve changes in the in vivo activity of Akt, GSK3β and NF-κB. - Graphical abstract: Schematic presentation of the signaling pathways involved in magnolol inhibited transient global ischemia brain apoptosis and inflammation in rats. The effect of magnolol on the scavenger of ROS, which inhibits p38 MAPK and CHOP protein inactivation

  7. Chlorogenic acid protection of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive neurons in the hippocampus of mice with impaired learning and memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyun Tu; Xiangqi Tang; Zhiping Hu

    2008-01-01

    of correct responses in the Y-maze test was greater in the ehlorogenic acid-treated group than in the model group. CONCLUSION: Chlorogenic acid protects kainic acid-induced injury to nNOS-positive neurons in the hippocampal CA1-4 regions, thereby ameliorating learning and memory impairment.

  8. Curcumin protects microglia and primary rat cortical neurons against HIV-1 gp120-mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Guo

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a molecule found in turmeric root that has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-tumor properties and has been widely used as both an herbal drug and a food additive to treat or prevent neurodegenerative diseases. To explore whether curcumin is able to ameliorate HIV-1-associated neurotoxicity, we treated a murine microglial cell line (N9 and primary rat cortical neurons with curcumin in the presence or absence of neurotoxic HIV-1 gp120 (V3 loop protein. We found that HIV-1 gp120 profoundly induced N9 cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1. HIV-1 gp120 also induced apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin exerted a powerful inhibitory effect against HIV-1 gp120-induced neuronal damage, reducing the production of ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 by N9 cells and inhibiting apoptosis of primary rat cortical neurons. Curcumin may exert its biological activities through inhibition of the delayed rectification and transient outward potassium (K(+ current, as curcumin effectively reduced HIV-1 gp120-mediated elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current in neurons. We conclude that HIV-1 gp120 increases ROS, TNF-α and MCP-1 production in microglia, and induces cortical neuron apoptosis by affecting the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ channel current. Curcumin reduces production of ROS and inflammatory mediators in HIV-1-gp120-stimulated microglia, and protects cortical neurons against HIV-1-mediated apoptosis, most likely through inhibition of HIV-1 gp120-induced elevation of the delayed rectification and transient outward K(+ current.

  9. Propolis derivatives inhibit the systemic inflammatory response and protect hepatic and neuronal cells in acute septic shock

    OpenAIRE

    Aida Abdelhamid Korish; Maha Mohamed Arafa

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe pathogenic infection triggers excessive release of cytokines as part of the massive inflammatory response associated with septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the protective effect of caffeic acid phenethye ester (CAPE) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced endotoxemia, hepatic and neuronal damage and the associated systemic inflammatory response (SIR). METHODS: Fifty male Wister rats were divided into: control, LPS, and CAPE+LPS groups. Plasma concentrations of vari...

  10. Sulforaphane protects primary cultures of cortical neurons against injury induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation via antiapoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuemei Wu; Jing Zhao; Shanshan Yu; Yanlin Chen; Jingxian Wu; Yong Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether sulforaphane (SFN) protects neurons against injury caused by oxygenglucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R) and,if so,to investigate the possible mechanisms.Methods Primary cultures of neurons were prepared from the cerebral cortex of 1-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats.On days 5-6 in vitro,the neurons were exposed to OGD for 1 h,followed by reoxygenation for 24 h.Cells were treated with 0,0.1,0.2,0.5,1,2.5,or 5 μmol/L SFN,with or without 10 μmol/L LY294002,a PI3K-specific inhibitor,during OGD/R (a total of 25 h).After 24-h reoxygenation,MTT was used to assess viability and injury was assessed by Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide (PI) staining;immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were performed to detect molecular events associated with apoptosis.Results The MTT assay showed that 1 μmol/L SFN significantly increased viability,and Hoechst 33258/PI staining showed that the numbers of injured neurons were reduced significantly in the SFN group.Furthermore,immunofluorescence staining and Westem blot showed that SFN increased Bcl-2 and decreased cleaved caspase-3 levels.Moreover,LY294002 inhibited the phosphorylated-Akt expression evoked by SFN,decreased Bcl-2 expression and increased cleaved caspase-3 expression.Conclusion SFN protects neurons against injury from OGD/R and this effect may be partly associated with an antiapoptosis pathway.

  11. Cr (VI) induced oxidative stress and toxicity in cultured cerebellar granule neurons at different stages of development and protective effect of Rosmarinic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Abolfazl; Soodi, Maliheh; Amani, Nahid

    2016-03-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a widespread metal ion in the workplace, industrial effluent, and water. The toxicity of chromium (VI) on various organs including the liver, kidneys, and lung were studied, but little is known about neurotoxicity. In this study, neurotoxic effects of Cr (VI) have been investigated by cultured cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Immature and mature neurons were exposed to different concentrations of potassium dichromate for 24 h and cytotoxicity was measured by MTT assay. In addition, immature neurons were exposed for 5 days as regards cytotoxic effect in development stages. The reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the protective effect of Rosmarinic acid on mature and immature neurons exposed to potassium dichromate, were measured. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and acetylcholinesterase activity in mature neurons were assessed following exposure to potassium dichromate. The results indicate that toxicity of Cr (VI) dependent on maturation steps. Cr (VI) was less toxic for immature neurons. Also, Cr (VI) induced MMP reduction and ROS production in both immature and mature neurons. In Cr (VI) treated neurons, increased lipid peroxidation and GPx activity but not acetylcholinesterase activity was observed. Interestingly, Rosmarinic acid, as a natural antioxidant, could protect mature but not immature neurons against Cr (VI) induced toxicity. Our findings revealed vulnerability of mature neurons to Cr (VI) induced toxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:25213303

  12. Thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis by repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 and protects from hypoxic neuronal cell death.

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    Christian I Schwer

    Full Text Available Ischemic and traumatic brain injury is associated with increased risk for death and disability. The inhibition of penumbral tissue damage has been recognized as a target for therapeutic intervention, because cellular injury evolves progressively upon ATP-depletion and loss of ion homeostasis. In patients, thiopental is used to treat refractory intracranial hypertension by reducing intracranial pressure and cerebral metabolic demands; however, therapeutic benefits of thiopental-treatment are controversially discussed. In the present study we identified fundamental neuroprotective molecular mechanisms mediated by thiopental. Here we show that thiopental inhibits global protein synthesis, which preserves the intracellular energy metabolite content in oxygen-deprived human neuronal SK-N-SH cells or primary mouse cortical neurons and thus ameliorates hypoxic cell damage. Sensitivity to hypoxic damage was restored by pharmacologic repression of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase. Translational inhibition was mediated by calcium influx, activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase, and inhibitory phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results explain the reduction of cerebral metabolic demands during thiopental treatment. Cycloheximide also protected neurons from hypoxic cell death, indicating that translational inhibitors may generally reduce secondary brain injury. In conclusion our study demonstrates that therapeutic inhibition of global protein synthesis protects neurons from hypoxic damage by preserving energy balance in oxygen-deprived cells. Molecular evidence for thiopental-mediated neuroprotection favours a positive clinical evaluation of barbiturate treatment. The chemical structure of thiopental could represent a pharmacologically relevant scaffold for the development of new organ-protective compounds to ameliorate tissue damage when oxygen availability is limited.

  13. Protective effects of peony root extract and its components on neuron damage in the hippocampus induced by the cobalt focus epilepsy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, T; Sugaya, A; Ohguchi, H; Kishida, N; Sugaya, E

    1997-08-01

    Protective effects of peony root extract and its components on neuron damage in the CA1 area of the hippocampus induced by the cobalt focus epilepsy model were examined. Neuron damage in the CA1 area of the hippocampus and frequent spike discharges induced by application of metallic cobalt to the cerebral cortex of rats were completely prevented when peony root extract was continuously administered orally at 1 g/kg/day for 30 days prior to cobalt application. Component crude gallotannin fraction showed marked but incomplete protective action. A combination of crude gallotannin fraction and paeoniflorin showed complete protective action in the same way as peony root extract against neuron damage although use of paeoniflorin alone had no effect. These findings together with our previous reports indicate that peony root extract and its component, gallotannin, have excellent protective effects on neuron damage in addition to anticonvulsant action by prior oral administration.

  14. Nerve growth factor protects cholinergic neurons against quinolinic acid-induced excitotoxicity in wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Vasiljević Ivana D.; Jovanović Marina D.; Čolić Miodrag J.; Mićić D.; Ninković Milica; Maličević Živorad

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of neuronal death in neurodegenerative diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD) is still unknown. There could be a complex interplay between altered energy metabolism, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Excitotoxic striatal lesions induced by quinolinic acid (QA), were used to test for the neuroprotective actions of nerve growth factor (NGF) on striatal cholinergic and GABAergic neurons. QA is an endogenous excitotoxin acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) rec...

  15. Hinokitiol protects primary neuron cells against prion peptide-induced toxicity via autophagy flux regulated by hypoxia inducing factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji-Hong; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-05-24

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are derived from structural changes of the native PrPc. Recent studies indicated that hinokitiol induced autophagy known to major function that keeps cells alive under stressful conditions. We investigated whether hinokitiol induces autophagy and attenuates PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. We observed increase of LC3-II protein level, GFP-LC3 puncta by hinokitiol in neuronal cells. Addition to, electron microscopy showed that hinokitiol enhanced autophagic vacuoles in neuronal cells. We demonstrated that hinokitiol protects against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy by using autophagy inhibitor, wortmannin and 3MA, and ATG5 small interfering RNA (siRNA). We checked hinokitiol activated the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and identified that hinokitiol-induced HIF-1α regulated autophagy. Taken together, this study is the first report demonstrating that hinokitiol protected against prion protein-induced neurotoxicity via autophagy regulated by HIF-1α. We suggest that hinokitiol is a possible therapeutic strategy in neuronal disorders including prion disease.

  16. Curcumin protects nigral dopaminergic neurons by iron-chelation in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xun Du; Hua-Min Xu; Hong Jiang; Ning Song; Jun Wang; Jun-Xia Xie

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Curcumin is a plant polyphenolic compound and a major component of spice turmeric (Curcuma longa).It has been reported to possess free radical-scavenging,iron-chelating,and anti-inflammatory properties in different tissues.Our previous study showed that curcumin protects MES23.5 dopaminergic cells from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro.The present study aimed to explore this neuroprotective effect in the 6-OHDAlesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease in vivo.[Methods] Rats were given intragastric curcumin for 24 days.6-OHDA lesioning was conducted on day 4 of curcumin treatment.Dopamine content was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection,tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons by immunohistochemistry,and iron-containing cells by Perls' iron staining.[Results] The dopamine content in the striatum and the number of THimmunoreactive neurons decreased after 6-OHDA treatment.Curcumin pretreatment reversed these changes.Further studies demonstrated that 6-OHDA treatment increased the number of iron-staining cells,which was dramatically decreased by curcumin pretreatment.[Conclusion]The protective effects of curcumin against 6-OHDA may be attributable to the ironchelating activity of curcumin to suppress the iron-induced degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  17. Human endogenous retrovirus-K(II envelope induction protects neurons during HIV/AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh K Bhat

    Full Text Available Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs are differentially expressed depending on the cell type and physiological circumstances. HERV-K has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases although the functional consequences of its expression remain unknown. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection causes neuroinflammation with neuronal damage and death. Herein, we investigated HERV-K(II/(HML-2 envelope (Env expression and its actions in the brain during HIV/AIDS. HERV-K(II Env expression was assessed in healthy brain tissues, autopsied HIV HIV- infected (HIV+ and uninfected (HIV- brains and in neural cell cultures by real time RT-PCR, massively parallel (deep sequencing, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Neuronal and neural stem cells expressing HERV-K(II Env were analyzed in assays of host responses including cellular viability, immune responses and neurobehavioral outcomes. Deep sequencing of human brain transcriptomes disclosed that RNA sequences encoded by HERV-K were among the most abundant HERV sequences detected in human brain. Comparison of different cell types revealed that HERV-K(II env RNA abundance was highest in cultured human neurons but was suppressed by epidermal growth factor exposure. HERV-K(II Env immunoreactivity was increased in the cerebral cortex from persons with HIV/AIDS, principally localized in neurons. Human neuronal cells transfected with HERV-K(II Env exhibited increased NGF and BDNF expression. Expression of HERV-K(II Env in neuronal cells increased cellular viability and prevented neurotoxicity mediated by HIV-1 Vpr. Intracerebral delivery of HERV-K(II Env expressed by neural stem cells suppressed TNF-α expression and microglial activation while also improving neurobehavioral deficits in vpr/RAG1-/- mice. HERV-K(II Env was highly expressed in human neurons, especially during HIV/AIDS, but in addition exerted neuroprotective effects. These findings imply that HERV gene products might exert adaptive

  18. Dihydromyricetin protects neurons in an MPTP-induced model of Parkinson's disease by suppressing glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhao-xiang; Zhao, Ya-fei; Cao, Ting; Zhen, Xue-chu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: It is general believed that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress play critical roles in the pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Dihydromyricetin (DHM), a natural flavonoid extracted from Ampelopsis grossedentata, has recently been found to elicit potent anti-oxidative effects. In the present study, we explored the role of DHM in protecting dopaminergic neurons. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1-methyl4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) for 7 d to induce PD. Additionally, mice were treated with either 5 or 10 mg/kg DHM for a total of 13 d (3 d before the start of MPTP, during MPTP administration (7 d) and 3 d after the end of MPTP). For the saline or DHM alone treatment groups, mice were injected with saline or DHM for 13 d. On d 14, behavioral tests (locomotor activity, the rotarod test and the pole test) were administered. After the behavioral tests, the mice were sacrificed, and brain tissue was collected for immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting. In addition, MES23.5 cells were treated with MPP+ and DHM, and evaluated using cell viability assays, reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements, apoptosis analysis and Western blotting. Results: DHM significantly attenuated MPTP-induced mouse behavioral impairments and dopaminergic neuron loss. In the MES23.5 cells, DHM attenuated MPP+-induced cell injury and ROS production in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, DHM increased glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which may be associated with DHM-induced dopaminergic neuronal protection. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that DHM is a potent neuroprotective agent for DA neurons by modulating the Akt/GSK-3β pathway, which suggests that DHM may be a promising therapeutic candidate for PD. PMID:27374489

  19. Intrastriatal GDNF gene transfer by inducible lentivirus vectors protects dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sha-Sha; Yang, Chun; Hao, Fei; Li, Chen; Lu, Tao; Zhao, Li-Ru; Duan, Wei-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic (DA) neurons both in vivo and in vitro. However, substantial evidence has shown that a long-term overexpression of GDNF gene is often associated with side effects. We previously improved tetracycline (Tet)-On lentivirus system carrying human GDNF (hGDNF) gene, and demonstrated that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated and functional in vitro. Here we further examined the efficiency and neuroprotection of Tet-On lentivirus-mediated hGDNF gene regulation in neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and a rat model of parkinsonism. The results showed that hGDNF gene expression was tightly regulated in transduced NPCs. Doxycycline (Dox)-induced hGDNF protected DA neurons from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced toxicity in vitro. Intrastriatal injections of Tet-On lentivirus vectors resulted in dramatically increased levels of hGDNF protein in the striatum of rats with Dox-drinking water, when compared to lentivirus-injected and saline-injected rats with normal drinking water, respectively. In addition, hGDNF protected nigral DA neurons and striatal DA fibers, and attenuated d-amphetamine-induced rotational asymmetry in the 6-OHDA lesioned rats. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that hGDNF gene transfer by Tet-On lentivirus vectors is tightly regulated in rat brain, and Dox-induced hGDNF is functional in neuroprotection of nigral DA neurons in a rat model of parkinsonism. PMID:24997241

  20. Erythropoietin-mediated protection of insect brain neurons involves JAK and STAT but not PI3K transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miljus, N; Heibeck, S; Jarrar, M; Micke, M; Ostrowski, D; Ehrenreich, H; Heinrich, R

    2014-01-31

    The cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) initiates adaptive cellular responses to both moderate environmental challenges and tissue damaging insults in various non-hematopoietic mammalian tissues including the nervous system. Neuroprotective and neuroregenerative functions of Epo in mammals are mediated through receptor-associated Janus kinase 2 and intracellular signaling cascades that modify the transcription of Epo-regulated genes. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) represent key components of two important Epo-induced transduction pathways. Our previous study on insects revealed neuroprotective and regenerative functions of recombinant human Epo (rhEpo) similar to those in mammalian nervous tissues. Here we demonstrate that rhEpo effectively rescues primary cultured locust brain neurons from apoptotic cell death induced by hypoxia or the chemical compound H-7. The Janus kinase inhibitor AG-490 and the STAT inhibitor sc-355797 abolished protective effects of rhEpo on locust brain neurons. In contrast, inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 had no effect on rhEpo-mediated neuroprotection. The results indicate that rhEpo mediates the protection of locust brain neurons through interference with apoptotic pathways by the activation of a Janus kinase-associated receptor and STAT transcription factor(s). The involvement of similar transduction pathways in mammals and insects for the mediation of neuroprotection and support of neural regeneration by Epo indicates that an Epo/Epo receptor-like signaling system with high structural and functional similarity exists in both groups of animals. Epo-like signaling involved in tissue protection appears to be an ancient beneficial function shared by vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:24269933

  1. A natural compound macelignan protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via microglial arginase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyofuji, Kana; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Mishima, Satoshi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory events involving activated microglia have been recognized to play an important role in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. Compounds regulating activation profiles of microglia may provide therapeutic benefits for Parkinson disease characterized by degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here we examined the effect of macelignan, a compound derived from nutmeg, on inflammatory degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Treatment of midbrain slice cultures with interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a substantial decrease in viable dopaminergic neurons and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production indicated by extracellular nitrite accumulation. Application of macelignan (10 μM) concomitantly with LPS prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Besides nitrite accumulation, up-regulation of inducible NO synthase protein expression in response to IFN-γ/LPS was confirmed by Western blotting, and immunohistochemical examination revealed expression of inducible NO synthase in a subpopulation of Iba-1-poitive microglia. However, macelignan did not affect any of these NO-related parameters. On the other hand, macelignan promoted expression of arginase-1 in midbrain slice cultures irrespective of the presence or the absence of IFN-γ/LPS treatment. Arginase-1 expression was mainly localized in a subpopulation of Iba-1-positive cells. Importantly, the neuroprotective effect of macelignan was antagonized by N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, a specific arginase inhibitor. The neuroprotective effect of macelignan was also prevented by GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist. Overall, these results indicate that macelignan, a compound with PPARγ agonist activity, can provide neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in an arginase-dependent but NO-independent manner.

  2. Microglia-induced IL-6 protects against neuronal loss following HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher; Zheng, Min; Kroll, Chandra M; Lane, Thomas E; Carr, Daniel J J

    2014-09-01

    Herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1) is one of the most widespread human pathogens and accounts for more than 90% of cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) causing severe and permanent neurologic sequelae among surviving patients. We hypothesize such CNS deficits are due to HSV-1 infection of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). In vivo, HSV-1 infection was found to diminish NPC numbers in the subventricular zone. Upon culture of NPCs in conditions that stimulate their differentiation, we found HSV-1 infection of NPCs resulted in the loss of neuronal precursors with no significant change in the percentage of astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. We propose this is due a direct effect of HSV-1 on neuronal survival without alteration of the differentiation process. The neuronal loss was prevented by the addition of microglia or conditioned media from NPC/microglia co-cultures. Using neutralizing antibodies and recombinant cytokines, we identified interleukin-6 (IL-6) as responsible for the protective effect by microglia, likely through its downstream Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) cascade.

  3. Bmi1 is down-regulated in the aging brain and displays antioxidant and protective activities in neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdouh

    Full Text Available Aging increases the risk to develop several neurodegenerative diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Inactivation of the Polycomb group gene Bmi1 in mice results in growth retardation, cerebellar degeneration, and development of a premature aging-like phenotype. This progeroid phenotype is characterized by formation of lens cataracts, apoptosis of cortical neurons, and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS concentrations, owing to p53-mediated repression of antioxidant response (AOR genes. Herein we report that Bmi1 expression progressively declines in the neurons of aging mouse and human brains. In old brains, p53 accumulates at the promoter of AOR genes, correlating with a repressed chromatin state, down-regulation of AOR genes, and increased oxidative damages to lipids and DNA. Comparative gene expression analysis further revealed that aging brains display an up-regulation of the senescence-associated genes IL-6, p19(Arf and p16(Ink4a, along with the pro-apoptotic gene Noxa, as seen in Bmi1-null mice. Increasing Bmi1 expression in cortical neurons conferred robust protection against DNA damage-induced cell death or mitochondrial poisoning, and resulted in suppression of ROS through activation of AOR genes. These observations unveil that Bmi1 genetic deficiency recapitulates aspects of physiological brain aging and that Bmi1 over-expression is a potential therapeutic modality against neurodegeneration.

  4. TGFβ1 inhibits IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and protects mDA neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolai; Zöller, Tanja; Krieglstein, Kerstin; Spittau, Björn

    2015-07-01

    Microglia-mediated neuroinflammation has been reported as a common feature of familial and sporadic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), and a growing body of evidence indicates that onset and progression of PD correlates with the extent of neuroinflammatory responses involving Interferon γ (IFNγ). Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) has been shown to be a major player in the regulation of microglia activation states and functions and, thus, might be a potential therapeutic agent by shaping microglial activation phenotypes during the course of neurodegenerative diseases such as PD. In this study, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is able to block IFNγ-induced microglia activation by attenuating STAT1 phosphorylation and IFNγRα expression. Moreover, we identified a set of genes involved in microglial IFNγ signaling transduction that were significantly down-regulated upon TGFβ1 treatment, resulting in decreased sensitivity of microglia toward IFNγ stimuli. Interestingly, genes mediating negative regulation of IFNγ signaling, such as SOCS2 and SOCS6, were up-regulated after TGFβ1 treatment. Finally, we demonstrate that TGFβ1 is capable of protecting midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from IFNγ-driven neurotoxicity in mixed neuron-glia cultures derived from embryonic day 14 (E14) midbrain tissue. Together, these data underline the importance of TGFβ1 as a key immunoregulatory factor for microglia by silencing IFNγ-mediated microglia activation and, thereby, rescuing mDA neurons from IFNγ-induced neurotoxicity. Interferon γ (IFNγ) is a potent pro-inflammatory factor that triggers the activation of microglia and the subsequent release of neurotoxic factors. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is able to inhibit the IFNγ-mediated activation of microglia, which is characterized by the release of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα). By decreasing the expression of IFNγ-induced genes as well as the signaling receptor IFNγR1, TGFβ1

  5. Berberine Preconditioning Protects Neurons Against Ischemia via Sphingosine-1-Phosphate and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1[Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qichun; Bian, Huimin; Guo, Liwei; Zhu, Huaxu

    2016-01-01

    Berberine exerts neuroprotective and modulates hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha (HIF-1[Formula: see text]. Based on the role of HIF-1[Formula: see text] in hypoxia preconditioning and association between HIF-1[Formula: see text] and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), we hypothesized that berberine preconditioning (BP) would ameliorate the cerebral injury induced by ischemia through activating the system of HIF-1[Formula: see text] and S1P. Adult male rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and rat primary cortical neurons treated with oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) with BP at 24[Formula: see text]h (40[Formula: see text]mg/kg) and 2[Formula: see text]h (10[Formula: see text][Formula: see text]mol/L), respectively, were used to determine the neuroprotective effects. The HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation, and S1P metabolism were assayed in the berberine-preconditioned neurons, and the HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated transcriptional modulation of sphingosine kinases (Sphk) 1 and 2 was analyzed using chromatin immunoprecipitation and real-time polymerase chain reaction. BP significantly prevented cerebral ischemic injury in the MCAO rats at 24[Formula: see text]h and 72[Formula: see text]h following ischemia/reperfusion. In OGD-treated neurons, BP enhanced HIF-1[Formula: see text] accumulation with activation of PI3K/Akt, and induced S1P production by activating Sphk2 via the promotion of HIF-1[Formula: see text]-mediated Sphk2 transcription. In conclusion, BP activated endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms associated with the S1P/HIF-1 pathway and helped protect neuronal cells against hypoxia/ischemia. PMID:27430910

  6. Mechanisms of Neuronal Protection against Excitotoxicity, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Stroke and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In stroke and neurodegenerative disease, neuronal excitotoxicity, caused by increased extracellular glutamate levels, is known to result in calcium overload and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial deficits may involve a deficiency in energy supply as well as generation of high levels of oxidants which are key contributors to neuronal cell death through necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Excessive glutamate receptor stimulation also results in increased nitric oxide generation which can be detrimental to cells as nitric oxide interacts with superoxide to form the toxic molecule peroxynitrite. High level oxidant production elicits neuronal apoptosis through the actions of proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members resulting in mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening. In addition to apoptotic responses to severe stress, accumulation of misfolded proteins and high levels of oxidants can elicit endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress pathways which may also contribute to induction of apoptosis. Two categories of therapeutics are discussed that impact major pro-death events that include induction of oxidants, calcium overload, and ER stress. The first category of therapeutic agent includes the amino acid taurine which prevents calcium overload and is also capable of preventing ER stress by inhibiting specific ER stress pathways. The second category involves N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA receptor partial antagonists illustrated by S-Methyl-N, N-diethyldithiocarbamate sulfoxide (DETC-MeSO, and memantine. DETC-MeSO is protective through preventing excitotoxicity and calcium overload and by blocking specific ER stress pathways. Another NMDA receptor partial antagonist is memantine which prevents excessive glutamate excitation but also remarkably allows maintenance of physiological neurotransmission. Targeting of these major sites of neuronal damage using pharmacological agents is discussed in terms of potential therapeutic approaches for

  7. Protective effect of sodium valproate on motor neurons in the spinal cord following sciatic nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Wu; Danmou Xing; Zhengren Peng; Wusheng Kan

    2006-01-01

    /total number of cells× 100%) was calculated.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: A value of neurons with positive Bcl-2 expression and apoptotic rate in spinal cord of rats in the two groups.RESULTS: A total of 30 SD rats were involved in the result analysis. ①expression of positive Bcl-2 neurons: A value of positive Bcl-2 neurons were 0.71 ±0.02, 0.86±0.04, 1.02±0.06 at days 4, 7 and 14, respectively after operation in the treatment group, which were obviously higher than those in the model group (0.62±0.03, 0.71±0.05, 0.89±0.04, t = 3.10-4.50, P < 0.05). ②apoptotic result of motor neurons: Apoptotic rate of motor neurons in spinal cord was (6.91±0.89)% and (15.12±2.34)% at days 7 and 14 in the treatment group, which was significantly lower than those in the model group [(9.45±1.61)%, (19.35±0.92)%, t= 2.39, 3.03. P< 0.05].CONCLUSION: VPA can increase expression of Bcl-2 in spinal cord and reduce neuronal apoptosis in rats following sciatic nerve injury, and has protective effect on motor neuron in spinal cord of rats.

  8. Propolis derivatives inhibit the systemic inflammatory response and protect hepatic and neuronal cells in acute septic shock

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    Aida Abdelhamid Korish

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe pathogenic infection triggers excessive release of cytokines as part of the massive inflammatory response associated with septic shock. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the protective effect of caffeic acid phenethye ester (CAPE against lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced endotoxemia, hepatic and neuronal damage and the associated systemic inflammatory response (SIR. METHODS: Fifty male Wister rats were divided into: control, LPS, and CAPE+LPS groups. Plasma concentrations of various cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and sICAM-1 were evaluated. In addition, the histopathological changes in the hepatic and neural cells were assessed. RESULTS: The LPS group showed high inflammatory cytokines and sICAM-1 levels reflecting the presence of SIR. Hepatocyte necrosis, apoptosis, extensive hemorrhage and inflammatory cellular infiltration together with brain astrocytes swelling, early neuron injury and presence of inflammatory foci confirmed the toxic tissue damage. Use of CAPE decreased the inflammatory cytokines and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokines levels. This biochemical evidence of decreased SIR was confirmed histologically by decreased cellular infiltration in the liver and brain tissue which coincides with preserved structure and protection of the liver and brain cells from the toxic effects of LPS. CONCLUSION: The ability of CAPE to alleviate the SIR, hepatic and neuronal cell damage induced by LPS and galactosamine could be attributed to its ability to reverse the imbalance of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines which may lead to the inhibition of adhesion molecules' expression. CAPE is a promising agent that could help in the prophylaxis and treatment of septic shock.

  9. Berberine Protects against Neuronal Damage via Suppression of Glia-Mediated Inflammation in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Cheng Chen; Tai-Ho Hung; Chao Yu Lee; Liang-Fei Wang; Chun-Hu Wu; Chia-Hua Ke; Szu-Fu Chen

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) triggers a series of neuroinflammatory processes that contribute to evolution of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects and anti-inflammatory actions of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, in both in vitro and in vivo TBI models. Mice subjected to controlled cortical impact injury were injected with berberine (10 mg·kg(-1)) or vehicle 10 min after injury. In addition to behavioral studies and histology analysis, blood-brain ba...

  10. Antioxidant and Protective Mechanisms against Hypoxia and Hypoglycaemia in Cortical Neurons in Vitro

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    José Joaquín Merino

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we have studied whether cell death could be induced in cortical neurons from rats subjected to different period of O2 deprivation and low glucose (ODLG. This “in vitro” model is designed to emulate the penumbra area under ischemia. In these conditions, cortical neurons displayed loss of mitochondrial respiratory ability however, nor necrosis neither apoptosis occurred despite ROS production. The absence of cellular death could be a consequence of increased antioxidant responses such as superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1 and GPX3. In addition, the levels of reduced glutathione were augmented and HIF-1/3α overexpressed. After long periods of ODLG (12–24 h cortical neurons showed cellular and mitochondrial membrane alterations and did not recuperate cellular viability during reperfusion. This could mean that therapies directed toward prevention of cellular and mitochondrial membrane imbalance or cell death through mechanisms other than necrosis or apoptosis, like authophagy, may be a way to prevent ODLG damage.

  11. Protective effect of alpha-synuclein knockdown on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunchun Tai; Ling Chen; Enping Huang; Chao Liu; Xingyi Yang; Pingming Qiu; Huijun Wang

    2014-01-01

    The over-expression of α-synuclein is a major factor in the death of dopaminergic neurons in a methamphetamine-induced model of Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, α-synuclein knockdown rats were created by injecting α-synuclein-shRNA lentivirus stereotaxically into the right striatum of experimental rats. At 2 weeks post-injection, the rats were injected intraper-itoneally with methamphetamine to establish the model of Parkinson’s disease. Expression ofα-synuclein mRNA and protein in the right striatum of the injected rats was significantly down-regulated. Food intake and body weight were greater in α-synuclein knockdown rats, and water intake and stereotyped behavior score were lower than in model rats. Striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase levels were significantly elevated in α-synuclein knockdown rats. Moreover, superoxide dismutase activity was greater in α-synuclein knockdown rat striatum, but the levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide synthase and nitrogen monoxide were lower compared with model rats. We also found that α-synuclein knockdown inhibited metham-phetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis. These results suggest that α-synuclein has the capacity to reverse methamphetamine-induced apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the rat striatum by inhibiting oxidative stress and improving dopaminergic system function.

  12. Neuronal erythropoietin overexpression protects mice against age-related hearing loss (presbycusis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Arianne Monge; Belfrage, Celina; Jain, Neha; Wei, Eric T; Martorell, Belén Canto; Gassmann, Max; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    So far, typical causes of presbycusis such as degeneration of hair cells and/or primary auditory (spiral ganglion) neurons cannot be treated. Because erythropoietin's (Epo) neuroprotective potential has been shown previously, we determined hearing thresholds of juvenile and aged mice overexpressing Epo in neuronal tissues. Behavioral audiometry revealed in contrast to 5 months of age, that 11-month-old Epo-transgenic mice had up to 35 dB lower hearing thresholds between 1.4 and 32 kHz, and at the highest frequencies (50-80 kHz), thresholds could be obtained in aged Epo-transgenic only but not anymore in old C57BL6 control mice. Click-evoked auditory brainstem response showed similar results. Numbers of spiral ganglion neurons in aged C57BL6 but not Epo-transgenic mice were dramatically reduced mainly in the basal turn, the location of high frequencies. In addition, there was a tendency to better preservation of inner and outer hair cells in Epo-transgenic mice. Hence, Epo's known neuroprotective action effectively suppresses the loss of spiral ganglion cells and probably also hair cells and, thus, development of presbycusis in mice. PMID:26364734

  13. Ischemic Postconditioning Protects Neuronal Death Caused by Cerebral Ischemia and Reperfusion via Attenuating Protein Aggregation

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    Jianmin Liang, Jihang Yao, Guangming Wang, Ying Wang, Boyu Wang, Pengfei Ge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of ischemic postconditioning on protein aggregation caused by transient ischemia and reperfusion and to clarify its underlying mechanism.Methods: Two-vessel-occluded transient global ischemia rat model was used. The rats in ischemic postconditioning group were subjected to three cycles of 30-s/30-s reperfusion/clamping after 15min of ischemia. Neuronal death in the CA1 region was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, and number of live neurons was assessed by cell counting under a light microscope. Succinyl-LLVY-AMC was used as substrate to assay proteasome activity in vitro. Protein carbonyl content was spectrophotometrically measured to analyze protein oxidization. Immunochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy were used to observe the distribution of ubiquitin in the CA1 neurons. Western blotting was used to analyze the quantitative alterations of protein aggregates, proteasome, hsp70 and hsp40 in cellular fractions under different ischemic conditions.Results: Histological examination showed that the percentage of live neurons in the CA1 region was elevated from 5.21%±1.21% to 55.32%±5.34% after administration of ischemic postconditioning (P=0.0087. Western blotting analysis showed that the protein aggregates in the ischemia group was 32.12±4.87, 41.86±4.71 and 34.51±5.18 times higher than that in the sham group at reperfusion 12h, 24h and 48h, respectively. However, protein aggregates were alleviated significantly by ischemic postconditioning to 2.84±0.97, 13.72±2.13 and 14.37±2.42 times at each indicated time point (P=0.000032, 0.0000051 and 0.0000082. Laser scanning confocal images showed ubiquitin labeled protein aggregates could not be discerned in the ischemic postconditioning group. Further study showed that ischemic postconditioning suppressed the production of carbonyl derivatives, elevated proteasome activity that was damaged by ischemia and reperfusion, increased the expression

  14. Protective substances against zinc-induced neuronal death after ischemia: carnosine as a target for drug of vascular type of dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Konoha, Keiko; Nagata, Tetsuya; Sadakane, Yutaka

    2007-06-01

    Recent studies have indicated the significance of zinc in neurodegeneration after transient global ischemia. After ischemia, excess glutamate and zinc, which are released in the synaptic clefts, cause the apoptotic death of the target neurons, and finally lead the pathogenesis of vascular type of dementia. Considering the removal of zinc using zinc-sensitive chelators was effective in the prevention of neuronal death after transient global ischemia, it is highly possible that substances which protect against zinc-induced neuronal death will become a candidate for drugs of vascular type of dementia. Based on this 'zinc hypothesis', we have searched for such substances among various agricultural products including fruits, vegetables, and fishes using our developed in vitro screening system. Among tested, we found that carnosine (beta-alanyl histidine) protected against zinc-induced death of cultured neurons, and have applied for the patent as a drug of ischemia-induced neuronal death and the treatment/prevention for vascular type of dementia (application No. 2006-145857) in Japan. Here, we review the perspective of protective substances of zinc-induced neuronal death as a drug of vascular type of dementia based on our studies and other numerous studies. PMID:18221226

  15. Minocycline inhibition of monocyte activation correlates with neuronal protection in SIV neuroAIDS.

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    Jennifer H Campbell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has been proposed as a potential conjunctive therapy for HIV-1 associated cognitive disorders. Precise mechanism(s of minocycline's functions are not well defined. METHODS: Fourteen rhesus macaques were SIV infected and neuronal metabolites measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H MRS. Seven received minocycline (4 mg/kg daily starting at day 28 post-infection (pi. Monocyte expansion and activation were assessed by flow cytometry, cell traffic to lymph nodes, CD16 regulation, viral replication, and cytokine production were studied. RESULTS: Minocycline treatment decreased plasma virus and pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16+ and CD14(loCD16+ monocytes, and reduced their expression of CD11b, CD163, CD64, CCR2 and HLA-DR. There was reduced recruitment of monocyte/macrophages and productively infected cells in axillary lymph nodes. There was an inverse correlation between brain NAA/Cr (neuronal injury and circulating CD14+CD16+ and CD14(loCD16+ monocytes. Minocycline treatment in vitro reduced SIV replication CD16 expression on activated CD14+CD16+ monocytes, and IL-6 production by monocytes following LPS stimulation. CONCLUSION: Neuroprotective effects of minocycline are due in part to reduction of activated monocytes, monocyte traffic. Mechanisms for these effects include CD16 regulation, reduced viral replication, and inhibited immune activation.

  16. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdain, P; Allaman, I; Rothenfusser, K; Fiumelli, H; Marquet, P; Magistretti, P J

    2016-01-01

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade. PMID:26893204

  17. Point application with Angong Niuhuang sticker protects hippocampal and cortical neurons in rats with cerebral ischemia

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    Dong-shu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angong Niuhuang pill, a Chinese materia medica preparation, can improve neurological functions after acute ischemic stroke. Because of its inconvenient application and toxic components (Cinnabaris and Realgar, we used transdermal enhancers to deliver Angong Niuhuang pill by modern technology, which expanded the safe dose range and clinical indications. In this study, Angong Niuhuang stickers administered at different point application doses (1.35, 2.7, and 5.4 g/kg were administered to the Dazhui (DU14, Qihai (RN6 and Mingmen (DU4 of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia, for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was used to determine the learning and memory ability of rats. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and Nissl staining were used to observe neuronal damage of the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia. The middle- and high-dose point application of Angong Niuhuang stickers attenuated neuronal damage in the cortex and hippocampal CA1 region, and improved the memory of rats with chronic cerebral ischemia with an efficacy similar to interventions by electroacupuncture at Dazhui (DU14, Qihai (RN6 and Mingmen (DU4. Our experimental findings indicate that point application with Angong Niuhuang stickers can improve cognitive function after chronic cerebral ischemia in rats and is neuroprotective with an equivalent efficacy to acupuncture.

  18. L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade

    KAUST Repository

    Jourdain, P.

    2016-02-19

    Converging experimental data indicate a neuroprotective action of L-Lactate. Using Digital Holographic Microscopy, we observe that transient application of glutamate (100 μM; 2 min) elicits a NMDA-dependent death in 65% of mouse cortical neurons in culture. In the presence of L-Lactate (or Pyruvate), the percentage of neuronal death decreases to 32%. UK5099, a blocker of the Mitochondrial Pyruvate Carrier, fully prevents L-Lactate-mediated neuroprotection. In addition, L-Lactate-induced neuroprotection is not only inhibited by probenicid and carbenoxolone, two blockers of ATP channel pannexins, but also abolished by apyrase, an enzyme degrading ATP, suggesting that ATP produced by the Lactate/Pyruvate pathway is released to act on purinergic receptors in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Finally, pharmacological approaches support the involvement of the P2Y receptors associated to the PI3-kinase pathway, leading to activation of KATP channels. This set of results indicates that L-Lactate acts as a signalling molecule for neuroprotection against excitotoxicity through coordinated cellular pathways involving ATP production, release and activation of a P2Y/KATP cascade.

  19. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    OpenAIRE

    Niehans, G A; Cherwitz, D. L.; Staley, N A; D. J. Knapp; Dalmasso, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples wer...

  20. Eriocaulon buergerianum extract protects PC12 cells and neurons in zebrafish against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced damage

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    Lin Zhixiu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ericaulon buergerianum (Gujingcao is an ophthalmic, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial Chinese medicinal herb. This study aims to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Ericaulon buergerianum ethanol extract (EBE and to elucidate its underlying action mechanism. Methods The viability of dopaminergic (DA neuron in zebrafish was examined by anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH immunostaining. The locomotor activity of zebrafish was assessed with a digital video tracking system. The viability and cellular damage of the PC12 cells were determined by MTT and LDH assays respectively. The nuclear morphological changes in apoptotic cells were evaluated with DNA staining by Hoechst 33342 dye. Intracellular nitric oxide (NO was quantified by DAF-FM diacetate staining. The expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was determined by Western blot. Results EBE inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced decrease in total distance of movement in zebrafish. Pretreatments of EBE (25, 50, 100 and 200 μg/ml increased the viability of 6-OHDA-damaged PC12 cells in a dose dependent manner. Protection against 6-OHDA-induced nuclear fragmentation and accumulation of apoptotic bodies was also observed in EBE pretreated cells. Anti-oxidative (inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression in PC12 cells in vitro activities of EBE are related to its neuroprotective effects in 6-OHDA-induced DA neuron damage. Conclusion EBE exhibited significant neuroprotective activities in zebrafish, including recovery of dopaminergic neuron loss caused by 6-OHDA in a dose-dependent manner in vivo, inhibition of 6-OHDA-induced decrease of total distance in movement in zebrafish. The iNOS-NO pathway may be involved.

  1. Protection of signal processing at low temperature in baroreceptive neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius of Syrian hamsters, a hibernating species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekizawa, Shin-Ichi; Horwitz, Barbara A.; Horowitz, John M.

    2013-01-01

    We previously described synaptic currents between baroreceptor fibers and second-order neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) that were larger in Syrian hamsters than in rats. This suggested that although electrical activity throughout the hamster brain decreased as brain temperature declined, the greater synaptic input to its NTS would support continued operation of cardiorespiratory reflexes at low body temperatures. Here, we focused on properties that would protect these neurons against potential damage from the larger synaptic inputs, testing the hypotheses that hamster NTS neurons exhibit: 1) intrinsic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) properties that limit Ca2+ influx to a greater degree than do rat NTS neurons and 2) properties that reduce gating signals to NMDARs to a greater degree than in rat NTS neurons. Whole cell patch-clamp recordings on anatomically identified second-order NTS baroreceptive neurons showed that NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents between sensory fibers and second-order NTS neurons were larger in hamsters than in rats at 33°C and 15°C, with no difference in their permeability to Ca2+. However, at 15°C, but not at 33°C, non-NMDAR currents evoked by glutamate released from baroreceptor fibers had significantly shorter durations in hamsters than in rats. Thus, hamster NMDARs did not exhibit lower Ca2+ influx than did rats (negating hypothesis 1), but they did exhibit significant differences in non-NMDAR neuronal properties at low temperature (consistent with hypothesis 2). The latter (shorter duration of non-NMDAR currents) would likely limit NMDAR coincidence gating and may help protect hamster NTS neurons, enabling them to contribute to signal processing at low body temperatures. PMID:24068050

  2. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

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    Chi-Fai Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ, but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD.

  3. Atomistic MD simulations reveal the protective role of cholesterol in dimeric beta-amyloid induced disruptions in neuronal membrane mimics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Liming; Buie, Creighton; Cheng, Sara; Chou, George; Vaughn, Mark; Cheng, K.

    2011-10-01

    Interactions of oligomeric beta-amyloid peptides with neuronal membranes have been linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The molecular details of the interactions of different lipid components, particularly cholesterol (CHOL), of the membranes with the peptides are not clear. Using an atomistic MD simulations approach, the water permeability barrier, structural geometry and order parameters of binary phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/CHOL lipid bilayers were examined from various 200 ns-simulation replicates. Our results suggest that the longer length dimer (2 x 42 residues) perturbs the membrane more than the shorter one (2 x 40 residues). In addition, we discovered a significant protective role of cholesterol in protein-induced disruptions of the membranes. The use of a new Monte-Carlo method in characterizing the structures of the conformal annular lipids in close proximity with the proteins will be introduced. We propose that the neurotoxicity of beta-amyloid peptide may be associated with the nanodomain or raft-like structures of the neuronal membranes in-vivo in the development of AD.

  4. Magnolol reduces glutamate-induced neuronal excitotoxicity and protects against permanent focal cerebral ischemia up to 4 hours.

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    Wei-Ting Lee

    Full Text Available Neuroprotective efficacy of magnolol, 5,5'-dially-2,2'-dihydroxydiphenyl, was investigated in a model of stroke and cultured neurons exposed to glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. Rats were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO. Magnolol or vehicle was administered intraperitoneally, at 1 hr pre-insult or 1-6 hrs post-insult. Brain infarction was measured upon sacrifice. Relative to controls, animals pre-treated with magnolol (50-200 mg/kg had significant infarct volume reductions by 30.9-37.8% and improved neurobehavioral outcomes (P<0.05, respectively. Delayed treatment with magnolol (100 mg/kg also protected against ischemic brain damage and improved neurobehavioral scores, even when administered up to 4 hrs post-insult (P<0.05, respectively. Additionally, magnolol (0.1 µM effectively attenuated the rises of intracellular Ca(2+ levels, [Ca(2+](i, in cultured neurons exposed to glutamate. Consequently, magnolol (0.1-1 µM significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity and cell swelling (P<0.05. Thus, magnolol offers neuroprotection against permanent focal cerebral ischemia with a therapeutic window of 4 hrs. This neuroprotection may be, partly, mediated by its ability to limit the glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  5. Protection of neurons in the retinal ganglion cell layer against excitotoxicity by the N-acylethanolamine, N-linoleoylethanolamine

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    Duncan RS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available R. Scott Duncan1,*, Hua Xin1,*, Daryl L Goad1, Kent D Chapman2,3, Peter Koulen1,31Vision Research Center and Departments of Ophthalmology and Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, USA; 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA; 3Center for Plant Lipid Research, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA *Authors contributed equallyAbstract: Retinal ganglion cell (RGC death is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases and disease processes of the eye, including glaucoma. The protection of RGCs has been an important strategy for combating glaucoma, but little clinical success has been reported to date. One pathophysiological consequence of glaucoma is excessive extracellular glutamate subsequently leading to excitotoxicity in the retina. Endocannabinoids, such as the N-acylethanolamine (NAE, arachidonylethanolamine (NAE 20:4, exhibit neuroprotective properties in some models of neurodegenerative disease. The majority of NAEs, however, are not cannabinoids, and their physiological function is not clear. Here, we determined whether the noncannabinoid NAE, linoleoylethanolamine (NAE18:2, protects neurons in the RGC layer against glutamate excitotoxicity in ex-vivo retina cultures. Using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP (2´-deoxyuridine 5´-triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL assay, we determined that NAE18:2 reduces the number of apoptotic RGC layer neurons in response to glutamate and conclude that NAE18:2 is a neuroprotective compound with potential for treating glaucomatous retinopathy.Keywords: neuroprotection, glutamate, calcium signaling, immunocytochemistry, eye, vision, glaucoma.

  6. Tetanus Toxin Hc Fragment Induces the Formation of Ceramide Platforms and Protects Neuronal Cells against Oxidative Stress.

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    Roger Cubí

    Full Text Available Tetanus toxin (TeTx is the protein, synthesized by the anaerobic bacteria Clostridium tetani, which causes tetanus disease. TeTx gains entry into target cells by means of its interaction with lipid rafts, which are membrane domains enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. However, the exact mechanism of host membrane binding remains to be fully established. In the present study we used the recombinant carboxyl terminal fragment from TeTx (Hc-TeTx, the domain responsible for target neuron binding, showing that Hc-TeTx induces a moderate but rapid and sustained increase in the ceramide/sphingomyelin ratio in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons and in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells, as well as induces the formation of ceramide platforms in the plasma membrane. The mentioned increase is due to the promotion of neutral sphingomyelinase activity and not to the de novo synthesis, since GW4869, a specific neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor, prevents neutral sphingomyelinase activity increase and formation of ceramide platforms. Moreover, neutral sphingomyelinase inhibition with GW4869 prevents Hc-TeTx-triggered signaling (Akt phosphorylation, as well as the protective effect of Hc-TeTx on PC12 cells subjected to oxidative stress, while siRNA directed against nSM2 prevents protection by Hc-TeTx of NSC-34 cells against oxidative insult. Finally, neutral sphingomyelinase activity seems not to be related with the internalization of Hc-TeTx into PC12 cells. Thus, the presented data shed light on the mechanisms triggered by TeTx after membrane binding, which could be related with the events leading to the neuroprotective action exerted by the Hc-TeTx fragment.

  7. Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by sodium ferulate in protecting neurons from beta-amyloid induced damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyan Yao; Deyu Zheng; Zhuo Liu; Ying Jin

    2006-01-01

    -induced released LDH and reduce MAP-2 expression, so as to play a key role in protecting the neurons against the Aβ impairments. The effect is characterized by dosage dependence.

  8. Rhinacanthus nasutus protects cultured neuronal cells against hypoxia induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimson, James M; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2011-07-26

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (Acanthaceae) is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzeheimer's disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL⁻¹ root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL⁻¹ had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL⁻¹ reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H₂DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  9. Rhinacanthus nasutus Protects Cultured Neuronal Cells against Hypoxia Induced Cell Death

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    James M. Brimson

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rhinacanthus nasutus (L. Kurz (Acanthaceae is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Alzeheimer’s disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL−1 root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL−1 had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL−1 reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H2DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells.

  10. Prototypical antipsychotic drugs protect hippocampal neuronal cultures against cell death induced by growth medium deprivation

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    Williams Sylvain

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several clinical studies suggested that antipsychotic-based medications could ameliorate cognitive functions impaired in certain schizophrenic patients. Accordingly, we investigated the effects of various dopaminergic receptor antagonists – including atypical antipsychotics that are prescribed for the treatment of schizophrenia – in a model of toxicity using cultured hippocampal neurons, the hippocampus being a region of particular relevance to cognition. Results Hippocampal cell death induced by deprivation of growth medium constituents was strongly blocked by drugs including antipsychotics (10-10-10-6 M that display nM affinities for D2 and/or D4 receptors (clozapine, haloperidol, (±-sulpiride, domperidone, clozapine, risperidone, chlorpromazine, (+-butaclamol and L-741,742. These effects were shared by some caspases inhibitors and were not accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, (--raclopride and remoxipride, two drugs that preferentially bind D2 over D4 receptors were ineffective, as well as the selective D3 receptor antagonist U 99194. Interestingly, (--raclopride (10-6 M was able to block the neuroprotective effect of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (10-6 M. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that D2-like receptors, particularly the D4 subtype, mediate the neuroprotective effects of antipsychotic drugs possibly through a ROS-independent, caspase-dependent mechanism.

  11. EGFR mediates astragaloside IV-induced Nrf2 activation to protect cortical neurons against in vitro ischemia/reperfusion damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Da-min [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Lu, Pei-Hua, E-mail: lphty1_1@163.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Zhang, Ke; Wang, Xiang [Department of Anesthesiology, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Sun, Min [Department of General Surgery, Affiliated Yixing People' s Hospital, Jiangsu University, Yixing (China); Chen, Guo-Qian [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China); Wang, Qiong, E-mail: WangQiongprof1@126.com [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Wuxi People' s Hospital Affiliated to Nanjing Medical University, Wuxi (China)

    2015-02-13

    In this study, we tested the potential role of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) against oxygen and glucose deprivation/re-oxygenation (OGD/R)-induced damages in murine cortical neurons, and studied the associated signaling mechanisms. AS-IV exerted significant neuroprotective effects against OGD/R by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, thereby attenuating oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. We found that AS-IV treatment in cortical neurons resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by Nrf2 Ser-40 phosphorylation, and its nuclear localization, as well as transcription of antioxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes: heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1) and sulphiredoxin 1 (SRXN-1). Knockdown of Nrf2 through lentiviral shRNAs prevented AS-IV-induced ARE genes transcription, and abolished its anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. Further, we discovered that AS-IV stimulated heparin-binding-epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) release to trans-activate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in cortical neurons. Blockage or silencing EGFR prevented Nrf2 activation by AS-IV, thus inhibiting AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities against OGD/R. In summary, AS-IV protects cortical neurons against OGD/R damages through activating of EGFR-Nrf2 signaling. - Highlights: • Pre-treatment of astragaloside IV (AS-IV) protects murine cortical neurons from OGD/R. • AS-IV activates Nrf2-ARE signaling in murine cortical neurons. • Nrf2 is required for AS-IV-mediated anti-oxidant and neuroprotective activities. • AS-IV stimulates HB-EGF release to trans-activate EGFR in murine cortical neurons. • EGFR mediates AS-IV-induced Nrf2 activation and neuroprotection against OGD/R.

  12. Major histocompatibility complex class I molecules protect motor neurons from astrocyte-induced toxicity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, SungWon; Miranda, Carlos J; Braun, Lyndsey; Meyer, Kathrin; Frakes, Ashley E; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Likhite, Shibi; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; McConnell, Michael J; Walker, Christopher M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes isolated from individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are toxic to motor neurons (MNs) and play a non-cell autonomous role in disease pathogenesis. The mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of MNs to cell death remain unclear. Here we report that astrocytes derived from either mice bearing mutations in genes associated with ALS or human subjects with ALS reduce the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecules on MNs; reduced MHCI expression makes these MNs susceptible to astrocyte-induced cell death. Increasing MHCI expression on MNs increases survival and motor performance in a mouse model of ALS and protects MNs against astrocyte toxicity. Overexpression of a single MHCI molecule, HLA-F, protects human MNs from ALS astrocyte-mediated toxicity, whereas knockdown of its receptor, the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor KIR3DL2, on human astrocytes results in enhanced MN death. Thus, our data indicate that, in ALS, loss of MHCI expression on MNs renders them more vulnerable to astrocyte-mediated toxicity. PMID:26928464

  13. Protective effect of tubuloside B on TNFα-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min DENG; Jin-yuan ZHAO; Xiao-dong JU; Peng-fei TU; Yong JIANG; Zheng-bin LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the neuroprotective effect of tubuloside B, one of the phenylethanoids isolated from the stems of Cistanche salsa, on tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y neuronal cells.METHODS: Cell viability was analyzed using MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were detected using Hoechst33342 staining, and confirmed by DNA fragmentation and flow cytometric analysis. The activity of caspase-3 was measured with special assay kit. The concentration of free intracellular calcium was determined with the probe Indo-1 by spectrometer. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and the potential of mitochondrial membrane were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) combined with fluorescence probe H2DCFDA or JC-1 respectively. RESULTS: SH-SY5Y cells treated with TNFα 100 μg/L for 36 h showed typical morphological changes of apoptosis. DNA ladder could be observed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The highest percentage of apoptotic cells accumulated to 37.5 %. Following 36 h treatment with TNFα, accumulation of intracellular ROS and [Ca2+]i and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, and caspase-3 activity increased by about five-fold compared with controls. However, pretreatment with tubuloside B (1, 10, or 100 mg/L) for 2 h attenuated the TNFα-mediated apoptosis. The antiapoptotic action of tubuloside B was partially dependent on an anti-oxidative stress effects, maintain of mitochondria function, decrease of concentration of free intracellular calcium and inhibition of caspase-3 activity. CONCLUSION: Tubuloside B has the neuroprotective capacity to antagonize TNFα-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells and may be useful in treating some neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehans, G A; Cherwitz, D L; Staley, N A; Knapp, D J; Dalmasso, A P

    1996-07-01

    Normal human tissues express membrane-associated complement inhibitory proteins that protect these tissues from damage by autologous complement. To determine whether neoplasms also express these proteins, we examined the distribution of the complement inhibitors decay-accelerating factor (DAF), CD59 (protectin), and membrane cofactor protein in frozen samples of human breast, colon, kidney, and lung carcinomas and in adjacent non-neoplastic tissues, using immunohistochemistry. All samples were also studied for deposition of C3 fragments and activated C5b-9. Differences between normal tissues and the corresponding neoplasms were often observed, with loss or gain of expression of one or more inhibitors. Ductal carcinomas of the breast showed the most variation in phenotype; some tumors expressed only one inhibitor while others expressed different combinations of two or three inhibitors. Colon carcinomas, by contrast, stained intensely for all inhibitors. Renal cell carcinomas had weak to moderate expression of one to three inhibitors, generally DAF and CD59, whereas non-small cell carcinomas of the lung usually expressed CD59 and membrane cofactor protein with variable DAF immunoreactivity. The two small cell carcinomas of the lung showed little or no staining for any inhibitor. Activated C5b-9 deposition was seen adjacent to tumor nests in a minority of carcinomas and showed no correlation with complement inhibitor expression. C3 fragment deposition was minimal. Our results demonstrate that most carcinomas, with the exception of small cell carcinomas of the lung, do express one or more complement inhibitors at a level likely to inhibit complement-mediated cellular damage. Unexpectedly, large quantities of DAF and CD59 were often observed in tumor stroma, with only limited deposition in normal connective tissue. This suggests that carcinomas may supplement the activity of membrane-associated complement inhibitors by release of soluble forms of DAF and CD59 into the

  15. Fractalkine/CX3CL1 protects striatal neurons from synergistic morphine and HIV-1 Tat-induced dendritic losses and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Masami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fractalkine/CX3CL1 and its cognate receptor CX3CR1 are abundantly expressed in the CNS. Fractalkine is an unusual C-X3-C motif chemokine that is important in neuron-microglial communication, a co-receptor for HIV infection, and can be neuroprotective. To assess the effects of fractalkine on opiate-HIV interactive neurotoxicity, wild-type murine striatal neurons were co-cultured with mixed glia from the striata of wild-type or Cx3cr1 knockout mice ± HIV-1 Tat and/or morphine. Time-lapse digital images were continuously recorded at 20 min intervals for up to 72 h using computer-aided microscopy to track the same cells repeatedly. Results Co-exposure to Tat and morphine caused synergistic increases in neuron death, dendritic pruning, and microglial motility as previously reported. Exogenous fractalkine prevented synergistic Tat and morphine-induced dendritic losses and neuron death even though the inflammatory mediator TNF-α remained significantly elevated. Antibody blockade of CX3CR1 mimicked the toxic effects of morphine plus Tat, but did not add to their toxicity; while fractalkine failed to protect wild-type neurons co-cultured with Cx3cr1-/--null glia against morphine and Tat toxicity. Exogenous fractalkine also normalized microglial motility, which is elevated by Tat and morphine co-exposure, presumably limiting microglial surveillance that may lead to toxic effects on neurons. Fractalkine immunofluorescence was expressed in neurons and to a lesser extent by other cell types, whereas CX3CR1 immunoreactivity or GFP fluorescence in cells cultured from the striatum of Cx3cr1-/- (Cx3cr1GFP/GFP mice were associated with microglia. Immunoblotting shows that fractalkine levels were unchanged following Tat and/or morphine exposure and there was no increase in released fractalkine as determined by ELISA. By contrast, CX3CR1 protein levels were markedly downregulated. Conclusions The results suggest that deficits in fractalkine

  16. Topiramate attenuates early brain injury following subarachnoid haemorrhage in rats via duplex protection against inflammation and neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yong; Guo, Song-Xue; Li, Jian-Ru; Du, Hang-Gen; Wang, Chao-Hui; Zhang, Jian-Min; Wu, Qun

    2015-10-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) insults contributes to the poor prognosis and high mortality observed in SAH patients. Topiramate (TPM) is a novel, broad-spectrum, antiepileptic drug with a reported protective effect against several brain injuries. The current study aimed to investigate the potential of TPM for neuroprotection against EBI after SAH and the possible dose-dependency of this effect. An endovascular perforation SAH model was established in rats, and TPM was administered by intraperitoneal injection after surgery at three different doses (20mg/kg, 40mg/kg, and 80mg/kg). The animals' neurological scores and brain water content were evaluated, and ELISA, Western blotting and immunostaining assays were conducted to assess the effect of TPM. The results revealed that TPM lowers the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase and proinflammatory mediators observed after SAH in a dose-related fashion, and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling pathway is the target of neuroinflammation regulation. In addition, TPM ameliorated SAH-induced cortical neuronal apoptosis by influencing Bax, Bcl-2 and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression, and the effect of TPM was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. Various dosages of TPM also upregulated the protein expression of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic signalling molecules, GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1, GABAAR γ2, and K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 2 (KCC2) together and downregulated Na(+)-K(+)-Cl(-) co-transporter 1 (NKCC1) expression. Thus, TPM may be an effective neuroprotectant in EBI after SAH by regulating neuroinflammation and neuronal cell death.

  17. HspB5/αB-crystallin increases dendritic complexity and protects the dendritic arbor during heat shock in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt-Kirbach, Britta; Moron, Margarethe; Glomb, Maximilian; Beck, Clara-Maria; Weller, Marie-Pascale; Golenhofen, Nikola

    2016-10-01

    The small heat shock protein ΗspΒ5 (αB-crystallin) exhibits generally cytoprotective functions and possesses powerful neuroprotective capacity in the brain. However, little is known about the mode of action of ΗspΒ5 or other members of the HspB family particularly in neurons. To get clues of the neuronal function of HspBs, we overexpressed several HspBs in cultured rat hippocampal neurons and investigated their effect on neuronal morphology and stress resistance. Whereas axon length and synapse density were not affected by any HspB, dendritic complexity was enhanced by HspB5 and, to a lesser extent, by HspB6. Furthermore, we could show that this process was dependent on phosphorylation, since a non-phosphorylatable mutant of HspB5 did not show this effect. Rarefaction of the dendritic arbor is one hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases. To investigate if HspB5, which is upregulated at pathophysiological conditions, might be able to protect dendrites during such situations, we exposed HspB5 overexpressing neuronal cultures to heat shock. HspB5 prevented heat shock-induced rarefaction of dendrites. In conclusion, we identified regulation of dendritic complexity as a new function of HspB5 in hippocampal neurons. PMID:27085702

  18. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Immune-Mediated Killing of Neurons in Culture and in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Sloka

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that low vitamin D levels are associated with an increased risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS. As MS is an inflammatory disorder with degeneration of axons and neurons, we examined whether the biologically active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3, could protect against the T cell-mediated killing of human neurons in culture, and the axonal loss seen in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Human neurons were exposed to activated human T lymphocytes and the loss of neurons was documented 24 hours later by counting the number of microtubule-associated protein-2 positive cells. Mice with EAE were harvested for counts of axonal profiles in the spinal cord. 1,25D3 was exposed to T cells in culture or administered to mice from peak EAE clinical severity when axonal loss was already evolving. Activated T lymphocytes killed human neurons prominently within 24 hours but toxicity was significantly attenuated when T cells were exposed to 1,25D3 prior to the co-culture. In EAE, 1,25D3 treatment initiated from peak clinical severity reduced the extent of clinical disability and mitigated the progressive loss of axons. The reduction of axonal and neuronal loss by 1,25D3 in the context of an inflammatory assault to the central nervous system is a potential contributor to the putative benefits of vitamin D in MS.

  19. Neuroprotection in Parkinson's Disease: a Multi-directional Genetic Strategy for Maximum Protection of Dopaminergic Neurons against Parkinsonian Toxicity

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    Mossa Gardaneh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "nThe complex biology of Parkinson's disease and the obscure mechanism of dopaminergic cell death in the course of the disease indicate that multiple intracellular pathways and numerous crucial elements contribute to the demise of these neurons. Therefore, multi-factorial approaches would more likely confer long-lasting survival and potentiate the biological function of dopamine neurons. We are proposing a multi-directional strategy to protect dopamine neurons against parkinsonian toxicity that involve transcription, anti-oxidant and neurotrophic factors. Specifically, Nurr1 an important DA transcription/ anti-inflammatory factor, glutathione peroxidase-1 an anti-oxidant enzyme (GPX-1 and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF a potent neurotrophic factor have all shown their capacity for dopaminergic neuroprotection. A model we are proposing is based on dopamine neuron-astrocyte-microglia co-culture that will supply all three factors in a tripartite fashion accelerating gene-to-gene and cell-to-cell cross-talks for synergy. While microglia will overexpress Nurr1, astrocytes will act as minipumps to secrete GDNF into the medium to act on GPX-1-overexpressing dopamine neurons growing within their proximity. The neurons will ultimately be exposed to the parkinsonian neurotoxin 6-OHDA and tested for their improved survival rate in vitro and in vivo, their integration capacity to neural network and their physiological function in the midbrain circuitry.

  20. Astrocytes require insulin-like growth factor I to protect neurons against oxidative injury [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/38u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Genis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a proposed mechanism in brain aging, making the study of its regulatory processes an important aspect of current neurobiological research. In this regard, the role of the aging regulator insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I in brain responses to oxidative stress remains elusive as both beneficial and detrimental actions have been ascribed to this growth factor. Because astrocytes protect neurons against oxidative injury, we explored whether IGF-I participates in astrocyte neuroprotection and found that blockade of the IGF-I receptor in astrocytes abrogated their rescuing effect on neurons. We found that IGF-I directly protects astrocytes against oxidative stress (H2O2. Indeed, in astrocytes but not in neurons, IGF-I decreases the pro-oxidant protein thioredoxin-interacting protein 1 and normalizes the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, IGF-I cooperates with trophic signals produced by astrocytes in response to H2O2 such as stem cell factor (SCF to protect neurons against oxidative insult. After stroke, a condition associated with brain aging where oxidative injury affects peri-infarcted regions, a simultaneous increase in SCF and IGF-I expression was found in the cortex, suggesting that a similar cooperative response takes place in vivo. Cell-specific modulation by IGF-I of brain responses to oxidative stress may contribute in clarifying the role of IGF-I in brain aging.

  1. Astrocytes require insulin-like growth factor I to protect neurons against oxidative injury [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/2lf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Genis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a proposed mechanism in brain aging, making the study of its regulatory processes an important aspect of current neurobiological research. In this regard, the role of the aging regulator insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I in brain responses to oxidative stress remains elusive as both beneficial and detrimental actions have been ascribed to this growth factor. Because astrocytes protect neurons against oxidative injury, we explored whether IGF-I participates in astrocyte neuroprotection and found that blockade of the IGF-I receptor in astrocytes abrogated their rescuing effect on neurons. The protection mediated by IGF-I against oxidative stress (H2O2 in astrocytes is probably needed for these cells to provide adequate neuroprotection. Indeed, in astrocytes but not in neurons, IGF-I helps decrease the pro-oxidant protein thioredoxin-interacting protein 1 and normalizes the levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, IGF-I cooperates with trophic signals produced by astrocytes in response to H2O2 such as stem cell factor (SCF to protect neurons against oxidative insult. After stroke, a condition associated with brain aging where oxidative injury affects peri-infarcted regions, a simultaneous increase in SCF and IGF-I expression was found in the cortex, suggesting that a similar cooperative response takes place in vivo. Cell-specific modulation by IGF-I of brain responses to oxidative stress may contribute in clarifying the role of IGF-I in brain aging.

  2. Protective effect of lithium chloride against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis in neuronal PC12 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuzhen; Wang, Qian; Li, Dongsheng; Wu, Zhenghua; Li, Dawei; Lu, Kaili; Zhao, Yuwu; Sun, Yongning

    2016-08-25

    Hypoglycemia is defined by an arbitrary plasma glucose level lower than 3.9mmol/L and is a most common and feared adverse effect of treatment of diabetes mellitus. Emerging evidences demonstrated that hypoglycemia could induce enhanced apoptosis. Lithium chloride (LiCl), a FDA approved drug clinically used for treatment of bipolar disorders, is recently proven having neuroprotection against various stresses in the cellular and animal models of neural disorders. Here, we have established a hypoglycemia model in vitro and assessed the neuroprotective efficacy of LiCl against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Our studies showed that LiCl protects against hypoglycemia-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. Exposure to hypoglycemia results in enhanced apoptosis and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms involved inhibition of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by decreasing wnt3a levels, β-catenin levels and increasing GSK-3β levels, which was confirmed by the use of Wnt-specific activator LiCl. Hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis were significantly reversed by LiCl, leading to increased cell survival. LiCl also alters the expression/levels of the Wnt pathway genes/proteins, which were reduced due to exposed to hypoglycemia. Overall, our results conclude that LiCl provides neuroprotection against hypoglycemia-induced apoptosis via activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:27241942

  3. Pretreatment with scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total lfavonoid protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injur y in hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangyu Kong; Wei Kong; Guangxin Miao; Shumin Zhao; Meng Chen; Xiaoying Zheng; Jiangtao Bai

    2014-01-01

    Previous experimental studies have shown that cerebral infarction can be effectively reduced following treatment with scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total lfavonoid (SSTF). However, the mechanism of action of SSTF as a preventive drug to treat cerebral infarction remains unclear. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with 50, 100, 200 mg/kg SSTF via intragastric ad-ministration for 1 week prior to the establishment of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. The results showed that pretreatment with SSTF effectively improved neurological function, re-duced brain water content and the permeability of blood vessels, ameliorated ischemia-induced morphology changes in hippocampal microvessels, down-regulated Fas and FasL protein expres-sion, elevated the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, and decreased malondialdehyde content. In contrast to low-dose SSTF pretreatment, the above changes were most obvious after pretreatment with moderate-and high-doses of SSTF. Experimental ifndings indicate that SSTF pretreatment can exert protective effects on the brain against cerebral isch-emia/reperfusion injury. The underlying mechanisms may involve reducing brain water content, increasing microvascular recanalization, inhibiting the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons, and attenuating free radical damage.

  4. Protective Effect of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on Ischemic Neurons and Expression of Bcl-2 and ICE Genes in Rat Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To study the protective effect of volatile anesthetics, isoflurane and sevoflurane, on ischemic neurons after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats and its possible molecular mechanism. Methods Rat cerebral ischemia-reperfusion model was developed by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and bilateral common carotid arteries (CCAs) 1 h after reperfusion. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and Northern blot hybridization, we calculated the number of apoptotic bodies and detected the expression of bcl-2 mRNA and interleukin-1 β converting enzyme (ICE) mRNA. Results The apoptotic bodies in hippocampus analyzed by FCM peaked at appeared 24 h after reperfusion, and decreased about 54% and 40%, respectively,after treatment with isoflurane and sevoflurane, as compared with ischemic group. There was no significant difference in the expression of bcl-2 mRNA and ICE mRNA between the inhaled anesthetic groups and ischemic group in hippocampus 24 hafter MCA/CCAs occlusion. Conclusion Isoflurane and sevoflurane partially inhibit apoptosis but have no significant effect on the expression of bcl-2 and ICE genes.

  5. Neuronal deletion of caspase 8 protects against brain injury in mouse models of controlled cortical impact and kainic acid-induced excitotoxicity.

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    Maryla Krajewska

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is an important health problem. Given the critical position of caspase 8 at the crossroads of cell death pathways, we generated a new viable mouse line (Ncasp8(-/-, in which the gene encoding caspase 8 was selectively deleted in neurons by cre-lox system.Caspase 8 deletion reduced rates of neuronal cell death in primary neuronal cultures and in whole brain organotypic coronal slice cultures prepared from 4 and 8 month old mice and cultivated up to 14 days in vitro. Treatments of cultures with recombinant murine TNFα (100 ng/ml or TRAIL (250 ng/mL plus cyclohexamide significantly protected neurons against cell death induced by these apoptosis-inducing ligands. A protective role of caspase 8 deletion in vivo was also demonstrated using a controlled cortical impact (CCI model of traumatic brain injury (TBI and seizure-induced brain injury caused by kainic acid (KA. Morphometric analyses were performed using digital imaging in conjunction with image analysis algorithms. By employing virtual images of hundreds of brain sections, we were able to perform quantitative morphometry of histological and immunohistochemical staining data in an unbiased manner. In the TBI model, homozygous deletion of caspase 8 resulted in reduced lesion volumes, improved post-injury motor performance, superior learning and memory retention, decreased apoptosis, diminished proteolytic processing of caspases and caspase substrates, and less neuronal degeneration, compared to wild type, homozygous cre, and caspase 8-floxed control mice. In the KA model, Ncasp8(-/- mice demonstrated superior survival, reduced seizure severity, less apoptosis, and reduced caspase 3 processing. Uninjured aged knockout mice showed improved learning and memory, implicating a possible role for caspase 8 in cognitive decline with aging.Neuron-specific deletion of caspase 8 reduces brain damage and improves post-traumatic functional outcomes, suggesting an important role for this

  6. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA protects neurons from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3/-9 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed at understanding the effect of the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) on oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1 mM) reduced viability of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons to 50% of basal levels, but DCP-LA significantly prevented the SNP effect in a concentration (1-100 nM)-dependent manner. In addition, DCP-LA (100 nM) rescued neurons from SNP-induced degradation. SNP (1 mM) activated caspase-3 and -9 in cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, but DCP-LA (100 nM) abolished the caspase activation. For a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, oral administration with DCP-LA (1 mg/kg) significantly diminished degraded area due to cerebral infarction. The results of the present study, thus, demonstrate that DCP-LA protects neurons at least in part from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspase-3/-9. PMID:20099079

  7. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA protects neurons from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3/-9 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed at understanding the effect of the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) on oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1 mM) reduced viability of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons to 50% of basal levels, but DCP-LA significantly prevented the SNP effect in a concentration (1-100 nM)-dependent manner. In addition, DCP-LA (100 nM) rescued neurons from SNP-induced degradation. SNP (1 mM) activated caspase-3 and -9 in cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, but DCP-LA (100 nM) abolished the caspase activation. For a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, oral administration with DCP-LA (1 mg/kg) significantly diminished degraded area due to cerebral infarction. The results of the present study, thus, demonstrate that DCP-LA protects neurons at least in part from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspase-3/-9.

  8. Protection of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by β-hydroxybutyrate involves the preservation of energy levels and decreased production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Montiel, Teresa; Soto-Tinoco, Eva; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Massieu, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in brain but in certain circumstances such as prolonged fasting and the suckling period alternative substrates can be used such as the ketone bodies (KB), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetoacetate. It has been shown that KB prevent neuronal death induced during energy limiting conditions and excitotoxicity. The protective effect of KB has been mainly attributed to the improvement of mitochondrial function. In the present study, we have investigated the protective effect of D-BHB against neuronal death induced by severe noncoma hypoglycemia in the rat in vivo and by glucose deprivation (GD) in cortical cultures. Results show that systemic administration of D-BHB reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in distinct cortical areas and subregions of the hippocampus and efficiently prevents neuronal death in the cortex of hypoglycemic animals. In vitro results show that D-BHB stimulates ATP production and reduces ROS levels, while the nonphysiologic isomer of BHB, L-BHB, has no effect on energy production but reduces ROS levels. Data suggest that protection by BHB, not only results from its metabolic action but is also related to its capability to reduce ROS, rendering this KB as a suitable candidate for the treatment of ischemic and traumatic injury.

  9. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional culture promote neuronal regeneration by neurotrophic protection and immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sufang; Wang, Bin; Li, Xing; Xiao, Zhifeng; Han, Jin; Zhao, Yannan; Fang, Yongxiang; Yin, Yanyun; Chen, Bing; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence has revealed three-dimensional (3D) culture could better mimic the stem cell niche in vivo in comparison with conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture. In this study, we found that bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) cultured in 3D collagen scaffold (3D BMSCs) exhibited distinctive features including significantly enhancing neurotrophic factor secretions and reducing macrophage activations challenged by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in vitro. To further evaluate 3D BMSCs' potential benefits to the regeneration of spinal cord injury (SCI), the 3D and 2D BMSCs were respectively implanted in rat hemisected SCI. Compared with 2D cohort, 3D BMSCs transplantation significantly reduced the expressions of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 at 5 days after transplantation, markedly enhanced axonal regeneration, and promoted motor functional recovery during 8 weeks of observation. When Nocodazole was used to depolymerize the cytoskeleton of 3D BMSCs, the changed expressions of neurotrophic factors and inflammatory cytokines were blunted, at least partially. Thus synergistic effects of neuronal protection and immunomodulation of 3D BMSCs may lead to a better functional recovery of SCI and the underlying mechanism may involve the alteration of their cellular morphology because of 3D culture. This study contributes to a better understanding of the cellular characteristics of 3D BMSCs and provides a novel strategy to promote the repair of the injured spinal cord. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1759-1769, 2016. PMID:26990583

  10. CGP37157, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, protects neurons from excitotoxicity by blocking voltage-gated Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Alberdi, E; Matute, C

    2014-04-10

    Inhibition of the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCLX) by CGP37157 is protective in models of neuronal injury that involve disruption of intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. However, the Ca(2+) signaling pathways and stores underlying neuroprotection by that inhibitor are not well defined. In the present study, we analyzed how intracellular Ca(2+) levels are modulated by CGP37157 (10 μM) during NMDA insults in primary cultures of rat cortical neurons. We initially assessed the presence of NCLX in mitochondria of cultured neurons by immunolabeling, and subsequently, we analyzed the effects of CGP37157 on neuronal Ca(2+) homeostasis using cameleon-based mitochondrial Ca(2+) and cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) live imaging. We observed that NCLX-driven mitochondrial Ca(2+) exchange occurs in cortical neurons under basal conditions as CGP37157 induced a decrease in [Ca(2)]i concomitant with a Ca(2+) accumulation inside the mitochondria. In turn, CGP37157 also inhibited mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux after the stimulation of acetylcholine receptors. In contrast, CGP37157 strongly prevented depolarization-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCCs), whereas it did not induce depletion of ER Ca(2+) stores. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload was reduced as a consequence of diminished Ca(2+) entry through VGCCs. The decrease in cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload by CGP37157 resulted in a reduction of excitotoxic mitochondrial damage, characterized here by a reduction in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and calpain activation. In summary, our results provide evidence that during excitotoxicity CGP37157 modulates cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics that leads to attenuation of NMDA-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal cell death by blocking VGCCs.

  11. Evidence that OGG1 glycosylase protects neurons against oxidative DNA damage and cell death under ischemic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Croteau, Deborah L; Souza-Pinto, Nadja;

    2011-01-01

    to ischemic and oxidative stress. After exposure of cultured neurons to oxidative and metabolic stress levels of OGG1 in the nucleus were elevated and mitochondria exhibited fragmentation and increased levels of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and reduced membrane potential......7,8-Dihydro-8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) is a major DNA glycosylase involved in base-excision repair (BER) of oxidative DNA damage to nuclear and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used OGG1-deficient (OGG1(-/-)) mice to examine the possible roles of OGG1 in the vulnerability of neurons....... Cortical neurons isolated from OGG1(-/-) mice were more vulnerable to oxidative insults than were OGG1(+/+) neurons, and OGG1(-/-) mice developed larger cortical infarcts and behavioral deficits after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with OGG1(+/+) mice. Accumulations of oxidative DNA...

  12. Protective effects of curcumin against human immunodeficiency virus 1 gp120 V3 loop-induced neuronal injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Gong; Yanyan Xing; Jun Dong; Lijuan Yang; Hongmei Tang; Rui Pan; Sai Xie; Luyan Guo; Junbin Wang; Qinyin Deng; Guoyin Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin improves the learning and memory deficits in rats induced by the gp120 V3 loop. The present study cultured rat hippocampal neurons with 1 nM gp120 V3 loop and 1 μM curcumin for 24 hours. The results showed that curcumin inhibited the gp120 V3 loop-induced mitochondrial membrane potential decrease, reduced the mRNA expression of the pro-apoptotic gene caspase-3, and attenuated hippocampal neuronal injury.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor-1 protects against prion peptide-induced cell death in neuronal cells via inhibition of Bax translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yang-Gyu; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, Ju-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Kim, Shang-Jin; Kang, Seog-Jin; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-11-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is one of the most important components of bovine colostrum. It exhibits antiapoptotic and antioxidative activities. Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by cell death through mitochondrial dysfunction and increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study examined the protective effect of IGF-1 on residues 106-126 of the cellular prion protein [PrP (106-126)]-mediated mitochondrial neurotoxicity and oxidative stress. In SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells, treatment with PrP (106-126) decreased the cell viability and IGF-1 pretreatment markedly blocked the PrP (106-126)-induced neuronal cell death. IGF-1 inhibited PrP (106-126)-induced intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial oxidative stress. In addition, IGF-1 blocked the translocation of the Bax protein to the mitochondria induced by PrP (106-126). These results demonstrate that IGF-1 protects neuronal cells against PrP (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity through an antioxidative effect and blockage of mitochondrial Bax translocation. The results also suggest that regulation of IGF-1 secretion may have a therapeutic potential in the management of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:22895829

  14. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke, E-mail: liyingke6f@126.com; Yuan, Hong-Bin, E-mail: yuanhongbin6f@126.com

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  15. Intrastriatal glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors for protecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of mice with Parkinson disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenghua Xiao; Yanqiang Wang; Hongmei Liu; Hongjun Wang; Junping Cao; Dianshuai Gao

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Substantia nigra is deep in position and limited in range, the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) injection directly into substantia nigra has relatively greater damages with higher difficulty. GDNF injection into striatum, the target area of dopaminergic neuron, may protect the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of substantia nigra through retrograde transport.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effect of intrastriatal GDNF on dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of mice with Parkinson disease (PD), and analyze the action pathway.DESIGN: A controlled observation.SETTING: Neurobiological Laboratory of Xuzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twenty-four male Kunming mice of 7 - 8 weeks old were used. GDNF,1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were purchased from Sigma Company (USA);LEICAQWin image processing and analytical system.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Neurobiological Laboratory of Xuzhou Medical College from September 2005 to October 2006. The PD models were established in adult KunMing mice by intraperitoneal injection of MPTP. The model mice were were randomly divided into four groups with 6 mice in each group: GDNF 4-day group, phosphate buffer solution (PSB) 4-day group, GDNF 6-day group and PSB 6-day group. Mice in the GDNF 4 and 6-day groups were administrated with 1 μL GDNF solution (20 μg/L, dispensed with 0.01 mol/L PBS) injected into right striatum at 4 and 6 days after model establishment. Mice in the PSB 4 and 6-day groups were administrated with 0.01 mol/L PBS of the same volume to the same injection at corresponding time points. ② On the 12th day after model establishment, the midbrain tissue section of each mice was divided into 3 areas from rostral to caudal sides. The positive neurons of tyroxine hydroxylase (TH) and calcium binding protein (CB) with obvious nucleolus and clear outline were randomly selected for the measurement, and the number of positive neurons

  16. Minocycline inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of microglia on neural progenitor cells and protected their neuronal differentiation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuqing; Su, Huanxing; Chu, Tak-Ho; Guo, Anchen; Wu, Wutian

    2013-05-10

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation offers great potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but their efficiency is limited by poor survival and neuronal differentiation after transplantation. In the injury site, microglia may become activated and participate in the inflammation reaction. In vitro studies indicated that activated microglia might impair NPC survival and neuronal differentiation, but resting microglia did not. This study investigated the potential of minocycline to modify the negative effects of activated microglia on NPCs in vitro. First, the direct effects of minocycline on NPCs were tested. The results showed that at the concentration of 10μg/ml or lower, minocycline did not affect NPC survival and proliferation, but impaired neuronal differentiation. Then microglia were activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or treated with LPS plus minocycline (LPSMC), and the effects of conditioned media on NPC apoptosis and differentiation were studied. The results showed that, compared with LPS treatment group, the microglia conditioned media of LPSMC treatment group resulted in a significantly lower apoptotic rate of NPCs, and increased the neuronal differentiation of NPCs. This suggested that minocycline might inhibit the negative effects of microglia on NPCs, and have the potential to support the survival and neuronal differentiation of transplanted NPCs for SCI.

  17. A physically-modified saline suppresses neuronal apoptosis, attenuates tau phosphorylation and protects memory in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushbu K Modi

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the leading cause of dementia in the aging population, is characterized by the presence of neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles and extensive neuronal apoptosis. Neuritic plaques are mainly composed of aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ protein while neurofibrillary tangles are composed of the hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Despite intense investigations, no effective therapy is currently available to halt the progression of this disease. Here, we have undertaken a novel approach to attenuate apoptosis and tau phosphorylation in cultured neuronal cells and in a transgenic animal model of AD. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution containing oxygenated nanobubbles that is generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP flow under elevated oxygen pressure. In our experiments, fibrillar Aβ1-42, but not the reverse peptide Aβ42-1, induced apoptosis and cell death in human SHSY5Y neuronal cells. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline, RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen or PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification, attenuated Aβ(1-42-induced cell death. RNS60 inhibited neuronal cell death via activation of the type 1A phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3 kinase-Akt-BAD pathway. Furthermore, RNS60 also decreased Aβ(1-42-induced tau phosphorylation via (PI-3 kinase-Akt-mediated inhibition of GSK-3β. Similarly, RNS60 treatment suppressed neuronal apoptosis, attenuated Tau phosphorylation, inhibited glial activation, and reduced the burden of Aβ in the hippocampus and protected memory and learning in 5XFAD transgenic mouse model of AD. Therefore, RNS60 may be a promising pharmaceutical candidate in halting or delaying the progression of AD.

  18. 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid protects primary neurons from amyloid β1-42-induced apoptosis via PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Hai-bing; CAO Xu; WANG Lei; RUN Xiao-qin; SU Ying; TIAN Cheng; SUN Sheng-gang; LIANG Zhi-hou

    2011-01-01

    Background Recently,1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (1,5-DQA),a caffeoylquinic acid derivative isolated from Aster scaber,was found to have neuroprotective effects.However,the protective mechanisms of 1,5-DQA have not yet been clearly identified.The purpose of this study was to explore the protective mechanisms of 1,5-DQA on neuronal culture.Methods We investigated the neuroprotective effects of 1,5-DQA against amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42)-induced neurotoxicity in primary neuronal culture.To evaluate the neuroprotective effects of 1,5-DQA,primary cultured cortical neurons from neonate rats were pretreated with 1,5-DQA for 2 hours and then treated with 40 μmol/L Aβ42 for 6 hours.Cell counting kit-8,Hoechst staining and Western blotting were used for detecting the protective mechanism.Comparisons between two groups were evaluated by independent t test,and multiple comparisons were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA).Results 1,5-DQA treated neurons showed increased neuronal cell viability against Aβ42 toxicity in a concentration-dependent manner,both phosphoinositide 3-kinase (P13K)/Akt and extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2)were activated by 1,5-DQA with stimulating their upstream tyrosine kinase A (Trk A).However,the neuroprotective effects of 1,5-DQA were blocked by LY294002,a PI3K inhibitor,but not by PD98059,an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase.Furthermore,1,5-DQA's anti-apoptotic potential was related to the enhanced inactivating phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and the modulation of expression of apoptosis-related protein Bcl-2/Bax.Conclusion These results suggest that 1,5-DQA prevents Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity through the activation of PI3K/Akt followed by the stimulation of Trk A,then the inhibition of GSK3β as well as the modulation of Bcl-2/Bax.

  19. Expression of c-Fos protein and nitricoxide synthase in neurons of cerebral cortex from fetal rats in hypoxia and protective role of Angelica sinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Yu; Hongxian Zhao; Yuling Wu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both c-Fos protein and nitricoxide synthase (NOS) have been used as general indexes in relative research about neurons, but it is lack of reports that c-Fos protein and NOS are applied synchronously to study the neurons of hypoxic fetal rats in uterus.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of hypoxia in uterus on the expression of c-Fos protein and NOS in neurons of cerebral cortex from fetal rats and whether Angelica sinensis has the protective effect on these neurons in hypoxia.DESIGN: Randomized control experiment.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twelve adult female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male Wistar rat with bodymass from 220 to 250 g were chosen. Parenteral solution of Angelica sinensis mainly contained angelica sinensis, 10 mL/ampoule, was provided by Department of Agent of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Hubei Medical University (batch number: 01062310).METHODS: This experiment was completed in the Department of Histology and Embryology of Luzhou Medical College from September 2003 to June 2004. ① Twelve adult female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male Wistar rat were housed in one rearing cage. Vaginal embolus was performed on conceive female rat at 8:00 am next day.On the 15th conceiving day,all conceiving rats were divided randomly into three groups:control group, hypoxia group and Angelica group with 4 in each group. Rats in hypoxia group and Angelica group were modeled with hypotonic hypoxia in uterus. Angelica group: Rats were injected with 8 mL/kg Angelica sinensis injection through caudal veins before hypoxia.Hypoxia group:Rats were injected with the same volume of saline.Control group:Rats were not modeled and fed with normal way. ② Twenty embryos of rats were chosen randomly from each group and then routinely embedded in paraffin. Paraffin sections were cut from the brain of embryos to anterior fontanelle. Double-label staining was used to detect the expression of nNOS and c-Fos in

  20. Gastro-protective action of lafutidine mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons without interaction with TRPV1 and involvement of endogenous prostaglandins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhiro Fukushima; Yoko Aoi; Shinichi Kato; Koji Takeuchi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Lafutidine, a histamine H2 receptor antagonist,exhibits gastro-protective action mediated by capsaicinsensitive afferent neurons (CSN). We compared the effect between lafutidine and capsaicin, with respect to the interaction with endogenous prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide (NO) and the afferent neurons, including transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1).METHODS: Male SD rats and C57BL/6 mice, both wildtype and prostacyclin IP receptor knockout animals, were used after 18 h of fasting. Gastric lesions were induced by the po administration of HCI/ethanol (60% in 150 mmol/L HCI) in a volume of 1 mL for rats or 0.3 mL for mice.RESULTS: Both lafutidine and capsaicin (1-10 mg/kg,po) afforded dose-dependent protection against HCI/ethanol in rats and mice. The effects were attenuated by both the ablation of CSN and pretreatment with NG-nitroL-arginine methyl ester, yet only the effect of capsaicin was mitigated by prior administration of capsazepine, the TRPV1 antagonist, as well as indomethacin. Lafutidine protected the stomach against HCI/ethanol in IP receptor knockout mice, similar to wild-type animals, while capsaicin failed to afford protection in the animals lacking IP receptors. Neither of these agents affected the mucosal PGE2 or 6-keto PGF1α contents in rat stomachs. Capsaicin evoked an increase in [Ca2+]i in rat TRPV1-transfected HEK293 cells while lafutidine did not.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that although both lafutidine and capsaicin exhibit gastro-protective action mediated by CSN, the mode of their effects differs regarding the dependency on endogenous PGs/IP receptors and TRPV1. It is assumed that lafutidine interacts with CSN at yet unidentified sites other than TRPV1.

  1. Adenosine A(2B) receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moidunny, Shamsudheen; Vinet, Jonathan; Wesseling, Evelyn; Bijzet, Johan; Shieh, Chu-Hsin; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C.D.; Bezzi, Paola; Boddeke, Hendrikus W.G.M.; Biber, Knut

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS), astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF e

  2. Inhibition of prothrombin kringle-2-induced inflammation by minocycline protects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jin Han; Leem, Eunju; Jeon, Min-Tae; Kim, Young-Je; Jung, Un Ju; Choi, Myung-Sook; Maeng, Sungho; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2014-05-01

    Prothrombin kringle-2 (pKr-2), a domain of prothrombin, can cause the degeneration of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons through microglial activation. However, the chemical products that inhibit pKr-2-induced inflammatory activities in the brain are still not well known. The present study investigated whether minocycline, a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative, could inhibit pKr-2-induced microglial activation and prevent the loss of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons in vivo. To address this question, rats were administered a unilateral injection of pKr-2 in the substantia nigra in the presence or absence of minocycline. Our results show that pKr-2 induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and inducible nitric oxide synthase from the activated microglia. In parallel, 7 days after pKr-2 injection, tyrosine hydroxylase immunocytochemical analysis and western blot analysis showed a significant loss of nigral DA neurons. This neurotoxicity was antagonized by minocycline and the observed neuroprotective effects were associated with the ability of minocycline to suppress the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that minocycline may be promising as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of DA neuronal degeneration associated with pKr-2-induced microglial activation. PMID:24488033

  3. Adenosine A2B receptor-mediated leukemia inhibitory factor release from astrocytes protects cortical neurons against excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moidunny Shamsudheen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF have been widely reported. In the central nervous system (CNS, astrocytes are the major source for LIF, expression of which is enhanced following disturbances leading to neuronal damage. How astrocytic LIF expression is regulated, however, has remained an unanswered question. Since neuronal stress is associated with production of extracellular adenosine, we investigated whether LIF expression in astrocytes was mediated through adenosine receptor signaling. Methods Mouse cortical neuronal and astrocyte cultures from wild-type and adenosine A2B receptor knock-out animals, as well as adenosine receptor agonists/antagonists and various enzymatic inhibitors, were used to study LIF expression and release in astrocytes. When needed, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Bonferroni post-hoc test was used for statistical analysis. Results We show here that glutamate-stressed cortical neurons induce LIF expression through activation of adenosine A2B receptor subtype in cultured astrocytes and require signaling of protein kinase C (PKC, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs: p38 and ERK1/2, and the nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB. Moreover, LIF concentration in the supernatant in response to 5′-N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA stimulation was directly correlated to de novo protein synthesis, suggesting that LIF release did not occur through a regulated release pathway. Immunocytochemistry experiments show that LIF-containing vesicles co-localize with clathrin and Rab11, but not with pHogrin, Chromogranin (CgA and CgB, suggesting that LIF might be secreted through recycling endosomes. We further show that pre-treatment with supernatants from NECA-treated astrocytes increased survival of cultured cortical neurons against glutamate, which was absent when the supernatants were pre-treated with an anti-LIF neutralizing antibody. Conclusions

  4. Increased GABA(A receptor ε-subunit expression on ventral respiratory column neurons protects breathing during pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith B Hengen

    Full Text Available GABAergic signaling is essential for proper respiratory function. Potentiation of this signaling with allosteric modulators such as anesthetics, barbiturates, and neurosteroids can lead to respiratory arrest. Paradoxically, pregnant animals continue to breathe normally despite nearly 100-fold increases in circulating neurosteroids. ε subunit-containing GABA(ARs are insensitive to positive allosteric modulation, thus we hypothesized that pregnant rats increase ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on brainstem neurons of the ventral respiratory column (VRC. In vivo, pregnancy rendered respiratory motor output insensitive to otherwise lethal doses of pentobarbital, a barbiturate previously used to categorize the ε subunit. Using electrode array recordings in vitro, we demonstrated that putative respiratory neurons of the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC were also rendered insensitive to the effects of pentobarbital during pregnancy, but unit activity in the VRC was rapidly inhibited by the GABA(AR agonist, muscimol. VRC unit activity from virgin and post-partum females was potently inhibited by both pentobarbital and muscimol. Brainstem ε subunit mRNA and protein levels were increased in pregnant rats, and GABA(AR ε subunit expression co-localized with a marker of rhythm generating neurons (neurokinin 1 receptors in the preBötC. These data support the hypothesis that pregnancy renders respiratory motor output and respiratory neuron activity insensitive to barbiturates, most likely via increased ε subunit-containing GABA(AR expression on respiratory rhythm-generating neurons. Increased ε subunit expression may be critical to preserve respiratory function (and life despite increased neurosteroid levels during pregnancy.

  5. Ferulic acid antioxidant protection against hydroxyl and peroxyl radical oxidation in synaptosomal and neuronal cell culture systems in vitro: structure-activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Jaroslaw; Aksenova, Marina; Stoyanova, Antonia; Butterfield, D Allan

    2002-05-01

    In this study, free radical scavenging abilities of ferulic acid in relation to its structural characteristics were evaluated in solution, cultured neurons, and synaptosomal systems exposed to hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals. Cultured neuronal cells exposed to the peroxyl radical initiator AAPH die in a dose-response manner and show elevated levels of protein carbonyls. The presence of ferulic acid or similar phenolic compounds, however, greatly reduces free radical damage in neuronal cell systems without causing cell death by themselves. In addition, synaptosomal membrane systems exposed to oxidative stress by hydroxyl and peroxyl radical generators show elevated levels of oxidation as indexed by protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation, and ROS measurement. Ferulic acid greatly attenuates these changes, and its effects are far more potent than those obtained for vanillic, coumaric, and cinnamic acid treatments. Moreover, ferulic acid protects against free radical mediated changes in conformation of synaptosomal membrane proteins as monitored by EPR spin labeling techniques. The results presented in this study suggest the importance of naturally occurring antioxidants such as ferulic acid in therapeutic intervention methodology against neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease in which oxidative stress is implicated.

  6. Protection of dopamine neurons by vibration training and up-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in a MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L; He, L X; Huang, S N; Gong, L J; Li, L; Lv, Y Y; Qian, Z M

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown whether the longer duration of vibration training (VT) has a beneficial effect on Parkinson's disease (PD). And also, the mechanisms underlying the reported sensorimotor-improvement in PD induced by short-duration of VT has not been determined. Here, we investigated the effects of longer duration (4 weeks) of low amplitude vibration (LAV) training on the numbers of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra by immunostaining and the levels of dopamine (DA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the striatum by HPLC and ELISA in the chronic MPTP lesion mouse. We demonstrated for the first time that the longer duration of VT could significantly increase the numbers of nigrostriatal DA neurons and the contents of striatal DA and BDNF in the MPTP mice. Our findings implied that longer duration of VT could protect dopaminergic neurons from the MPTP-induced damage probably by upregulating BDNF and also provided evidence for the beneficial effect of longer duration of VT on PD at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:24908088

  7. miR-7 and miR-153 protect neurons against MPP+- induced cell death via upregulation of mTOR pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolia eFragkouli

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Differential expression of microRNAs (miRs in the brain of patients with neurodegenerative diseases suggests that they may have key regulatory roles in the development of these disorders. Two such miRs, miR-7 and miR-153 have recently been shown to target α-synuclein, a protein critically involved in the pathological process of Parkinson’s disease. By using a well-established in culture Parkinson’s disease model that of neurotoxin 1-Methyl-4-Phenyl-Pyridinium (MPP+, we examined whether miR-7 and miR-153 display neuroprotective properties. Herein, we demonstrate that treatment of cortical neurons with MPP+ induced a dose-dependent cell death with apoptotic characteristics. This was reflected in altered intracellular signaling characterized by increased levels of activated kinases p38MAPK and ERK1/2 and reduced levels of activated AKT, p70S6K and SAPK/JNK. Overexpression of miR-7 or miR-153 by adenoviral transduction protected cortical neurons from MPP+-induced toxicity, restored neuronal viability and anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein levels while attenuated activation of caspase-3. Moreover, both miR-7 and miR-153 interfered with MPP+-induced alterations in intracellular signaling pathways in a partially overlapping manner; specifically, they preserved activation of mTOR and SAPK/JNK signaling pathways in the MPP+-treated neurons, while miR-153 also attenuated MPP+-induced activation of p38MAPK. No major effects were observed in the rest of signaling cascades or proteins investigated. Furthermore, the neuroprotective effect of miR-7 and miR-153 was alleviated when MPP+ was co-administered with rapamycin. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-7 and miR-153 protect neurons from cell death by interfering with the MPP+-induced downregulation of mTOR signaling.

  8. Deletion of Nuclear Factor kappa B p50 Subunit Decreases Inflammatory Response and Mildly Protects Neurons from Transient Forebrain Ischemia-induced Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolova, Taisia; Dhungana, Hiramani; Korhonen, Paula; Valonen, Piia; Kolosowska, Natalia; Konttinen, Henna; Kanninen, Katja; Tanila, Heikki; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari

    2016-08-01

    Transient forebrain ischemia induces delayed death of the hippocampal pyramidal neurons, particularly in the CA2 and medial CA1 area. Early pharmacological inhibition of inflammatory response can ameliorate neuronal death, but it also inhibits processes leading to tissue regeneration. Therefore, research efforts are now directed to modulation of post-ischemic inflammation, with the aim to promote beneficial effects of inflammation and limit adverse effects. Transcription factor NF-κB plays a key role in the inflammation and cell survival/apoptosis pathways. In the brain, NF-κB is predominantly found in the form of a heterodimer of p65 (RelA) and p50 subunit, where p65 has a transactivation domain while p50 is chiefly involved in DNA binding. In this study, we subjected middle-aged Nfkb1 knockout mice (lacking p50 subunit) and wild-type controls of both sexs to 17 min of transient forebrain ischemia and assessed mouse performance in a panel of behavioral tests after two weeks of post-operative recovery. We found that ischemia failed to induce clear memory and motor deficits, but affected spontaneous locomotion in genotype- and sex-specific way. We also show that both the lack of the NF-κB p50 subunit and female sex independently protected CA2 hippocampal neurons from ischemia-induced cell death. Additionally, the NF-κB p50 subunit deficiency significantly reduced ischemia-induced microgliosis, astrogliosis, and neurogenesis. Lower levels of hippocampal microgliosis significantly correlated with faster spatial learning. We conclude that NF-κB regulates the outcome of transient forebrain ischemia in middle-aged subjects in a sex-specific way, having an impact not only on neuronal death but also specific inflammatory responses and neurogenesis. PMID:27493832

  9. Protective effects of a polysaccharide from Spirulina platensis on dopaminergic neurons in an MPTP-induced Parkinson′s disease model in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine whether a polysaccharide obtained from Spirulina platensis shows protective effects on dopaminergic neurons. A Parkinson′s disease model was established through the intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP in C57BL/6J mice. Prior to the MPTP injection, some mice were pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of a polysaccharide derived from Spirulina platensis once daily for 10 days. The results showed that the immunoreactive staining and mRNA expression of the dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, in the substantia nigra, were significantly increased in mice pretreated with 800 mg/kg of the polysaccharide compared with those in MPTP-treated mice. The activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the serum and midbrain were also increased significantly in mice injected with MPTP after pretreatment with the polysaccharide from Spirulina platensis. By contrast, the activity of monoamine oxidase B in serum and midbrain maintained unchanged. These experimental findings indicate that the polysaccharide obtained from Spirulina platensis plays a protective role against the MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6J mice, and that the antioxidative properties of this polysaccharide likely underlie its neuroprotective effect.

  10. 黄豆苷元神经保护作用研究进展%Research Progress in Neuronal Protection Mechanisms of Daidzein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽; 张永忠

    2012-01-01

    Daidzein is an isoflavone in an aglycone form. It has a series of biological activities. The animal experiments, clinical researches and epidemiological investigations indicated that daidzein has multiple functions for preventing and treating menopausal symptom, osteoporosis, breast cancer, prostate cancer and other diseases. More attentions have been paid to its capability for neuronal protection. In this paper, the functions and the neuronal protection mechanisms of daidzein have been discussed.%黄豆苷元是大豆异黄酮的3种苷元中的一种,具有多种生物学活性。动物实验、临床研究及流行病学调查表明黄豆苷元对更年期综合症、骨质疏松、乳腺癌、前列腺癌等具有防治作用。近来黄豆苷元的神经保护作用也日益受到重视。故本文对黄豆苷元神经保护方面的作用及其机理进行综述。

  11. Selective Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Modulator 3,3'-Diindolylmethane Impairs AhR and ARNT Signaling and Protects Mouse Neuronal Cells Against Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzemieniec, J; Litwa, E; Wnuk, A; Lason, W; Krzeptowski, W; Kajta, M

    2016-10-01

    The neuroprotective potential of 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), which is a selective aryl hydrocarbon receptor modulator, has recently been shown in cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation. However, there are no data concerning the protective capacity and mechanisms of DIM action in neuronal cells exposed to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective potential of DIM against the hypoxia-induced damage in mouse hippocampal cells in primary cultures, with a particular focus on DIM interactions with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), its nuclear translocator ARNT, and estrogen receptor β (ERβ). In the present study, 18 h of hypoxia induced apoptotic processes, in terms of the mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase-3, and fragmentation of cell nuclei. These effects were accompanied by substantial lactate dehydrogenase release and neuronal cell death. The results of the present study demonstrated strong neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic actions of DIM in hippocampal cells exposed to hypoxia. In addition, DIM decreased the Ahr and Arnt mRNA expression and stimulated Erβ mRNA expression level. DIM-induced mRNA alterations were mirrored by changes in protein levels, except for ERβ, as detected by ELISA, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence labeling. We also demonstrated that DIM decreased the expression of AhR-regulated CYP1A1. Using specific siRNAs, we provided evidence that impairment of AhR and ARNT, but not ERβ plays a key role in the neuroprotective action of DIM against hypoxia-induced cell damage. This study may have implication for identifying new agents that could protect neurons against hypoxia by targeting AhR/ARNT signaling. PMID:26476840

  12. High-throughput functional genomics identifies genes that ameliorate toxicity due to oxidative stress in neuronal HT-22 cells: GFPT2 protects cells against peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzler, Jürgen; Link, Dieter; Schäfer, Rolf; Liebetrau, Wolfgang; Kazinski, Michael; Bonin-Debs, Angelika; Behl, Christian; Buckel, Peter; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    We describe a novel genetic screen that is performed by transfecting every individual clone of an expression clone collection into a separate population of cells in a high-throughput mode. We combined high-throughput functional genomics with experimental validation to discover human genes that ameliorate cytotoxic responses of neuronal HT-22 cells upon exposure to oxidative stress. A collection of 5,000 human cDNAs in mammalian expression vectors were individually transfected into HT-22 cells, which were then exposed to H(2)O(2). Five genes were found that are known to be involved in pathways of detoxification of peroxide (catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, peroxiredoxin-1, peroxiredoxin-5, and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2). The presence of those genes in our "hit list" validates our screening platform. In addition, a set of candidate genes was found that has not been previously described as involved in detoxification of peroxide. One of these genes, which was consistently found to reduce H(2)O(2) -induced toxicity in HT-22, was GFPT2. This gene is expressed at significant levels in the central nervous system (CNS) and encodes glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (GFPT) 2, a rate-limiting enzyme in hexosamine biosynthesis. GFPT has recently also been shown to ameliorate the toxicity of methylmercury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methylmercury causes neuronal cell death in part by protein modification as well as enhancing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The protective effect of GFPT2 against H(2)O(2) toxicity in neuronal HT-22 cells may be similar to its protection against methylmercury in yeast. Thus, GFPT appears to be conserved among yeast and men as a critical target of methylmercury and ROS-induced cytotoxicity.

  13. Controlled enzymatic production of astrocytic hydrogen peroxide protects neurons from oxidative stress via an Nrf2-independent pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Haskew-Layton, Renée E.; Payappilly, Jimmy B.; Smirnova, Natalya A.; Ma, Thong C.; Chan, Kelvin K.; Murphy, Timothy H.; Guo, Hengchang; Langley, Brett; Sultana, Rukhsana; Butterfield, D. Allan; Santagata, Sandro; Alldred, Melissa J.; Gazaryan, Irina G.; Bell, George W.; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    Neurons rely on their metabolic coupling with astrocytes to combat oxidative stress. The transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) appears important for astrocyte-dependent neuroprotection from oxidative insults. Indeed, Nrf2 activators are effective in stroke, Parkinson disease, and Huntington disease models. However, key endogenous signals that initiate adaptive neuroprotective cascades in astrocytes, including activation of Nrf2-mediated gene expression, remai...

  14. Carboxypeptidase E protects hippocampal neurons during stress in male mice by up-regulating prosurvival BCL2 protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, S R K; Thouennon, E; Li, W-S; Cheng, Y; Bhupatkar, J; Cawley, N X; Lane, M; Merchenthaler, I; Loh, Y P

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged chronic stress causing elevated plasma glucocorticoids leads to neurodegeneration. Adaptation to stress (allostasis) through neuroprotective mechanisms can delay this process. Studies on hippocampal neurons have identified carboxypeptidase E (CPE) as a novel neuroprotective protein that acts extracellularly, independent of its enzymatic activity, although the mechanism of action is unclear. Here, we aim to determine if CPE plays a neuroprotective role in allostasis in mouse hippocampus during chronic restraint stress (CRS), and the molecular mechanisms involved. Quantitative RT-PCR/in situ hybridization and Western blots were used to assay for mRNA and protein. After mild CRS (1 h/d for 7 d), CPE protein and mRNA were significantly elevated in the hippocampal CA3 region, compared to naïve littermates. In addition, luciferase reporter assays identified a functional glucocorticoid regulatory element within the cpe promoter that mediated the up-regulation of CPE expression in primary hippocampal neurons following dexamethasone treatment, suggesting that circulating plasma glucocorticoids could evoke a similar effect on CPE in the hippocampus in vivo. Overexpression of CPE in hippocampal neurons, or CRS in mice, resulted in elevated prosurvival BCL2 protein/mRNA and p-AKT levels in the hippocampus; however, CPE(-/-) mice showed a decrease. Thus, during mild CRS, CPE expression is up-regulated, possibly contributed by glucocorticoids, to mediate neuroprotection of the hippocampus by enhancing BCL2 expression through AKT signaling, and thereby maintaining allostasis.

  15. Triheptanoin Protects Motor Neurons and Delays the Onset of Motor Symptoms in a Mouse Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Tesfaye W; Wong, Yide; Barkl-Luke, Mallory E; Ngo, Shyuan T; Thomas, Nicola K; McDonald, Tanya S; Borges, Karin

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that energy metabolism is disturbed in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) patients and animal models. Treatment with triheptanoin, the triglyceride of heptanoate, is a promising approach to provide alternative fuel to improve oxidative phosphorylation and aid ATP generation. Heptanoate can be metabolized to propionyl-CoA, which after carboxylation can produce succinyl-CoA and thereby re-fill the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (anaplerosis). Here we tested the hypothesis that treatment with triheptanoin prevents motor neuron loss and delays the onset of disease symptoms in female mice overexpressing the mutant human SOD1G93A (hSOD1G93A) gene. When oral triheptanoin (35% of caloric content) was initiated at P35, motor neuron loss at 70 days of age was attenuated by 33%. In untreated hSOD1G93A mice, the loss of hind limb grip strength began at 16.7 weeks. Triheptanoin maintained hind limb grip strength for 2.8 weeks longer (pexpression of genes associated with muscle metabolism. In gastrocnemius muscles, the mRNA levels of pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate dehydrogenases and methyl-malonyl mutase were reduced by 24-33% in 10 week old hSOD1G93A mice when compared to wild-type mice, suggesting that TCA cycling in skeletal muscle may be slowed in this ALS mouse model at a stage when muscle strength is still normal. At 25 weeks of age, mRNA levels of succinate dehydrogenases, glutamic pyruvic transaminase 2 and the propionyl carboxylase β subunit were reduced by 69-84% in control, but not in triheptanoin treated hSOD1G93A animals. Taken together, our results suggest that triheptanoin slows motor neuron loss and the onset of motor symptoms in ALS mice by improving TCA cycling. PMID:27564703

  16. Exercise Preconditioning Protects against Spinal Cord Injury in Rats by Upregulating Neuronal and Astroglial Heat Shock Protein 72

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Kuei Chang; Willy Chou; Hung-Jung Lin; Yi-Ching Huang; Ling-Yu Tang; Mao-Tsun Lin; Ching-Ping Chang

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock protein 72 (HSP 72) is a universal marker of stress protein whose expression can be induced by physical exercise. Here we report that, in a localized model of spinal cord injury (SCI), exercised rats (given pre-SCI exercise) had significantly higher levels of neuronal and astroglial HSP 72, a lower functional deficit, fewer spinal cord contusions, and fewer apoptotic cells than did non-exercised rats. pSUPER plasmid expressing HSP 72 small interfering RNA (SiRNA-HSP 72) was inj...

  17. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Clive Bate; Alun Williams

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson’s disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2. I...

  18. Human Adipose Tissue Conditioned Media from Lean Subjects Is Protective against H2O2 Induced Neurotoxicity in Human SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongxiao Wan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue secretes numerous hormone-like factors, which are known as adipokines. Adipokine receptors have been identified in the central nervous system but the potential role of adipokine signaling in neuroprotection is unclear. The aim of this study is to determine (1 Whether adipokines secreted from cultured adipose tissue of lean humans is protective against oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in human SH-SY5Y neuronal cells; and (2 To explore potential signaling pathways involved in these processes. Adipose tissue conditioned media (ATCM from healthy lean subjects completely prevented H2O2 induced neurotoxicity, while this effect is lost after heating ATCM. ATCM activated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and Akt at serine 308 in SH-SY5Y cells. PD98059 (25 µM, SP600125 (5 µM and LY29400 (20 µM partially blocked the protective effects of ATCM against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity. Findings demonstrate that heat-sensitive factors secreted from human adipose tissue of lean subjects are protective against H2O2 induced neurotoxicity and ERK1/2, JNK, and PI3K signaling pathways are involved in these processes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates preliminary but encouraging data to further support that adipose tissue secreted factors from lean human subjects might possess neuroprotective properties and unravel the specific roles of ERK1/2, JNK and PI3K in these processes.

  19. Experimental Cancer Cachexia Changes Neuron Numbers and Peptide Levels in the Intestine: Partial Protective Effects after Dietary Supplementation with L-Glutamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicentini, Geraldo E.; Fracaro, Luciane; de Souza, Sara R. G.; Martins, Heber A.; Guarnier, Flávia A.; Zanoni, Jacqueline N.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysmotility frequently occurs in cancer cachexia and may result from damage to enteric innervation caused by oxidative stress, especially due to glutathione depletion. We assessed the effect of dietary supplementation with 20 g/kg l-glutamine (a glutathione precursor) on the intrinsic innervation of the enteric nervous system in healthy and Walker 256 tumor-bearing Wistar rats during the development of experimental cachexia (14 days), in comparison with non-supplemented rats, by using immunohistochemical methods and Western blotting. The total neural population and cholinergic subpopulation densities in the myenteric plexus, as well as the total population and VIPergic subpopulation in the submucosal plexus of the jejunum and ileum, were reduced in cachectic rats, resulting in adaptive morphometric alterations and an increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) expression, suggesting a neuroplastic response. l-glutamine supplementation prevented decrease in myenteric neuronal density in the ileum, morphometric alterations in the neurons and nerve fibers (in both the plexuses of the jejunum and ileum), and the overexpression of VIP and CGRP. Cancer cachexia severely affected the intrinsic innervation of the jejunum and ileum to various degrees and this injury seems to be associated with adaptive neural plasticity. l-glutamine supplementation presented partial protective effects on the enteric innervation against cancer cachexia, possibly by attenuating oxidative stress. PMID:27635657

  20. Expression of the neuronal adaptor protein X11alpha protects against memory dysfunction in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mitchell, Jacqueline C

    2010-01-01

    X11alpha is a neuronal-specific adaptor protein that binds to the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Overexpression of X11alpha reduces Abeta production but whether X11alpha also protects against Abeta-related memory dysfunction is not known. To test this possibility, we crossed X11alpha transgenic mice with AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice. AbetaPP-Tg2576 mice produce high levels of brain Abeta and develop age-related defects in memory function that correlate with increasing Abeta load. Overexpression of X11alpha alone had no detectable adverse effect upon behavior. However, X11alpha reduced brain Abeta levels and corrected spatial reference memory defects in aged X11alpha\\/AbetaPP double transgenics. Thus, X11alpha may be a therapeutic target for Alzheimer\\'s disease.

  1. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  2. Protection of taurine and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor against excitotoxicity induced by glutamate in primary cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Chunliu; Gupta, Amit; Prentice, Howard; Wu, Jang-Yen

    2010-01-01

    Abstracts Background Both taurine, an inhibitory neurotransmitter and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a growth factor, possess neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties in vitro. However, the mechanisms of their underlying neuroprotective effects are not fully understood. Methods In the present study, we investigated the potential protective benefits of taurine, G-CSF and the combination of taurine and G-CSF against excitotoxicity induced by glutamate in primary cortical neur...

  3. Protective Efficacy of the Caterpillar Mushroom, Ophiocordyceps sinensis (Ascomycetes), from India in Neuronal Hippocampal Cells against Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Mamta; Bhardwaj, Anuja; Manickam, Manimaran; Tulsawani, Rajkumar; Srivastava, Mousami; Sugadev, Ragumani; Misra, Kshipra

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrated the protective efficiency of extracts of the Indian variety of Ophiocordyceps sinensis (=Cordyceps sinensis) (CSEs) in HT22 (murine hippocampal) cells under hypoxic conditions. Various parameters such as cell viability, reactive oxygen species, levels of endogenous antioxidants, inflammatory cytokines, transcription factors, and oxidation of macromolecules were analyzed. In addition, the radical scavenging abilities of hydroxyl radicals, nitric oxide, and superoxide radicals were also studied. Antioxidant compounds, ascorbic acid, hesperidin, and rutin were quantified by high-performance thin-layer chromatography. The information acquired from high-performance thin-layer chromatography profiling was subjected to principal component analysis for data clustering. Findings of this research revealed that ascorbic acid and rutin were highest in aqueous CSE, whereas the maximum amount of hesperidin was found in 25% alcoholic CSE. In vitro studies showed that all the CSEs protected HT22 cells well by upregulating the level of endogenous antioxidants and preventing the oxidation of lipids and proteins. These extracts also reduced the amount of hypoxia-induced inflammatory cytokines and transcription factors on par with the normoxic control with more or less equal protection in the cells under hypoxia, and indicated significant radical scavenging potential. PMID:26756295

  4. PEG-PEI/siROCK2 Protects Against Aβ42-Induced Neurotoxicity in Primary Neuron Cells for Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunyun; Yang, Xingyi; Lei, Qingfeng; Li, Zhong; Hu, Jingyang; Wen, Xiaojun; Wang, Huijun; Liu, Zhonglin

    2015-08-01

    Gene therapy that targets the ROCK2 gene has yielded promising results in the treatment of AD. Our previous study indicated that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 could effectively suppress ROCK2 mRNA expression and showed a promising prospect for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. However, the ability of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 to reduce Aβ-induced cytotoxicity is unknown. To investigate the effect of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 against Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity, primary cultured cortical neurons were pretreated with PEG-PEI/siROCK2 for 24 h and then treated with 5 μM Aβ42 for 24 h. We found that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 increased the cell viability and reduced the number of apoptotic cells induced by Aβ42, as measured using an MTT assay and Annexin V/PI staining. A further study revealed that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 can activate p-Akt, and treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the neuroprotective effects. These results suggest that PEG-PEI/siROCK2 prevents Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and that the activation of PI3K/Akt pathway is involved in neuroprotection. Taken together, these findings shed light on the role of PEG-PEI/siROCK2 as a potential therapeutic agent for AD.

  5. Astroglial U87 Cells Protect Neuronal SH-SY5Y Cells from Indirect Effect of Radiation by Reducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Fas Mediated Apoptotic Pathway in Coculture System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Yasmeen; Rehman, Abdul; Xie, Bingjie; Xu, Jin; Hong, Ma; Hong, Qing; Deng, Yulin

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies provide the evidence that indirect effects of radiation could lead to neuronal cells death but underlying mechanism is not completely understood. On the other hand astroglial cells are known to protect neuronal cells against stress conditions in vivo and invitro. Yet, the fate of neuronal cells and the neuroprotective effect of coculture system (with glial cells) in response to indirect radiation exposure remain rarely discussed. Here, we purpose that the indirect effect of radiation may induce DNA damage by cell cycle arrest and receptor mediated apoptotic cascade which lead to apoptotic death of neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. We also hypothesized that coculture (with glial U87) may relieved the neuronal SH-SY5Y cells from toxicity of indirect effects radiation by reducing DNA damage and expression of apoptotic proteins in vitro. In the present study irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) was used as source of indirect effect of radiation. Neuronal SH-SY5Y cells were exposed to ICCM with and without coculture with (glial U87) in transwell coculture system respectively. Various endpoints such as, cell survival number assay, Annexin V/PI assay, cell cycle analysis by flow cytometer, mRNA level of Fas receptor by q RT-PCR, expression of key apoptotic proteins by western blot and estimation of neurotrophic factors by ELISA method were analyzed into neuronal SH-SY5Y cells with and without co culture after ICCM exposure respectively. We found that ICCM induced DNA damage in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells by significant increase in cell cycle arrest at S-phase (***P cultures system (with glial U87) neuronal SH-SY5Y depicts remarkable resistance against ICCM induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26142731

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    OpenAIRE

    Shi-lei Guo; Zhi-ying Zhang; Yan Xu; Yun-xia Zhi; Chang-jie Han; Yu-hao Zhou; Fang Liu; Hai-yan Lin; Chuan-sen Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were...

  7. Bone Marrow-Derived, Neural-Like Cells Have the Characteristics of Neurons to Protect the Peripheral Nerve in Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-lei Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that “neural-like cells” may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve.

  8. Bone marrow-derived, neural-like cells have the characteristics of neurons to protect the peripheral nerve in microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Yan; Zhi, Yun-Xia; Han, Chang-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Hao; Liu, Fang; Lin, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Chuan-Sen

    2015-01-01

    Effective repair of peripheral nerve defects is difficult because of the slow growth of new axonal growth. We propose that "neural-like cells" may be useful for the protection of peripheral nerve destructions. Such cells should prolong the time for the disintegration of spinal nerves, reduce lesions, and improve recovery. But the mechanism of neural-like cells in the peripheral nerve is still unclear. In this study, bone marrow-derived neural-like cells were used as seed cells. The cells were injected into the distal end of severed rabbit peripheral nerves that were no longer integrated with the central nervous system. Electromyography (EMG), immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the development of the cells in the peripheral nerve environment. The CMAP amplitude appeared during the 5th week following surgery, at which time morphological characteristics of myelinated nerve fiber formation were observed. Bone marrow-derived neural-like cells could protect the disintegration and destruction of the injured peripheral nerve. PMID:25861281

  9. Inhibition of aminoacylase 3 protects rat brain cortex neuronal cells from the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal mercapturate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bragin, Anatol [Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Faull, Kym [Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [Institute of Genomics and Proteomics, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Damoiseaux, Robert; Schibler, Matthew J. [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pushkin, Alexander, E-mail: apushkin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and we hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.

  10. Vestibular Neuronitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  11. A study on the mechanisms by which minocycline protects against MDMA ('ecstasy')-induced neurotoxicity of 5-HT cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Laura; Llopis, Noemi; Torres, Elisa; Izco, Maria; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, M Isabel

    2010-08-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') is a selective 5-HT neurotoxin in rat brain which has been shown to produce acute neuroinflammation characterized by activation of microglia and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). We aimed to determine whether or not minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic capable of inhibiting microglial activation, could prevent the inflammatory response and reduce the toxicity induced by MDMA. Adult male Dark Agouti rats were given minocycline twice a day for 2 days (45 mg/kg on the first day and 90 mg/kg on the second day; 12-h apart, i.p.). MDMA (12.5 mg/kg; i.p.) was given after the third minocycline injection and animals were killed either 1 h later for the determination of NFkappaB binding activity, 3 h later for the determination of IL-1beta, 24 h later for the determination of microglial activation or 7 days later for the determination of [(3)H]-paroxetine binding as a measure of 5-HT neurotoxicity. MDMA increased NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and microglial activation both in the frontal cortex and in the hypothalamus and 7 days later produced a reduction in the density of 5-HT uptake sites in both these brain areas. Minocycline prevented the MDMA-induced increase in NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and microglial activation in the frontal cortex and prevented the 5-HT neurotoxicity 7 days later. However, in the hypothalamus, in spite of preventing MDMA-induced microglial activation, minocycline failed to prevent MDMA-induced NFkappaB activation, IL-1beta release and neurotoxicity. This suggests that the protective mechanism of minocycline against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity in frontal cortex involves inhibition of MDMA-induced NFkappaB activation possibly through a reduction in IL-1beta signalling. PMID:19777321

  12. Ischemic postconditioning protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L; Wang, J; Zhu, H; Wu, X; Zhou, L; Song, Y; Zhu, S; Hao, M; Liu, C; Fan, Y; Wang, Y; Li, Q

    2016-01-01

    As a result of its spatial confinement in cardiomyocytes, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is thought to regulate mitochondrial and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function by maintaining nitroso-redox balance and Ca(2+) cycling. Thus, we hypothesize that ischemic postconditioning (IPostC) protects hearts against ischemic/reperfusion (I/R) injury through an nNOS-mediated pathway. Isolated mouse hearts were subjected to I/R injury in a Langendorff apparatus, H9C2 cells and primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) in vitro. IPostC, compared with I/R, decreased infarct size and improved cardiac function, and the selective nNOS inhibitors abolished these effects. IPostC recovered nNOS activity and arginase expression. IPostC also increased AMP kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and alleviated oxidative stress, and nNOS and AMPK inhibition abolished these effects. IPostC increased nitrotyrosine production in the cytosol but decreased it in mitochondria. Enhanced phospholamban (PLB) phosphorylation, normalized SR function and decreased Ca(2+) overload were observed following the recovery of nNOS activity, and nNOS inhibition abolished these effects. Similar effects of IPostC were demonstrated in cardiomyocytes in vitro. IPostC decreased oxidative stress partially by regulating uncoupled nNOS and the nNOS/AMPK/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha/superoxide dismutase axis, and improved SR function through increasing SR Ca(2+) load. These results suggest that IPostC protected hearts against I/R injury via an nNOS-mediated pathway. PMID:27171264

  13. Inhibition of caspases and intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations are involved in resveratrol protection against apoptosis in rat primary neuron cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-hai GONG; Qian WANG; Jing-shan SHI; Xie-nan HUANG; Qiong LIU; Hu MA

    2007-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the influence of resveratrol (Res),a nutritional antioxidant,on the inhibition of apoptosis in rat primary neuron cultures. Methods:The cultured cortical neurons of neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with Res (0. 1,1.0,and 10.0μmol/L) and oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/RP) with oxygen and glucose were initiated at d 10 in vitro. Neuronal apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry,and morphological changes of neurons were observed by an electron microscope. For the mechanism studies,the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and the transcription of caspases-3 and -12 in neurons were detected by Fura 2/AM loading and real-time RT-PCR,respectively.Results:OGD/RP insult could induce an increase in the apoptotic rate of neurons (from 11.1% to 49.0%),and elicit an obvious morphological change in neurons;pretreatments with Res (0.1,1.0,and 10.0 μmol/L,respectively) significantly reduced the elevated rate of apoptosis to 41.7%,40.8%,and 37.4%,respectively,and ameliorated the neuronal morphological injury. Similarly,the OGD/RP insult obviously elicited the elevated levels of the [Ca2+]i and the expressions of caspases-3 and-12 mRNA in neurons. Res pretreatments markedly depressed the neuronal abnormal elevation of [Ca2+]i and the overexpression of caspases-3 and -12 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusion:Res can attenuate the rat cortical neuronal apoptosis induced by OGD/RP. The mechanisms are,at least partly,due to the inhibition of the calcium overload and the overexpression of caspases-3 and - 12 mRNA.

  14. Partial Abstracts of East China Symposium of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology-2003 (Part Ⅱ)——Signal Transduction Pathway of the Protective Effects of Ginkgolides on Chemical Hypoxia Injury to CorticalNeurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZHU; YeZHANG; Hong-ShanCHEN; Shu-YiJIN

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides (Gin), mainly including A, B, C, J, M and belonging to terpene lactone are one of the main active constituents in the extractof leaves of Ginkgo biloba L. Gin B is a specific and potent antagonist of platelet-activating factor (PAF). Some animal and clinical data showthe potential anti-ischemic/hypoxic effects and obvious protective effects of Gin on neurons, however the mechanisms of which and specially

  15. 五味子酮保护大鼠皮层神经元对抗氯胺酮损伤的实验研究%Protective effect of schisandrone on ketamine-induced damage in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明; 蔡志平; 赵志英

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究五味子酮是否具有保护神经元免受氯胺酮损伤的作用.方法 原代培养的神经元分别加入不同浓度的氯胺酮、五味子酮后培养24 h,观察神经元形态特征和检测神经元存活率.结果 神经元经不同浓度氯胺酮处理后胞体立体感消失,颜色变暗,细胞轮廓不清,较高浓度氯胺酮组神经元轴突断裂,部分死亡.与对照组比较随着氯胺酮剂量的增加神经元存活率逐渐下降(P<0.05).20 μmol/L氯胺酮分别加入30、50、70 μmol/L五味子酮处理组神经元存活率明显高于20 μmol/L氯胺酮组(P<0.05),且70 μmol/L五味子酮组神经元存活率高于其他两组(P<0.05).结论 氯胺酮具有损伤体外培养神经元的作用且成剂量依赖性,五味子酮具有保护神经元免受氯胺酮损伤的作用.%Objective To investigate the protective effect of schisandrone on ketamine-induced damage in cultured rat cortical neurons. Methods Primary cultured neurons were treated respectively by ketamine and schisandrone with different concentration for 24 hours. Neuron morphology was observed and neuron vitality was measured by MTT assay. Results Lack of three-dimensional sense,faded color,uncleared outline were observed in neurons treated by ketamine with different concentrations. Fractured neuron axons or neurons death were observed in neurons treated by high dosage of ketamine. The neuron surviving rate was decreased with the increase of ketamine dosage compared with the figures in the control group ( P <0. 05 ). The surviving rate of neurons treated by 20 μmol/L ketamine combined with 30,50,70 μmol/L schisandrone was higher than those treated by 20 μmol/L ketamine. The surviving rate of neurons treated by 70 μmol/L schisandrone was higher than that of the other two groups ( P <0. 05 ). Conclusion Ketamine can induce injury in cultured neurons in a dosage-dependent way and schisandrone has protective effect on ketamin induced neuron damage.

  16. 17β雌二醇对氯胺酮诱导皮层神经元凋亡的影响%17β-estradiol protects cortical neurons from ketamine-induced apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建立; 高冬艳; 杜彦茹; 侯艳宁

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effects of 17β-es-tradiol on the apoptosis induced by ketamine in primary cultured cortical neurons. Methods Primary cultured cortical neurons were treated with different concentra-tions of ketamine or 17β-estradiol respectively. 24 hours after various treatments, neuron viability was measured by MTT assay. The structure of neurons was analyzed using microscope. Apoptotic neurons were de-termined by the TUNEL assay. The level of pAkt ex-pression was analyzed by Western blot. ResultsCompared with the control group, ketamine decreased neuron viability in a dose-dependent manner. Com-pared with ketamine group, 17β-estradiol increased neuron viability in a dose-dependent manner. Lack of three-dimensional sense,faded color,uncleared outline were observed, and fractured neuron axons or neurons death were also observed in neurons treated by 100μmol · L-1 ketamine. 100 μmol · L-1 ketamine in-creased the number of apoptotic neurons and decreased the expression of pAkt. 0.1 μmol · L-1 17β-estradiol decreased the number of apoptotic neurons and in-creased the expression of pAkt. LY294002 inhibited the protective effects of 17β-estradiol, the number of apoptotic neurons increased, and the level of pAkt de-creased significantly. Conclusion 17β-estradiol ex-erts the neuroprotective effects against ketamine-in-duced neuroapoptosis by activating the PI3 K/Akt sig-naling pathway.%目的:研究17β雌二醇对氯胺酮诱导的原代培养皮层神经元凋亡的影响。方法原代培养大鼠皮层神经元,分别给予不同浓度的氯胺酮及17β雌二醇培养24 h,MTT法检测神经元的存活率,显微镜下观察神经元的形态变化, TUNEL法检测神经元调亡,Western blot法测定pAkt蛋白的表达。结果与对照组比较,氯胺酮能剂量依赖性降低神经元存活率。与氯胺酮组比较,17β雌二醇能剂量依赖性提高神经元的存活率。100μmol·L-1氯胺酮组显微镜下神经元数量减少,胞体

  17. Neuroglobin Plays a Protective Role in Arsenite-Induced Cytotoxicity by Inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1GTPases in Rat Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: We have previously shown that neuroglobin (Ngb expression can be regulated by sodium arsenite (NaAsO2 exposure in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs. However, the precise molecular mechanisms of Ngb action are largely unknown. Ras homolog (Rho guanosine triphosphatases (Rho GTPases are involved in the regulation of a number of cellular processes, including cell cytotoxicity. It has been reported that Ngb can act as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitior (GDI role to inactivate Rho GTPases. Therefore, we investigated Rho GTPases activation induced by NaAsO2 exposure in rat CGNs and effects of Rho GTPases activation on the cells. We also investigated the role of Ngb in this process. Methods: Primary cultures of CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pups. The cytotoxic effects of NaAsO2 on CGNs were evaluated using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and TUNEL staining. RNA interference technology was used to silence Ngb, and the subsequent effects were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Cdc42 and Rac1 activation were measured by pull-down assay and Western blot. Results: NaAsO2 induced cytotoxicity in rat CGNs, increased GTP-bound form of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases in the cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Cdc42 or Rac1 activity using the inhibitor ZCL278 or NSC23766 decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability in the cells exposed to NaAsO2. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown, we show that NaAsO2-induced cytotoxicity was exacerbated, activation of Cdc42 (GTP-Cdc42 and Rac1 (GTP-Rac1 was increased in Ngb RNA silencing cells. Conclusions: cytotoxic effects of NaAsO2 on rat CGNs is induced at least partly by Cdc42 and Rac1 activation, and Ngb can inhibit Cdc42 and Rac1 activation to play protective role in rat CGNs exposed to NaAsO2.

  18. Astrocyte-Specific Overexpression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Protects Hippocampal Neurons and Reduces Behavioral Deficits following Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu K Madathil

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors often suffer from long-lasting cognitive impairment that stems from hippocampal injury. Systemic administration of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, a polypeptide growth factor known to play vital roles in neuronal survival, has been shown to attenuate posttraumatic cognitive and motor dysfunction. However, its neuroprotective effects in TBI have not been examined. To this end, moderate or severe contusion brain injury was induced in mice with conditional (postnatal overexpression of IGF-1 using the controlled cortical impact (CCI injury model. CCI brain injury produces robust reactive astrocytosis in regions of neuronal damage such as the hippocampus. We exploited this regional astrocytosis by linking expression of hIGF-1 to the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP promoter, effectively targeting IGF-1 delivery to vulnerable neurons. Following brain injury, IGF-1Tg mice exhibited a progressive increase in hippocampal IGF-1 levels which was coupled with enhanced hippocampal reactive astrocytosis and significantly greater GFAP levels relative to WT mice. IGF-1 overexpression stimulated Akt phosphorylation and reduced acute (1 and 3d hippocampal neurodegeneration, culminating in greater neuron survival at 10d after CCI injury. Hippocampal neuroprotection achieved by IGF-1 overexpression was accompanied by improved motor and cognitive function in brain-injured mice. These data provide strong support for the therapeutic efficacy of increased brain levels of IGF-1 in the setting of TBI.

  19. Isoflurane post-conditioning protects primary cultures of cortical neurons against oxygen and glucose deprivation injury via upregulation of Slit2/Robo1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-Chun; Zhang, Li-Min; Li, Qiang; Tong, Dong-Yi; Fan, Long-Chang; An, Ping; Wu, Xiu-Ying; Chen, Wei-Min; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2013-11-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested to contribute to isoflurane-mediated neuroprotection. Previous studies have suggested that the protein Slit can abrogate neuronal death in mixed neuronal-glial cultures exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reperfusion (OGD/R). We hypothesized that isoflurane increases the expression of Slit and its receptor Robo when cortical neurons are exposed to OGD/R. To test this hypothesis, we exposed primary cortical neurons to OGD for 90 min and reperfusion for 24h and investigated how isoflurane post-conditioning affected cell survival and expression of Slit2 and receptors Robo1 and Robo4. Cell survival increased after administration of isoflurane, as assessed by the lactate dehydrogenase assay, trypan blue analysis, and propidium iodide staining. Western blot analysis showed that cleaved caspase-3 was increased after OGD/R(PSlit2 and Robo1, but not Robo4, were increased after OGD/R (PSlit2 and Robo1 expression. These findings provide a novel explanation for the pleiotropic effects of isoflurane that could benefit the central nervous system.

  20. Inhibition on the S-nitrosylation of MKK4 can protect hippocampal CA1 neurons in rat cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xue Wen; Hao, Ling Yun; Qi, Su Hua

    2016-06-01

    S-nitrosylation, the nitric oxide-derived post-translational modification of proteins, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological functions. In this present study, a rat model of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion by four-vessel occlusion was generated to assess MKK4 S-nitrosylation. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting were performed to evaluate MKK4 S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation. Neuronal loss was observed using histological detection. These results indicated that endogenous NO promoted the S-nitrosylation of MKK4. However, application of the exogenous NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GNSO), an inhibitor of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist MK801 diminished I/R-induced S-nitrosylation and phosphorylation. These compounds also markedly decreased cerebral I/R-induced degeneration and death of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region in rats. Taken together, we demonstrated for the first time, that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion can induce S-nitrosylation of MKK4. We also found that inhibiting S-nitrosylation and activation of MKK4 resulted in marked decreases in neuronal degeneration and apoptosis, potentially via NMDAR-mediated mechanisms. These findings may lead to a new field of inquiry to investigate the underlying pathogenesis of stoke and the development of novel treatment strategies.

  1. Geniposide, the component of the Chinese herbal formula Tongluojiunao, protects amyloid-βpeptide (1-42)-mediated death of hippocampal neurons via the non-classical estrogen signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao Li; Yan Tan; Qi Zhang; Xu Wang; Angran Fan; Qian Hua; Feng Wang; Haimin Ding; Chunyan Jin; Jinyan Chen; Yanan Zhao; Xiaojing Li; Wenju Chen; Ping Sun

    2014-01-01

    Tongluojiunao (TLJN) is an herbal medicine consisting of two main components, geniposide and ginsenoside Rg1. TLJN has been shown to protect primary cultured hippocampal neurons. How-ever, its mechanism of action remains unclear. In the present study, primary cultured hippocampal neurons treated with Aβ1-42 (10 µmol/L) signiifcantly increased the release of lactate dehydroge-nase, which was markedly reduced by TLJN (2 µL/mL), speciifcally by the component geniposide (26 µmol/L), but not ginsenoside Rg1 (2.5 µmol/L). hTe estrogen receptor inhibitor, ICI182780 (1 µmol/L), did not block TLJN-or geniposide-mediated decrease of lactate dehydrogenase under Aβ1-42-exposed conditions. However, the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor, LY294002 (50 µmol/L) or U0126 (10 µmol/L), respectively blo cked the decrease of lactate dehydrogenase mediated by TLJN or geniposide. hTerefore, these results suggest that the non-classical estrogen pathway (i.e., phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase or mitogen-activated protein kinase) is involved in the neuroprotective effect of TLJN, speciifcally its component, geniposide, against Aβ1-42-mediated cell death in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

  2. 梓醇对MPP+诱导的中脑多巴胺能神经元损伤的保护作用%The protective effect of catalpol against MPP+-induce stress in mesencephalic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田媛媛; 尹忠慧; 王海军

    2013-01-01

    为探讨梓醇对多巴胺能神经元的保护作用,本研究采用梓醇预处理中脑原代细胞,再给予MPP+(10uM)诱导多巴胺能神经元损伤。通过酪氨酸羟化酶(TH)的免疫细胞化学染色、脂质过氧化产物和细胞内活性氧类物质的检测,观察了梓醇对MPP+诱导的多巴胺神经元的影响。结果显示:经梓醇预处理可以明显对多巴胺能神经元起到保护作用,并且抑制脂质过氧化产物和活性氧自由基的生成。本研究结果提示,梓醇很可能成为氧化应激导致的神经细胞损伤性疾病的代替性化学药品。%The present study was to investigate the protective effects of catalpol on dopaminergic neurons were exposured to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+10uM)after pretreated with catalpol. The effests of catalpol on MPP+-induced oxidative stress in cultured dopaminergic neurons were observed by immunocytochemical staining for tyrosine hydroxylase(TH) and measuring intracellular reactive oxygen species(ROS). The results showed that catalpol increased neurons cellular viability and markedly attenuated MPP+-induced dopaminergic neurons death and reduced the content of ROS. These findings suggest that catalpol may be a candidate chemical for the treatment of oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Heat shock protein 70 protects against seizure-induced neuronal cell death in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation-induced nitric oxide synthase II expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Chen, Shang-Der; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chang, Alice Y W; Chan, Samuel H H; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2014-02-01

    Status epilepticus induces subcellular changes that may eventually lead to neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. Based on an animal model of status epilepticus, our laboratory showed previously that sustained hippocampal seizure activity activates nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and upregulates nitric oxide synthase (NOS) II gene expression, leading to apoptotic neuronal cell death in the hippocampus. The present study examined the potential modulatory role of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) on NF-κB signaling in the hippocampus following experimental status epilepticus. In Sprague-Dawley rats, kainic acid (KA) was microinjected unilaterally into the hippocampal CA3 subfield to induce prolonged bilateral seizure activity. Expression of HSP70 was elevated as early as 1h after the elicitation of sustained seizure activity, followed by a progressive elevation that peaked at 24h. Pretreatment with an antisense oligonucleotide against hsp70 decreased the HSP70 expression, and significantly augmented IκB kinase (IKK) activity and phosphorylation of IκBα, alongside enhanced nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB in the hippocampal CA3 neurons and glial cells. These cellular events were followed by enhanced upregulation of NOS II and peroxynitrite expression 3h after sustained seizure activity that led to an increase of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation in the hippocampal CA3 neurons 7days after experimental status epilepticus. We concluded that HSP70 protects against apoptotic cell death induced by NF-κB activation and NOS II-peroxynitrite signaling cascade in the hippocampal CA3 and glial cells following experimental status epilepticus via suppression of IKK activity and deactivation of IκBα.

  4. Pinocembrin protects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in neurons through inhibiting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE-independent signaling pathways and regulating mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Rui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that amyloid-β peptide (Aβ plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Interaction between Aβ and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE has been implicated in neuronal degeneration associated with this disease. Pinocembrin, a flavonoid abundant in propolis, has been reported to possess numerous biological activities beneficial to health. Our previous studies have demonstrated that pinocembrin has neuroprotective effects on ischemic and vascular dementia in animal models. It has been approved by the State Food and Drug Administration of China for clinical use in stroke patients. Against this background, we investigated the effects of pinocembrin on cognitive function and neuronal protection against Aβ-induced toxicity and explored its potential mechanism. Methods Mice received an intracerebroventricular fusion of Aβ25-35. Pinocembrin was administrated orally at 20 mg/kg/day and 40 mg/kg/day for 8 days. Behavioral performance, cerebral cortex neuropil ultrastructure, neuronal degeneration and RAGE expression were assessed. Further, a RAGE-overexpressing cell model and an AD cell model were used for investigating the mechanisms of pinocembrin. The mechanisms underlying the efficacy of pinocembrin were conducted on target action, mitochondrial function and potential signal transduction using fluorescence-based multiparametric technologies on a high-content analysis platform. Results Our results showed that oral administration of pinocembrin improved cognitive function, preserved the ultrastructural neuropil and decreased neurodegeneration of the cerebral cortex in Aβ25-35-treated mice. Pinocembrin did not have a significant effect on inhibiting Aβ1-42 production and scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. However, pinocembrin significantly inhibited the upregulation of RAGE transcripts and protein expression both in vivo and in vitro, and also markedly

  5. Protective effects of a polysaccharide fromSpirulina platensis on dopaminergic neurons in an MPTP-induced Parkinson’s disease model in C57BL/6J mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Zhang; Jian Lu; Ji-guo Zhang; Jun-xia Xie

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether a polysaccharide obtained fromSpirulina platensis shows protective effects on dopaminergic neurons. A Parkinson’s disease model was established through the intraperitoneal injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyr-idine (MPTP) in C57BL/6J mice. Prior to the MPTP injection, some mice were pretreated with intraperitoneal injections of a polysaccharide derived fromSpirulina platensis once daily for 10 days. The results showed that the immunoreactive staining and mRNA expression of the dopa-mine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis, in the substantia nigra, were signiifcantly increased in mice pretreated with 800 mg/kg of the poly-saccharide compared with those in MPTP-treated mice. The activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the serum and midbrain were also increased signiifcantly in mice injected with MPTP after pretreatment with the polysaccharide fromSpirulina platensis. By con-trast, the activity of monoamine oxidase B in serum and midbrain maintained unchanged. These experimental ifndings indicate that the polysaccharide obtained fromSpirulina platensis plays a protective role against the MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6J mice, and that the antioxidative properties of this polysaccharide likely underlie its neuroprotective effect.

  6. Carboxypeptidase E Protects Hippocampal Neurons During Stress in Male Mice by Up-regulating Pro-survival BCL2 Protein Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, S. R. K.; Thouennon, E.; Li, W.-S.; Cheng, Y; Bhupatkar, J.; Cawley, N.X.; Lane, M.; Merchenthaler, I; Loh, Y P

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged chronic stress causing elevated plasma glucocorticoids leads to neurodegeneration. Adaptation to stress (allostasis) through neuroprotective mechanisms can delay this process. Studies on hippocampal neurons have identified carboxypeptidase E (CPE) as a novel neuroprotective protein that acts extracellularly, independent of its enzymatic activity, although the mechanism of action is unclear. Here, we aim to determine if CPE plays a neuroprotective role in allostasis in mouse hippocam...

  7. Protection against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation/Reperfusion Injury in Cortical Neurons by Combining Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Acid with Lyciumbarbarum Polysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Zhe Shi; Di Wu; Jian-Ping Yao; Xiaoli Yao; Zhijian (James) Huang; Peng Li; Jian-Bo Wan; Chengwei He; Huanxing Su

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic stroke, characterized by the disturbance of the blood supply to the brain, is a severe worldwide health threat with high mortality and morbidity. However, there is no effective pharmacotherapy for ischemic injury. Currently, combined treatment is highly recommended for this devastating injury. In the present study, we investigated neuroprotective effects of the combination of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) and Lyciumbarbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on cortical neurons u...

  8. Conditional deletion of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 reveals that astrocytic GLT-1 protects against fatal epilepsy while neuronal GLT-1 contributes significantly to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Geraldine T; Sun, Yan; Frederick, Natalie M; Zhou, Yun; Dhamne, Sameer C; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Miranda, Clive; Bedoya, Edward A; Fischer, Kathryn D; Armsen, Wencke; Wang, Jianlin; Danbolt, Niels C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Aoki, Chiye J; Rosenberg, Paul A

    2015-04-01

    GLT-1 (EAAT2; slc1a2) is the major glutamate transporter in the brain, and is predominantly expressed in astrocytes, but at lower levels also in excitatory terminals. We generated a conditional GLT-1 knock-out mouse to uncover cell-type-specific functional roles of GLT-1. Inactivation of the GLT-1 gene was achieved in either neurons or astrocytes by expression of synapsin-Cre or inducible human GFAP-CreERT2. Elimination of GLT-1 from astrocytes resulted in loss of ∼80% of GLT-1 protein and of glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes. This loss was accompanied by excess mortality, lower body weight, and seizures suggesting that astrocytic GLT-1 is of major importance. However, there was only a small (15%) reduction that did not reach significance of glutamate uptake into crude forebrain synaptosomes. In contrast, when GLT-1 was deleted in neurons, both the GLT-1 protein and glutamate uptake activity that could be solubilized and reconstituted in liposomes were virtually unaffected. These mice showed normal survival, weight gain, and no seizures. However, the synaptosomal glutamate uptake capacity (Vmax) was reduced significantly (40%). In conclusion, astrocytic GLT-1 performs critical functions required for normal weight gain, resistance to epilepsy, and survival. However, the contribution of astrocytic GLT-1 to glutamate uptake into synaptosomes is less than expected, and the contribution of neuronal GLT-1 to synaptosomal glutamate uptake is greater than expected based on their relative protein expression. These results have important implications for the interpretation of the many previous studies assessing glutamate uptake capacity by measuring synaptosomal uptake. PMID:25834045

  9. Dimethyl Fumarate Protects Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells and Neurons from Oxidative Damage through Nrf2-ERK1/2 MAPK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common multifocal inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. Due to the progressive neurodegenerative nature of MS, developing treatments that exhibit direct neuroprotective effects are needed. Tecfidera™ (BG-12 is an oral formulation of the fumaric acid esters (FAE, containing the active metabolite dimethyl fumarate (DMF. Although BG-12 showed remarkable efficacy in lowering relapse rates in clinical trials, its mechanism of action in MS is not yet well understood. In this study, we reported the potential neuroprotective effects of dimethyl fumarate (DMF on mouse and rat neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons. We found that DMF increased the frequency of the multipotent neurospheres and the survival of NPCs following oxidative stress with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment. In addition, utilizing the reactive oxygen species (ROS assay, we showed that DMF reduced ROS production induced by H2O2. DMF also decreased oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Using motor neuron survival assay, DMF significantly promoted survival of motor neurons under oxidative stress. We further analyzed the expression of oxidative stress-induced genes in the NPC cultures and showed that DMF increased the expression of transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 at both levels of RNA and protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated the involvement of Nrf2-ERK1/2 MAPK pathway in DMF-mediated neuroprotection. Finally, we utilized SuperArray gene screen technology to identify additional anti-oxidative stress genes (Gstp1, Sod2, Nqo1, Srxn1, Fth1. Our data suggests that analysis of anti-oxidative stress mechanisms may yield further insights into new targets for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS.

  10. 孕酮抑制Aβ诱导星形胶质细胞活化所致神经元损伤%Progesterone protects neurons against impairment induced by Aβactivated astrocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洁; 吴红海; 于洋; 秦亚彬; 韩晓磊; 侯艳宁

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of progester-one ( PROG) in protecting the neurons against impair-ment induced by the Aβ1-42 activated astrocytes, and the underlying molecular mechanism. Methods The astrocytes were divided into 5 groups: control, Aβ, and Aβplus PROG groups treated with 3 different con-centrations of progesterone for 24h. Then, Aβand pro-gesterone were removed, and neurons were co-cultured with the treated astrocytes. MTT assay was used to e-valuate the viability of cultured neurons; ELISA was used to detect the levels of IL-1βand TNF-αin culture media of astrocytes; immunofluorescence and Western blot were performed to detect the activation of NF-κB in astrocytes. Results PROG dose dependently pro-tected against Aβ1-42 activated astrocytes induced via-bility decrease in co-cultured neurons. Aβ induced release of IL-1β and TNF-α from astrocytes, and in-crease of NF-κB activity was abolished by progesterone treatment. Conclusion PROG protects the neurons through inhibiting the reactivity of astrocytes, and the underlying mechanism involves the NF-κB signal trans-duction.%目的:探究孕酮抑制Aβ诱导的星形胶质细胞活化,发挥神经元保护作用及其机制,为孕酮在阿尔采末病( Alzheimer’ s disease, AD)防治中的应用提供实验依据。方法将原代培养的星形胶质细胞随机分为对照组、Aβ组及Aβ加3个浓度孕酮组,分别处理24 h后,与神经元共培养。MTT法检测神经元的存活率;ELISA检测条件培养液中炎症因子IL-1β和TNF-α的水平;免疫荧光法和Western blot检测星形胶质细胞NF-κB的活性。结果孕酮浓度依赖地抑制Aβ诱导的星形胶质细胞活化引起的神经元存活率下降;抑制Aβ诱导的星形胶质细胞IL-1β和TNF-α释放的升高;抑制Aβ诱导星形胶质细胞NF-κB的活性增加。结论孕酮通过抑制Aβ诱导的星形胶质细胞活化,发挥神经元保护作用,其作用机制可能与NF-κB信号通路有关。

  11. [Mirror neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia Vila, Francisco José

    2011-01-01

    Mirror neurons were recently discovered in frontal brain areas of the monkey. They are activated when the animal makes a specific movement, but also when the animal observes the same movement in another animal. Some of them also respond to the emotional expression of other animals of the same species. These mirror neurons have also been found in humans. They respond to or "reflect" actions of other individuals in the brain and are thought to represent the basis for imitation and empathy and hence the neurobiological substrate for "theory of mind", the potential origin of language and the so-called moral instinct.

  12. Protective effect of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain slices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lirong Jin; Zhen Hong; Chunjiu Zhong; Yang Wang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, the use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease have solely focused on in vivo animal models. Because of the number of influencing factors, it has been difficult to determine a consistent outcome. OBJECTIVE: To establish an injury model in brain slices of substantia nigra and striatum using 1-methyl-4-phenylpytidinium ion (MPP+), and to investigate the effect of MSCs on dopaminergic neurons following MPP+ induced damage.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: An in vitro, randomized, controlled, animal experiment using immunohistochemistry was performed at the Laboratory of the Department of Anatomy, Fudan University between January 2004 and December 2006.MATERIALS: Primary MSC cultures were obtained from femurs and tibias of adult Sprague Dawley rats. Organotypic brain slices were isolated from substantia nigra and striatum of 1-day-old Sprague Dawley rat pups. Monoclonal antibodies for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, 1:5 000) were from Santa Cruz (USA); goat anti-rabbit IgG antibodies labeled with FITC were from Boster Company (China).METHODS: Organotypic brain slices were cultured for 5 days in whole culture medium supplemented with 50% DMEM, 25% equine serum, and 25% Tyrode's balanced salt solution. The medium was supplemented with 5 μg/mL Ara-C, and the culture was continued for an additional 5 days. The undergrowth of brain slices was discarded at day 10. Eugonic brain slices were cultured with basal media for an additional 7 days. The brain slices were divided into three groups: control, MPP+ exposure, and co-culture. For the MPP+ group, MPP+ (30 μmol/L) was added to the media at day 17 and brain slices were cultured for 4 days, followed by control media. For the co-culture group, the MPP+ injured brain slices were placed over MSCs in the well and were further cultured for 7 days.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: After 28 days in culture, neurite outgrowth was examined in the brain slices under phase

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Modulation of Microglia via CD163-Targeted Glucocorticoids Protects Dopaminergic Neurons in the 6-OHDA Parkinson's Disease Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tentillier, Noemie; Etzerodt, Anders; Olesen, Mads N;

    2016-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Increasing evidence supports a decisive role for inflammation in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease (PD). The immune response in PD seems to involve, not only microglia, but also other immune cells infiltrated into the brain. Indeed, we observed here the infiltration...... of macrophages, specifically CD163+ macrophages, into the area of neurodegeneration in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) PD model. Therefore, we investigated the therapeutic potential of the infiltrated CD163+ macrophages to modulate local microglia in the brain to achieve neuroprotection. To do so, we designed...... intravenous CD163-targeted liposomes with Dexa for 3 weeks exhibited better motor performance than the control groups and had minimal glucocorticoid-driven side effects. Furthermore, these animals showed better survival of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra and an increased number of microglia...

  14. Antagomirs targeting microRNA-134 increase hippocampal pyramidal neuron spine volume in vivo and protect against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Engel, Tobias; Merino-Serrais, Paula; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Reynolds, James; Reschke, Cristina R; Conroy, Ronan M; McKiernan, Ross C; deFelipe, Javier; Henshall, David C

    2015-07-01

    Emerging data support roles for microRNA (miRNA) in the pathogenesis of various neurologic disorders including epilepsy. MicroRNA-134 (miR-134) is enriched in dendrites of hippocampal neurons, where it negatively regulates spine volume. Recent work identified upregulation of miR-134 in experimental and human epilepsy. Targeting miR-134 in vivo using antagomirs had potent anticonvulsant effects against kainic acid-induced seizures and was associated with a reduction in dendritic spine number. In the present study, we measured dendritic spine volume in mice injected with miR-134-targeting antagomirs and tested effects of the antagomirs on status epilepticus triggered by the cholinergic agonist pilocarpine. Morphometric analysis of over 6,400 dendritic spines in Lucifer yellow-injected CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed increased spine volume in mice given antagomirs compared to controls that received a scrambled sequence. Treatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs did not alter performance in a behavioral test (novel object location). Status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine was associated with upregulation of miR-134 within the hippocampus of mice. Pretreatment of mice with miR-134 antagomirs reduced the proportion of animals that developed status epilepticus following pilocarpine and increased animal survival. In antagomir-treated mice that did develop status epilepticus, seizure onset was delayed and total seizure power was reduced. These studies provide in vivo evidence that miR-134 regulates spine volume in the hippocampus and validation of the seizure-suppressive effects of miR-134 antagomirs in a model with a different triggering mechanism, indicating broad conservation of anticonvulsant effects.

  15. Insect peptide CopA3-induced protein degradation of p27Kip1 stimulates proliferation and protects neuronal cells from apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Taek; Kim, Dae Hong; Lee, Min Bum; Nam, Hyo Jung; Kang, Jin Ku; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Ik Hwan [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Heon [Department of Biomedical Science, Jungwon University, Goesan, Chungcheongbukdo 367-700 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae Sam [Department of Agricultural Biology, National Academy of Agricultural Science, RDA, Suwon 441-707 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho, E-mail: hokim@daejin.ac.kr [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Daejin University, Pocheon, Gyeonggido 487-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •CopA3 peptide isolated from the Korean dung beetle has antimicrobial activity. •Our study reported that CopA3 has anticancer and immunosuppressive effects. •We here demonstrated that CopA3 has neurotropic and neuroprotective effects. •CopA3 degrades p27Kip1 protein and this mediates effects of CopA3 on neuronal cells. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated that the antibacterial peptide, CopA3 (a D-type disulfide dimer peptide, LLCIALRKK), inhibits LPS-induced macrophage activation and also has anticancer activity in leukemia cells. Here, we examined whether CopA3 could affect neuronal cell proliferation. We found that CopA3 time-dependently increased cell proliferation by up to 31 ± 2% in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, and up to 29 ± 2% in neural stem cells isolated from neonatal mouse brains. In both cell types, CopA3 also significantly inhibited the apoptosis and viability losses caused by 6-hydroxy dopamine (a Parkinson disease-mimicking agent) and okadaic acid (an Alzheimer’s disease-mimicking agent). Immunoblotting revealed that the p27Kip1 protein (a negative regulator of cell cycle progression) was markedly degraded in CopA3-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Conversely, an adenovirus expressing p27Kip1 significantly inhibited the antiapoptotic effects of CopA3 against 6-hydroxy dopamine- and okadaic acid-induced apoptosis, and decreased the neurotropic effects of CopA3. These results collectively suggest that CopA3-mediated protein degradation of p27Kip1 may be the main mechanism through which CopA3 exerts neuroprotective and neurotropic effects.

  16. Synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids protect retinal neurons from AMPA excitotoxicity in vivo, via activation of CB1 receptors: Involvement of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokona, Despina; Thermos, Kyriaki

    2015-07-01

    Cannabinoids have been suggested to protect retinal ganglion cells in different models of toxicity, but their effects on other retinal neurons are poorly known. We investigated the neuroprotective actions of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (Anandamide/AEA) and the synthetic cannabinoids R1-Methanandamide (MethAEA) and HU-210, in an in vivo retinal model of AMPA excitotoxicity, and the mechanisms involved in the neuroprotection. Sprague-Dawley rats were intravitreally injected with PBS or AMPA in the absence or presence of the cannabinoid agonists. Brain nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity (IR), as well as TUNEL staining, assessed the AMPA-induced retinal amacrine cell loss and the dose-dependent neuroprotection afforded by cannabinoids. The CB1 receptor selective antagonist AM251 and the PI3K/Akt inhibitor wortmannin reversed the cannabinoid-induced neuroprotection, suggesting the involvement of CB1 receptors and the PI3K/Akt pathway in cannabinoids' actions. Experiments with the CB2 agonist JWH015 and [(3)H]CP55940 radioligand binding suggested that the CB2 receptor is not involved in the neuroprotection. AEA and HU-210 induced phosphorylation of Akt but only AEA induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 kinases, as revealed by western blot analysis. To investigate the role of caspase-3 in the AMPA-induced cell death, the caspase-3 inhibitor Z-DEVD-FMK was co-injected with AMPA. Z-DEVD-FMK had no effect on AMPA excitotoxicity. Moreover, no difference was observed in the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK kinases between PBS- and AMPA-treated retinas. These results suggest that endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids protect retinal amacrine neurons from AMPA excitotoxicity in vivo via a mechanism involving the CB1 receptors, and the PI3K/Akt and/or MEK/ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

  17. Protective Effects of Astaxanthin on Hippocampal Neurons Damage Induced by hydrogen peroxide%虾青素对活性氧所致海马神经细胞氧化损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹秀明; 祁小倩; 王珊珊

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of astaxanthin on oxidative damage of hippocampal neurons injured by H2O2. Methods The hippocampal neurons isolated from SD rats and cultured by the B27 serun-free culture medium were subjected to oxidative stress induced by 2. 0 10"4 mol L-1 H2O2 for 24hr and treated with or without astaxanthin. The cell viability was examined using the microculture tetrazolium test (MTT) assay. The release of LDH, the activity of SOD.XAT.GSH-Px and the content of MDA were determined employing chemical colorimetry. Results Astaxanthin could enhance the survival rate, inhibit the increasing release of LDH of hippocanmal neurons induced by H2O2. Astaxanthin significantly increased the activity of SOD.CAT and GSH-Px (P<0.01). Conclusion Astaxanthin has a protective effect on hippocampal neurons against H2 O2 damage across wide range of concentrations (10-7~10-5 mol o L-1).%目的 从细胞水平上研究了虾青素对活性氧所致海马神经细胞损伤的保护作用.方法 通过B27无血清培养法进行SD乳鼠的大脑海马神经细胞的分离、培养及其鉴定;MTT法检测细胞存活率,比色法测定细胞LDH的释放量,SOD、CAT活性、GSH-Px的活力及MDA的含量.结果 虾青素能提高活性氧损伤过的海马神经细胞的存活率,减少细胞LDH的释放量,并增加细胞SOD、CAT活性、GSH-Px的活力,降低MDA的含量.结论 虾青素对活性氧诱导的海马神经细胞损伤具有保护作用.

  18. Phytic Acid Protects against 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Apoptosis in Normal and Iron Excess Conditions in a Cell Culture Model

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Xu; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Reddy, Manju B.

    2011-01-01

    Iron may play an important role in Parkinson's disease (PD) since it can induce oxidative stress-dependent neurodegeneration. The objective of this study was to determine whether the iron chelator, phytic acid (IP6) can protect against 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) induced apoptosis in immortalized rat mesencephalic dopaminergic cells under normal and iron-excess conditions. Caspase-3 activity was increased about 6-fold after 6-OHDA treatment (compared to control; < . 0 0 1 ) and 30 μmol/L I...

  19. Quercetin Protects against Okadaic Acid-Induced Injury via MAPK and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathways in HT22 Hippocampal Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress and the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein play essential roles in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Quercetin is a major flavonoid that has anti-oxidant, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of quercetin to HT22 cells (a cell line from mouse hippocampal neurons. We found that Okadaic acid (OA induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein at Ser199, Ser396, Thr205, and Thr231 and produced oxidative stress to the HT22 cells. The oxidative stress suppressed the cell viability and decreased the levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, superoxide dismutase (SOD, mitochondria membrane potential (MMP and Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px. It up-regulated malondialdehyde (MDA production and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. In addition, phosphoinositide 3 kinase/protein kinase B/Glycogen synthase kinase3β (PI3K/Akt/GSK3β and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK were also involved in this process. We found that pre-treatment with quercetin can inhibited OA-induced the hyperphosphorylation of tau protein and oxidative stress. Moreover, pre-treatment with quercetin not only inhibited OA-induced apoptosis via the reduction of Bax, and up-regulation of cleaved caspase 3, but also via the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/GSK3β, MAPKs and activation of NF-κB p65. Our findings suggest the therapeutic potential of quercetin to treat AD.

  20. Erythropoietin protects neuron against ketamine induced injuries%促红细胞生成素保护神经元免受氯胺酮所致的损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚游; 姚尚龙; 吴艳

    2008-01-01

    目的 研究促红细胞生成素(EPO)是否可以保护神经元免受氯胺酮所致损伤.方法 原代培养神经元,分别加入不同浓度的氯胺酮、EPO后培养24 h.噻唑蓝(MTT)法检测神经元存活率,TdT介导的dUTP缺口末端标记技术(TUNEL)检测凋亡神经元,荧光法测定半胱氨酸蛋白水解酶(caspase)-3活性,蛋白质印迹法检测磷酸化蛋白激酶B(pAkt)的表达.结果 1、10、30 μmol/L氯胺酮处理组神经元的存活率分别为(91±5)%、(42±6)%和(23±7)%,明显低于对照组(P<0.05或0.01);10 μmol/L氯胺酮分别加0.3、1、3、10 U/mlEPO处理组神经元存活率分别为(73±6)%、(86±9)%、(78±8)%和(71±10)%,明显高于10 μmol/L氯胺酮组(P<0.05或0.01).10 μmol/L氯胺酮组神经元凋亡增加,caspase-3相对活性为(280±60)%,明显高于对照组[(97±15)%,P<0.01],而pAkt的表达减少.10 μmol/L氯胺酮+1 U/mlEPO组caspase-3相对活性为(130±30)%,明显低于10 μmol/L氯胺酮组,而pAkt表达增加.磷酸肌醇3激酶(PI3K)抑制剂LY294002拮抗了EPO的作用.结论 EPO可以保护神经元免受氯胺酮导致的损伤,其保护作用是通过促进pAkt表达实现的.%Objective To investigate whether erythropoietin(EPO)protects neuron against ketamine induced injuries.Methods Neurons were obtained from SD rat brain,cultured.and treated with ketamine of the concentrations of 0.1,1,10,and 30 μmol/L respectively.Neurons not treated by any agent were used as control group.Another neurons were divided into 3 groups undergoing the treatment of ketamine of the terminal concentration of 10 μmol/L,EPO+ketamine group undergoing the treatment of 10 μmol/L ketamine and EPO of the terminal concentrations of 0.3,1,3,and 10 U/ml,and ketamine+EPO+LY294002 group undergoing the treatment of 10 μmol/L ketamine, 1 U/ml EPO, and 10 μmol/L LY294002,a P13k inhibitor.Twenty-four hours after the co-inoculation the survival rates of the neurons were detected by MTT method.The apoptotic rate

  1. 活化 Caspase 9在牛磺酸保护神经细胞中的保护作用%Taurine protects neuronal cells by suppressing Caspase 9 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘阳; 王李瑶; 张庆华; 夏鹤春; 孙涛

    2014-01-01

    目的:神经系统疾病与神经细胞的凋亡密切相关。文中旨在探讨牛磺酸通过活化Caspase 9对海马神经元细胞凋亡的抑制作用,进而探讨牛磺酸对神经系统的保护作用及其机制。方法海马神经元细胞分为4组:对照组、损伤凋亡组、牛磺酸低剂量保护组、牛磺酸高剂量保护组。监测各组细胞生长状态,MTT监测各组细胞凋亡状态,免疫荧光及蛋白印迹法测定Caspase 9在各组中的表达水平。结果与对照组比较,损伤凋亡组海马神经元细胞生长不良,MTT实验示损失凋亡组细胞活力(A值为0.102±0.025)明显低于对照组(A值为0.643±0.013),低、高剂量干预组细胞活力(A值分别为0.504±0.072、0.452±0.029)明显提高(P<0.05);免疫荧光测定示损伤凋亡组Caspase 9活化明显增高(A值为61386.8±10083.6),对照组(A值为4502.2±2518.1)及牛磺酸低、高剂量保护组(A值分别为20077.4±4187.5和13976.2±7044.1)活化较低(P<0.05);蛋白印迹法示损伤凋亡组Caspase 9表达(A值为1.23)较对照组(A值为0.17)及低、高剂量保护组(A值分别为0.21和0.19),明显升高(P<0.05)。结论牛磺酸可抑制Caspase 9的活化,对神经细胞有较好的保护作用。%Objective Neurological diseases are closely associated with the apoptosis of neuronal cells .This article aims to study the inhibitory effect of taurine on the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons by activating Caspase 9 as well as its protective effect on the nervous system and its mechanisms . Methods Mouse hippocampal neuronal cells were randomly divided into four groups:control, injury and apoptosis, low-dose taurine protection, and high-dose taurine protection.The proliferation of the neuronalcells was observed, their apoptosis examined by MTT colorimetric assay, and the expression of Caspase 9 in different groups

  2. The 5α-reductase inhibitor Dutasteride but not Finasteride protects dopamine neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litim, Nadhir; Bourque, Mélanie; Al Sweidi, Sara; Morissette, Marc; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2015-10-01

    Finasteride and Dutasteride are 5α-reductase inhibitors used in the clinic to treat endocrine conditions and were recently found to modulate brain dopamine (DA) neurotransmission and motor behavior. We investigated if Finasteride and Dutasteride have a neuroprotective effect in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) male mice as a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Experimental groups included saline treated controls and mice treated with saline, Finasteride (5 and 12.5 mg/kg) or Dutasteride (5 and 12.5 mg/kg) for 5 days before and 5 days after MPTP administration (4 MPTP injections, 6.5 mg/kg on day 5 inducing a moderate DA depletion) and then they were euthanized. MPTP administration decreased striatal DA contents measured by HPLC while serotonin contents remained unchanged. MPTP mice treated with Dutasteride 5 and 12.5 mg/kg had higher striatal DA and metabolites (DOPAC and HVA) contents with a decrease of metabolites/DA ratios compared to saline-treated MPTP mice. Finasteride had no protective effect on striatal DA contents. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA levels measured by in situ hybridization in the substantia nigra pars compacta were unchanged. Dutasteride at 12.5 mg/kg reduced the effect of MPTP on specific binding to striatal DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) measured by autoradiography. MPTP reduced compared to controls plasma testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry; Dutasteride and Finasteride increased plasma T levels while DHT levels remained low. In summary, our results showed that a 5α-reductase inhibitor, Dutasteride has neuroprotective activity preventing in male mice the MPTP-induced loss of several dopaminergic markers. PMID:26006269

  3. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neuronal Migration Disorders Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Neuronal Migration Disorders? Neuronal migration disorders (NMDs) are a group ...

  4. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Fact Sheet See a list of all ... can I get more information? What are motor neuron diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  5. Protective effect of paclitaxel on injury of hippocampal neurons induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion%紫杉醇对脑缺血-再灌注诱导海马神经元损伤的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐素华; 巩娟娟; 倪小宇

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究紫杉醇对脑缺血-再灌注(I-R)后海马神经元损伤的保护作用及分子机制.方法 SD大鼠随机分为假手术对照组(A组)、I-R对照组(B组)、1% DMSO溶剂处理组(C组)、紫杉醇8 μg/kg组(D组,缺血前30 min脑室注射),每组各10只.采用大鼠四动脉结扎全脑缺血模型,应用免疫印迹法检测紫杉醇对B细胞淋巴瘤-白血病2(Bcl-2)、半胱天冬氨酸蛋白酶3(Caspase-3)表达的影响.结果 与A组相比,B、C组Bcl-2及Caspase-3磷酸化表达增加(P<0.05),而D组Bcl-2及Caspase-3磷酸化表达较B组明显减少(P<0.05).结论 紫杉醇可能对脑I-R诱导海马神经元的损伤有保护作用;这种保护作用可能与Bcl-2、Caspase-3蛋白活性密切相关.%Objective To investigate the effect and molecular mechanism of paclitaxel on the injury of hippocampal neurons induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion(I-R). Methods SD rats were randomly divided into four groups of A(sham operation) ,B(I-R model) ,C(injection of 1% DMSO) and D(intraventricular injection of paclitaxel 8 μg/kg 30 min before ischemia) with 10 rats each. The cerebral ischemia model was established by four-vessel occlusion, and the expressions of B cell lymphoma/leukemia-2(Bcl-2) and cystein asparate proteinase-3(Caspase-3) were detected by Western blot Results Compared with group A, the phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 was increased in groups of B and C(P<0. 05). However, the phosphorylation of Bcl-2 and Caspase-3 in group D was significantly lower than that in group B(P<0. 05). Conclusion Paclitaxel may protect I-R-induced injury of hippocampal neurons, which is probably related with the activation of Bcl-2 and Caspase-3.

  6. [Neuronal network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmeier, M; Maresová, D

    2005-01-01

    Function of the central nervous system is based on mutual relations among the nerve cells. Description of nerve cells and their processes, including their contacts was enabled by improvement of optical features of the microscope and by the development of impregnation techniques. It is associated with the name of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723), J. Ev. Purkyne (1787-1869), Camillo Golgi (1843-1926), and Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934). Principal units of the neuronal network are the synapses. The term synapse was introduced into neurophysiology by Charles Scott Sherrington (1857-1952). Majority of the interactions between nerve cells is mediated by neurotransmitters acting at the receptors of the postsynaptic membrane or at the autoreceptors of the presynaptic part of the synapse. Attachment of the vesicles to the presynaptic membrane and the release of the neurotransmitter into the synaptic cleft depend on the intracellular calcium concentration and on the presence of several proteins in the presynaptic element.

  7. The role of metallothionein II in neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth;

    2003-01-01

    -I+II can affect neurons directly. It is likely that MT isoforms could be beneficial also during neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we have examined if MT-II affects survival and neurite extension of dopaminergic and hippocampal neurons. We show for the first time that MT-II treatment can...... significantly stimulate neurite extension from both dopaminergic and hippocampal neurons. Moreover, MT-II treatment significantly increases survival of dopaminergic neurons exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and protects significantly hippocampal neurons from amyloid beta-peptide-induced neurotoxicity...

  8. Protection of berberin on cortical neurons of rat injured by Aβ25-35%小檗碱对Aβ25-35损伤大鼠皮层神经元的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静; 张艳军; 常亮堂

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the protective effect of berberin on the cortical neurons of rat injured by Aβ25-35 and investigate its mechamism. Methods Aβ25-35 was used to treat the cortical neurons of primary culture rat, at the final concentration of 40 μg/mL for 36 h, Alzheimer's disease (AD) model was reproduced, and then interferred with berberin together. The experiments were divided into control, model, 0.5 μmol/L berberin, and 2 μmol/L berberin groups. Hoechst33258 stain assay was used to observe the morphological change, Annexin V-FITC/PI double stain flow cytometry assay was used to examine the early neural apoptisis; Western blotting assay was used to observe the activated Caspase-3 protien expression; and RT-PCR assay was used to investigate the mRNA expression of target of Rapamycin (mTOR) related genes. Results Neural apoptosis of AD model significantly increased when treated with 40 μg/mL Aβ25-35 for 36 h compared with the control group (P<0.01). Following 2 μmol/L berberin treatment, the percentage of Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis significantly decreased (P<0.05) compared with the model group. Berberin (0.5 and 2 μmol/mL) inhibited Aβ25-35-induced abnormal activated Caspase-3 expression, down-regulated the expression of abnormal activated mTOR mRNA and S6kinase P70S6K mRNA (P<0.05, 0.01), and up-regulated the expression of 4E binding protein (4EBP1) mRNA of AD model (P<0.01). Conclusion Berberin exhibits the protective effects against Aβ25-35-induced toxicity in cortical neurons of primary cultured rat, which maybe relates with the inhibition of mTOR signal pathway.%目的 考察小檗碱对Aβ25-35损伤的神经元的保护作用,并初步探讨其机制.方法 40μg/mL Aβ25-35作用原代培养大鼠脑皮层神经元36 h,复制阿尔茨海默病(Alzheimer's disease,AD)细胞模型,同时加入小檗碱进行干预,实验分为对照组、模型组、0.5μmol/L小檗碱组、2μmol/L小檗碱组.通过Hoechst33258染色

  9. Role of propofol in protection of neurons against ischemia/reperfusion injury%异丙酚对缺血再灌注损伤神经细胞的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娜; 周建平; 黄安宁; 袁京; 许秀丽; 冯泽国

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the role of propofol in protection of neurons against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Methods Hippocampal cells of Wistar rats at the age of 12h were cultured in vitro and a hypoxia and reoxygenation model of primary hippocampal cells was established. Morphology of hippocampal cells was observed. Cell survival rate was calculated with trypan blue staining. An in vivo model of I/R injury was established. The rats were divided into middle cerebral artery occlusion(MCAO) model group, propofol treatment group, and normal control group. Longa's neurological symptoms were scored. Cerebral infarction size was measured with TTC and H&E staining. Results The survived hippocampal cells were characterized by a large number of cytodendrites with a dense neuron net in hypoxia and reoxygenation model group after propofol treatment. The cell survival rate was significantly higher in propofol(100μmol/L) treatment group than in MCAO model group(56.2 ± 3.7 vs 38.6 ± 4.3, P<0.05). The score of neurological symptoms was significantly higher in 24h MCAO model group than in propofol treatment group (0.8 ± 0.5 vs 2.3 ± 0.5, P<0.05). TTC and H&E staining indicated that the infarction size was significantly smaller in propofol treatment group than in MCAO model group (123.21 ± 11.04 vs 214.95 ± 16.79, P<0.05). H&E staining showed more normal cells in propofol treatment group than in MCAO model group. Conclusion Propofol can protect neurons against I/R injury.%目的 研究异丙酚对缺血再灌注损伤神经细胞的保护作用.方法 取12h新生Wistar大鼠海马细胞进行体外培养,建立原代海马细胞缺糖缺氧再给氧模型(oxygen glucose deprivation,OGD).观察海马细胞形态,苔盼蓝染色计算细胞存活率.建立SD大鼠脑缺血再灌注损伤模型,分为模型组、异丙酚用药组、正常对照组.观测各组动物术后神经症状评分、TTC染色测定脑梗死体积大小及HE染色.结果 海马细胞缺糖缺氧再

  10. Reynosin protects against neuronal toxicity in dopamine-induced SH-SY5Y cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats as models of Parkinson's disease: Reciprocal up-regulation of E6-AP and down-regulation of α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Ahrom; Kim, Dong-Woo; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin; Oh, Ki-Bong; Shin, Jongheon; Mar, Woongchon

    2013-08-01

    Aggregation of α-synuclein (ASYN) is considered a major determinant of neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD). E6-associated protein (E6-AP), an E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, has been known to promote the degradation of α-synuclein. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the sesquiterpene lactone reynosin on dopamine (DA)-induced neuronal toxicity and regulation of E6-associated protein and α-synuclein proteins in both in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease. Usi"ng flow cytometry and western blot analysis, we determined that reynosin significantly protected both against cell death from dopamine-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and against the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats (a rodent Parkinson's disease model system). In addition, reynosin made up-regulation of E6-associated protein expression and down-regulation of the over-expression of α-synuclein protein in both dopamine-treated SH-SY5Y cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of reynosin against dopamine-induced neuronal cell death may be due to the reciprocal up-regulation of E6-associated protein and down-regulation of α-synuclein protein expression.

  11. Protective effects of H2S on dopamine neurons in rats with Parkinson's disease%硫化氢对帕金森病模型大鼠多巴胺神经元的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹蔚兰; 何剑琴; 张恺芳; 欧阳新平

    2011-01-01

    目的:观察硫化氢对帕金森病(Parkinson's disease,PD)大鼠神经行为学、氧化应激以及多巴胺及其代谢产物的影响.方法:采用6-羟基多巴胺(6-OHDA)注射于脑右侧黑质造成偏侧PD模型.将模型动物随机分为模型组、硫化氢组(硫氢化钠做供体),每组10只;另分别取10只正常大鼠为正常组及假手术组(以抗坏血酸注射).观察PD大鼠经过硫化氢处理后神经行为学、脑组织丙二醛(MDA)、谷胱甘肽(GSH)、超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)含量以及多巴胺代谢产物的变化.结果:与模型组比较硫化氧组大鼠行为学明显改善(P<0.01),同时脑组织中GSH、SOD含量均升高,MDA含量降低,多巴胺及其代谢产物升高.结论:硫化氢对PD模型大鼠多巴胺神经元具有保护作用.%Objective: To observe the effects of H2S prescription on neuroethology, oxidative stress, dopamine and its metabolites in rats with Parkinson's disease (PD).Methods: Model of hemilateral PD mt was established with injection of 6-hydroxydopamine( 6-OHDA )into the right substantia nigra of midbrain.The PD model rats were randomly divided into model group, H2S group (sodium hydrosulfide, NariS, was used as H2S donor), control group and sham-operated group( injected by ascorbic acid) ,10 rats for each group.The changes of neuroethology, the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the levels of dopamine and its metabolites were compared among groups.Results: Compared with model group, the neuroethology of rats in H2S group were significantly improved.The contents of GSH, SOD were reduced significanfiy; The contents of MDA and the levels of dopamine( DA ),HVA, dihydroxv-phenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) were elevated significantly.Conclusion: H2S can protect the dopamine neurons in rats with Parkinson's disease.

  12. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  13. Protective effects of genistein against apoptosis induced by acrylamide in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons%三羟异黄酮对丙烯酰胺诱导大鼠小脑颗粒神经元凋亡的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周礼华; 徐淑秀; 江城梅

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effects of genistein on apoptosis of rat cerebellar granule neurons induced by acrylamide. METHODS: Rat cerebellar granule neurons were prepared from the cerebellar cortex cells of 5-7day-old SD rats pups. The neurons were identified by Nissl staining method.The 8-day cultured cells passage were divided randomly into control group, acrylamide model group, genistein pretreatment group Ⅰ ,Ⅱ , Ⅲ (cerebellar granule neurons were pretreated with 10,25,50 μ mol/L genistein for 12 hours,the culture medium discarded and fresh DMEM/F12 solution added with the above mentioned concentration of genistein with 10 mmol/L acrylamide tocultured neurons for 24 hours). The neuronal viability was measured by MTT. Morphology of neurons and their nuclei were examined by phase-contrast and Hochest33342 staining,respectively. The ratio of apoptotic cells was detected by TUNEL.RESULTS: The cell survival rates of genistein pretreatment group Ⅱ and Ⅲ were not significantly higher than acrylamide model group. Genistein pretreatment group Ⅰ significantly prolonged the cell survival rate. The effects of diminished neuronal body, chromatin concentration and the ratio of apoptotic cells induced by acrylamide were markedly weakened.CONCLUSION: Genistein did not show a dose-dependent effect on protection. The appropriate concentration of 10 μ mol/L was found to protect against apoptosis induced by acrylamide in primary culture of cerebellar granule neurons.%目的:探讨三羟异黄酮(genistein,GEN)对丙烯酰胺(acrylamide,ACR)诱导的大鼠小脑颗粒神经元凋亡的保护作用.方法:取新生5~7 d的SD大鼠小脑皮质细胞进行培养,采用尼氏染色法鉴定神经元,将培养8 d的神经元随机分成5组:正常对照组、ACR染毒组(浓度为10mmol/L)以及CEN不同浓度保护组(染毒前分别用浓度为10、25、50μmol/L的GEN预先处理细胞12h,再给予ACR染毒24 h).MTT法检测细胞

  14. Refractory Neuron Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Watts, Lloyd; Mead, Carver

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks typically use an abstraction of the behaviour of a biological neuron, in which the continuously varying mean firing rate of the neuron is presumed to carry information about the neuron's time-varying state of excitation. However, the detailed timing of action potentials is known to be important in many biological systems. To build electronic models of such systems, one must have well-characterized neuron circuits that capture the essential behaviour of real neur...

  15. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Davison, Andrew P.; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  16. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    OpenAIRE

    Goulding, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion.

  17. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell culture This dataset is associated with the following publication: Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T....

  18. Prolonged exposure of cortical neurons to oligomeric amyloid-β impairs NMDA receptor function via NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production: protective effect of green tea (–-epigallocatechin-3-gallate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Y Sun

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Excessive production of Aβ (amyloid β-peptide has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of AD (Alzheimer's disease. Although not yet well understood, aggregation of Aβ is known to cause toxicity to neurons. Our recent study demonstrated the ability for oligomeric Aβ to stimulate the production of ROS (reactive oxygen species in neurons through an NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate-dependent pathway. However, whether prolonged exposure of neurons to aggregated Aβ is associated with impairment of NMDA receptor function has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, we show that prolonged exposure of primary cortical neurons to Aβ oligomers caused mitochondrial dysfunction, an attenuation of NMDA receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx and inhibition of NMDA-induced AA (arachidonic acid release. Mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in NMDA receptor activity due to oligomeric Aβ are associated with an increase in ROS production. Gp91ds-tat, a specific peptide inhibitor of NADPH oxidase, and Mn(III-tetrakis(4-benzoic acid-porphyrin chloride, an ROS scavenger, effectively abrogated Aβ-induced ROS production. Furthermore, Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, impairment of NMDA Ca2+ influx and ROS production were prevented by pre-treatment of neurons with EGCG [(−-epigallocatechin-3-gallate], a major polyphenolic component of green tea. Taken together, these results support a role for NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production in the cytotoxic effects of Aβ, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of EGCG and other dietary polyphenols in delaying onset or retarding the progression of AD.

  19. Study of a New Neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, S. L.; Bhanot, G. V.; Weckel, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    We study a modular neuron alternative to the McCulloch-Pitts neuron that arises naturally in analog devices in which the neuron inputs are represented as coherent oscillatory wave signals. Although the modular neuron can compute $XOR$ at the one neuron level, it is still characterized by the same Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension as the standard neuron. We give the formulas needed for constructing networks using the new neuron and training them using back-propagation. A numerical study of the mod...

  20. Inhibition of HIF-prolyl-4-hydroxylases prevents mitochondrial impairment and cell death in a model of neuronal oxytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neitemeier, S; Dolga, A M; Honrath, B; Karuppagounder, S S; Alim, I; Ratan, R R; Culmsee, C

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial impairment induced by oxidative stress is a main characteristic of intrinsic cell death pathways in neurons underlying the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protection of mitochondrial integrity and function is emerging as a promising strategy to prevent neuronal dama

  1. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct networks of neurons that extend the range. The range increases more rapidly with network size when we make use of heterogeneous populations of neurons with a variety of thresholds, rather than homogeneous populations of neurons all with the same threshold. The limited precision of neural responses thus can have a direct effect on the optimal network structure, with diverse functional properties of the constituent neurons supporting an economical information processing strategy that reduces the metabolic costs of handling a broad...

  2. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition.

  3. Kalman Filter Neuron Training

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Haruhiko; KOYAMA, Shuhei; HONAMI, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Takao

    1991-01-01

    An attempt of implementing Kalman filter algorithm in the procedure for training the neural network was made and evaluated. The Kalman filter neuron training program (KNT) was coded. The performance of Kalman filter in KNT was compared to commonly used neuron training algorithm. The study revealed that KNT requires much less calculation time to accomplish neuron training than commonly used other algorithms do. KNT also gave much smaller final error than any other algorithms tested in this study.

  4. Ginsenoside Rg1 exerts a protective effect against Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-induced toxicity in primary cultured rat cortical neurons through the NF-κB/NO pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaying; Yang, Hongyu; Zhao, Qingwei; Zhang, Xingguo; Lou, Yijia

    2016-03-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) is a multipotent triterpene saponin extracted from ginseng, and has been proven to act as a nootropic agent against various types of neurological damage. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect and the underlying mechanisms of Rg1 on apoptosis induced by β-amyloid peptide 25-35 (Aβ25-35) in primary cultured cortical neurons. The primary neurons were preincubated with 20 µM Rg1 for 24 h and exposed to 10 µM Aβ25-35 for 72 h. In the present study, we found that Rg1 prevented nuclear factor κ-light-chain‑enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) nuclear translocation and IκB-α phosphorylation in primary cultured cortical neurons after Aβ25-35 exposure by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species (ROS); ROS was measured using DCFDA and examined using a fluorescence microscope. In addition, Rg1 successfully suppressed Aβ25‑35-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide (NO) production in a NF-κB-dependent manner; the suppression of NO was clearly illustrated by the NO production assay. Pretreatment of the cells with Rg1 elevated the proportion of Bcl-2/Bax, lessened the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytoplasm and then blocked mitochondrial apoptotic cascades after Aβ25-35 insult by lowering NO generation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Rg1 rescues primary cultured cortical neurons from Aβ25-35-induced cell apoptosis through the downregulation of the NF-κB/NO signaling pathway. PMID:26865401

  5. Neuroprotective effects of Neuregulin-1 on B35 Neuronal Cells following Ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Croslan, DaJoie R.; Schoell, Matthew C.; Ford, Gregory D.; Pulliam, John V.; Gates, Alicia; Clement, Ceilessia M.; Harris, Adalynn E.; Ford, Byron D.

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) protected neurons from death in vivo following focal ischemia. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro rat ischemia model to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of NRG-1 on ischemia-induced neuronal death. Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells differentiated by serum withdrawal, developed enhanced neuronal characteristics including, neurite extension and upregulation of neuronal markers of differ...

  6. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  7. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons ar...

  8. Corticospinal mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraskov, A; Philipp, R; Waldert, S; Vigneswaran, G; Quallo, M M; Lemon, R N

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report the properties of neurons with mirror-like characteristics that were identified as pyramidal tract neurons (PTNs) and recorded in the ventral premotor cortex (area F5) and primary motor cortex (M1) of three macaque monkeys. We analysed the neurons' discharge while the monkeys performed active grasp of either food or an object, and also while they observed an experimenter carrying out a similar range of grasps. A considerable proportion of tested PTNs showed clear mirror-like properties (52% F5 and 58% M1). Some PTNs exhibited 'classical' mirror neuron properties, increasing activity for both execution and observation, while others decreased their discharge during observation ('suppression mirror-neurons'). These experiments not only demonstrate the existence of PTNs as mirror neurons in M1, but also reveal some interesting differences between M1 and F5 mirror PTNs. Although observation-related changes in the discharge of PTNs must reach the spinal cord and will include some direct projections to motoneurons supplying grasping muscles, there was no EMG activity in these muscles during action observation. We suggest that the mirror neuron system is involved in the withholding of unwanted movement during action observation. Mirror neurons are differentially recruited in the behaviour that switches rapidly between making your own movements and observing those of others.

  9. NEURON and Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Michael L; Davison, Andrew P; Muller, Eilif

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including graphical user interface tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the xml module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  10. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  11. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  12. Straintronic spin-neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which t...

  13. Recent Developments in NEURON

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Michael L.; Carnevale, Nicholas T.

    2005-01-01

    We describe four recent additions to NEURON's suite of graphical tools that make it easier for users to create and manage models: an enhancement to the Channel Builder that facilitates the specification and efficient simulation of stochastic channel models

  14. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Michael J.; Ristig, Manfred L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct network...

  15. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Daniel; Segall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These "Josephson junction neurons" reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, lar...

  16. An Antioxidant Phytotherapy to Rescue Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Pingniang Shen; Boyang Yu; Qiujuan Wang; Yongqing Yan; Danni Zhu; Zhihong Lin; Kefeng Ruan

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of ischemic neuronal injury. A Chinese herbal formula composed of Poria cocos (Chinese name: Fu Ling), Atractylodes macrocephala (Chinese name: Bai Zhu) and Angelica sinensis (Chinese names: Danggui, Dong quai, Donggui; Korean name: Danggwi) (FBD), has been proved to be beneficial in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R).This study was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of FBD against neuronal oxidative stress in vivo ...

  17. Study of the nutrition and protective effect of bone marrow stromal stem cells excrine factors on damaged neurons%骨髓基质干细胞因子对受损神经元的营养保护作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓智; 涂悦; 孙洪涛; 张赛

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the protection effect of bone marrow stromal stem cells(BMSCs)excrine factors on damaged neurons.Methods BMSCs were cultured in neuron lysate through the transwell system.ELISA assay was used to test the concentration of excrine factors. The conditioned medium of BMSCs was added onto the damaged neurons induced by glutamate.Then ELISA and apoptosis in situ assays were used to test lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) level and apoptosis cell proportion. After the transplantation of conditioned medium, all the rats were given a mark for their nerve function.Results After induced by neuron lysate,BMSCs were highly expressed nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain -derived neurotrophic factor( BDNF),but stromal cell -derived factor (SDF) -1α and transforming growth factor (TGF) -β -1 were no statistics difference.The LDH level and apoptosis cell proportion was negative correlation with the added BMSCs conditioned medium proportion.The results in vivo showed that the rats could obtain better scores of nerve function than control group. Conclusion The bone marrow stromal stem cells excrine factors have definitely protection effect on damaged neurons,and NGF and BDNF may play an important role in this event.%目的 观察骨髓基质干细胞( BMSCs)外分泌因子对损伤神经的保护作用.方法 利用Transwell双室培养体系使BMSCs浸润于神经元裂解液中,酶联免疫吸附(ELISA)法测定细胞因子浓度;将BMSCs条件培养液加入经谷氨酸致伤的神经元表面,ELISA法和原位凋亡法检测乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)含量和口凋亡细胞数量;条件培养液原位注射于大鼠创伤灶后予以动物神经功能缺陷综合评分.结果 经神经元裂解液诱导后,BMSCs条件培养液中神经生长因子(NGF)、脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)含量明显增加,基质衍生因子-1α(SDF-1α)、转化生长因子-β-1(TGF-β-1)含量变化差异无统计学意义;LDH含量和细胞凋亡数量随BMSCs条件培养

  18. Molecular signalling pathways involved in AMPK-mediated neuronal preconditioning and optimisation of a high content screening assay to monitor excitotoxic neuronal death.

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ujval A

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal preconditioning is a phenomenon where a previous exposure to a sublethal stress stimulus increases the resistance of neurons towards a second, normally lethal stress stimulus. Activation of the energy stress sensor, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been shown to contribute to the protective effects of ischemic and mitochondrial uncoupling-induced preconditioning in neurons, however the molecular basis of AMPK-mediated preconditioning have been less well characterised. First...

  19. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  20. Dipeptide Piracetam Analogue Noopept Improves Viability of Hippocampal HT-22 Neurons in the Glutamate Toxicity Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipova, T A; Nikolaev, S V; Ostrovskaya, P U; Gudasheva, T A; Seredenin, S B

    2016-05-01

    Effect of noopept (N-phenylacetyl-prolylglycine ethyl ester) on viability of neurons exposed to neurotoxic action of glutamic acid (5 mM) was studied in vitro in immortalized mouse hippocampal HT-22 neurons. Noopept added to the medium before or after glutamic acid improved neuronal survival in a concentration range of 10-11-10-5 M. Comparison of the effective noopept concentrations determined in previous studies on cultured cortical and cerebellar neurons showed that hippocampal neurons are more sensitive to the protective effect of noopept. PMID:27265136

  1. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan; Irons, Hillary R.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.

    2010-01-01

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral co...

  2. Nrf2 activation in astrocytes protects against neurodegeneration in mouse models of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas, Marcelo R.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Sirkis, Daniel W.; Messing, Albee; Jeffrey A. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor Nrf2 in astrocytes coordinates the up-regulation of antioxidant defenses and confers protection to neighboring neurons. Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) cause familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal disorder characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. Non-neuronal cells, including astrocytes, shape motor neuron survival in ALS and are a potential target to prevent motor neuron degeneration. The pr...

  3. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  4. Protective effect of Mrh-aFGF on the neurons in ventral tegmental area of rats with Parkinson’ s disease%Mrh-aFGF对帕金森病大鼠中脑腹侧被盖区神经元的保护

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖春苟; 蒋威; 李力强; 邹锦慧; 沈伟哉

    2016-01-01

    Objepctive To explore the protective effect of modified recombinant human aFGF ( Mrh-aFGF) on the neurons in ventral tegmental area of rats with Parkinson’ s disease ( PD) . Methods The 54 SD rats were ramdomly divided into the control group,the model group and the treatment group,and there were 18 rats in each group. PD rats of the model group and the treatment group were induced by in-jecting 6-OHDA into the left substantia nigra compacta ( SNC) and ventral tegmental area ( VTA) to build the PD model. Rats in the treat-ment group were given Mrh-aFGF injection after lateral ventricle injection,and the behavioral changes of the rats were detected after apomor-phine injection. The morphologic features and pathological changes of neurons in the ventral tegmental area were observed by Nissl’ s staining and electronic microscope. Results Compared to the right VTA of PD rats,the number of neurons in left side ( the injured side) decreased significantly in the model group(P<0. 05). In the treatment group,the structure of left (the injured side) VTA was markedly improved and the number of neurons was increased one week,two weeks and four weeks after operation compared with the model group (P<0. 05). The neurons in the VTA of the model group were found to have karyopyknosis,endoplasmic reticulum,degranulation,mitochondria swelling,cristae disappear,pre-synaptic and post-synaptic membranes swelling,and synaptic cleft disappear. In the treatment group,the ultrastructure of the neurons in the VTA,such as nuclei,mitochondria,synaptic structure,kept well compared to the model group. Conclusion Mrh-aFGF could protect the neurons in the ventral tegmental area from the loss and improve the ultrastructure of the neurons of PD rats.%目的:探讨重组人改构体酸性成纤维细胞生长因子( Mrh-aFGF)对帕金森病( PD)大鼠中脑腹侧被盖区神经元病变的影响。方法将54只SPF级雄性SD大鼠随机分为对照组、模型组和治疗组,每组18只。6-

  5. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  6. The Endogenous Hallucinogen and Trace Amine N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Displays Potent Protective Effects against Hypoxia via Sigma-1 Receptor Activation in Human Primary iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons and Microglia-Like Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Riba, Jordi; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs), monocyte-derived macrophages (moMACs), and dendritic cells (moDCs). Results showed that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2) through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain.

  7. The Endogenous Hallucinogen and Trace Amine N,N-Dimethyltryptamine (DMT) Displays Potent Protective Effects against Hypoxia via Sigma-1 Receptor Activation in Human Primary iPSC-Derived Cortical Neurons and Microglia-Like Immune Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Attila; Kovacs, Attila; Riba, Jordi; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Frecska, Ede

    2016-01-01

    N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) is a potent endogenous hallucinogen present in the brain of humans and other mammals. Despite extensive research, its physiological role remains largely unknown. Recently, DMT has been found to activate the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R), an intracellular chaperone fulfilling an interface role between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. It ensures the correct transmission of ER stress into the nucleus resulting in the enhanced production of antistress and antioxidant proteins. Due to this function, the activation of Sig-1R can mitigate the outcome of hypoxia or oxidative stress. In this paper, we aimed to test the hypothesis that DMT plays a neuroprotective role in the brain by activating the Sig-1R. We tested whether DMT can mitigate hypoxic stress in in vitro cultured human cortical neurons (derived from induced pluripotent stem cells, iPSCs), monocyte-derived macrophages (moMACs), and dendritic cells (moDCs). Results showed that DMT robustly increases the survival of these cell types in severe hypoxia (0.5% O2) through the Sig-1R. Furthermore, this phenomenon is associated with the decreased expression and function of the alpha subunit of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) suggesting that DMT-mediated Sig-1R activation may alleviate hypoxia-induced cellular stress and increase survival in a HIF-1-independent manner. Our results reveal a novel and important role of DMT in human cellular physiology. We postulate that this compound may be endogenously generated in situations of stress, ameliorating the adverse effects of hypoxic/ischemic insult to the brain. PMID:27683542

  8. 帕金森病研究的热点:3-硝基丙酸预处理对多巴胺能神经元的保护作用%Hotspot in the research of Parkinson disease: the protective effects of 3-nitropropionic acid preconditioning on dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓学军; 孙圣刚; 曹学兵; 李红戈; 梁直厚

    2005-01-01

    inhibit the process of oxidative phosphorylation and injure the energy metabolism of the cell and thereby induce cell injury. However, small dose of 3-NP can excite intrinsic cellular protective factor to protect neurons and increase the tolerance of neurons to ischemic hypoxia through mild inhibiting the process of oxidative phosphorylation. It is unclear whether it also has the similar effect on dopaminergic neurons.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether 3-NP preconditioning could enhance the tolerance of dopaminergic neurons to MPP+(1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine)toxicity.DESIGN: A randomized controlled exploring research based on neuroblastoma SH-SYSY cell that could secrete dopamine.SETTING: Department of neurology of a university hospital.MATERIALS: The study was conducted in the Laboratory of Pathophysiology of Tongji Medical College between March 2003 and November 2003. SH-SYSY cell was obtained from the Cell Center of Peking Union Medical University.INTERVENTIONS: Cells were randomly divided into 6 groups. MPP+ was added into the cultured dopaminergic neuron SH-SY5Y cells for the establishment of the cell model for Parkinson disease. Before the admission of MPP+ (0.25 mmol/L), 3-NP(0. 2 mmol/L) was added once or repetitive times to form preconditioning. Microculture tetrozolium(MTT) was used to detect cell survival rate, and[3H] DA uptake rate was used to test the anterior synaptic function of dopaminergic neurons.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Major consequence: Cell survival rate;Minor consequence: [3H] DA uptake rate.RESULTS: Cell survival rate of MPP+ group was 54.3%, which was significantly lower than that of blank control group( P < 0.01) . After 3-NP preconditioning, cell survival rate significantly elevated, which was 71.8%(single) or 85.2% (repetitive) . There was significant difference between single preconditioning and repetitive preconditioning( P < 0.05 ). The results of[3H] DA uptake rate were similar to that of cell survival rate. [3H] DA uptake rate was 65

  9. New findings on neuron development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A mature neuron receives inputs from multiple dendrites and sends its output to other neurons via a single axon.This polarized morphology requires proper axonal/dendritic differentiation during development.

  10. Exploring neuronal activity with photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdieu, Laurent; Léger, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Information coding * Optical recordings of neuronal activity * Functional organization of the cortex at the level of a cortical column * Microarchitecture of a cortical column * Dynamics of neuronal populations * Outlook * Bibliography

  11. Neuronal nets in robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives a generic idea of the solutions that the neuronal nets contribute to the robotics. The advantages and the inconveniences are exposed that have regarding the conventional techniques. It also describe the more excellent applications as the pursuit of trajectories, the positioning based on images, the force control or of the mobile robots management, among others

  12. Increase of p25 associated with cortical neuronal death induced by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tianwen; Fang, Lijun; Lin, Zhiying; Huang, En; Ye, Qinyong

    2016-09-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal damage in hypoxic cerebral cortex are complicated. Recent studies indicated that deregulation of Cdk5 was involved in neuronal death induced by hypoxia (1% O2). However, the pathological effect of Cdk5 is not fully elucidated. Therefore, in order to decipher the effect of Cdk5 on cellular death in hypoxic condition, the Cdk5 and its activator p35/p25 were investigated in cortical neurons at 10 DIV (Days In Vitro). Upon exposure to hypoxia, the cortical neurons showed a time-dependent increase of neuronal death compared to normoxia-treated control neurons. In correlation to the increase of neuronal death under hypoxia, the level of p25, a truncated form of p35, also increased in a time-dependent manner. Importantly, inhibition of Cdk5 kinase activity by roscovitine protected neurons from death under hypoxic stress. In contrast, ectopic upregulation of Cdk5 kinase activity in neurons expressing p25 led to an increase of neuronal death in comparison to control neurons expressing GFP. It suggests that ectopic increase of Cdk5 kinase activity through conversion of p35 to p25 is involved in the process of neuronal death induced by hypoxia. PMID:27402274

  13. Ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates activated microglia-induced neuronal damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lining Ke; Wei Guo; Jianwen Xu; Guodong Zhang; Wei Wang; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    The microglia-mediated inlfammatory reaction promotes neuronal damage under cerebral isch-emia/hypoxia conditions. We therefore speculated that inhibition of hypoxia-induced microglial activation may alleviate neuronal damage. To test this hypothesis, we co-cultured ginsenoside Rb1, an active component of ginseng, and cortical neurons. Ginsenoside Rb1 protected neuronal morphology and structure in a single hypoxic culture system and in a hypoxic co-culture system with microglia, and reduced neuronal apoptosis and caspase-3 production. The protective effect was observable prior to placing in co-culture. Additionally, ginsenoside Rb1 inhibited levels of tumor necrosis factor-αin a co-culture system containing activated N9 microglial cells. Ginse-noside Rb1 also signiifcantly decreased nitric oxide and superoxide production induced by N9 microglia. Our ifndings indicate that ginsenoside Rb1 attenuates damage to cerebral cortex neu-rons by downregulation of nitric oxide, superoxide, and tumor necrosis factor-αexpression in hypoxia-activated microglia.

  14. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  15. Sun Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Tanning Sun Protection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... for integrating sun protection into your daily routine. Sun Protection Tips Avoid overexposure to UV rays from ...

  16. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  17. Toxicity of Neurons Treated with Herbicides and Neuroprotection by Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant SS31

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hemachandra Reddy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the neurotoxicity of two commonly used herbicides: picloram and triclopyr and the neuroprotective effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, SS31. Using mouse neuroblastoma (N2a cells and primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, we investigated the toxicity of these herbicides, and protective effects of SS1 peptide against picloram and triclopyr toxicity. We measured total RNA content, cell viability and mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins, neuroprotective genes, mitochondrial- encoded electron transport chain (ETC genes in N2a cells treated with herbicides and SS31. Using primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, neuronal survival was studied in neurons treated with herbicides, in neurons pretreated with SS31 plus treated with herbicides, neurons treated with SS31 alone, and untreated neurons. Significantly decreased total RNA content, and cell viability in N2a cells treated with picloram and triclopyr were found compared to untreated N2a cells. Decreased mRNA expression of neuroprotective genes, and ETC genes in cells treated with herbicides was found compared to untreated cells. Decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins 1–6 in N2a cells treated with picloram was found, suggesting that picloram affects the antioxidant enzymes in N2a cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of primary neurons revealed that decreased neuronal branching and degenerating neurons in neurons treated with picloram and triclopyr. However, neurons pretreated with SS31 prevented degenerative process caused by herbicides. Based on these results, we propose that herbicides—picloram and triclopyr appear to damage neurons, and the SS31 peptide appears to protect neurons from herbicide toxicity.

  18. Toxicity of neurons treated with herbicides and neuroprotection by mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SS31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Tejaswini P; Manczak, Maria; Calkins, Marcus J; Mao, Peizhong; Reddy, Arubala P; Shirendeb, Ulziibat; Park, Byung; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the neurotoxicity of two commonly used herbicides: picloram and triclopyr and the neuroprotective effects of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, SS31. Using mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells and primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, we investigated the toxicity of these herbicides, and protective effects of SS1 peptide against picloram and triclopyr toxicity. We measured total RNA content, cell viability and mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins, neuroprotective genes, mitochondrial-encoded electron transport chain (ETC) genes in N2a cells treated with herbicides and SS31. Using primary neurons from C57BL/6 mice, neuronal survival was studied in neurons treated with herbicides, in neurons pretreated with SS31 plus treated with herbicides, neurons treated with SS31 alone, and untreated neurons. Significantly decreased total RNA content, and cell viability in N2a cells treated with picloram and triclopyr were found compared to untreated N2a cells. Decreased mRNA expression of neuroprotective genes, and ETC genes in cells treated with herbicides was found compared to untreated cells. Decreased mRNA expression of peroxiredoxins 1-6 in N2a cells treated with picloram was found, suggesting that picloram affects the antioxidant enzymes in N2a cells. Immunofluorescence analysis of primary neurons revealed that decreased neuronal branching and degenerating neurons in neurons treated with picloram and triclopyr. However, neurons pretreated with SS31 prevented degenerative process caused by herbicides. Based on these results, we propose that herbicides--picloram and triclopyr appear to damage neurons, and the SS31 peptide appears to protect neurons from herbicide toxicity. PMID:21318024

  19. Roles for the pro-neurotrophin receptor sortilin in neuronal development, aging and brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Pernille; Giehl, Klaus; Nyengaard, Jens R;

    2007-01-01

    apoptosis of sympathetic neurons, it did prevent their age-dependent degeneration. Furthermore, in an injury protocol, lesioned corticospinal neurons in Sort1(-/-) mice were protected from death. Thus, the sortilin pathway has distinct roles in pro-neurotrophin-induced apoptotic signaling in pathological...

  20. The neuron classification problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bota, Mihail; Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic account of neuron cell types is a basic prerequisite for determining the vertebrate nervous system global wiring diagram. With comprehensive lineage and phylogenetic information unavailable, a general ontology based on structure-function taxonomy is proposed and implemented in a knowledge management system, and a prototype analysis of select regions (including retina, cerebellum, and hypothalamus) presented. The supporting Brain Architecture Knowledge Management System (BAMS) Neu...

  1. Motor neurone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown aetiology. Progressive motor weakness and bulbar dysfunction lead to premature death, usually from respiratory failure. Confirming the diagnosis may initially be difficult until the full clinical features are manifest. For all forms of the disease there is a significant differential diagnosis to consider, including treatable conditions, and therefore specialist neurological opinion ...

  2. Micropatterning neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardelauf, Heike; Waide, Sarah; Sisnaiske, Julia; Jacob, Peter; Hausherr, Vanessa; Schöbel, Nicole; Janasek, Dirk; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2014-07-01

    Spatially organised neuronal networks have wide reaching applications, including fundamental research, toxicology testing, pharmaceutical screening and the realisation of neuronal implant interfaces. Despite the large number of methods catalogued in the literature there remains the need to identify a method that delivers high pattern compliance, long-term stability and is widely accessible to neuroscientists. In this comparative study, aminated (polylysine/polyornithine and aminosilanes) and cytophobic (poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and methylated) material contrasts were evaluated. Backfilling plasma stencilled PEGylated substrates with polylysine does not produce good material contrasts, whereas polylysine patterned on methylated substrates becomes mobilised by agents in the cell culture media which results in rapid pattern decay. Aminosilanes, polylysine substitutes, are prone to hydrolysis and the chemistries prove challenging to master. Instead, the stable coupling between polylysine and PLL-g-PEG can be exploited: Microcontact printing polylysine onto a PLL-g-PEG coated glass substrate provides a simple means to produce microstructured networks of primary neurons that have superior pattern compliance during long term (>1 month) culture.

  3. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  4. 许旺细胞源神经营养因子对脊髓背根节感觉神经元的保护作用%Protective effect of Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor on sensory neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘黎军; 朱家恺; 王大平; 肖建德; 杨雷

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor is a bioactive protein isolated and purified from the kytoplasm of Schwann cell. It can obviously maintain the survival of spinal cord anterior horn motor neuron and promote the regeneration of peripheral nerve.OBJECTIVE: To observe the protective effect of Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factor on the high injury of peripheral nerve-induced apoptosis of sensory neurons in spinal dorsal root ganglia.DESIGN: Randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Shenzhen Second People's Hospital.MATERIALS: Totally 30 3-week-old SD infant rats, of clean grade and either gender, were used in this experiment. They were randomly divided into neurotrophic factor group and control group with 15 rats in each one.Left sides of the animals in both two groups were set as normal sides and right sides as injured sides.METHODS: This experiment was carried out at the Experimental Animal Center, Medical College of Sun Yat-sen University from May 2003 to July 2003. ① L4.5 nerve root high-mutilation animal models were developed on the rats in two groups. Proximal nerve stump was connected with silicone tube. According to grouping, 60 mg/L Schwann cell-derived neurotrophic factors and 20 μL normal saline were injected into the silicone tubes respectively. Two ends of silicone tube were enveloped with vaseline.② Sample collecting was conducted at postoperative 4 weeks, survival rate and morphological change of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia of injured nerve was observed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Gross observation of sciatic nerve regeneration at injured side of the rats in two groups ② Survival of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia ③ Morphological change of sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia.RESULTS: All the 30 rats entered the stage of result analysis. ① Gross observation of sciatic nerve regeneration: In the neurotrophic factor group,nerve new born axon grew along silicone tube, with 1cm in length

  5. Effect of deep brain stimulation on substantia nigra neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Sheng-tian; MA Yu; ZHANG Kai; ZHANG Jian-guo

    2012-01-01

    Background Parkinson's disease(PD)is a common neurodegenerative disease,which occurs mainly in the elderly.Recent studies have demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the occurrence and development of PD.Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation(STN-DBS)has been recognized as an effective treatment for PD.Recent clinical observations have shown that STN-DBS was able to delay early PD progression,and experiments in animal models have also demonstrated a protective effect of STN-DBS on neurons.However,the correlation between the neuron-protective effect of STN-DBS and the progression of substantia nigra pars compacta(SNc)neuronal apoptosis is still unknown.The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect and potential mechanism of STN-DBS on SNc neurons in PD rats.Methods After the establishment of a PD rat model by unilateral/2-point injection of 6-hydroxydopamine in the medial forebrain bundle of the brain,DBS by implanting electrodes in the STN was administered.Behavioral changes were observed,and morphological changes of SNc neurons were analyzed by Nissl staining and DNA in situ end-labeling.Through extracellular recording of single neuron discharges and microelectrophoresis,the causes of and changes in SNc excitability during STN-DBS were analyzed,and the protective effect and potential mechanism of action of STN-DBS on SNc neurons in PD rats was investigated.Results SNc neuron apoptosis was significantly decreased(P<0.05)in the stimulation group,compared with the sham stimulation PD group.Spontaneous discharges of SNc neurons were observed in normal rats and PD model rats,and the mean frequency of spontaneous discharges of SNc neurons in normal rats((40.65±11.08)Hz)was higher than that of residual SNc neurons in PD rats((36.71±9.23)Hz).Electrical stimulation of the STN in rats was associated with elevated excitation in unilateral SNc neurons.However,administering the gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor blocker

  6. Developmental and activity-dependent expression of LanCL1 confers antioxidant activity required for neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Chen, Mina; Pang, Dejiang; Bi, Dandan; Zou, Yi; Xia, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Weiwei; Luo, Liping; Deng, Rongkang; Tan, Honglin; Zhou, Liang; Yu, Shouyang; Guo, Liheng; Du, XiaoXia; Cui, Yiyuan; Hu, Jiahua; Mao, Qing; Worley, Paul F; Xiao, Bo

    2014-08-25

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases with neuronal activity that accompanies synaptic development and function. Transcription-related factors and metabolic enzymes that are expressed in all tissues have been described to counteract neuronal ROS to prevent oxidative damage. Here, we describe the antioxidant gene LanCL1 that is prominently enriched in brain neurons. Its expression is developmentally regulated and induced by neuronal activity, neurotrophic factors implicated in neuronal plasticity and survival, and oxidative stress. Genetic deletion of LanCL1 causes enhanced accumulation of ROS in brain, as well as development-related lipid, protein, and DNA damage; mitochondrial dysfunction; and apoptotic neurodegeneration. LanCL1 transgene protects neurons from ROS. LanCL1 protein purified from eukaryotic cells catalyzes the formation of thioether products similar to glutathione S-transferase. These studies reveal a neuron-specific glutathione defense mechanism that is essential for neuronal function and survival. PMID:25158856

  7. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M; Romeo, F; Inoue, S; Niklison-Chirou, M V; Elia, A J; Dinsdale, D; Morone, N; Knight, R A; Mak, T W; Melino, G

    2016-09-01

    Newly generated neurons pass through a series of well-defined developmental stages, which allow them to integrate into existing neuronal circuits. After exit from the cell cycle, postmitotic neurons undergo neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic maturation and plasticity. Lack of a global metabolic analysis during early cortical neuronal development led us to explore the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biology during ex vivo differentiation of primary cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we observed a huge increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Changes in mitochondrial mass, morphology and function were correlated with the upregulation of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, TFAM and PGC-1α. Concomitant with mitochondrial biogenesis, we observed an increase in glucose metabolism during neuronal differentiation, which was linked to an increase in glucose uptake and enhanced GLUT3 mRNA expression and platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKp) protein expression. In addition, glutamate-glutamine metabolism was also increased during the differentiation of cortical neurons. We identified PI3K-Akt-mTOR signalling as a critical regulator role of energy metabolism in neurons. Selective pharmacological inhibition of these metabolic pathways indicate existence of metabolic checkpoint that need to be satisfied in order to allow neuronal differentiation. PMID:27058317

  8. Trophic factors as modulators of motor neuron physiology and survival: implications for ALS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis B Tovar-y-Romo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motor neuron physiology and development depend on a continuous and tightly regulated trophic support from a variety of cellular sources. Trophic factors guide the generation and positioning of motor neurons during every stage of the developmental process. As well, they are involved in axon guidance and synapse formation. Even in the adult spinal cord an uninterrupted trophic input is required to maintain neuronal functioning and protection from noxious stimuli. Among the trophic factors that have been demonstrated to participate in motor neuron physiology are vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1. Upon binding to membrane receptors expressed in motor neurons or neighboring glia, these trophic factors activate intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell survival and have protective action on motor neurons, in both in vivo and in vitro models of neuronal degeneration. For these reasons these factors have been considered a promising therapeutic method for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases, although their efficacy in human clinical trials have not yet shown the expected protection. In this review we summarize experimental data on the role of these trophic factors in motor neuron function and survival, as well as their mechanisms of action. We also briefly discuss the potential therapeutic use of the trophic factors and why these therapies may have not been yet successful in the clinical use.

  9. 苦参碱对缺血性脑中风小鼠神经元及星形胶质细胞的保护作用%Protective effects of matrine on Neurons and Astrocytes in focal ischemia induced by pMCAO in mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程丽艳; 沈佳; 沈陶冶; 史红

    2012-01-01

    目的:观察苦参碱(Matrine)对缺血性脑中风小鼠的神经保护作用及对缺氧缺糖诱导的神经元和星形胶质细胞损伤的减轻作用,并初步探讨可能的作用机制.方法:采用原代培养小鼠大脑皮层神经元及星形胶质细胞缺氧缺糖模型(Oxygen and glucose deprivation,OGD),MTT法和测定乳酸脱氢酶(LDH)观察Matrine对OGD神经元及星形胶质细胞的损伤是否有减轻作用;建立小鼠永久性大脑中动脉阻塞(Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion,pMCAO)模型,观察Matrine 10 min、1h、3h及6h四个不同时间点给药后,脑梗死面积和神经症状的改善情况及其分子机制是否与抑制神经元及星形胶质细胞NF-κB信号通路有关.结果:经OGD诱导后,原代培养小鼠大脑皮层神经元及星形胶质细胞活力明显下降,与OGD模型组比较,给予Matrine(50 μmol/L)干预后,神经元及星形胶质细胞的存活率明显提高(P<0.01);与此同时,OGD可使小鼠大脑皮层星形胶质细胞LDH漏出量增高(P<0.01),Matrine(50 μmol/L)与模型组比较,LDH漏出量明显降低(P<0.01);Matrine(37.5 mg/kg) 10 min、1h两个给药时间点的脑梗死面积与模型组比较明显减少(P<0.01);与模型组比较,Martine 10 min、1h两个给药时间点术后24 h的神经症状评分明显降低(P<0.01);Matrine可降低pMCAO缺血区IκBα与IKK蛋白的表达水平(P<0.01,P<0.05),同时降低细胞核NF-κB蛋白的表达(P<0.01).结论:Matrine可通过直接保护神经元及星形胶质细胞改善缺血性脑中风症状,其作用时间窗可能在发病1h以内,Matrine保护作用可能与NF-κB信号通路有关.%AIM: To investigate the protective effects of matrine on neurons and astrocytes in focal ischemia induced by permanent middle cer-ebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) in mouse and explore the possible mechanism. METHODS: MTT and LDH assays were used to assess the protective effects of matrine in primary culture of neurons

  10. Interactions of neurons with topographic nano cues affect branching morphology mimicking neuron-neuron interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranes, Koby; Kollmar, Davida; Chejanovsky, Nathan; Sharoni, Amos; Shefi, Orit

    2012-08-01

    We study the effect of topographic nano-cues on neuronal growth-morphology using invertebrate neurons in culture. We use photolithography to fabricate substrates with repeatable line-pattern ridges of nano-scale heights of 10-150 nm. We plate leech neurons atop the patterned-substrates and compare their growth pattern to neurons plated atop non-patterned substrates. The model system allows us the analysis of single neurite-single ridge interactions. The use of high resolution electron microscopy reveals small filopodia processes that attach to the line-pattern ridges. These fine processes, that cannot be detected in light microscopy, add anchoring sites onto the side of the ridges, thus additional physical support. These interactions of the neuronal process dominantly affect the neuronal growth direction. We analyze the response of the entire neuronal branching tree to the patterned substrates and find significant effect on the growth patterns compared to non-patterned substrates. Moreover, interactions with the nano-cues trigger a growth strategy similarly to interactions with other neuronal cells, as reflected in their morphometric parameters. The number of branches and the number of neurites originating from the soma decrease following the interaction demonstrating a tendency to a more simplified neuronal branching tree. The effect of the nano-cues on the neuronal function deserves further investigation and will strengthen our understanding of the interplay between function and form.

  11. The origin of cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Parnavelas J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the gangli...

  12. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons.

  13. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  14. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  15. STDP in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Gilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented.

  16. CALBINDIN CONTENT AND DIFFERENTIAL VULNERABILITY OF MIDBRAIN EFFERENT DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN MACAQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria G Dopeso-Reyes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Calbindin (CB is a calcium binding protein reported to protect dopaminergic neurons from degeneration. Although a direct link between CB content and differential vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons has long been accepted, factors other than CB have also been suggested, particularly those related to the dopamine transporter. Indeed, several studies have reported that CB levels are not causally related to the differential vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons against neurotoxins. Here we have used dual stains for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and CB in 3 control and 3 MPTP-treated monkeys to visualize dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and in the dorsal and ventral tiers of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNcd and SNcv co-expressing TH and CB. In control animals, the highest percentages of co-localization were found in VTA (58.2%, followed by neurons located in the SNcd (34.7%. As expected, SNcv neurons lacked CB expression. In MPTP-treated animals, the percentage of CB-ir/TH-ir neurons in the VTA was similar to control monkeys (62.1%, whereas most of the few surviving neurons in the SNcd were CB-ir/TH-ir (88.6%. Next, we have elucidated the presence of CB within identified nigrostriatal and nigroextrastriatal midbrain dopaminergic projection neurons. For this purpose, two control monkeys received one injection of Fluoro-Gold into the caudate nucleus and one injection of cholera toxin (CTB into the postcommissural putamen, whereas two more monkeys were injected with CTB into the internal division of the globus pallidus. As expected, all the nigrocaudate- and nigroputamen-projecting neurons were TH-ir, although surprisingly, all of these nigrostriatal-projecting neurons were negative for CB. Furthermore, all the nigropallidal-projecting neurons co-expressed both TH and CB. In summary, although CB-ir dopaminergic neurons seem to be less prone to MPTP-induced degeneration, our data clearly demonstrated that these neurons are not

  17. Selective neuronal vulnerability to oxidative stress in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinkun Wang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress (OS, caused by the imbalance between the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS, plays an important role in brain aging, neurodegenerative diseases, and other related adverse conditions, such as ischemia. While ROS/RNS serve as signaling molecules at physiological levels, an excessive amount of these molecules leads to oxidative modification and, therefore, dysfunction of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The response of neurons to this pervasive stress, however, is not uniform in the brain. While many brain neurons can cope with a rise in OS, there are select populations of neurons in the brain that are vulnerable. Because of their selective vulnerability, these neurons are usually the first to exhibit functional decline and cell death during normal aging, or in age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms of selective neuronal vulnerability (SNV to OS is important in the development of future intervention approaches to protect such vulnerable neurons from the stresses of the aging process and the pathological states that lead to neurodegeneration. In this review, the currently known molecular and cellular factors that contribute to SNV to OS are summarized. Included among the major underlying factors are high intrinsic OS, high demand for ROS/RNS-based signaling, low ATP production, mitochondrial dysfunction, and high inflammatory response in vulnerable neurons. The contribution to the selective vulnerability of neurons to OS by other intrinsic or extrinsic factors, such as deficient DNA damage repair, low calcium-buffering capacity, and glutamate excitotoxicity, are also discussed.

  18. FGF-2 induces neuronal death through upregulation of system xc-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqian; Albano, Rebecca; Lobner, Doug

    2014-02-14

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter (system xc-) transports cystine into cell in exchange for glutamate. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) upregulates system xc- selectively on astrocytes, which leads to increased cystine uptake, the substrate for glutathione production, and increased glutamate release. While increased intracellular glutathione can limit oxidative stress, the increased glutamate release can potentially lead to excitotoxicity to neurons. To test this hypothesis, mixed neuronal and glial cortical cultures were treated with FGF-2. Treatment with FGF-2 for 48 h caused a significant neuronal death in these cultures. Cell death was not observed in neuronal-enriched cultures, or astrocyte-enriched cultures, suggesting the toxicity was the result of neuron-glia interaction. Blocking system xc- eliminated the neuronal death as did the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX), but not the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. When cultures were exposed directly to glutamate, both NBQX and memantine blocked the neuronal toxicity. The mechanism of this altered profile of glutamate receptor mediated toxicity by FGF-2 is unclear. The selective calcium permeable AMPA receptor antagonist 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NASPM) failed to offer protection. The most likely explanation for the results is that 48 h FGF-2 treatment induces AMPA/kainate receptor toxicity through increased system xc- function resulting in increased release of glutamate. At the same time, FGF-2 alters the sensitivity of the neurons to glutamate toxicity in a manner that promotes selective AMPA/kainate receptor mediated toxicity.

  19. Ketogenic diet and astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamecq Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is an anticonvulsant diet enriched in fat. It provides the body with a minimal protein requirement and a restricted carbohydrate supply, the vast majority of calories (more than 80-90% being given by fat. Though anticonvulsant activity of ketogenic diet has been well documented by a large number of experimental and clinical studies, underlying mechanisms still remain partially unclear. Astrocyte-neuron interactions, among which metabolic shuttles, may influence synaptic activity and hence anticonvulsant protection. The astrocyte-neuron metabolic shuttles may be themselves influenced by the availability in energetic substrates such as hydrates of carbon and fats. Historically, ketogenic diet had been designed to mimic changes such as ketosis occurring upon starvation, a physiological state already known to exhibit anticonvulsant protection and sometimes referred to as “water diet”. For this reason, a special attention should be paid to metabolic features shared in common by ketogenic diet and starvation and especially those features that might result in anticonvulsant protection. Compared to feeding by usual mixed diet, starvation and ketogenic diet are both characterised by increased fat, lowered glucose and aminoacid supplies to cells. The resulting impact of these changes in energetic substrates on astrocyte/neuron metabolic shuttles might have anticonvulsant and/or neuroprotective properties. This is the aim of this communication to review some important astrocyte/neuron metabolic interactions (astrocyte/neuron lactate shuttle, glutamateinduced astrocytic glycolysis activation, glutamate/glutamine cycle along with the neurovascular coupling and the extent to which the way of their alteration by starvation and/or ketogenic diet might result in seizure and/or brain protection.

  20. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  1. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  2. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides w...... that these neuropeptides play a role in neurotransmission....

  3. Cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wu; O'Shaughnessy, Thomas; Chang, Eddie

    2006-07-31

    Neuronal networks have been widely used for neurophysiology, drug discovery and toxicity testing. An essential prerequisite for future widespread application of neuronal networks is the development of efficient cryopreservation protocols to facilitate their storage and transportation. Here is the first report on cryopreservation of mammalian adherent neuronal networks. Dissociated spinal cord cells were attached to a poly-d-lysine/laminin surface and allowed to form neuronal networks. Adherent neuronal networks were embedded in a thin film of collagen gel and loaded with trehalose prior to transfer to a freezing medium containing DMSO, FBS and culture medium. This was followed by a slow rate of cooling to -80 degrees C for 24 h and then storage for up to 2 months in liquid nitrogen at -196 degrees C. The three components: DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading combined provided the highest post-thaw viability, relative to individual or two component protocols. The post-thaw cells with this protocol demonstrated similar neuronal and astrocytic markers and morphological structure as those detected in unfrozen cells. Fluorescent dye FM1-43 staining revealed active recycling of synaptic vesicles upon depolarizing stimulation in the post-thaw neuronal networks. These results suggest that a combination of DMSO, collagen gel entrapment and trehalose loading can significantly improve conventional slow-cooling methods in cryopreservation of adherent neuronal networks.

  4. 睫状神经营养因子对糖尿病早期大鼠视网膜神经组织的保护作用%Protective effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor on retinal neurons in rats with early diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁紫岩; 张卯年

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) against retinal neurons damage in a rat model of diabetes mellitus(DM).METHODS: Forty Sprague Dawley rats (weighing 250g-280g) received an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60mg/kg). The rats were then randomly divided into two groups: the treatment (DM+CNTF) or control (DM+BSS) group. The CNTF (0.5μg/μL) or balanced salt solution (2μL) was injected into the vitreus of the rats. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) was measured and retinal ultrastructure was assessed 4 and 12 weeks after establishing the model and performing the injections.RESULTS: No difference in blood glucose or body weight was noted between the two groups. There were significantly fewer apoptotic RGCs in DM+CNTF group (8.56±1.22, P0.05).12wk时TUNEL检测DM+CNTF组大鼠神经节细胞凋亡与DM+BSS组相比减少(P<0.05).透射电镜下观察发现从4wk起两组大鼠视网膜神经组织出现细胞凋亡的改变,经CNTF治疗细胞凋亡改变有所减轻,表现为外节膜盘间隙减小,感光细胞水肿减轻及核染色质浓集减轻等.结论:CNTF对DM+CNTF组和DM+BSS组大鼠的体重及血糖无明显影响.CNTF治疗组结果显示对本实验糖尿病大鼠视网膜神经节细胞及感光细胞有一定保护作用.

  5. More questions for mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Emma

    2013-09-01

    The mirror neuron system is widely held to provide direct access to the motor goals of others. This paper critically investigates this idea, focusing on the so-called 'intentional worry'. I explore two answers to the intentional worry: first that the worry is premised on too limited an understanding of mirror neuron behaviour (Sections 2 and 3), second that the appeal made to mirror neurons can be refined in such a way as to avoid the worry (Section 4). I argue that the first response requires an account of the mechanism by which small-scale gestures are supposedly mapped to larger chains of actions but that none of the extant accounts of this mechanism are plausible. Section 4 then briefly examines refinements of the mirror neuron-mindreading hypothesis which avoid the intentional worry. I conclude that these refinements may well be plausible but that they undermine many of the claims standardly made for mirror neurons.

  6. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  7. Orexin neurons receive glycinergic innervations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hondo

    Full Text Available Glycine, a nonessential amino-acid that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is currently used as a dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. We confirmed the effects of glycine on sleep/wakefulness behavior in mice when administered peripherally. Glycine administration increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep time and decreased the amount and mean episode duration of wakefulness when administered in the dark period. Since peripheral administration of glycine induced fragmentation of sleep/wakefulness states, which is a characteristic of orexin deficiency, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons. The number of Fos-positive orexin neurons markedly decreased after intraperitoneal administration of glycine to mice. To examine whether glycine acts directly on orexin neurons, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Glycine directly induced hyperpolarization and cessation of firing of orexin neurons. These responses were inhibited by a specific glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine. Triple-labeling immunofluorescent analysis showed close apposition of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2-immunoreactive glycinergic fibers onto orexin-immunoreactive neurons. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that GlyT2-immunoreactive terminals made symmetrical synaptic contacts with somata and dendrites of orexin neurons. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that glycine receptor alpha subunits were localized in the postsynaptic membrane of symmetrical inhibitory synapses on orexin neurons. Considering the importance of glycinergic regulation during REM sleep, our observations suggest that glycine injection might affect the activity of orexin neurons, and that glycinergic inhibition of orexin neurons might play a role in physiological sleep regulation.

  8. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  9. Postmitotic specification of Drosophila insulinergic neurons from pioneer neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7 and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic beta-cells.

  10. Parallel Algorithms for Neuronal Spike Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Bergheim, Thomas Stian; Skogvold, Arve Aleksander Nymo

    2011-01-01

    Neurons communicate through electrophysiological signals, which may be recorded using electrodes inserted into living tissue.When a neuron emits a signal, it is referred to as a spike, and an electrode can detect these from multiple neurons.Neuronal spike sorting is the process of classifying the spike activity based on which neuron each spike signal is emitted from.Advances in technology have introduced better recording equipment, which allows the recording of many neurons at the same time.H...

  11. Mitochondrial Protection by Exogenous Otx2 in Mouse Retinal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung-Tai Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OTX2 (orthodenticle homeobox 2 haplodeficiency causes diverse defects in mammalian visual systems ranging from retinal dysfunction to anophthalmia. We find that the retinal dystrophy of Otx2+/GFP heterozygous knockin mice is mainly due to the loss of bipolar cells and consequent deficits in retinal activity. Among bipolar cell types, OFF-cone bipolar subsets, which lack autonomous Otx2 gene expression but receive Otx2 proteins from photoreceptors, degenerate most rapidly in Otx2+/GFP mouse retinas, suggesting a neuroprotective effect of the imported Otx2 protein. In support of this hypothesis, retinal dystrophy in Otx2+/GFP mice is prevented by intraocular injection of Otx2 protein, which localizes to the mitochondria of bipolar cells and facilitates ATP synthesis as a part of mitochondrial ATP synthase complex. Taken together, our findings demonstrate a mitochondrial function for Otx2 and suggest a potential therapeutic application of OTX2 protein delivery in human retinal dystrophy.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of piperine on primarily cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Min; Sun, Zhao-Hui; Zuo, Huan-Cong

    2010-01-01

    It was previously reported that piperine (PIP) significantly blocks convulsions induced by intracerebroventricular injection of threshold doses of kainate, but had no or only slight effects on convulsions induced by L-glutamate, N-methyl-D-aspartate and guanidinosuccinate. In traditional Chinese medicine, black pepper has been used for epileptic treatment; however, the exact mechanism is still unclear. We reported here in that appropriate concentration of PIP effectively inhibites the synchronized oscillation of intracellular calcium in rat hippocampal neuronal networks and represses spontaneous synaptic activities in terms of spontaneous synaptic currents (SSC) and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC). Moreover, pretreatment with PIP expects protective effect on glutamate-induced decrease of cell viability and apoptosis of hippocampal neurons. These data suggest that the neuroprotective effects of PIP might be associated with suppression of synchronization of neuronal networks, presynaptic glutamic acid release, and Ca(2+) overloading.

  13. Structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero/galactofucan polysaccharides on dopaminergic neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Huaide; Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and more-widespread neuronal changes that cause complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero-polysaccharides (DF1) and sulfated galactofucan polysaccharides (DF2) on dopaminergic neuron in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with samples significantly ameliorated the depletion of both DA and TH-, Bcl-2- and Bax-positive neurons in MPTP-induced PD mice, DF1 showed the highest activity. The in vitro results found that DF1 and DF2 could reverse the decreased mitochondrial activity and the increased LDL release induced by MPP(+) (Pneuronal injury caused by MPP(+). Furthermore, the administration of samples effectively decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the level/activities of GSH, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT in MPTP mice. Thus, the neuron protective effect may be mediated, in part, through antioxidant activity and the prevention of cell apoptosis. The chemical composition of DF1, DF2 and DF differed markedly, the DF1 fraction had the most complex chemical composition and showed the highest neuron protective activity. These results suggest that diverse monosaccharides and uronic acid might contribute to neuron protective activity.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of neuregulin-1 on B35 neuronal cells following ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croslan, DaJoie R; Schoell, Matthew C; Ford, Gregory D; Pulliam, John V; Gates, Alicia; Clement, Ceilessia M; Harris, Adalynn E; Ford, Byron D

    2008-05-19

    We previously showed that neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) protected neurons from death in vivo following focal ischemia. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro rat ischemia model to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of NRG-1 on ischemia-induced neuronal death. Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells differentiated by serum withdrawal, developed enhanced neuronal characteristics including, neurite extension and upregulation of neuronal markers of differentiation. When B35 neurons were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation or glutamate, widespread neuronal death was seen after both treatments. Treatment with NRG-1 immediately after OGD significantly increased neuronal survival. NRG-1 administration also resulted in a significant decrease in annexin V, an early marker of apoptosis. However, the neurotoxic actions of glutamate were unaffected by NRG-1. The neuroprotective effects of NRG-1 were prevented by an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway. These results provide a new model to gain insight into the mechanisms employed by NRG-1 to protect neurons from ischemic brain injury. PMID:18410912

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Neuregulin-1 on B35 Neuronal Cells following Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croslan, DaJoie R.; Schoell, Matthew C.; Ford, Gregory D.; Pulliam, John V.; Gates, Alicia; Clement, Ceilessia M.; Harris, Adalynn E.; Ford, Byron D.

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) protected neurons from death in vivo following focal ischemia. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro rat ischemia model to examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of NRG-1 on ischemia-induced neuronal death. Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells differentiated by serum withdrawal, developed enhanced neuronal characteristics including, neurite extension and upregulation of neuronal markers of differentiation. When B35 neurons were subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)/reoxygenation or glutamate, widespread neuronal death was seen after both treatments. Treatment with NRG-1 immediately after OGD significantly increased neuronal survival. NRG-1 administration also resulted in a significant decrease in annexin V, an early marker of apoptosis. However, the neurotoxic actions of glutamate were unaffected by NRG-1. The neuroprotective effects of NRG-1 were prevented by an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt pathway. These results provide a new model to gain insight into the mechanisms employed by NRG-1 to protect neurons from ischemic brain injury. PMID:18410912

  16. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  17. EGF enhances the effect of GDNF on protecting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease model in rats%表皮生长因子加强胶质细胞系源性神经营养因子对PD模型大鼠黑质多巴胺能神经元的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪梅; 丁艳霞; 王炎强; 高殿帅

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究表皮生长因子(EGF)能否加强胶质细胞系源性神经营养因子(GDNF)保护帕金森病(PD)模型大鼠黑质内多巴胺(DA)能神经元.方法:大鼠右侧纹状体内注射6-羟多巴胺(6-OHDA)并行为学分析筛选PD动物模型.将动物模型随机分为EGF+GDNF组(右侧黑质内注射EGF+GDNF)和GDNF组(右侧黑质内注射GDNF).动物继续存活至第21天,取一部分动物中脑黑质节段,用免疫组织化学显色方法,以抗钙结合蛋白D28K(CB)和胶质源纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)抗体免疫反应阳性分别检测右侧黑质含CB的神经元及激活的星形胶质细胞,光镜下观察并进行细胞计数;另一部分动物被快速断头取脑,分离右侧黑质,用免疫印迹法分析黑质CB及GFAP蛋白的表达,蛋白条带用图像处理仪扫描,结果用LabWorks软件分析处理.结果:免疫组织化学显色显示,EGF+GDNF组大鼠黑质内CB及GFAP反应阳性细胞数量均高于GDNF组;免疫印迹法检测表明EGF+ GDNF组大鼠黑质内CB及GFAP蛋白表达量高于GDNF组.结论:EGF可能通过促进PD模型大鼠黑质内神经元表达CB和激活星形胶质细胞,从而加强GDNF对黑质内DA能神经元的保护作用.%Objective: To explore whether epidermal growth factor (EGF) is capable of enhancing the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) on protecting dopamine (DA) neurons in substantia nigra (SN) of PD model rats. Methods-. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) was injected into rats' right striatum and behavioral tests were performed Parkinson's disease (PD) rats were selected according to the result of behavioral tests. Then, the PD rats were randomly divided into two groups: GDNF group (intranigral GDNF injection) and EGF+GDNF group (intranigral EGF+GDNF injection). The rats were allowed to survive for another 21 days. Then some PD rats were sacrificed, and the midbrain substantia nigra (SN) were performed for analyses of cal-bindin D28 K (CB) and glial fibrillary

  18. A Neuron Model for FPGA Spiking Neuronal Network Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONTEANU, G.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a neuron model, able to reproduce the basic elements of the neuronal dynamics, optimized for digital implementation of Spiking Neural Networks. Its architecture is structured in two major blocks, a datapath and a control unit. The datapath consists of a membrane potential circuit, which emulates the neuronal dynamics at the soma level, and a synaptic circuit used to update the synaptic weight according to the spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP mechanism. The proposed model is implemented into a Cyclone II-Altera FPGA device. Our results indicate the neuron model can be used to build up 1K Spiking Neural Networks on reconfigurable logic suport, to explore various network topologies.

  19. Single neuron dynamics and computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, Nicolas; Hakim, Vincent; Richardson, Magnus J E

    2014-04-01

    At the single neuron level, information processing involves the transformation of input spike trains into an appropriate output spike train. Building upon the classical view of a neuron as a threshold device, models have been developed in recent years that take into account the diverse electrophysiological make-up of neurons and accurately describe their input-output relations. Here, we review these recent advances and survey the computational roles that they have uncovered for various electrophysiological properties, for dendritic arbor anatomy as well as for short-term synaptic plasticity.

  20. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  1. From Neurons to Brain: Adaptive Self-Wiring of Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Ronen; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    1998-01-01

    During embryonic morpho-genesis, a collection of individual neurons turns into a functioning network with unique capabilities. Only recently has this most staggering example of emergent process in the natural world, began to be studied. Here we propose a navigational strategy for neurites growth cones, based on sophisticated chemical signaling. We further propose that the embryonic environment (the neurons and the glia cells) acts as an excitable media in which concentric and spiral chemical ...

  2. Neuronal Coding of pacemaker neurons - A random dynamical systems approach

    OpenAIRE

    de Jaeger, T

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of neurons under the influence of periodic external input has been modelled very successfully by circle maps. The aim of this note is to extend certain aspects of this analysis to a much more general class of forcing processes. We apply results on the fibred rotation number of randomly forced circle maps to show the uniqueness of the asymptotic firing frequency of ergodically forced pacemaker neurons. The details of the analysis are carried out for the forced leaky integrate-and...

  3. Cerebral ischemia—induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NomuY

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism of cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal apoptosis mediated by nitric oxide (NO) in the brain,we investigated:(1)cell death in hippocampal CA1 neurons of rats after a rransient four vessel occlusion (4VO)/reperfusion and (2) apoptosis induced by NOC18(NO releaser) using SHSY5Y cells,a human neuroblastoma cell line.We found that 4VO caused expression of inducible type of NO synthase (iNOS) in glial cells and neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region of rats.Next we examined in vitro apoptotic effects of NOC18 on SHSY5Y cells and suggest that NO decrease mitochondrial membrane potential,release cytochrome C from mitochondria,activates caspase-3,degrade inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase(Icad),and activated DNase translocate into nucleus and induce DNA fragmentation.Thus we conclude that the excess amount of NO produced by glial iNOS at cerebral ischemia could be involved in neuronal apoptosis in CA1 region.Regarding NO action on neurons,we further obtained that NO propects neuronal apoptosis in PC12 cells perhaps by nitrosylation of caspase,subsequent reduction of proteolytic activity.Taken together,we suggest that NO seem to exert dual effects(toxic and beneficial) on neuronal apoptosis,the one (toxic);apoptosis-induction throuth the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potentials and cytochrome C release and the othe (beneficial);protection against apoptosis through the inhibition of caspase activity.

  4. BK channels reveal novel phosphate sensitivity in SNr neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Juan Ji

    Full Text Available Whether large conductance Ca(2+-activated potassium (BK channels are present in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr is a matter of debate. Using the patch-clamp technique, we examined the functional expression of BK channels in neurons of the SNr and showed that the channels were activated or inhibited by internal high-energy phosphates (IHEPs at positive and negative membrane potentials, respectively. SNr neurons showed membrane potential hyperpolarization under glucose-deprivation conditions which was attenuated by paxilline, a specific BK channel blocker. In addition, Fluo-3 fluorescence recording detected an increase in the level of internal free calcium ([Ca(2+](i during ischemic hyperpolarization. These results confirm that BK channels are present in SNr neurons and indicate that their unique IHEP sensitivity is requisite in neuronal ischemic responses. Bearing in mind that the K(ATP channel blocker tolbutamide also attenuated the hyperpolarization, we suggest that BK channels may play a protective role in the basal ganglia by modulating the excitability of SNr neurons along with K(ATP channels under ischemic stresses.

  5. BDNF heightens the sensitivity of motor neurons to excitotoxic insults through activation of TrkB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peter; Kalb, Robert G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The survival promoting and neuroprotective actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well known but under certain circumstances this growth factor can also exacerbate excitotoxic insults to neurons. Prior exploration of the receptor through which BDNF exerts this action on motor neurons deflects attention away from p75. Here we investigated the possibility that BDNF acts through the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, to confer on motor neurons sensitivity to excitotoxic challenge. We blocked BDNF activation of TrkB using a dominant negative TrkB mutant or a TrkB function blocking antibody, and found that this protected motor neurons against excitotoxic insult in cultures of mixed spinal cord neurons. Addition of a function blocking antibody to BDNF to mixed spinal cord neuron cultures is also neuroprotective indicating that endogenously produced BDNF participates in vulnerability to excitotoxicity. We next examined the intracellular signaling cascades that are engaged upon TrkB activation. Previously we found that inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide-3'-kinase (PI3'K) pathway blocks BDNF-induced excitotoxic sensitivity. Here we show that expression of a constitutively active catalytic subunit of PI3'K, p110, confers excitotoxic sensitivity (ES) upon motor neurons not incubated with BDNF. Parallel studies with purified motor neurons confirm that these events are likely to be occuring specifically within motor neurons. The abrogation of BDNF's capacity to accentuate excitotoxic insults may make it a more attractive neuroprotective agent.

  6. The neuronal and actin commitment: Why do neurons need rings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-09-01

    The role of the actin cytoskeleton in neurons has been extensively studied in actin-enriched compartments such as the growth cone and dendritic spines. The recent discovery of actin rings in the axon shaft and in dendrites, together with the identification of axon actin trails, has advanced our understanding on actin organization and dynamics in neurons. However, specifically in the case of actin rings, the mechanisms regulating their nucleation and assembly, and the functions that they may exert in axons and dendrites remain largely unexplored. Here we discuss the possible structural, mechanistic and functional properties of the subcortical neuronal cytoskeleton putting the current knowledge in perspective with the information available on actin rings formed in other biological contexts, and with the organization of actin-spectrin lattices in other cell types. The detailed analysis of these novel neuronal actin ring structures, together with the elucidation of the function of actin-binding proteins in neuron biology, has a large potential to uncover new mechanisms of neuronal function under normal conditions that may have impact in our understanding of axon degeneration and regeneration. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of environment protection related to the use of nuclear energy aiming to power generation, based on the harmonic concept of economic and industrial development, preserving the environment, is discussed. A brief study of environmental impacts for some energy sources, including nuclear energy, to present the systems of a nuclear power plant which aim at environmental protection, is done. (M.C.K.)

  8. Protective effect and mechanism of rHuEPO against status epilepticus-induced neuron apoptosis in rats%重组人红细胞生成素对大鼠癫痫持续状态诱导的神经元凋亡的保护机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘振华; 徐院花; 田田

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨重组人红细胞生成素(rHuEPO)对大鼠癫痫持续状态(SE)诱导的神经元凋亡的保护机制。方法 SD大鼠60只随机均分为五组:A组为空白对照;其余四组采用海人酸(KA)点燃大鼠SE模型后,B组作为模型对照,C组用rHuEPO处理,D组用rHuEPO和LY294002处理,E组用二甲基亚砜(LY294002的溶剂)处理。Western blot法检测Akt、p‐Akt、Bcl‐2和Bax蛋白表达;定量RT‐PCR检测Bcl‐2和Bax mRNA表达。结果 C组Bcl‐2 mRNA表达量高于B组(P<0.05),D组p‐Akt蛋白表达低于C组(P<0.05)。结论 rHuEPO对SD大鼠SE诱导的海马神经元具有保护作用;其机制可能是通过PI3K/Akt途径对线粒体凋亡途径相关调控因子Bcl‐2和Bax进行调控,进而介导线粒体凋亡途径,抑制细胞凋亡。%Objective To explore the protective effect and underlying mechanism of recombinant human erythropoietin(rHuEPO) against status epilepticus(SE)‐induced neuron apoptosis in rats .Methods Sixty SD rats were equally divided into 5 groups .Group A was taken as blank control .SE models were established by kainic acid(KA) in the other 4 groups .Group B was taken as model control .Group C was treated with rHuEPO ,group D was treated with rHuEPO and LY294002 , and group E was treated with DMSO(a solvent of LY294002) .The protein expressions of Akt ,p‐Akt , Bcl‐2 and Bax were detected by Western blot .The mRNA expressions of Bcl‐2 and Bax were detected by qRT‐PCR .Results Bcl‐2 mRNA expression was higher in group C than that in group B (P<0 .05) .The expression of p‐Akt protein was less in group D than that in group C (P<0 .05) . Conclusion The rHuEPO has a neuroprotective effect on SE‐induced neuron apoptosis in rats .The mechanism for that may be through PI3K/AKT pathway to regulate the expressions of Bcl‐2 and Bax , which mediates mitochondrial apoptotic pathways and inhibits cell apoptosis .

  9. Tinbergen on mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Niko Tinbergen defined the scope of behavioural biology with his four problems: causation, ontogeny, survival value and evolution. About 20 years ago, there was another highly significant development in behavioural biology-the discovery of mirror neurons (MNs). Here, I use Tinbergen's original four problems (rather than the list that appears in textbooks) to highlight the differences between two prominent accounts of MNs, the genetic and associative accounts; to suggest that the latter provides the defeasible 'best explanation' for current data on the causation and ontogeny of MNs; and to argue that functional analysis, of the kind that Tinbergen identified somewhat misleadingly with studies of 'survival value', should be a high priority for future research. In this kind of functional analysis, system-level theories would assign MNs a small, but potentially important, role in the achievement of action understanding-or another social cognitive function-by a production line of interacting component processes. These theories would be tested by experimental intervention in human and non-human animal samples with carefully documented and controlled developmental histories.

  10. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild. PMID:26640653

  11. Modeling neuronal vulnerability in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roselli, Francesco; Caroni, Pico

    2014-08-20

    Using computational models of motor neuron ion fluxes, firing properties, and energy requirements, Le Masson et al. (2014) reveal how local imbalances in energy homeostasis may self-amplify and contribute to neurodegeneration in ALS.

  12. The neuronal infrastructure of speaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, L.M.E.; Segaert, K.M.; Hagoort, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Models of speaking distinguish producing meaning, words and syntax as three different linguistic components of speaking. Nevertheless, little is known about the brain's integrated neuronal infrastructure for speech production. We investigated semantic, lexical and syntactic aspects of speaking using

  13. Towards Automatic Classification of Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting information growth of morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenge...

  14. Neuronal Classification of Atria Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2008-01-01

    Motivation. In medical field, particularly the cardiology, the diagnosis systems constitute the essential domain of research. In some applications, the traditional methods of classification present some limitations. The neuronal technique is considered as one of the promising algorithms to resolve such problem.Method. In this paper, two approaches of the Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) technique are investigated to classify the heart beats which are Multi Layer Perception (MLP) and Radial B...

  15. A more substantive neuron doctrine

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, JYF

    1999-01-01

    First, it is not clear from Gold and Stoljar's definition of biological neuroscience whether it includes computational and representational concepts. If so, then their evaluation of Kandel's theory is problematic. If not, then a more direct refutation of the radical neuron doctrine is available. Second, objections to the psychological sciences might derive not just from the conflation of the radical and the trivial neuron doctrines. There might also be the implicit belief that, for many menta...

  16. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  17. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-ind......We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N...... of an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose utilization...... is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based...

  18. Network synchronization in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Yaron; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2016-03-22

    Oscillatory activity is widespread in dynamic neuronal networks. The main paradigm for the origin of periodicity consists of specialized pacemaking elements that synchronize and drive the rest of the network; however, other models exist. Here, we studied the spontaneous emergence of synchronized periodic bursting in a network of cultured dissociated neurons from rat hippocampus and cortex. Surprisingly, about 60% of all active neurons were self-sustained oscillators when disconnected, each with its own natural frequency. The individual neuron's tendency to oscillate and the corresponding oscillation frequency are controlled by its excitability. The single neuron intrinsic oscillations were blocked by riluzole, and are thus dependent on persistent sodium leak currents. Upon a gradual retrieval of connectivity, the synchrony evolves: Loose synchrony appears already at weak connectivity, with the oscillators converging to one common oscillation frequency, yet shifted in phase across the population. Further strengthening of the connectivity causes a reduction in the mean phase shifts until zero-lag is achieved, manifested by synchronous periodic network bursts. Interestingly, the frequency of network bursting matches the average of the intrinsic frequencies. Overall, the network behaves like other universal systems, where order emerges spontaneously by entrainment of independent rhythmic units. Although simplified with respect to circuitry in the brain, our results attribute a basic functional role for intrinsic single neuron excitability mechanisms in driving the network's activity and dynamics, contributing to our understanding of developing neural circuits.

  19. Neuritin 1 promotes neuronal migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Arianna; Cartelli, Daniele; Cappelletti, Graziella; Cariboni, Anna; Andrews, William; Parnavelas, John; Poletti, Angelo; Galbiati, Mariarita

    2014-01-01

    Neuritin 1 (Nrn1 or cpg15-1) is an activity-dependent protein involved in synaptic plasticity during brain development, a process that relies upon neuronal migration. By analyzing Nrn1 expression, we found that it is highly expressed in a mouse model of migrating immortalized neurons (GN11 cells), but not in a mouse model of non-migrating neurons (GT1-7 cells). We thus hypothesized that Nrn1 might control neuronal migration. By using complementary assays, as Boyden's microchemotaxis, scratch-wounding and live cell imaging, we found that GN11 cell migration is enhanced when Nrn1 is overexpressed and decreased when Nrn1 is silenced. The effects of Nrn1 in promoting neuronal migration have been then confirmed ex vivo, on rat cortical interneurons, by Boyden chamber assays and focal electroporation of acute embryonic brain slices. Furthermore, we found that Nrn1 level modulation affects GN11 cell morphology. The process is also paralleled by Nrn1-induced α-tubulin post-translational modifications, a well-recognized marker of microtubule stability. Altogether, the data demonstrate a novel function of Nrn1 in promoting migration of neuronal cells and indicate that Nrn1 levels impact on microtubule stability. PMID:23212301

  20. Cooperative effects of neuronal ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G; Siebler, M

    1995-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of neurons as the basic cellular elements of the central nervous system and their synaptic connections are well characterized down to a molecular level. However, the behavior of complex noisy networks formed by these constituents usually cannot simply be derived from the knowledge of its microscopic parameters. As a consequence, cooperative phenomena based on the interaction of neurons were postulated. This is a report on a study of global network spike activity as a function of synaptic interaction. We performed experiments in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons and, for comparison, simulations of a mathematical model closely related to electrophysiology. Numeric analyses revealed that at a critical level of synaptic connectivity the firing behavior undergoes a phase transition. This cooperative effect depends crucially on the interaction of numerous cells and cannot be attributed to the spike threshold of individual neurons. In the experiment a drastic increase in the firing level was observed upon increase of synaptic efficacy by lowering of the extracellular magnesium concentration, which is compatible with our theoretical predictions. This "on-off" phenomenon demonstrates that even in small neuronal ensembles collective behavior can emerge which is not explained by the characteristics of single neurons. PMID:8542966

  1. Automated identification of neurons and their locations

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, Andrew; Roe, Dan L; Stanley, H E; Rosene, Douglas L; Urbanc, Brigita

    2007-01-01

    Individual locations of many neuronal cell bodies (>10^4) are needed to enable statistically significant measurements of spatial organization within the brain such as nearest-neighbor and microcolumnarity measurements. In this paper, we introduce an Automated Neuron Recognition Algorithm (ANRA) which obtains the (x,y) location of individual neurons within digitized images of Nissl-stained, 30 micron thick, frozen sections of the cerebral cortex of the Rhesus monkey. Identification of neurons within such Nissl-stained sections is inherently difficult due to the variability in neuron staining, the overlap of neurons, the presence of partial or damaged neurons at tissue surfaces, and the presence of non-neuron objects, such as glial cells, blood vessels, and random artifacts. To overcome these challenges and identify neurons, ANRA applies a combination of image segmentation and machine learning. The steps involve active contour segmentation to find outlines of potential neuron cell bodies followed by artificial ...

  2. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  3. Signals mediating Klotho-induced neuroprotection in hippocampal neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Fu; Chen, Li-Jen; Niu, Ho-Shan; Yang, Ting-Ting; Lin, Kao-Chang; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2015-01-01

    The erythropoietin (Epo) receptor (EpoR) is expressed in the brain and was shown to have neuroprotective effects against brain damage in animal models. A recent study indicated that EpoR and its activity are the downstream effectors of Klotho for cytoprotection in the kidney. Thus, we propose that Klotho can stimulate the expression of EpoR in neuronal cells to enhance Epo-mediated protection. H19-7 hippocampal neuronal cells were treated with recombinant Klotho. In H19-7 cells, Klotho increased the expression of both the EpoR protein and mRNA. Klotho also enhanced the transcription activity of the EpoR promoter in H19-7 cells. Moreover, Klotho augmented the Epo-triggered phosphorylation of Jak2 and Stat5 and protected H19-7 cells from hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity. The silencing of EpoR abolished the protective effect of Klotho against peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, the silencing of GATA1 diminished the Klotho-induced increase in EpoR protein and mRNA expression as well as its promoter activity. In conclusion, Klotho increased EpoR expression in neuronal cells through GATA1, thereby enabling EpoR to function as a cytoprotective protein against oxidative injury. PMID:25856523

  4. Chronic motor neuron disease possibly related to intoxication with organochlorine insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, R G; Resende, L A; Silva, M D; Camargo, A

    1993-07-01

    We report on two patients with a history of chronic exposure to organochlorine insecticides who developed clinical and electromyographic signs and symptoms of chronic motor neuron disease. Measurements of aldrin, lindane and heptachlor confirmed the intoxication. We emphasize the importance of searching for toxic and environmental factors in cases of motor neuron disease especially in Third World countries, where workers usually wear no adequate protective equipment. PMID:7690513

  5. MITOCHONDRIA-DERIVED REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES MEDIATE CASPASE- DEPENDENT AND-INDEPENDENT NEURONAL DEATH

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, James L.; McManus, Meagan J.; Murphy, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria-targeted drugs that effectively decrease oxidative stress, protect mitochondrial energetics, and prevent neuronal loss may therefore lend therapeutic benefit to these currently incurable diseases. To investigate the efficacy of such drugs, we examined the effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ10 and MitoE2 on neuronal death induced by neurotrophin deficiency. Our results...

  6. Cognition and behavior in motor neuron disease

    OpenAIRE

    Raaphorst, J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor neuron loss, leading to weakness of the muscles of arms and legs, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Depending on the involvement of the lower and the upper motor neuron, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; both lower and upper motor neuron affected) and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA; only lower motor neuron affected) are recognized. There is no cure, despite numerous pharmaceutical tria...

  7. 多西环素对脂多糖-帕金森病模型大鼠多巴胺能神经元的保护作用%Protective effects of doxycycline upon dopaminergic neuron in LPS-induced rat model of Parkinson′s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王普清; 孙圣刚; 乔娴

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨多西环素对脂多糖(LPS)-帕金森病(PD)模型大鼠多巴胺能神经元的保护作用及其机制.方法 动物随机分为3组:正常对照组、LPS组和多西环素干预组;采用LPS黑质内立体定向注射建立PD模型;免疫组化染色法观察多西环素干预前后黑质多巴胺能神经元和MHCⅡ阳性小胶质细胞的变化;高效液相色谱-电化学检测仪检测纹状体多巴胺(DA)、DOPAC(二羟苯乙酸)含量的变化;Western 印迹检测黑质小胶质细胞MHCⅡ(主要组织相容性复合物Ⅱ)蛋白的表达.结果 多西环素干预后,黑质残存多巴胺神经元由LPS组的38%±5%上升到79%±4%(P<0.01);纹状体DA及DOPAC含量分别由LPS组的4.89±0.27和0.70±0.07上升到7.00±0.34和1.10±0.10(P<0.01);腹腔注射阿朴吗啡诱导动物旋转的平均圈数由LPS组的(208±14)次/30 min减少到(80±12)次/30 min(P<0.01);而黑质致密部MHCⅡ阳性细胞数量由LPS组的835±82减少到354±59(P<0.01);Western 印迹检测MHCⅡ蛋白的表达也明显减少.结论 多西环素能够抑制LPS诱导的黑质多巴胺能神经元变性,它可以通过下调小胶质细胞MHCⅡ的表达来实现其神经保护作用.%Objective To explore the protective effect of doxycycline (DC) upon dopaminergic neuron in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induce rat model of Parkinson′s disease (PD).Methods Sixty SD rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, LPS and doxycycline treatment. LPS was stereostatically injected into unilateral substantia nigra (SNc) of rats to establish the PD models. The damage to the substantia nigra DA neurons was observed by using tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical staining. Specific antibody OX6 (MHCⅡ marker) was used to detect the changes in morphology and the numbers of microglia. The contents of dopamine and DOPAC in striatum were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Western blot were used to detect the expression of MHCⅡ (Major

  8. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.; Chan, C. Savio

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically,...

  9. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    This thesis examines protection against risks as material and social phenomena among the Ammarin tribe in Petra - a settled Bedouin community in southern Jordan. By examining the active role of material culture that is often disregarded in risk studies, the thesis discusses how protective...... of architecture, the social use of luminosity, prophylactic items, saint veneration, Qur'anic items, and heritage production. The thesis challenges the preoccupation with "meaning" in material culture studies, by focusing on conceptualizations of "presence" and "absence" as equally important to protective...... strategies are confirming their efficacy, and act as material anchors for negotiating Bedouin identities in response to a rapid transformation from nomadic pastoralists to sedentary wageworkers. The tensions surrounding the materiality of protection, along with the role of the past in the present is further...

  10. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  11. Environmental Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Regina; Diewald, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Nature protection and conservation are fundamental elements of environmental protection as this is an important part of the human existence; it is a vital component of the present and future harmonious socio economic development. The ecosystems and the organisms, like the marine and atmospheric terrestrial resources used by humankind, must be administrated in such a way that their optimum and continuous productivity may be assured and maintained. It is necessary to take rigorous measures agai...

  12. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  13. Isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in developing hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai; Weitao Guo

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the P2X7 receptor may be the target of isoflurane, so we investigated the roles of the P2X7 receptor and inositol triphosphate receptor in calcium overload and neuronal apoptosis induced by isoflurane in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. Results showed that isoflurane induced widespread neuronal apoptosis and significantly increased cytoplasmic Ca2+. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or removal of extracellular Ca2+ combined with blockade of inositol triphosphate receptors completely inhibited apoptosis or increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or blockade of inositol triphosphate receptor alone could partly inhibit these effects of isoflurane. Isoflurane could directly activate P2X7-gated channels and induce inward currents, but did not affect the expression of P2X7 receptor protein in neurons. These findings indicate that the mechanism by which isoflurane induced neuronal apoptosis in rat developing brain was mediated by intracellular calcium overload, which was caused by P2X7 receptor mediated calcium influx and inositol triphosphate receptor mediated calcium release.

  14. Estrogen intervention in microvascular morphology and choline acetyltransferase expression in rat hippocampal neurons in chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenjun Yang; Hongwei Yan; Guomin Zhang; Zhihong Chen; Jingfeng Xue

    2011-01-01

    We observed dynamic changes in microvessels and a protective effect of estrogen on chronic cerebral ischemia ovariectomized rat models established through permanent occlusion of bilateral carotid arteries at 7, 14 and 21 days. The results revealed that estrogen improved microvasculature in the hippocampus of chronic cerebral ischemic rats, upregulated Bcl-2 protein expression, downregulated Bax protein expression, increased choline acetyltransferase expression in hippocampal cholinergic neurons, and suppressed hippocampal neuronal apoptosis. These findings indicate that estrogen can protect hippocampal neurons in rats with chronic cerebral ischemia.

  15. Learning of time series through neuron-to-neuron instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model neuron with delayline feedback connections can learn a time series generated by another model neuron. It has been known that some student neurons that have completed such learning under the instruction of a teacher's quasi-periodic sequence mimic the teacher's time series over a long interval, even after instruction has ceased. We found that in addition to such faithful students, there are unfaithful students whose time series eventually diverge exponentially from that of the teacher. In order to understand the circumstances that allow for such a variety of students, the orbit dimension was estimated numerically. The quasi-periodic orbits in question were found to be confined in spaces with dimensions significantly smaller than that of the full phase space

  16. Protected Areas - Protected Federal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Federal Lands data consists of land areas that are run and maintained by U.S. Governmental authorities and are considered protected.The Department of Natural...

  17. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  18. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. PMID:26598734

  19. Activity deprivation induces neuronal cell death: mediation by tissue-type plasminogen activator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eldi Schonfeld-Dado

    Full Text Available Spontaneous activity is an essential attribute of neuronal networks and plays a critical role in their development and maintenance. Upon blockade of activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX, neurons degenerate slowly and die in a manner resembling neurodegenerative diseases-induced neuronal cell death. The molecular cascade leading to this type of slow cell death is not entirely clear. Primary post-natal cortical neurons were exposed to TTX for up to two weeks, followed by molecular, biochemical and immunefluorescence analysis. The expression of the neuronal marker, neuron specific enolase (NSE, was down-regulated, as expected, but surprisingly, there was a concomitant and striking elevation in expression of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that tPA was highly elevated inside affected neurons. Transfection of an endogenous tPA inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1, protected the TTX-exposed neurons from dying. These results indicate that tPA is a pivotal player in slowly progressing activity deprivation-induced neurodegeneration.

  20. Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R

    2014-01-01

    The protection of accelerator equipment is as old as accelerator technology and was for many years related to high-power equipment. Examples are the protection of powering equipment from overheating (magnets, power converters, high-current cables), of superconducting magnets from damage after a quench and of klystrons. The protection of equipment from beam accidents is more recent. It is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI cyclotron, to the emission of synchrotron light by electron–positron accelerators and FELs, and to the increase of energy stored in the beam (in particular for hadron colliders such as LHC). Designing a machine protection system requires an excellent understanding of accelerator physics and operation to anticipate possible failures that could lead to damage. Machine protection includes beam and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop beam operation (e.g. dumping the beam or stopping the beam at low energy) and an ...

  1. Correlations and Neuronal Population Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Adam; Coen-Cagli, Ruben; Kanitscheider, Ingmar; Pouget, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Brain function involves the activity of neuronal populations. Much recent effort has been devoted to measuring the activity of neuronal populations in different parts of the brain under various experimental conditions. Population activity patterns contain rich structure, yet many studies have focused on measuring pairwise relationships between members of a larger population-termed noise correlations. Here we review recent progress in understanding how these correlations affect population information, how information should be quantified, and what mechanisms may give rise to correlations. As population coding theory has improved, it has made clear that some forms of correlation are more important for information than others. We argue that this is a critical lesson for those interested in neuronal population responses more generally: Descriptions of population responses should be motivated by and linked to well-specified function. Within this context, we offer suggestions of where current theoretical frameworks fall short.

  2. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  3. The neuronal code for number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions.

  4. Turning skin into dopamine neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin Parmar; Johan Jakobsson

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to generate neurons from fibroblasts became a reality with the development of iPS technology a few years ago.By reprogramming somatic cells using transcription factor (TF) overexpression,it is possible to generate pluripotent stem cells that then can be differentiated into any somatic cell type including various subtypes of neurons.This raises the possibility of using donor-matched or even patientspecific cells for cell therapy of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD),Huntington's disease and stroke.Supporting this idea,dopamine neurons,which are the cells dying in PD,derived from human iPS cells have been demonstrated to survive transplantation and reverse motor symptoms in animal models of PD [1].

  5. Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Zerlauth, Markus; Wenninger, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The present architecture of the machine protection system is being recalled and the performance of the associated systems during the 2011 run will be briefly summarized. An analysis of the causes of beam dumps as well as an assessment of the dependability of the machine protection systems (MPS) itself is being presented. Emphasis will be given to events that risked exposing parts of the machine to damage. Further improvements and mitigations of potential holes in the protection systems will be evaluated along with their impact on the 2012 run. The role of rMPP during the various operational phases (commissioning, intensity ramp up, MDs...) will be discussed along with a proposal for the intensity ramp up for the start of beam operation in 2012.

  6. Prospective Coding by Spiking Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanni Brea

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Animals learn to make predictions, such as associating the sound of a bell with upcoming feeding or predicting a movement that a motor command is eliciting. How predictions are realized on the neuronal level and what plasticity rule underlies their learning is not well understood. Here we propose a biologically plausible synaptic plasticity rule to learn predictions on a single neuron level on a timescale of seconds. The learning rule allows a spiking two-compartment neuron to match its current firing rate to its own expected future discounted firing rate. For instance, if an originally neutral event is repeatedly followed by an event that elevates the firing rate of a neuron, the originally neutral event will eventually also elevate the neuron's firing rate. The plasticity rule is a form of spike timing dependent plasticity in which a presynaptic spike followed by a postsynaptic spike leads to potentiation. Even if the plasticity window has a width of 20 milliseconds, associations on the time scale of seconds can be learned. We illustrate prospective coding with three examples: learning to predict a time varying input, learning to predict the next stimulus in a delayed paired-associate task and learning with a recurrent network to reproduce a temporally compressed version of a sequence. We discuss the potential role of the learning mechanism in classical trace conditioning. In the special case that the signal to be predicted encodes reward, the neuron learns to predict the discounted future reward and learning is closely related to the temporal difference learning algorithm TD(λ.

  7. Physical protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myre, W.C.; DeMontmollin, J.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Serious concern about physical protection of nuclear facilities began around 1972. R and D was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories which had developed techniques to protect weapons for many years. Special vehicles, convoy procedures, and a communications system previously developed for weapons shipments were improved and extended for shipments of other sensitive materials. Barriers, perimeter alarms, portal and internal control systems were developed, tested, and published in handbooks and presented at symposia. Training programs were initiated for U.S. and foreign personnel. Containment and surveillance techniques were developed for the IAEA. Presently emphasis is on computer security, active barriers, and techniques to prevent theft or sabotage by insiders .

  8. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H;

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  9. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness. PMID:7488645

  10. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  11. Electrodiagnosis of motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleep, Anuradha; Shefner, Jeremy

    2013-02-01

    Electrodiagnostic testing has proved useful in helping to establish the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis by eliminating possible disease mimics and by demonstrating abnormalities in body areas that are clinically unaffected. Electrodiagnosis begins with an understanding of the clinical features of the disease, because clinical correlation is essential. To improve the sensitivity of the electrophysiologic evaluation, the Awaji criteria have been proposed as a modification to the revised El Escorial criteria. Although techniques to evaluate corticomotor neuron abnormalities and to quantify lower motor neuron loss have been developed, they remain primarily research techniques and have not yet influenced clinical practice.

  12. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrew J; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15-20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage. PMID:27650924

  13. Neuronal networks provide rapid neuroprotection against spreading toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Andrew J; Robertson, Graham; Zagnoni, Michele; Connolly, Christopher N

    2016-09-21

    Acute secondary neuronal cell death, as seen in neurodegenerative disease, cerebral ischemia (stroke) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), drives spreading neurotoxicity into surrounding, undamaged, brain areas. This spreading toxicity occurs via two mechanisms, synaptic toxicity through hyperactivity, and excitotoxicity following the accumulation of extracellular glutamate. To date, there are no fast-acting therapeutic tools capable of terminating secondary spreading toxicity within a time frame relevant to the emergency treatment of stroke or TBI patients. Here, using hippocampal neurons (DIV 15-20) cultured in microfluidic devices in order to deliver a localized excitotoxic insult, we replicate secondary spreading toxicity and demonstrate that this process is driven by GluN2B receptors. In addition to the modeling of spreading toxicity, this approach has uncovered a previously unknown, fast acting, GluN2A-dependent neuroprotective signaling mechanism. This mechanism utilizes the innate capacity of surrounding neuronal networks to provide protection against both forms of spreading neuronal toxicity, synaptic hyperactivity and direct glutamate excitotoxicity. Importantly, network neuroprotection against spreading toxicity can be effectively stimulated after an excitotoxic insult has been delivered, and may identify a new therapeutic window to limit brain damage.

  14. [What mirror neurons have revealed: revisited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Akira; Maeda, Kazutaka

    2014-06-01

    The first paper on mirror neurons was published in 1992. In the span of over two decades since then, much knowledge about the relationship between social cognitive function and the motor control system has been accumulated. Direct matching of visual actions and their corresponding motor representations is the most important functional property of mirror neuron. Many studies have emphasized intrinsic simulation as a core concept for mirror neurons. Mirror neurons are thought to play a role in social cognitive function. However, the function of mirror neurons in the macaque remains unclear, because such cognitive functions are limited or lacking in macaque monkeys. It is therefore important to discuss these neurons in the context of motor function. Rizzolatti and colleagues have stressed that the most important function of mirror neurons in macaques is recognition of actions performed by other individuals. I suggest that mirror neurons in the Macaque inferior pariental lobule might be correlated with body schema. In the parieto-premotor network, matching of corollary discharge and actual sensory feedback is an essential neuronal operation. Recently, neurons showing mirror properties were found in some cortical areas outside the mirror neuron system. The current work would revisit the outcomes of mirror neuron studies to discuss the function of mirror neurons in the monkey.

  15. Protection Myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Salter, Ammon; Li, Cher

    from having an orientation towards legal appropriability, we conjecture that protection myopia may lead some firms to allocate too much attention to legal appropriability, in particular when the behavioral and structural contingencies are unfavorable. Examining a panel of three successive waves...

  16. Protection mechanism of brain derived neurotrophic factor on neuron-like cells under serum free condition%脑源性神经营养因子对无血清培养的神经元保护机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭斐; 赵琛; 李桂晨; 景良; 郭阳

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨在无血清培养条件下脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)对神经元样细胞存活的影响及其作用机制.方法 在无血清条件下培养具有BDNF受体TrkB表达的神经母细胞瘤细胞SY5Y-TrkB,在培养液中单独加入BDNF,或联合加入磷脂酰肌醇3-激酶(PI3K)抑制剂/丝裂原活化蛋白激酶(MAPK)抑制剂进行细胞培养,利用细胞活性测定法(MTS)检测活细胞活性.结果 与在10%胎牛血清(FBS)培养液中培养的细胞相比,无血清条件下培养24、48 72 h后,SY5Y-TrkB细胞的存活率分别为51%、38%、25%.若细胞在无血清条件下培养24 h,无处理因素的细胞存活率设定为100%,给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为154%;用10μmol/L PI3K抑制剂LY294002预处理1 h,再给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为100%;而应用80 tmol/LMAPK抑制剂PD98059预处理1 h,再给予BDNF后的细胞存活率为158%.结论 BDNF通过PI3K信号通路保护SY5Y-TrkB细胞免受无血清培养引起的细胞死亡.%Objective To study the effect of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on neuron-like cell survival under serum free condition and the related mechanism.Methods Tropomyosin receptor kinase (TrkB)expressing neuroblastoma cells SY5Y-TrkB were cultured in serum free media, treated with BDNF, or with a combination of BDNF and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor or mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor.Cell survival was detected by MTS assay.Results Compared to the cells cultured in 10%FBS medium, the survival rate of SY5Y-TrkB cells in serum free medium decreased to 51% by 24 h, 38% by 48 h,and 25% by 72 h.SY5Y-TrkB cells were cultured in serum-free medium for 24 h; compared to control cells whose survival rate was set as 100%, adding BDNF to the medium increased cell survival rate to 154%.Pretreatment of the cells with P13K inhibitor LY294002 ( 10 μmol/L) for 1 h before BDNF resulted in a cell survival rate of 100% ;while pretreatment of cells with MAPK

  17. [The ontogeny of the mirror neuron system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myowa-Yamakoshi, Masako

    2014-06-01

    Abstract Humans utilize the mirror neuron system to understand and predict others' actions. However, the ontogeny of the mirror neuron system remains unknown. Whether mirror neuron function is an innate trait or whether mirror neurons acquire their sensorimotor matching properties ontogenetically remains to be clarified. In this paper, I review the ontogenetic theory of the mirror neuron system. I then discuss the functioning of the mirror neuron system in the context of social cognitive abilities, which are unique to humans. Recently, some researchers argue that it is too early to interpret the function of mirror neurons as an understanding of the underlying psychological states of others. They imply that such functioning would require inferential cognitive processes that are known to involve areas outside the mirror neuron system. Filling in this missing link may be the key to elucidating the unique ability of humans to understand others' actions.

  18. Performance of a Single Quantum Neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIFei; ZHAOShengmei; ZHENGBaoyu

    2005-01-01

    Quantum neural network (QNN) is a promising area in the field of quantum computing and quantum information processing. A novel model for quantum neuron is described, a quantum learning algorithm is proposed and its convergence property is investigated. It has been shown, Quantum neuron (QN) has the same convergence property as Conventional neuron (CN) but can attain faster training than Conventional neuron. The computational power of the quantum neuron is also explored.Numerical and graphical results show that this single quantum neuron can implement the Walsh-Hadamard transformation, perform the XOR function unrealizable with a classical neuron and can eliminate the necessity of building a network of neurons to obtain nonlinear mapping.

  19. What do mirror neurons mirror?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uithol, S.; Rooij, I.J.E.I. van; Bekkering, H.; Haselager, W.F.G.

    2011-01-01

    Single cell recordings in monkeys provide strong evidence for an important role of the motor system in action understanding. This evidence is backed up by data from studies of the (human) mirror neuron system using neuroimaging or TMS techniques, and behavioral experiments. Although the data acquire

  20. The neuronal infrastructure of speaking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, L.M.E.; Segaert, K.M.; Hagoort, P.

    2012-01-01

    Models of speaking distinguish producing meaning, words and syntax as three different linguistic components of speaking. Nevertheless, little is known about the brain’s integrated neuronal infrastructure for speech production. We investigated semantic, lexical and syntactic aspects of speaking using

  1. Unbalanced Neuronal Circuits in Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gen-Jack; Tomasi, Dardo; Baler, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    Through sequential waves of drug-induced neurochemical stimulation, addiction co-opts the brain's neuronal circuits that mediate reward, motivation, , to behavioral inflexibility and a severe disruption of self-control and compulsive drug intake. Brain imaging technologies have allowed neuroscientists to map out the neural landscape of addiction in the human brain and to understand how drugs modify it.

  2. Automated identification of neurons and their locations

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, A.; Cruz, L; Roe, D L; H. E. Stanley; Rosene, D.L.; Urbanc, B.

    2008-01-01

    Individual locations of many neuronal cell bodies (>10^4) are needed to enable statistically significant measurements of spatial organization within the brain such as nearest-neighbor and microcolumnarity measurements. In this paper, we introduce an Automated Neuron Recognition Algorithm (ANRA) which obtains the (x,y) location of individual neurons within digitized images of Nissl-stained, 30 micron thick, frozen sections of the cerebral cortex of the Rhesus monkey. Identification of neurons ...

  3. Molecular basis for catecholaminergic neuron diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, Jan; Mueller, Anne; Hefti, Franz; Rosenthal, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    Catecholaminergic neurons control diverse cognitive, motor, and endocrine functions and are associated with multiple psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. We present global gene-expression profiles that define the four major classes of dopaminergic (DA) and noradrenergic neurons in the brain. Hypothalamic DA neurons and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus display distinct group-specific signatures of transporters, channels, transcription, plasticity, axon-guidance, and surviva...

  4. Signal Propagation in Drosophila Central Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gouwens, Nathan W.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila is an important model organism for investigating neural development, neural morphology, neurophysiology, and neural correlates of behaviors. However, almost nothing is known about how electrical signals propagate in Drosophila neurons. Here we address these issues in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs), one of the most well-studied classes of Drosophila neurons. We use morphological and electrophysiological data to deduce the passive membrane properties of these neurons and to b...

  5. Artificial Neurons with Arbitrarily Complex Internal Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kohring, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neurons with arbitrarily complex internal structure are introduced. The neurons can be described in terms of a set of internal variables, a set activation functions which describe the time evolution of these variables and a set of characteristic functions which control how the neurons interact with one another. The information capacity of attractor networks composed of these generalized neurons is shown to reach the maximum allowed bound. A simple example taken from the domain of p...

  6. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva Serra, I.; Husson, Z.; Bartlett, J.D.; Smith, E.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistoche...

  7. Convergent cortical innervation of striatal projection neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Yamawaki, Naoki; Wokosin, David L.; Wickersham, Ian R.; Gordon M. G Shepherd; Surmeier, D. James

    2013-01-01

    Anatomical studies have led to the assertion that intratelencephalic (IT) and pyramidal tract (PT) cortical neurons innervate different striatal projection neurons. To test this hypothesis, the responses of mouse striatal neurons to optogenetic activation of IT and PT axons were measured. Contrary to expectation, direct and indirect pathway striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) responded to both IT and PT activation, arguing that these cortical networks innervate both striatal projection n...

  8. A Method for Neuronal Source Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang Won; Szymanska, Agnieszka A.; Wu, Shun Chi; Swindlehurst, A. Lee; Nenadic, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Multi-sensor microelectrodes for extracellular action potential recording have significantly improved the quality of in vivo recorded neuronal signals. These microelectrodes have also been instrumental in the localization of neuronal signal sources. However, existing neuron localization methods have been mostly utilized in vivo, where the true neuron location remains unknown. Therefore, these methods could not be experimentally validated. This article presents experimental validation of a met...

  9. Inhibitory effect of acupuncture on neuronal apoptosis in rats after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bangyu Ju; Jing Zhang; Guohua Jiang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed neuronal death after total cerebral ischemia may accompany with apoptosis, but acupuncture may play a certain role in protecting nerve through inhibiting ischemic neuronal apoptosis.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of acupuncture on neuronal apoptosis in rats after cerebral ischemia and analyze its cerebral protective mechanism.DESIGN: Contrast observation among groups.SETTING: Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS: A total of 30 male healthy Wistar rats of general grade and weighing (250±20) g were randomly divided into three groups, including sham operation group, cerebral ischemia group and acupuncture group with 10 rats in each group. Apoptosis in situ kit was provided by Baolingman Company,Germany.METHODS: The experiment was carried out in the Laboratory Center, Heilongjiang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from May to November 2004. ① Rats in the cerebral ischemia group and the acupuncture group were used to establish total cerebral ischemic models with four vessels occlusion; in addition, models in the sham operation group were established with the same method as mentioned above.However, four vessels of rats in the sham operation were exposured and cerebral ischemia did not occur. Rats in the acupuncture group were given acupuncture treatment after operation. Needle of 40 mm in length was used to acupuncture bilateral Zusanli (St 36) and Quchi (LI 11) with the depth of 3 mm, and then bilateral acupoints were connected with KWD-808Ⅱ omnipotenc impulse electro-therapeutic apparatus (frequency: 1 Hz;thin waves; voltage: 2 V) once a day for totally 30 minutes. Meanwhile, needle of 25 mm in length was used to acupuncture Baihui (Du 20) with the depth of 3 mm, and then the needle was twirled once every 5 minutes for 30 minutes in total. The course was 7 days. ② Neuronal injuries in hippocampal CA1 area after cerebral ischemia were observed with Nissl body staining method at 7 days after treatment

  10. Low level laser therapy reduces oxidative stress in cortical neurons in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tedford, Clark E.; McCarthy, Thomas; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    It is accepted that the mechanisms of low level laser therapy (LLLT) involves photons that are absorbed in the mitochondria of cells and lead to increase of mitochondrial metabolism resulting in more electron transport, increase of mitochondrial membrane potential, and more ATP production. Intracellular calcium changes are seen that correlate with mitochondrial stimulation. The situation with two other intermediates is more complex however: reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). Evidence exists that low levels of ROS are produced by LLLT in normal cells that can be beneficial by (for instance) activating NF-kB. However high fluences of light can produce large amounts of ROS that can damage the cells. In oxidatively stressed cells the situation may be different. We exposed primary cultured cortical neurons to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cobalt chloride (CoCl2) oxidative insults in the presence or absence of LLLT (810-nm laser at 0.3 or 3 J/cm2). Cell viability of cortical neurons was determined by lactate dehydrogenase assay. ROS in neurons was detected using an ROS probe, MitoRox with confocal microscopy. Results showed that LLLT dose-dependently reversed ROS production and protected cortical neurons against H2O2 or CoCl2 induced oxidative injury in cultured cortical neurons. Conclusion: LLLT can protect cortical neurons against oxidative stress by reversing the levels of ROS.

  11. BlastNeuron for Automated Comparison, Retrieval and Clustering of 3D Neuron Morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yinan; Long, Fuhui; Qu, Lei; Xiao, Hang; Hawrylycz, Michael; Myers, Eugene W; Peng, Hanchuan

    2015-10-01

    Characterizing the identity and types of neurons in the brain, as well as their associated function, requires a means of quantifying and comparing 3D neuron morphology. Presently, neuron comparison methods are based on statistics from neuronal morphology such as size and number of branches, which are not fully suitable for detecting local similarities and differences in the detailed structure. We developed BlastNeuron to compare neurons in terms of their global appearance, detailed arborization patterns, and topological similarity. BlastNeuron first compares and clusters 3D neuron reconstructions based on global morphology features and moment invariants, independent of their orientations, sizes, level of reconstruction and other variations. Subsequently, BlastNeuron performs local alignment between any pair of retrieved neurons via a tree-topology driven dynamic programming method. A 3D correspondence map can thus be generated at the resolution of single reconstruction nodes. We applied BlastNeuron to three datasets: (1) 10,000+ neuron reconstructions from a public morphology database, (2) 681 newly and manually reconstructed neurons, and (3) neurons reconstructions produced using several independent reconstruction methods. Our approach was able to accurately and efficiently retrieve morphologically and functionally similar neuron structures from large morphology database, identify the local common structures, and find clusters of neurons that share similarities in both morphology and molecular profiles.

  12. Studies Gain Insight into Neuronal Polarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A typical matured nerve cell (or neuron) has one axon and multiple dendrites. It receives information at the dendrites and sending signals to other neurons via the axon. Although scientists have discovered that this axon-dendrite polarity is a cardinal feature of neuronal morphology essential for information flow, they are still in the dark about the cause of this polarization.

  13. Information processing at single neuron level

    OpenAIRE

    Vidybida, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    Based on numerical simulation of Hodgkin and Huxley type neuron stimulated from many synaptic inputs, an abstract concept of signal processing in individual neuron is proposed. In the concept proposed, neuron performs binding of synaptic inputs into a single output event, based on the degree of temporal coherence between the inputs. Inhibition serves as controlling factor of this type of binding.

  14. NEURONAL PHOSPHOPROTEINS: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of a great variety of neuron-specific phosproteins in nervous tissue supports the view that protein phosphorylation plays many roles in neuronal function. The physiological significance of several of these phosphoproteins has already been established. Some neuronal p...

  15. HIV-1 differentially modulates autophagy in neurons and astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Rajeev; Chauhan, Ashok

    2015-08-15

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway that maintains cellular homeostasis, has emerged as an innate immune defense against pathogens. The role of autophagy in the deregulated HIV-infected central nervous system (CNS) is unclear. We have found that HIV-1-induced neuro-glial (neurons and astrocytes) damage involves modulation of the autophagy pathway. Neuro-glial stress induced by HIV-1 led to biochemical and morphological dysfunctions. X4 HIV-1 produced neuro-glial toxicity coupled with suppression of autophagy, while R5 HIV-1-induced toxicity was restricted to neurons. Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor (autophagy inducer) relieved the blockage of the autophagy pathway caused by HIV-1 and resulted in neuro-glial protection. Further understanding of the regulation of autophagy by cytokines and chemokines or other signaling events may lead to recognition of therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    Radioactive Shipping Service

    2005-01-01

    The section of the radiation protection group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  17. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  18. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tel. 73171

  19. Corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention describes a corrosion protection device for long-term storage containers of radioactive matter, in particular of irradiated fuel elements stored in geological formations apt for the purpose. This device prevents corrosion of the containers even if water emerges unexpectedly, or, in any case, inhibits and minimizes corrosion. The device comprehends reactive anodes that are connected to the containers by means of conductive connections. (orig.)

  20. Protecting Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galster, Kjeld Hald. Doctoral Student (History). Saxo Institute. May 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Supervisor: Professor, Dr. Gunner Lind. Democratic debate on defence and democratic organisation of the forces are as central to the life of a democr......ABSTRACT Galster, Kjeld Hald. Doctoral Student (History). Saxo Institute. May 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Supervisor: Professor, Dr. Gunner Lind. Democratic debate on defence and democratic organisation of the forces are as central to the life....... The dissertation addresses two essential problems of the correlation of democracy, the debate, and the current defence policy. Firstly, is democratic society capable of pursuing constantly a defence policy reflecting the classic, realist logic, or does this happen only sporadically, because the debate is being.......d.-studerende (historie). Saxo-Instituttet, maj 2007. Protecting Democracy: Danish Defence Debate in Times of Change. Vejleder: Professor, dr. phil. Gunner Lind. En forsvarsdebat hvilende på demokratisk debat og en demokratisk indretning af forsvaret er lige så selvfølgeligt for den demokratiske stat som forsvar i det...

  1. Coherence resonance in globally coupled neuronal networks with different neuron numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wei-Lian; Zhang Zheng-Zhen; Zeng Shang-You; Luo Xiao-Shu; Hu Jin-Lin; Zeng Shao-Wen; Qiu Yi; Wu Hui-Si

    2012-01-01

    Because a brain consists of tremendous neuronal networks with different neuron numbers ranging from tens to tens of thousands,we study the coherence resonance due to ion channel noises in globally coupled neuronal networks with different neuron numbers.We confirm that for all neuronal networks with different neuron numbers there exist the array enhanced coherence resonance and the optimal synaptic conductance to cause the maximal spiking coherence.Furthermoremore,the enhancement effects of coupling on spiking coherence and on optimal synaptic conductance are almost the same,regardless of the neuron numbers in the neuronal networks.Therefore for all the neuronal networks with different neuron numbers in the brain,relative weak synaptic conductance (0.1 mS/cm2) is sufficient to induce the maximal spiking coherence and the best sub-threshold signal encoding.

  2. Dopamine neuron stimulating actions of a GDNF propeptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke H Bradley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, have shown great promise for protection and restoration of damaged or dying dopamine neurons in animal models and in some Parkinson's disease (PD clinical trials. However, the delivery of neurotrophic factors to the brain is difficult due to their large size and poor bio-distribution. In addition, developing more efficacious trophic factors is hampered by the difficulty of synthesis and structural modification. Small molecules with neurotrophic actions that are easy to synthesize and modify to improve bioavailability are needed. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here we present the neurobiological actions of dopamine neuron stimulating peptide-11 (DNSP-11, an 11-mer peptide from the proGDNF domain. In vitro, DNSP-11 supports the survival of fetal mesencephalic neurons, increasing both the number of surviving cells and neuritic outgrowth. In MN9D cells, DNSP-11 protects against dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA-induced cell death, significantly decreasing TUNEL-positive cells and levels of caspase-3 activity. In vivo, a single injection of DNSP-11 into the normal adult rat substantia nigra is taken up rapidly into neurons and increases resting levels of dopamine and its metabolites for up to 28 days. Of particular note, DNSP-11 significantly improves apomorphine-induced rotational behavior, and increases dopamine and dopamine metabolite tissue levels in the substantia nigra in a rat model of PD. Unlike GDNF, DNSP-11 was found to block staurosporine- and gramicidin-induced cytotoxicity in nutrient-deprived dopaminergic B65 cells, and its neuroprotective effects included preventing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, these data support that DNSP-11 exhibits potent neurotrophic actions analogous to GDNF, making it a viable candidate for a PD therapeutic. However, it likely signals through pathways that do not

  3. Neuroprotective effect of pentosan polysulphate on ischemia-related neuronal death of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yamashita, Yasuko; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Niwa, Masami

    2006-11-27

    Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) negatively charged sulphated glycosaminoglycan was studied in ischemia-related hippocampal neuronal death and compared with a low molecular weight of heparin, named dalteparin in rats. Transient global ischemia was produced by four vessel-occlusion, the occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries following the electrocautherization of the vertebral arteries. 3mg/kg of PPS or 300IU/kg of dalteparin was administered i.v. immediately after 7min-occlusion/reperfusion. Seven days after the operation, the animals were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde, and paraffinized coronal brain sections measuring 6microm in thickness were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Neuronal damage was then estimated as a ratio of the number of degenerated neurons to that of both the surviving and degenerated neurons in three distinct area of the CA1 subfield. The ratio of neuronal death increased with the length of the occlusion-time, at 5, 7 and 10min. Both PPS and dalteparin significantly inhibited the neuronal damage induced by 7min-occlusion. These results demonstrated that both PPS and dalteparin could thus protect brain neurons against ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage thus suggesting that they may be potentially useful therapeutic agents for acute ischemic stroke. PMID:17011126

  4. Neuroprotective effect of pentosan polysulphate on ischemia-related neuronal death of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai-Yamashita, Yasuko; Kinugawa, Hidekazu; Niwa, Masami

    2006-11-27

    Pentosan polysulphate (PPS) negatively charged sulphated glycosaminoglycan was studied in ischemia-related hippocampal neuronal death and compared with a low molecular weight of heparin, named dalteparin in rats. Transient global ischemia was produced by four vessel-occlusion, the occlusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries following the electrocautherization of the vertebral arteries. 3mg/kg of PPS or 300IU/kg of dalteparin was administered i.v. immediately after 7min-occlusion/reperfusion. Seven days after the operation, the animals were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde, and paraffinized coronal brain sections measuring 6microm in thickness were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Neuronal damage was then estimated as a ratio of the number of degenerated neurons to that of both the surviving and degenerated neurons in three distinct area of the CA1 subfield. The ratio of neuronal death increased with the length of the occlusion-time, at 5, 7 and 10min. Both PPS and dalteparin significantly inhibited the neuronal damage induced by 7min-occlusion. These results demonstrated that both PPS and dalteparin could thus protect brain neurons against ischemia/reperfusion-induced damage thus suggesting that they may be potentially useful therapeutic agents for acute ischemic stroke.

  5. Neuronal Deletion of Ghrelin Receptor Almost Completely Prevents Diet-Induced Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Han; Lin, Ligen; Xu, Pingwen; Saito, Kenji; Wei, Qiong; Meadows, Adelina G; Bongmba, Odelia Y N; Pradhan, Geetali; Zheng, Hui; Xu, Yong; Sun, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Ghrelin signaling has major effects on energy and glucose homeostasis, but it is unknown whether ghrelin's functions are centrally and/or peripherally mediated. The ghrelin receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R), is highly expressed in the brain and detectable in some peripheral tissues. To understand the roles of neuronal GHS-R, we generated a mouse line where Ghsr gene is deleted in all neurons using synapsin 1 (Syn1)-Cre driver. Our data showed that neuronal Ghsr deletion abolishes ghrelin-induced spontaneous food intake but has no effect on total energy intake. Remarkably, neuronal Ghsr deletion almost completely prevented diet-induced obesity (DIO) and significantly improved insulin sensitivity. The neuronal Ghsr-deleted mice also showed improved metabolic flexibility, indicative of better adaption to different fuels. In addition, gene expression analysis suggested that hypothalamus and/or midbrain might be the sites that mediate the effects of GHS-R in thermogenesis and physical activity, respectively. Collectively, our results indicate that neuronal GHS-R is a crucial regulator of energy metabolism and a key mediator of DIO. Neuronal Ghsr deletion protects against DIO by regulating energy expenditure, not by energy intake. These novel findings suggest that suppressing central ghrelin signaling may serve as a unique antiobesity strategy. PMID:27207529

  6. Zebrafish chemical screening reveals the impairment of dopaminergic neuronal survival by cardiac glycosides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaping Sun

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the prominent degeneration of dopaminergic (DA neurons among other cell types. Here we report a first chemical screen of over 5,000 compounds in zebrafish, aimed at identifying small molecule modulators of DA neuron development or survival. We find that Neriifolin, a member of the cardiac glycoside family of compounds, impairs survival but not differentiation of both zebrafish and mammalian DA neurons. Cardiac glycosides are inhibitors of Na(+/K(+ ATPase activity and widely used for treating heart disorders. Our data suggest that Neriifolin impairs DA neuronal survival by targeting the neuronal enriched Na(+/K(+ ATPase α3 subunit (ATP1A3. Modulation of ionic homeostasis, knockdown of p53, or treatment with antioxidants protects DA neurons from Neriifolin-induced death. These results reveal a previously unknown effect of cardiac glycosides on DA neuronal survival and suggest that it is mediated through ATP1A3 inhibition, oxidative stress, and p53. They also elucidate potential approaches for counteracting the neurotoxicity of this valuable class of medications.

  7. Effects of Extracellular ATP on Survival of Sensory Neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia of Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    ATP was added to the cultured sensory neurons obtained from the dorsal root ganglia of the neonatal rats and PBS was added to serve as control. MTT assays were conducted to evaluate the survival and activity of the cultured neurons. And the silicone regenerative chamber was used after the sciatic nerve incision of the mature SD rat. 1 mmol/L ATP was injected into the left chamber and 0.09 % natrium chloride was injected into the right chamber as controls. The changes of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in the corresponding dorsal root ganglia were measured histochemically and image analysis was also performed 4 days after the sciatic nerve injury. The results showed that extracellular ATP could enhance the survival of the neurons and the number of NOS positive neurons were significantly different between the ATP and control groups (P<0.05). It was suggested that extracellular ATP had neurotrophic effect on neurons survival and could inhibit the NOS activity of the sensory neurons after the peripheral nerve incision, hence exerting the protective effect on the neurons, which was valuable for nerve regeneration after nerve injury.

  8. An extracellular proteolytic cascade promotes neuronal degeneration in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E; Rogove, A D; Bugge, T H; Degen, J L; Strickland, S

    1997-01-15

    Mice lacking the serine protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) are resistant to excitotoxin-mediated hippocampal neuronal degeneration. We have used genetic and cellular analyses to study the role of tPA in neuronal cell death. Mice deficient for the zymogen plasminogen, a known substrate for tPA, are also resistant to excitotoxins, implicating an extracellular proteolytic cascade in degeneration. The two known components of this cascade, tPA and plasminogen, are both synthesized in the mouse hippocampus. tPA mRNA and protein are present in neurons and microglia, whereas plasminogen mRNA and protein are found exclusively in neurons. tPA-deficient mice exhibit attenuated microglial activation as a reaction to neuronal injury. In contrast, the microglial response of plasminogen-deficient mice was comparable to that of wild-type mice, suggesting a tPA-mediated, plasminogen-independent pathway for activation of microglia. Infusion of inhibitors of the extracellular tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade into the hippocampus protects neurons against excitotoxic injury, suggesting a novel strategy for intervening in neuronal degeneration.

  9. TRPA1 is a major oxidant sensor in murine airway sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessac, Bret F; Sivula, Michael; von Hehn, Christian A; Escalera, Jasmine; Cohn, Lauren; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-05-01

    Sensory neurons in the airways are finely tuned to respond to reactive chemicals threatening airway function and integrity. Nasal trigeminal nerve endings are particularly sensitive to oxidants formed in polluted air and during oxidative stress as well as to chlorine, which is frequently released in industrial and domestic accidents. Oxidant activation of airway neurons induces respiratory depression, nasal obstruction, sneezing, cough, and pain. While normally protective, chemosensory airway reflexes can provoke severe complications in patients affected by inflammatory airway conditions like rhinitis and asthma. Here, we showed that both hypochlorite, the oxidizing mediator of chlorine, and hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species, activated Ca(2+) influx and membrane currents in an oxidant-sensitive subpopulation of chemosensory neurons. These responses were absent in neurons from mice lacking TRPA1, an ion channel of the transient receptor potential (TRP) gene family. TRPA1 channels were strongly activated by hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide in primary sensory neurons and heterologous cells. In tests of respiratory function, Trpa1(-/-) mice displayed profound deficiencies in hypochlorite- and hydrogen peroxide-induced respiratory depression as well as decreased oxidant-induced pain behavior. Our results indicate that TRPA1 is an oxidant sensor in sensory neurons, initiating neuronal excitation and subsequent physiological responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18398506

  10. Effects of Cerebral Ischemia in Mice Deficient in Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhihong; Huang, Paul L.; Panahian, Nariman; Dalkara, Turgay; Fishman, Mark C.; Moskowitz, Michael A.

    1994-09-01

    The proposal that nitric oxide (NO) or its reactant products mediate toxicity in brain remains controversial in part because of the use of nonselective agents that block NO formation in neuronal, glial, and vascular compartments. In mutant mice deficient in neuronal NO synthase (NOS) activity, infarct volumes decreased significantly 24 and 72 hours after middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the neurological deficits were less than those in normal mice. This result could not be accounted for by differences in blood flow or vascular anatomy. However, infarct size in the mutant became larger after endothelial NOS inhibition by nitro-L-arginine administration. Hence, neuronal NO production appears to exacerbate acute ischemic injury, whereas vascular NO protects after middle cerebral artery occlusion. The data emphasize the importance of developing selective inhibitors of the neuronal isoform.

  11. Serotonin released from amacrine neurons is scavenged and degraded in bipolar neurons in the retina

    OpenAIRE

    Ghai, Kanika; Zelinka, Christopher; Fischer, Andy J.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is synthesized in the retina by one type of amacrine neuron but accumulates in bipolar neurons in many vertebrates. The mechanisms, functions and purpose underlying of serotonin in bipolar cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous serotonin transiently accumulates in a distinct type of bipolar neuron. KCl-mediated depolarization causes the depletion of serotonin from amacrine neurons and, subsequently, serotonin is taken-up by bipolar neurons. Th...

  12. What we know currently about mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilner, J M; Lemon, R N

    2013-12-01

    Mirror neurons were discovered over twenty years ago in the ventral premotor region F5 of the macaque monkey. Since their discovery much has been written about these neurons, both in the scientific literature and in the popular press. They have been proposed to be the neuronal substrate underlying a vast array of different functions. Indeed so much has been written about mirror neurons that last year they were referred to, rightly or wrongly, as "The most hyped concept in neuroscience". Here we try to cut through some of this hyperbole and review what is currently known (and not known) about mirror neurons.

  13. Clinical implications of the involvement of tPA in neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirka, S E

    1997-05-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), the serine protease that converts inactive plasminogen to the protease plasmin, was recently shown to mediate neurodegeneration in the mouse hippocampus. Mice deficient in tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) display a dramatic resistance to a paradigm of excitotoxic neuronal death that involves intrahippocampal injection of the excitotoxin. This model is thought to reproduce the mechanism of neuronal death observed during acute (such as ischemic stroke) and degenerative (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) diseases of the nervous system. The requirement for the proteolytic activity of tPA to mediate neuronal death is acute in the adult mouse. Serine protease inhibitors, specific for tPA or the tPA/plasmin proteolytic cascade, are effective in conferring extensive neuroprotection following the excitotoxic injection. These findings suggest possible new ways for interfering with the neuronal death observed in the hippocampus as a result of excitotoxicity. In addition, tPA is produced in the hippocampus primarily by microglial cells, which become activated in response to the neuronal injury. Blocking microglial activation has been shown in other injury paradigms to protect against neuronal death, therefore suggesting another way to retard neurodegeneration in the CNS. Furthermore, after the insult has been inflicted and in the presence of a compromised blood-brain barrier macrophages (cells deriving from the same lineage as microglia) migrate into the brain, where they are thought to contribute to the neuronal cell loss by secreting neurotoxic molecules. If these macrophages/microglia expressed, however, a tPA inhibitor, rather than the possibly neurotoxic tPA, they might be able to protect the neurons from dying.

  14. Selective deletion of PTEN in dopamine neurons leads to trophic effects and adaptation of striatal medium spiny projecting neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Diaz-Ruiz

    Full Text Available The widespread distribution of the tumor suppressor PTEN in the nervous system suggests a role in a broad range of brain functions. PTEN negatively regulates the signaling pathways initiated by protein kinase B (Akt thereby regulating signals for growth, proliferation and cell survival. Pten deletion in the mouse brain has revealed its role in controlling cell size and number. In this study, we used Cre-loxP technology to specifically inactivate Pten in dopamine (DA neurons (Pten KO mice. The resulting mutant mice showed neuronal hypertrophy, and an increased number of dopaminergic neurons and fibers in the ventral mesencephalon. Interestingly, quantitative microdialysis studies in Pten KO mice revealed no alterations in basal DA extracellular levels or evoked DA release in the dorsal striatum, despite a significant increase in total DA tissue levels. Striatal dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1 and prodynorphin (PDyn mRNA levels were significantly elevated in KO animals, suggesting an enhancement in neuronal activity associated with the striatonigral projection pathway, while dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2 and preproenkephalin (PPE mRNA levels remained unchanged. In addition, PTEN inactivation protected DA neurons and significantly enhanced DA-dependent behavioral functions in KO mice after a progressive 6OHDA lesion. These results provide further evidence about the role of PTEN in the brain and suggest that manipulation of the PTEN/Akt signaling pathway during development may alter the basal state of dopaminergic neurotransmission and could provide a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Sprouty2 and -4 hypomorphism promotes neuronal survival and astrocytosis in a mouse model of kainic acid induced neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongrong, Sitthisak; Hausott, Barbara; Marvaldi, Letizia; Agostinho, Alexandra S; Zangrandi, Luca; Burtscher, Johannes; Fogli, Barbara; Schwarzer, Christoph; Klimaschewski, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Sprouty (Spry) proteins play a key role as negative feedback inhibitors of the Ras/Raf/MAPK/ERK pathway downstream of various receptor tyrosine kinases. Among the four Sprouty isoforms, Spry2 and Spry4 are expressed in the hippocampus. In this study, possible effects of Spry2 and Spry4 hypomorphism on neurodegeneration and seizure thresholds in a mouse model of epileptogenesis was analyzed. The Spry2/4 hypomorphs exhibited stronger ERK activation which was limited to the CA3 pyramidal cell layer and to the hilar region. The seizure threshold of Spry2/4(+/-) mice was significantly reduced at naive state but no difference to wildtype mice was observed 1 month following KA treatment. Histomorphological analysis revealed that dentate granule cell dispersion (GCD) was diminished in Spry2/4(+/-) mice in the subchronic phase after KA injection. Neuronal degeneration was reduced in CA1 and CA3 principal neuron layers as well as in scattered neurons of the contralateral CA1 and hilar regions. Moreover, Spry2/4 reduction resulted in enhanced survival of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y expressing interneurons. GFAP staining intensity and number of reactive astrocytes markedly increased in lesioned areas of Spry2/4(+/-) mice as compared with wildtype mice. Taken together, although the seizure threshold is reduced in naive Spry2/4(+/-) mice, neurodegeneration and GCD is mitigated following KA induced hippocampal lesions, identifying Spry proteins as possible pharmacological targets in brain injuries resulting in neurodegeneration. The present data are consistent with the established functions of the ERK pathway in astrocyte proliferation as well as protection from neuronal cell death and suggest a novel role of Spry proteins in the migration of differentiated neurons.

  16. Protecting Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    House Science Committee Chairman Robert Walker (R-Pa.) has introduced a bill into Congress to give the United States the legislative authority to implement the 1991 Environmental Protocol to the Antarctic Treaty. That protocol established rules and principles to shield the Antarctic environment from human spoilage—placing limits on the discharge of pollutants, protecting plant and animal life, and requiring environmental impact assessments before new activities and programs are launched. The protocol also forbids prospecting or developing of mineral resources except for scientific research.

  17. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental Studies and Internal Dosimetry projects include: Environmental Protection; 1977 Environmental Monitoring Report; Sewage Sludge Disposal on the Sanitary Landfill; Radiological Analyses of Marshall Islands Environmental Samples, 1974 to 1976; External Radiation Survey and Dose Predictions for Rongelap, Utirik, Rongerik, Ailuk, and Wotje Atolls; Marshall Islands - Diet and Life Style Study; Dose Reassessment for Populations on Rongelap and Utirik Following Exposure to Fallout from BRAVO Incident (March 1, 1954); Whole Body Counting Results from 1974 to 1979 for Bikini Island Residents; Dietary Radioactivity Intake from Bioassay Data, a Model Applied to 137Cs Intake by Bikini Island Residents; and External Exposure Measurements at Bikini Atoll

  18. Neuronal modelling of baroreflex response to orthostatic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Azfar

    The accelerations experienced in aerial combat can cause pilot loss of consciousness (GLOC) due to a critical reduction in cerebral blood circulation. The development of smart protective equipment requires understanding of how the brain processes blood pressure (BP) information in response to acceleration. We present a biologically plausible model of the Baroreflex to investigate the neural correlates of short-term BP control under acceleration or orthostatic stress. The neuronal network model, which employs an integrate-and-fire representation of a biological neuron, comprises the sensory, motor, and the central neural processing areas that form the Baroreflex. Our modelling strategy is to test hypotheses relating to the encoding mechanisms of multiple sensory inputs to the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of central neural processing. The goal is to run simulations and reproduce model responses that are consistent with the variety of available experimental data. Model construction and connectivity are inspired by the available anatomical and neurophysiological evidence that points to a barotopic organization in the NTS, and the presence of frequency-dependent synaptic depression, which provides a mechanism for generating non-linear local responses in NTS neurons that result in quantifiable dynamic global baroreflex responses. The entire physiological range of BP and rate of change of BP variables is encoded in a palisade of NTS neurons in that the spike responses approximate Gaussian 'tuning' curves. An adapting weighted-average decoding scheme computes the motor responses and a compensatory signal regulates the heart rate (HR). Model simulations suggest that: (1) the NTS neurons can encode the hydrostatic pressure difference between two vertically separated sensory receptor regions at +Gz, and use changes in that difference for the regulation of HR; (2) even though NTS neurons do not fire with a cardiac rhythm seen in the afferents, pulse

  19. Intrinsic response of thoracic propriospinal neurons to axotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner Dennis J

    2010-06-01

    regenerative response, as well as the apoptotic response, since expression of all of three classes of gene are up-regulated only during the initial period examined, 3-days post-SCI. The up-regulation in the expression of genes for several growth factor receptors during the first week post-SCI also suggest that administration of these factors may protect TPS neurons from cell death and maintain a regenerative response, but only if given during the early period after injury.

  20. Spatially selective photoconductive stimulation of live neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob eCampbell

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic activity is intimately linked to neuronal structure and function. Stimulation of live cultured primary neurons, coupled with fluorescent indicator imaging, is a powerful technique to assess the impact of synaptic activity on neuronal protein trafficking and function. Current technology for neuronal stimulation in culture include chemical techniques or microelectrode or optogenetic based techniques. While technically powerful, chemical stimulation has limited spatial resolution and microelectrode and optogenetic techniques require specialized equipment and expertise. We report an optimized and improved technique for laser based photoconductive stimulation of live neurons using an inverted confocal microscope that overcomes these limitations. The advantages of this approach include its non-invasive nature and adaptability to temporal and spatial manipulation. We demonstrate that the technique can be manipulated to achieve spatially selective stimulation of live neurons. Coupled with live imaging of fluorescent indicators, this simple and efficient technique should allow for significant advances in neuronal cell biology.

  1. Neuronal avalanches and brain plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.; Perrone-Capano, C.

    2007-12-01

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Moreover, experimental studies of morphology indicate that neurons develop a network of small-world-like connections, with the possibility of a very high connectivity degree. Here we discuss a recent model based on self-organized criticality, which consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The model is implemented on regular and small world lattices and on a scale-free network, the Apollonian network. The system exhibits an avalanche activity with a power law distribution of sizes and durations. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power law behaviour with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra. The exponents are found to be quite stable with respect to initial configurations and strength of plastic remodelling, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of neural network models.

  2. Neuronal autophagy in cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Jin-Hua Gu; Zheng-Hong Qin

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy has evolved as a conserved process for the bulk degradation and recycling of cytosolic components,such as long-lived proteins and organelles.In neurons,autophagy is important for homeostasis and protein quality control and is maintained at relatively low levels under normal conditions,while it is upregulated in response to pathophysiological conditions,such as cerebral ischemic injury.However,the role of autophagy is more complex.It depends on age or brain maturity,region,severity of insult,and the stage of ischemia.Whether autophagy plays a beneficial or a detrimental role in cerebral ischemia depends on various pathological conditions.In this review,we elucidate the role of neuronal autophagy in cerebral ischemia.

  3. SOD2 Mediates Amifostine-Induced Protection against Glutamate in PC12 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Jia; Lei Zhang; Xiaolei Shi; Mingchun Wu; Xiang Zhou; Xiaonan Liu; Tingting Huo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Cytoprotectant amifostine attenuates radiation-induced oxidative injury by increasing intracellular manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in peripheral tissue. However, whether amifostine could protect neuronal cells against oxidative injury has not been reported. The purpose of this study is to explore the protection of amifostine in PC12 cells. Methods. PC12 cells exposed to glutamate were used to mimic neuronal oxidative injury. SOD assay kit was taken to evaluate intracellular...

  4. Melatonin Protects N2a against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Autophagy Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    国艳春; 王剑飞; 王忠强; 杨易; 王西明; 段秋红

    2010-01-01

    Researches have shown that melatonin is neuroprotectant in ischemia/reperfusion-mediated injury.Although melatonin is known as an effective antioxidant,the mechanism of the protection cannot be explained merely by antioxidation.This study was devoted to explore other existing mechanisms by investigating whether melatonin protects ischemia/reperfusion-injured neurons through elevating autophagy,since autophagy has been frequently suggested to play a crucial role in neuron survival.To find it out,an ischemia/...

  5. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  6. Neuronal responses to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  7. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  8. INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON NEURONAL NICOTINIC ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTORS. A.S. Bale*; P.J. Bushnell; C.A. Meacham; T.J. Shafer Neurotoxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Toluene (TOL...

  9. Neuregulin-1 is neuroprotective in a rat model of organophosphate-induced delayed neuronal injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yonggang [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Lein, Pamela J. [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Liu, Cuimei [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Bruun, Donald A.; Giulivi, Cecilia [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Gregory D. [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Department of Biology, Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Tewolde, Teclemichael [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States); Ross-Inta, Catherine [Department of Molecular Biosciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA, 95616 (United States); Ford, Byron D., E-mail: bford@msm.edu [Department of Neurobiology, Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, 30310 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Current medical countermeasures against organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are effective in reducing mortality, but do not sufficiently protect the CNS from delayed brain damage and persistent neurological symptoms. In this study, we examined the efficacy of neuregulin-1 (NRG-1) in protecting against delayed neuronal cell death following acute intoxication with the OP diisopropylflurophosphate (DFP). Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with pyridostigmine (0.1 mg/kg BW, i.m.) and atropine methylnitrate (20 mg/kg BW, i.m.) prior to DFP (9 mg/kg BW, i.p.) intoxication to increase survival and reduce peripheral signs of cholinergic toxicity but not prevent DFP-induced seizures or delayed neuronal injury. Pretreatment with NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. However, neuronal injury was significantly reduced in most brain regions by pretreatment with NRG-1 isoforms NRG-EGF (3.2 μg/kg BW, i.a) or NRG-GGF2 (48 μg/kg BW, i.a.) as determined by FluroJade-B labeling in multiple brain regions at 24 h post-DFP injection. NRG-1 also blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress-mediated protein damage in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection similarly provided significant neuroprotection against delayed neuronal injury. These findings identify NRG-1 as a promising adjuvant therapy to current medical countermeasures for enhancing neuroprotection against acute OP intoxication. -- Highlights: ► NRG-1 blocked DFP induced neuronal injury. ► NRG-1 did not protect against seizures in rats exposed to DFP. ► NRG-1 blocked apoptosis and oxidative stress in the brains of DFP-intoxicated rats. ► Administration of NRG-1 at 1 h after DFP injection prevented delayed neuronal injury.

  10. Results on a Binding Neuron Model and Their Implications for Modified Hourglass Model for Neuronal Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arunachalam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The classical models of single neuron like Hodgkin-Huxley point neuron or leaky integrate and fire neuron assume the influence of postsynaptic potentials to last till the neuron fires. Vidybida (2008 in a refreshing departure has proposed models for binding neurons in which the trace of an input is remembered only for a finite fixed period of time after which it is forgotten. The binding neurons conform to the behaviour of real neurons and are applicable in constructing fast recurrent networks for computer modeling. This paper develops explicitly several useful results for a binding neuron like the firing time distribution and other statistical characteristics. We also discuss the applicability of the developed results in constructing a modified hourglass network model in which there are interconnected neurons with excitatory as well as inhibitory inputs. Limited simulation results of the hourglass network are presented.

  11. NBLAST: Rapid, Sensitive Comparison of Neuronal Structure and Construction of Neuron Family Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta; Manton, James D; Ostrovsky, Aaron D; Prohaska, Steffen; Jefferis, Gregory S X E

    2016-07-20

    Neural circuit mapping is generating datasets of tens of thousands of labeled neurons. New computational tools are needed to search and organize these data. We present NBLAST, a sensitive and rapid algorithm, for measuring pairwise neuronal similarity. NBLAST considers both position and local geometry, decomposing neurons into short segments; matched segments are scored using a probabilistic scoring matrix defined by statistics of matches and non-matches. We validated NBLAST on a published dataset of 16,129 single Drosophila neurons. NBLAST can distinguish neuronal types down to the finest level (single identified neurons) without a priori information. Cluster analysis of extensively studied neuronal classes identified new types and unreported topographical features. Fully automated clustering organized the validation dataset into 1,052 clusters, many of which map onto previously described neuronal types. NBLAST supports additional query types, including searching neurons against transgene expression patterns. Finally, we show that NBLAST is effective with data from other invertebrates and zebrafish. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27373836

  12. NBLAST: Rapid, Sensitive Comparison of Neuronal Structure and Construction of Neuron Family Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta; Manton, James D; Ostrovsky, Aaron D; Prohaska, Steffen; Jefferis, Gregory S X E

    2016-07-20

    Neural circuit mapping is generating datasets of tens of thousands of labeled neurons. New computational tools are needed to search and organize these data. We present NBLAST, a sensitive and rapid algorithm, for measuring pairwise neuronal similarity. NBLAST considers both position and local geometry, decomposing neurons into short segments; matched segments are scored using a probabilistic scoring matrix defined by statistics of matches and non-matches. We validated NBLAST on a published dataset of 16,129 single Drosophila neurons. NBLAST can distinguish neuronal types down to the finest level (single identified neurons) without a priori information. Cluster analysis of extensively studied neuronal classes identified new types and unreported topographical features. Fully automated clustering organized the validation dataset into 1,052 clusters, many of which map onto previously described neuronal types. NBLAST supports additional query types, including searching neurons against transgene expression patterns. Finally, we show that NBLAST is effective with data from other invertebrates and zebrafish. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betschart Claudia

    2010-12-01

    -D like properties in immortalized neurons and gamma secretase-like properties in primary neurons, suggesting that cell type may be a critical factor that specifies the aspartyl protease responsible for cpA. Since gamma secretase inhibitors were also protective in primary neurons, further study of the role of gamma-secretase activity in HD neurons is justified.

  14. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  15. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27477243

  16. High fidelity neuronal networks formed by plasma masking with a bilayer membrane: analysis of neurodegenerative and neuroprotective processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardelauf, Heike; Sisnaiske, Julia; Taghipour-Anvari, Amir Ali; Jacob, Peter; Drabiniok, Evelyn; Marggraf, Ulrich; Frimat, Jean-Philippe; Hengstler, Jan G; Neyer, Andreas; van Thriel, Christoph; West, Jonathan

    2011-08-21

    Spatially defined neuronal networks have great potential to be used in a wide spectrum of neurobiology assays. We present an original technique for the precise and reproducible formation of neuronal networks. A PDMS membrane comprising through-holes aligned with interconnecting microchannels was used during oxygen plasma etching to dry mask a protein rejecting poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) adlayer. Patterns were faithfully replicated to produce an oxidized interconnected array pattern which supported protein adsorption. Differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuron-like cells adhered to the array nodes with the micron-scale interconnecting tracks guiding neurite outgrowth to produce neuronal connections and establish a network. A 2.0 μm track width was optimal for high-level network formation and node compliance. These spatially standardized neuronal networks were used to analyse the dynamics of acrylamide-induced neurite degeneration and the protective effects of co-treatment with calpeptin or brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

  17. Offspring Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric T. Steiner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parental aggression, that is, offspring protection aggression, can be viewed as a type of parental investment. Most mammalian males do not exhibit parental investment and therefore exhibit little, if any, parental aggression. Men demonstrate parental investment, and are typically more physically aggressive than women, but parental physical aggression in humans has been largely unexplored. The current study examined potential sex differences in estimates of parental physical aggression involving hypothetical situations, while controlling for general physical aggression. A self-report measure was administered to 217 students from a western U.S. university (55 male nonparents, 50 female nonparents, 54 fathers, and 58 mothers. Male nonparents reported higher parental physical aggression than female nonparents, but there was no difference between mothers and fathers. The results are interpreted in light of ancestral effects of sexual selection and proximal effects of sex differences in testosterone, risk taking, and fear aversion.

  18. Protective clothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A protective suit used for isolating its wearer from radioactively contaminated areas is described in three parts. The first part includes the covering for the wearer's head, arms and upper body and at the waist is releasably fitted around an opening into the contaminated area. The second part includes the legs of the suit and is releasably connectible to the first part of the suit to enclose the wearer who is then supplied with air through an umbilical pipe. A further part surrounds the second part and is releasably connectible to it, enclosing a space between the parts. This further part is also releasably connectible to the opening at the waist to prevent egress from the contaminated area. The releasable connections between the parts may be bayonet type fittings or may be rotating T-shaped projections which engage in T-shaped grooves. (author)

  19. Ebi/AP-1 suppresses pro-apoptotic genes expression and permits long-term survival of Drosophila sensory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Mi Lim

    Full Text Available Sensory organs are constantly exposed to physical and chemical stresses that collectively threaten the survival of sensory neurons. Failure to protect stressed neurons leads to age-related loss of neurons and sensory dysfunction in organs in which the supply of new sensory neurons is limited, such as the human auditory system. Transducin β-like protein 1 (TBL1 is a candidate gene for ocular albinism with late-onset sensorineural deafness, a form of X-linked age-related hearing loss. TBL1 encodes an evolutionarily conserved F-box-like and WD40 repeats-containing subunit of the nuclear receptor co-repressor/silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor and other transcriptional co-repressor complexes. Here we report that a Drosophila homologue of TBL1, Ebi, is required for maintenance of photoreceptor neurons. Loss of ebi function caused late-onset neuronal apoptosis in the retina and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Ebi formed a complex with activator protein 1 (AP-1 and was required for repression of Drosophila pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic genes expression. These results suggest that Ebi/AP-1 suppresses basal transcription levels of apoptotic genes and thereby protects sensory neurons from degeneration.

  20. Enteric glia mediate neuronal outgrowth through release of neurotrophic factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher R.Hansebout; Caixin Su; Kiran Reddy; Donald Zhang; Cai Jiang; Michel P.Rathbone; Shucui Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplanted enteric glia enhance axonal regeneration,reduce tissue damage,and promote functional recovery following spinal cord injury.However,the mechanisms by which enteric glia mediate these beneficial effects are unknown.Neurotrophic factors can promote neuronal differentiation,survival and neurite extension.We hypothesized that enteric glia may exert their protective effects against spinal cord injury partially through the secretion of neurotrophic factors.In the present study,we demonstrated that primary enteric glia cells release nerve growth factor,brain-derived neurotrophic factor and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor over time with their concentrations reaching approximately 250,100 and 50 pg/mL of culture medium respectively after 48 hours.The biological relevance of this secretion was assessed by incubating dissociated dorsal root ganglion neuronal cultures in enteric glia-conditioned medium with and/or without neutralizing antibodies to each of these proteins and evaluating the differences in neurite growth.We discovered that conditioned medium enhances neurite outgrowth in dorsal root ganglion neurons.Even though there was no detectable amount of neurotrophin-3 secretion using ELISA analysis,the neurite outgrowth effect can be attenuated by the antibody-mediated neutralization of each of the aforementioned neurotrophic factors.Therefore,enteric glia secrete nerve growth factor,brain-derived neurotrophic factor,glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3 into their surrounding environment in concentrations that can cause a biological effect.

  1. Characterization of NCAM diversity in cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegelashvili, George; Andersson, A M; Schousboe, Arne;

    1993-01-01

    A single transcript of the NCAM gene undergoes differential processing resulting in a multiplicity of mRNAs and their translation products. In this study, the diversity of NCAM in rat primary neuronal cultures was investigated utilizing immuno- and Northern blot analyses. NCAM polypeptides of 190 k......Da (NCAM-A) and 135 kDa (NCAM-B) were shown to be associated with the neuronal phenotype. These data were confirmed by Northern blotting, which in both neocortical neurons and cerebellar granule neurons revealed mRNA classes of 7.4 kb and 6.7 kb encoding for NCAM-A and -B, respectively. However......, oligonucleotide probes, specific for selected exons or exon combinations, revealed special features of cerebellar granule neurons as compared to neocortical neurons: expression of 4.3 kb NCAM mRNA, a relatively low amount of VASE-containing variants, and an apparent lack of mRNA species containing exons alpha...

  2. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  3. 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from wine-processed Fructus corni inhibits hippocampal neuron apoptosis***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Gu; Zequn Jiang; Mingyan Wang; Haiying Jiang; Fengming Zhao; Xia Ding; Baochang Cai; Zhen Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a compound extracted from wine- pro-cessed Fructus corni, has a protective effect on hippocampal neurons. The present study was de-signed to explore the related mechanisms. Our study revealed that high and medium doses (10, 1μmol/L) of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could improve the morphology of H2O2-treated rat hippocampal neurons as revealed by inverted phase-contrast microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. MTT results showed that incubation with high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural caused a significant increase in the viability of neuronal cells injured by H2O2. Flow cytometry assays con-firmed that H2O2 could induce cellapoptosis, while high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural had a visible protective effect on apoptotic rat hippocampal neurons. Re-al-time PCR and western blot analysis showed that high and medium doses of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural prevented H2O2-induced up-regulation of p53, Bax and caspase-3 and antagonized the down-regulation of Bcl-2 induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested that 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could inhibit apoptosis of cultured rat hippocampal neurons injured by H2O2 via increase in Bcl-2 levels and decrease in p53, Bax and caspase-3 protein expression lev-els.

  4. Study of apoptosis pattern of dopaminergic neurons and neuroprotective effect of nicotine in MPTP mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Hu; Wei Cao; Shenggang Sun

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons and the protective effect of nicotine in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease. Methods :The mouse model of Parkinson's disease were formed by MPTP (30 mg/kg/d×7, i.p.); and the loss and apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons was observed by Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) and TUNEL stains. In "Nicotime plus MPTP" group, mice were pretreated with nicotine before MPTP injection. The putative protective effect of nicotine was analyzed. Results:The number of TH-positive cells decreased during MPTP treatment. Apoptotic neurons began to appear after three injections of MPTP and peaked on the 8th day.In the MPTP-intoxicated mice treated with nicotine, the loss of TH-positive cells was significantly less than that of MPTP-treated group (30 mg/kg/d×7)(P < 0.05). Conclusion:The chronic treatment of MPTP can induce the apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra, and nicotine might have a neuroprotecitve effect on dopaminergic neurons against MPTP toxicity.

  5. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks. PMID:26398224

  6. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks.

  7. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaul Druckmann; Berger, Thomas K.; Felix Schürmann; Sean Hill; Henry Markram; Idan Segev

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Neurons perform complicated non-linear transformations on their input before producing their output - a train of action potentials. This input-output transformation is shaped by the specific composition of ion channels, out of the many possible types, that are embedded in the neuron's membrane. Experimentally, characterizing this transformation relies on injecting different stimuli to the neuron while recording its output; but which of the many possible stimuli should one apply...

  8. Neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis the spinal cord of 27 post mortem patients of the years 1997 to 2000 was investigated in comparison to 29 controls matched for sex, age and year of death. In addition to immunohistochemical examinations and demonstration of pathological cell changes, we also quantified the neurons of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. In comparison to controls, MS-patients show a significant loss of 43% of the cervical neurons and a signif...

  9. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eNagayama; Ryota eHomma; Fumiaki eImamura

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the...

  10. Towards functional classification of neuronal types

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2014-01-01

    How many types of neurons are there in the brain? This basic neuroscience question remains unsettled despite many decades of research. Classification schemes have been proposed based on anatomical, electrophysiological or molecular properties. However, different schemes do not always agree with each other. This raises the question of whether one can classify neurons based on their function directly. For example, among sensory neurons, can a classification scheme be devised that is based on th...

  11. The genealogy of genealogy of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leonid L

    2014-12-01

    Two scenarios of neuronal evolution (monophyly and polyphyly) are discussed in the historical timeline starting from the 19th century. The recent genomic studies on Ctenophores re-initiated a broad interest in the hypotheses of independent origins of neurons. However, even earlier work on ctenophores suggested that their nervous systems are unique in many aspects of their organization and a possibility of the independent origin of neurons and synapses was introduced well before modern advances in genomic biology.

  12. Neuron model-free PID control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shuqing

    2001-09-01

    Based on the neuron model and learning strategy, the neuron intelligent PID control system is set up in this paper. The neuron model-free PID control method is posed. The simulation tests with an example of a hydraulic turbine generator unit are made. The result show that god control performances are obtained. This new intelligent controller is very simple and has very strong adaptability and robustness. It can be used directly in practice.

  13. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmann Thomas; Panman Lia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the dev...

  14. Reflections on mirror neurons and speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Lotto, Andrew J.; Hickok, Gregory S.; Holt, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons, a class of neurons that respond when a monkey performs an action and also when the monkey observes others producing the same action, has promoted a renaissance for the Motor Theory (MT) of speech perception. This is because mirror neurons seem to accomplish the same kind of one to one mapping between perception and action that MT theorizes to be the basis of human speech communication. However, this seeming correspondence is superficial, and there are theoreti...

  15. A New Population of Parvocellular Oxytocin Neurons Controlling Magnocellular Neuron Activity and Inflammatory Pain Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliava, Marina; Melchior, Meggane; Knobloch-Bollmann, H Sophie; Wahis, Jérôme; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Tang, Yan; Ciobanu, Alexandru Cristian; Triana del Rio, Rodrigo; Roth, Lena C; Althammer, Ferdinand; Chavant, Virginie; Goumon, Yannick; Gruber, Tim; Petit-Demoulière, Nathalie; Busnelli, Marta; Chini, Bice; Tan, Linette L; Mitre, Mariela; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Giese, Günter; Sprengel, Rolf; Kuner, Rohini; Poisbeau, Pierrick; Seeburg, Peter H; Stoop, Ron; Charlet, Alexandre; Grinevich, Valery

    2016-03-16

    Oxytocin (OT) is a neuropeptide elaborated by the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic (SON) nuclei. Magnocellular OT neurons of these nuclei innervate numerous forebrain regions and release OT into the blood from the posterior pituitary. The PVN also harbors parvocellular OT cells that project to the brainstem and spinal cord, but their function has not been directly assessed. Here, we identified a subset of approximately 30 parvocellular OT neurons, with collateral projections onto magnocellular OT neurons and neurons of deep layers of the spinal cord. Evoked OT release from these OT neurons suppresses nociception and promotes analgesia in an animal model of inflammatory pain. Our findings identify a new population of OT neurons that modulates nociception in a two tier process: (1) directly by release of OT from axons onto sensory spinal cord neurons and inhibiting their activity and (2) indirectly by stimulating OT release from SON neurons into the periphery.

  16. Correction: Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Robert A; Lai, Barry; Holmes, William R; Lee, Daewoo

    2015-09-01

    Correction for 'Understanding metal homeostasis in primary cultured neurons. Studies using single neuron subcellular and quantitative metallomics' by Robert A. Colvin et al., Metallomics, 2015, 7, 1111-1123.

  17. PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF GREEN TEA FROM PAF-INDUCED NEUROTOXITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Enji; Hah Xuefei; Joseph Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    Objective The protective effect of chinese green tea from PAF-induced neurotoxity was investigated Method LaN1 ( neuroblastoma cell line) was used as neuron. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) -release was an indicator of cell death. Cytoplasmic calcium was measured with Aequouin-loaded method. Results When applied to LaN1 cells, green tea in concentration 2mg/ml or stronger obviously damaged cells. If lower concentration (0. 5mg/ml and l.Omg/ml) of green tea were applied, green tea inhibited the elevation of intracellular calcium and reduced the cytotoxity induced by PAF in neurons. Conclusion PAF plays an important role in brain injury and stroke, the protective effect of green tea could be a basis to explore weather green tea or its derivative may have preventive and therapeutic potential for neuronal injury.

  18. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 9 activation in microglia after oxygen-glu-cose deprivation and reoxygenation protects neurons from damage%氧葡萄糖剥夺-再恢复后抑制小胶质细胞TLR9激活对神经元的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭晴霞; 杨碧莹; 潘经锐; 王鸿轩; 黎祥喷; 王艺东

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To observe the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) activation in microglia BV-2 cells after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation ( OGDR) , and its effects on neuronal apoptosis.METHODS:The BV-2 cell super-natants were collected after the corresponding treatment and added to mouse primary cortical neurons after OGDR for 4 h, followed by normal culture for 24 h.The cells were divided into normal BV-2 group, NC-siRNA group, TLR9-siRNA group, OGDR group, OGDR+NC-siRNA group, OGDR+TLR9-siRNA group and control group (without adding BV-2 cell supernatant) .The changes of the neuronal morphology were observed under an inverted phase-contrast microscope, and the neuronal apoptosis was detected by TUNEL.The protein expression of cleaved caspase-3 was detected by Western blot-ting.RESULTS:After OGDR, the axon turned thin, twisted and broken, and neuronal swelling, decrease in refraction and vacuolar degeneration were observed.The green-stained apoptotic bodies in the neurons in all groups were positive. Compared with control group, the caspase-3 protein levels in other groups were increased.Compared with the normal BV-2 group, the caspase-3 protein in OGDR group and TLR9-siRNA group was increased.Compared with OGDR+TLR9-siRNA group, the caspase-3 protein in TLR9-siRNA group and OGDR group was decreased.CONCLUSION: After OGDR, TLR9 activation in BV-2 cells induces neuronal apoptosis with the increase in caspase-3 protein level.Inhibition of TLR9 expression reduces neuronal damage.%目的:观察氧葡萄糖剥夺-再恢复(OGDR)后小胶质细胞BV-2 Toll 样受体9(TLR9)激活对神经元凋亡的影响。方法:对BV-2细胞或TLR9-siRNA转染的BV-2细胞进行OGDR处理4 h后,将细胞上清添加至OGDR处理4 h的小鼠原代皮层神经元中,继续正常培养24 h后,倒置显微镜下观察神经元形态变化,TUNEL染色检测神经元凋亡,Western blotting检测神经元caspase-3蛋白的表达。实验分为正常BV-2

  19. Brain state-dependent neuronal computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale eQuilichini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal firing pattern, which includes both the frequency and the timing of action potentials, is a key component of information processing in the brain. Although the relationship between neuronal output (the firing pattern and function (during a task/behavior is not fully understood, there is now considerable evidence that a given neuron can show very different firing patterns according to brain state. Thus, such neurons assembled into neuronal networks generate different rhythms (e.g. theta, gamma, sharp wave ripples, which sign specific brain states (e.g. learning, sleep. This implies that a given neuronal network, defined by its hard-wired physical connectivity, can support different brain state-dependent activities through the modulation of its functional connectivity. Here, we review data demonstrating that not only the firing pattern, but also the functional connections between neurons, can change dynamically. We then explore the possible mechanisms of such versatility, focusing on the intrinsic properties of neurons and the properties of the synapses they establish, and how they can be modified by neuromodulators, i.e. the different ways that neurons can use to switch from one mode of communication to the other.

  20. Macroscopic Description for Networks of Spiking Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montbrió, Ernest; Pazó, Diego; Roxin, Alex

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of neuroscience, statistical physics, and nonlinear dynamics is to understand how brain function arises from the collective dynamics of networks of spiking neurons. This challenge has been chiefly addressed through large-scale numerical simulations. Alternatively, researchers have formulated mean-field theories to gain insight into macroscopic states of large neuronal networks in terms of the collective firing activity of the neurons, or the firing rate. However, these theories have not succeeded in establishing an exact correspondence between the firing rate of the network and the underlying microscopic state of the spiking neurons. This has largely constrained the range of applicability of such macroscopic descriptions, particularly when trying to describe neuronal synchronization. Here, we provide the derivation of a set of exact macroscopic equations for a network of spiking neurons. Our results reveal that the spike generation mechanism of individual neurons introduces an effective coupling between two biophysically relevant macroscopic quantities, the firing rate and the mean membrane potential, which together govern the evolution of the neuronal network. The resulting equations exactly describe all possible macroscopic dynamical states of the network, including states of synchronous spiking activity. Finally, we show that the firing-rate description is related, via a conformal map, to a low-dimensional description in terms of the Kuramoto order parameter, called Ott-Antonsen theory. We anticipate that our results will be an important tool in investigating how large networks of spiking neurons self-organize in time to process and encode information in the brain.

  1. Autosomal dominant adult neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, Peter C.G.

    2011-01-01

    this thesis investigates a family with autosomal dominant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, with chapters on clinical neurology, neuropathology, neurogenetics, neurophysiology, auditory and visual aspects.

  2. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Druckmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose.

  3. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  4. Astaxanthin rescues neuron loss and attenuates oxidative stress induced by amygdala kindling in adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Xie, Tao; He, Xue-Xin; Mao, Zhuo-Feng; Jia, Li-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping; Zhen, Jun-Li; Liu, Liang-Min

    2015-06-15

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the neuronal damage induced by epilepsy. The present study assessed the possible neuroprotective effects of astaxanthin (ATX) on neuronal damage, in hippocampal CA3 neurons following amygdala kindling. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were chronically kindled in the amygdala and ATX or equal volume of vehicle was given by intraperitoneally. Twenty-four hours after the last stimulation, the rats were sacrificed by decapitation. Histopathological changes and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured, cytosolic cytochrome c (CytC) and caspase-3 activities in the hippocampus were also recorded. We found extensive neuronal damage in the CA3 region in the kindling group, which was preceded by increases of ROS level and MDA concentration and was followed by caspase-3 activation and an increase in cytosolic CytC. Treatment with ATX markedly attenuated the neuronal damage. In addition, ATX significantly decreased ROS and MDA concentrations and increased GSH levels. Moreover, ATX suppressed the translation of CytC release and caspase-3 activation in hippocampus. Together, these results suggest that ATX protects against neuronal loss due to epilepsy in the rat hippocampus by attenuating oxidative damage, lipid peroxidation and inhibiting the mitochondrion-related apoptotic pathway.

  5. Effects of annexins Ⅱ and V on survival of neurons and astrocytes in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu HAN; Kai-hua ZHANG; Pei-hua LU; Xiao-ming XU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of annexins Ⅱ and V on the survival and neurite outgrowth of primary cultured neurons and the survival of astrocytes after peroxide and hypoxia insults in vitro. METHODS: Annexins Ⅱ and V proteins and/or corresponding antibodies were added to the medium of primary neocortical cultures. H2O2 and NaN3 were used to induce neuron injury, respectively. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release was measured. RESULTS:Addition of annexin Ⅱ or V into the culture medium did not affect the normal survival and neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons. However, when an antibody against annexin Ⅱ or V was added to the culture, the survival and neurite outgrowth of these neurons markedly declined. Further, addition of the two annexins into cortical cultures after peroxide and hypoxia insults markedly reduced the LDH release and cell death. CONCLUSION: Annexins Ⅱ and V are essential for the survival and neurite outgrowth of developing cortical neurons, the survival of glial cells,and protect neurons and glial cells against peroxide and hypoxia injuries.

  6. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 gene NMNAT1 regulates neuronal dendrite and axon morphogenesis in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hong; ZHANG Jing-yu; YANGZi-chao; LIU Ming; GANG Bao-zhi; ZHAO Qing-jie

    2011-01-01

    Background Wallerian degeneration is a self-destructive process of axonal degeneration that occurs after an axonal injury or during neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease.Recent studies have found that the activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) synthase enzyme,nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT1) can affect the rate of Wallerian degeneration in mice and drosophila.NMNAT1 protects neurons and axons from degeneration.However,the role of NMNAT1 in neurons of central nervous system is still not well understood.Methods We set up the culture of primary mouse neurons in vitro and manipulated the expression level of NMNAT1 by RNA interference and gene overexpression methods.Using electroporation transfection we can up-regulate or down-regulate NMNAT1 in cultured mouse dendrites and axons and study the neuronal morphogenesis by immunocytochemistry.In all functional assays,FK-866 (CAS 658084-64-1),a highly specific non-competitive inhibitor of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase was used as a pharmacological and positive control.Results Our results showed that knocking down NMNAT1 by RNA interference led to a marked decrease in dendrite outgrowth and branching and a significant decrease in axon growth and branching in developing cortical neurons in vitro.Conclusions These findings reveal a novel role for NMNAT1 in the morphogenesis of developing cortical neurons,which indicate that the loss of function of NMNAT1 may contribute to different neurodegenerative disorders in central nervous system.

  7. Dissecting the role of Engrailed in adult dopaminergic neurons: Insights into Parkinson disease pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Prochiantz, Alain; Fuchs, Julia; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    The homeoprotein Engrailed (Engrailed-1/Engrailed-2, collectively En1/2) is not only a survival factor for mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons during development, but continues to exert neuroprotective and physiological functions in adult mDA neurons. Loss of one En1 allele in the mouse leads to progressive demise of mDA neurons in the ventral midbrain starting from 6 weeks of age. These mice also develop Parkinson disease-like motor and non-motor symptoms. The characterization of En1 heterozygous mice have revealed striking parallels to central mechanisms of Parkinson disease pathogenesis, mainly related to mitochondrial dysfunction and retrograde degeneration. Thanks to the ability of homeoproteins to transduce cells, En1/2 proteins have also been used to protect mDA neurons in various experimental models of Parkinson disease. This neuroprotection is partly linked to the ability of En1/2 to regulate the translation of certain nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs for complex I subunits. Other transcription factors that govern mDA neuron development (e.g. Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, Pitx3) also continue to function for the survival and maintenance of mDA neurons in the adult and act through partially overlapping but also diverse mechanisms. PMID:26459030

  8. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1(-/-) mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1(-/-) mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  9. The hippocampal laminin matrix is dynamic and critical for neuronal survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zu-Lin; Indyk, Justin A; Strickland, Sidney

    2003-07-01

    Laminins are extracellular matrix proteins that participate in neuronal development, survival, and regeneration. During excitotoxin challenge in the mouse hippocampus, neuron interaction with laminin-10 (alpha5,beta1,gamma1) protects against neuronal death. To investigate how laminin is involved in neuronal viability, we infused laminin-1 (alpha1,beta1,gamma1) into the mouse hippocampus. This infusion specifically disrupted the endogenous laminin layer. This disruption was at least partially due to the interaction of the laminin-1 gamma1 chain with endogenous laminin-10, because infusion of anti-laminin gamma1 antibody had the same effect. The disruption of the laminin layer by laminin-1 1) did not require the intact protein because infusion of plasmin-digested laminin-1 gave similar results; 2) was posttranscriptional, because there was no effect on laminin mRNA expression; and 3) occurred in both tPA(-/-) and plasminogen(-/-) mice, indicating that increased plasmin activity was not responsible. Finally, although tPA(-/-) mice are normally resistant to excitotoxin-induced neurodegeneration, disruption of the endogenous laminin layer by laminin-1 or anti-laminin gamma1 antibody renders the tPA(-/-) hippocampal neurons sensitive to kainate. These results demonstrate that neuron interactions with the deposited matrix are not necessarily recapitulated by interactions with soluble components and that the laminin matrix is a dynamic structure amenable to modification by exogenous molecules.

  10. Roles for the TGFβ superfamily in the development and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Shane V; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2014-10-01

    The adult midbrain contains 75% of all dopaminergic neurons in the CNS. Within the midbrain, these neurons are divided into three anatomically and functionally distinct clusters termed A8, A9 and A10. The A9 group plays a functionally non-redundant role in the control of voluntary movement, which is highlighted by the motor syndrome that results from their progressive degeneration in the neurodegenerative disorder, Parkinson's disease. Despite 50 years of investigation, treatment for Parkinson's disease remains symptomatic, but an intensive research effort has proposed delivering neurotrophic factors to the brain to protect the remaining dopaminergic neurons, or using these neurotrophic factors to differentiate dopaminergic neurons from stem cell sources for cell transplantation. Most neurotrophic factors studied in this context have been members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily. In recent years, an intensive research effort has focused on understanding the function of these proteins in midbrain dopaminergic neuron development and their role in the molecular architecture that regulates the development of this brain region, with the goal of applying this knowledge to develop novel therapies for Parkinson's disease. In this review, the current evidence showing that TGFβ superfamily members play critical roles in the regulation of midbrain dopaminergic neuron induction, differentiation, target innervation and survival during embryonic and postnatal development is analysed, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Dissecting the role of Engrailed in adult dopaminergic neurons--Insights into Parkinson disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Prochiantz, Alain; Fuchs, Julia; Joshi, Rajiv L

    2015-12-21

    The homeoprotein Engrailed (Engrailed-1/Engrailed-2, collectively En1/2) is not only a survival factor for mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) neurons during development, but continues to exert neuroprotective and physiological functions in adult mDA neurons. Loss of one En1 allele in the mouse leads to progressive demise of mDA neurons in the ventral midbrain starting from 6 weeks of age. These mice also develop Parkinson disease-like motor and non-motor symptoms. The characterization of En1 heterozygous mice have revealed striking parallels to central mechanisms of Parkinson disease pathogenesis, mainly related to mitochondrial dysfunction and retrograde degeneration. Thanks to the ability of homeoproteins to transduce cells, En1/2 proteins have also been used to protect mDA neurons in various experimental models of Parkinson disease. This neuroprotection is partly linked to the ability of En1/2 to regulate the translation of certain nuclear-encoded mitochondrial mRNAs for complex I subunits. Other transcription factors that govern mDA neuron development (e.g. Foxa1/2, Lmx1a/b, Nurr1, Otx2, Pitx3) also continue to function for the survival and maintenance of mDA neurons in the adult and act through partially overlapping but also diverse mechanisms.

  12. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  13. Intervention effects of ganoderma lucidum spores on epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons and expression of neurotrophin-4 and N-cadherin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Qiu Wang

    Full Text Available Epilepsy can cause cerebral transient dysfunctions. Ganoderma lucidum spores (GLS, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has shown some antiepileptic effects in our previous studies. This was the first study of the effects of GLS on cultured primary hippocampal neurons, treated with Mg(2+ free medium. This in vitro model of epileptiform discharge hippocampal neurons allowed us to investigate the anti-epileptic effects and mechanism of GLS activity. Primary hippocampal neurons from <1 day old rats were cultured and their morphologies observed under fluorescence microscope. Neurons were confirmed by immunofluorescent staining of neuron specific enolase (NSE. Sterile method for GLS generation was investigated and serial dilutions of GLS were used to test the maximum non-toxic concentration of GLS on hippocampal neurons. The optimized concentration of GLS of 0.122 mg/ml was identified and used for subsequent analysis. Using the in vitro model, hippocampal neurons were divided into 4 groups for subsequent treatment i control, ii model (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours, iii GLS group I (incubated with Mg(2+ free medium containing GLS for 3 hours and replaced with normal medium and incubated for 6 hours and iv GLS group II (neurons incubated with Mg(2+ free medium for 3 hours then replaced with a normal medium containing GLS for 6 hours. Neurotrophin-4 and N-Cadherin protein expression were detected using Western blot. The results showed that the number of normal hippocampal neurons increased and the morphologies of hippocampal neurons were well preserved after GLS treatment. Furthermore, the expression of neurotrophin-4 was significantly increased while the expression of N-Cadherin was decreased in the GLS treated group compared with the model group. This data indicates that GLS may protect hippocampal neurons by promoting neurotrophin-4 expression and inhibiting N-Cadherin expression.

  14. Pharmacological activation/inhibition of the cannabinoid system affects alcohol withdrawal-induced neuronal hypersensitivity to excitotoxic insults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Rubio

    Full Text Available Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic challenge. Ethanol withdrawal increased N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-evoked neuronal death, probably by altering the ratio between GluN2A and GluN2B NMDA receptor subunits. The stimulation of the endocannabinoid system with the cannabinoid agonist HU-210 decreased NMDA-induced neuronal death exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. This neuroprotection could be explained by a decrease in NMDA-stimulated calcium influx after the administration of HU-210, found exclusively in ethanol-withdrawn neurons. By contrast, the inhibition of the cannabinoid system with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant (SR141716 during ethanol withdrawal increased death of ethanol-withdrawn neurons without any modification of NMDA-stimulated calcium influx. Moreover, chronic administration of rimonabant increased NMDA-stimulated toxicity not only in withdrawn neurons, but also in control neurons. In summary, we show for the first time that the stimulation of the endocannabinoid system is protective against the hyperexcitability developed during alcohol withdrawal. By contrast, the blockade of the endocannabinoid system is highly counterproductive during alcohol withdrawal.

  15. Effects of aspartame metabolites on astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycerz, Karol; Jaworska-Adamu, Jadwiga Elżbieta

    2013-01-01

    Aspartame, a widespread sweetener used in many food products, is considered as a highly hazardous compound. Aspartame was discovered in 1965 and raises a lot of controversy up to date. Astrocytes are glial cells, the presence and functions of which are closely connected with the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this article is to demonstrate the direct and indirect role of astrocytes participating in the harmful effects of aspartame metabolites on neurons. The artificial sweetener is broken down into phenylalanine (50%), aspartic acid (40%) and methanol (10%) during metabolism in the body. The excess of phenylalanine blocks the transport of important amino acids to the brain contributing to reduced levels of dopamine and serotonin. Astrocytes directly affect the transport of this amino acid and also indirectly by modulation of carriers in the endothelium. Aspartic acid at high concentrations is a toxin that causes hyperexcitability of neurons and is also a precursor of other excitatory amino acid - glutamates. Their excess in quantity and lack of astrocytic uptake induces excitotoxicity and leads to the degeneration of astrocytes and neurons. The methanol metabolites cause CNS depression, vision disorders and other symptoms leading ultimately to metabolic acidosis and coma. Astrocytes do not play a significant role in methanol poisoning due to a permanent consumption of large amounts of aspartame. Despite intense speculations about the carcinogenicity of aspartame, the latest studies show that its metabolite - diketopiperazine - is cancirogenic in the CNS. It contributes to the formation of tumors in the CNS such as gliomas, medulloblastomas and meningiomas. Glial cells are the main source of tumors, which can be caused inter alia by the sweetener in the brain. On the one hand the action of astrocytes during aspartame poisoning may be advantageous for neuro-protection while on the other it may intensify the destruction of neurons. The role of the glia in

  16. Leptin Action on GABAergic Neurons Prevents Obesity and Reduces Inhibitory Tone to POMC Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Vong, Linh; Ye, Chianping; Yang, Zongfang; Choi, Brian; Chua, Streamson; Lowell, Bradford B.

    2011-01-01

    Leptin acts in the brain to prevent obesity. The underlying neurocircuitry responsible for this is poorly understood, in part due to incomplete knowledge regarding first order, leptin-responsive neurons. To address this, we and others have been removing leptin receptors from candidate first order neurons. While functionally relevant neurons have been identified, the observed effects have been small suggesting that most first order neurons remain unidentified. Here we take an alternative appro...

  17. Not Just for Bimodal Neurons Anymore: The Contribution of Unimodal Neurons to Cortical Multisensory Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Allman, Brian L.; Keniston, Leslie P.; Meredith, M. Alex

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, neuronal studies of multisensory processing proceeded by first identifying neurons that were overtly multisensory (e.g., bimodal, trimodal) and then testing them. In contrast, the present study examined, without precondition, neurons in an extrastriate visual area of the cat for their responses to separate (visual, auditory) and combined-modality (visual and auditory) stimulation. As expected, traditional bimodal forms of multisensory neurons were identified. In addition, howev...