WorldWideScience

Sample records for cd36 deficiency protects

  1. CD36 Protein Influences Myocardial Ca2+ Homeostasis and Phospholipid Metabolism CONDUCTION ANOMALIES IN CD36-DEFICIENT MICE DURING FASTING

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pietka, T. A.; Sulkin, M.S.; Kuda, Ondřej; Wang, W.; Zhou, D.; Yamada, K. A.; Yang, K.; Su, X.; Gross, R. W.; Nerbonne, J. M.; Efimov, I. R.; Abumrad, N. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 46 (2012), s. 38901-38912 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : calcium * cyclic AMP (cAMP) * heart * phospholipid * phospholipid metabolism * polyunsaturated fatty acids * CD36 deficiency * SERCA2a * sudden death Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  2. CD36 deficiency leads to choroidal involution via COX2 down-regulation in rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Houssier

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the Western world, a major cause of blindness is age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Recent research in angiogenesis has furthered the understanding of choroidal neovascularization, which occurs in the "wet" form of AMD. In contrast, very little is known about the mechanisms of the predominant, "dry" form of AMD, which is characterized by retinal atrophy and choroidal involution. The aim of this study is to elucidate the possible implication of the scavenger receptor CD36 in retinal degeneration and choroidal involution, the cardinal features of the dry form of AMD. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We here show that deficiency of CD36, which participates in outer segment (OS phagocytosis by the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE in vitro, leads to significant progressive age-related photoreceptor degeneration evaluated histologically at different ages in two rodent models of CD36 invalidation in vivo (Spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR and CD36-/- mice. Furthermore, these animals developed significant age related choroidal involution reflected in a 100%-300% increase in the avascular area of the choriocapillaries measured on vascular corrosion casts of aged animals. We also show that proangiogenic COX2 expression in RPE is stimulated by CD36 activating antibody and that CD36-deficient RPE cells from SHR rats fail to induce COX2 and subsequent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression upon OS or antibody stimulation in vitro. CD36-/- mice express reduced levels of COX2 and VEGF in vivo, and COX2-/- mice develop progressive choroidal degeneration similar to what is seen in CD36 deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: CD36 deficiency leads to choroidal involution via COX2 down-regulation in the RPE. These results show a novel molecular mechanism of choroidal degeneration, a key feature of dry AMD. These findings unveil a pathogenic process, to our knowledge previously undescribed, with important implications for the development of new therapies.

  3. Treatment with medium chain fatty acids milk of CD36-deficient preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Hirano, Ken-Ichi; Yorifuji, Tohru; Komatsu, Haruki; Takatani, Tomonozumi; Morioka, Ichiro; Hirayama, Satoshi; Miida, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    CD36 deficiency is characterized by limited cellular long chain fatty acid uptake in the skeletal and cardiac muscles and often causes energy crisis in these muscles. However, suitable treatment for CD36 deficiency remains to be established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and metabolic effects of medium chain triacylglycerols (MCTs) in two CD36-deficient preschool children who often developed fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia. Fasting blood glucose, total ketone bodies, and free fatty acids were examined and compared for usual supper diets and for diets with replacement of one component with 2 g/kg of 9% MCT-containing milk (MCT milk). Changes in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels, resulting from replacement of glucose water intake with 1 g/kg of MCT milk and determined by using bicycle pedaling tasks, were examined and compared. Hypoglycemic and/or myalgia episodes in daily life were also investigated. Biochemically, participants' blood glucose and total ketone bodies levels after overnight fasting substantially increased after dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Increases in serum creatine kinase and alanine aminotransferase levels resulting from the bicycle pedaling task were suppressed by MCT milk. Hypoglycemia leading to unconsciousness and tachycardia before breakfast decreased after introduction of dietary suppers containing MCT milk. Occurrence of myalgia in the lower limbs also decreased after intakes of MCT milk before long and/or strenuous exercising. Our results suggest that MCTs can prevent fasting hypoglycemia and exercise-induced myalgia in CD36-deficient young children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Different patterns of {sup 123}I-BMIPP myocardial accumulation in patients with type I and II CD36 deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kenichi; Nagatomo, Takafumi [Niigata Coll. of Pharmacy (Japan); Toba, Ken; Ogawa, Yusuke; Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Tanabe, Naohito; Miyajima, Seiichi; Kusano, Yoriko; Hirokawa, Yoichi

    1997-12-01

    The CD36 molecule is a multifunctional membrane type receptor glycoprotein that reacts with thrombospondin, collagen, oxidized LDL and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). LCFA are one of the major cardiac energy substrates, hence LCFA metabolism may have an important role in cardiac diseases. In this study, we analyzed CD36 expression in 200 patients with heart diseases (44 patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), 16 with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), 26 with old myocardial infarction (OMI), 55 with angina pectoris (AP) and 59 with other miscellaneous heart diseases) using a flow cytometer. {sup 123}I-{beta}-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial accumulation was also examined in some patients. Eight patients (2 with HCM, 1 with DCM, 2 with OMI, and 3 with AP) were diagnosed as having type I CD36 deficiency (neither platelets nor monocytes expressed CD36). Sixteen patients (3 with HCM, 1 with DCM, 1 with OMI, 8 with AP, and 3 with other heart diseases) showed type II CD36 deficiency (monocytes expressed CD36 but platelets did not). In all 8 patients with type I CD36 deficiency, there was no BMIPP accumulation in the heart. However, in 13 patients with type II CD36 deficiency, focally reduced BMIPP accumulation was observed, but there were no patients without BMIPP accumulation. CD36 deficiency was observed in a higher proportion (12%) of patients with heart disease in this study than in a reported control study. Type I CD36 deficiency is associated with absence of BMIPP accumulation in the heart, hence it may have an important role in LCFA metabolic disorders and some types of cardiac hypertrophy as well as other heart diseases. (author)

  5. Intestinal lipid absorption is not affected in CD36 deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudriaan, Jeltje R.; Dahlmans, Vivian E. H.; Febbraio, Maria; Teusink, Bas; Romijn, Johannes A.; Havekes, Louis M.; Voshol, Peter J.

    2002-01-01

    Increasing evidence has implicated the membrane protein CD36 (or fatty acid translocase, FAT) to be involved in high affinity fatty acid uptake. CD36 is expressed in tissues active in fatty acid metabolism, like adipose tissue and skeletal and cardiac muscle, but also in intestine. CD36 is localized

  6. Absence of fatty acid transporter CD36 protects against Western-type diet-related cardiac dysfunction following pressure overload in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbusch, Laura K M; Luiken, Joost J F P; Vlasblom, Ronald; Chabowski, Adrian; Hoebers, Nicole T H; Coumans, Will A; Vroegrijk, Irene O C M; Voshol, Peter J; Ouwens, D Margriet; Glatz, Jan F C; Diamant, Michaela

    2011-10-01

    Cardiac patients often are obese and have hypertension, but in most studies these conditions are investigated separately. Here, we aimed at 1) elucidating the interaction of metabolic and mechanophysical stress in the development of cardiac dysfunction in mice and 2) preventing this interaction by ablation of the fatty acid transporter CD36. Male wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6 mice and CD36(-/-) mice received chow or Western-type diet (WTD) for 10 wk and then underwent a sham surgery or transverse aortic constriction (TAC) under anesthesia. After a 6-wk continuation of the diet, cardiac function, morphology, lipid profiles, and molecular parameters were assessed. WTD administration affected body and organ weights of WT and CD36(-/-) mice, but it affected only plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in WT mice. Cardiac lipid concentrations increased in WT mice receiving WTD, decreased in CD36(-/-) on chow, and remained unchanged in CD36(-/-) receiving WTD. TAC induced cardiac hypertrophy in WT mice on chow but did not affect cardiac function and cardiac lipid concentrations. WTD or CD36 ablation worsened the outcome of TAC. Ablation of CD36 protected against the WTD-related aggravation of cardiac functional and structural changes induced by TAC. In conclusion, cardiac dysfunction and remodeling worsen when the heart is exposed to two stresses, metabolic and mechanophysical, at the same time. CD36 ablation prevents the metabolic stress resulting from a WTD. Thus, metabolic conditions are a critical factor for the compromised heart and provide new targets for metabolic manipulation in cardioprotection.

  7. CD36 Provides Host Protection Against Klebsiella pneumoniae Intrapulmonary Infection by Enhancing Lipopolysaccharide Responsiveness and Macrophage Phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olonisakin, Tolani F; Li, Huihua; Xiong, Zeyu; Kochman, Elizabeth J K; Yu, Minting; Qu, Yanyan; Hulver, Mei; Kolls, Jay K; St Croix, Claudette; Doi, Yohei; Nguyen, Minh-Hong; Shanks, Robert M Q; Mallampalli, Rama K; Kagan, Valerian E; Ray, Anuradha; Silverstein, Roy L; Ray, Prabir; Lee, Janet S

    2016-12-15

    Klebsiella pneumoniae remains an important cause of intrapulmonary infection and invasive disease worldwide. K. pneumoniae can evade serum killing and phagocytosis primarily through the expression of a polysaccharide capsule, but its pathogenicity is also influenced by host factors. We examined whether CD36, a scavenger receptor that recognizes pathogen and modified self ligands, is a host determinant of K. pneumoniae pathogenicity. Despite differences in serum sensitivity and virulence of 3 distinct K. pneumoniae (hypermucoviscous K1, research K2, and carbapenemase-producing ST258) strains, the absence of CD36 significantly increased host susceptibility to acute intrapulmonary infection by K. pneumoniae, regardless of strain. We demonstrate that CD36 enhances LPS responsiveness to K. pneumoniae to increase downstream cytokine production and macrophage phagocytosis that is independent of polysaccharide capsular antigen. Our study provides new insights into host determinants of K. pneumoniae pathogenicity and raises the possibility that functional mutations in CD36 may predispose individuals to K. pneumoniae syndromes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Variants of CD36 gene and their association with CD36 protein expression in platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianguo; Liu, Ying; Hong, Xiaozhen; Chen, Shu; Ma, Kairong; Lan, Xiaofei; Ying, Yanling; He, Ji; Zhu, Faming; Lv, Hangjun

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between CD36 expression level in platelets and polymorphism of the CD36 gene still needs to be explored. Here, we investigated polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and CD36 expression level in platelets in the Chinese Han population. Materials and methods A total of 477 samples were sequenced for exons 2 to 14 of the CD36 gene using a polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing method. In 192 of these individuals the expression levels of CD36 antigen were analysed by flow cytometry. The genotype-phenotype relationship in platelets was analysed. Results A total of 22 variants of the CD36 gene were identified, of which five variants (111 A>T, 681 C>A, 1172–1183 del12b, 1236 delT and 1395 A>C) were novel variations, and nine were also found in single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) but had not been confirmed in individuals with CD36 deficiency. Two variants (329–332 delAC and 1228–1239 del12bp) in the coding region are the most frequent mutations in the Chinese population. Type II CD36 deficiency was identified in seven of 192 individuals, giving a frequency of 3.6%. Individuals with CD36 variations or wild-type genotypes both showed CD36 antigen negative, low-level and high-level expression patterns in platelets. The frequency of the nt-132 A>C polymorphism in the 5′-UTR is relatively high in the Chinese population (0.3516): the expression of CD36 was lower in individuals with nt-132 A>C than in those with the wild-type genotype. Discussion The distribution of CD36 gene variants in the Chinese population is different from that previously reported. The levels of expression of CD36 antigen in platelets are not determined directly by the genotypes of the CD36 coding region. This suggests that the molecular basis of type II CD36 deficiency may be derived from combined effects of coding region and potential cis-regulatory elements in the 5′-UTR of the CD36 gene. PMID:24960640

  9. Protective or deleterious role of scavenger receptors SR-A and CD36 on host resistance to Staphylococcus aureus depends on the site of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène Blanchet

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human opportunistic pathogen responsible for a broad spectrum of infections ranging from benign skin infection to more severe life threatening disorders (e.g. pneumonia, sepsis, particularly in intensive care patients. Scavenger receptors (SR-A and CD36 are known to be involved in S. aureus recognition by immune cells in addition to MARCO, TLR2, NOD2 and α5β1 integrin. In the present study, we further deciphered the contribution of SR-A and CD36 scavenger receptors in the control of infection of mice by S. aureus. Using double SR-A/CD36 knockout mice (S/C-KO and S. aureus strain HG001, a clinically relevant non-mutagenized strain, we showed that the absence of these two scavenger receptors was protective in peritoneal infection. In contrast, the deletion of these two receptors was detrimental in pulmonary infection following intranasal instillation. For pulmonary infection, susceptible mice (S/C-KO had more colony-forming units (CFU in their broncho-alveolar lavages fluids, associated with increased recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils. For peritoneal infection, susceptible mice (wild-type had more CFU in their blood, but recruited less macrophages and neutrophils in the peritoneal cavity than resistant mice. Exacerbated cytokine levels were often observed in the susceptible mice in the infected compartment as well as in the plasma. The exception was the enhanced compartmentalized expression of IL-1β for the resistant mice (S/C-KO after peritoneal infection. A similar mirrored susceptibility to S. aureus infection was also observed for MARCO and TLR2. Marco and tlr2 -/- mice were more resistant to peritoneal infection but more susceptible to pulmonary infection than wild type mice. In conclusion, our results show that innate immune receptors can play distinct and opposite roles depending on the site of infection. Their presence is protective for local pulmonary infection, whereas it becomes detrimental

  10. Comparative Studies of Vertebrate Platelet Glycoprotein 4 (CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Holmes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelet glycoprotein 4 (CD36 (or fatty acyl translocase [FAT], or scavenger receptor class B, member 3 [SCARB3] is an essential cell surface and skeletal muscle outer mitochondrial membrane glycoprotein involved in multiple functions in the body. CD36 serves as a ligand receptor of thrombospondin, long chain fatty acids, oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDLs and malaria-infected erythrocytes. CD36 also influences various diseases, including angiogenesis, thrombosis, atherosclerosis, malaria, diabetes, steatosis, dementia and obesity. Genetic deficiency of this protein results in significant changes in fatty acid and oxidized lipid uptake. Comparative CD36 amino acid sequences and structures and CD36 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate CD36 sequences shared 53–100% identity as compared with 29–32% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, SCARB1 and SCARB2. At least eight vertebrate CD36 N-glycosylation sites were conserved which are required for membrane integration. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and predicted secondary structures were also studied. Three CD36 domains were identified including cytoplasmic, transmembrane and exoplasmic sequences. Conserved sequences included N- and C-terminal transmembrane glycines; and exoplasmic cysteine disulphide residues; TSP-1 and PE binding sites, Thr92 and His242, respectively; 17 conserved proline and 14 glycine residues, which may participate in forming CD36 ‘short loops’; and basic amino acid residues, and may contribute to fatty acid and thrombospondin binding. Vertebrate CD36 genes usually contained 12 coding exons. The human CD36 gene contained transcription factor binding sites (including PPARG and PPARA contributing to a high gene expression level (6.6 times average. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate CD36 gene with vertebrate

  11. Soluble CD36- a marker of the (pathophysiological) role of CD36 in the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koonen, Debby P Y; Jensen, Majken Karoline; Handberg, Aase

    2011-01-01

    associated with obesity and lipid components of the metabolic syndrome, with risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Recently, non-cell bound CD36 was identified in human plasma and was termed soluble CD36 (sCD36). In this review we will describe the functions of CD36 in tissues and address the role of s......CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor observed in many cell types and tissues throughout the body. Recent literature has implicated CD36 in the pathogenesis of metabolic dysregulation such as found in obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Genetic variation at the CD36 loci have been......CD36 in the context of the metabolic syndrome. We will also highlight recent findings from human genetic studies looking at the CD36 locus in relation to metabolic profile in the general population. Finally, we present a model in which insulin resistance, oxLDL, low-grade inflammation and liver...

  12. Leishmania amazonensis Engages CD36 to Drive Parasitophorous Vacuole Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendi Okuda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania amastigotes manipulate the activity of macrophages to favor their own success. However, very little is known about the role of innate recognition and signaling triggered by amastigotes in this host-parasite interaction. In this work we developed a new infection model in adult Drosophila to take advantage of its superior genetic resources to identify novel host factors limiting Leishmania amazonensis infection. The model is based on the capacity of macrophage-like cells, plasmatocytes, to phagocytose and control the proliferation of parasites injected into adult flies. Using this model, we screened a collection of RNAi-expressing flies for anti-Leishmania defense factors. Notably, we found three CD36-like scavenger receptors that were important for defending against Leishmania infection. Mechanistic studies in mouse macrophages showed that CD36 accumulates specifically at sites where the parasite contacts the parasitophorous vacuole membrane. Furthermore, CD36-deficient macrophages were defective in the formation of the large parasitophorous vacuole typical of L. amazonensis infection, a phenotype caused by inefficient fusion with late endosomes and/or lysosomes. These data identify an unprecedented role for CD36 in the biogenesis of the parasitophorous vacuole and further highlight the utility of Drosophila as a model system for dissecting innate immune responses to infection.

  13. CD36 mediates endothelial dysfunction downstream of circulating factors induced by O3 exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sarah; Colombo, Elizabeth S; Lucas, Selita N; Hall, Pamela R; Febbraio, Maria; Paffett, Michael L; Campen, Matthew J

    2013-08-01

    Inhaled pollutants induce the release of vasoactive factors into the systemic circulation, but little information is available regarding the nature of these factors or their receptors. The pattern recognition receptor CD36 interacts with many damage-related circulating molecules, leading to activation of endothelial cells and promoting vascular inflammation; therefore, we hypothesized that CD36 plays a pivotal role in mediating cross talk between inhaled ozone (O3)-induced circulating factors and systemic vascular dysfunction. O3 exposure (1 ppm × 4h) induced lung inflammation in wild-type (WT) mice, which was absent in the CD36 deficient (CD36(-/-)) mice. Acetylcholine (ACh)-evoked vasorelaxation was impaired in isolated aortas from O3-exposed WT mice but not in vessels from CD36(-/-) mice. To delineate whether vascular impairments were caused by lung inflammation or CD36-mediated generation of circulating factors, naïve aortas were treated with diluted serum from control or O3-exposed WT mice, which recapitulated the impairments of vasorelaxation observed after inhalation exposures. Aortas from CD36(-/-) mice were insensitive to the effects of O3-induced circulating factors, with robust vasorelaxation responses in the presence of serum from O3-exposed WT mice. Lung inflammation was not a requirement for production of circulating vasoactive factors, as serum from O3-exposed CD36(-/-) mice could inhibit vasorelaxation in naïve WT aortas. These results suggest that O3 inhalation induces the release of circulating bioactive factors capable of impairing vasorelaxation to ACh via a CD36-dependent signaling mechanism. Although lung inflammatory and systemic vascular effects were both dependent on CD36, the presence of circulating factors appears to be independent of CD36 and inflammatory responses.

  14. CD36 is indispensable for thermogenesis under conditions of fasting and cold stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putri, Mirasari [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Department of Public Health, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Syamsunarno, Mas Rizky A.A. [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jl. Raya Bandung Sumedang KM 21, Jatinangor, West Java 45363 (Indonesia); Iso, Tatsuya, E-mail: isot@gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Education and Research Support Center, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Aiko; Hanaoka, Hirofumi [Department of Bioimaging Information Analysis, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Sunaga, Hiroaki [Department of Laboratory Sciences, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Koitabashi, Norimichi [Department of Medicine and Biological Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Matsui, Hiroki [Department of Laboratory Sciences, Gunma University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi [Department of Public Health, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); Tsushima, Yoshito [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, 3-39-22 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma 371-8511 (Japan); and others

    2015-02-20

    Hypothermia can occur during fasting when thermoregulatory mechanisms, involving fatty acid (FA) utilization, are disturbed. CD36/FA translocase is a membrane protein which facilitates membrane transport of long-chain FA in the FA consuming heart, skeletal muscle (SkM) and adipose tissues. It also accelerates uptake of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein by brown adipose tissue (BAT) in a cold environment. In mice deficient for CD36 (CD36{sup −/−} mice), FA uptake is markedly reduced with a compensatory increase in glucose uptake in the heart and SkM, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose especially during fasting. However, the role of CD36 in thermogenic activity during fasting remains to be determined. In fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice, body temperature drastically decreased shortly after cold exposure. The hypothermia was accompanied by a marked reduction in blood glucose and in stores of triacylglycerols in BAT and of glycogen in glycolytic SkM. Biodistribution analysis using the FA analogue {sup 125}I-BMIPP and the glucose analogue {sup 18}F-FDG revealed that uptake of FA and glucose was severely impaired in BAT and glycolytic SkM in cold-exposed CD36{sup −/−} mice. Further, induction of the genes of thermogenesis in BAT was blunted in fasted CD36{sup −/−} mice after cold exposure. These findings strongly suggest that CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit pronounced hypothermia after fasting due to depletion of energy storage in BAT and glycolytic SkM and to reduced supply of energy substrates to these tissues. Our study underscores the importance of CD36 for nutrient homeostasis to survive potentially life-threatening challenges, such as cold and starvation. - Highlights: • We examined the role of CD36 in thermogenesis during cold exposure. • CD36{sup −/−} mice exhibit rapid hypothermia after cold exposure during fasting. • Uptake of fatty acid and glucose is impaired in thermogenic tissues during fasting. • Storage of energy substrates is

  15. Soluble CD36 (sCD36) clusters with markers of insulin resistance, and high sCD36 is associated with increased type 2 diabetes risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, A; Norberg, M; Stenlund, H

    2010-01-01

    Soluble CD36 (sCD36) may be an early marker of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate sCD36 as a predictor of type 2 diabetes and to study its relationship with components of the metabolic syndrome (MetSy). DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS......, AND OUTCOME MEASURES: We conducted a case-referent study nested within a population-based health survey. Baseline variables included sCD36, body mass index, blood pressure, blood lipids, adipokines, inflammatory markers, and beta-cell function. A total of 173 initially nondiabetic cohort members who developed...

  16. Viral Inhibition of Bacterial Phagocytosis by Human Macrophages: Redundant Role of CD36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace E Cooper

    Full Text Available Macrophages are essential to maintaining lung homoeostasis and recent work has demonstrated that influenza-infected lung macrophages downregulate their expression of the scavenger receptor CD36. This receptor has also been shown to be involved in phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae, a primary agent associated with pneumonia secondary to viral infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of CD36 in the effects of viral infection on macrophage phagocytic function. Human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM were exposed to H3N2 X31 influenza virus, M37 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV or UV-irradiated virus. No infection of MDM was seen upon exposure to UV-irradiated virus but incubation with live X31 or M37 resulted in significant levels of viral detection by flow cytometry or RT-PCR respectively. Infection resulted in significantly diminished uptake of S. pneumoniae by MDM and significantly decreased expression of CD36 at both the cell surface and mRNA level. Concurrently, there was a significant increase in IFNβ gene expression in response to infection and we observed a significant decrease in bacterial phagocytosis (p = 0.031 and CD36 gene expression (p = 0.031 by MDM cultured for 24 h in 50IU/ml IFNβ. Knockdown of CD36 by siRNA resulted in decreased phagocytosis, but this was mimicked by transfection reagent alone. When MDM were incubated with CD36 blocking antibodies no effect on phagocytic ability was observed. These data indicate that autologous IFNβ production by virally-infected cells can inhibit bacterial phagocytosis, but that decreased CD36 expression by these cells does not play a major role in this functional deficiency.

  17. CD36 is required for myoblast fusion during myogenic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-Yoon [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Dongguk University and Medical Institute of Dongguk University, Gyeongju 780-714 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Youngeun [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In-San, E-mail: iskim@knu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Cell and Matrix Research Institute, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was induced during myogenic differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD36 expression was localized in multinucleated myotubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of myogenic markers is attenuated in CD36 knockdown C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of CD36 significantly inhibited myotube formation during differentiation. -- Abstract: Recently, CD36 has been found to be involved in the cytokine-induced fusion of macrophage. Myoblast fusion to form multinucleated myotubes is required for myogenesis and muscle regeneration. Because a search of gene expression database revealed the attenuation of CD36 expression in the muscles of muscular dystrophy patients, the possibility that CD36 could be required for myoblast fusion was investigated. CD36 expression was markedly up-regulated during myoblast differentiation and localized in multinucleated myotubes. Knockdown of endogenous CD36 significantly decreased the expression of myogenic markers as well as myotube formation. These results support the notion that CD36 plays an important role in cell fusion during myogenic differentiation. Our finding will aid the elucidation of the common mechanism governing cell-to-cell fusion in various fusion models.

  18. β-Amyloid promotes accumulation of lipid peroxides by inhibiting CD36-mediated clearance of oxidized lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Tayeba

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies suggest that hypercholesterolemia, an established risk factor for atherosclerosis, is also a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. The myeloid scavenger receptor CD36 binds oxidized lipoproteins that accumulate with hypercholesterolemia and mediates their clearance from the circulation and peripheral tissues. Recently, we demonstrated that CD36 also binds fibrillar β-amyloid and initiates a signaling cascade that regulates microglial recruitment and activation. As increased lipoprotein oxidation and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products have been reported in Alzheimer's disease, we investigated whether β-amyloid altered oxidized lipoprotein clearance via CD36. Methods The availability of mice genetically deficient in class A (SRAI & II and class B (CD36 scavenger receptors has facilitated studies to discriminate their individual actions. Using primary microglia and macrophages, we assessed the impact of Aβ on: (a cholesterol ester accumulation by GC-MS and neutral lipid staining, (b binding, uptake and degradation of 125I-labeled oxidized lipoproteins via CD36, SR-A and CD36/SR-A-independent pathways, (c expression of SR-A and CD36. In addition, using mice with targeted deletions in essential kinases in the CD36-signaling cascade, we investigated whether Aβ-CD36 signaling altered metabolism of oxidized lipoproteins. Results In primary microglia and macrophages, Aβ inhibited binding, uptake and degradation of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL in a dose-dependent manner. While untreated cells accumulated abundant cholesterol ester in the presence of oxLDL, cells treated with Aβ were devoid of cholesterol ester. Pretreatment of cells with Aβ did not affect subsequent degradation of oxidized lipoproteins, indicating that lysosomal accumulation of Aβ did not disrupt this degradation pathway. Using mice with targeted deletions of the scavenger receptors, we demonstrated that Aβ inhibited oxidized

  19. CD36 and Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Promote House Dust Mite Allergy Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Preeyam S; Kearney, John F

    2017-08-01

    Over 89% of asthmatic children in underdeveloped countries demonstrate sensitivity to house dust mites (HDMs). The allergic response to HDMs is partially mediated by epithelial cell-derived cytokines that activate group 2 innate lymphoid cells, induce migration and activation of dendritic cells, and promote effector differentiation of HDM-specific TH2 cells. However, the contribution of innate receptor engagement on epithelial or dendritic cells by HDMs that ultimately mediates said innate and adaptive allergic responses is poorly understood. We and other investigators have demonstrated that HDMs express phosphorylcholine (PC) moieties. The major PC receptors involved in immune responses include CD36 and platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). Because CD36 and PAFR are expressed by epithelial cells and dendritic cells, and expression of these receptors is higher in human asthmatics, we determined whether engagement of CD36 or PAFR on epithelial or dendritic cells contributes to HDM allergy development. Testing bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that CD36 engagement on radioresistant cells and PAFR engagement on radioresistant and radiosensitive cells in the lung promote allergic responses to HDMs. Additionally, passive anti-PC IgM Abs administered intratracheally with HDMs decreased allergen uptake by epithelial cells and APCs in the lungs of C57BL/6 mice but not CD36 -/- or PAFR -/- mice. These results show that CD36 and PAFR are important mediators of HDM allergy development and that inhibiting HDM engagement with PC receptors in the lung protects against allergic airway disease. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Inflammatory stress promotes the development of obesity-related chronic kidney disease via CD36 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Xiao, Yayun; Luo, Xuan; Zhao, Yunfei; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Yan; Wu, Tingting; Wei, Li; Chen, Yaxi

    2017-07-01

    Ectopic fat located in the kidney has emerged as a novel cause of obesity-related chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this study, we aimed to investigate whether inflammatory stress promotes ectopic lipid deposition in the kidney and causes renal injury in obese mice and whether the pathological process is mediated by the fatty acid translocase, CD36. High-fat diet (HFD) feeding alone resulted in obesity, hyperlipidemia, and slight renal lipid accumulation in mice, which nevertheless had normal kidney function. HFD-fed mice with chronic inflammation had severe renal steatosis and obvious glomerular and tubular damage, which was accompanied by increased CD36 expression. Interestingly, CD36 deficiency in HFD-fed mice eliminated renal lipid accumulation and pathological changes induced by chronic inflammation. In both human mesangial cells (HMCs) and human kidney 2 (HK2) cells, inflammatory stress increased the efficiency of CD36 protein incorporation into membrane lipid rafts, promoting FFA uptake and intracellular lipid accumulation. Silencing of CD36 in vitro markedly attenuated FFA uptake, lipid accumulation, and cellular stress induced by inflammatory stress. We conclude that inflammatory stress aggravates renal injury by activation of the CD36 pathway, suggesting that this mechanism may operate in obese individuals with chronic inflammation, making them prone to CKD. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Deficiencies in radiation protection record systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.B.; Lyon, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation protection records are a fundamental part of any program for protecting radiation workers. Records are essential to epidemiological studies of radiation workers and are becoming increasingly important as the number of radiation exposure litigation cases increases. Ready retrievability of comprehensive records is also essential to the adequate defense of a radiation protection program. Appraisals of numerous radiation protection programs have revealed that few record-keeping systems comply with American National Standards Institute, Standard Practice N13.6-1972. Record-keeping requirements and types of deficiencies in radiation protection records systems are presented in this paper, followed by general recommendations for implementing a comprehensive radiation protection records system

  2. CD36 gene polymorphism is associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šerý, Omar; Janoutová, J.; Ewerlingová, Laura; Hálová, Alice; Lochman, J.; Janout, V.; Khan, N. A.; Balcar, Vladimír Josef

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 135, č. 1 (2017), s. 46-53 ISSN 0300-9084 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : polymorphism * association * CD36 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology OBOR OECD: Neurosciences (including psychophysiology Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  3. CD36 and Fyn kinase mediate malaria-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ifeanyi U Anidi

    Full Text Available Severe malaria can trigger acute lung injury characterized by pulmonary edema resulting from increased endothelial permeability. However, the mechanism through which lung fluid conductance is altered during malaria remains unclear. To define the role that the scavenger receptor CD36 may play in mediating this response, C57BL/6J (WT and CD36-/- mice were infected with P. berghei ANKA and monitored for changes in pulmonary endothelial barrier function employing an isolated perfused lung system. WT lungs demonstrated a >10-fold increase in two measures of paracellular fluid conductance and a decrease in the albumin reflection coefficient (σalb compared to control lungs indicating a loss of barrier function. In contrast, malaria-infected CD36-/- mice had near normal fluid conductance but a similar reduction in σalb. In WT mice, lung sequestered iRBCs demonstrated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. To determine whether knockout of CD36 could protect against ROS-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction, mouse lung microvascular endothelial monolayers (MLMVEC from WT and CD36-/- mice were exposed to H2O2. Unlike WT monolayers, which showed dose-dependent decreases in transendothelial electrical resistance (TER from H2O2 indicating loss of barrier function, CD36-/- MLMVEC demonstrated dose-dependent increases in TER. The differences between responses in WT and CD36-/- endothelial cells correlated with important differences in the intracellular compartmentalization of the CD36-associated Fyn kinase. Malaria infection increased total lung Fyn levels in CD36-/- lungs compared to WT, but this increase was due to elevated production of the inactive form of Fyn further suggesting a dysregulation of Fyn-mediated signaling. The importance of Fyn in CD36-dependent endothelial signaling was confirmed using in vitro Fyn knockdown as well as Fyn-/- mice, which were also protected from H2O2- and malaria-induced lung endothelial leak, respectively. Our

  4. Alternative promoter usage of the membrane glycoprotein CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whatling Carl

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD36 is a membrane glycoprotein involved in a variety of cellular processes such as lipid transport, immune regulation, hemostasis, adhesion, angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. It is expressed in many tissues and cell types, with a tissue specific expression pattern that is a result of a complex regulation for which the molecular mechanisms are not yet fully understood. There are several alternative mRNA isoforms described for the gene. We have investigated the expression patterns of five alternative first exons of the CD36 gene in several human tissues and cell types, to better understand the molecular details behind its regulation. Results We have identified one novel alternative first exon of the CD36 gene, and confirmed the expression of four previously known alternative first exons of the gene. The alternative transcripts are all expressed in more than one human tissue and their expression patterns vary highly in skeletal muscle, heart, liver, adipose tissue, placenta, spinal cord, cerebrum and monocytes. All alternative first exons are upregulated in THP-1 macrophages in response to oxidized low density lipoproteins. The alternative promoters lack TATA-boxes and CpG islands. The upstream region of exon 1b contains several features common for house keeping gene and monocyte specific gene promoters. Conclusion Tissue-specific expression patterns of the alternative first exons of CD36 suggest that the alternative first exons of the gene are regulated individually and tissue specifically. At the same time, the fact that all first exons are upregulated in THP-1 macrophages in response to oxidized low density lipoproteins may suggest that the alternative first exons are coregulated in this cell type and environmental condition. The molecular mechanisms regulating CD36 thus appear to be unusually complex, which might reflect the multifunctional role of the gene in different tissues and cellular conditions.

  5. CD36 and malaria: friends or foes? A decade of data provides some answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Ana; Neculai, Dante; Kain, Kevin C

    2014-09-01

    The past 10 years have generated new insights into the complex interaction between CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36) and malaria. These range from the crystallization of the CD36 homolog, LIMPII (lysosomal integral membrane protein II), permitting modeling of CD36 and its binding to diverse ligands, to cell biology-based studies of CD36 and large population genetic studies assessing the association of CD36 polymorphisms and malarial disease severity. Collectively these lines of evidence indicate that a receptor other than CD36 is associated with severity. CD36 plays an important role in innate immunity and in the phagocytic uptake of multiple pathogens including malaria. CD36 polymorphisms lack association with severity, and isolates that cause severe disease primarily bind to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) rather than to CD36. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetics of Cd36 and the hypertension metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2002), s. 148-153 ISSN 0270-9295 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/00/1636; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA ČR(CZ) GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:NIHFogarty(US) RO3TW001236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2002

  7. Genetics of Cd36 and the hypertension metabolic syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, W. T.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2002), s. 148-153 ISSN 0270-9295 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA ČR GA301/00/1636; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:NIHFogarty(US) RO3TW001236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.176, year: 2002

  8. Dependence of Brown Adipose Tissue Function on CD36-Mediated Coenzyme Q Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M. Anderson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ. While cells synthesize CoQ mostly endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function are not well understood. Here, we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective nonshivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis.

  9. Binding of Plasmodium falciparum to CD36 can be shielded by the glycocalyx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Wang, Christian William; Kurtzhals, Jorgen Anders Lindholm

    2017-01-01

    FCR3/IT) was selected on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human CD36. Cytoadhesion to CHO CD36 at 1-4 days after seeding was quantified by using a static binding assay. Results: The glycocalyx thickness of CHO cells increased during 4 days in culture as assessed by metabolic...... labelling of glycans with azido sugars and with electron microscopy studying the binding of cationized ferritin to cell surfaces. The functional importance of this process was addressed in binding assays by using CHO cells transfected with CD36. In parallel with the maturation of the glycocalyx, antibody......-binding to CD36 was inhibited, despite stable expression of CD36. P. falciparum selected for CD36-binding recognized CD36 on CHO cells on the first day in culture, but the binding was lost after 2-4 days. Conclusion: The endothelial glycocalyx affects parasite cytoadhesion in vitro, an effect that has...

  10. The structural basis for CD36 binding by the malaria parasite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Turner, Louise; Bolla, Jani Reddy

    2016-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor involved in fatty acid metabolism, innate immunity and angiogenesis. It interacts with lipoprotein particles and facilitates uptake of long chain fatty acids. It is also the most common target of the PfEMP1 proteins of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum......, tethering parasite-infected erythrocytes to endothelial receptors. This prevents their destruction by splenic clearance and allows increased parasitaemia. Here we describe the structure of CD36 in complex with long chain fatty acids and a CD36-binding PfEMP1 protein domain. A conserved hydrophobic pocket...... allows the hugely diverse PfEMP1 protein family to bind to a conserved phenylalanine residue at the membrane distal tip of CD36. This phenylalanine is also required for CD36 to interact with lipoprotein particles. By targeting a site on CD36 that is required for its physiological function, PfEMP1...

  11. Low CD36 and LOX-1 Levels and CD36 Gene Subexpression Are Associated with Metabolic Dysregulation in Older Individuals with Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perla-Monserrat Madrigal-Ruíz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obesity study in the context of scavenger receptors has been linked to atherosclerosis. CD36 and LOX-1 are important, since they have been associated with atherogenic and metabolic disease but not fat redistribution. The aim of our study was to determinate the association between CD36 and LOX-1 in presence of age and abdominal obesity. Methods. This is a cross-sectional study that included 151 healthy individuals, clinically and anthropometrically classified into two groups by age (<30 and ≥30 years old and abdominal obesity (according to World Health Organization guidelines. We excluded individuals with any chronic and metabolic illness, use of medication, or smoking. Fasting blood samples were taken to perform determination of CD36 mRNA expression by real-time PCR, lipid profile and metabolic and low grade inflammation markers by routine methods, and soluble scavenger receptors (CD36 and LOX-1 by ELISA. Results. Individuals ≥30 years old with abdominal obesity presented high atherogenic index, lower soluble scavenger receptor levels, and subexpression of CD36 mRNA (54% less. On the other hand, individuals <30 years old with abdominal adiposity presented higher levels in the same parameters, except LOX-1 soluble levels. Conclusion. In this study, individuals over 30 years of age presented low soluble scavenger receptors levels pattern and CD36 gene subexpression, which suggest the chronic metabolic dysregulation in abdominal obesity.

  12. Adiponectin has a pivotal role in the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), a selective CD36 azapeptide ligand, after transient coronary artery occlusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, David N; Bessi, Valérie L; Ménard, Liliane; Piquereau, Jérôme; Proulx, Caroline; Febbraio, Maria; Lubell, William D; Carpentier, André C; Burelle, Yan; Ong, Huy; Marleau, Sylvie

    2018-02-01

    CD36 is a multiligand receptor involved in lipid metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), an azapeptide belonging to a new class of selective CD36 ligands. The role of CP-3(iv) in mediating cardioprotection was investigated because CD36 signaling leads to activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, a transcriptional regulator of adiponectin. CP-3(iv) pretreatment reduced infarct size by 54% and preserved hemodynamics in C57BL/6 mice subjected to 30 min coronary ligation and reperfusion but had no effect in CD36-deficient mice. The effects of CP-3(iv) were associated with an increase in circulating adiponectin levels, epididymal fat adiponectin gene expression, and adiponectin transcriptional regulators ( Pparg, Cebpb, Sirt1) after 6 h of reperfusion. Reduced myocardial oxidative stress and apoptosis were observed along with an increase in expression of myocardial adiponectin target proteins, including cyclooxygenase-2, phospho-AMPK, and phospho-Akt. Moreover, CP-3(iv) increased myocardial performance in isolated hearts, whereas blockade of adiponectin with an anti-adiponectin antibody abrogated it. CP-3(iv) exerts cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (MI/R) injury and dysfunction, at least in part, by increasing circulating and myocardial adiponectin levels. Hence, both paracrine and endocrine effects of adiponectin may contribute to reduced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis after MI/R, in a CD36-dependent manner.-Huynh, D. N., Bessi, V. L., Ménard, L., Piquereau, J., Proulx, C., Febbraio, M., Lubell, W. D., Carpentier, A. C., Burelle, Y., Ong, H., Marleau, S. Adiponectin has a pivotal role in the cardioprotective effect of CP-3(iv), a selective CD36 azapeptide ligand, after transient coronary artery occlusion in mice.

  13. Identification of the Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein Scavenger Receptor CD36 in Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Aase; Levin, Klaus; Højlund, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Macrophage CD36 scavenges oxidized low-density lipoprotein, leading to foam cell formation, and appears to be a key proatherogenic molecule. Increased expression of CD36 has been attributed to hyperglycemia and to defective macrophage insulin signaling in insulin resistance. Premature...

  14. CD36 is involved in oleic acid detection by the murine olfactory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja eOberland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory signals influence food intake in a variety of species. To maximize the chances of finding a source of calories, an animal’s preference for fatty foods and triglycerides already becomes apparent during olfactory food search behavior. However, the molecular identity of both receptors and ligands mediating olfactory-dependent fatty acid recognition are, so far, undescribed. We here describe that a subset of olfactory sensory neurons expresses the fatty acid receptor CD36 and demonstrate a receptor-like localization of CD36 in olfactory cilia by STED microscopy. CD36-positive olfactory neurons share olfaction-specific transduction elements and project to numerous glomeruli in the ventral olfactory bulb. In accordance with the described roles of CD36 as fatty acid receptor or co-receptor in other sensory systems, the number of olfactory neurons responding to oleic acid, a major milk component, in Ca2+ imaging experiments is drastically reduced in young CD36 knock-out mice. Strikingly, we also observe marked age-dependent changes in CD36 localization, which is prominently present in the ciliary compartment only during the suckling period. Our results support the involvement of CD36 in fatty acid detection by the mammalian olfactory system.

  15. Differential effects of strength training and testosterone treatment on soluble CD36 in aging men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Christensen, Louise L; Kvorning, Thue

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We measured soluble CD36 (sCD36) and body composition to determine the effects of testosterone treatment (TT) and/or strength training (ST) on cardiovascular risk in men with low normal testosterone levels. METHODS: Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 54 men aged 60-78 years...... central fat mass (r = 0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to testosterone treatment, six months of strength training reduced sCD36 levels suggesting decreased cardiovascular risk, possibly due to a reduction in central fat mass....

  16. Contraction-induced skeletal muscle FAT/CD36 trafficking and FA uptake is AMPK independent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Albers, Peter Hjorth; Rose, Adam John

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating FAT/CD36 translocation and fatty acid uptake in skeletal muscle during contractions. In one model, WT and AMPK KD mice were exercised or EDL and SOL muscles were contracted, ex vivo. In separate studies, FAT/CD36...... with increased fatty acid uptake, both in EDL and SOL muscle from WT and AMPK KD mice and in the perfused rat hindlimb. This suggests that AMPK is not essential in regulation of FAT/CD36 translocation and fatty acid uptake in skeletal muscle during contractions. However, AMPK could be important in regulation...

  17. L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency protects from metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Chi-un; Nabuurs, Christine; Stockebrand, Malte C; Neu, Axel; Nunes, Patricia; Morellini, Fabio; Sauter, Kathrin; Schillemeit, Stefan; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Marescau, Bart; Heerschap, Arend; Isbrandt, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated creatine (Cr) serves as an energy buffer for ATP replenishment in organs with highly fluctuating energy demand. The central role of Cr in the brain and muscle is emphasized by severe neurometabolic disorders caused by Cr deficiency. Common symptoms of inborn errors of creatine synthesis or distribution include mental retardation and muscular weakness. Human mutations in l-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase (AGAT), the first enzyme of Cr synthesis, lead to severely reduced Cr and guanidinoacetate (GuA) levels. Here, we report the generation and metabolic characterization of AGAT-deficient mice that are devoid of Cr and its precursor GuA. AGAT-deficient mice exhibited decreased fat deposition, attenuated gluconeogenesis, reduced cholesterol levels and enhanced glucose tolerance. Furthermore, Cr deficiency completely protected from the development of metabolic syndrome caused by diet-induced obesity. Biochemical analyses revealed the chronic Cr-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which stimulates catabolic pathways in metabolically relevant tissues such as the brain, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver, suggesting a mechanism underlying the metabolic phenotype. In summary, our results show marked metabolic effects of Cr deficiency via the chronic activation of AMPK in a first animal model of AGAT deficiency. In addition to insights into metabolic changes in Cr deficiency syndromes, our genetic model reveals a novel mechanism as a potential treatment option for obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  18. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daoudi, A.; Plesník, J.; Sayed, A.; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, A.; Rouabah, L.; Khan, N. A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 11 (2015), s. 9096-9104 ISSN 2072-6643 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : CD36 * taste * obesity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.759, year: 2015

  19. CD36 Mediated Fatty Acid-Induced Podocyte Apoptosis via Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hua

    Full Text Available Hyperlipidemia-induced apoptosis mediated by fatty acid translocase CD36 is associated with increased uptake of ox-LDL or fatty acid in macrophages, hepatocytes and proximal tubular epithelial cells, leading to atherosclerosis, liver damage and fibrosis in obese patients, and diabetic nephropathy (DN, respectively. However, the specific role of CD36 in podocyte apoptosis in DN with hyperlipidemia remains poorly investigated.The expression of CD36 was measured in paraffin-embedded kidney tissue samples (Ctr = 18, DN = 20 by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining. We cultured conditionally immortalized mouse podocytes (MPC5 and treated cells with palmitic acid, and measured CD36 expression by real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence; lipid uptake by Oil red O staining and BODIPY staining; apoptosis by flow cytometry assay, TUNEL assay and Western blot analysis; and ROS production by DCFH-DA fluorescence staining. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0 statistical software.CD36 expression was increased in kidney tissue from DN patients with hyperlipidemia. Palmitic acid upregulated CD36 expression and promoted its translocation from cytoplasm to plasma membrane in podocytes. Furthermore, palmitic acid increased lipid uptake, ROS production and apoptosis in podocytes, Sulfo-N-succinimidyloleate (SSO, the specific inhibitor of the fatty acid binding site on CD36, decreased palmitic acid-induced fatty acid accumulation, ROS production, and apoptosis in podocytes. Antioxidant 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6- tetramethylpiperidine -1-oxyl (tempol inhibited the overproduction of ROS and apoptosis in podocytes induced by palmitic acid.CD36 mediated fatty acid-induced podocyte apoptosis via oxidative stress might participate in the process of DN.

  20. Wnt1 Positively Regulates CD36 Expression via TCF4 and PPAR-γ in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scavenger receptors including CD36 control the phagocytosis of oxidized low-density lipoprotein and play an important role in macrophage physiology, but the underlying molecular mechanism by which CD36 is regulated in macrophages or during macrophage differentiation from monocytes remains to be determined. Methods: Here, we investigated the relationship between Wnt1 and CD36 during macrophage differentiation. CD36 was suppressed following knockdown of Wnt1 by siRNA, while it was increased by ectopic overexpression of Wnt1 in macrophages. Using a β-catenin inhibitor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ siRNA, and transcription factor 4 (TCF4 siRNA, we demonstrated that Wnt1 regulates the expression of CD36 through TCF4 and PPAR-γ. Co-immunoprecipitation, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence experiments showed that β-catenin interacted with PPAR-γ and that PPAR-γ and TCF4 colocalized in the nucleus. Furthermore, Pax3 regulated Wnt1 via binding to the first binding site in the Wnt1 promoter. Results: Our study demonstrated that during macrophage differentiation from monocytes, Wnt1 promotes CD36 expression via activation of PPAR-γ and TCF4. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that Wnt1 plays an important role in macrophage physiology via activation of the canonical Wnt pathway.

  1. Circulating sCD36 levels in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll, S; Poulsen, M K; Ornstrup, M J

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: CD36 is implicated in fatty acid uptake in multiple tissues, including hepatocytes and adipocytes. Circulating CD36 (sCD36) is increased in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).We explored this association further by investigating correlations between sCD36 levels....... An unhealthy and unbalanced CD36 expression in adipose and hepatic tissue may shift the fatty acid load to the liver.Clinical Trials.gov (NCT01464801, NCT01412645, NCT01446276).International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 05 December 2016. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.223....... resonance imaging (n=94, subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue) and liver biopsy (n=28 NAFLD patients) performed. Plasma sCD36 was assessed by ELISA. RESULTS: NAFLD patients had elevated sCD36 levels compared to controls (0.68 (0.12-2.27) versus 0.43 (0.10-1.18), P

  2. Deregulated Lipid Sensing by Intestinal CD36 in Diet-Induced Hyperinsulinemic Obese Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Buttet

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome (MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and is generally associated with abnormally elevated postprandial triglyceride levels. We evaluated intestinal synthesis of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRL in a mouse model of the MetS obtained by feeding a palm oil-rich high fat diet (HFD. By contrast to control mice, MetS mice secreted two populations of TRL. If the smaller size population represented 44% of total particles in the beginning of intestinal lipid absorption in MetS mice, it accounted for only 17% after 4 h due to the secretion of larger size TRL. The MetS mice displayed accentuated postprandial hypertriglyceridemia up to 3 h due to a defective TRL clearance. These alterations reflected a delay in lipid induction of genes for key proteins of TRL formation (MTP, L-FABP and blood clearance (ApoC2. These abnormalities associated with blunted lipid sensing by CD36, which is normally required to optimize jejunal formation of large TRL. In MetS mice CD36 was not downregulated by lipid in contrast to control mice. Treatment of controls with the proteosomal inhibitor MG132, which prevented CD36 downregulation, resulted in blunted lipid-induction of MTP, L-FABP and ApoC2 gene expression, as in MetS mice. Absence of CD36 sensing was due to the hyperinsulinemia in MetS mice. Acute insulin treatment of controls before lipid administration abolished CD36 downregulation, lipid-induction of TRL genes and reduced postprandial triglycerides (TG, while streptozotocin-treatment of MetS mice restored lipid-induced CD36 degradation and TG secretion. In vitro, insulin treatment abolished CD36-mediated up-regulation of MTP in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, HFD treatment impairs TRL formation in early stage of lipid absorption via insulin-mediated inhibition of CD36 lipid sensing. This impairment results in production of smaller TRL that are cleared slowly from the circulation, which might contribute to the

  3. CD36 in chronic kidney disease: novel insights and therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochun; Okamura, Daryl M; Lu, Xifeng; Chen, Yaxi; Moorhead, John; Varghese, Zac; Ruan, Xiong Z

    2017-12-01

    CD36 (also known as scavenger receptor B2) is a multifunctional receptor that mediates the binding and cellular uptake of long-chain fatty acids, oxidized lipids and phospholipids, advanced oxidation protein products, thrombospondin and advanced glycation end products, and has roles in lipid accumulation, inflammatory signalling, energy reprogramming, apoptosis and kidney fibrosis. Renal CD36 is mainly expressed in tubular epithelial cells, podocytes and mesangial cells, and is markedly upregulated in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD). As fatty acids are the preferred energy source for proximal tubule cells, a reduction in fatty acid oxidation in CKD affects kidney lipid metabolism by disrupting the balance between fatty acid synthesis, uptake and consumption. The outcome is intracellular lipid accumulation, which has an important role in the pathogenesis of kidney fibrosis. In experimental models, antagonist blockade or genetic knockout of CD36 prevents kidney injury, suggesting that CD36 could be a novel target for therapy. Here, we discuss the regulation and post-translational modification of CD36, its role in renal pathophysiology and its potential as a biomarker and as a therapeutic target for the prevention of kidney fibrosis.

  4. Circulating CD36 Is Reduced in HNF1A-MODY Carriers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bacon, Siobhan

    2013-01-01

    Premature atherosclerosis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) accounts for approximately 2% of all diabetes, with mutations in the transcription factor; hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A) accounting for the majority of MODY cases. There is somewhat limited data available on the prevalence of macrovascular disease in HNF1A-MODY carriers with diabetes. Marked insulin resistance and the associated dyslipidaemia are not clinical features of HNF1A-MODY carriers. The scavenger protein CD36 has been shown to play a substantial role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, largely through its interaction with oxidised LDL. Higher levels of monocyte CD36 and plasma CD36(sCD36) are seen to cluster with insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine levels of sCD36 in participants with HNF1A-MODY diabetes and to compare them with unaffected normoglycaemic family members and participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. A CD36 synthetic peptide inhibits silica-induced lung fibrosis in the mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Lv, Lina; Chen, Ying; Chen, Jie

    2010-02-01

    Silicosis is a kind of pneumoconiosis caused by inhalation of silica dust, which is characterized by lung fibrosis. The biologically active form of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) plays a key role in the development of lung fibrosis. CD36 is involved in the transformation of latent TGF-beta1 (L-TGF-beta1) to active TGF-beta1. The antagonistic effect of the synthetic peptide was analyzed by the administration of CD36 (93-110) synthetic peptide to the silicosis model of mice. The hydroxyproline content of the silica + CD36 (93-110) synthetic peptide group was significantly lower than that of the other experimental groups [silica and silica + CD36 (208-225) synthetic peptide groups] (p synthetic peptide group were less than those of the other experimental groups. The expressions of collagen I and III of the silica + CD36 (93-110) synthetic peptide group were significantly lower than those of the other experimental groups (p synthetic peptide reduced the tissue fibrotic pathologies and collagen accumulation in the silicosis model of mice, resulting in the decreased severity of silica-induced lung fibrosis.

  6. CD36 Differently Regulates Macrophage Responses to Smooth and Rough Lipopolysaccharide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Biedroń

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is the major pathogen-associated molecular pattern of Gram-negative bacterial infections, and includes smooth (S-LPS and rough (R-LPS chemotypes. Upon activation by LPS through CD14, TLR4/MD-2 heterodimers sequentially induce two waves of intracellular signaling for macrophage activation: the MyD88-dependent pathway from the plasma membrane and, following internalization, the TRIF-dependent pathway from endosomes. We sought to better define the role of scavenger receptors CD36 and CD204/SR-A as accessory LPS receptors that can contribute to pro-inflammatory and microbicidal activation of macrophages. We have found that CD36 differently regulates activation of mouse macrophages by S-LPS versus R-LPS. The ability of CD36 to substitute for CD14 in loading R-LPS, but not S-LPS onto TLR4/MD-2 allows CD14-independent macrophage responses to R-LPS. Conversely, S-LPS, but not R-LPS effectively stimulates CD14 binding to CD36, which favors S-LPS transfer from CD14 onto TLR4/MD-2 under conditions of low CD14 occupancy with S-LPS in serum-free medium. In contrast, in the presence of serum, CD36 reduces S-LPS binding to TLR4/MD-2 and the subsequent MyD88-dependent signaling, by mediating internalization of S-LPS/CD14 complexes. Additionally, CD36 positively regulates activation of TRIF-dependent signaling by both S-LPS and R-LPS, by promoting TLR4/MD-2 endocytosis. In contrast, we have found that SR-A does not function as a S-LPS receptor. Thus, by co-operating with CD14 in both R- and S-LPS loading onto TLR4/MD-2, CD36 can enhance the sensitivity of tissue-resident macrophages in detecting infections by Gram-negative bacteria. However, in later phases, following influx of serum to the infection site, the CD36-mediated negative regulation of MyD88-dependent branch of S-LPS-induced TLR4 signaling might constitute a mechanism to prevent an excessive inflammatory response, while preserving the adjuvant effect of S-LPS for adaptive

  7. Plasma sCD36 is associated with markers of atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and fatty liver in a nondiabetic healthy population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, A; Højlund, K; Gastaldelli, A

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with increased CD36 expression in a number of tissues. Moreover, excess macrophage CD36 may initiate atherosclerotic lesions. The aim of this study was to determine whether plasma soluble CD36 (sCD36) was associated with insulin resistance, fatty liver and carotid...

  8. Multiple metabolic hits converge on CD36 as novel mediator of tubular epithelial apoptosis in diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Susztak

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DNP is a common complication of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus and the most common cause of kidney failure. While DNP manifests with albuminuria and diabetic glomerulopathy, its progression correlates best with tubular epithelial degeneration (TED and interstitial fibrosis. However, mechanisms leading to TED in DNP remain poorly understood.We found that expression of scavenger receptor CD36 coincided with proximal tubular epithelial cell (PTEC apoptosis and TED specifically in human DNP. High glucose stimulated cell surface expression of CD36 in PTECs. CD36 expression was necessary and sufficient to mediate PTEC apoptosis induced by glycated albumins (AGE-BSA and CML-BSA and free fatty acid palmitate through sequential activation of src kinase, and proapoptotic p38 MAPK and caspase 3. In contrast, paucity of expression of CD36 in PTECs in diabetic mice with diabetic glomerulopathy was associated with normal tubular epithelium and the absence of tubular apoptosis. Mouse PTECs lacked CD36 and were resistant to AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis. Recombinant expression of CD36 in mouse PTECs conferred susceptibility to AGE-BSA-induced apoptosis.Our findings suggest a novel role for CD36 as an essential mediator of proximal tubular apoptosis in human DNP. Because CD36 expression was induced by glucose in PTECs, and because increased CD36 mediated AGE-BSA-, CML-BSA-, and palmitate-induced PTEC apoptosis, we propose a two-step metabolic hit model for TED, a hallmark of progression in DNP.

  9. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjer Daoudi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36, plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165. The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29 exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001. We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers.

  10. CML/CD36 accelerates atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Suining; Li, Lihua; Yan, Jinchuan; Ye, Fei; Shao, Chen; Sun, Zhen; Bao, Zhengyang; Dai, Zhiyin; Zhu, Jie; Jing, Lele; Wang, Zhongqun

    2018-01-01

    Among the various complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis causes the highest disability and morbidity. A multitude of macrophage-derived foam cells are retained in atherosclerotic plaques resulting not only from recruitment of monocytes into lesions but also from a reduced rate of macrophage migration from lesions. Nε-carboxymethyl-Lysine (CML), an advanced glycation end product, is responsible for most complications of diabetes. This study was designed to investigate the mechanism of CML/CD36 accelerating atherosclerotic progression via inhibiting foam cell migration. In vivo study and in vitro study were performed. For the in vivo investigation, CML/CD36 accelerated atherosclerotic progression via promoting the accumulation of macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta and inhibited macrophage-derived foam cells in aorta migrating to the para-aorta lymph node of diabetic apoE -/- mice. For the in vitro investigation, CML/CD36 inhibited RAW264.7-derived foam cell migration through NOX-derived ROS, FAK phosphorylation, Arp2/3 complex activation and F-actin polymerization. Thus, we concluded that CML/CD36 inhibited foam cells of plaque migrating to para-aorta lymph nodes, accelerating atherosclerotic progression. The corresponding mechanism may be via free cholesterol, ROS generation, p-FAK, Arp2/3, F-actin polymerization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Oxidized LDL Induces Alternative Macrophage Phenotype through Activation of CD36 and PAFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Rios

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OxLDL is recognized by macrophage scavenger receptors, including CD36; we have recently found that Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor (PAFR is also involved. Since PAFR in macrophages is associated with suppressor function, we examined the effect of oxLDL on macrophage phenotype. It was found that the presence of oxLDL during macrophage differentiation induced high mRNA levels to IL-10, mannose receptor, PPARγ and arginase-1 and low levels of IL-12 and iNOS. When human THP-1 macrophages were pre-treated with oxLDL then stimulated with LPS, the production of IL-10 and TGF-β significantly increased, whereas that of IL-6 and IL-8 decreased. In murine TG-elicited macrophages, this protocol significantly reduced NO, iNOS and COX2 expression. Thus, oxLDL induced macrophage differentiation and activation towards the alternatively activated M2-phenotype. In murine macrophages, oxLDL induced TGF-β, arginase-1 and IL-10 mRNA expression, which were significantly reduced by pre-treatment with PAFR antagonists (WEB and CV or with antibodies to CD36. The mRNA expression of IL-12, RANTES and CXCL2 were not affected. We showed that this profile of macrophage activation is dependent on the engagement of both CD36 and PAFR. We conclude that oxLDL induces alternative macrophage activation by mechanisms involving CD36 and PAFR.

  12. Oral Fat Sensing and CD36 Gene Polymorphism in Algerian Lean and Obese Teenagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, Hadjer; Plesník, Jiří; Sayed, Amira; Šerý, Omar; Rouabah, Abdelkader; Rouabah, Leila; Khan, Naim Akhtar

    2015-11-04

    Growing number of evidences have suggested that oral fat sensing, mediated by a glycoprotein CD36 (cluster of differentiation 36), plays a significant role in the development of obesity. Indeed, a decreased expression of CD36 in some obese subjects is associated with high dietary fat intake. In the present study, we examined whether an increase in body mass index (BMI) is associated with altered oleic acid lingual detection thresholds and blood lipid profile in young Algerian teenagers (n = 165). The obese teenagers (n = 83; 14.01 ± 0.19 years; BMI z-score 2.67 ± 0.29) exhibited higher lingual detection threshold for oleic acid than lean participants (n = 82, 13.92 ± 0.23 years; BMI z-score 0.03 ± 0.0001). We also studied the association between rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and obesity. The AA and AG genotypes were more frequent in obese teenagers, whereas GG genotype was more common in lean participants. The A-allele frequency was higher in obese teenagers than that in lean children. We report that rs1761667 polymorphism of CD36 gene and oro-gustatory thresholds for fat might play a significant role in the development of obesity in young teenagers.

  13. Study of biochemical parameters of CD36 protein and effect of RNA interference on its function

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zídková, J.; Kontrová, K.; Sajdok, J.; Káš, J.; Mikulík, Karel; Pěknicová, Jana; Zídek, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2006), s. 203-203 ISSN 1567-5688 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cd36 protein * spontaneously hypertensive rat * metabolic disorders Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.875, year: 2006

  14. Circulating CD36+ microparticles are not altered by docosahexaenoic or eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, M; Thorne, R F; Alkhatatbeh, M J; Garg, M L; Lincz, L F

    2016-03-01

    Circulating microparticles (MP) are the source of a plasma derived form of the scavenger receptor CD36, termed soluble (s)CD36, the levels of which correlate with markers of atherosclerosis and risk of cardiovascular disease. Long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have cardioprotective effects that we have previously reported to be gender specific. The aim of this study was to determine if dietary docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and/or eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) supplementation affect circulating CD36 + MP levels, and if this occurs differentially in healthy men and women. Participants (43M, 51F) aged 39.6 ± 1.7 years received 4 weeks of daily supplementation with DHA rich (200 mg EPA; 1000 mg DHA), EPA rich (1000 mg EPA; 200 mg DHA), or placebo (sunola) oil in a double-blinded, randomised, placebo controlled trial. Plasma CD36 + MP were enumerated by flow cytometry and differences between genders and treatments were evaluated by Student's or paired t-test and one way ANOVA. Males and females had similar levels of CD36 + MP at baseline (mean = 1018 ± 325 vs 980 ± 318; p = 0.577) and these were not significantly changed after DHA (M, p = 0.571; F, p = 0.444) or EPA (M, p = 0.361; F, p = 0.901) supplementation. Likewise, the overall percent change in these levels were not different between supplemented cohorts compared to placebo when all participants were combined (% change in CD36 + MP: DHA = 5.7 ± 37.5, EPA = -3.4 ± 35.4, placebo = -11.5 ± 32.9; p = 0.158) or stratified by gender (M, DHA = -2.6 ± 30.6, EPA = -15.1 ± 20.1, placebo = -21.4 ± 28.7, p = 0.187; F, DHA = 11.7 ± 41.5, EPA = 6.8 ± 42.9, placebo = -2.8 ± 34.7, p = 0.552). The cardioprotective effects of DHA and EPA do not act through a CD36 + MP mechanism. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by

  15. Cathelicidin suppresses lipid accumulation and hepatic steatosis by inhibition of the CD36 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Deanna Hoang-Yen; Tran, Diana Hoang-Ngoc; Mattai, S. Anjani; Sallam, Tamer; Ortiz, Christina; Lee, Elaine C.; Robbins, Lori; Ho, Samantha; Lee, Jung Eun; Fisseha, Elizabeth; Shieh, Christine; Sideri, Aristea; Shih, David Q; Fleshner, Philip; McGovern, Dermot PB; Vu, Michelle; Hing, Tressia C.; Bakirtzi, Kyriaki; Cheng, Michelle; Su, Bowei; Law, Ivy; Karagiannides, Iordanes; Targan, Stephan R.; Gallo, Richard L.; Li, Zhaoping; Koon, Hon Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obesity is a global epidemic which increases the risk of the metabolic syndrome. Cathelicidin (LL-37 and mCRAMP) is an antimicrobial peptide with an unknown role in obesity. We hypothesize that cathelicidin expression correlates with obesity and modulates fat mass and hepatic steatosis. Materials and Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a high-fat diet. Streptozotocin was injected into mice to induce diabetes. Experimental groups were injected with cathelicidin and CD36 overexpressing lentiviruses. Human mesenteric fat adipocytes, mouse 3T3-L1 differentiated adipocytes, and human HepG2 hepatocytes were used in the in vitro experiments. Cathelicidin levels in non-diabetic, prediabetic, and Type II diabetic patients were measured by ELISA. Results Lentiviral cathelicidin overexpression reduced hepatic steatosis and decreased the fat mass of high-fat diet-treated diabetic mice. Cathelicidin overexpression reduced mesenteric fat and hepatic fatty acid translocase (CD36) expression that was reversed by lentiviral CD36 overexpression. Exposure of adipocytes and hepatocytes to cathelicidin significantly inhibited CD36 expression and reduced lipid accumulation. Serum cathelicidin protein levels were significantly increased in non-diabetic and prediabetic patients with obesity, compared to non-diabetic patients with normal body mass index (BMI) values. Prediabetic patients had lower serum cathelicidin protein levels than non-diabetic subjects. Conclusions Cathelicidin inhibits the CD36 fat receptor and lipid accumulation in adipocytes and hepatocytes, leading to a reduction of fat mass and hepatic steatosis in vivo. Circulating cathelicidin levels are associated with increased BMI. Our results demonstrate that cathelicidin modulates the development of obesity. PMID:27163748

  16. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Ling, Z.Y.; Deng, S.B.; Du, H.A.; Yin, Y.H.; Yuan, J.; She, Q.; Chen, Y.Q.

    2014-01-01

    Associations between polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease (CHD) are not clear. We assessed allele frequencies and genotype distributions of CD36 gene polymorphisms in 112 CHD patients and 129 control patients using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Additionally, we detected CD36 mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR, and we quantified plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There were no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05) in allele frequencies of rs1761667 or in genotype distribution and allele frequencies of rs3173798. The genotype distribution of rs1761667 significantly differed between CHD patients and controls (P=0.034), with a significantly higher frequency of the AG genotype in the CHD group compared to the control group (P=0.011). The plasma levels of ox-LDL in patients with the AG genotype were remarkably higher than those with the GG and AA genotypes (P=0.010). In a randomized sample taken from patients in the two groups, the CD36 mRNA expression of the CHD patients was higher than that of the controls. In CHD patients, the CD36 mRNA expression in AG genotype patients was remarkably higher than in those with an AA genotype (P=0.005). After adjusted logistic regression analysis, the AG genotype of rs1761667 was associated with an increased risk of CHD (OR=2.337, 95% CI=1.336-4.087, P=0.003). In conclusion, the rs1761667 polymorphism may be closely associated with developing CHD in the Chongqing Han population of China, and an AG genotype may be a genetic susceptibility factor for CHD

  17. Associations between CD36 gene polymorphisms and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Ling, Z.Y.; Deng, S.B.; Du, H.A.; Yin, Y.H.; Yuan, J.; She, Q.; Chen, Y.Q. [Department of Cardiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2014-08-08

    Associations between polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and susceptibility to coronary artery heart disease (CHD) are not clear. We assessed allele frequencies and genotype distributions of CD36 gene polymorphisms in 112 CHD patients and 129 control patients using semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Additionally, we detected CD36 mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR, and we quantified plasma levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There were no significant differences between the two groups (P>0.05) in allele frequencies of rs1761667 or in genotype distribution and allele frequencies of rs3173798. The genotype distribution of rs1761667 significantly differed between CHD patients and controls (P=0.034), with a significantly higher frequency of the AG genotype in the CHD group compared to the control group (P=0.011). The plasma levels of ox-LDL in patients with the AG genotype were remarkably higher than those with the GG and AA genotypes (P=0.010). In a randomized sample taken from patients in the two groups, the CD36 mRNA expression of the CHD patients was higher than that of the controls. In CHD patients, the CD36 mRNA expression in AG genotype patients was remarkably higher than in those with an AA genotype (P=0.005). After adjusted logistic regression analysis, the AG genotype of rs1761667 was associated with an increased risk of CHD (OR=2.337, 95% CI=1.336-4.087, P=0.003). In conclusion, the rs1761667 polymorphism may be closely associated with developing CHD in the Chongqing Han population of China, and an AG genotype may be a genetic susceptibility factor for CHD.

  18. CD36 is essential for regulation of the host innate response to Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin-mediated dermonecrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Moriah J.; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) in the USA. Alpha-hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. Here we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36−/− mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared to CD36+/+ (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36−/− mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36+/+, but not CD36−/−, macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36+/+ macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:26223653

  19. Rac1-NADPH oxidase signaling promotes CD36 activation under glucotoxic conditions in pancreatic beta cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elumalai, Suma; Karunakaran, Udayakumar; Lee, In Kyu; Moon, Jun Sung; Won, Kyu Chang

    2017-04-01

    We recently reported that cluster determinant 36 (CD36), a fatty acid transporter, plays a pivotal role in glucotoxicity-induced β-cell dysfunction. However, little is known about how glucotoxicity influences CD36 expression. Emerging evidence suggests that the small GTPase Rac1 is involved in the pathogenesis of beta cell dysfunction in type 2 diabetes (T2D). The primary objective of the current study was to determine the role of Rac1 in CD36 activation and its impact on β-cell dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. To address this question, we subjected INS-1 cells and human beta cells (1.1B4) to high glucose conditions (30mM) in the presence or absence of Rac1 inhibition either by NSC23766 (Rac1 GTPase inhibitor) or small interfering RNA. High glucose exposure in INS-1 and human beta cells (1.1b4) resulted in the activation of Rac1 and induced cell apoptosis. Rac1 activation mediates NADPH oxidase (NOX) activation leading to elevated ROS production in both cells. Activation of the Rac1-NOX complex by high glucose levels enhanced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. The inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 inhibited NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation induced by high glucose concentrations in INS-1 & human 1.1b4 beta cells. Inhibition of Rac1-NOX complex activation by NSC23766 significantly reduced CD36 expression in INS-1 and human 1.1b4 beta cell membrane fractions. In addition, Rac1 inhibition by NSC23766 significantly reduced high glucose-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibition by VAS2870 also attenuated high glucose-induced ROS generation and cell apoptosis. These results suggest that Rac1-NADPH oxidase dependent CD36 expression contributes to high glucose-induced beta cell dysfunction and cell death. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflammatory stress increases hepatic CD36 translational efficiency via activation of the mTOR signalling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Wang

    Full Text Available Inflammatory stress is an independent risk factor for the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. Although CD36 is known to facilitate long-chain fatty acid uptake and contributes to NAFLD progression, the mechanisms that link inflammatory stress to hepatic CD36 expression and steatosis remain unclear. As the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signalling pathway is involved in CD36 translational activation, this study was undertaken to investigate whether inflammatory stress enhances hepatic CD36 expression via mTOR signalling pathway and the underlying mechanisms. To induce inflammatory stress, we used tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 stimulation of the human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells in vitro and casein injection in C57BL/6J mice in vivo. The data showed that inflammatory stress increased hepatic CD36 protein levels but had no effect on mRNA expression. A protein degradation assay revealed that CD36 protein stability was not different between HepG2 cells treated with or without TNF-α or IL-6. A polysomal analysis indicated that CD36 translational efficiency was significantly increased by inflammatory stress. Additionally, inflammatory stress enhanced the phosphorylation of mTOR and its downstream translational regulators including p70S6K, 4E-BP1 and eIF4E. Rapamycin, an mTOR-specific inhibitor, reduced the phosphorylation of mTOR signalling pathway and decreased the CD36 translational efficiency and protein level even under inflammatory stress resulting in the alleviation of inflammatory stress-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. This study demonstrates that the activation of the mTOR signalling pathway increases hepatic CD36 translational efficiency, resulting in increased CD36 protein expression under inflammatory stress.

  1. CD36 abnormality and impaired myocardial long-chain fatty acid uptake in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Fumio; Tanaka, Takao; Sohmiya, Koichi; Kawamura, Keishiro [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    In this study, in order to discover the relationship between hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and the CD36 molecular abnormality, the expression level of platelet CD36 and CD36 cDNA in 55 HCM patients was analyzed. Twelve patients showed negligible (<5%) CD36 expression on their platelets. Among them, one was found to be homozygous for the C-478{yields}T substitution and 6 were heterozygous for the C-478{yields}T substitution. In 9 patients, CD36 was expressed by less than 50% of the platelets. One of them was found to be heterozygous for the C-478{yields}T substitution. Two other patients were also found to be heterozygous for this point mutation, although their platelets expressed CD36. Thus, 23 out of 55 (41.8%) HCM patients had negligible (<5%) or reduced (<50%) levels of CD36 expression on platelets, or had a point mutation of CD36 cDNA. These 55 HCM patients were also evaluated with myocardial scintigraphy both for long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) uptake and perfusion, which showed a moderate to severe discrepancy between myocardial LCFA accumulation and myocardial perfusion in 95.5% of the patients (21/23). On the other hand, 70% of the patients with normal (>90%) CD36 expression (14/20) did not show any severe discrepancies between myocardial LCFA accumulation and myocardial perfusion. These data could suggest that abnormal myocardial LCFA metabolism seen in HCM patients may be related to abnormality of the CD36 molecule, and that abnormalities of this molecule may be linked to the cause of some types of HCM. (K.H.)

  2. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 enhances myocardial adenylyl cyclase signaling in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klevstig, M.; Manakov, D.; Kašparová, D.; Brabcová, I.; Papoušek, František; Žurmanová, J.; Zídek, Václav; Šilhavý, Jan; Neckář, Jan; Pravenec, Michal; Kolář, František; Nováková, O.; Novotný, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 10 (2013), s. 1477-1486 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0505 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR rats * Cd36 * heart * beta-Adrenergic receptors * Adenylyl cyclase * Protein kinase A Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.073, year: 2013

  3. Transgenic rescue of defective Cd36 ameliorates insulin resistance in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Musilová, Alena; Křen, Vladimír; Kazdová, L.; Aitman, T. J.; Glazier, A. M.; Ibrahimi, A.; Abumrad, N. A.; Qi, N.; Wang, J. M.; St.Lezin, E. M.; Kurtz, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 2 (2001), s. 156-158 ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/00/1636; GA ČR GV204/98/K015; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 (fatty acid transporter) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 29.600, year: 2001

  4. The Natural Compound Dansameum Reduces foam Cell Formation by Downregulating CD36 and Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor-gamma; Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kang-Seo; Ahn, Sang Hyun; Lee, Kang Pa; Park, Sun-Young; Cheon, Jin Hong; Choi, Jun-Yong; Kim, Kibong

    2018-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-induced vascular disorders are major causes of death in most western countries. During the development of atherosclerotic lesions, foam cell formation is essential and formed through the expression of CD36 and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ). To investigate whether dansameum extract (DSE) could show anti-atherosclerotic effect through down-regulating cellular redox state including CD36 and PARP-γ expression in oxidative low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL)-treated RAW264.7 cells and on differentiated foam cells in ApoE Knockout (ApoE-/-) mice. The Korean polyherbal medicine DSE was prepared from three plants in the following proportions: 40 g of Salvia miltiorrhiza root, 4 g of Amomumxanthioides fruit, and 4 g of Santalum album lignum. The immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used for analysis of protein and mRNA involved in foam cell formation. We first showed that effects of DSE on foam cell formation in both oxLDL-induced RAW264.7 cells and in blood vessels from apolipoprotein E deficientApoE-/- mice with high fat diet-fed. DSE treatment significantly reduced the expression of CD36 and PPAR-γ in oxLDL-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and ApoE-/-mice, in the latter case by regulating heme oxygenase-1. Furthermore, DSE treatment also reduced cellular lipid content in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our data suggest that DSE may have anti-atherosclerotic properties through regulating foam cell formation. Dansameum extract (DSE) Regulates the expression of CD36 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in oxidative low-density lipoprotein-stimulated RAW264.7 Cells and ApoE Knockout (ApoE Knockout [ApoE-/-]) miceDSE Regulates Cholesterol Levels in the Serum of ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) miceDSE Reduced the Formation of Foam Cells by Regulating heme oxygenase-1 in ApoE-/- mice with high fat diet-fed. Abbreviations used: DSE: Dansameum extract, PPAR-γ: Peroxisome proliferator

  5. Unsaturated long-chain fatty acids inhibit the binding of oxidized low-density lipoproteins to a model CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Marie; Kozai, Yuki; Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Matsuno, Yukari; Fujioka, Maiko; Kamei, Kozue; Inagaki, Hitomi; Eguchi, Ai; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Transmembrane protein CD36 binds multiple ligands, including oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDLs) and long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs). Our aim was to determine whether LCFAs compete with oxLDLs for binding to CD36. We addressed this issue by examining the inhibitory effect of LCFAs against the binding of Alexa-fluor-labeled oxLDLs (AFL-oxLDL) to a synthetic peptide representing the oxLDL-binding site on CD36 (3S-CD36₁₅₀₋₁₆₈). All of the unsaturated LCFAs tested, inhibited the binding of AFL-oxLDL to 3S-CD36₁₅₀₋₁₆₈, albeit to varying degrees. For instance, the concentrations required for 50% inhibition of binding for oleic, linoleic, and α-linolenic acids were 0.25, 0.97, and 1.2 mM, respectively. None of the saturated LCFAs tested (e.g. stearic acid) exhibited inhibitory effects. These results suggest that at least unsaturated LCFAs can compete with oxLDLs for binding to CD36. The study also provides information on the structural requirements of LCFAs for inhibition of oxLDLs-CD36 binding.

  6. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) in the pigeon (Columba livia domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, P; Zhang, A T; Wang, C; Azzam, M M M; Zou, X T

    2012-07-01

    Fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that plays an important role in transporting long-chain fatty acids. In the current study, a full-length cDNA of FAT/CD36 was first cloned from the intestine of White King pigeon by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The full-length cDNA of pigeon FAT/CD36 was 2,282 bp, including a 5'-untranslated region of 224 bp, a 3'-untranslated region of 642 bp, and an open reading frame of 1,416 bp encoding a protein of 471 amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 52.7 kDa. Sequence comparison indicated that FAT/CD36 of pigeon had high identity with other avian FAT/CD36. Using quantitative real-time PCR, expression of FAT/CD36 was the greatest in the duodenum at 28 d posthatch, and in the jejunum, the expression of FAT/CD36 at 14 d posthatch was greater than at 8 d but the same as 28 d posthatch. However, in the ileum, expression of FAT/CD36 peaked at embryonic d 15 and 8 d posthatch. The effects of long-chain fatty acids on pigeon FAT/CD36 and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) mRNA expression were also investigated in vitro. It showed that a low concentration (5 μM) of oleic acid, palmitic acid, and linoleic acid can significantly increase FAT/CD36 and PPARγ mRNA level in pigeon jejunum. However, for linolenic acid or arachidonic acid, the induction of both gene expressions needed a higher concentration (50 μM or 250 μM). Two hundred and 50 μM palmitic acid was shown to suppress FAT/CD36 gene expression. The results suggest that FAT/CD36 may be a representative of intestine development in pigeon, and it could be regulated by long-chain fatty acids via PPARγ pathway.

  7. Circulating soluble CD36 is a novel marker of liver injury in subjects with altered glucose tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Real, Jose-Manuel; Handberg, Aase; Ortega, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    ) and indicators of liver health. We evaluated a cohort of men from the general population (n=117). As expected, serum (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) were associated positively with body mass index (BMI) and age and negatively with SI (minimal model method). Circulating...... sCD36 was positively associated with ALT, AST and GGT in subjects with altered glucose tolerance, but not in those with normal glucose tolerance. The difference in the slope of the relationships was significant (P=.01). Age, BMI and triglycerides (but not sCD36) contributed independently to 29......% of ALT variance in subjects with normal glucose tolerance. In contrast, SI and sCD36 contributed independently to 39% of ALT variance in subjects with altered glucose tolerance. The correlation between ALT activity and sCD36 was confirmed in an independent, replication study. In summary, circulating s...

  8. Phytosterol-enriched yogurt increases LDL affinity and reduces CD36 expression in polygenic hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiu, Gianluca; Pinach, Silvia; Veglia, Fabrizio; Gambino, Roberto; Marena, Saverio; Uberti, Barbara; Alemanno, Natalina; Burt, Davina; Pagano, Gianfranco; Cassader, Maurizio

    2009-02-01

    Dietary enrichment with phytosterols (plant sterols similar to cholesterol) is able to reduce plasma cholesterol levels due to reduced intestinal absorption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of phytosterol-enriched yogurt consumption on the major serum lipid parameters, low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor activity, LDL-receptor affinity, and CD36 expression in hypercholesterolemic subjects. Fifteen patients affected by polygenic hypercholesterolemia were evaluated in a single-blind randomized crossover study after a 4 weeks treatment with a phytosterol-enriched yogurt containing 1.6 g esterefied phytosterols (equivalent to 1.0 g free phytosterol). Lipid parameters were compared with a phytosterol-free placebo-controlled diet. The effect of the two treatments on each variable, measured as percentage change, was compared by paired samples t test and covariance analysis. The treatment induced a modest but significant decrease in LDL-cholesterol levels (4.3%, P = 0.03) and a significant increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL) 3-cholesterol (17.1%, P = 0.01). Phytosterol consumption had no effect on LDL-receptor activity whereas patient LDL-receptor affinity significantly increased (9.7%, P = 0.01) and CD36 expression showed a marked significant decrease (18.2%, P = 0.01) in the phytosterol-enriched yoghurt patients. Our data show that the oral administration of a phytosterol-enriched yogurt has modest but significant effects on commonly measured lipid parameters. The improvement of LDL-receptor affinity and the reduction in CD36 expression may reflect an important antiatherogenic effect.

  9. Hepatic fat accumulation and regulation of FAT/CD36: an effect of hepatic irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martius, Gesa; Alwahsh, Salamah Mohammad; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans; Ramadori, Giuliano; Malik, Ihtzaz Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Irradiation is known to induce inflammation and affect fat metabolic pathways. The current study investigates hepatic fat accumulation and fatty acid transportation in a rat model of single dose liver irradiation (25-Gy). Rat livers were selectively irradiated in-vivo (25-Gy), sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Hepatic lipids were studied by colorimetric assays in liver and serum. Intracellular lipids, protein and mRNA were studied by Nile red staining, immunohistology, Western Blot analysis and RT-PCR in liver, respectively. Changes in FAT/CD36 expression were studied in-vitro in a human monocyte cell line U937 after irradiation in presence or absence of infliximab (IFX). Nile Red staining of liver cryosections showed a quick (12-48 h) increase in fat droplets. Accordingly, hepatic triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) were elevated. An early increase (3-6 h) in the serum level of HDL-C, TG and cholesterol was measured after single dose irradiation followed by a decrease thereafter. Furthermore, expression of the fat transporter protein FAT/CD36 was increased, immunohistochemistry revealed basolateral and cytoplasmic expression in hepatocytes. Moreover, apolipoprotein-B100, -C3 and enzymes (acetyl-CoA carboxylase, lipoprotein-lipase, carnitine-palmitoyltransferase, malonyl-CoA-decarboxylase) involved in fat metabolism were induced at 12-24 h. Early activation of the NFkβ pathway (IκBα) by TNF-α was seen, followed by a significant elevation of serum markers for liver damage (AST and GLDH). TNF-α blockage by anti-TNF-α in cell culture (U937) prevented the increase of FAT/CD36 caused by irradiation. Selective liver irradiation is a model for rapid induction of steatosis hepatis and fat accumulation could be triggered by irradiation-induced inflammatory mediators (e.g. TNF-α). PMID:25197426

  10. Simvastatin Promotes Hematoma Absorption and Reduces Hydrocephalus Following Intraventricular Hemorrhage in Part by Upregulating CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianwei; Shi, Xia; Tan, Qiang; Feng, Zhou; Wang, Yuelong; Yuan, Qiaoying; Tao, Yihao; Zhang, Jianbo; Tan, Liang; Zhu, Gang; Feng, Hua; Chen, Zhi

    2017-08-01

    We previously found that hematoma worsens hydrocephalus after intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) via increasing iron deposition and aggravating ependymal cilia injury; therefore, promoting hematoma absorption may be a promising strategy for IVH. Recently, some investigations imply that simvastatin has the ability of accelerating hematoma absorption. Thus, this study was designed to examine the efficacy of simvastatin for IVH in rats. Intracerebral hemorrhage with ventricular extension was induced in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after autologous blood injection. Simvastatin or vehicle was administered orally at 1 day after IVH and then daily for 1 week. MRI studies were performed to measure the volumes of intracranial hematoma and lateral ventricle at days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after IVH. Motor and neurocognitive functions were assessed at days 1 to 7 and 23 to 28, respectively. Iron deposition, iron-related protein expression, ependymal damage, and histology were detected at day 28. Expression of CD36 scavenger receptor (facilitating phagocytosis) was examined at day 3 after IVH using western blotting and immunofluorescence. Simvastatin significantly increased hematoma absorption ratio, reduced ventricular volume, and attenuated neurological dysfunction post-IVH. In addition, less iron accumulation and more cilia survival was observed in the simvastatin group when compared with the control. What's more, higher expression of CD36 was detected around the hematoma after simvastatin administration. Simvastatin significantly enhanced brain hematoma absorption, alleviated hydrocephalus, and improved neurological recovery after experimental IVH, which may in part by upregulating CD36 expression. Our data suggest that early simvastatin use may be a novel therapy for IVH patients.

  11. A new leptin-mediated mechanism for stimulating fatty acid oxidation: a pivotal role for sarcolemmal FAT/CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momken, Iman; Chabowski, Adrian; Dirkx, Ellen; Nabben, Miranda; Jain, Swati S; McFarlan, Jay T; Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P; Bonen, Arend

    2017-01-01

    Leptin stimulates fatty acid oxidation in muscle and heart; but, the mechanism by which these tissues provide additional intracellular fatty acids for their oxidation remains unknown. We examined, in isolated muscle and cardiac myocytes, whether leptin, via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, stimulated fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36)-mediated fatty acid uptake to enhance fatty acid oxidation. In both mouse skeletal muscle and rat cardiomyocytes, leptin increased fatty acid oxidation, an effect that was blocked when AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside or Compound C. In wild-type mice, leptin induced the translocation of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane and increased fatty acid uptake into giant sarcolemmal vesicles and into cardiomyocytes. In muscles of FAT/CD36-KO mice, and in cardiomyocytes in which cell surface FAT/CD36 action was blocked by sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate, the leptin-stimulated influx of fatty acids was inhibited; concomitantly, the normal leptin-stimulated increase in fatty acid oxidation was also prevented, despite the normal leptin-induced increase in AMPK phosphorylation. Conversely, in muscle of AMPK kinase-dead mice, leptin failed to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36, along with a failure to stimulate fatty acid uptake and oxidation. Similarly, when siRNA was used to reduce AMPK in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, leptin failed to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36. Our studies have revealed a novel mechanism of leptin-induced fatty acid oxidation in muscle tissue; namely, this process is dependent on the activation of AMPK to induce the translocation of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane, thereby stimulating fatty acid uptake. Without increasing this leptin-stimulated, FAT/CD36-dependent fatty acid uptake process, leptin-stimulated AMPK phosphorylation does not enhance fatty acid oxidation. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Genetics of Cd36 and the clustering of multiple cardiovascular risk factors in spontaneous hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Šimáková, Miroslava; Křen, Vladimír; Křenová, D.; Horký, K.; Jáchymová, M.; Míková, B.; Kazdová, L.; Aitman, T. J.; Churchill, P. C.; Webb, R. C.; Hingarh, N. H.; Yang, Y.; Wang, J. M.; St.Lezin, E. M.; Kurtz, W. T.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 12 (1999), s. 1651-1657 ISSN 0021-9738 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA306/97/0521; GA ČR GV204/98/K015 Grant - others:NIH(US) ROI HL-56028; NIH(US) PO1 HL-35018; NIH(US) HL-18575 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 * cardiovascular risk factors * spontaneous hypertension Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.921, year: 1999

  13. CD36 mediates the phagocytosis of Plasmodium falciparuminfected erythrocytes by rodent macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Patel, S. N.; Serghides, L.; Smith, T. G.; Febbraio, M.; Silverstein, R. L.; Kurtz, T. W.; Pravenec, Michal; Kain, K. C.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 189, č. 2 (2004), s. 204-213 ISSN 0022-1899 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:CIHR(CA) MT-13721; Ontario Ministry of Health(CA) Career Scientist award; CIHR(CA) Canada Research Chair; Department of Medicine(CA) Studentship; Canadian Blood Services(CA) Fellowship Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : CD36 * plasmodium falciparum * SHR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.943, year: 2004

  14. Circulating sCD36 is associated with unhealthy fat distribution and elevated circulating triglycerides in morbidly obese individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knøsgaard, L; Thomsen, S B; Støckel, M

    2014-01-01

    with the metabolic syndrome had a higher LF% and higher levels of the inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 (P=0.003 and P=0.014) as well as a tendency towards higher levels of sCD36. CONCLUSION: sCD36 was reduced by weight loss and associated with an unhealthy fat accumulation and circulating triglycerides, which support......BACKGROUND: The recently identified circulating sCD36 has been proposed to reflect tissue CD36 expression, and is upregulated in case of obesity, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of weight loss secondary to bariatric surgery in relation to s......CD36 among morbidly obese individuals. Furthermore, we investigated the levels of sCD36 in relation to obesity-related metabolic complications, low-grade inflammation and fat distribution. METHODS: Twenty morbidly obese individuals (body mass index (BMI) 43.0±5.4 kg m(-2)) with a referral to Roux...

  15. Immunohistochemical analysis of CD31, CD36, and CD44 antigens in human omentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ayse; Akkus, Murat; Nergiz, Yusuf; Yuruker, Sinan

    2004-03-01

    Milky spots in the human omental tissue are known to be consisting of lymphocytes, macrophages and mast cells. Our goal was to evaluate the relationship of lymphoid cells and macrophages with vasculature and stromal components. In this study we examined the biopsy specimens obtained from the adult patients whom were operated for different purposes in the General Surgery Department of Dicle University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. We used CD31 as an endothelial cell marker, CD36 which is known to react with microvascular endothelium and adipocytes, and CD44 which is a hyaluronic acid receptor using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. We observed that CD31 was mainly reactive with vascular endothelial cells and platelets, CD36 was reactive with microvascular endothelium and adipocytes and CD44 was mainly expressed by the endothelial cells of high endothelial venules, fibroblasts in stromal compartments and by large mononuclear cells. We determined the structural and immunophenotypic features of omental lymphoid tissue components stressing vascular and stromal elements, and we briefly discussed the significance of the expression of these molecules in the determined locations.

  16. Receptor of advanced glycation end products (RAGE) positively regulates CD36 expression and reactive oxygen species production in human monocytes in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthis, A; Hatzitolios, A; Fidani, S; Befani, C; Giannakoulas, G; Koliakos, G

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) engagement of a monocyte surface receptor (RAGE) induces atherosclerosis. AGEs also act as CD36 ligands. We studied reactive oxygen species (ROS) and CD36 expression after siRNA inhibition of RAGE expression in human monocytes. We isolated monocytes from: a) 10 type 2 diabetics, and b) 5 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. CD36 expression and ROS production were evaluated before and after RAGE knockdown. After incubation of monocytes with AGE + bovine serum albumin (BSA), CD36 expression and intracellular ROS increased significantly in all groups. In RAGE-knockdown monocytes, AGE-induced CD36 expression and ROS generation were also significantly inhibited. Blocking RAGE expression using siRNA in human monocytes led to a significant inhibition of CD36 expression and ROS production, suggesting a positive interaction between RAGE, CD36 expression and ROS generation in monocytes.

  17. FAT/CD36 is localized in sarcolemma and in vesicle-like structures in subsarcolemma regions but not in mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Jacob; Mogensen, Martin; Prats, Clara

    2010-01-01

    was performed on single muscle fibers dissected from soleus muscle of lean and obese Zucker rats and from the vastus lateralis muscle from humans. Co-staining against FAT/CD36 and MitoNEET clearly show that FAT/CD36 is highly present in sarcolemma and it also associates with some vesicle-like intracellular...... compartments. However, FAT/CD36 protein was not detected in mitochondrial membranes, supporting the biochemical findings. Based on the presented data FAT/CD36 seems to be abundantly expressed in sarcolemma and in vesicle-like structure throughout the muscle cell. However, FAT/CD36 was not present......The primary aim of the present study was to investigate in which cellular compartments FAT/CD36 is localized. Intact and fully functional skeletal muscle mitochondria were isolated from lean and obese female Zucker rats and from 10 healthy male individuals. FAT/CD36 could not be detected...

  18. L-arginine:glycine amidinotransferase deficiency protects from metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choe, C.U.; Nabuurs, C.I.H.C.; Stockebrand, M.C.; Neu, A.; Nunes, P.M.; Morellini, F.; Sauter, K.; Schillemeit, S.; Hermans-Borgmeyer, I.; Marescau, B.; Heerschap, A.; Isbrandt, D.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated creatine (Cr) serves as an energy buffer for ATP replenishment in organs with highly fluctuating energy demand. The central role of Cr in the brain and muscle is emphasized by severe neurometabolic disorders caused by Cr deficiency. Common symptoms of inborn errors of creatine

  19. Identification of renal Cd36 as a determinant of blood pressure and risk for hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Churchill, P. C.; Churchill, M. C.; Vyklický, O.; Kazdová, L.; Aitman, T. J.; Petretto, E.; Hubner, N.; Wallace, C. A.; Zimdahl, H.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Dunbar, J.; Bidani, A.; Griffin, K.; Qi, N.; Maxová, M.; Křen, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 8 (2008), s. 952-954 ISSN 1061-4036 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8545; GA MZd(CZ) NR8495; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME791; GA MZd(CZ) NR9359; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110604; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55005624; EC(XE) LSHG-CT-2005-019015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : spontaneously hypertensive rat * Cd36 * hypertension Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 30.259, year: 2008

  20. Fatty acid translocase gene CD36 rs1527483 variant influences oral fat perception in Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hing-Huat; Tan, Yen-Nee; Say, Yee-How

    2017-01-01

    We determined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1761667 and rs1527483) in the fatty acid translocase CD36 gene - a receptor for fatty acids - is associated with oral fat perception (OFP) of different fat contents in custards and commercially-available foods, and obesity measures in Malaysian subjects (n=313; 118 males, 293 ethnic Chinese; 20 ethnic Indians). A 170-mm visual analogue scale was used to assess the ratings of perceived fat content, oiliness and creaminess of 0%, 2%, 6% and 10% fat content-by-weight custards and low-fat/regular versions of commercially-available milk, mayonnaise and cream crackers. Overall, the subjects managed to significantly discriminate the fat content, oiliness and creaminess between low-fat/regular versions of milk and mayonnaise. Females rated the perception of fat content and oiliness of both milks higher, but ethnicity, obesity and adiposity status did not seem to play a role in influencing most of OFP. The overall minor allele frequencies for rs1761667 and rs1527483 were 0.30 and 0.26, respectively. Females and individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype significantly perceived greater creaminess of 10% fat-by-weight custard. Also, individuals with rs1527483 TT genotype and T allele significantly perceived greater fat content of cream crackers, independent of fat concentration. rs1761667 SNP did not significantly affect OFP, except for cream crackers. Both gene variants were also not associated with obesity measures. Taken together, this study supports the notion that CD36 - specifically rs1527483, plays a role in OFP, but not in influencing obesity in Malaysian subjects. Besides, gender is an important factor for OFP, where females had higher sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Soluble CD36 and risk markers of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis are elevated in polycystic ovary syndrome and significantly reduced during pioglitazone treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the relation between soluble CD36 (sCD36), risk markers of atherosclerosis and body composition, and glucose and lipid metabolism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Research Design and Methods: Thirty PCOS patients were randomized to pioglitazone, 30 mg/day or placebo...... independent predictors of glucose, and lipid metabolism, whereas hsCRP and IL-6 showed no significant contribution. Following pioglitazone treatment, insulin sensitivity increased, whereas sCD36 (3.21(0.76 - 13.6) vs. 2.33 (0.84 - 6.46) relative units) and hsCRP decreased (p... measured in body composition. Conclusions: sCD36 and oxLDL correlated with measures of insulin sensitivity independent of central fat mass. Pioglitazone treatment reduced sCD36 while improving insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism, further supporting the association between sCD36 and insulin resistance...

  2. Increased hepatic CD36 expression with age is associated with enhanced susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheedfar, Fareeba; Sung, Miranda My; Aparicio-Vergara, Marcela; Kloosterhuis, Niels J; Miquilena-Colina, Maria Eugenia; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Febbraio, Maria; Jacobs, René L; de Bruin, Alain|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304837261; Vinciguerra, Manlio; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Hofker, Marten H; Dyck, Jason Rb; Koonen, Debby P Y

    CD36 has been associated with obesity and diabetes in human liver diseases, however, its role in age-associated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is unknown. Therefore, liver biopsies were collected from individuals with histologically normal livers (n=30), and from patients diagnosed with

  3. miR-758-5p regulates cholesterol uptake via targeting the CD36 3'UTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Rong; Xia, Lin-Qin; Liu, Jing; Liao, Lin-Ling; Zhang, Yang; Deng, Min; Zhong, Hui-Juan; Feng, Ting-Ting; He, Ping-Ping; Ouyang, Xin-Ping

    2017-12-09

    miR-758-3p plays an important role via regulting ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism of miR-758-5p in cholesterol metabolism is still unclear. Here, we revealed that miR-758-5p decreased total cholesterol accumulation in THP-1 macrophage derived foam cells through markedly reducing cholesterol uptake, and no effect on the cholesterol efflux. Interestingly, computational analysis suggests that CD36 may be a target gene of miR-758-5p. Our study further demonstrated that miR-758-5p decreased CD36 expression at both protein and mRNA levels via targeting the CD36 3'UTR in THP-1 macrophage derived foam cells. The present present study concluded that miR-758-5p decreases lipid accumulation of foam cell via regulating CD36-mediated the cholesterol uptake. Therefore, targeting miR-758-5p may offer a promising strategy to treat atherosclerotic vascular disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Blocking Wnt5a signaling decreases CD36 expression and foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Ian; Szymanski, Candice; Duckett, K Jordan; Consitt, Leslie A; Silver, Mitchell J; Malgor, Ramiro

    2018-02-20

    Wnt5a is a highly studied member of the Wnt family and recently has been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, but its precise role is unknown. Foam cell development is a critical process to atherosclerotic plaque formation. In the present study, we investigated the role of noncanonical Wnt5a signaling in the development of foam cells. Human carotid atherosclerotic tissue and THP-1-derived macrophages were used to investigate the contribution of Wnt5a signaling in the formation of foam cells. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate protein expression of scavenger receptors and noncanonical Wnt5a receptors [frizzled 5 (Fz5) and receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (Ror2)] in human atherosclerotic macrophages/foam cells. Changes in protein expression in response to Wnt5a stimulation/inhibition were determined by Western blot, and lipid accumulation was evaluated by fluorescent lipid droplet staining. Wnt5a (Pfoam cells within the plaque. In vitro studies revealed that Wnt5a significantly increased the expression of the lipid uptake receptor CD36 (P.05). rWnt5a also significantly increased lipid accumulation in THP-1 macrophages (Pfoam cells. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Parvovirus B19 integration into human CD36+ erythroid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janovitz, Tyler; Wong, Susan; Young, Neal S; Oliveira, Thiago; Falck-Pedersen, Erik

    2017-11-01

    The pathogenic autonomous human parvovirus B19 (B19V) productively infects erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs). Functional similarities between B19V nonstructural protein (NS1), a DNA binding endonuclease, and the Rep proteins of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) led us to hypothesize that NS1 may facilitate targeted nicking of the human genome and B19 vDNA integration. We adapted an integration capture sequencing protocol (IC-Seq) to screen B19V infected human CD36+ EPCs for viral integrants, and discovered 40,000 unique B19V integration events distributed throughout the human genome. Computational analysis of integration patterns revealed strong correlations with gene intronic regions, H3K9me3 sites, and the identification of 41 base pair consensus sequence with an octanucleotide core motif. The octanucleotide core has homology to a single region of B19V, adjacent to the P6 promoter TATA box. We present the first direct evidence that B19V infection of erythroid progenitor cells disrupts the human genome and facilitates viral DNA integration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. From fat to FAT (CD36/SR-B2): Understanding the regulation of cellular fatty acid uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Jan F C; Luiken, Joost J F P

    2017-05-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular uptake of long-chain fatty acids and the regulation of this process have been elucidated in appreciable detail in the last decades. Two main players in this field, each discovered in the early 1990s, are (i) a membrane-associated protein first identified in adipose ('fat') tissue and referred to as putative fatty acid translocase (FAT)/CD36 (now officially designated as SR-B2) which facilitates the transport of fatty acids across the plasma membrane, and (ii) the family of transcription factors designated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, PPARγ, and PPARβ/δ) for which fatty acids and fatty acid metabolites are the preferred ligand. CD36/SR-B2 is the predominant membrane protein involved in fatty acid uptake into intestinal enterocytes, adipocytes and cardiac and skeletal myocytes. The rate of cellular fatty acid uptake is regulated by the subcellular vesicular recycling of CD36/SR-B2 from endosomes to the plasma membrane. Fatty acid-induced activation of PPARs results in the upregulation of the expression of genes encoding various proteins and enzymes involved in cellular fatty acid utilization. Both CD36/SR-B2 and the PPARs have been implicated in the derangements in fatty acid and lipid metabolism occurring with the development of pathophysiological conditions, such as high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and diabetic cardiomyopathy, and have been suggested as targets for metabolic intervention. In this brief review we discuss the discovery and current understanding of both CD36/SR-B2 and the PPARs in metabolic homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Circulating CD36 and fractalkine levels are associated with vulnerable plaque progression in patients with unstable angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui Jian; Yang, Ming; Li, Ji Fu; Xue, Li; Chen, Yu Guo; Chen, Wen Qiang

    2014-11-01

    The chemokine, fractalkine, independently enhances the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques. The present study investigated the combined effects of CD36 and fractalkine on coronary plaque progression in patients with unstable angina pectoris. In the present study, 120 unstable angina pectoris patients undergoing coronary angiography and intravascular ultrasound were divided into two groups: an intermediate lesion group (lumen diameter stenosis 50-70%, 80 patients) and a severe lesion group (at least one lesion with lumen diameter stenosis > 70%, 40 patients). The control group consisted of 40 healthy age- and sex-matched subjects. Concentrations of CD36 and fractalkine were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Major adverse cardiovascular events were monitored over a 2-year follow up. Intravascular ultrasound showed that patients with severe lesions had more calcified and mixed plaques, and a larger plaque area and plaque burden than patients with intermediate lesions (P < 0.05-0.01). More patients with severe lesions underwent stent deployment (P < 0.05) than those with intermediate lesions. CD36 and fractalkine concentrations were significantly higher in the severe lesion patients (P < 0.05), and both had significant positive correlations (P < 0.05) with the plaque burden of atherosclerotic lesions. Using the matched nested case-control study, we found that CD36 and fractalkine levels were higher in patients with recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events than controls (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CD36 and fractalkine both promote, and might synergistically enhance, the progression of coronary atherosclerotic plaques. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Direct association of a promoter polymorphism in the CD36/FAT fatty acid transporter gene with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corpeleijn, E.; Kallen, van der C.J.H.; Kruijshoop, M.; Magagnin, M.G.P.; Bruin, de T.W.A.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Blaak, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: The membrane-bound fatty acid transporter CD36/FAT may play a role in disturbed fatty acid handling as observed in the metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Genetic variation in the CD36 gene may contribute to the aetiology of diabetes. METHODS: A population-based cohort in

  9. Alterations in the cardiac proteome of the spontaneously hypertensive rat induced by transgenic expression of CD36

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Manakov, D.; Ujčíková, Hana; Pravenec, Michal; Novotný, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 145, Aug 11 (2016), s. 177-186 ISSN 1874-3919 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : SHR * CD36 * heart * left and right ventricles * proteomics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.914, year: 2016

  10. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic β-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic β-cells, and to examine this in relation to β-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP...

  11. Suppression of FAT/CD36 mRNA by human growth hormone in pancreatic ß-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Louise Torp; Thams, Peter Grevsen; Gaarn, Louise Winkel

    2011-01-01

    of this study was to examine the effect of human growth hormone (hGH) on mRNAs of fatty acid transport and binding proteins expressed in pancreatic ß-cells, and to examine this in relation to ß-cell survival after exposure to fatty acids. hGH decreased mRNA levels of FAT/CD36, whereas mRNAs of GPR40, FASN, FABP...

  12. Role of FAT/CD36 in novel PKC isoform activation in heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klevstig, M. J.; Marková, I.; Burianová, J.; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal; Nováková, O.; Novák, F.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 357, 1-2 (2011), s. 163-169 ISSN 0300-8177 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) SVV33779266 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : CD36 * novel PKC * spontaneously hypertensive rat * insulin resistance Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2011

  13. Aorta macrophage inflammatory and epigenetic changes in a murine model of obstructive sleep apnea: Potential role of CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Rene; Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Almendros, Isaac; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Qiao, Zhuanghong; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2017-02-27

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 8-10% of the population, is characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), and causally associates with cardiovascular morbidities. In CIH-exposed mice, closely mimicking the chronicity of human OSA, increased accumulation and proliferation of pro-inflammatory metabolic M1-like macrophages highly expressing CD36, emerged in aorta. Transcriptomic and MeDIP-seq approaches identified activation of pro-atherogenic pathways involving a complex interplay of histone modifications in functionally-relevant biological pathways, such as inflammation and oxidative stress in aorta macrophages. Discontinuation of CIH did not elicit significant improvements in aorta wall macrophage phenotype. However, CIH-induced aorta changes were absent in CD36 knockout mice, Our results provide mechanistic insights showing that CIH exposures during sleep in absence of concurrent pro-atherogenic settings (i.e., genetic propensity or dietary manipulation) lead to the recruitment of CD36(+) high macrophages to the aortic wall and trigger atherogenesis. Furthermore, long-term CIH-induced changes may not be reversible with usual OSA treatment.

  14. Obesity-driven prepartal hepatic lipid accumulation in dairy cows is associated with increased CD36 and SREBP-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodanović, Radiša; Korićanac, Goran; Vujanac, Ivan; Djordjević, Ana; Pantelić, Marija; Romić, Snježana; Stanimirović, Zoran; Kirovski, Danijela

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that obesity in dairy cows enhanced expression of proteins involved in hepatic fatty acid uptake and metabolism. Sixteen Holstein-Friesian close-up cows were divided into 2 equal groups based on their body condition score (BCS) as optimal (3.25≤BCS≤3.5) and high (4.0≤BCS≤4.25). Intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT) and liver biopsies were carried out at day 10 before calving. Blood samples were collected before (basal) and after glucose infusion, and glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels were determined at each sample point. In addition, β-hydroxybutyrate and triglycerides levels were measured in the basal samples. The liver biopsies were analyzed for total lipid content and protein expression of insulin receptor beta (IRβ), fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) and sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1). Basal glucose and insulin were higher in high-BCS cows, which coincided with higher circulating triglycerides and hepatic lipid content. Clearance rate and AUC for NEFA during GTT were higher in optimal-BCS cows. The development of insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese cows was paralleled by increased hepatic expression of the IRβ, CD36 and SREBP-1. These results suggest that increased expression of hepatic CD36 and SREBP-1 is relevant in the obesity-driven lipid accumulation in the liver of dairy cows during late gestation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Human CD36 overexpression in renal tubules accelerates the progression of renal diseases in a mouse model of folic acid-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong Hwan; Choi, Jee Eun; Song, Ju Hung; Ahn, Seon-Ho

    2018-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a risk factor for progression to chronic kidney disease, with even subclinical AKI episodes progressing to chronic kidney disease. Several risk factors such as preexisting kidney disease, hyperglycemia, and hypertension may aggravate renal disease after AKI. However, mechanisms underlying the progression of AKI are still unclear. This study identified the effect of human cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) overexpression on the progression of folic acid-induced AKI. Pax8-rtTA/tetracycline response element-human CD36 transgenic mice were used to elucidate the effect of human CD36 overexpression in the proximal tubules on folic acid-induced AKI. Results of histological analysis showed severely dilated tubules with casts and albuminuria in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD36 compared with folic acid-treated wild-type mice. In addition, analysis of mRNA expression showed a significant increase in the collagen 3a1 gene in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD 36 compared with folic acid-treated wild type mice. Human CD36-overexpressing transgenic mice showed severe pathological changes and albuminuria compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of the collagen 3a1 gene increased in folic acid-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that human CD36 overexpression is a risk factor of AKI and its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  16. Human CD36 overexpression in renal tubules accelerates the progression of renal diseases in a mouse model of folic acid-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwan Jung

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute kidney injury (AKI is a risk factor for progression to chronic kidney disease, with even subclinical AKI episodes progressing to chronic kidney disease. Several risk factors such as preexisting kidney disease, hyperglycemia, and hypertension may aggravate renal disease after AKI. However, mechanisms underlying the progression of AKI are still unclear. This study identified the effect of human cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36 overexpression on the progression of folic acid-induced AKI. Methods : Pax8-rtTA/tetracycline response element-human CD36 transgenic mice were used to elucidate the effect of human CD36 overexpression in the proximal tubules on folic acid-induced AKI. Results : Results of histological analysis showed severely dilated tubules with casts and albuminuria in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD36 compared with folic acid-treated wild-type mice. In addition, analysis of mRNA expression showed a significant increase in the collagen 3a1 gene in folic acid-treated transgenic mice overexpressing human CD 36 compared with folic acid-treated wild type mice. Conclusion : Human CD36-overexpressing transgenic mice showed severe pathological changes and albuminuria compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, mRNA expression of the collagen 3a1 gene increased in folic acid-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that human CD36 overexpression is a risk factor of AKI and its progression to chronic kidney disease.

  17. Identification of the odor-active volatile compound (Z,Z)-4,7-tridecadienal as a potential ligand for the transmembrane receptor CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuzuki, Satoshi; Amitsuka, Takahiko; Okahashi, Tatsuya; Kozai, Yuki; Yamasaki, Masayuki; Inoue, Kazuo; Fushiki, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) is a broadly expressed transmembrane protein that has multiple ligands, including oxidized low-density lipoproteins. We found recently that CD36 is expressed in olfactory sensory neurons and postulated that it plays a role in the detection of distinct odorants in the nasal cavity. To date, however, there have been few examples of attempts to identify CD36-recognizable odorants. In this study, by an in vitro assay using a peptide mimic of the receptor, we provided evidence that CD36 recognizes (Z,Z)-4,7-tridecadienal, an odor-active volatile compound that is known to occur in Katsuobushi (dried, fermented, and smoked skipjack tuna commonly used in Japanese cuisine as a seasoning) and in the preorbital secretion of male oribi. In addition, by comparing the data with those of its related compounds, we provided information on the structural requirements of (Z,Z)-4,7-tridecadienal for recognition by CD36. For instance, we showed that flexible rotation around the C2-C3 bond of the volatile may be of importance in gaining access to CD36. Identification of (Z,Z)-4,7-tridecadienal as the ligand prompts us to hypothesize that CD36 could participate in the control of distinct mammalian behaviors (e.g., food selection) through its ability to recognize specific odorants in the environment.

  18. Low Levels of CD36 in Peripheral Blood Monocytes in Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Mexican Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Gómez-Bañuelos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA have a higher risk for atherosclerosis. There is no clinical information about scavenger receptor CD36 and the development of subclinical atherosclerosis in patients with RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between membrane expression of CD36 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT in patients with RA. Methods. We included 67 patients with RA from the Rheumatology Department of Hospital Civil “Dr. Juan I. Menchaca,” Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. We evaluated the cIMT, considering subclinical atherosclerosis when >0.6 mm. Since our main objective was to associate the membrane expression of CD36 with subclinical atherosclerosis, other molecules related with cardiovascular risk such as ox-LDL, IL-6, and TNFα were tested. Results. We found low CD36 membrane expression in PBMC from RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis (P<0.001. CD36 mean fluorescence intensity had negative correlations with cIMT (r = −0.578, P<0.001, ox-LDL (r = −0.427, P = 0.05, TNFα (r = −0.729, P<0.001, and IL-6 (r = −0.822, P<0.001. Conclusion. RA patients with subclinical atherosclerosis showed low membrane expression of CD36 in PBMC and increased serum proinflammatory cytokines. Further studies are needed to clarify the regulation of CD36 in RA.

  19. Differential effects of strength training and testosterone treatment on soluble CD36 in aging men: Possible relation to changes in body composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Christensen, Louise L; Kvorning, Thue

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We measured soluble CD36 (sCD36) and body composition to determine the effects of testosterone treatment (TT) and/or strength training (ST) on cardiovascular risk in men with low normal testosterone levels. Methods. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 54 men aged 60-78 years...... central fat mass (r = 0.84). Conclusions. Compared to testosterone treatment, six months of strength training reduced sCD36 levels suggesting decreased cardiovascular risk, possibly due to a reduction in central fat mass....

  20. Genetically Determined MBL Deficiency Is Associated with Protection against Chronic Cardiomyopathy in Chagas Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rosa Luz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, whose sugar moieties are recognized by mannan binding lectin (MBL, a soluble pattern-recognition molecule that activates the lectin pathway of complement. MBL levels and protein activity are affected by polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene. We sequenced the MBL2 promoter and exon 1 in 196 chronic CD patients and 202 controls. The MBL2*C allele, which causes MBL deficiency, was associated with protection against CD (P = 0.007, OR = 0.32. Compared with controls, genotypes with this allele were completely absent in patients with the cardiac form of the disease (P = 0.003. Furthermore, cardiac patients with genotypes causing MBL deficiency presented less heart damage (P = 0.003, OR = 0.23, compared with cardiac patients having the XA haplotype causing low MBL levels, but fully capable of activating complement (P = 0.005, OR = 7.07. Among the patients, those with alleles causing MBL deficiency presented lower levels of cytokines and chemokines possibly implicated in symptom development (IL9, p = 0.013; PDGFB, p = 0.036 and RANTES, p = 0.031. These findings suggest a protective effect of genetically determined MBL deficiency against the development and progression of chronic CD cardiomyopathy.

  1. Protection of Human Neutrophils by Endogenous Catalase: STUDIES WITH CELLS FROM CATALASE-DEFICIENT INDIVIDUALS

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Dirk; Weening, Ron S.; Wyss, Sonja R.; Aebi, Hugo E.

    1980-01-01

    To investigate the importance of catalase as a protecting enzyme against oxidative damage in phagocytic leukocytes, we have tested the functional capacity of neutrophils from two individuals homozygous for Swiss-type acatalasemia and from two individuals heterozygous for this deficiency. In the former cells, 25-30% of residual activity of catalase was present. In the latter cells, the values were close to normal.

  2. Induction of CD36 and thrombospondin-1 in macrophages by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and its relevance in the inflammatory process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Ortiz-Masià

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of a complex biological response of vascular tissue to pathogens or damaged cells. First inflammatory cells attempt to remove the injurious stimuli and this is followed by a healing process mediated principally by phagocytosis of senescent cells. Hypoxia and p38-MAPK are associated with inflammation, and hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 has been detected in inflamed tissues. We aimed to analyse the role of p38-MAPK and HIF-1 in the transcriptional regulation of CD36, a class B scavenger receptor, and its ligand thrombospondin (TSP-1 in macrophages and to evaluate the involvement of this pathway in phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. We have also assessed HIF-1α, p38-MAPK and CD36 immunostaining in the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Results show that hypoxia increases neutrophil phagocytosis by macrophages and induces the expression of CD36 and TSP-1. Addition of a p38-MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced the increase in CD36 and TSP-1 expression provoked by hypoxia and decreased HIF-1α stabilization in macrophages. Transient transfection of macrophages with a miHIF-1α-targeting vector blocked the increase in mRNA expression of CD36 and TSP-1 during hypoxia and reduced phagocytosis, thus highlighting a role for the transcriptional activity of HIF-1. CD36 and TSP-1 were necessary for the phagocytosis of neutrophils induced by hypoxic macrophages, since functional blockade of these proteins undermined this process. Immunohistochemical studies revealed CD36, HIF-1α and p38-MAPK expression in the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. A positive and significant correlation between HIF-1α and CD36 expression and CD36 and p38-MAPK expression was observed in cells of the lamina propria of the damaged mucosa. Our results demonstrate a HIF-1-dependent up-regulation of CD36 and TSP-1 that mediates the increased phagocytosis of neutrophils by macrophages during hypoxia. Moreover, they suggest

  3. The lipid-sensor candidates CD36 and GPR120 are differentially regulated by dietary lipids in mouse taste buds: impact on spontaneous fat preference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Martin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies in rodents and humans suggest that the chemoreception of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA in oral cavity is involved in the spontaneous preference for fatty foods and might contribute to the obesity risk. CD36 and GPR120 are LCFA receptors identified in rodent taste bud cells. The fact that CD36 or GPR120 gene inactivation leads to a decrease in the preference for lipids raises the question of the respective role(s played by these gustatory lipid-sensor candidates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a combination of biochemical, nutritional and behavioural studies in wild-type, CD36(+/-and CD36(-/- mice, it was found that: 1° CD36 and GPR120 display different diurnal rhythms in the gustatory circumvallate papillae, CD36 mRNA levels being down-regulated during the dark period in contrast to GPR120, 2° this change is due to food intake and strictly dependent of the presence of lipids in the diet, 3° CD36 protein levels are also rapidly but transiently decreased by the food intake, a two-fold drop in CD36 protein levels being found 1 h after refeeding, followed by a progressive return to the pre-prandial values, 4° this down-regulation, which has a post-transcriptional origin, seems sufficient to alter the spontaneous fat preference, independently to change in the GPR120 gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to GPR120, CD36 appears to be a food-sensitive lipid sensor in the gustatory circumvallate papillae. Lipid-mediated change in lingual CD36 expression might modulate the motivation for fat during a meal, initially high and then gradually decreasing secondary to the food intake. This short-term lipid-mediated effect is reminiscent of sensory-specific satiety. These findings, which highlight the role played by CD36 in the oro-sensory perception of dietary lipids, raise the possibility of novel pharmacological strategies to modify attraction for fatty foods and decrease obesity risks.

  4. The lipid-sensor candidates CD36 and GPR120 are differentially regulated by dietary lipids in mouse taste buds: impact on spontaneous fat preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Céline; Passilly-Degrace, Patricia; Gaillard, Dany; Merlin, Jean-François; Chevrot, Michaël; Besnard, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies in rodents and humans suggest that the chemoreception of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in oral cavity is involved in the spontaneous preference for fatty foods and might contribute to the obesity risk. CD36 and GPR120 are LCFA receptors identified in rodent taste bud cells. The fact that CD36 or GPR120 gene inactivation leads to a decrease in the preference for lipids raises the question of the respective role(s) played by these gustatory lipid-sensor candidates. Using a combination of biochemical, nutritional and behavioural studies in wild-type, CD36(+/-)and CD36(-/-) mice, it was found that: 1°) CD36 and GPR120 display different diurnal rhythms in the gustatory circumvallate papillae, CD36 mRNA levels being down-regulated during the dark period in contrast to GPR120, 2°) this change is due to food intake and strictly dependent of the presence of lipids in the diet, 3°) CD36 protein levels are also rapidly but transiently decreased by the food intake, a two-fold drop in CD36 protein levels being found 1 h after refeeding, followed by a progressive return to the pre-prandial values, 4°) this down-regulation, which has a post-transcriptional origin, seems sufficient to alter the spontaneous fat preference, independently to change in the GPR120 gene expression. In contrast to GPR120, CD36 appears to be a food-sensitive lipid sensor in the gustatory circumvallate papillae. Lipid-mediated change in lingual CD36 expression might modulate the motivation for fat during a meal, initially high and then gradually decreasing secondary to the food intake. This short-term lipid-mediated effect is reminiscent of sensory-specific satiety. These findings, which highlight the role played by CD36 in the oro-sensory perception of dietary lipids, raise the possibility of novel pharmacological strategies to modify attraction for fatty foods and decrease obesity risks.

  5. CD36/SR-B2-TLR2 Dependent Pathways Enhance Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated Atherosclerosis in the Ldlr KO Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Brown

    Full Text Available There is strong epidemiological association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease but underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Because the human periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg, interacts with innate immune receptors Toll-like Receptor (TLR 2 and CD36/scavenger receptor-B2 (SR-B2, we studied how CD36/SR-B2 and TLR pathways promote Pg-mediated atherosclerosis. Western diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr° mice infected orally with Pg had a significant increase in lesion burden compared with uninfected controls.This increase was entirely CD36/SR-B2-dependent, as there was no significant change in lesion burden between infected and uninfected Cd36o/Ldlro mice [corrected]. Western diet feeding promoted enhanced CD36/SR-B2-dependent IL1β generation and foam cell formation as a result of Pg lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS exposure. CD36/SR-B2 and TLR2 were necessary for inflammasome activation and optimal IL1ß generation, but also resulted in LPS induced lethality (pyroptosis. Modified forms of LDL inhibited Pg-mediated IL1ß generation in a CD36/SR-B2-dependent manner and prevented pyroptosis, but promoted foam cell formation. Our data show that Pg infection in the oral cavity can lead to significant TLR2-CD36/SR-B2 dependent IL1ß release. In the vessel wall, macrophages encountering systemic release of IL1ß, PgLPS and modified LDL have increased lipid uptake, foam cell formation, and release of IL1ß, but because pyroptosis is inhibited, this enables macrophage survival and promotes increased plaque development. These studies may explain increased lesion burden as a result of periodontal disease, and suggest strategies for development of therapeutics.

  6. CD36/SR-B2-TLR2 Dependent Pathways Enhance Porphyromonas gingivalis Mediated Atherosclerosis in the Ldlr KO Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul M; Kennedy, David J; Morton, Richard E; Febbraio, Maria

    2015-01-01

    There is strong epidemiological association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease but underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Because the human periodontal disease pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), interacts with innate immune receptors Toll-like Receptor (TLR) 2 and CD36/scavenger receptor-B2 (SR-B2), we studied how CD36/SR-B2 and TLR pathways promote Pg-mediated atherosclerosis. Western diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor knockout (Ldlr°) mice infected orally with Pg had a significant increase in lesion burden compared with uninfected controls.This increase was entirely CD36/SR-B2-dependent, as there was no significant change in lesion burden between infected and uninfected Cd36o/Ldlro mice [corrected]. Western diet feeding promoted enhanced CD36/SR-B2-dependent IL1β generation and foam cell formation as a result of Pg lipopolysaccharide (PgLPS) exposure. CD36/SR-B2 and TLR2 were necessary for inflammasome activation and optimal IL1ß generation, but also resulted in LPS induced lethality (pyroptosis). Modified forms of LDL inhibited Pg-mediated IL1ß generation in a CD36/SR-B2-dependent manner and prevented pyroptosis, but promoted foam cell formation. Our data show that Pg infection in the oral cavity can lead to significant TLR2-CD36/SR-B2 dependent IL1ß release. In the vessel wall, macrophages encountering systemic release of IL1ß, PgLPS and modified LDL have increased lipid uptake, foam cell formation, and release of IL1ß, but because pyroptosis is inhibited, this enables macrophage survival and promotes increased plaque development. These studies may explain increased lesion burden as a result of periodontal disease, and suggest strategies for development of therapeutics.

  7. A high content drug screen identifies ursolic acid as an inhibitor of amyloid beta protein interactions with its receptor CD36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kim; Boyd, Justin D; Glicksman, Marcie; Moore, Kathryn J; El Khoury, Joseph

    2011-10-07

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Aβ binds to microglia via a receptor complex that includes CD36 leading to production of proinflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic reactive oxygen species and subsequent neurodegeneration. Interruption of Aβ binding to CD36 is a potential therapeutic strategy for AD. To identify pharmacologic inhibitors of Aβ binding to CD36, we developed a 384-well plate assay for binding of fluorescently labeled Aβ to Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing human CD36 (CHO-CD36) and screened an Food and Drug Administration-approved compound library. The assay was optimized based on the cells' tolerance to dimethyl sulfoxide, Aβ concentration, time required for Aβ binding, reproducibility, and signal-to-background ratio. Using this assay, we identified four compounds as potential inhibitors of Aβ binding to CD36. These compounds were ursolic acid, ellipticine, zoxazolamine, and homomoschatoline. Of these compounds, only ursolic acid, a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, successfully inhibited binding of Aβ to CHO-CD36 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ursolic acid effect reached a plateau at ~20 μm, with a maximal inhibition of 64%. Ursolic acid also blocked binding of Aβ to microglial cells and subsequent ROS production. Our data indicate that cell-based high-content screening of small molecule libraries for their ability to block binding of Aβ to its receptors is a useful tool to identify novel inhibitors of receptors involved in AD pathogenesis. Our data also suggest that ursolic acid is a potential therapeutic agent for AD via its ability to block Aβ-CD36 interactions.

  8. A High Content Drug Screen Identifies Ursolic Acid as an Inhibitor of Amyloid β Protein Interactions with Its Receptor CD36*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kim; Boyd, Justin D.; Glicksman, Marcie; Moore, Kathryn J.; El Khoury, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    A pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD) is deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Aβ binds to microglia via a receptor complex that includes CD36 leading to production of proinflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic reactive oxygen species and subsequent neurodegeneration. Interruption of Aβ binding to CD36 is a potential therapeutic strategy for AD. To identify pharmacologic inhibitors of Aβ binding to CD36, we developed a 384-well plate assay for binding of fluorescently labeled Aβ to Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing human CD36 (CHO-CD36) and screened an Food and Drug Administration-approved compound library. The assay was optimized based on the cells' tolerance to dimethyl sulfoxide, Aβ concentration, time required for Aβ binding, reproducibility, and signal-to-background ratio. Using this assay, we identified four compounds as potential inhibitors of Aβ binding to CD36. These compounds were ursolic acid, ellipticine, zoxazolamine, and homomoschatoline. Of these compounds, only ursolic acid, a naturally occurring pentacyclic triterpenoid, successfully inhibited binding of Aβ to CHO-CD36 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The ursolic acid effect reached a plateau at ∼20 μm, with a maximal inhibition of 64%. Ursolic acid also blocked binding of Aβ to microglial cells and subsequent ROS production. Our data indicate that cell-based high-content screening of small molecule libraries for their ability to block binding of Aβ to its receptors is a useful tool to identify novel inhibitors of receptors involved in AD pathogenesis. Our data also suggest that ursolic acid is a potential therapeutic agent for AD via its ability to block Aβ-CD36 interactions. PMID:21835916

  9. Identification of defective CD36 as a quantitative trait locus for cardiovascular risk factor clustering in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Křen, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 2 (2001), s. 161-169 ISSN 1389-2029 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA301/00/1636; GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A079; GA ČR(CZ) GV204/98/K015; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/00/1646 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 (fatty acid transporter) * spontaneously hypertensive rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  10. CD36-dependent 7-ketocholesterol accumulation in macrophages mediates progression of atherosclerosis in response to chronic air pollution exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiaoquan; Zhong, Jixin; Maiseyeu, Andrei; Gopalakrishnan, Bhavani; Villamena, Frederick A; Chen, Lung-Chi; Harkema, Jack R; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2014-10-10

    Air pollution exposure has been shown to potentiate plaque progression in humans and animals. Our previous studies have suggested a role for oxidized lipids in mediating adverse vascular effect of air pollution. However, the types of oxidized lipids formed in response to air pollutants and how this occurs and their relevance to atherosclerosis are not fully understood. To investigate the mechanisms by which particulate matter pollution on 7-KCh accumulation, foam cell formation, and atherosclerosis. Our results suggest a potential role for CD36-mediated abnormal accumulations of oxidized lipids, such as 7-KCh, in air pollution-induced atherosclerosis progression. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Internalization of modified lipids by CD36 and SR-A leads to hepatic inflammation and lysosomal cholesterol storage in Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle Bieghs

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is characterized by steatosis and inflammation, which can further progress into fibrosis and cirrhosis. Recently, we demonstrated that combined deletion of the two main scavenger receptors, CD36 and macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1, which are important for modified cholesterol-rich lipoprotein uptake, reduced NASH. The individual contributions of these receptors to NASH and the intracellular mechanisms by which they contribute to inflammation have not been established. We hypothesize that CD36 and MSR1 contribute independently to the onset of inflammation in NASH, by affecting intracellular cholesterol distribution inside Kupffer cells (KCs.Ldlr(-/- mice were transplanted with wild-type (Wt, Cd36(-/- or Msr1(-/- bone marrow and fed a Western diet for 3 months. Cd36(-/-- and Msr1(-/-- transplanted (tp mice showed a similar reduction in hepatic inflammation compared to Wt-tp mice. While the total amount of cholesterol inside KCs was similar in all groups, KCs of Cd36(-/-- and Msr1(-/--tp mice showed increased cytoplasmic cholesterol accumulation, while Wt-tp mice showed increased lysosomal cholesterol accumulation.CD36 and MSR1 contribute similarly and independently to the progression of inflammation in NASH. One possible explanation for the inflammatory response related to expression of these receptors could be abnormal cholesterol trafficking in KCs. These data provide a new basis for prevention and treatment of NASH.

  12. Differential effects of strength training and testosterone treatment on soluble CD36 in aging men: Possible relation to changes in body composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Christensen, Louise L; Kvorning, Thue; Larsen, Rasmus; Højlund, Kurt; Brixen, Kim; Hougaard, David M; Handberg, Aase; Andersen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    We measured soluble CD36 (sCD36) and body composition to determine the effects of testosterone treatment (TT) and/or strength training (ST) on cardiovascular risk in men with low normal testosterone levels. Double-blinded, placebo-controlled study in 54 men aged 60-78 years with bioavailable testosterone 94 cm randomized to TT (gel, 50-100 mg/day, n = 20), placebo (n = 18) or ST (n = 16) for 6 months. Moreover, the ST group was randomized to TT (ST + TT, n = 7) or placebo (ST + placebo, n = 9) after 3 months. sCD36, total and regional fat mass were established by Dual X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Data are presented as median (quartiles). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were performed on delta values at 0, 3 and 6 months. ST + placebo decreased sCD36 levels by 21% [from 0.80 (0.68-1.22) to 0.63 (0.51-0.73) rel. units] vs. TT and vs. placebo (p testosterone and lean body mass. Fat mass measures significantly improved during ST + placebo, ST + TT, and TT vs. placebo. During ST + placebo, delta sCD36 was associated with delta total fat mass (r = 0.81) and delta central fat mass (r = 0.84). Compared to testosterone treatment, six months of strength training reduced sCD36 levels suggesting decreased cardiovascular risk, possibly due to a reduction in central fat mass.

  13. Plasminogen Deficiency Delays the Onset and Protects from Demyelination and Paralysis in Autoimmune Neuroinflammatory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Maureen A; Gao, Zhen; McElhinney, Kathryn E; Thornton, Sherry; Flick, Matthew J; Lane, Adam; Degen, Jay L; Ryu, Jae Kyu; Akassoglou, Katerina; Mullins, Eric S

    2017-04-05

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS. Fibrinogen deposition at sites of blood-brain barrier breakdown is a prominent feature of neuroinflammatory disease and contributes to disease severity. Plasminogen, the primary fibrinolytic enzyme, also modifies inflammatory processes. We used a murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), to evaluate the hypothesis that the loss of plasminogen would exacerbate neuroinflammatory disease. However, contrary to initial expectations, EAE-challenged plasminogen-deficient (Plg - ) mice developed significantly delayed disease onset and reduced disease severity compared with wild-type (Plg + ) mice. Similarly, pharmacologic inhibition of plasmin activation with tranexamic acid also delayed disease onset. The T-cell response to immunization was similar between genotypes, suggesting that the contribution of plasminogen was downstream of the T-cell response. Spinal cords from EAE-challenged Plg - mice demonstrated significantly decreased demyelination and microglial/macrophage accumulation compared with Plg + mice. Although fibrinogen-deficient mice or mice with combined deficiencies of plasminogen and fibrinogen had decreased EAE severity, they did not exhibit the delay in EAE disease onset, as seen in mice with plasminogen deficiency alone. Together, these data suggest that plasminogen and plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis is a key modifier of the onset of neuroinflammatory demyelination. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Multiple sclerosis is a severe, chronic, demyelinating disease. Understanding the pathobiology related to the autoreactive T-cell and microglial/macrophage demyelinating response is critical to effectively target therapeutics. We describe for the first time that deficiency of plasminogen, the key fibrinolytic enzyme, delays disease onset and protects from the development of the paralysis associated with a murine model of multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune

  14. Hepatic fatty acid translocase CD36 upregulation is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and increased steatosis in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquilena-Colina, María Eugenia; Lima-Cabello, Elena; Sánchez-Campos, Sonia; García-Mediavilla, María Victoria; Fernández-Bermejo, Miguel; Lozano-Rodríguez, Tamara; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Buqué, Xabier; Ochoa, Begoña; Aspichueta, Patricia; González-Gallego, Javier; García-Monzón, Carmelo

    2011-10-01

    Fatty acid translocase CD36 (FAT/CD36) mediates uptake and intracellular transport of long-chain fatty acids in diverse cell types. While the pathogenic role of FAT/CD36 in hepatic steatosis in rodents is well-defined, little is known about its significance in human liver diseases. To examine the expression of FAT/CD36 and its cellular and subcellular distribution within the liver of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. 34 patients with non-alcoholic steatosis (NAS), 30 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), 66 with HCV genotype 1 (HCV G1) and 32 with non-diseased liver (NL). Real-time PCR and western blot analysis were used to assess hepatic FAT/CD36 expression. Computational image analysis of immunostained liver biopsy sections was performed to determine subcellular distribution and FAT/CD36 expression index. Compared with NL, hepatic mRNA and protein levels of FAT/CD36 were significantly higher in patients with NAS (median fold increase 0.84 (range 0.15-1.61) and 0.66 (range 0.33-1.06), respectively); NASH (0.91 (0.22-1.81) and 0.81 (0.38-0.92), respectively); HCV G1 without steatosis (0.30 (0.17-1.59) and 0.33 (0.29-0.52), respectively); and HCV G1 with steatosis (0.85 (0.15-1.98) and 0.87 (0.52-1.26), respectively). In contrast to NL, FAT/CD36 was predominantly located at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes in patients with NAFLD and HCV G1 with steatosis. A significant correlation was observed between hepatic FAT/CD36 expression index and plasma insulin levels, insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and histological grade of steatosis in patients with NASH (r=0.663, r=0.735 and r=0.711, respectively) and those with HCV G1 with steatosis (r=0.723, r=0.769 and r=0.648, respectively). Hepatic FAT/CD36 upregulation is significantly associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinaemia and increased steatosis in patients with NASH and HCV G1 with fatty liver. Translocation of this fatty acid transporter to

  15. Uptake of long chain fatty acids is regulated by dynamic interaction of FAT/CD36 with cholesterol/sphingolipid enriched microdomains (lipid rafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms of long chain fatty acid uptake across the plasma membrane are important targets in treatment of many human diseases like obesity or hepatic steatosis. Long chain fatty acid translocation is achieved by a concert of co-existing mechanisms. These lipids can passively diffuse, but certain membrane proteins can also accelerate the transport. However, we now can provide further evidence that not only proteins but also lipid microdomains play an important part in the regulation of the facilitated uptake process. Methods Dynamic association of FAT/CD36 a candidate fatty acid transporter with lipid rafts was analysed by isolation of detergent resistant membranes (DRMs and by clustering of lipid rafts with antibodies on living cells. Lipid raft integrity was modulated by cholesterol depletion using methyl-β-cyclodextrin and sphingolipid depletion using myriocin and sphingomyelinase. Functional analyses were performed using an [3H]-oleate uptake assay. Results Overexpression of FAT/CD36 and FATP4 increased long chain fatty acid uptake. The uptake of long chain fatty acids was cholesterol and sphingolipid dependent. Floating experiments showed that there are two pools of FAT/CD36, one found in DRMs and another outside of these domains. FAT/CD36 co-localized with the lipid raft marker PLAP in antibody-clustered domains at the plasma membrane and segregated away from the non-raft marker GFP-TMD. Antibody cross-linking increased DRM association of FAT/CD36 and accelerated the overall fatty acid uptake in a cholesterol dependent manner. Another candidate transporter, FATP4, was neither present in DRMs nor co-localized with FAT/CD36 at the plasma membrane. Conclusion Our observations suggest the existence of two pools of FAT/CD36 within cellular membranes. As increased raft association of FAT/CD36 leads to an increased fatty acid uptake, dynamic association of FAT/CD36 with lipid rafts might regulate the process. There is no

  16. RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lidocaine against sepsis-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhou, Jie; Liao, Changli; Li, Xiaobing; Liu, Minghua; Song, Daqiang; Jiang, Xian

    2017-04-01

    Lidocaine (Lido) is reported to suppress inflammatory responses and exhibit a therapeutic effect in models of cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced acute lung injury (ALI). The receptor for advanced glycation end product (RAGE) exerts pro-inflammatory effects by enhancing pro-inflammatory cytokine production. However, the precise mechanism by which Lido confers protection against ALI is not clear. ALI was induced in RAGE WT and RAGE knockout (KO) rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) operations for 24 h. The results showed that Lido significantly inhibited CLP-induced lung inflammation and histopathological lung injury. Furthermore, Lido significantly reduced CLP-induced upregulation of HMGB1 and RAGE expression and activation of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. With the use of RAGE KO rats, we demonstrate here that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced lung inflammatory cell infiltration and histopathological lung injury. These results suggest that RAGE deficiency attenuates the protective effect of Lido against CLP-induced ALI by attenuating the pro-inflammatory cytokines production.

  17. CD36 Upregulation Mediated by Intranasal LV-NRF2 Treatment Mitigates Hypoxia-Induced Progression of Alzheimer's-Like Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. Results: We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. Innovation: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2208–2230. PMID:24702189

  18. PCSK9 Induces CD36 Degradation and Affects Long-Chain Fatty Acid Uptake and Triglyceride Metabolism in Adipocytes and in Mouse Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demers, Annie; Samami, Samaneh; Lauzier, Benjamin; Des Rosiers, Christine; Ngo Sock, Emilienne Tudor; Ong, Huy; Mayer, Gaetan

    2015-12-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) promotes the degradation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor thereby elevating plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and the risk of coronary heart disease. Thus, the use of PCSK9 inhibitors holds great promise to prevent heart disease. Previous work found that PCSK9 is involved in triglyceride metabolism, independently of its action on low-density lipoprotein receptor, and that other yet unidentified receptors could mediate this effect. Therefore, we assessed whether PCSK9 enhances the degradation of CD36, a major receptor involved in transport of long-chain fatty acids and triglyceride storage. Overexpressed or recombinant PCSK9 induced CD36 degradation in cell lines and primary adipocytes and reduced the uptake of the palmitate analog Bodipy FL C16 and oxidized low-density lipoprotein in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and hepatic HepG2 cells, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance, coimmunoprecipitation, confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, and protein degradation pathway inhibitors revealed that PCSK9 directly interacts with CD36 and targets the receptor to lysosomes through a mechanism involving the proteasome. Importantly, the level of CD36 protein was increased by >3-fold upon small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous PCSK9 in hepatic cells and similarly increased in the liver and visceral adipose tissue of Pcsk9(-/-) mice. In Pcsk9(-/-) mice, increased hepatic CD36 was correlated with an amplified uptake of fatty acid and accumulation of triglycerides and lipid droplets. Our results demonstrate an important role of PCSK9 in modulating the function of CD36 and triglyceride metabolism. PCSK9-mediated CD36 degradation may serve to limit fatty acid uptake and triglyceride accumulation in tissues, such as the liver. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Dietary α-linolenic acid supplementation alters skeletal muscle plasma membrane lipid composition, sarcolemmal FAT/CD36 abundance, and palmitate transport rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorner, Zane; Barbeau, Pierre-Andre; Castellani, Laura; Wright, David C; Chabowski, Adrian; Holloway, Graham P

    2016-12-01

    The cellular processes influenced by consuming polyunsaturated fatty acids remains poorly defined. Within skeletal muscle, a rate-limiting step in fatty acid oxidation is the movement of lipids across the sarcolemmal membrane, and therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of consuming flaxseed oil high in α-linolenic acid (ALA), on plasma membrane lipid composition and the capacity to transport palmitate. Rats fed a diet supplemented with ALA (10%) displayed marked increases in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) within whole muscle and sarcolemmal membranes (approximately five-fold), at the apparent expense of arachidonic acid (-50%). These changes coincided with increased sarcolemmal palmitate transport rates (+20%), plasma membrane fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36; +20%) abundance, skeletal muscle triacylglycerol content (approximately twofold), and rates of whole body fat oxidation (~50%). The redistribution of FAT/CD36 to the plasma membrane could not be explained by increased phosphorylation of signaling pathways implicated in regulating FAT/CD36 trafficking events (i.e., phosphorylation of ERK1/2, CaMKII, AMPK, and Akt), suggesting the increased n-3 PUFA composition of the plasma membrane influenced FAT/CD36 accumulation. Altogether, the present data provide evidence that a diet supplemented with ALA increases the transport of lipids into resting skeletal muscle in conjunction with increased sarcolemmal n-3 PUFA and FAT/CD36 contents. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  20. X-linked G6PD deficiency protects hemizygous males but not heterozygous females against severe malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldiouma Guindo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD is important in the control of oxidant stress in erythrocytes, the host cells for Plasmodium falciparum. Mutations in this enzyme produce X-linked deficiency states associated with protection against malaria, notably in Africa where the A- form of G6PD deficiency is widespread. Some reports have proposed that heterozygous females with mosaic populations of normal and deficient erythrocytes (due to random X chromosome inactivation have malaria resistance similar to or greater than hemizygous males with populations of uniformly deficient erythrocytes. These proposals are paradoxical, and they are not consistent with currently hypothesized mechanisms of protection.We conducted large case-control studies of the A- form of G6PD deficiency in cases of severe or uncomplicated malaria among two ethnic populations of rural Mali, West Africa, where malaria is hyperendemic. Our results indicate that the uniform state of G6PD deficiency in hemizygous male children conferred significant protection against severe, life-threatening malaria, and that it may have likewise protected homozygous female children. No such protection was evident from the mosaic state of G6PD deficiency in heterozygous females. We also found no significant differences in the parasite densities of males and females with differences in G6PD status. Pooled odds ratios from meta-analysis of our data and data from a previous study confirmed highly significant protection against severe malaria in hemizygous males but not in heterozygous females. Among the different forms of severe malaria, protection was principally evident against cerebral malaria, the most frequent form of life-threatening malaria in these studies.The A- form of G6PD deficiency in Africa is under strong natural selection from the preferential protection it provides to hemizygous males against life-threatening malaria. Little or no such protection is present among heterozygous females

  1. CD36 overexpression predisposes to arrhythmias but reduces infarct size in spontaneously hypertensive rats: gene expression profile analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neckář, Jan; Šilhavý, Jan; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Seidman, J. G.; Seidman, Ch.; Kazdová, L.; Klevstig, M.; Novák, F.; Vecka, M.; Papoušek, František; Houštěk, Josef; Drahota, Zdeněk; Kurtz, T. W.; Kolář, František; Pravenec, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 2 (2012), s. 173-182 ISSN 1094-8341 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08017; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA MZd(CZ) NR9359; GA MZd(CZ) NR9387; GA MZd(CZ) NS9757; GA MZd(CZ) NS10504; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAAX01110901; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200520703; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037; GA ČR GAP301/10/0756; GA MŠk 7E10067 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Cd36 * spontaneously hypertensive rat * arrhythmias * infarct size * gene expression profiles Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2012

  2. Oily Fish Consumption Modifies the Association between CD36 rs6969989 Polymorphism and Lipid Profiles in Korean Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoonjin; Kim, Yangha

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CD36, a class B scavenger receptor, rs6969989 polymorphism with the serum lipid profiles in Korean women, together with their modulation by oily fish consumption. Subjects were participants from the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (KoGES), which was initiated in 2001 as a large-scale. A total of 4,210 women aged 39 to 70 were included in this study. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires, anthropometric measurements, and blood chemical analysis. Dietary intake was analyzed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. The minor allele frequency for rs6969989 was found in 12% of this population. Homozygotes minor G allele at the rs6868989 exhibited significantly higher high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations ( P -trend=0.043) and lower fasting glucose ( P -trend=0.013) than major allele A carriers. The risk of low HDL-C was significantly lower in homozygotes for the G allele than the A allele carriers ( P -trend=0.032). Gene-diet interaction effects between rs6969989 and oily fish intake were significantly associated with the risk of dyslipidemia ( P -interaction= 0.004). Subjects with homozygotes minor G allele and high oily fish intake generally had a lower risk of dyslipidemia than did those with major allele homozygotes and low oily fish intake. These findings supported that oily fish consumption may modulate the contributions of CD36 rs6969989 on genetic predisposition to the risk of dyslipidemia.

  3. The effect of albumin on podocytes: The role of the fatty acid moiety and the potential role of CD36 scavenger receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawluczyk, I.Z.A., E-mail: izap1@le.ac.uk [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom); Pervez, A.; Ghaderi Najafabadi, M. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Saleem, M.A. [Academic and Children' s Renal Unit, University of Bristol, Southmead Hospital, Bristol (United Kingdom); Topham, P.S. [Department of Infection, Immunity and inflammation, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); John Walls Renal Unit, Leicester General Hospital Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Evidence is emerging that podocytes are able to endocytose proteins such as albumin using kinetics consistent with a receptor-mediated process. To date the role of the fatty acid moiety on albumin uptake kinetics has not been delineated and the receptor responsible for uptake is yet to be identified. Albumin uptake studies were carried out on cultured human podocytes exposed to FITC-labelled human serum albumin either carrying fatty acids (HSA{sub +FA}) or depleted of them (HSA{sub −FA}). Receptor-mediated endocytosis of FITC-HSA{sub +FA} over 60 min was 5 times greater than that of FITC-HSA{sub −FA}. 24 h exposure of podocytes to albumin up-regulated nephrin expression and induced the activation of caspase-3. These effects were more pronounced in response to HSA{sub −FA.} Individually, anti-CD36 antibodies had no effect upon endocytosis of FITC-HSA. However, a cocktail of 2 antibodies reduced uptake by nearly 50%. Albumin endocytosis was enhanced in the presence of the CD36 specific inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO) while knock-down of CD36 using CD36siRNA had no effect on uptake. These data suggest that receptor-mediated endocytosis of albumin by podocytes is regulated by the fatty acid moiety, although, some of the detrimental effects are induced independently of it. CD36 does not play a direct role in the uptake of albumin. - Highlights: • The fatty acid moiety is essential for receptor mediated endocytosis of albumin. • Fatty acid depleted albumin is more pathogenic to podocytes. • CD36 is not directly involved in albumin uptake by podocytes.

  4. Expression of genes encoding IGFBPs, SNARK, CD36, and PECAM1 in the liver of mice treated with chromium disilicide and titanium nitride nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minchenko, Dmytro O; Tsymbal, D O; Yavorovsky, O P; Solokha, N V; Minchenko, O H

    2017-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of chromium disilicide and titanium nitride nanoparticles on the expression level of genes encoding important regulatory factors (IGFBP1, IGFBP2, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, IGFBP5, SNARK/NUAK2, CD36, and PECAM1/CD31) in mouse liver for evaluation of possible toxic effects of these nanoparticles. Male mice received 20 mg chromium disilicide nanoparticles (45 nm) and titanium nitride nanoparticles (20 nm) with food every working day for 2 months. The expression of IGFBP1, IGFBP2, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, IGFBP5, SNARK, CD36, and PECAM1 genes in mouse liver was studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Treatment of mice with chromium disilicide nanoparticles led to down-regulation of the expression of IGFBP2, IGFBP5, PECAM1, and SNARK genes in the liver in comparison with control mice, with more prominent changes for SNARK gene. At the same time, the expression of IGFBP3 and CD36 genes was increased in mouse liver upon treatment with chromium disilicide nanoparticles. We have also shown that treatment with titanium nitride nanoparticles resulted in down-regulation of the expression of IGFBP2 and SNARK genes in the liver with more prominent changes for SNARK gene. At the same time, the expression of IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and CD36 genes was increased in the liver of mice treated with titanium nitride nanoparticles. Furthermore, the effect of chromium disilicide nanoparticles on IGFBP2 and CD36 genes expression was significantly stronger as compared to titanium nitride nanoparticles. The results of this study demonstrate that chromium disilicide and titanium nitride nanoparticles have variable effects on the expression of IGFBP2, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, IGFBP5, SNARK, CD36, and PECAM1 genes in mouse liver, which may reflect the genotoxic activities of the studied nanoparticles.

  5. Myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from ischemia reperfusion injury by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Shi; Rao, Jianhua; Zhu, Jianjun; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Lu, Ling; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Although the role of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) in regulating cell proliferation is well established, its function in immune responses remains to be fully appreciated. In the current study, we analyzed myeloid-specific PTEN function in regulating tissue inflammatory immune response in a murine liver partial warm ischemia model. Myeloid-specific PTEN knockout (KO) resulted in liver protection from ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) by deviating the local innate immune response against ischemia reperfusion toward the regulatory type: expression of proinflammatory genes was selectively decreased and anti-inflammatory IL-10 was simultaneously increased in ischemia reperfusion livers of PTEN KO mice compared with those of wild-type (WT) mice. PI3K inhibitor and IL-10-neutralizing Abs, but not exogenous LPS, recreated liver IRI in these KO mice. At the cellular level, Kupffer cells and peritoneal macrophages isolated from KO mice expressed higher levels of M2 markers and produced lower TNF-α and higher IL-10 in response to TLR ligands than did their WT counterparts. They had enhanced Stat3- and Stat6-signaling pathway activation, but diminished Stat1-signaling pathway activation, in response to TLR4 stimulation. Inactivation of Kupffer cells by gadolinium chloride enhanced proinflammatory immune activation and increased IRI in livers of myeloid PTEN KO mice. Thus, myeloid PTEN deficiency protects livers from IRI by facilitating M2 macrophage differentiation. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Tet38 Efflux Pump Affects Staphylococcus aureus Internalization by Epithelial Cells through Interaction with CD36 and Contributes to Bacterial Escape from Acidic and Nonacidic Phagolysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Bolduc, Q C; Khan, N S; Vyas, J M; Hooper, D C

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the Tet38 efflux pump is involved in internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by A549 lung epithelial cells. A lack of tet38 reduced bacterial uptake by A549 cells to 36% of that of the parental strain RN6390. Using invasion assays coupled with confocal microscopy imaging, we studied the host cell receptor(s) responsible for bacterial uptake via interaction with Tet38. We also assessed the ability of S. aureus to survive following alkalinization of the phagolysosomes by chloroquine. Antibody to the scavenger receptor CD36 reduced the internalization of S. aureus RN6390 by A549 cells, but the dependence on CD36 was reduced in QT7 tet38, suggesting that an interaction between Tet38 and CD36 contributed to S. aureus internalization. Following fusion of the S. aureus-associated endosomes with lysosomes, alkalinization of the acidic environment with chloroquine led to a rapid increase in the number of S. aureus RN6390 bacteria in the cytosol, followed by a decrease shortly thereafter. This effect of chloroquine was not seen in the absence of intact Tet38 in mutant QT7. These data taken together suggest that Tet38 plays a role both in bacterial internalization via interaction with CD36 and in bacterial escape from the phagolysosomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. The rs1527483, but not rs3212018, CD36 polymorphism associates with linoleic acid detection and obesity in Czech young adults

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plesník, J.; Šerý, Omar; Khan, A. S.; Bielik, P.; Khan, N. A.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 4 (2018), s. 472-478 ISSN 0007-1145 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-29900A Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : CD36 * fat taste * genetic polymorphism * rs1527483 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology OBOR OECD: Physiology (including cytology) Impact factor: 3.706, year: 2016

  8. Chromosome assignment of Cd36 transgenes in two rat SHR lines by FISH and linkage mapping of transgenic insert in the SHR-TG19 line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liška, F.; Levan, G.; Helou, K.; Sladká, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Křen, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2002), s. 139-144 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/98/K015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : spontaneously hypertensive rat * Cd36 * transgenic lines Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  9. Infection by and protective immune responses against Plasmodium berghei ANKA are not affected in macrophage scavenger receptors A deficient mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portugal Sílvia

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scavenger receptors (SRs recognize endogenous molecules modified by pathological processes as well as components of diverse microorganisms. Mice deficient for both SR-AI and II are more susceptible to infections by a variety of bacterial and viral pathogens. Results Here we show that SR-A deficient mice and wild type mice are equally susceptible to malaria infection both during liver and blood stages. Moreover, like wild type mice, SR-A deficient mice are able to mount a protective immune response against radiation attenuated sporozoites. Conclusion Our results do not reveal a function of SR-A I and II receptors in the Plasmodium berghei ANKA infection, both in the development of CM and parasitemia control. Moreover, these receptors appear not to be required for the establishment of a protective immune response against the malaria liver stages.

  10. Coronary artery calcification in hemophilia A: No evidence for a protective effect of factor VIII deficiency on atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinenburg, A.; Rutten, A.; Kavousi, M.; Leebeek, F.W.G.; Ypma, P.F.; Laros-Van Gorkom, B.A.P.; Nijziel, M.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Mauser-Bunschoten, E.P.; Roosendaal, G.; Biesma, D.H.; Van Der Lugt A., [No Value; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Bots, M.L.; Schutgens, R.E.G.

    2011-01-01

    Mortality due to ischemic heart disease is lower in hemophilia patients when compared to the general male population. As coagulation plays a role in the inflammatory pathways involved in atherogenesis, we investigated whether the clotting factor deficiency protects hemophilia patients from

  11. Partial deficiency of sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase confers protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Billich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P regulates the egress of T cells from lymphoid organs; levels of S1P in the tissues are controlled by S1P lyase (Sgpl1. Hence, Sgpl1 offers a target to block T cell-dependent inflammatory processes. However, the involvement of Sgpl1 in models of disease has not been fully elucidated yet, since Sgpl1 KO mice have a short life-span. METHODOLOGY: We generated inducible Sgpl1 KO mice featuring partial reduction of Sgpl1 activity and analyzed them with respect to sphingolipid levels, T-cell distribution, and response in models of inflammation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The partially Sgpl1 deficient mice are viable but feature profound reduction of peripheral T cells, similar to the constitutive KO mice. While thymic T cell development in these mice appears normal, mature T cells are retained in thymus and lymph nodes, leading to reduced T cell numbers in spleen and blood, with a skewing towards increased proportions of memory T cells and T regulatory cells. The therapeutic relevance of Sgpl1 is demonstrated by the fact that the inducible KO mice are protected in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. T cell immigration into the CNS was found to be profoundly reduced. Since S1P levels in the brain of the animals are unchanged, we conclude that protection in EAE is due to the peripheral effect on T cells, leading to reduced CNS immigration, rather than on local effects in the CNS. SIGNIFICANCE: The data suggest Sgpl1 as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  12. Macrophage JAK2 deficiency protects against high-fat diet-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Harsh R; Sivasubramaniyam, Tharini; Revelo, Xavier S; Schroer, Stephanie A; Luk, Cynthia T; Rikkala, Prashanth R; Metherel, Adam H; Dodington, David W; Park, Yoo Jin; Kim, Min Jeong; Rapps, Joshua A; Besla, Rickvinder; Robbins, Clinton S; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Bazinet, Richard P; Winer, Daniel A; Woo, Minna

    2017-08-09

    During obesity, macrophages can infiltrate metabolic tissues, and contribute to chronic low-grade inflammation, and mediate insulin resistance and diabetes. Recent studies have elucidated the metabolic role of JAK2, a key mediator downstream of various cytokines and growth factors. Our study addresses the essential role of macrophage JAK2 in the pathogenesis to obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance. During high-fat diet (HFD) feeding, macrophage-specific JAK2 knockout (M-JAK2 -/- ) mice gained less body weight compared to wildtype littermate control (M-JAK2 +/+ ) mice and were protected from HFD-induced systemic insulin resistance. Histological analysis revealed smaller adipocytes and qPCR analysis showed upregulated expression of some adipogenesis markers in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of HFD-fed M-JAK2 -/- mice. There were decreased crown-like structures in VAT along with reduced mRNA expression of some macrophage markers and chemokines in liver and VAT of HFD-fed M-JAK2 -/- mice. Peritoneal macrophages from M-JAK2 -/- mice and Jak2 knockdown in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 also showed lower levels of chemokine expression and reduced phosphorylated STAT3. However, leptin-dependent effects on augmenting chemokine expression in RAW 264.7 cells did not require JAK2. Collectively, our findings show that macrophage JAK2 deficiency improves systemic insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation in VAT and liver in response to metabolic stress.

  13. A20 (Tnfaip3 deficiency in myeloid cells protects against influenza A virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Maelfait

    Full Text Available The innate immune response provides the first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens by responding to specific microbial molecules. Influenza A virus (IAV produces double-stranded RNA as an intermediate during the replication life cycle, which activates the intracellular pathogen recognition receptor RIG-I and induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines and antiviral interferon. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses to IAV and other viruses is of key importance to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Here we used myeloid cell specific A20 knockout mice to examine the role of the ubiquitin-editing protein A20 in the response of myeloid cells to IAV infection. A20 deficient macrophages were hyperresponsive to double stranded RNA and IAV infection, as illustrated by enhanced NF-κB and IRF3 activation, concomitant with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and type I interferon. In vivo this was associated with an increased number of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in the lungs of IAV infected mice. Surprisingly, myeloid cell specific A20 knockout mice are protected against lethal IAV infection. These results challenge the general belief that an excessive host proinflammatory response is associated with IAV-induced lethality, and suggest that under certain conditions inhibition of A20 might be of interest in the management of IAV infections.

  14. Hearts deficient in both Mfn1 and Mfn2 are protected against acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, A R; Burke, N; Dongworth, R K; Kalkhoran, S B; Dyson, A; Vicencio, J M; Dorn, G W; Yellon, D M; Hausenloy, D J

    2016-05-26

    mitochondrial dysfunction, hearts deficient in both Mfn1 and Mfn2 are protected against acute myocardial infarction due to impaired mitochondria/SR tethering.

  15. Transgenic expression of CD36 in the spontaneously hypertensive rat is associated with amelioration of metabolic disturbances but has no effect on hypertension

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Musilová, Alena; Kazdová, L.; Qi, N.; Wang, J.; St. Lezin, E. S.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 6 (2003), s. 681-688 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/00/1646; GA ČR GA301/00/1636; GA MZd NB4904 Grant - others:HHMI(US) 55000331 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : Cd36 * dyslipidemia * transgenic SHR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.939, year: 2003

  16. Antibody-based inhibition of circulating DLK1 protects from estrogen deficiency-induced bone loss in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figeac, Florence; Andersen, Ditte C.; Nipper Nielsen, Casper A.

    2018-01-01

    /TV) and inhibition of bone resorption. No significant changes were observed in total fat mass or in the number of bone marrow adipocytes. These results support the potential use of anti-DLK1 antibody therapy as a novel intervention to protect from E deficiency associated bone loss....... deficiency-associated bone loss in mice. Thus, we generated mouse monoclonal anti-mouse DLK1 antibodies (MAb DLK1) that enabled us to reduce and also quantitate the levels of bioavailable serum DLK1 in vivo. Ovariectomized (ovx) mice were injected intraperitoneally twice weekly with MAb DLK1 over a period...... of one month. DEXA-, microCT scanning, and bone histomorphometric analyses were performed. Compared to controls, MAb DLK1 treated ovx mice were protected against ovx-induced bone loss, as revealed by significantly increased total bone mass (BMD) due to increased trabecular bone volume fraction (BV...

  17. Phagocytosis of cholesteryl ester is amplified in diabetic mouse macrophages and is largely mediated by CD36 and SR-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Guest

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, which accounts for approximately 75% of all diabetes-related deaths. Here we investigate the link between diabetes and macrophage cholesteryl ester accumulation. When diabetic (db/db mice are given cholesteryl ester intraperitoneally (IP, peritoneal macrophages (PerMPhis recovered from these animals showed a 58% increase in intracellular cholesteryl ester accumulation over PerMPhis from heterozygote control (db/+ mice. Notably, PerMPhi fluid-phase endocytosis and large particle phagocytosis was equivalent in db/+and db/db mice. However, IP administration of CD36 and SR-A blocking antibodies led to 37% and 25% reductions in cholesteryl ester accumulation in PerMPhi. Finally, in order to determine if these scavenger receptors (SRs were part of the mechanism responsible for the increased accumulation of cholesteryl esters observed in the diabetic mouse macrophages, receptor expression was quantified by flow cytometry. Importantly, db/db PerMPhis showed a 43% increase in CD36 expression and an 80% increase in SR-A expression. Taken together, these data indicate that direct cholesteryl ester accumulation in mouse macrophages is mediated by CD36 and SR-A, and the magnitude of accumulation is increased in db/db macrophages due to increased scavenger receptor expression.

  18. Protection of mice deficient in mature B cells from West Nile virus infection by passive and active immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draves, Kevin E.; Young, Lucy B.; Bryan, Marianne A.; Dresch, Christiane; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael

    2017-01-01

    B cell activating factor receptor (BAFFR)-/- mice have a profound reduction in mature B cells, but unlike μMT mice, they have normal numbers of newly formed, immature B cells. Using a West Nile virus (WNV) challenge model that requires antibodies (Abs) for protection, we found that unlike wild-type (WT) mice, BAFFR-/- mice were highly susceptible to WNV and succumbed to infection within 8 to 12 days after subcutaneous virus challenge. Although mature B cells were required to protect against lethal infection, infected BAFFR-/- mice had reduced WNV E-specific IgG responses and neutralizing Abs. Passive transfer of immune sera from previously infected WT mice rescued BAFFR-/- and fully B cell-deficient μMT mice, but unlike μMT mice that died around 30 days post-infection, BAFFR-/- mice survived, developed WNV-specific IgG Abs and overcame a second WNV challenge. Remarkably, protective immunity could be induced in mature B cell-deficient mice. Administration of a WNV E-anti-CD180 conjugate vaccine 30 days prior to WNV infection induced Ab responses that protected against lethal infection in BAFFR-/- mice but not in μMT mice. Thus, the immature B cells present in BAFFR-/- and not μMT mice contribute to protective antiviral immunity. A CD180-based vaccine may promote immunity in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:29176765

  19. TLR4 Deficiency Protects against Hepatic Fibrosis and Diethylnitrosamine-Induced Pre-Carcinogenic Liver Injury in Fibrotic Liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Nicole Weber

    depends on pre-existing fibrosis and genetic background. The generation of ABCB4-/: TLR4-/- double-deficient mice illustrates that TLR4-deficiency protects against hepatic injury in a preclinical mouse model of chronic liver disease.

  20. Habitual aerobic exercise does not protect against micro- or macrovascular endothelial dysfunction in healthy estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Strahler, Talia R; Vorwald, Victoria M; Pierce, Gary L; Seals, Douglas R

    2017-01-01

    Aging causes micro- and macrovascular endothelial dysfunction, as assessed by endothelium-dependent dilation (EDD), which can be prevented and reversed by habitual aerobic exercise (AE) in men. However, in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, whole forearm microvascular EDD has not been studied, and a beneficial effect of AE on macrovascular EDD has not been consistently shown. We assessed forearm blood flow in response to brachial artery infusions of acetylcholine (FBF ACh ), a measure of whole forearm microvascular EDD, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of macrovascular EDD, in 12 premenopausal sedentary women (Pre-S; 24 ± 1 yr; V̇o 2max = 37.5 ± 1.6 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ), 25 estrogen-deficient postmenopausal sedentary women (Post-S; 62 ± 1 yr; V̇o 2max = 24.7 ± 0.9 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ), and 16 estrogen-deficient postmenopausal AE-trained women (Post-AE; 59 ± 1 yr; V̇o 2max = 40.4 ± 1.4 ml·kg -1 ·min -1 ). FBF ACh was lower in Post-S and Post-AE compared with Pre-S women (135 ± 9 and 116 ± 17 vs. 193 ± 21 AUC, respectively, both P healthy nonobese estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, despite being associated with lower systemic markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. This is the first study to demonstrate that habitual aerobic exercise may not protect against age/menopause-related whole forearm microvascular endothelial dysfunction in healthy nonobese estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, consistent with recent findings regarding macrovascular endothelial function. This is in contrast to what is observed in healthy middle-aged and older aerobic exercise-trained men. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. DPP4 deficiency exerts protective effect against H2O2 induced oxidative stress in isolated cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chun Ku

    Full Text Available Apart from the antihyperglycemic effects, DPP4 inhibitors and GLP-1 molecules are involved in the preservation of cardiac functions. We have demonstrated that DPP4-deficient rats possess resistance to endotoxemia and ischemia/reperfusion stress. However, whether the decrease of DPP4 activity simply augmented the GLP-1 signaling or that such decrease resulted in a change of cellular function remain unclear. Accordingly, we investigated the responses of H(2O(2-induced oxidative stress in adult wild-type and DPP4-deficient rats isolated cardiomyocytes. The coadministration of GLP-1 or DPP4 inhibitor was also performed to define the mechanisms. Cell viability, ROS concentration, catalase activity, glucose uptake, prosurvival, proapoptotic signaling, and contractile function were examined after cells exposed to H(2O(2. DPP4-deficient cardiomyocytes were found to be resistant to H(2O(2-induced cell death via activating AKT signaling, enhancing glucose uptake, preserving catalase activity, diminishing ROS level and proapoptotic signaling. GLP-1 concentration-dependently improved cell viability in wild-type cardiomyocyte against ROS stress, and the ceiling response concentration (200 nM was chosen for studies. GLP-1 was shown to decrease H(2O(2-induced cell death by its receptor-dependent AKT pathway in wild-type cardiomyocytes, but failed to cause further activation of AKT in DPP4-deficient cardiomyocytes. Acute treatment of DPP4 inhibitor only augmented the protective effect of low dose GLP-1, but failed to alter fuel utilization or ameliorate cell viability in wild-type cardiomyocytes after H(2O(2 exposure. The improvement of cell viability after H(2O(2 exposure was correlated with the alleviation of cellular contractile dysfunction in both DPP4-deficient and GLP-1 treated wild-type cardiomyocytes. These findings demonstrated that GLP-1 receptor-dependent pathway is important and exert protective effect in wild-type cardiomyocyte. Long term loss of

  2. NLRP3 Inflammasome Deficiency Protects against Microbial Sepsis via Increased Lipoxin B4 Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonmin; Nakahira, Kiichi; Dalli, Jesmond; Siempos, Ilias I; Norris, Paul C; Colas, Romain A; Moon, Jong-Seok; Shinohara, Masakazu; Hisata, Shu; Howrylak, Judie Ann; Suh, Gee-Young; Ryter, Stefan W; Serhan, Charles N; Choi, Augustine M K

    2017-09-15

    Sepsis, a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection, is a major public health concern with high mortality and morbidity. Although inflammatory responses triggered by infection are crucial for host defense against invading microbes, the excessive inflammation often causes tissue damage leading to organ dysfunction. Resolution of inflammation, an active immune process mediated by endogenous lipid mediators (LMs), is important to maintain host homeostasis. We sought to determine the role of the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor, pyrin domain-containing-3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in polymicrobial sepsis and regulation of LM biosynthesis. We performed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) using mice lacking NLRP3 inflammasome-associated molecules to assess mortality. Inflammation was evaluated by using biologic fluids including plasma, bronchoalveolar, and peritoneal lavage fluid. Local acting LMs in peritoneal lavage fluid from polymicrobacterial septic mice were assessed by mass spectrometry-based metabololipidomics. Genetic deficiency of NLRP3 inhibited inflammatory responses and enhanced survival of CLP-induced septic mice. NLRP3 deficiency reduced proinflammatory LMs and increased proresolving LM, lipoxin B 4 (LXB 4 ) in septic mice, and in macrophages stimulated with LPS and ATP. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induced caspase-7 cleavage and pyroptosis. Caspase-7 deficiency similarly reduced inflammation and mortality in CLP-induced sepsis, and increased LXB 4 production in vivo and in vitro. Exogenous application of LXB 4 reduced inflammation, pyroptosis, and mortality of mice after CLP. Genetic deficiency of NLRP3 promoted resolution of inflammation in polymicrobial sepsis by relieving caspase-7-dependent repression of LXB 4 biosynthesis, and increased survival potentially via LXB 4 production and inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines.

  3. Comparison of the protective effectiveness of NPQ in Arabidopsis plants deficient in PsbS protein and zeaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Maxwell A; Belgio, Erica; Ruban, Alexander V

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of protective energy dissipation by non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) in photosystem II (PSII) has been recently quantified by a new non-invasive photochemical quenching parameter, qPd. PSII yield (ФPSII) was expressed in terms of NPQ, and the extent of damage to the reaction centres (RCIIs) was calculated via qPd as: ФPSII=qPd×(F v/F m)/{1+[1-(F v/F m)]×NPQ}. Here this approach was used to determine the amount of NPQ required to protect all PSII reaction centres (pNPQ) under a gradually increasing light intensity, in the zeaxanthin-deficient (npq1) Arabidopsis mutant, compared with PsbS protein-deficient (npq4) and wild-type plants. The relationship between maximum pNPQ and tolerated light intensity for all plant genotypes followed similar trends. These results suggest that under a gradually increasing light intensity, where pNPQ is allowed to develop, it is only the amplitude of pNPQ which is the determining factor for protection. However, the use of a sudden constant high light exposure routine revealed that the presence of PsbS, not zeaxanthin, offered better protection for PSII. This was attributed to a slower development of pNPQ in plants lacking PsbS in comparison with plants that lacked zeaxanthin. This research adds further support to the value of pNPQ and qPd as effective parameters for assessing NPQ effectiveness in different types of plants. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  4. Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I, a CD36 Related Protein in Macrobrachium nipponense: Characterization, RNA Interference, and Expression Analysis with Different Dietary Lipid Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhili Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI, is a member of the CD36 superfamily comprising transmembrane proteins involved in mammalian and fish lipid homeostasis regulation. We hypothesize that this receptor plays an important role in Macrobrachium nipponense lipid metabolism. However, little attention has been paid to SR-BI in commercial crustaceans. In the present study, we report a cDNA encoding M. nipponense scavenger receptor class B, type I (designated as MnSR-BI, obtained from a hepatopancreas cDNA library. The complete MnSR-BI coding sequence was 1545 bp, encoding 514 amino acid peptides. The MnSR-BI primary structure consisted of a CD36 domain that contained two transmembrane regions at the N- and C-terminals of the protein. SR-BI mRNA expression was specifically detected in muscle, gill, ovum, intestine, hepatopancreas, stomach, and ovary tissues. Furthermore, its expression in the hepatopancreas was regulated by dietary lipid sources, with prawns fed soybean and linseed oils exhibiting higher expression levels. RNAi-based SR-BI silencing resulted in the suppression of its expression in the hepatopancreas and variation in the expression of lipid metabolism-related genes. This is the first report of SR-BI in freshwater prawns and provides the basis for further studies on SR-BI in crustaceans.

  5. Effects of CD36 Genotype on Oral Perception of Oleic Acid Supplemented Safflower Oil Emulsions in Two Ethnic Groups: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Brenda; Melis, Melania; Scoular, Katelyn; Driver, Michael; Schaich, Karen M; Keller, Kathleen L; Tomassini Barbarossa, Iole; Tepper, Beverly J

    2018-04-16

    Previous studies demonstrate humans can detect fatty acids via specialized sensors on the tongue, such as the CD36 receptor. Genetic variation at the common single nucleotide polymorphism rs1761667 of CD36 has been shown to differentially impact the perception of fatty acids, but comparative data among different ethnic groups are lacking. In a small cohort of Caucasian and East Asian young adults, we investigated if: (1) participants could detect oleic acid (C18:1) added to safflower oil emulsions at a constant ratio of 3% (w/v); (2) supplementation of oleic acid to safflower oil emulsions enhanced perception of fattiness and creaminess; and (3) variation at rs1761667 influenced oleic acid detection and fat taste perception. In a 3-alternate forced choice test, 62% of participants detected 2.9 ± 0.7 mM oleic acid (or 0.08% w/v) in a 2.8% safflower oil emulsion. Supplementation of oleic acid did not enhance fattiness and creaminess perception for the cohort as a whole, though East Asians carrying the GG genotype perceived more overall fattiness and creaminess than their AA genotype counterparts (P ethnic-specific effects on fat taste perception. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Food Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Institute of Food Technologists.

  6. Diabetes mellitus tipo 2: qual o papel da insulina na expressão de NF-kappaB, PPARγ e CD36?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina de Oliveira SILVA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available No diabetes mellitus tipo 2 (DM2 e na síndrome de resistência à insulina, as complicações cardiovasculares resultam de um conjunto de processos aterogênicos envolvendo hiperglicemia crônica, excessiva glicação de proteínas (AGEs, ativação do fator nuclear kappa B (NKκB associada com o aumento da expressão de citocinas inflamatórias e estresse oxidativo, observando-se ainda alteração de LDL e expressão do receptor de scavenger CD36. A contribuição da hiperinsulinemia nesta sequência não é completamente elucidada. Nesta revisão, relata-se como a insulina pode modular a expressão proteica de NFκB, PPAR gama (PPARγ e CD36 em células da musculatura lisa vascular (CMLV da aorta de ratos estimuladas pelos AGE.

  7. A mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract improves fructose consumption-induced insulin resistance in rats: modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and glucose transporter-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Peng; Yao, Ling; Lin, Xuemei; Gu, Tieguang; Rong, Xianglu; Batey, Robert; Yamahara, Johji; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Yuhao

    2016-01-01

    Apple pomace is a by-product of the processing of apple for juice, cider or wine preparation. Rosemary is a herb commonly used as spice and flavoring agent in food processing. Evidence suggests that both apple pomace and rosemary have rich bioactive molecules with numerous metabolic effects. To provide more information for using apple pomace and rosemary as functional foods for management of metabolism-associated disorders, the present study investigated the insulin-sensitizing effect of a mixture of apple pomace and rosemary extract (AR). The results showed that treatment with AR (500 mg/kg, daily, by gavage) for 5 weeks attenuated chronic liquid fructose consumption-induced increases in fasting plasma insulin concentration, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index and the adipose tissue insulin resistance index in rats. Mechanistically, AR suppressed fructose-induced acceleration of the clearance of plasma non-esterified fatty acids during oral glucose tolerance test, and decreased excessive triglyceride accumulation and the increased Oil Red O staining area in the gastrocnemius. Furthermore, AR restored fructose-induced overexpression of sarcolemmal CD36 that is known to contribute to etiology of insulin resistance by facilitating fatty acid uptake, and downregulation of sarcolemmal glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 that is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter. Thus, these results demonstrate that AR improves fructose-induced insulin resistance in rats via modulation of sarcolemmal CD36 and GLUT-4.

  8. Modelling protection behaviour towards micronutrient deficiencies: Case of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes as health intervention for school-going children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogendi, Joseph Birundu; De Steur, Hans; Gellynck, Xavier; Makokha, Anselimo

    2016-02-01

    Despite successes recorded in combating iodine deficiency, more than 2 billion people are still at risk of iodine deficiency disorders. Rural landlocked and mountainous areas of developing countries are the hardest hit, hence the need to explore and advance novel strategies such as biofortification. We evaluated adoption, purchase, and consumption of iodine biofortified vegetable legumes (IBVL) using the theory of protection motivations (PMT) integrated with an economic valuation technique. A total of 1,200 participants from three land-locked locations in East Africa were recruited via multi-stage cluster sampling, and data were collected using two, slightly distinct, questionnaires incorporating PMT constructs. The survey also elicited preferences for iodine biofortified foods when offered at a premium or discount. Determinants of protection motivations and preferences for iodine biofortified foods were assessed using path analysis modelling and two-limit Tobit regression, respectively. Knowledge of iodine, iodine-health link, salt iodization, and biofortification was very low, albeit lower at the household level. Iodine and biofortification were not recognized as nutrient and novel approaches, respectively. On the other hand, severity, fear, occupation, knowledge, iodine status, household composition, and self-efficacy predicted the intention to consume biofortified foods at the household level; only vulnerability, self-efficacy, and location were the most crucial elements at the school level. In addition, results demonstrated a positive willingness-to-pay a premium or acceptance of a lesser discount for biofortification. Furthermore, preference towards iodine biofortified foods was a function of protection motivations, severity, vulnerability, fear, response efficacy, response cost, knowledge, iodine status, gender, age. and household head. Results lend support for prevention of iodine deficiency in unprotected populations through biofortification; however

  9. The Training Deficiency in Corporate America: Training Security Professionals to Protect Sensitive Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth T.

    2017-01-01

    Increased internal and external training approaches are elements senior leaders need to know before creating a training plan for security professionals to protect sensitive information. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore training strategies telecommunication industry leaders use to ensure security professionals can protect…

  10. P-glycoprotein-deficient mice have proximal tubule dysfunction but are protected against ischemic renal injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, M.; Kramers, C.; Levtchenko, E.N.; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Dijkman, H.B.P.M.; Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Hoorn, J.W.A. van der; Russel, F.G.M.; Masereeuw, R.

    2007-01-01

    The multidrug resistance gene 1 product, P-glycoprotein (P-gp), is expressed in several excretory organs, including the apical membrane of proximal tubules. After inducing acute renal failure, P-gp expression is upregulated and this might be a protective function by pumping out toxicants and harmful

  11. Vitamin D deficiency in children with chronic illnesses: Predisposing and protecting factors

    OpenAIRE

    Koskivirta, Panu

    2011-01-01

    This thesis assesses clinical differences in patients with low and high vitamin D levels. The factors analyzed included the underlying disease, body size, age, ethnic background, use of vitamin D supplements and the season when the blood sample was taken. Fifty patients with the lowest and 50 patients with the highest vitamin D concentrations were selected from a cohort of 1351 chronically ill children and adolescents who had had their vitamin D status assessed at Children's Hospital. Protect...

  12. NOD2 Deficiency Protects against Cardiac Remodeling after Myocardial Infarction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Although the pathogenesis of myocardial infarction (MI is multifactorial, activation of innate immune system to induce inflammation has emerged as a key pathophysiological process in MI. NOD2, one member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR family, plays an important role in the innate immune response. This study was to examine the role of NOD2 during MI. Methods: MI was induced by permanent ligation of the left coronary artery in wild type and NOD2-/- mice and cardiac fibroblasts were isolated. Results: NOD2 expression was significantly increased in myocardium in post-MI mice. NOD2 deficiency improved cardiac dysfunction and remodeling after MI as evidenced by echocardiographic analysis, reduced the levels of cytokines, inflammatory cell infiltration and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 activity. In vitro, we further found that NOD2 activation induced the activation of MAPK signaling pathways, production of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-9 activity in cardiac fibroblasts. Conclusions: Our studies demonstrate that NOD2 is a critical component of a signal transduction pathway that links cardiac injury by exacerbation of inflammation and MMP-9 activity. Pharmacological targeting of NOD2-mediated signaling pathways may provide a novel approach to treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Fatty acid binding protein 4 deficiency protects against oxygen-induced retinopathy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magali Saint-Geniez

    Full Text Available Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is a leading cause of blindness in children worldwide due to increasing survival rates of premature infants. Initial suppression, followed by increased production of the retinal vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF expression are key events that trigger the pathological neovascularization in ROP. Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4 is an intracellular lipid chaperone that is induced by VEGF in a subset of endothelial cells. FABP4 exhibits a pro-angiogenic function in cultured endothelial cells and in airway microvasculature, but whether it plays a role in modulation of retinal angiogenesis is not known. We hypothesized that FABP4 deficiency could ameliorate pathological retinal vascularization and investigated this hypothesis using a well-characterized mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR. We found that FABP4 was not expressed in retinal vessels, but was present in resident macrophages/microglial cells and endothelial cells of the hyaloid vasculature in the immature retina. While FABP4 expression was not required for normal development of retinal vessels, FABP4 expression was upregulated and localized to neovascular tufts in OIR. FABP4-/- mice demonstrated a significant decrease in neovessel formation as well as a significant improvement in physiological revascularization of the avascular retinal tissues. These alterations in retinal vasculature were accompanied by reduced endothelial cell proliferation, but no effect on apoptosis or macrophage/microglia recruitment. FABP4-/- OIR samples demonstrated decreased expression of genes involved in angiogenesis, such as Placental Growth Factor, and angiopoietin 2. Collectively, our findings suggest FABP4 as a potential target of pathologic retinal angiogenesis in proliferative retinopathies.

  14. The water extract of Liuwei dihuang possesses multi-protective properties on neurons and muscle tissue against deficiency of survival motor neuron protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Ting; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Liang, Wei-Fang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2017-10-15

    Deficiency of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein, which is encoded by the SMN1 and SMN2 genes, induces widespread splicing defects mainly in spinal motor neurons, and leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Currently, there is no effective treatment for SMA. Liuwei dihuang (LWDH), a traditional Chinese herbal formula, possesses multiple therapeutic benefits against various diseases via modulation of the nervous, immune and endocrine systems. Previously, we demonstrated water extract of LWDH (LWDH-WE) protects dopaminergic neurons and improves motor activity in models of Parkinson's disease. This study aimed to investigate the potential protection of LWDH-WE on SMN deficiency-induced neurodegeneration and muscle weakness. The effects of LWDH-WE on SMN deficiency-induced neurotoxicity and muscle atrophy were examined by using SMN-deficient NSC34 motor neuron-like cells and SMA-like mice, respectively. Inducible SMN-knockdown NSC34 motor neuron-like cells were used to mimic SMN-deficient condition. Doxycycline (1 µg/ml) was used to induce SMN deficiency in stable NSC34 cell line carrying SMN-specific shRNA. SMAΔ7 mice were used as a severe type of SMA mouse model. Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Apoptotic cells and neurite length were observed by inverted microscope. Protein expressions were examined by western blots. Muscle strength of animals was evaluated by hind-limb suspension test. LWDH-WE significantly increased SMN protein level, mitochondrial membrane potential and cell viability of SMN-deficient NSC34 cells. LWDH-WE attenuated SMN deficiency-induced down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and up-regulation of cytosolic cytochrome c and cleaved caspase-3. Moreover, LWDH-WE prevented SMN deficiency-induced inhibition of neurite outgrowth and activation of Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA)/ Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK2)/ phospho

  15. Malfunction and failure in regulation and protection systems of PHWRs -identification of deficient areas and suggested scope of improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, A.K.; Prabhat Kumar; Arya, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    The reactor regulation and protection systems have changed significantly in Narora Atomic Power Station type of reactors as compared to RAPS design. As compared to total negative reactivity worth offered by moderator dump for reactor shutdown in Rajasthan Atomic Power Station, the worth of the two fast acting shutdown systems (PSS and SSS) is far lesser. In fact the worth is not even adequate to maintain the shutdown indefinitely. This has necessitated incorporation of two slow acting systems for reactor regulation and protection i.e. ALPS and GRAB systems. The negative reactivity insertion rate from fast acting PSS and SSS is however much faster as compared to moderator dump. The above changes have brought about significant changes in reactivity devices and also associated problems due to larger number of systems and equipment. The layout has also become very congested on the top of calandria vault making maintenance and inspection more cumbersome. The paper highlights the malfunction and deficiencies observed in PSS, SSS and regulating rods and identifies the further scope of improvement. (author)

  16. Vaccination with a live attenuated Acinetobacter baumannii deficient in thioredoxin provides protection against systemic Acinetobacter infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Sarah; Ketter, Patrick M; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Grimm, Rose C; May, Holly C; Cap, Andrew P; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2017-06-08

    Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-Ab), an opportunistic pathogen associated with nosocomial and combat related infections, has a high mortality due to its virulence and limited treatment options. Deletion of the thioredoxin gene (TrxA) from a clinical isolate of MDR-Ab resulted in a 100-fold increase in 50% lethal dose (LD 50 ) in a systemic challenge murine model. Thus, we investigated the potential use of this attenuated strain as a live vaccine against MDR-Ab. Mice were vaccinated by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of 2×10 5 CFU of the ΔtrxA mutant, boosted 14days later with an equivalent inoculum, and then challenged 30days post-vaccination by i.p. injection with 10 LD 50 of the wild type (WT) Ci79 strain. Efficacy of vaccination was evaluated by monitoring MDR-Ab specific antibody titers and cytokine production, observing pathology and organ burdens after WT challenge, and measuring levels of serum pentraxin-3, a molecular correlate of A. baumannii infection severity, before and after challenge. Mice vaccinated with ΔtrxA were fully protected against the lethal challenge of WT. However, minimal immunoglobulin class switching was observed with IgM predominating. Spleens harvested from vaccinated mice exhibited negligible levels of IL-4, IFN-γ and IL-17 production when stimulated with UV-inactivated WT Ci79. Importantly, tissues obtained from vaccinated mice displayed reduced pathology and organ burden compared to challenged non-vaccinated mice. Additionally, serum pentraxin-3 concentrations were not increased 24h after challenge in vaccinated mice, correlating with reduction of WT MDR-Ab infection in ΔtrxA immunized mice. Furthermore, passive immunization with ΔtrxA-immune sera provided protection against lethal systemic Ci79 challenge. Collectively, the defined live attenuated ΔtrxA strain is a vaccine candidate against emerging MDR Acinetobacter infection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor–2 Deficiency Confers Protection against Bleomycin-Induced Lung Injury and Fibrosis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long Shuang; Fu, Panfeng; Patel, Priya; Harijith, Anantha; Sun, Tianjiao; Zhao, Yutong; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Chun, Jerold

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating disease characterized by alveolar epithelial cell injury, the accumulation of fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, and the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through its G protein–coupled receptors is critical for its various biological functions. Recently, LPA and LPA receptor 1 were implicated in lung fibrogenesis. However, the role of other LPA receptors in fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we use a bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis model to investigate the roles of LPA2 in pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, we found that LPA2 knockout (Lpar2−/−) mice were protected against bleomycin-induced lung injury, fibrosis, and mortality, compared with wild-type control mice. Furthermore, LPA2 deficiency attenuated the bleomycin-induced expression of fibronectin (FN), α–smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and collagen in lung tissue, as well as levels of IL-6, transforming growth factor–β (TGF-β), and total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In human lung fibroblasts, the knockdown of LPA2 attenuated the LPA-induced expression of TGF-β1 and the differentiation of lung fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, resulting in the decreased expression of FN, α-SMA, and collagen, as well as decreased activation of extracellular regulated kinase 1/2, Akt, Smad3, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Moreover, the knockdown of LPA2 with small interfering RNA also mitigated the TGF-β1–induced differentiation of lung fibroblasts. In addition, LPA2 deficiency significantly attenuated the bleomycin-induced apoptosis of alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells in the mouse lung. Together, our data indicate that the knockdown of LPA2 attenuated bleomycin-induced lung injury and pulmonary fibrosis, and this may be related to an inhibition of the LPA-induced expression of TGF-β and the activation and differentiation of fibroblasts. PMID:23808384

  18. CD36 AA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is associated with decreased lipid taste perception in Tunisian obese woman: association with pro-inflammatory TNF-a GA and IL-6 GC genotypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plesník, J.; Mřížák, I.; Šerý, Omar; Arfa, A.; Fekih, M.; Bouslema, A.; Zaouali, M.; Tabka, Z.; Khan, N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, Supplement 1 (2014), s. 7-7 ISSN 0767-3981. [Annual Meeting of French Society of Pharmacology and Therapeutics /18./. 22.04.2014-24.04.2014, Poitiers] Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : CD36 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  19. Immunization with lipopolysaccharide-deficient whole cells provides protective immunity in an experimental mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meritxell García-Quintanilla

    Full Text Available The increasing clinical importance of infections caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii warrants the development of novel approaches for prevention and treatment. In this context, vaccination of certain patient populations may contribute to reducing the morbidity and mortality caused by this pathogen. Vaccines against Gram-negative bacteria based on inactivated bacterial cells are highly immunogenic and have been shown to produce protective immunity against a number of bacterial species. However, the high endotoxin levels present in these vaccines due to the presence of lipopolysaccharide complicates their use in human vaccination. In the present study, we used a laboratory-derived strain of A. baumannii that completely lacks lipopolysaccharide due to a mutation in the lpxD gene (IB010, one of the genes involved in the first steps of lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, for vaccination. We demonstrate that IB010 has greatly reduced endotoxin content (<1.0 endotoxin unit/106 cells compared to wild type cells. Immunization with formalin inactivated IB010 produced a robust antibody response consisting of both IgG1 and IgG2c subtypes. Mice immunized with IB010 had significantly lower post-infection tissue bacterial loads and significantly lower serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 compared to control mice in a mouse model of disseminated A. baumannii infection. Importantly, immunized mice were protected from infection with the ATCC 19606 strain and an A. baumannii clinical isolate. These data suggest that immunization with inactivated A. baumannii whole cells deficient in lipopolysaccharide could serve as the basis for a vaccine for the prevention of infection caused by A. baumannii.

  20. Deficiency in type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor in mice protects against oxygen-induced lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flejou Jean-François

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular responses to aging and oxidative stress are regulated by type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R. Oxidant injury, which is implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of respiratory diseases, acutely upregulates IGF-1R expression in the lung. This led us to suspect that reduction of IGF-1R levels in lung tissue could prevent deleterious effects of oxygen exposure. Methods Since IGF-1R null mutant mice die at birth from respiratory failure, we generated compound heterozygous mice harboring a hypomorphic (Igf-1rneo and a knockout (Igf-1r- receptor allele. These IGF-1Rneo/- mice, strongly deficient in IGF-1R, were subjected to hyperoxia and analyzed for survival time, ventilatory control, pulmonary histopathology, morphometry, lung edema and vascular permeability. Results Strikingly, after 72 h of exposure to 90% O2, IGF-1Rneo/- mice had a significantly better survival rate during recovery than IGF-1R+/+ mice (77% versus 53%, P neo/- mice which developed conspicuously less edema and vascular extravasation than controls. Also, hyperoxia-induced abnormal pattern of breathing which precipitated respiratory failure was elicited less frequently in the IGF-1Rneo/- mice. Conclusion Together, these data demonstrate that a decrease in IGF-1R signaling in mice protects against oxidant-induced lung injury.

  1. Small heterodimer partner (SHP deficiency protects myocardia from lipid accumulation in high fat diet-fed mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hun Ohn

    Full Text Available The small heterodimer partner (SHP regulates fatty acid oxidation and lipogenesis in the liver by regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ expression. SHP is also abundantly expressed in the myocardium. We investigated the effect of SHP expression on myocardia assessing not only heart structure and function but also lipid metabolism and related gene expression in a SHP deletion animal model. Transcriptional profiling with a microarray revealed that genes participating in cell growth, cytokine signalling, phospholipid metabolism, and extracellular matrix are up-regulated in the myocardia of SHP knockout (KO mice compared to those of wild-type (WT mice (nominal p value < 0.05. Consistent with these gene expression changes, the left ventricular masses of SHP KO mice were significantly higher than WT mice (76.8 ± 20.5 mg vs. 52.8 ± 6.8 mg, P = 0.0093. After 12 weeks of high fat diet (HFD, SHP KO mice gained less weight and exhibited less elevation in serum-free fatty acid and less ectopic lipid accumulation in the myocardium than WT mice. According to microarray analysis, genes regulated by PPARγ1 and PPARα were down-regulated in myocardia of SHP KO mice compared to their expression in WT mice after HFD, suggesting that the reduction in lipid accumulation in the myocardium resulted from a decrease in lipogenesis regulated by PPARγ. We confirmed the reduced expression of PPARγ1 and PPARα target genes such as CD36, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase by SHP KO after HFD.

  2. Lysyl Oxidase-Like 1 Protein Deficiency Protects Mice from Adenoviral Transforming Growth Factor-β1-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaye, Pierre-Simon; Shimbori, Chiko; Upagupta, Chandak; Sato, Seidai; Shi, Wei; Gauldie, Jack; Ask, Kjetil; Kolb, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease characterized by excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the lung parenchyma. The abnormal ECM deposition slowly overtakes normal lung tissue, disturbing gas exchange and leading to respiratory failure and death. ECM cross-linking and subsequent stiffening is thought to be a major contributor of disease progression and also promotes the activation of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, one of the main profibrotic growth factors. Lysyl oxidase-like (LOXL) 1 belongs to the cross-linking enzyme family and has been shown to be up-regulated in active fibrotic regions of bleomycin-treated mice and patients with IPF. We demonstrate in this study that LOXL1-deficient mice are protected from experimental lung fibrosis induced by overexpression of TGF-β1 using adenoviral (Ad) gene transfer (AdTGF-β1). The lack of LOXL1 prevented accumulation of insoluble cross-linked collagen in the lungs, and therefore limited lung stiffness after AdTGF-β1. In addition, we applied mechanical stretch to lung slices from LOXL1 +/+ and LOXL1 -/- mice treated with AdTGF-β1. Lung stiffness (Young's modulus) of LOXL1 -/- lung slices was significantly lower compared with LOXL1 +/+ lung slices. Moreover, the release of activated TGF-β1 after mechanical stretch was significantly lower in LOXL1 -/- mice compared with LOXL1 +/+ mice after AdTGF-β1. These data support the concept that cross-linking enzyme inhibition represents an interesting therapeutic target for drug development in IPF.

  3. Effect of polymorphisms in the CD36 and STAT3 genes on different dietary interventions among patients with coronary artery disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Vera Lucia; Markoski, Melissa Medeiros; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Garofallo, Sílvia; Santos, Julia Lorenzon Dos; Oliveira, Aline; Wechenfelder, Camila; Campos, Viviane Paiva de; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Machado, Luana; Marcadenti, Aline

    2016-09-05

    Cardiovascular disease has become a major health problem, and it has been associated with both environmental and genetic factors. Studies have shown that the Mediterranean Diet (MeDiet), or its components such as nuts and olive oil, may be strongly associated with the improvement of cardiovascular risk factors in specific populations. The purpose of the GENUTRI study is to investigate the interaction of genetics with cardiovascular risk factors in a non-Mediterranean population with coronary artery disease (CAD) according to three different diets: rich in pecan nuts, in extra-virgin olive oil or a control diet. The GENUTRI study is a single-center, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, 12-week pragmatic clinical trial conducted in patients aged 40 to 80 years and diagnosed with CAD. A standardized questionnaire will be applied to data collection and a blood sample will be obtained for lipid, glycemic and inflammatory profile evaluation. Polymorphisms in the CD36 and STAT3 genes will be detected using the TaqMan® SNP Genotyping Assay. Patients will be allocated in three groups: group 1: 30 g/day of pecan nuts; group 2: 30 ml/day of olive oil; and group 3: control diet. The primary outcome will consist of changes in LDL-cholesterol (in mg/dl) after 12 weeks of intervention. Studies have shown the beneficial effects of diets rich in nuts and olive oil mainly in the Mediterranean population. GENUTRI is a clinical trial focusing on the effects of nuts or olive oil supplementation in Brazilian individuals. Additionally, we will try to demonstrate that genetic polymorphisms linked to cardiovascular disease may modulate the effects of different diets on biochemical and inflammatory markers among these subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02202265 (registered on 18 July 2014: first version).

  4. Sunlight, skin cancer and vitamin D: What are the conclusions of recent findings that protection against solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes 25-hydroxyvitamin D deficiency in solid organ-transplant recipients, xeroderma pigmentosum, and other risk groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Jörg

    2007-03-01

    A connection between vitamin D deficiency and severe health problems including various types of cancer has been demonstrated. We have shown that patients that have to protect themselves against solar UV radiation for medical reasons, including patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS), lupus erythematodes (LE) or transplant recipients, are at risk to develop vitamin D deficiency. We conclude that 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels as a measure of vitamin D status have to be analyzed in patients that have to protect themselves against solar UV radiation for medical reasons. Suboptimal vitamin D status has to be substituted (e.g. via oral treatment) to protect against serious vitamin D deficiency-related health problems without increasing the risk to develop solar UV-induced skin cancer. Our finding that protection against solar UV radiation causes vitamin D deficiency underlines the need for re-defining dermatological recommendations for solar UV protection in skin cancer prevention programs.

  5. SAP deficiency mitigated atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lingyun; Wu, Teng; Zeng, Cuiling; Li, Xiangli; Li, Xiaoqiang; Wen, Dingwen; Ji, Tianxing; Lan, Tian; Xing, Liying; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing

    2016-01-01

    Serum amyloid P conpoent (SAP), a member of the pentraxin family, interact with pathogens and cell debris to promote their removal by macrophages and neutrophils and is co-localized with atherosclerotic plaques in patients. However, the exact mechanism of SAP in atherogenesis is still unclear. We investigated whether SAP influence macrophage recruitment and foam cell formation and ultimately affect atherosclerotic progression. we generated apoE(-/-); SAP(-/-) (DKO) mice and fed them western diet for 4 and 8 weeks to characterize atherosclerosis development. SAP deficiency effectively reduced plaque size both in the aorta (p = 0.0006 for 4 wks; p = 0.0001 for 8 wks) and the aortic root (p = 0.0061 for 4 wks; p = 0.0079 for 8wks) compared with apoE(-/-) mice. Meanwhile, SAP deficiency inhibited oxLDL-induced foam cell formation (p = 0.0004) compared with apoE(-/-) mice and SAP treatment increases oxLDL-induced foam cell formation (p = 0.002) in RAW cells. Besides, SAP deficiency reduced macrophages recruitment (p = 0.035) in vivo and in vitro (p = 0.026). Furthermore, SAP treatment enhanced CD36 (p = 0.007) and FcγRI (p = 0.031) expression induced by oxLDL through upregulating JNK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation whereas specific JNK1/2 inhibitor reduced CD36 (p = 0.0005) and FcγRI (P = 0.0007) expression in RAW cell. SAP deficiency also significantly decreased the expression of M1 and M2 macrophage markers and inflammatory cytokines in oxLDL-induced macrophages. SAP deficiency mitigated foam cell formation and atherosclerotic development in apoE(-/-) mice, due to reduction in macrophages recruitment, polarization and pro-inflammatory cytokines and inhibition the CD36/FcγR-dependent signaling pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A MATE-family efflux pump rescues the Escherichia coli 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient mutator phenotype and protects against H(2O(2 killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier R Guelfo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypermutation may accelerate bacterial evolution in the short-term. In the long-term, however, hypermutators (cells with an increased rate of mutation can be expected to be at a disadvantage due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Therefore, in theory, hypermutators are doomed to extinction unless they compensate the elevated mutational burden (deleterious load. Different mechanisms capable of restoring a low mutation rate to hypermutators have been proposed. By choosing an 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (GO-deficient Escherichia coli strain as a hypermutator model, we investigated the existence of genes able to rescue the hypermutable phenotype by multicopy suppression. Using an in vivo-generated mini-MudII4042 genomic library and a mutator screen, we obtained chromosomal fragments that decrease the rate of mutation in a mutT-deficient strain. Analysis of a selected clone showed that the expression of NorM is responsible for the decreased mutation rate in 8-oxoguanine-repair-deficient (mutT, mutY, and mutM mutY strains. NorM is a member of the multidrug and toxin extrusion (MATE family of efflux pumps whose role in E. coli cell physiology remains unknown. Our results indicate that NorM may act as a GO-system backup decreasing AT to CG and GC to TA transversions. In addition, the ability of NorM to reduce the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in a GO-deficient strain and protect the cell from oxidative stress, including protein carbonylation, suggests that it can extrude specific molecules-byproducts of bacterial metabolism-that oxidize the guanine present in both DNA and nucleotide pools. Altogether, our results indicate that NorM protects the cell from specific ROS when the GO system cannot cope with the damage.

  7. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Falank, Carolyne [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The role of homologous recombination repair in DU-induced toxicity was examined. • Loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. • XRCC3 protects cell from DU-induced chromosome breaks and fusions. • XRCC3 plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation of the X chromosome. - Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  8. ACE-2/Ang1-7/Mas cascade mediates ACE inhibitor, captopril, protective effects in estrogen-deficient osteoporotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuohashish, Hatem M; Ahmed, Mohammed M; Sabry, Dina; Khattab, Mahmoud M; Al-Rejaie, Salim S

    2017-08-01

    The local role of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) was documented recently beside its conventional systemic functions. Studies showed that the effector angiotensin II (AngII) alters bone health, while inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE-1) preserved these effects. The newly identified Ang1-7 exerts numerous beneficial effects opposing the AngII. Thus, the current study examines the role of Ang1-7 in mediating the osteo-preservative effects of ACEI (captopril) through the G-protein coupled Mas receptor using an ovariectomized (OVX) rat model of osteoporosis. 8 weeks after the surgical procedures, captopril was administered orally (40mgkg -1 d -1 ), while the specific Mas receptor blocker (A-779) was delivered at infusion rate of 400ngkg -1 min -1 for 6 weeks. Bone metabolic markers were measured in serum and urine. Minerals concentrations were quantified in serum, urine and femoral bones by inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS). Trabecular and cortical morphometry was analyzed in the right distal femurs using micro-CT. Finally, the expressions of RAS peptides, enzymes and receptors along with the receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) were determined femurs heads. OVX animals markedly showed altered bone metabolism and mineralization along with disturbed bone micro-structure. Captopril significantly restored the metabolic bone bio-markers and corrected Ca 2+ and P values in urine and bones of estrogen deficient rats. Moreover, the trabecular and cortical morphometric features were repaired by captopril in OVX groups. Captopril also improved the expressions of ACE-2, Ang1-7, Mas and OPG, while abolished OVX-induced up-regulation of ACE-1, AngII, Ang type 1 receptor (AT1R) and RANKL. Inhibition of Ang1-7 cascade by A-779 significantly eradicated captopril protective effects on bone metabolism, mineralization and micro-structure. A-779 also restored OVX effects on RANKL expression and ACE-1/AngII/AT1R

  9. Kimchi methanol extract and the kimchi active compound, 3'-(4'-hydroxyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid, downregulate CD36 in THP-1 macrophages stimulated by oxLDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Song, Yeong-Ok

    2014-08-01

    Macrophage foam cell formation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a key step in the progression of atherosclerosis, which is involved in cholesterol influx and efflux in macrophages mediated by related proteins such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CD36, PPARα, liver-X receptor α (LXRα), and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of kimchi methanol extract (KME) and a kimchi active compound, 3-(4'-hydroxyl-3',5'-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HDMPPA) on cholesterol flux in THP-1-derived macrophages treated with oxLDL. The effects of KME and HDMPPA on cell viability and lipid peroxidation were determined. Furthermore, the protein expression of PPARγ, CD36, PPARα, LXRα, and ABCA1 was examined. OxLDL strongly induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in THP-1-derived macrophages. However, KME and HDMPPA significantly improved cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by oxLDL in THP-1-derived macrophages (P<.05). Moreover, KME and HDMPPA suppressed CD36 and PPARγ expressions, both of which participate in cholesterol influx. In contrast, KME and HDMPPA augmented LXRα, PPARα, and ABCA1 expression, which are associated with cholesterol efflux. Consequently, KME and HDMPPA suppressed lipid accumulation. These results indicate that KME and HDMPPA may inhibit lipid accumulation, in part, by regulating cholesterol influx- and efflux-related proteins. These findings will thus be useful for future prevention strategies against atherosclerosis.

  10. Selective predisposition to bacterial infections in IRAK-4-deficient children : IRAK-4-dependent TLRs are otherwise redundant in protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ku, Cheng-Lung; von Bernuth, Horst; Picard, Capucine; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Chang, Huey-Hsuan; Yang, Kun; Chrabieh, Maya; Issekutz, Andrew C.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Gallin, John; Holland, Steven M.; Roifman, Chaim; Ehl, Stephan; Smart, Joanne; Tang, Mimi; Barrat, Franck J.; Levy, Ofer; McDonald, Douglas; Day-Good, Noorbibi K.; Miller, Richard; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Al-Hajjar, Sami; Al-Ghonaium, Abdulaziz; Speert, David; Sanlaville, Damien; Li, Xiaoxia; Geissmann, Frederic; Vivier, Eric; Marodi, Laszlo; Garty, Ben-Zion; Chapel, Helen; Rodriguez-Gallego, Carlos; Bossuyt, Xavier; Abel, Laurent; Puel, Anne; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Human interleukin ( IL) 1 receptor - associated kinase 4 ( IRAK- 4) deficiency is a recently discovered primary immunodefi ciency that impairs Toll/ IL- 1R immunity, except for the Toll- like receptor ( TLR) 3 - and TLR4 - interferon ( IFN)-alpha/beta pathways. The clinical and immunological

  11. Kimchi Methanol Extract and the Kimchi Active Compound, 3′-(4′-Hydroxyl-3′,5′-Dimethoxyphenyl)Propionic Acid, Downregulate CD36 in THP-1 Macrophages Stimulated by oxLDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Ye-Rang; Kim, Hyun-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Macrophage foam cell formation by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is a key step in the progression of atherosclerosis, which is involved in cholesterol influx and efflux in macrophages mediated by related proteins such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CD36, PPARα, liver-X receptor α (LXRα), and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1). The aim of this study was to investigate the beneficial effects of kimchi methanol extract (KME) and a kimchi active compound, 3-(4′-hydroxyl-3′,5′-dimethoxyphenyl)propionic acid (HDMPPA) on cholesterol flux in THP-1-derived macrophages treated with oxLDL. The effects of KME and HDMPPA on cell viability and lipid peroxidation were determined. Furthermore, the protein expression of PPARγ, CD36, PPARα, LXRα, and ABCA1 was examined. OxLDL strongly induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in THP-1-derived macrophages. However, KME and HDMPPA significantly improved cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by oxLDL in THP-1-derived macrophages (P<.05). Moreover, KME and HDMPPA suppressed CD36 and PPARγ expressions, both of which participate in cholesterol influx. In contrast, KME and HDMPPA augmented LXRα, PPARα, and ABCA1 expression, which are associated with cholesterol efflux. Consequently, KME and HDMPPA suppressed lipid accumulation. These results indicate that KME and HDMPPA may inhibit lipid accumulation, in part, by regulating cholesterol influx- and efflux-related proteins. These findings will thus be useful for future prevention strategies against atherosclerosis. PMID:25010893

  12. Vaccination with Replication Deficient Adenovectors Encoding YF-17D Antigens Induces Long-Lasting Protection from Severe Yellow Fever Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Maria R; Larsen, Mads A B; Kongsgaard, Michael; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren; Stryhn, Anette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-02-01

    The live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YF-17D) has been successfully used for more than 70 years. It is generally considered a safe vaccine, however, recent reports of serious adverse events following vaccination have raised concerns and led to suggestions that even safer YF vaccines should be developed. Replication deficient adenoviruses (Ad) have been widely evaluated as recombinant vectors, particularly in the context of prophylactic vaccination against viral infections in which induction of CD8+ T-cell mediated immunity is crucial, but potent antibody responses may also be elicited using these vectors. In this study, we present two adenobased vectors targeting non-structural and structural YF antigens and characterize their immunological properties. We report that a single immunization with an Ad-vector encoding the non-structural protein 3 from YF-17D could elicit a strong CD8+ T-cell response, which afforded a high degree of protection from subsequent intracranial challenge of vaccinated mice. However, full protection was only observed using a vector encoding the structural proteins from YF-17D. This vector elicited virus-specific CD8+ T cells as well as neutralizing antibodies, and both components were shown to be important for protection thus mimicking the situation recently uncovered in YF-17D vaccinated mice. Considering that Ad-vectors are very safe, easy to produce and highly immunogenic in humans, our data indicate that a replication deficient adenovector-based YF vaccine may represent a safe and efficient alternative to the classical live attenuated YF vaccine and should be further tested.

  13. Deficiencies in Natura 2000 for protecting recovering large carnivores: A spotlight on the wolf Canis lupus in Poland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom A Diserens

    Full Text Available If protected areas are to remain relevant in our dynamic world they must be adapted to changes in species ranges. In the EU one of the most notable such changes is the recent recovery of large carnivores, which are protected by Natura 2000 at the national and population levels. However, the Natura 2000 network was designed prior to their recent recovery, which raises the question whether the network is sufficient to protect the contemporary ranges of large carnivores. To investigate this question we evaluated Natura 2000 coverage of the three wolf Canis lupus populations in Poland. Wolf tracking data showed that wolves have recolonised almost all suitable habitat in Poland (as determined by a recent habitat suitability model, so we calculated the overlap between the Natura 2000 network and all wolf habitat in Poland. On the basis of published Natura 2000 criteria, we used 20% as the minimum required coverage. At the national level, wolves are sufficiently protected (22% coverage, but at the population level, the Baltic and Carpathian populations are far better protected (28 and 47%, respectively than the endangered Central European Lowland population (12%. As Natura 2000 insufficiently protects the most endangered wolf population in Poland, we recommend expansion of Natura 2000 to protect at least an additional 8% of wolf habitat in western Poland, and discuss which specific forests are most in need of additional coverage. Implementation of these actions will have positive conservation implications and help Poland to fulfil its Habitats Directive obligations. As it is likely that similar gaps in Natura 2000 are arising in other EU member states experiencing large carnivore recoveries, particularly in Central Europe, we make the case for a flexible approach to Natura 2000 and suggest that such coverage evaluations may be beneficial elsewhere.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  15. Metabolic Modulation by Medium-Chain Triglycerides Reduces Oxidative Stress and Ameliorates CD36-Mediated Cardiac Remodeling in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat in the Initial and Established Stages of Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifudeen, Ismael; Subhadra, Lakshmi; Konnottil, Remani; Nair, R Renuka

    2017-03-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is characterized by a decrease in oxidation of long-chain fatty acids, possibly mediated by reduced expression of the cell-surface protein cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36). Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were therefore supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT), a substrate that bypasses CD36, based on the assumption that the metabolic modulation will ameliorate ventricular remodeling. The diet of 2-month-old and 6-month-old SHRs was supplemented with 5% MCT (Tricaprylin), for 4 months. Metabolic modulation was assessed by mRNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α and medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Blood pressure was measured noninvasively. LVH was assessed with the use of hypertrophy index, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, mRNA expression of B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac fibrosis, and calcineurin-A levels. Oxidative stress indicators (cardiac malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 3-nitrotyrosine levels), myocardial energy level (ATP, phosphocreatine), and lipid profile were determined. Supplementation of MCT stimulated fatty acid oxidation in animals of both age groups, reduced hypertrophy and oxidative stress along with the maintenance of energy level. Blood pressure, body weight, and lipid profile were unaffected by the treatment. The results indicate that modulation of myocardial fatty acid metabolism by MCT prevents progressive cardiac remodeling in SHRs, possibly by maintenance of energy level and decrease in oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MVA.85A boosting of BCG and an attenuated, phoP deficient M. tuberculosis vaccine both show protective efficacy against tuberculosis in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Verreck

    Full Text Available Continuous high global tuberculosis (TB mortality rates and variable vaccine efficacy of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG motivate the search for better vaccine regimes. Relevant models are required to downselect the most promising vaccines entering clinical efficacy testing and to identify correlates of protection.Here, we evaluated immunogenicity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rhesus monkeys with two novel strategies: BCG boosted by modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing antigen 85A (MVA.85A, and attenuated M. tuberculosis with a disrupted phoP gene (SO2 as a single-dose vaccine. Both strategies were well tolerated, and immunogenic as evidenced by induction of specific IFNgamma responses. Antigen 85A-specific IFNgamma secretion was specifically increased by MVA.85A boosting. Importantly, both MVA.85A and SO2 treatment significantly reduced pathology and chest X-ray scores upon infectious challenge with M. tuberculosis Erdman strain. MVA.85A and SO2 treatment also showed reduced average lung bacterial counts (1.0 and 1.2 log respectively, compared with 0.4 log for BCG and significant protective effect by reduction in C-reactive protein levels, body weight loss, and decrease of erythrocyte-associated hematologic parameters (MCV, MCH, Hb, Ht as markers of inflammatory infection, all relative to non-vaccinated controls. Lymphocyte stimulation revealed Ag85A-induced IFNgamma levels post-infection as the strongest immunocorrelate for protection (spearman's rho: -0.60.Both the BCG/MVA.85A prime-boost regime and the novel live attenuated, phoP deficient TB vaccine candidate SO2 showed significant protective efficacy by various parameters in rhesus macaques. Considering the phylogenetic relationship between macaque and man and the similarity in manifestations of TB disease, these data support further development of these primary and combination TB vaccine candidates.

  17. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  18. The activation of protein homeostasis protective mechanisms perhaps is not responsible for lifespan extension caused by deficiencies of mitochondrial proteins in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yaguang; Chen, Sixi; Ma, Mengmeng; Yao, Xiuping; Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Lu, Jianxin

    2015-05-01

    During aging the ability of organisms to maintain the protein homeostasis declines and damaged and misfolded proteins accumulate in cells. But whether the deterioration of protein homeostasis is the cause or consequence of aging is not clearly understood. Mitochondrial dysfunctions usually lead to increased longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans, the cause of which is believed to be the activation of protein homeostasis protective mechanisms including mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) and GCN-2 kinase mediated nutrient-sensing pathway. However, we investigated four genes which encode well-defined mitochondrial proteins and found that: (i) UPR(mt) activation was associated with not only increased longevity by knockdown of mfn-1, cco-1, or nuo-6, but also decreased longevity by mev-1 RNAi; (ii) The blockage of UPR(mt) pathway did not repress mfn-1, cco-1, or nuo-6 RNAi induced lifespan extension; (iii) The activation of UPR(mt) did not increase longevity; (iv) Knockdown of mfn-1, cco-1, or nuo-6 increased longevity independently of GCN-2. The combined results indicate that two important kinds of the protein homeostasis protective mechanisms, namely UPR(mt) and GCN-2 pathways, are not responsible for mitochondrial deficiency induced lifespan extension. The enhanced protection of protein homeostasis may be insufficient to slow aging, and there may be other mechanisms that contribute to the increased longevity in response to mitochondrial dysfunctions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetically Engineered Ascorbic acid-deficient Live Mutants of Leishmania donovani induce long lasting Protective Immunity against Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sneha; Madhubala, Rentala

    2015-06-02

    Visceral leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania donovani is the most severe systemic form of the disease. There are still no vaccines available for humans and there are limitations associated with the current therapeutic regimens for leishmaniasis. Recently, we reported functional importance of Arabino-1, 4-lactone oxidase (ALO) enzyme from L. donovani involved in ascorbate biosynthesis pathway. In this study, we have shown that ΔALO parasites do not affect the ability of null mutants to invade visceral organs but severely impair parasite persistence beyond 16 week in BALB/c mice and hence are safe as an immunogen. Both short term (5 week) and long term (20 week) immunization with ΔALO parasites conferred sustained protection against virulent challenge in BALB/c mice, activated splenocytes and resulted in induction of pro-inflammatory cytokine response. Protection in immunized mice after challenge correlated with the stimulation of IFN-γ producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Antigen-mediated cell immunity correlated with robust nitrite and superoxide generation, macrophage-derived oxidants critical in controlling Leishmania infection. Our data shows that live attenuated ΔALO parasites are safe, induce protective immunity and can provide sustained protection against Leishmania donovani. We further conclude that the parasites attenuated in their anti-oxidative defence mechanism can be exploited as vaccine candidates.

  20. Modulation of macrophage activation state protects tissue from necrosis during critical limb ischemia in thrombospondin-1-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Bréchot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages, key regulators of healing/regeneration processes, strongly infiltrate ischemic tissues from patients suffering from critical limb ischemia (CLI. However pro-inflammatory markers correlate with disease progression and risk of amputation, suggesting that modulating macrophage activation state might be beneficial. We previously reported that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 is highly expressed in ischemic tissues during CLI in humans. TSP-1 is a matricellular protein that displays well-known angiostatic properties in cancer, and regulates inflammation in vivo and macrophages properties in vitro. We therefore sought to investigate its function in a mouse model of CLI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a genetic model of tsp-1(-/- mice subjected to femoral artery excision, we report that tsp-1(-/- mice were clinically and histologically protected from necrosis compared to controls. Tissue protection was associated with increased postischemic angiogenesis and muscle regeneration. We next showed that macrophages present in ischemic tissues exhibited distinct phenotypes in tsp-1(-/- and wt mice. A strong reduction of necrotic myofibers phagocytosis was observed in tsp-1(-/- mice. We next demonstrated that phagocytosis of muscle cell debris is a potent pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages in vitro. Consistently with these findings, macrophages that infiltrated ischemic tissues exhibited a reduced postischemic pro-inflammatory activation state in tsp-1(-/- mice, characterized by a reduced Ly-6C expression and a less pro-inflammatory cytokine expression profile. Finally, we showed that monocyte depletion reversed clinical and histological protection from necrosis observed in tsp-1(-/- mice, thereby demonstrating that macrophages mediated tissue protection in these mice. CONCLUSION: This study defines targeting postischemic macrophage activation state as a new potential therapeutic approach to protect tissues from necrosis and promote tissue

  1. ClC-3 deficiency protects preadipocytes against apoptosis induced by palmitate in vitro and in type 2 diabetes mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Ying; Huang, Xiong-Qin; Zhao, Li-Yan; Sun, Fang-Yun; Chen, Wen-Liang; Du, Jie-Yi; Yuan, Feng; Li, Jie; Huang, Xue-Lian; Liu, Jie; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Guan, Yong-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Wen; Wang, Guan-Lei

    2014-11-01

    Palmitate, a common saturated free fatty acid (FFA), has been demonstrated to induce preadipocyte apoptosis in the absence of adipogenic stimuli, suggesting that preadipocytes may be prone to apoptosis under adipogenic insufficient conditions, like type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). ClC-3, encoding Cl(-) channel or Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter, is critical for cell fate choices of proliferation versus apoptosis under diseased conditions. However, it is unknown whether ClC-3 is related with preadipocyte apoptosis induced by palmitate or T2DM. Palmitate, but not oleate, induced apoptosis and increase in ClC-3 protein expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte. ClC-3 specific siRNA attenuated palmitate-induced apoptosis and increased protein levels of Grp78, ATF4, CHOP and phosphorylation of JNK1/2, whereas had no effects on increased phospho-PERK and phospho-eIF2α protein expression. Moreover, the enhanced apoptosis was shown in preadipocytes from high-sucrose/fat, low-dose STZ induced T2DM mouse model with hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia (elevated serum TG and FFA levels) and insulin resistance. ClC-3 knockout significantly attenuated preadipocyte apoptosis and the above metabolic disorders in T2DM mice. These data demonstrated that ClC-3 deficiency prevent preadipocytes against palmitate-induced apoptosis via suppressing ER stress, and also suggested that ClC-3 may play a role in regulating cellular apoptosis and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism during T2DM.

  2. Perilipin1 deficiency in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells attenuates lesions in atherosclerosis-prone mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhao

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the role of perilipin 1 (Plin1 in whole body or bone marrow-derived cells on atherogenesis.Accumulated evidence have indicated the role of Plin1 in atherosclerosis, however, these findings are controversial. In this study, we showed that Plin1 was assembled and colocalized with CD68 in macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE-/- mice. We further found 39% reduction of plaque size in the aortic roots of Plin1 and ApoE double knockout (Plin1-/-ApoE-/- females compared with ApoE-/- female littermates. In order to verify whether this reduction was macrophage-specific, the bone marrow cells from wild-type or Plin1 deficient mice (Plin1-/- were transplanted into LDL receptor deficient mice (LDLR-/-. Mice receiving Plin1-/- bone marrow cells showed also 49% reduction in aortic atherosclerotic lesions compared with LDLR-/- mice received wild-type bone marrow cells. In vitro experiments showed that Plin1-/- macrophages had decreased protein expression of CD36 translocase and an enhanced cholesterol ester hydrolysis upon aggregated-LDL loading, with unaltered expression of many other regulators of cholesterol metabolism, such as cellular lipases, and Plin2 and 3. Given the fundamental role of Plin1 in protecting LD lipids from lipase hydrolysis, it is reasonably speculated that the assembly of Plin1 in microphages might function to reduce lipolysis and hence increase lipid retention in ApoE-/- plaques, but this pro-atherosclerotic property would be abrogated on inactivation of Plin1.Plin1 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells may be responsible for reduced atherosclerotic lesions in the mice.

  3. Protection from lethal herpes simplex virus type 1 infection by vaccination with a UL41-deficient recombinant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Ishioka, Ken; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ikuta, Kazufumi; Suzutani, Tatsuo

    2016-06-08

    The UL41 gene of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) encodes a virion host shut off protein which is involved in immune evasion. The growth and virulence of HSV-1 is markedly reduced by the deletion of UL41. In this report, the UL41-deleted recombinant HSV-1 strain VR∆41 was evaluated as a prophylactic live attenuated vaccine against lethal HSV-1 infection in a mouse model. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with the VR∆41 strain clearly inhibited lethal wild-type HSV-1 (VR-3 strain) infection after both i.p. and intracerebral (i.c.) inoculations. Vaccination with the VR∆41 strain was safer than VR-3 vaccination and was able to protect against a wild-type challenge to the same degree as VR-3 vaccination. In contrast, i.p. inoculation with ultraviolet-irradiated VR-3 induced resistance against i.p. infection, but not against i.c. Although replication of the VR∆41 strain in mice was greatly reduced compared to that of the VR-3 strain, VR∆41 strain maintained the ability to spread to the central nervous system (CNS) from a peripheral inoculation site. These results indicated that the VR∆41 strain evoked a potent immune reaction through viral protein expression within CNS without the induction of lethal encephalitis. The entry of antigens into the CNS was essential for the establishment of protective immunity against the lethal HSV encephalitis. We concluded that only a live attenuated vaccine is able to afford a prophylactic effect against CNS infection with HSV. In order to fulfill this requirement, UL41-deleted viruses provide a strong candidate for use as a recombinant live vaccine.

  4. Induction of Protective Immunity to Cryptococcal Infection in Mice by a Heat-Killed, Chitosan-Deficient Strain of Cryptococcus neoformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Upadhya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a major opportunistic fungal pathogen that causes fatal meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals and is responsible for a large proportion of AIDS-related deaths. The fungal cell wall is an essential organelle which undergoes constant modification during various stages of growth and is critical for fungal pathogenesis. One critical component of the fungal cell wall is chitin, which in C. neoformans is predominantly deacetylated to chitosan. We previously reported that three chitin deacetylase (CDA genes have to be deleted to generate a chitosan-deficient C. neoformans strain. This cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain was avirulent in mice, as it was rapidly cleared from the lungs of infected mice. Here, we report that clearance of the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain was associated with sharply spiked concentrations of proinflammatory molecules that are known to be critical mediators of the orchestration of a protective Th1-type adaptive immune response. This was followed by the selective enrichment of the Th1-type T cell population in the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain-infected mouse lung. Importantly, this response resulted in the development of robust protective immunity to a subsequent lethal challenge with a virulent wild-type C. neoformans strain. Moreover, protective immunity was also induced in mice vaccinated with heat-killed cda1Δ2Δ3Δ cells and was effective in multiple mouse strains. The results presented here provide a strong framework to develop the cda1Δ2Δ3Δ strain as a potential vaccine candidate for C. neoformans infection.

  5. Adult-onset deficiency of acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 protects mice from diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Taylor; Nelson, David W; Gao, Yu; Huang, Ting-Ni; Yen, Mei-I; Yen, Chi-Liang E

    2015-02-01

    Acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT) 2 catalyzes triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis, required in intestinal fat absorption. We previously demonstrated that mice without a functional MGAT2-coding gene (Mogat2(-/-)) exhibit increased energy expenditure and resistance to obesity induced by excess calories. One critical question raised is whether lacking MGAT2 during early development is required for the metabolic phenotypes in adult mice. In this study, we found that Mogat2(-/-) pups grew slower than wild-type littermates during the suckling period. To determine whether inactivating MGAT2 in adult mice is sufficient to confer resistance to diet-induced obesity, we generated mice with an inducible Mogat2-inactivating mutation. Mice with adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency (Mogat2(AKO)) exhibited a transient decrease in food intake like Mogat2(-/-) mice when fed a high-fat diet and a moderate increase in energy expenditure after acclimatization. They gained less weight than littermate controls, but the difference was smaller than that between wild-type and Mogat2(-/-) mice. The moderate reduction in weight gain was associated with reduced hepatic TAG and improved glucose tolerance. Similar protective effects were also observed in mice that had gained weight on a high-fat diet before inactivating MGAT2. These findings suggest that adult-onset MGAT2 deficiency mitigates metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding and that MGAT2 modulates early postnatal nutrition and may program metabolism later in life. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Elastogenesis in cultured dermal fibroblasts from patients with lysosomal beta-galactosidase, protective protein/cathepsin A and neuraminidase-1 deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatano, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Kuwahara, Jun; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Takada, Goro; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-02-01

    The human GLB1 gene encodes a lysosomal beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and an elastin-binding protein (EBP). Defect of the EBP as a chaperon for tropoelastin and a component of receptor complex among neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) and protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA) is suggested responsible for impaired elastogenesis in autosomal recessive beta-Gal, PPCA and NEU1 deficiencies. The purpose of this study is to determine effects of GLB1, PPCA and NEU1 gene mutations on elastogenesis in skin fibroblasts. Elastic fiber formation and the EBP mRNA expression were examined by immunofluorescence with an anti-tropoelastin antibody and RT-PCR selective for EBP in skin fibroblasts with these lysosomal enzyme deficiencies. Apparently normal elastogenesis and EBP mRNA expression were observed for fibroblasts from Morquio B disease cases with the GLB1 gene alleles (W273L/W273L, W273L/R482H and W273L/W509C substitutions, respectively), a galactosialidosis case with the PPCA allele (IVS7+3A/IVS7+3A) and a sialidosis case with the NEU1 allele (V217M/G243R) as well as normal subject. In this study, the W273L substitution in the EBP could impossibly cause the proposed defect of elastogenesis, and the typical PPCA splicing mutation and the V217M/G243R substitutions in the NEU1 might hardly have effects on elastic fiber formation in the dermal fibroblasts.

  7. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Vectored by a Stable Chimeric and Replication-Deficient Sendai Virus Protects Mice without Inducing Enhanced Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Marian Alexander; Gori-Savellini, Gianni; Gandolfo, Claudia; Papa, Guido; Kaufmann, Christine; Felder, Eva; Ginori, Alessandro; Disanto, Maria Giulia; Spina, Donatella; Cusi, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe respiratory infections in children and elderly people, and no marketed vaccine exists. In this study, we generated and analyzed a subunit vaccine against RSV based on a novel genome replication-deficient Sendai virus (SeV) vector. We inserted the RSV F protein, known to be a genetically stable antigen, into our vector in a specific way to optimize the vaccine features. By exchanging the ectodomain of the SeV F protein for its counterpart from RSV, we created a chimeric vectored vaccine that contains the RSV F protein as an essential structural component. In this way, the antigen is actively expressed on the surfaces of vaccine particles in its prefusion conformation, and as recently reported for other vectored vaccines, the occurrence of silencing mutations of the transgene in the vaccine genome can be prevented. In addition, its active gene expression contributes to further stimulation of the immune response. In order to understand the best route of immunization, we compared vaccine efficacies after intranasal (i.n.) or intramuscular (i.m.) immunization of BALB/c mice. Via both routes, substantial RSV-specific immune responses were induced, consisting of serum IgG and neutralizing antibodies, as well as cytotoxic T cells. Moreover, i.n. immunization was also able to stimulate specific mucosal IgA in the upper and lower respiratory tract. In virus challenge experiments, animals were protected against RSV infection after both i.n. and i.m. immunization without inducing vaccine-enhanced disease. Above all, the replication-deficient SeV appeared to be safe and well tolerated. IMPORTANCE Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory diseases in young children and elderly people worldwide. There is a great demand for a licensed vaccine. Promising existing vaccine approaches based on live-attenuated vaccines or viral vectors have suffered from unforeseen drawbacks related to immunogenicity

  8. Health Deficiencies

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of all health deficiencies currently listed on Nursing Home Compare, including the nursing home that received the deficiency, the associated inspection date,...

  9. Intermittent fasting protects against the deterioration of cognitive function, energy metabolism and dyslipidemia in Alzheimer's disease-induced estrogen deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Bae Kun; Kang, Suna; Kim, Da Sol; Park, Sunmin

    2018-02-01

    Intermittent fasting may be an effective intervention to protect against age-related metabolic disturbances, although it is still controversial. Here, we investigated the effect of intermittent fasting on the deterioration of the metabolism and cognitive functions in rats with estrogen deficiency and its mechanism was also explored. Ovariectomized rats were infused with β-amyloid (25-35; Alzheimer's disease) or β-amyloid (35-25, Non-Alzheimer's disease; normal cognitive function) into the hippocampus. Each group was randomly divided into two sub-groups: one with intermittent fasting and the other fed ad libitum: Alzheimer's disease-ad libitum, Alzheimer's disease-intermittent fasting, Non-Alzheimer's disease-ad libitum, and Non-Alzheimer's disease-intermittent fasting. Rats in the intermittent fasting groups had a restriction of food consumption to a 3-h period every day. Each group included 10 rats and all rats fed a high-fat diet for four weeks. Interestingly, Alzheimer's disease increased tail skin temperature more than Non-Alzheimer's disease and intermittent fasting prevented the increase. Alzheimer's disease reduced bone mineral density in the spine and femur compared to the Non-Alzheimer's disease, whereas bone mineral density in the hip and leg was reduced by intermittent fasting. Fat mass only in the abdomen was decreased by intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting decreased food intake without changing energy expenditure. Alzheimer's disease increased glucose oxidation, whereas intermittent fasting elevated fat oxidation as a fuel source. Alzheimer's disease and intermittent fasting deteriorated insulin resistance in the fasting state but intermittent fasting decreased serum glucose levels after oral glucose challenge by increasing insulin secretion. Alzheimer's disease deteriorated short and spatial memory function compared to the Non-Alzheimer's disease, whereas intermittent fasting prevented memory loss in comparison to ad libitum. Unexpectedly

  10. Reduced dietary omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acid ratio and 12/15-lipoxygenase deficiency are protective against chronic high fat diet-induced steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos Lazic

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with metabolic perturbations including liver and adipose tissue inflammation, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Omega-6 fatty acids (ω6 promote and omega-3 fatty acids (ω3 reduce inflammation as they can be metabolized to pro- and anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, respectively. 12/15-lipoxygenase (12/15-LO enzymatically produces some of these metabolites and is induced by high fat (HF diet. We investigated the effects of altering dietary ω6/ω3 ratio and 12/15-LO deficiency on HF diet-induced tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. We examined how these conditions affect circulating concentrations of oxidized metabolites of ω6 arachidonic and linoleic acids and innate and adaptive immune system activity in the liver. For 15 weeks, wild-type (WT mice were fed either a soybean oil-enriched HF diet with high dietary ω6/ω3 ratio (11∶1, HFH, similar to Western-style diet, or a fat Kcal-matched, fish oil-enriched HF diet with a low dietary ω6/ω3 ratio of 2.7∶1 (HFL. Importantly, the total saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat content was matched in the two HF diets, which is unlike most published fish oil studies in mice. Despite modestly increased food intake, WT mice fed HFL were protected from HFH-diet induced steatohepatitis, evidenced by decreased hepatic mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory genes and genes involved in lymphocyte homing, and reduced deposition of hepatic triglyceride. Furthermore, oxidized metabolites of ω6 arachidonic acid were decreased in the plasma of WT HFL compared to WT HFH-fed mice. 12/15-LO knockout (KO mice were also protected from HFH-induced fatty liver and elevated mRNA markers of inflammation and lymphocyte homing. 12/15-LOKO mice were protected from HFH-induced insulin resistance but reducing dietary ω6/ω3 ratio in WT mice did not ameliorate insulin resistance or adipose tissue inflammation. In conclusion, lowering dietary ω6/ω3 ratio in HF diet

  11. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells that help protect the body against infection (agammaglobulinemia). Related Information What does it mean if a ... deficiency type 1B Genetic Testing Registry: X-linked agammaglobulinemia with growth hormone deficiency Other Diagnosis and Management ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially harmful donations and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , we are committed ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  15. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  16. Iodine Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects in humans, termed iodine deficiency disorders, due to inadequate thyroid hormone production. Globally, it is estimated that 2 billion individuals have an insufficient iodine intake, and South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa are particularly affected.

  17. Ca2+ Binding/Permeation via Calcium Channel, CaV1.1, Regulates the Intracellular Distribution of the Fatty Acid Transport Protein, CD36, and Fatty Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Dimitra K; Dagnino-Acosta, Adan; Lee, Chang Seok; Griffin, Deric M; Wang, Hui; Lagor, William R; Pautler, Robia G; Dirksen, Robert T; Hamilton, Susan L

    2015-09-25

    Ca(2+) permeation and/or binding to the skeletal muscle L-type Ca(2+) channel (CaV1.1) facilitates activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase type II (CaMKII) and Ca(2+) store refilling to reduce muscle fatigue and atrophy (Lee, C. S., Dagnino-Acosta, A., Yarotskyy, V., Hanna, A., Lyfenko, A., Knoblauch, M., Georgiou, D. K., Poché, R. A., Swank, M. W., Long, C., Ismailov, I. I., Lanner, J., Tran, T., Dong, K., Rodney, G. G., Dickinson, M. E., Beeton, C., Zhang, P., Dirksen, R. T., and Hamilton, S. L. (2015) Skelet. Muscle 5, 4). Mice with a mutation (E1014K) in the Cacna1s (α1 subunit of CaV1.1) gene that abolishes Ca(2+) binding within the CaV1.1 pore gain more body weight and fat on a chow diet than control mice, without changes in food intake or activity, suggesting that CaV1.1-mediated CaMKII activation impacts muscle energy expenditure. We delineate a pathway (Cav1.1→ CaMKII→ NOS) in normal skeletal muscle that regulates the intracellular distribution of the fatty acid transport protein, CD36, altering fatty acid metabolism. The consequences of blocking this pathway are decreased mitochondrial β-oxidation and decreased energy expenditure. This study delineates a previously uncharacterized CaV1.1-mediated pathway that regulates energy utilization in skeletal muscle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Vitamin B12 status in older adults living in Ontario long-term care homes: prevalence and incidence of deficiency with supplementation as a protective factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Kaylen J; Sharratt, Mike T; Heckman, George G; Keller, Heather H

    2016-02-01

    Vitamin B12 (B12) deficiency, although treatable, impacts up to 43% of community-living older adults; long-term care (LTC) residents may be at greater risk. Recommendations for screening require further evidence on prevalence and incidence in LTC. Small, ungeneralizable samples provide a limited perspective on these issues. The purposes of this study were to report prevalence of B12 deficiency at admission to LTC, incidence 1 year post-admission, and identify subgroups with differential risk. This multi-site (8), retrospective prevalence study used random proportionate sampling of resident charts (n = 412). Data at admission extracted included demographics, B12 status, B12 supplementation, medications, diagnoses, functional independence, cognitive performance, and nutrition. Prevalence at admission of B12 deficiency (B12 (>300 pmol/L). One year post-admission incidence was 4%. Better B12 status was significantly associated with supplementation use prior to LTC admission. Other characteristics were not associated with status. This work provides a better estimate of B12 deficiency prevalence than previously available for LTC, upon which to base protocols and policy. Prospective studies are needed to establish treatment efficacy and effect on health related outcomes.

  19. NK1.1+ cells are important for the development of protective immunity against MHC I-deficient, HPV16-associated tumours

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Bubeník, Jan; Reiniš, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2011), s. 281-288 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520807 Grant - others:EU-FP6-NOE(XE) Project 018933 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MHC class I-deficient tumours * CD8+, CD4+, NK1.1+cell subpopulations * interferon gamma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.835, year: 2011

  20. Induction of protective immunity against MHC class I-deficient, HPV16-associated tumours with peptide and dendritic cell-based vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan; Štěpánek, Ivan; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Přibylová, Hana; Indrová, Marie; Bubeník, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 3 (2010), s. 545-551 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520605; GA AV ČR IAA500520807 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : MHC class I-deficient tumours * CpG oligodeoxynucleotides * human papilloma virus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.571, year: 2010

  1. Relative Tissue Factor Deficiency Attenuates Ventilator-Induced Coagulopathy but Does Not Protect against Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther K. Wolthuis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preventing tissue-factor-(TF- mediated systemic coagulopathy improves outcome in models of sepsis. Preventing TF-mediated pulmonary coagulopathy could attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. We investigated the effect of relative TF deficiency on pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation in a murine model of VILI. Heterozygous TF knockout (TF+/− mice and their wild-type (TF+/+ littermates were sedated (controls or sedated, tracheotomized, and mechanically ventilated with either low or high tidal volumes for 5 hours. Mechanical ventilation resulted in pulmonary coagulopathy and inflammation, with more injury after mechanical ventilation with higher tidal volumes. Compared with TF+/+ mice, TF+/− mice demonstrated significantly lower pulmonary thrombin-antithrombin complex levels in both ventilation groups. There were, however, no differences in lung wet-to-dry ratio, BALF total protein levels, neutrophil influx, and lung histopathology scores between TF+/− and TF+/+ mice. Notably, pulmonary levels of cytokines were significantly higher in TF+/− as compared to TF+/+ mice. Systemic levels of cytokines were not altered by the relative absence of TF. TF deficiency is associated with decreased pulmonary coagulation independent of the ventilation strategy. However, relative TF deficiency does not reduce VILI and actually results in higher pulmonary levels of inflammatory mediators.

  2. VLCAD deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boneh, A; Andresen, B S; Gregersen, N

    2006-01-01

    We diagnosed six newborn babies with very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (VLCADD) through newborn screening in three years in Victoria (prevalence rate: 1:31,500). We identified seven known and two new mutations in our patients (2/6 homozygotes; 4/6 compound heterozygotes). Blood sa...

  3. The effects of visceral obesity and androgens on bone: trenbolone protects against loss of femoral bone mineral density and structural strength in viscerally obese and testosterone-deficient male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, D G; Elliott, G E; Beck, B R; Forwood, M R; Du Toit, E F

    2016-03-01

    In males, visceral obesity and androgen deficiency often present together and result in harmful effects on bone. Our findings show that both factors are independently associated with adverse effects on femoral bone structure and strength, and trenbolone protects rats from diet-induced visceral obesity and consequently normalises femoral bone structural strength. In light of the rapidly increasing incidence of obesity and osteoporosis globally, and recent conjecture regarding the effects of visceral adiposity and testosterone deficiency on bone health, we investigated the effects of increased visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass on femoral bone mineral density (BMD), structure and strength in normal weight rats with testosterone deficiency. Male Wistar rats (n = 50) were fed either standard rat chow (CTRL, n = 10) or a high-fat/high-sugar diet (HF/HS, n = 40). Following 8 weeks of feeding, rats underwent sham surgery (CTRL, n = 10; HF/HS, n = 10) or orchiectomy (HF/HS + ORX, n = 30). Following a 4-week recovery period, mini-osmotic pumps containing either vehicle (CTRL, n = 10; HF/HS, n = 10; HF/HS + ORX, n = 10), 2.0 mg kg day(-1), testosterone (HF/HS + ORX + TEST, n = 10) or 2.0 mg kg day(-1) trenbolone (HF/HS + ORX + TREN, n = 10) were implanted for 8 weeks of treatment. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and three-point bending tests were used to assess bone mass, structure and strength of femora. Diet-induced visceral obesity resulted in decreased bone mineral area (BMA) and content (BMC) and impaired femoral stiffness and strength. Orchiectomy further impaired BMA, BMC and BMD and reduced energy to failure in viscerally obese animals. Both TEST and TREN treatment restored BMA, BMC, BMD and energy to failure. Only TREN reduced visceral adiposity and improved femoral stiffness and strength. Findings support a role for both visceral adiposity and testosterone deficiency as independent risk factors

  4. Live vaccinia-rabies virus recombinants, but not an inactivated rabies virus cell culture vaccine, protect B-lymphocyte-deficient A/WySnJ mice against rabies: considerations of recombinant defective poxviruses for rabies immunization of immunocompromised individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodmell, Donald L; Esposito, Joseph J; Ewalt, Larry C

    2004-09-03

    Presently, commercially available cell culture rabies vaccines for humans and animals consist of the five inactivated rabies virus proteins. The vaccines elicit a CD4+ helper T-cell response and a humoral B-cell response against the viral glycoprotein (G) resulting in the production of virus neutralizing antibody. Antibody against the viral nucleoprotein (N) is also present, but the mechanism(s) of its protection is unclear. HIV-infected individuals with low CD4+ T-lymphocyte counts and individuals undergoing treatment with immunosuppressive drugs have an impaired neutralizing antibody response after pre- and post-exposure immunization with rabies cell culture vaccines. Here we show the efficacy of live vaccinia-rabies virus recombinants, but not a cell culture vaccine consisting of inactivated rabies virus, to elicit elevated levels of neutralizing antibody in B-lymphocyte deficient A/WySnJ mice. The cell culture vaccine also failed to protect the mice, whereas a single immunization of a vaccinia recombinant expressing the rabies virus G or co-expressing G and N equally protected the mice up to 18 months after vaccination. The data suggest that recombinant poxviruses expressing the rabies virus G, in particular replication defective poxviruses such as canarypox or MVA vaccinia virus that undergo abortive replication in non-avian cells, or the attenuated vaccinia virus NYVAC, should be evaluated as rabies vaccines in immunocompromised individuals.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  6. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  7. Long-term blinded placebo-controlled study of SNT-MC17/idebenone in the dystrophin deficient mdx mouse: cardiac protection and improved exercise performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyse, Gunnar M.; Van der Mieren, Gerry; Erb, Michael; D'hooge, Jan; Herijgers, Paul; Verbeken, Erik; Jara, Alejandro; Van Den Bergh, An; Mertens, Luc; Courdier-Fruh, Isabelle; Barzaghi, Patrizia; Meier, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Aims Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and still incurable disease, with heart failure as a leading cause of death. The identification of a disease-modifying therapy may require early-initiated and long-term administration, but such type of therapeutic trial is not evident in humans. We have performed such a trial of SNT-MC17/idebenone in the mdx mouse model of DMD, based on the drug’s potential to improve mitochondrial respiratory chain function and reduce oxidative stress. Methods and results In this study, 200 mg/kg bodyweight of either SNT-MC17/idebenone or placebo was given from age 4 weeks until 10 months in mdx and wild-type mice. All evaluators were blinded to mouse type and treatment groups. Idebenone treatment significantly corrected cardiac diastolic dysfunction and prevented mortality from cardiac pump failure induced by dobutamine stress testing in vivo, significantly reduced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis, and significantly improved voluntary running performance in mdx mice. Conclusion We have identified a novel potential therapeutic strategy for human DMD, as SNT-MC17/idebenone was cardioprotective and improved exercise performance in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse. Our data also illustrate that the mdx mouse provides unique opportunities for long-term controlled prehuman therapeutic studies. PMID:18784063

  8. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M. Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.; Hammarström, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. PMID:26092449

  9. An Exopolysaccharide-Deficient Mutant of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Efficiently Displays a Protective Llama Antibody Fragment against Rotavirus on Its Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Beatriz; Krogh-Andersen, Kasper; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Martínez, Noelia; Günaydın, Gökçe; Lin, Yin; Martín, M Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A; Hammarström, Lennart; Marcotte, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Rotavirus is the leading cause of infantile diarrhea in developing countries, where it causes a high number of deaths among infants. Two vaccines are available, being highly effective in developed countries although markedly less efficient in developing countries. As a complementary treatment to the vaccines, a Lactobacillus strain producing an anti-rotavirus antibody fragment in the gastrointestinal tract could potentially be used. In order to develop such an alternative therapy, the effectiveness of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG to produce and display a VHH antibody fragment (referred to as anti-rotavirus protein 1 [ARP1]) on the surface was investigated. L. rhamnosus GG is one of the best-characterized probiotic bacteria and has intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Among four L. rhamnosus GG strains [GG (CMC), GG (ATCC 53103), GG (NCC 3003), and GG (UT)] originating from different sources, only GG (UT) was able to display ARP1 on the bacterial surface. The genomic analysis of strain GG (UT) showed that the genes welE and welF of the EPS cluster are inactivated, which causes a defect in exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, allowing efficient display of ARP1 on its surface. Finally, GG (UT) seemed to confer a level of protection against rotavirus-induced diarrhea similar to that of wild-type GG (NCC 3003) in a mouse pup model, indicating that the EPS may not be involved in the intrinsic antirotavirus activity. Most important, GG (EM233), a derivative of GG (UT) producing ARP1, was significantly more protective than the control strain L. casei BL23. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  12. Interleukin-21 receptor deficiency increases the initial toll-like receptor 2 response but protects against joint pathology by reducing Th1 and Th17 cells during streptococcal cell wall arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marijnissen, Renoud J; Roeleveld, Debbie M; Young, Deborah; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, Shahla; Garcia de Aquino, Sabrina; van de Loo, Fons A J; van Spriel, Annemiek B; Boots, Annemieke M H; van den Berg, Wim B; Koenders, Marije I

    2014-04-01

    The cytokine interleukin-21 (IL-21) can have both proinflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential dual role of IL-21 in experimental arthritis in relation to Th17 cells. Antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) and chronic streptococcal cell wall (SCW) arthritis were induced in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R(-/-) ) and wild-type mice. Knee joints, synovial tissue, and serum were analyzed for arthritis pathology and inflammatory markers. During AIA and chronic SCW arthritis, IL-21R deficiency protected against severe inflammation and joint destruction. This was accompanied by suppressed serum IgG1 levels and antigen-specific T cell responses. Levels of IL-17 were reduced during AIA, and synovial lymphocytes isolated during SCW arthritis for flow cytometry demonstrated that mainly IL-17+ interferon-γ (IFNγ)-positive T cells were reduced in IL-21R(-/-) mice. However, during the acute phases of SCW arthritis, significantly higher joint swelling scores were observed, consistent with enhanced tumor necrosis factor and IL-6 expression. Interestingly, IL-21R(-/-) mice were significantly less capable of up-regulating suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) and SOCS-3 messenger RNA. IL-21 stimulation also affected the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2)/caspase recruitment domain 15 response to SCW fragments in vitro, indicating that impaired SOCS regulation in the absence of IL-21 signaling might contribute to the increased local activation during SCW arthritis. In contrast to the proinflammatory role of IL-21 in adaptive immunity, which drives IL-17+IFN+ cells and joint pathology during chronic experimental arthritis, IL-21 also has an important immunosuppressive role, presumably by inhibiting TLR signaling via SOCS-1 and SOCS-3. If this dual role of IL-21 in various immune processes is present in human disease, it could make IL-21 a difficult therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright © 2014 by the American

  13. Garcinia mangostana pericarp extract protects against oxidative stress and cardiovascular remodeling via suppression of p47phox and iNOS in nitric oxide deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonprom, Pattanapong; Boonla, Orachorn; Chayaburakul, Kanokporn; Welbat, Jariya Umka; Pannangpetch, Patchareewan; Kukongviriyapan, Upa; Kukongviriyapan, Veerapol; Pakdeechote, Poungrat; Prachaney, Parichat

    2017-07-01

    N ω -Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME)-induced hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling are associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Garcinia mangostana Linn., has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study investigated whether G. mangostana pericarp extract (GME) could prevent l-NAME-induced hemodynamic alterations, cardiovascular remodeling, oxidative stress and inflammation in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 40mg/kg/day of l-NAME in drinking water to induce hypertension, and were simultaneously treated with GME at a dose of 200mg/kg/day. Rats that received l-NAME for five weeks had high blood pressure, left ventricular hypertrophy and thickening of aortic wall. Vascular superoxide production, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), and plasma tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were significantly increased in l-NAME-hypertensive rats (poxide metabolites were observed in l-NAME hypertension. GME prevented the development of hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling induced by l-NAME with reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. These data suggest that GME had a protective effect against l-NAME-induced hypertension and cardiovascular remodeling via suppressing p47 phox NADPH oxidase subunit and iNOS protein expression resulting in enhancing NO bioavailability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  17. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  18. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  19. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) protects against hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by suppressing inflammation and oxidative stress in NLRC5 deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zong; Ding, Tao; Ma, Chuan-Gen

    2017-11-18

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury could arise as a complication of liver surgery and transplantation. No specific therapeutic strategies are available to attenuate I/R injury. NOD-, LRR-and CARD-containing 5 (NLRC5), a member of the NOD-like protein family, has been suggested to negatively regulate nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) through interacting with IKKα and blocking their phosphorylation. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) has been shown to attenuate liver injury. In the current study, we investigated the pre-treatment of DEX on hepatic I/R injury in wild type (WT) and NLRC5 knockout (NLRC5 -/- ) mice. Our results indicated that NLRC5 -/- showed significantly stronger histologic damage, inflammatory response, oxidative stress and apoptosis after I/R compared to the WT group of mice, indicating the protective role of NLRC5 against liver I/R injury. Importantly, I/R-induced increase of NLRC5 was reduced by DEX pre-treatment. After hepatic I/R injury, WT and NLRC5 -/- mice pre-treated with DEX exhibited attenuated histological disruption, and reduced pro-inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which was associated with the inactivated NF-κB pathway. Moreover, suppression of oxidative stress and apoptosis was observed in DEX-treated mice with I/R injury, probably through enhancing nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), reducing mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Caspase-3/poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) pathways. In vitro, the results were further confirmed in WT and NLRC5 -/- hepatocytes pre-treated with or without DEX. Together, the findings illustrated that lack of NLRC5 resulted in severer liver I/R injury, which could be alleviated by DEX pre-treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Overexpression of microRNA-26a protects against deficient β-cell function via targeting phosphatase with tensin homology in mouse models of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yingli; Jin, Di; Jiang, Xiaoshu; Lv, Chunmei; Zhu, Hui

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) increased rapidly in the world. The development of β-cell dysfunction is the quintessential defects in T2DM patients However, the pathogenesis of β-cell dysfunction is still unclear. MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs and has been reported to be involved in pathogenesis of β-cell dysfunction and T2DM. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which miR-26a regulate β-cell function and insulin signaling pathway in high fat diet (HFD) fed and db/db T2DM mice model. The expression of miR-26a was down-regulated dramatically in the serum and islets of both HFD and db/db mice model. miR-26a overexpression protected against HFD-induced diabetes and maintained prolonged normoglycemic time in HFD fed mice. Overexpression of miR-26a improved β-cell dysfunction in T2DM mice. Further, we identified that PTEN is a direct target gene of miR-26a. Overexpression of miR-26a significantly inhibited the luciferase activity of hPTEN 3'-UTR, while the effect of miR-26a disappeared when the miR-26a potential binding site within the PTEN 3'-UTR was mutated. Overexpression of miR-26a reduced both the mRNA and protein levels of PTEN in vitro and in vivo. We also found that miR-26a overexpression increased the expression of p-Akt and p-FoxO-1, while the effect of miR-26a was blocked by PTEN overexpression. In conclusion, our data indicated that miR-26a potentially contributes to the β-cell dysfunction in T2DM, and miR-26a may be a new therapeutic strategy against T2DM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical management of salivary deficiency: A review article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSaif, K. M

    1991-01-01

    The physical, chemical and antibacterial properties of saliva provide protection to human dentition against dental diseases, Therefore, salivary deficiency has to be managed carefully. The causes of saliva deficiency are many and varied. It is worth mentioning that saliva flow rate is normally affected by physiologic condition, such as eating, resting, sleeping, cold or hot season etc. In this paper the protective role of saliva, etiologiy of saliva deficiency and its clinical management are discussed. (author

  2. Acute Testosterone Deficiency Alters Adipose Tissue Fatty Acid Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, Sylvia; Bush, Nikki C; Jensen, Michael D

    2017-08-01

    Although the long-term effects of testosterone on adipose tissue lipid metabolism in men have been defined, the short-term regulation of these effects is not well understood. We examined the effects of acute testosterone withdrawal on subcutaneous abdominal and femoral adipose tissue fatty acid (FA) storage and cellular mechanisms. This was a prospective, randomized trial. Mayo Clinic Clinical Research Unit. Thirty-two male volunteers ages 18 to 50 participated in these studies. Volunteers were randomized to receive (1) no treatment (control), (2) injections (7.5 mg) of Lupron®, or (3) Lupron and testosterone (L+T) replacement for 49 days, resulting in 4 weeks of sex steroid suppression in the Lupron group. We measured body composition, fat cell size, adipose tissue meal FA and direct free FA storage, lipoprotein lipase (LPL), acyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACS), diacylglycerol acyltransferase activities, and CD36 content. Compared with control and L+T groups, acute testosterone deficiency resulted in greater femoral adipose tissue meal FA storage rates, fasting and fed LPL activity, and ACS activity. These results suggest that in men, testosterone plays a tonic role in restraining FA storage in femoral adipose tissue via suppression of LPL and ACS activities. FA storage mechanisms in men appear sensitive to short-term changes in testosterone concentrations.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  6. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  12. Carnitine Deficiency and Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk de Bruyn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two cases of carnitine deficiency in pregnancy. In our first case, systematic screening revealed L-carnitine deficiency in the first born of an asymptomatic mother. In the course of her second pregnancy, maternal carnitine levels showed a deficiency as well. In a second case, a mother known with carnitine deficiency under supplementation was followed throughout her pregnancy. Both pregnancies had an uneventful outcome. Because carnitine deficiency can have serious complications, supplementation with carnitine is advised. This supplementation should be continued throughout pregnancy according to plasma concentrations.

  13. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    /4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11......Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  14. Colour vision deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simunovic, M P

    2010-05-01

    Colour vision deficiency is one of the commonest disorders of vision and can be divided into congenital and acquired forms. Congenital colour vision deficiency affects as many as 8% of males and 0.5% of females--the difference in prevalence reflects the fact that the commonest forms of congenital colour vision deficiency are inherited in an X-linked recessive manner. Until relatively recently, our understanding of the pathophysiological basis of colour vision deficiency largely rested on behavioural data; however, modern molecular genetic techniques have helped to elucidate its mechanisms. The current management of congenital colour vision deficiency lies chiefly in appropriate counselling (including career counselling). Although visual aids may be of benefit to those with colour vision deficiency when performing certain tasks, the evidence suggests that they do not enable wearers to obtain normal colour discrimination. In the future, gene therapy remains a possibility, with animal models demonstrating amelioration following treatment.

  15. LACTASE DEFICIENCY IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Shcherbak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the article is the lactase deficiency in children. The most frequent clinical manifestations — diarrhea and flatulence —are not specific to this pathology. Symptoms, typical for the majority of the diseases nosologies of the digestive system, lack of timely laboratory diagnosis, and, often, lack of pediatricians awareness about the specifics of this disease are the cause of lactase deficiency under-diagnostics. The article describes in detail the physiopathological mechanisms, clinical picture, diagnosis and dietary correction of lactase deficiency, the data concerning the prevalence of this disease are cited.Key words: lactose, lactase deficiency, children, health food.

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  17. Iodine deficiency disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iodine deficiency (IDD) is one of the common problem in the diet. Iodine deficiency as prevalence of goiter in population occurs in the mountainous areas. There is consensus that 800 million people are at risk of IDD from living in iodine deficient area and 190 million from goiter. Very high prevalence of IDD in different parts of the world are striking. It has generally observed that in iodine-deficient areas about 50% are affected with goiter, 1-5% from cretinsim and 20% from impaired mental and/or mortor function. (A.B.)

  18. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Ralph; Allen, Lindsay H; Bjørke-Monsen, Anne-Lise

    2017-01-01

    , subclinical deficiency affects between 2.5% and 26% of the general population depending on the definition used, although the clinical relevance is unclear. B12 deficiency can affect individuals at all ages, but most particularly elderly individuals. Infants, children, adolescents and women of reproductive age...... are also at high risk of deficiency in populations where dietary intake of B12-containing animal-derived foods is restricted. Deficiency is caused by either inadequate intake, inadequate bioavailability or malabsorption. Disruption of B12 transport in the blood, or impaired cellular uptake or metabolism...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  20. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  3. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  4. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  5. MENTAL DEFICIENCY. SECOND EDITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILLIARD, L.T.; KIRMAN, BRIAN H.

    REVISED TO INCLUDE LEGISLATIVE AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES NEW IN BRITAIN SINCE THE 1957 EDITION, THE TEXT INCLUDES RECENT ADVANCES IN ETIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND TREATMENT OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY. CONSIDERATION OF THE BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFICIENCY INCLUDES HISTORICAL AND LEGAL ASPECTS, THE SOCIAL BACKGROUND OF MENTAL DEFECT, PRENATAL CAUSES OF…

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  8. G6PD Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a genetic disorder that is most common in males. About 1 in 10 African American males in the United States has it. G6PD deficiency mainly affects red blood cells, which carry oxygen ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  12. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  20. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  2. IgA deficiency and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karmtej; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-02-01

    IgA is the most abundant immunoglobulin in the human body, and performs a very specialized role which involves mucosal immunity, development of tolerance and protection against infection. IgA is the key immunoglobulin in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, which provide the most intimate interface between the environment and self. Normal levels of IgA are based on early studies consisting of only small numbers of patients. The international consensus definition of IgA deficiency is a level of 0.07g/l after the age of four years in the absence of IgG and IgM deficiencies. The epidemiology of IgA deficiency reveals interesting variances between geographical regions - the incidence in Caucasians being much higher than that in Asians. IgA deficiency has also been found to co-exist with autoimmune diseases, allergies and malignancies. The association with autoimmunity is particularly interesting because it suggests a common genetic linkage that could potentially also explain the diversity in geoepidemiology. Both MHC and non-MHC associations have been described and the 8.1 haplotype has been significantly associated with autoimmunity in IgA deficiency patients over controls. Non-MHC genetic associations include IFIH1 and CLEC16A. The mutations leading to IgA deficiency have not been defined, but in some cases of IgA deficiency it has been suggested that the pathogenesis involves a failure in switched memory B cells that can lead to this cohort experiencing an increased incidence of recurrent bacterial infections or autoimmune diseases. Attempts to investigate the role of cytokines that can induce IgA synthesis in cells of patients with IgA deficiency, such as IL21 or the combination of CD40L/anti-CD40, IL-4 and IL10, are underway. © 2013.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  1. Manganese deficiency in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Sidsel Birkelund; Jensen, Poul Erik; Husted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential plant micronutrient with an indispensable function as a catalyst in the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII). Even so, Mn deficiency frequently occurs without visual leaf symptoms, thereby masking the distribution and dimension of the problem...... restricting crop productivity in many places of the world. Hence, timely alleviation of latent Mn deficiency is a challenge in promoting plant growth and quality. We describe here the key mechanisms of Mn deficiency in plants by focusing on the impact of Mn on PSII stability and functionality. We also address...... the mechanisms underlying the differential tolerance towards Mn deficiency observed among plant genotypes, which enable Mn-efficient plants to grow on marginal land with poor Mn availability....

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... National Institute of Health Department of Health and Human Services OIG USA.gov

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special measures can help prevent the condition in these groups. ... is a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC measures many parts of your blood. This test checks ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... test called a complete blood count (CBC) to see if you have lower than normal red blood ... iron-deficiency anemia: Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Grants & Training Grants and Training Home Policies and Guidelines Funding Opportunities and Contacts Training and Career Development ... Study - Red Blood Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size of your liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding ... bleeding in the stomach, upper intestines, colon, or pelvic organs. Treatment Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth Pale skin Swelling or soreness of the tongue Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest ... Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of your eyelids are ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  18. Vitamin D Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflammation) • Some lymphomas, a type of cancer Other risk factors for vitamin D deficiency ... medications • Frequent falls in older adults, or a non-traumatic fracture (bone break without ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ... deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed only breast ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can cause complications and may be life-threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs of iron-deficiency anemia ... abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you curious about how ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get enough iron ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and childhood can have long-lasting, negative effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A hematologist (a blood disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing age ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About ... NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... Reticulocytes are young, immature red blood cells. Over time, reticulocytes become mature red blood cells that carry ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ... frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View more ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children who have lead in their blood from ... a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  17. Overview: recognizing the problem of magnesium deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelig, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    The magnesium content of the usual American diet is less than the recommended dietary allowance. Excesses of some macro- and micro-nutrients interact with Mg, increasing its requirements. Marginal deficiency of Mg is not associated with hypomagnesemia, is not characterized by typical manifestations, as is thus difficult to diagnose. Serum or plasma Mg levels are held within narrow limits unless tissue levels are very low, or renal function is poor. Vulnerability to Mg deficiency increases during growth and development, pregnancy, when under physical or psychological stress, and during illness or its treatment that interferes with absorption or causes loss of Mg. Evidence of biochemical changes of early Mg deficiency is rarely sought, although the roles of Mg in many enzyme systems are recognized. The effects of Mg deficiency on metabolism, even in disorders caused by vitamin dependencies in which Mg is a co-factor, are largely unexplored. Deficiency of Mg is diagnosed confidently when the laboratory reports hypomagnesemia in patients with convulsions or arrhythmias. Without these signs, Mg levels are not often ordered, even in the presence of neuromuscular irritability such as respond to Mg repletion. Because Mg supplementation or Mg-sparing drugs protect against premature or ectopic heart beats and sudden death, to which diuretic-treated hypertensive patients are at risk, it is increasingly being advised that their Mg status be determined.

  18. Factor XI deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayme Diamant

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a patient with a prolonged aPTT who was diagnosedas having factor XI deficiency after a rather large hematoma wasformed after angiography. Factor XI deficiency affects 1 in 1 millionpeople, but it is more common in Ashkenazim with a gene frequencyof 5% to 11%, being 0.3% homozygotes. These individuals usuallydo not present hemorrhagic events, except in cases of trauma orsurgery. These patients should be identified by routine coagulationscreening; bleeding could be prevented by use of fresh humanplasma or plasma concentrates.

  19. Vitamin Excess and Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, Liliane; Krebs, Nancy F

    2018-04-01

    The published literature supports the high prevalence of supplement use in children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatricians today are faced with questions from parents and patients about the benefits, safety, efficacy, and correct dose of vitamins and minerals. In this article, we review 7 vitamins with the most clinical relevance as judged by abundance in food, risks and symptoms of deficiency, and potential for toxicity. Specifically, we focus on possible clinical scenarios that can be indicative of nutritional deficiency. We synthesize and summarize guidelines from nutrition experts, various medical societies, the World Health Organization, and the American Academy of Pediatrics. © American Academy of Pediatrics, 2018. All rights reserved.

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  1. Vitamin B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin B12 (B12; also known as cobalamin) is a B vitamin that has an important role in cellular metabolism, especially in DNA synthesis, methylation and mitochondrial metabolism. Clinical B12 deficiency with classic haematological and neurological manifestations is relatively uncommon. However, sub...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... proof packages for supplements can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency ... within months. Supplements come in pill form or in drops for children. Large amounts of iron can be harmful, so ...

  6. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaemia is a worldwide health problem affecting developed and developing countries. Children <5 years of age and women of child-bearing age are the most vulnerable. Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) ranked 15th and 14th in the global disability-adjusted life-years in. 1990 and 2010, respectively.[1] Globally, the ...

  7. Diagnosing oceanic nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. Mark

    2016-11-01

    The supply of a range of nutrient elements to surface waters is an important driver of oceanic production and the subsequent linked cycling of the nutrients and carbon. Relative deficiencies of different nutrients with respect to biological requirements, within both surface and internal water masses, can be both a key indicator and driver of the potential for these nutrients to become limiting for the production of new organic material in the upper ocean. The availability of high-quality, full-depth and global-scale datasets on the concentrations of a wide range of both macro- and micro-nutrients produced through the international GEOTRACES programme provides the potential for estimation of multi-element deficiencies at unprecedented scales. Resultant coherent large-scale patterns in diagnosed deficiency can be linked to the interacting physical-chemical-biological processes which drive upper ocean nutrient biogeochemistry. Calculations of ranked deficiencies across multiple elements further highlight important remaining uncertainties in the stoichiometric plasticity of nutrient ratios within oceanic microbial systems and caveats with regards to linkages to upper ocean nutrient limitation. This article is part of the themed issue 'Biological and climatic impacts of ocean trace element chemistry'.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  10. Iodine-deficiency disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Jooste, P.L.; Pandav, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    billion individuals worldwide have insufficient iodine intake, with those in south Asia and sub-Saharan Africa particularly affected. Iodine deficiency has many adverse effects on growth and development. These effects are due to inadequate production of thyroid hormone and are termed

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as if you are following a ... unhealthy environments, or other factors that increase your risk of developing iron-deficiency ... to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for and strategies ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  16. Anemia - B12 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lack (deficiency) of vitamin B12 . Causes Your body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. In order ... rest of your life. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. Treatment may no longer ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  3. Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolk, Jan; Seersholm, Niels; Kalsheker, Noor

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha One International Registry (AIR), a multinational research program focused on alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, was formed in response to a World Health Organization recommendation. Each of the nearly 20 participating countries maintains a national registry of patients with AAT defic...... epidemiology, inflammatory and signalling processes, therapeutic advances, and lung imaging techniques....

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor about delayed clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and low-birth-weight babies (weighing less than 5.5 pounds) are at even greater risk for iron- ... loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  18. MCAD deficiency in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Brage Storstein; Lund, Allan Meldgaard; Hougaard, David Michael

    2012-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency (MCADD) is the most common defect of fatty acid oxidation. Many countries have introduced newborn screening for MCADD, because characteristic acylcarnitines can easily be identified in filter paper blood spot samples by tandem mass spectrometry (MS...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: prolidase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... instructions for making the enzyme prolidase, also called peptidase D. Prolidase helps divide certain dipeptides, which are ... Names for This Condition hyperimidodipeptiduria imidodipeptidase deficiency PD peptidase deficiency Related Information How are genetic conditions and ...

  20. Radiation protection philosophy: time for changes?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovich, J.V.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation protection philosophy, or paradigm, has evolved over a number of decades and it is still evolving. Traditionally, it has dealt only with man-made, planned, in principle avoidable, radiation exposures of workers and general public. This philosophy, as presently accepted around the world, has some deficiencies. The object of this paper is to discuss these deficiencies and propose some changes. (author)

  1. Malaria Protection In Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The high frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency gene in malaria endemic regions is believed to be due to the enzyme deficiency advantage against fatal malaria. However, the mechanism of this protection is not well understood and therefore was investigated by comparing differences in ...

  2. ALPHA,·ANTITRYPSIN DEFICIENCY*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-02-06

    Feb 6, 1971 ... Lieberman," in fact, found that 15·2% of 66 patients hospitalized with pulmonary emphysema had heterozygous alpha,-antitrypsin deficiency. The over-all incidence of the deficiency was 25'8% in this group. Of patients under the age of 50 years, 47·8% had deficient levels. If such observations are confirmed ...

  3. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáuregui-Lobera I

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with emotions and behavior, often directly related to the presence of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, iron deficiency without anemia may cause cognitive disturbances. At present, the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is 2%–6% among European children. Given the importance of iron deficiency relative to proper cognitive development and the alterations that can persist through adulthood as a result of this deficiency, the objective of this study was to review the current state of knowledge about this health problem. The relevance of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia, the distinction between the cognitive consequences of iron deficiency and those affecting specifically cognitive development, and the debate about the utility of iron supplements are the most relevant and controversial topics. Despite there being methodological differences among studies, there is some evidence that iron supplementation improves cognitive functions. Nevertheless, this must be confirmed by means of adequate follow-up studies among different groups. Keywords: iron deficiency, anemia, cognitive functions, supplementation

  4. [Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binek, Alicja; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława

    2012-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class A is the main protein of the mucosal immune system. Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency (sIgAD) is the most common primary immunodeficiency in Caucasians. sIGAD is strongly associated with the certain major histocompatibility complex region. Most individuals with sIgAD are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections, allergic disorders and autoimmune manifestations. Several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, diabetes mellitus type 1, Graves disease and celiac disease, are associated with an increased prevalence of sIgAD. Screening for sIgAD in coeliac disease is essential. Patients need treatment of associated diseases. It is also known that IgA deficiency may progress into a common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Pathogenesis and molecular mechanism involved in sIgAD should be elucidated in the future.

  5. Risk factors associated with anemia, iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in rural Nepali pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, Zeina; Taren, Douglas; Duncan, Burris; Pandey, Pooja; Thomson, Cynthia; Winzerling, Joy; Muramoto, Myra; Shrestha, Ram

    2012-05-01

    We conducted a cross sectional study to investigate risk factors associated with severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) anemia and the soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) was measured among a subsample of 479 women. The iron status categories were: 1) normal (Hb> or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR anemia without iron deficiency (Hbanemia (Hb > or = 11.0 g/dl and sTfR>8.5 mg/l); and 4) iron deficiency anemia (IDA): (Hb8.5 mg/l). Factors associated with severe anemia and poor iron status were determined using logistic regression. Hookworm infection increased the risk for developing severe anemia [adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 4.26; 95% CI 1.67-10.89; panemia. Intake of iron supplements as tablets and/or tonic was protective against severe anemia, anemia without iron deficiency and IDA. Dietary heme iron was significantly associated with iron deficiency without anemia (RRR: 0.1; 95% CI 0.02-0.47; pclassification and multiple approaches are needed to reduce anemia and associated nutrient deficiencies.

  6. Deficiently extremal Gorenstein algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thus, R/I is a Cohen–. Macaulay algebra of Type 1, and hence R/I is Gorenstein. In view of Theorem 2.1, R/I is a nearly (or 1-deficient) extremal Gorenstein algebra. We now shall describe a result of Bruns and Hibi [1] which characterizes the Stanley–. Reisner rings having 2-pure but not 2-linear resolutions. Theorem 2.3.

  7. Iron deficiency anaemia

    OpenAIRE

    Barragán-Ibañez, G.; Santoyo-Sánchez, A.; Ramos-Peñafiel, C.O.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem that affects all age groups. In Mexico, it is a common cause of morbidity, and accounts for 50% of cases of anaemia worldwide. It is more prevalent during the first 2 years of life, during adolescence and pregnancy. It is characterised by fatigue, weakness, pallor and koilonychia. Treatment is based on dietary recommendations and oral and intravenous iron supplements. In this review article, we summarise the characteristics of iron efficiency...

  8. Biotin and biotinidase deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Zempleni, Janos; Hassan, Yousef I; Wijeratne, Subhashinee SK

    2008-01-01

    Biotin is a water-soluble vitamin that serves as an essential coenzyme for five carboxylases in mammals. Biotin-dependent carboxylases catalyze the fixation of bicarbonate in organic acids and play crucial roles in the metabolism of fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Carboxylase activities decrease substantially in response to biotin deficiency. Biotin is also covalently attached to histones; biotinylated histones are enriched in repeat regions in the human genome and appear to play a role...

  9. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel thera...

  10. Adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurecka, Agnieszka; Zikanova, Marie; Kmoch, Stanislav; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Adenylosuccinate lyase ADSL) deficiency is a defect of purine metabolism affecting purinosome assembly and reducing metabolite fluxes through purine de novo synthesis and purine nucleotide recycling pathways. Biochemically this defect manifests by the presence in the biologic fluids of two dephosphorylated substrates of ADSL enzyme: succinylaminoimidazole carboxamide riboside (SAICAr) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). More than 80 individuals with ADSL deficiency have been identified, but incidence of the disease remains unknown. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The fatal neonatal form has onset from birth and presents with fatal neonatal encephalopathy with a lack of spontaneous movement, respiratory failure, and intractable seizures resulting in early death within the first weeks of life. Patients with type I (severe form) present with a purely neurologic clinical picture characterized by severe psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, early onset of seizures, and autistic features. A more slowly progressing form has also been described (type II, moderate or mild form), as having later onset, usually within the first years of life, slight to moderate psychomotor retardation and transient contact disturbances. Diagnosis is facilitated by demonstration of SAICAr and S-Ado in extracellular fluids such as plasma, cerebrospinal fluid and/or followed by genomic and/or cDNA sequencing and characterization of mutant proteins. Over 50 ADSL mutations have been identified and their effects on protein biogenesis, structural stability and activity as well as on purinosome assembly were characterized. To date there is no specific and effective therapy for ADSL deficiency.

  11. Environmetal protection within the law relating to regional policy. Anchoring the climatic protection und the protection of biodiversity within the law relating to regional policy; Umweltschutz im Planungsrecht. Die Verankerung des Klimaschutzes und des Schutzes der biologischen Vielfalt im raumbezogenen Planungsrecht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Gerold; Albrecht, Juliane [Leibniz-Institut fuer oekologische Raumentwicklung e.V., Dresden (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The report is concerned with the anchoring of the climate protection within the law relating to regional policy. The report covers the following topics: (1) Fundamentals of planning policy: the regional planning legislation, municipal planning authority, constitutional provisos, environmental protection as constitutional principle; (2) climate protection laws: legal instruments; legal planning relevance of climate protection instruments deficiencies and protective effect; (3) biodiversity protection: laws concerning biodiversity, legal planning relevance of biodiversity protection instruments: deficiencies and protective effects.

  12. Primary Carnitine Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan; Hougaard, David M; Sandhu, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency (PCD) causes low levels of carnitine in patients potentially leading to metabolic and cardiac symptoms. Newborn screening for PCD is now routine in many countries by measuring carnitine levels in infants. In this study we report Apgar scores, length and weight...... in newborns with PCD and newborns born to mothers with PCD compared to controls. Furthermore we report how effective different screening algorithms have been to detect newborns with PCD in the Faroe Islands. RESULTS: Newborns with PCD and newborns born to mothers with PCD did not differ with regard to Apgar...

  13. Pseudoachondroplasia with immune deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kultursay, N.; Taneli, B.; Cavusoglu, A.

    1988-01-01

    A 5-year old boy was admitted to the hospital with failure to thrive since he was 2 years old, with weakness in his legs and a waddling gait. He has normal mental development. His parents are normal phenotypically and are unrelated. In analysing his pedigree only a grandfather is described to have waddling gait. He has a normal craniofacial appearance but a disproportionate body with normal trunk and short extremities with height below the 3rd percentile. The diagnosis of pseudoachondroplasia was made on clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. He also had immune deficiency characterised by low T-lymphocyte populations and a low level of serum immunoglobulin A. (orig.)

  14. Morbidity and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Laursen, Torben; Green, Anders

    2008-01-01

    identified in the National Patient Registry. Lag time until first admission was used as a measure of morbidity. Patients were divided into childhood onset (CO) and adult onset (AO), discriminated by an age cut-off of 18 years at onset of GHD. METHOD: Sex- and cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) in CO and AO......OBJECTIVE: To estimate morbidity in Denmark in all patients with GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Morbidity was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in the GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Diagnoses and dates of admissions were...

  15. Iron deficiency anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Barragán-Ibañez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anaemia is a public health problem that affects all age groups. In Mexico, it is a common cause of morbidity, and accounts for 50% of cases of anaemia worldwide. It is more prevalent during the first 2 years of life, during adolescence and pregnancy. It is characterised by fatigue, weakness, pallor and koilonychia. Treatment is based on dietary recommendations and oral and intravenous iron supplements. In this review article, we summarise the characteristics of iron efficiency anaemia, its metabolism, epidemiology, symptoms and diagnosis, and explore different therapeutic approaches.

  16. Orexin deficiency and narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    Orexin deficiency results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy in many mammalian species, including mice, dogs, and humans, suggesting that the orexin system is particularly important for normal regulation of sleep/wakefulness states, and especially for maintenance of wakefulness. This review discusses animal models of narcolepsy; the contribution of each orexin receptor subtype to the narcoleptic phenotypes; and the etiology of orexin neuronal death. It also raises the possibility of novel therapies targeting the orexin system for sleep disorders including insomia and narcolepsy-cataplexy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study found that many older adults over ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues ... and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , ...

  19. Mortality and GH deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Laursen, Torben

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided into chil......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the mortality in Denmark in patients suffering from GH deficiency (GHD). DESIGN: Mortality was analyzed in 1794 GHD patients and 8014 controls matched on age and gender. All records in GHD patients were studied and additional morbidity noted. Patients were divided...... in CO and AO GHD in both genders, when compared with controls. The hazard ratio (HR) for CO males was 8.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5-15.1) and for females 9.4 (CI 4.6-19.4). For AO males, HR was 1.9 (CI 1.7-2.2) and for females 3.4 (CI 2.9-4.0). We found a significantly higher HR in AO females...... a significantly increased mortality in GHD patients when compared with controls, possibly due to their hypopituitary status. Mortality was increased in AO female patients when compared with males. For CO and AO GHD, different causes of significantly increased mortality were identified...

  20. Vitamin A deficiency disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, D S

    1999-08-01

    The major cause of blindness in children worldwide is xerophthalmia caused by vitamin A deficiency. In addition it has other adverse effects, including increased mortality and the term vitamin A deficiency disorders (VADD) has been introduced to cover the whole clinical spectrum of disease. The ocular manifestations of xerophthalmia have been classified and a set of prevalence criteria for the detection of a problem of public health magnitude has been in use for more than two decades. The global prevalence of VADD is now well documented and World Health Organisation (WHO) receives information continuously for updating its data base on the subject. The pathogenesis of the disease is still imperfectly understood, it is not at all clear precisely why certain subjects in vulnerable communities develop xerophthalmia, while the majority are spared. A schedule for treatment of the established case has been available for a long time, but at both clinic and hospital level concentrated sources of vitamin A for treatment are frequently not available. More emphasis needs to be laid on prevention and a choice of methods consisting of large dose supplementation, fortification of food, control of precipitating infections and dietary improvement. The advantages and drawbacks of each are discussed.

  1. Lead toxicity and nutritional deficiencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levander, O.A.

    1979-04-01

    Recent data concerning lead toxicity and nutritional deficiencies are summarized. Lead poisoning can be exacerbated by consumption of either deficient or excessive levels of protein. Mineral deficiencies also exaggerate lead poisoning. Evidence for antagonism between lead and nutritional levels of selenium is inconclusive. Vitamin E deficiency and lead poisoning interact to produce an anemia in rats that is more severe than that caused by either treatment alone. A pro-oxidant stress of lead on red blood cells is hypothesized to cause their accelerated destruction. In addition, disruption of normal membrane structure, leading to peroxidative damage, may occur. Calcium deficiencies in children are negatively correlated with lead concentrations in their blood. Other examples of interactions between minerals and lead poisoning are provided. Nutritional deficiencies have been shown to have an additive effect in potentiating lead toxicity in some cases. (112 references, 4 tables)

  2. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labrune Philippe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency, or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI, is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea. Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty, generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency. GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib. Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21 and SLC37A4 (11q23 respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most

  3. Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froissart, Roseline; Piraud, Monique; Boudjemline, Alix Mollet; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Petit, François; Hubert-Buron, Aurélie; Eberschweiler, Pascale Trioche; Gajdos, Vincent; Labrune, Philippe

    2011-05-20

    Glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (G6P deficiency), or glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), is a group of inherited metabolic diseases, including types Ia and Ib, characterized by poor tolerance to fasting, growth retardation and hepatomegaly resulting from accumulation of glycogen and fat in the liver. Prevalence is unknown and annual incidence is around 1/100,000 births. GSDIa is the more frequent type, representing about 80% of GSDI patients. The disease commonly manifests, between the ages of 3 to 4 months by symptoms of hypoglycemia (tremors, seizures, cyanosis, apnea). Patients have poor tolerance to fasting, marked hepatomegaly, growth retardation (small stature and delayed puberty), generally improved by an appropriate diet, osteopenia and sometimes osteoporosis, full-cheeked round face, enlarged kydneys and platelet dysfunctions leading to frequent epistaxis. In addition, in GSDIb, neutropenia and neutrophil dysfunction are responsible for tendency towards infections, relapsing aphtous gingivostomatitis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Late complications are hepatic (adenomas with rare but possible transformation into hepatocarcinoma) and renal (glomerular hyperfiltration leading to proteinuria and sometimes to renal insufficiency). GSDI is caused by a dysfunction in the G6P system, a key step in the regulation of glycemia. The deficit concerns the catalytic subunit G6P-alpha (type Ia) which is restricted to expression in the liver, kidney and intestine, or the ubiquitously expressed G6P transporter (type Ib). Mutations in the genes G6PC (17q21) and SLC37A4 (11q23) respectively cause GSDIa and Ib. Many mutations have been identified in both genes,. Transmission is autosomal recessive. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, on abnormal basal values and absence of hyperglycemic response to glucagon. It can be confirmed by demonstrating a deficient activity of a G6P system component in a liver biopsy. To date, the diagnosis is most commonly confirmed

  4. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    J?uregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life aft...

  5. [Iron deficiency and digestive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozon, G J N

    2014-11-01

    Iron deficiency anemia still remains problematic worldwide. Iron deficiency without anemia is often undiagnosed. We reviewed, in this study, symptoms and syndromes associated with iron deficiency with or without anemia: fatigue, cognitive functions, restless legs syndrome, hair loss, and chronic heart failure. Iron is absorbed through the digestive tract. Hepcidin and ferroportin are the main proteins of iron regulation. Pathogenic micro-organisms or intestinal dysbiosis are suspected to influence iron absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Diagnostics of nitrogen deficiency in mini-cucumber plant by near ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In protected agriculture, deficiency of an essential element may drastically affect plant growth, appearance and most importantly yield. Information about nutrient deficiencies in crops grown in controlled environment is essential to optimize food productivity. In this study, near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) analysis ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: transcobalamin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deficiency Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) CLIMB: Children Living with Inherited Metabolic Diseases ( ...

  8. Nutritional deficiencies after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Bikram S; Finelli, Frederick C; Shope, Timothy R; Koch, Timothy R

    2012-09-01

    Lifestyle intervention programmes often produce insufficient weight loss and poor weight loss maintenance. As a result, an increasing number of patients with obesity and related comorbidities undergo bariatric surgery, which includes approaches such as the adjustable gastric band or the 'divided' Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). This Review summarizes the current knowledge on nutrient deficiencies that can develop after bariatric surgery and highlights follow-up and treatment options for bariatric surgery patients who develop a micronutrient deficiency. The major macronutrient deficiency after bariatric surgery is protein malnutrition. Deficiencies in micronutrients, which include trace elements, essential minerals, and water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins, are common before bariatric surgery and often persist postoperatively, despite universal recommendations on multivitamin and mineral supplements. Other disorders, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, can promote micronutrient deficiencies, especially in patients with diabetes mellitus. Recognition of the clinical presentations of micronutrient deficiencies is important, both to enable early intervention and to minimize long-term adverse effects. A major clinical concern is the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the development of metabolic bone diseases, such as osteoporosis or osteomalacia; metabolic bone diseases may explain the increased risk of hip fracture in patients after RYGB. Further studies are required to determine the optimal levels of nutrient supplementation and whether postoperative laboratory monitoring effectively detects nutrient deficiencies. In the absence of such data, clinicians should inquire about and treat symptoms that suggest nutrient deficiencies.

  9. Vitamin D deficiency: a paediatric orthopaedic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Nicholas M P; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-02-01

    At the turn of the last century, rickets (vitamin D deficiency) was one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases of the paediatric population presenting to physicians. Today, the most common referral pathway for these patients ends in a paediatric orthopaedic outpatient clinic. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical entity that can affect all children and should be looked for in all children with musculoskeletal symptoms. The child at risk of rickets is now white, breastfed, protected from the sun and obese. Vitamin D deficiency can present as atypical muscular pain, pathological fractures or slipped upper femoral epiphysis. Obesity is linked with lower vitamin D levels; however, in the paediatric population, this does not necessarily equal clinical disorder. Vitamin D supplements can be used to reduce the risk of pathological fractures in the cerebral palsy child. It should also form part of the differential diagnosis in the work-up of nonaccidental injuries. Children with a low vitamin D present with a higher incidence of fractures from normal activities. Vitamin D levels need to be assessed before any form of orthopaedic surgery, as it can affect growth, both in the diaphysis of the bone and in the growth plate. Vitamin D levels are a key element in the successful practice of paediatric orthopaedics. It is not just the possible cause of disorder presenting to the clinician but also extremely important in ensuring the successful postoperative recovery of the patient.

  10. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe: pandemic?12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana; Gonzalez-Gross, Marcela; Valtueña, Jara; De Henauw, Stefaan; Moreno, Luis; Damsgaard, Camilla T; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian; Jorde, Rolf; Grimnes, Guri; Moschonis, George; Mavrogianni, Christina; Manios, Yannis; Thamm, Michael; Mensink, Gert BM; Rabenberg, Martina; Busch, Markus A; Cox, Lorna; Meadows, Sarah; Goldberg, Gail; Prentice, Ann; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Nijpels, Giel; Pilz, Stefan; Swart, Karin M; van Schoor, Natasja M; Lips, Paul; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cotch, Mary Frances; Koskinen, Seppo; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon A; Sempos, Christopher T; Kiely, Mairead

    2016-01-01

    strategies take will depend on European policy but should aim to ensure vitamin D intakes that are protective against vitamin D deficiency in the majority of the European population. PMID:26864360

  11. Argininosuccinate lyase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Erez, Ayelet; Lee, Brendan

    2012-05-01

    The urea cycle consists of six consecutive enzymatic reactions that convert waste nitrogen into urea. Deficiencies of any of these enzymes of the cycle result in urea cycle disorders (UCDs), a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia. Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) catalyzes the fourth reaction in this cycle, resulting in the breakdown of argininosuccinic acid to arginine and fumarate. ASL deficiency (ASLD) is the second most common UCD, with a prevalence of ~1 in 70,000 live births. ASLD can manifest as either a severe neonatal-onset form with hyperammonemia within the first few days after birth or as a late-onset form with episodic hyperammonemia and/or long-term complications that include liver dysfunction, neurocognitive deficits, and hypertension. These long-term complications can occur in the absence of hyperammonemic episodes, implying that ASL has functions outside of its role in ureagenesis and the tissue-specific lack of ASL may be responsible for these manifestations. The biochemical diagnosis of ASLD is typically established with elevation of plasma citrulline together with elevated argininosuccinic acid in the plasma or urine. Molecular genetic testing of ASL and assay of ASL enzyme activity are helpful when the biochemical findings are equivocal. However, there is no correlation between the genotype or enzyme activity and clinical outcome. Treatment of acute metabolic decompensations with hyperammonemia involves discontinuing oral protein intake, supplementing oral intake with intravenous lipids and/or glucose, and use of intravenous arginine and nitrogen-scavenging therapy. Dietary restriction of protein and dietary supplementation with arginine are the mainstays in long-term management. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is best considered only in patients with recurrent hyperammonemia or metabolic decompensations resistant to conventional medical therapy.

  12. Can silicon partially alleviate micronutrient deficiency in plants? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Apaolaza, Lourdes

    2014-09-01

    Silicon protects plants against various biotic and abiotic stresses, including metal toxicity. Under a high metal concentration, Si can externally decrease metal availability to the plant by its precipitation in the growth media, and Si also affects the metal distribution inside the plant, diminishing the damage. Could Si also protect plants against metal deficiency stress? Recently, the physiological role of Si in relation to micronutrients deficiency symptoms has been assessed in several plant species in hydroponics. In cucumber, Si supply mitigated the symptoms of Fe deficiency, but this effect was not clear under Zn- or Mn-deficiency conditions. The main factor controlling this beneficial effect seems to be the Si contribution to the formation of metal deposits in the root and/or leaves apoplast and its role in their following remobilization when required. The enhancement of the content of long-distance transport molecules (such as citrate) due to Si addition should also contribute to the metal transport from root to shoot, which will diminish deficiency symptoms.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... back to the lungs. Read less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ... into clinical practice to promote the prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, ... Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study found that many older adults over 65 years of age had ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  16. Interactions between copper deficiency, selenium deficiency and adriamycin toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J.; Tackett, R.; Johnson, M.A. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (United States))

    1991-03-15

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there are interactions between copper (Cu) and selenium (Se) status, and adriamycin (ADR) toxicity. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed Cu,Se adequate; Cu deficient, Se adequate ({minus}Cu); Cu adequate, Se deficient; or Cu,Se deficient diets for 38-41 days. ADR or saline (SAL) were administered weekly for the last 4 weeks of the study. Cu deficiency was confirmed by a 3-fold decrease in liver Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and liver Cu, and a 5-fold decrease in RBC Cu,Zn-SOD. Se deficiency was confirmed by a 10-fold decrease in liver glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). ADR, Cu deficiency and Se deficiency all caused EKG abnormalities. However, Cu and Se deficiencies did not enhance ADR's influence on EKGs. ADR increased lipid peroxidation in liver by 15% and in heart by 18% (NS). Cu deficiency decreased ADR-induced lipid peroxidation in heart tissue by 25%. ADR influenced Se status by significantly increasing heart GSH-Px, and Cu status by increasing liver Cu, plasma ceruloplasmin and liver Cu, Zn-SOD. These elevations in Cu,Zn-SOD and GSH-Px may be a consequence of the increased lipid peroxidation initiated by ADR. In {minus}Cu rats, ADR caused severe hemolytic anemia characterized by a 19% decrease in hematocrit and a 17-fold increase in splenic Fe. These data suggest that there are numerous interactions between ADR toxicity and Cu and Se status.

  17. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelzer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and radiological terms, quantities, and units. Basic principles of radiation protection (ICRP, IAEA, EURATOM, FRG). Biological effects of ionizing radiation. Objectives of practical radiation protection. (HP) [de

  18. C5a receptor deficiency alters energy utilization and fat storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Roy

    Full Text Available To investigate the impact of whole body C5a receptor (C5aR deficiency on energy metabolism and fat storage.Male wildtype (WT and C5aR knockout (C5aRKO mice were fed a low fat (CHOW or a high fat high sucrose diet-induced obesity (DIO diet for 14 weeks. Body weight and food intake were measured weekly. Indirect calorimetry, dietary fatload clearance, insulin and glucose tolerance tests were also evaluated. Liver, muscle and adipose tissue mRNA gene expression were measured by RT-PCR.At week one and 12, C5aRKO mice on DIO had increased oxygen consumption. After 12 weeks, although food intake was comparable, C5aRKO mice had lower body weight (-7% CHOW, -12% DIO as well as smaller gonadal (-38% CHOW, -36% DIO and inguinal (-29% CHOW, -30% DIO fat pads than their WT counterparts. Conversely, in WT mice, C5aR was upregulated in DIO vs CHOW diets in gonadal adipose tissue, muscle and liver, while C5L2 mRNA expression was lower in C5aRKO on both diet. Furthermore, blood analysis showed lower plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels in both C5aRKO groups, with faster postprandial triglyceride clearance after a fatload. Additionally, C5aRKO mice showed lower CD36 expression in gonadal and muscle on both diets, while DGAT1 expression was higher in gonadal (CHOW and liver (CHOW and DIO and PPARγ was increased in muscle and liver.These observations point towards a role (either direct or indirect for C5aR in energy expenditure and fat storage, suggesting a dual role for C5aR in metabolism as well as in immunity.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter Home Health Conditions Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Dopamine transporter deficiency syndrome is a rare movement disorder. ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: lactate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this condition: lactate dehydrogenase-A deficiency (sometimes called glycogen storage disease XI) and lactate dehydrogenase-B deficiency. People with ... Resources Genetic Testing (2 links) Genetic Testing Registry: Glycogen storage disease XI Genetic Testing Registry: Lactate dehydrogenase B deficiency ...

  1. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  2. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disorder associated with the development of liver and lung disease. AAT is a 52-kD glycoprotein, produced mainly by hepatocytes and secreted into the blood. Agglomeration of the AAT-protein in hepatocytes can result in liver disease. Exposure to smoke is the major risk factor for the development of lung disease characterised as early chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD). Diagnosis is based on the analysis of the AAT genotype and phenotype. The measurement of the AAT serum level is useful as screening test. Liver biopsy is not necessary to establish the diagnosis. Therapy for AAT-related liver disease is supportive, a specific therapy is not available. AATD is a rare condition (1:5000-10000) and, as a consequence, data and information on diagnosis and treatment are not easily accessible. This chapter provides a comprehensive overview on AATD, covering basic biology, diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron deficiency - a global problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    Iron deficiency is an important nutritional global problem. This paper contains summery of information gathered from a dietary survey as iron deficiency anaemia is major public health problem in many developing countries including Pakistan. Comparison of anaemia in different age group and sex versus various regions in the world are given. In Pakistan also anaemia is widespread. According to the report of Micro-Nutrient survey of Pakistan 40% of the population are found to have low level of haemoglobin, more than half of pregnant women suffered from marginal or deficient haemoglobin. (A.B.)

  4. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors.

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency and Diabetes Mellitus with Severe Retinal Complications in a Sardinian Population, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Antonio; Contini, Emma Luigia; Carru, Ciriaco; Solinas, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is one of the most common human genetic abnormalities, with a high prevalence in Sardinia, Italy. Evidence indicates that G6PD-deficient patients are protected against vascular disease. Little is known about the relationship between G6PD deficiency and diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare G6PD deficiency prevalence in Sardinian diabetic men with severe retinal vascular complications and in age-matched non-diabetic controls and ascertain whether G6PD deficiency may offer protection against this vascular disorder. Methods: Erythrocyte G6PD activity was determined using a quantitative assay in 390 diabetic men with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) and 390 male non-diabetic controls, both aged ≥50 years. Conditional logistic regression models were used to investigate the association between G6PD deficiency and diabetes with severe retinal complications. Results: G6PD deficiency was found in 21 (5.4 %) diabetic patients and 33 (8.5 %) controls (P=0.09). In a univariate conditional logistic regression model, G6PD deficiency showed a trend for protection against diabetes with PDR, but the odds ratio (OR) fell short of statistical significance (OR=0.6, 95% confidence interval=0.35-1.08, P=0.09). In multivariate conditional logistic regression models, including as covariates G6PD deficiency, plasma glucose, and systemic hypertension or systolic or diastolic blood pressure, G6PD deficiency showed no statistically significant protection against diabetes with PDR. Conclusions: The prevalence of G6PD deficiency in diabetic men with PDR was lower than in age-matched non-diabetic controls. G6PD deficiency showed a trend for protection against diabetes with PDR, but results were not statistically significant. PMID:24324368

  6. Physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    Physical protection is defined and its function in relation to other functions of a State System of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Materials is described. The need for a uniform minimum international standard for physical protection as well as the need for international cooperation in physical protection is emphasized. The IAEA's INFCIRC/225/Rev. 1 (Annex 1) is reviewed. The Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (Annex 2) is discussed. Photographs show examples of typical physical protection technology (Annex 3)

  7. Breastfeeding exclusively and iron deficiency anemia during the first 6 months of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa F.S.V. Marques

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The objective was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among exclusively breastfed infants from one to six months of life and to identify associated risk factors. Methods This is a cohort study of the hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels of 102 healthy full-term infants, weighing more than 2500 grams (5.5 pounds at birth, evaluated for growth development and supported to promote exclusive breastfeeding. Hemoglobin and ferritin levels were measured in the first, fourth, and sixth months of life. The hemoglobin and ferritin levels of the mothers were also measured in the first month postpartum. Results At four months, 5.7% presented iron deficiency and 3.4% had iron deficiency anemia. At six months, the percentage of children with iron deficiency increased more than four times, reaching 26.1%, while iron deficiency anemia was present in 23.9% of the infants studied. Iron deficiency at six months of age was significantly correlated to growth velocity. Conclusion According to the results of this study, exclusive breastfeeding protects infants from iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia for the first four months of life. After this age, in accordance with the literature, the findings of this study demonstrated an increase in anemia and iron deficiency rates, adding to evidence that supports the monitoring of iron levels in exclusively breastfed children presenting higher weight gains beginning at four months of age.

  8. Sickle cell protection from malaria: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A linkage between presence of Sickle Haemoglobin (HbS and protection from malaria infection and clinical manifestations in certain areas was suspected from early observations and progressively elucidated by more recent studies. Research has confirmed the abovementioned connection, but also clarified how such protection may be abolished by coexistence of sickle cell trait (HbS trait and alpha thalassemia, which may explain the relatively low incidence of HbS trait in the Mediterranean. The mechanisms of such protective effect are now being investigated: factors of genetic, molecular and immunological nature are prominent. As for genetic factors attention is given to the role of the red blood cell (RBC membrane complement regulatory proteins as polymorphisms of these components seem to be associated with resistance to severe malaria; genetic ligands like the Duffy group blood antigen, necessary for erythrocytic invasion, and human protein CD36, a major receptor for P. falciparum-infected RBC‘s, are also under scrutiny: attention is focused also on plasmodium erythrocyte-binding antigens, which bind to RBC surface components. Genome-wide linkage and association studies are now carried out too, in order to identify genes associated with malaria resistance. Only a minor role is attributed to intravascular sickling, phagocytosis and haemolysis, while specific molecular mechanisms are the object of intensive research: among these a decisive role is played by a biochemical sequence, involving activation of haeme oxygenase (HMO-1, whose effect appears mediated by carbon monoxide (CO. A central role in protection from malaria is also played by immunological factors, which may stimulate antibody production to plasmodium antigens in the early years of life; the role of agents like pathogenic CD8 T-cells has been suggested while the effects of molecular actions on the immunity mechanism are presently investigated. It thus appears that protection from

  9. Iron deficiency among blood donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rigas, A S; Pedersen, O B; Magnussen, K

    2017-01-01

    and menopausal status are the strongest predictors of iron deficiency. Only little information on the health effects of iron deficiency in blood donors exits. Possibly, after a standard full blood donation, a temporarily reduced physical performance for women is observed. However, iron deficiency among blood...... donors is not reflected in a reduced self-perceived mental and physical health. In general, the high proportion of iron-deficient donors can be alleviated either by extending the inter-donation intervals or by guided iron supplementation. The experience from Copenhagen, the Capital Region of Denmark......, is that routine ferritin measurements and iron supplementation are feasible and effective ways of reducing the proportion of donors with low haemoglobin levels....

  10. Evolutionary Processes and Mental Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, Herman H.

    1973-01-01

    The author hypothesizes that central nervous system damage of deficiency associated with mental retardation affects primarily those cortical processes which developed at a late stage in man's evolutionary history. (Author)

  11. Selective IgA Deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Yel, Leman

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency is the most common primary immunodeficiency defined as decreased serum level of IgA in the presence of normal levels of other immunoglobulin isotypes. Most individuals with IgA deficiency are asymptomatic and identified coincidentally. However, some patients may present with recurrent infections of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts, allergic disorders, and autoimmune manifestations. IgA and Its Functions: Although IgA is the most abund...

  12. Iron deficiency and cognitive functions

    OpenAIRE

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera Department of Nutrition and Bromatology, Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain Abstract: Micronutrient deficiencies, especially those related to iodine and iron, are linked to different cognitive impairments, as well as to potential long-term behavioral changes. Among the cognitive impairments caused by iron deficiency, those referring to attention span, intelligence, and sensory perception functions are mainly cited, as well as those associated with...

  13. Critical reappraisal of vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audran, Maurice; Briot, Karine

    2010-03-01

    The current surge of interest in vitamin D is fuelled not only by evidence that vitamin D supplementation decreases the risk of osteoporotic fractures but also by vast observational studies indicating a variety of beneficial extraskeletal effects (including decreases in the risks of cancer, inflammatory diseases, and even death). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) assay is now a highly reliable method for evaluating vitamin D stores in individual patients. Nevertheless, the normal or desirable 25(OH)D range for patients seen in everyday clinical practice needs to be more accurately defined. Maintaining serum 25(OH)D above 75 nmol/L is currently recommended to ensure optimal bone health, but higher levels may be required to obtain some of the extraskeletal benefits. Naturally occurring vitamin D is by far the most widely used form for correcting vitamin D deficiency, and the hydroxylated derivatives have only a few highly specific indications. However, controversy persists about the optimal modalities of natural vitamin D supplementation in terms of the type of vitamin (D2 or D3), schedule (once daily or at wider intervals), and route (oral or injectable). For chronic supplementation to protect against bone loss, a daily dosage of at least 800 IU seems required. Higher dosages (e.g., 100,000 to 200,000 IU every 2 months for 6 months) may be needed to correct established vitamin D deficiency; a repeat 25(OH)D assay after 4 to 6 months may help to assess the treatment response and to adjust the subsequent vitamin D dosage. The current emphasis is on the detection of vitamin D deficiency in the general population and in subgroups at risk for osteoporosis followed by an assessment of severity and the initiation of appropriate treatment. From a public health perspective, supplying at least 800 IU per day seems useful and safe. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. PPARgamma Deficiency Counteracts Thymic Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ernszt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thymic senescence contributes to increased incidence of infection, cancer and autoimmunity at senior ages. This process manifests as adipose involution. As with other adipose tissues, thymic adipose involution is also controlled by PPARgamma. This is supported by observations reporting that systemic PPARgamma activation accelerates thymic adipose involution. Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased PPARgamma activity could prevent thymic adipose involution, although it may trigger metabolic adverse effects. We have confirmed that both human and murine thymic sections show marked staining for PPARgamma at senior ages. We have also tested the thymic lobes of PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice. Supporting our working hypothesis both adult PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice show delayed thymic senescence by thymus histology, thymocyte mouse T-cell recombination excision circle qPCR and peripheral blood naive T-cell ratio by flow-cytometry. Delayed senescence showed dose–response with respect to PPARgamma deficiency. Functional immune parameters were also evaluated at senior ages in PPARgamma haplo-insufficient mice (null mice do not reach senior ages due to metabolic adverse affects. As expected, sustained and elevated T-cell production conferred oral tolerance and enhanced vaccination efficiency in senior PPARgamma haplo-insufficient, but not in senior wild-type littermates according to ELISA IgG measurements. Of note, humans also show increased oral intolerance issues and decreased protection by vaccines at senior ages. Moreover, PPARgamma haplo-insufficiency also exists in human known as a rare disease (FPLD3 causing metabolic adverse effects, similar to the mouse. When compared to age- and metabolic disorder-matched other patient samples (FPLD2 not affecting PPARgamma activity, FPLD3 patients showed increased human Trec (hTrec values by qPCR (within healthy human range suggesting delayed thymic senescence, in accordance with

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  16. Allelic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency in West Africa and severe malaria susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Taane G; Fry, Andrew E; Auburn, Sarah; Campino, Susana; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Teo, Yik Y; Small, Kerrin; Wilson, Jonathan; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Sabeti, Pardis; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A

    2009-08-01

    Several lines of evidence link glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency to protection from severe malaria. Early reports suggested most G6PD deficiency in sub-Saharan Africa was because of the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele, and recent association studies of G6PD deficiency have employed genotyping as a convenient way to determine enzyme status. However, further work has suggested that other G6PD deficiency alleles are relatively common in some regions of West Africa. To investigate the consequences of unrecognized allelic heterogeneity on association studies, in particular studies of G6PD deficiency and malaria, we carried out a case-control analysis of 2488 Gambian children with severe malaria and 3875 controls. No significant association was found between severe malaria and the 202A/376G G6PD A- allele when analyzed alone, but pooling 202A/376G with other deficiency alleles revealed the signal of protection (male odds ratio (OR) 0.77, 95% CI 0.62-0.95, P=0.016; female OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.56-0.89, P=0.004). We have identified the 968C mutation as the most common G6PD A- allele in The Gambia. Our results highlight some of the consequences of allelic heterogeneity, particularly the increased type I error. They also suggest that G6PD-deficient male hemizygotes and female heterozygotes are protected from severe malaria.

  17. Impact of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency on the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Peter A.; Leopold, Jane A.; Gupte, Sachin A.; Recchia, Fabio A.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) catalyzes the rate-determining step in the pentose phosphate pathway and produces NADPH to fuel glutathione recycling. G6PD deficiency is the most common enzyme deficiency in humans and affects over 400 million people worldwide; however, its impact on cardiovascular disease is poorly understood. The glutathione pathway is paramount to antioxidant defense, and G6PD-deficient cells do not cope well with oxidative damage. Limited clinical evidence indicates that G6PD deficiency may be associated with hypertension. However, there are also data to support a protective role of G6PD deficiency in decreasing the risk of heart disease and cardiovascular-associated deaths, perhaps through a decrease in cholesterol synthesis. Studies in G6PD-deficient (G6PDX) mice are mixed and provide evidence for both protective and deleterious effects. G6PD deficiency may provide a protective effect through decreasing cholesterol synthesis, superoxide production, and reductive stress. However, recent studies indicate that G6PDX mice are moderately more susceptible to ventricular dilation in response to myocardial infarction or pressure overload-induced heart failure. Furthermore, G6PDX hearts do not recover as well as nondeficient mice when faced with ischemia-reperfusion injury, and G6PDX mice are susceptible to the development of age-associated cardiac hypertrophy. Overall, the limited available data indicate a complex interplay in which adverse effects of G6PD deficiency may outweigh potential protective effects in the face of cardiac stress. Definitive clinical studies in large populations are needed to determine the effects of G6PD deficiency on the development of cardiovascular disease and subsequent outcomes. PMID:23241320

  18. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    strategies are entangled in cultural, religious, and national identities. Using ethnographic methods, I investigate protection against selected risks: harm from evil eyes, violation of domestic sanctity, and cultural heritage dilapidation. Protection against these risks is examined through studies...

  19. [Protective eyeglasses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, G

    1997-01-01

    Reminder of the materials used for the manufacture of corrective lenses. Belgian statistics concerning eye accidents at work and European legislation concerning the prevention of eye accidents, personal protective equipment, P.P.E. Eye protection for sports.

  20. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinda, J.; Lieskovska, Z.

    1998-01-01

    In this chapter environmental protection in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed. The economics of environmental protection, state budget, Slovak state environmental fund, economic instruments, environmental laws, environmental impact assessment, environmental management systems, and environmental education are presented

  1. Iron deficiency and bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáuregui-Lobera, Ignacio

    2013-05-15

    It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia) may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients' outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron), before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  2. Iron Deficiency and Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jáuregui-Lobera

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that the prevalence of anaemia in patients scheduled for bariatric surgery is higher than in the general population and the prevalence of iron deficiencies (with or without anaemia may be higher as well. After surgery, iron deficiencies and anaemia may occur in a higher percentage of patients, mainly as a consequence of nutrient deficiencies. In addition, perioperative anaemia has been related with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and poorer quality of life after bariatric surgery. The treatment of perioperative anaemia and nutrient deficiencies has been shown to improve patients’ outcomes and quality of life. All patients should undergo an appropriate nutritional evaluation, including selective micronutrient measurements (e.g., iron, before any bariatric surgical procedure. In comparison with purely restrictive procedures, more extensive perioperative nutritional evaluations are required for malabsorptive procedures due to their nutritional consequences. The aim of this study was to review the current knowledge of nutritional deficits in obese patients and those that commonly appear after bariatric surgery, specifically iron deficiencies and their consequences. As a result, some recommendations for screening and supplementation are presented.

  3. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Tanoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ions (Mg2+ are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency.

  4. Protecting knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Shehu, Edlira

    2018-01-01

    Most firms use secrecy to protect their knowledge from potential imitators. However, the theoretical foundations for secrecy have not been well explored. We extend knowledge protection literature and propose theoretical mechanisms explaining how information visibility influences the importance...... of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument. Building on mechanisms from information economics and signaling theory, we postulate that secrecy is more important for protecting knowledge for firms that have legal requirements to reveal information to shareholders. Furthermore, we argue that this effect...... and a firm's investment in fixed assets. Our findings inform both academics and managers on how firms balance information disclosure requirements with the use of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument....

  5. Iron deficiency in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, A F

    1982-06-01

    Iron in food is classified as belonging to the haem pool, the nonhaem pool, and extraneous sources. Haem iron is derived from vegetable and animal sources with varying bioavailability. Hookworm infestation of the intestinal tract affects 450 million people in the tropics. Schistosoma mansoni caused blood loss in 7 Egyptian patients of 7.5- 25.9 ml/day which is equivalent to a daily loss of iron of .6-7.3 mg daily urinary loss of iron in 9 Egyptian patients. Trichuris trichiura infestation by whipworm is widespread in children with blood loss of 5 ml/day/worm. The etiology of anemia in children besides iron deficiency includes malaria, bacterial or viral infections, folate deficiency and sickle-cell disease. Severe infections cause profound iron-deficiency anemia in children in central American and Malaysia. Plasmodium falciparum malaria-induced anaemia in tropical Africa lowers the mean haemoglobin concentration in the population by 2 g/dI, causing profound anaemia in some. The increased risk of premature delivery, low birthweight, fetal abnormalities, and fetal death is directly related to the degree of maternal anemia. Perinatal mortality was reduced from 38 to 4% in treated anemic mothers. Mental performance was significantly lower in anemic school children and improved after they received iron. Supplements of iron, soy-protein, calcium, and vitamins given to villagers with widespread malnutrition, iron deficiency, and hookworm infestation in Colombia reduced enteric infections in children. Severe iron-deficiency anemia was treated in adults in northern Nigeria by daily in Ferastral 10 ml, which is equivalent to 500 mg of iron per day. Choloroquine, folic acid, rephenium hydroxynaphthoate, and tetrachlorethylene treat adults with severe iron deficiency from hookworm infestation in rural tropical Africa. Blood transfusion is indicated if the patient is dying of anaemia or is pregnant with a haemoglobin concentration 6 gm/dl. In South East Asia, mg per day

  6. [Nutritional deficiencies associated with bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folope, Vanessa; Coëffier, Moïse; Déchelotte, Pierre

    2007-04-01

    Morbidly obese patients often have nutritional deficiencies, particularly in fat-soluble vitamins, folic acid and zinc. After bariatric surgery, these deficiencies may increase and others can appear, especially because of the limitation of food intake in gastric reduction surgery and of malabsorption in by-pass procedures. The latter result in more important weight loss but also increase the risk of more severe deficiencies. The protein deficiency associated with a decrease in the fat-free mass has been described in both procedures. It can sometimes require an enteral or parenteral support. Anemia can be secondary to iron deficiency, folic acid deficiency and even to vitamin B12 deficiency. Neurological disorders such as Gayet-Wernicke encephalopathy due to thiamine deficiency, or peripheral neuropathies may also be observed. Malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients, especially if diagnosed after by-pass surgery, rarely cause clinical symptoms. However, some complications have been reported such as bone demineralization due to vitamin D deficiency, hair loss secondary to zinc deficiency or hemeralopia from vitamin A deficiency. A careful nutritional follow-up should be performed during pregnancy after obesity surgery, because possible deficiencies can affect the health of both the mother and child. In conclusion, increased awareness of the risk of deficiency and the systematic dosage of micronutrients are needed in the pre- and postoperative period in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The case by case correction of these deficiencies is mandatory, and their systematic prevention should be evaluated.

  7. Insider protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddoups, I.G.

    1993-07-01

    The government community is broadly addressing the insider threat. The first section of this paper defines protection approaches and the latter sections present various applicable technology developments. The bulk of the paper discusses technology developments applied to (1) personnel and material tracking and inventory, (2) classified document protection, and (3) protecting security systems. The personnel and material tracking system uses a PC based-host to (1) collect information from proximity tags and material movement sensors, (2) apply rules to this input to assure that the ongoing activity meets the site selectable rules and, (3) forward the results to either an automated inventory system or an alarm system. The document protection system uses a PC network to efficiently and securely control classified material which is stored on write-once-read-mostly optical media. The protection of sensor to multiplexer communications in a security system is emphasized in the discussion of protecting security systems.

  8. Kinematic characteristics of anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees with concomitant meniscus deficiency during ascending stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Huang, Wenhan; Ma, Limin; Lin, Zefeng; Huang, Huayang; Xia, Hong

    2017-02-01

    It is commonly believed that a torn ACL or a damaged meniscus may be associated with altered knee joint movements. The purpose of this study was to measure the tibiofemoral kinematics of ACL deficiency with concomitant meniscus deficiency. Unilateral knees of 28 ACL deficient participants were studied while ascending stairs. Among these patients, 6 had isolated ACL injuries (group I), 8 had combined ACL and medial meniscus injuries (group II), 8 had combined ACL and lateral meniscus injuries (group III) and 6 had combined ACL and medial-lateral meniscus injuries (group IV). Both knees were then scanned during a stair climb activity using single fluoroscopic image system. Knee kinematics were measured at 0°, 5°, 10°, 15°, 30° and 60° of flexion during ascending stairs. At 0°, 15° and 30° flexion of the knee, the tibia rotated externally by 13.9 ± 6.1°,13.8 ± 9.5° and 15.9 ± 9.8° in Group I. Group II and III exhibited decreased external rotation from 60° to full extension. Statistical differences were found in 0°, 15°and 30° of flexion for the 2 groups compared with Group I. In general, the tibia showed anterior translation with respect to the femur during ascending stairs. It was further determined that Group III had larger anterior translation compared with Group IV at 0° and 5° of flexion (-6.9 ± 1.7 mm vs. 6.2 ± 11.3 mm, P = 0.041; -9.0 ± 1.8 mm vs. 8.1 ± 13.4 mm, P = 0.044). During ascending stairs the ACL deficient knee with different deficiencies in the meniscus will show significantly different kinematics compared with that of uninjured contralateral knee. Considering the varying effect of meniscus injuries on knee joint kinematics, future studies should concentrate on specific treatment of patients with combined ACL and meniscus injuries to protect the joint from abnormal kinematics and subsequent postoperative degeneration.

  9. Metabolic changes associated with selenium deficiency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Beata; Villemaire, Michelle L; Sandercock, Linda E; Jirik, Frank R; Vogel, Hans J

    2014-12-01

    Selenium (Se), which is a central component for the biosynthesis and functionality of selenoproteins, plays an important role in the anti-oxidative response, reproduction, thyroid hormone metabolism and the protection from infection and inflammation. However, dietary Se effects have not well been established to date and the available studies often present contradictory results. To obtain a better understanding of Se intake and its influence on the metabolism of living systems, we have utilized a metabolomics approach to gain insight into the specific metabolic alterations caused by Se deficiency in mice. Serum samples were collected from two groups of C57BL/6 mice: an experimental group which was fed a Se-deficient diet and controls consuming normal chow. The samples were analyzed by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting metabolite data were examined separately for both analytical methods and in a combined manner. By applying multivariate statistical analysis we were able to distinguish the two groups and detect a metabolite pattern associated with Se deficiency. We found that the concentrations of 15 metabolites significantly changed in serum samples collected from Se-deficient mice when compared to the controls. Many of the perturbed biological pathways pointed towards compensatory mechanisms during Se deficiency and were associated with amino acid metabolism. Our findings show that a metabolomics approach may be applied to identify the metabolic impact of Se and reveal the most impaired biological pathways as well as induced regulatory mechanisms during Se deficiency.

  10. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  11. Preventing Iron Deficiency and Anaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siegal_D

    Anaemia, often due to iron deficiency, is one of the most widespread causes of mortality and morbidity in ... Pregnant women must make many new red blood cells, provide iron for the foetus and may lose much blood during .... Do not give tea and coffee to children. • Eat fermented porridges and germinate/malt cereals and ...

  12. Vitamin D deficiency in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashman, Kevin D.; Dowling, Kirsten G; Škrabáková, Zuzana

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency has been described as being pandemic, but serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] distribution data for the European Union are of very variable quality. The NIH-led international Vitamin D Standardization Program (VDSP) has developed protocols for standardizing existi...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: proopiomelanocortin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individuals are prone to weight-related conditions like cardiovascular disease or type 2 diabetes . Low levels of ACTH ... to run in my family? What is the prognosis of a genetic condition? Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center Frequency POMC deficiency is a rare ...

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochinok T.V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the role of iron in the human body is highlighted. The mechanism of development of iron deficiency states, their consequences and the basic principles of diagnosis and correction of children of different ages are shown.

  15. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  16. Iron deficiency in cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Augusto Naoum

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Anemia is a frequent complication in cancer patients, both at diagnosis and during treatment, with a multifactorial etiology in most cases. Iron deficiency is among the most common causes of anemia in this setting and can develop in nearly half of patients with solid tumors and hematologic malignancies. Surprisingly, this fact is usually neglected by the attending physician in a way that proper and prompt investigation of the iron status is either not performed or postponed. In cancer patients, functional iron deficiency is the predominant mechanism, in which iron availability is reduced due to disease or the therapy-related inflammatory process. Hence, serum ferritin is not reliable in detecting iron deficiency in this setting, whereas transferrin saturation seems more appropriate for this purpose. Besides, lack of bioavailable iron can be further worsened by the use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents that increase iron utilization in the bone marrow. Iron deficiency can cause anemia or worsen pre-existing anemia, leading to a decline in performance status and adherence to treatment, with possible implications in clinical outcome. Due to its frequency and importance, treatment of this condition is already recommended in many specialty guidelines and should be performed preferably with intravenous iron. The evidences regarding the efficacy of this treatment are solid, with response gain when combined with erythropoiesis stimulating agents and significant increments in hemoglobin as monotherapy. Among intravenous iron formulations, slow release preparations present more favorable pharmacological characteristics and efficacy in cancer patients.

  17. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  18. Epigenetic Deficiencies and Replicative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell-specific synthetic lethal interactions entail promising therapeutic possibilities. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Pfister et al. describe a synthetic lethal interaction where cancer cells deficient in H3K36me3 owing to SETD2 loss-of-function mutation are strongly sensitized to inhibiti...

  19. Implicações políticas da institucionalização da deficiência The political implications of the institutionalization of deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Marques

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available O investimento social no corpo põe em evidência valores estéticos e de produtividade, determinantes dos padrões de normalidade vigentes. Um corpo deficiente está fora dos padrões estabelecidos, gerando uma prática preconceituosa e segregacionista. A instituição assistencialista constitui um dos mais eficientes mecanismos de defesa da sociedade em relação aos portadores de deficiência, identificando-os e mantendo-os isolados do convívio social. Escondida atrás de um discurso de proteção e de preparação dos deficientes para uma possível reintegração no contexto social, a institucionalização da deficiência protege mais a sociedade do que seus portadores.The social emphasis on the body exposes esthetical and productivity values, that establish the dominant normality patterns. A deficienty body is out of the established models, implying on a preconceptious and segregationist praxis. The assistentialist institution is one of the most efficient society mechanisms relating to the deficient individuals by identifying and keeping them isolated from the social acquaintanceship. Hidden by a discourse on the deficient protection and preparation to a possible social reintegration, the deficiency instituonalization protects more the society than its deficients.

  20. Present status of understanding on the G6PD deficiency and natural selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathy V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available G6PD deficiency is a common hemolytic genetic disorder, particularly in the areas endemic to malaria. Individuals are generally asymptomatic and hemolytic anemia occurs when some anti-malarial drugs or other oxidizing chemicals are administered. It has been proposed that G6PD deficiency provides protection against malaria. Maintaining of G6PD deficient alleles at polymorphic proportions is complicated because of the X-linked nature of G6PD deficiency. A comprehensive review of the literature on the hypothesis of malarial protection and the nature of the selection is being presented. Most of the epidemiological, in vitro and in vivo studies report selection for G6PD deficiency. Analysis of the G6PD gene also reveals that G6PD-deficient alleles show some signatures of selection. However, the question of how this polymorphism is being maintained remains unresolved because the selection/fitness coefficients for the different genotypes in the two sexes have not been established. Prevalence of G6PD deficiency in Indian caste and tribal populations and the different variants reported has also been reviewed.