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Sample records for cd16 monocyte subsets

  1. CD16+ Monocyte Subsets Are Increased in Large Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and Are Differentially Related with Circulating and Cell-Associated Biochemical and Inflammatory Biomarkers

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    Giorgio Ghigliotti; Chiara Barisione; Silvano Garibaldi; Claudio Brunelli; Daniela Palmieri; Giovanni Spinella; Bianca Pane; Paolo Spallarossa; Paola Altieri; Patrizia Fabbi; Gianmario Sambuceti; Domenico Palombo

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory components are present in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Circulating monocytes display heterogeneity, and three subsets have been identified, based on the differential expression for CD14 and CD16 receptors: CD14+CD16-, classical, CD14+CD16+, intermediate and CD14dim CD16+, non-classical monocytes. Increased proinflammatory CD16+ monocytes with high expression of CD143 are present in CKD patients. D-dimer is increased in AAA patients, and might contribute to the pro-inflamma...

  2. slan-defined subsets of CD16-positive monocytes: impact of granulomatous inflammation and M-CSF receptor mutation.

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    Hofer, Thomas P; Zawada, Adam M; Frankenberger, Marion; Skokann, Kerstin; Satzl, Anna A; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Schuberth, Madeleine; Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian; Rotter, Björn; Heine, Gunnar H; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems

    2015-12-10

    Human monocytes are subdivided into classical, intermediate, and nonclassical subsets, but there is no unequivocal strategy to dissect the latter 2 cell types. We show herein that the cell surface marker 6-sulfo LacNAc (slan) can define slan-positive CD14(+)CD16(++) nonclassical monocytes and slan-negative CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Gene expression profiling confirms that slan-negative intermediate monocytes show highest expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II genes, whereas a differential ubiquitin signature is a novel feature of the slan approach. In unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the slan-positive nonclassical monocytes cluster with monocytes and are clearly distinct from CD1c(+) dendritic cells. In clinical studies, we show a selective increase of the slan-negative intermediate monocytes to >100 cells per microliter in patients with sarcoidosis and a fivefold depletion of the slan-positive monocytes in patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS), which is caused by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor mutations. These data demonstrate that the slan-based definition of CD16-positive monocyte subsets is informative in molecular studies and in clinical settings. PMID:26443621

  3. Significance of detection of the monocyte CD14+CD16+ subsets and monocyte-platelet aggregates in patients with cerebral infarction by FCM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the mononuclear cell subsets distribution and monocyte-platelet aggregates of the peripheral blood in patients with cerebral infarction and its clinical significance. Methods: In 48 patients with cerebral infarction and 31 normal controls, the expression levels of CD14, CD16, CD41 were measured by flow cytometry. Results: The expression levels of CD14, Cr16 and CD41 on monocyte in group of cerebral infarction patients were significant difference than those in normal control (P+CD16+ subsets and the monocyte-platelet aggregates (PMAs) were helpful for the early diagnosis in patients with cerebral infarction. (authors)

  4. CD16(+) monocyte subsets are increased in large abdominal aortic aneurysms and are differentially related with circulating and cell-associated biochemical and inflammatory biomarkers.

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    Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Barisione, Chiara; Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Palmieri, Daniela; Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Spallarossa, Paolo; Altieri, Paola; Fabbi, Patrizia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Palombo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory components are present in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Circulating monocytes display heterogeneity, and three subsets have been identified, based on the differential expression for CD14 and CD16 receptors: CD14(+)CD16(−), classical, CD14(+)CD16(+), intermediate and CD14(dim)CD16(+), non-classical monocytes. Increased proinflammatory CD16+ monocytes with high expression of CD143 are present in CKD patients. D-dimer is increased in AAA patients, and might contribute to the pro-inflammatory response associated to circulating monocytes. We aimed to investigate the frequency of CD14(+)CD16(+), CD14(dim)CD16(+) monocytes and monocyte CD143 expression in AAA patients, and their relationship with Ddimer, eGFR and other inflammatory parameters. Blood from 74 AAA patients and 30 healthy controls was analyzed to determine the frequency of CD14(+)CD16(+), CD14(dim)CD16(+) monocytes and the monocyte CD143 expression by means of flow-cytometry. AAA patients had expanded CD16+ subsets (CD14(+)CD16(+): 7.66 ± 0.31% vs 5.42 ± 0.27%; CD14(dim)CD16(+): 7.43 ± 0.48% vs 5.54 ± 0.38%, AAA vs controls, mean ± SE, both p D-dimer and age, and to reduced eGFR. CD14(dim)CD16(+) cells were associated to uric acid, surface CD143, and reduced count of total leukocytes and neutrophils. Within AAA patients, the two CD16(+) subsets and the monocyte CD143 expression display different relationships with D-dimer, parameters of renal function and circulating biochemical and inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:23348634

  5. CD16+ Monocyte Subsets Are Increased in Large Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms and Are Differentially Related with Circulating and Cell-Associated Biochemical and Inflammatory Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigliotti, Giorgio; Barisione, Chiara; Garibaldi, Silvano; Brunelli, Claudio; Palmieri, Daniela; Spinella, Giovanni; Pane, Bianca; Spallarossa, Paolo; Altieri, Paola; Fabbi, Patrizia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Palombo, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Proinflammatory components are present in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Circulating monocytes display heterogeneity, and three subsets have been identified, based on the differential expression for CD14 and CD16 receptors: CD14+CD16-, classical, CD14+CD16+, intermediate and CD14dim CD16+, non-classical monocytes. Increased proinflammatory CD16+ monocytes with high expression of CD143 are present in CKD patients. D-dimer is increased in AAA patients, and might contribute to the pro-inflammatory response associated to circulating monocytes. We aimed to investigate the frequency of CD14+CD16+, CD14dim CD16+ monocytes and monocyte CD143 expression in AAA patients, and their relationship with D-dimer, eGFR and other inflammatory parameters. Blood from 74 AAA patients and 30 healthy controls was analyzed to determine the frequency of CD14+, CD16+, CD14dim CD16+ monocytes and the monocyte CD143 expression by means of flow-cytometry. AAA patients had expanded CD16+ SUPsets (CD14+CD16+: 7.66 ± 0.31% vs 5.42 ± 0.27%; CD14dim CD16+: 7.43 ± 0.48% vs 5.54 ± 0.38%, AAA vs controls, mean ± SE, both pD-dimer and age, and to reduced eGFR. CD14dim CD16+ cells were associated to uric acid, surface CD143, and reduced count of total leukocytes and neutrophils. Within AAA patients, the two CD16+ supsets and the monocyte CD143 expression display different relationships with D-dimer, parameters of renal function and circulating biochemical and inflammatory biomarkers. PMID:23348634

  6. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART)-Related Hypertriglyceridemia Is Associated With Failure of Recovery of CD14lowCD16+ Monocyte Subsets in AIDS Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Junyan; Zhao, Hongxin; Ma, Yaluan; Zhou, Haiwei; Hao, Yu; Li, Yanmei; Song, Chuan; Han, Ning; Liu, Xiangyi; Zeng, Hui; QIN, MINGZHAO

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As cellular reservoirs, CD16+ monocyte subsets play important roles in the progression of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduced the percentages of CD14highCD16+ monocyte subsets, but did not recover the percentages of CD14lowCD16+ subsets. Eighty-four chronic HIV-infected, HAART-naïve individuals and 55 HIV-negative subjects (31 without hyperlipidemia and 24 with hypertriglyceridemia) were enrolled. Plasma HIV-1 RNA level...

  7. Susceptibility and Response of Human Blood Monocyte Subsets to Primary Dengue Virus Infection

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    Wong, Kok Loon; Chen, Weiqiang; Balakrishnan, Thavamalar; Toh, Ying Xiu; Fink, Katja; Wong, Siew-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Human blood monocytes play a central role in dengue infections and form the majority of virus infected cells in the blood. Human blood monocytes are heterogeneous and divided into CD16− and CD16+ subsets. Monocyte subsets play distinct roles during disease, but it is not currently known if monocyte subsets differentially contribute to dengue protection and pathogenesis. Here, we compared the susceptibility and response of the human CD16− and CD16+ blood monocyte subsets to primary dengue viru...

  8. Differential control of Helios+/− Treg development by monocyte subsets through disparate inflammatory cytokines

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    Zhong, Hui; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2013-01-01

    Control of Helios+/− Treg subset development is mediated through distinct cytokines and monocyte subpopulations.CD16+ monocytes inhibit Helios+ Treg proliferation through IL-12, whereas CD16monocytes suppress Helios− Treg development through TNF-α.

  9. Infliximab therapy increases the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes and modifies macrophage cytokine response to bacterial infection.

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    Nazareth, N; Magro, F; Silva, J; Duro, M; Gracio, D; Coelho, R; Appelberg, R; Macedo, G; Sarmento, A

    2014-09-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) has been correlated with altered macrophage response to microorganisms. Considering the efficacy of infliximab treatment on CD remission, we investigated infliximab effects on circulating monocyte subsets and on macrophage cytokine response to bacteria. Human peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were obtained from CD patients, treated or not with infliximab. Macrophages were infected with Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) or M. avium subsp avium, and cytokine levels [tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-10] were evaluated at different time-points. To evaluate infliximab-dependent effects on monocyte subsets, we studied CD14 and CD16 expression by peripheral blood monocytes before and after different infliximab administrations. We also investigated TNF secretion by macrophages obtained from CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes and the frequency of TNF(+) cells among CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocyte-derived macrophages from CD patients. Infliximab treatment resulted in elevated TNF and IL-10 macrophage response to bacteria. An infliximab-dependent increase in the frequency of circulating CD16(+) monocytes (particularly the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset) was also observed (before infliximab: 4·65 ± 0·58%; after three administrations: 10·68 ± 2·23%). In response to MAP infection, macrophages obtained from CD16(+) monocytes were higher TNF producers and CD16(+) macrophages from infliximab-treated CD patients showed increased frequency of TNF(+) cells. In conclusion, infliximab treatment increased the TNF production of CD macrophages in response to bacteria, which seemed to depend upon enrichment of CD16(+) circulating monocytes, particularly of the CD14(++) CD16(+) subset. Infliximab treatment of CD patients also resulted in increased macrophage IL-10 production in response to bacteria, suggesting an infliximab-induced shift to M2 macrophages. PMID:24816497

  10. Circulating CD14brightCD16+ 'intermediate' monocytes exhibit enhanced parasite pattern recognition in human helminth infection.

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    Joseph D Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Circulating monocyte sub-sets have recently emerged as mediators of divergent immune functions during infectious disease but their role in helminth infection has not been investigated. In this study we evaluated whether 'classical' (CD14brightCD16-, 'intermediate' (CD14brightCD16+, and 'non-classical' (CD14dimCD16+ monocyte sub-sets from peripheral blood mononuclear cells varied in both abundance and ability to bind antigenic material amongst individuals living in a region of Northern Senegal which is co-endemic for Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium. Monocyte recognition of excretory/secretory (E/S products released by skin-invasive cercariae, or eggs, of S. mansoni was assessed by flow cytometry and compared between S. mansoni mono-infected, S. mansoni and S. haematobium co-infected, and uninfected participants. Each of the three monocyte sub-sets in the different infection groups bound schistosome E/S material. However, 'intermediate' CD14brightCD16+ monocytes had a significantly enhanced ability to bind cercarial and egg E/S. Moreover, this elevation of ligand binding was particularly evident in co-infected participants. This is the first demonstration of modulated parasite pattern recognition in CD14brightCD16+ intermediate monocytes during helminth infection, which may have functional consequences for the ability of infected individuals to respond immunologically to infection.

  11. Changes of monocyte subsets in patients with acute coronary syndrome and correlation with myocardial injury markers

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Li; Yin, Yigang; Zhou, Ruifang; Lin, Jie; Li, Jianming; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of peripheral blood monocytes subsets in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and its clinical significance. Methods: A total of 68 ACS patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. Monocyte subset analysis was performed using flow cytometry: CD14++CD16-(Mon1), CD14++CD16+ (Mon2), and CD14+CD16++ (Mon3). Results: 1. The number of Mon1 and Mon3 were significantly increased in ACS patients compared with HS (P

  12. Monocyte Subsets in Schistosomiasis Patients with Periportal Fibrosis

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    Jamille Souza Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A major issue with Schistosoma mansoni infection is the development of periportal fibrosis, which is predominantly caused by the host immune response to egg antigens. Experimental studies have pointed to the participation of monocytes in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of this study was to characterize the subsets of monocytes in individuals with different degrees of periportal fibrosis secondary to schistosomiasis. Monocytes were classified into classical (CD14++CD16−, intermediate (CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical (CD14+CD16++. The expressions of monocyte markers and cytokines were assessed using flow cytometry. The frequency of classical monocytes was higher than the other subsets. The expression of HLA-DR, IL-6, TNF-α, and TGF-β was higher in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis as compared to other groups. Although no differences were observed in receptors expression (IL-4R and IL-10R between groups of patients, the expression of IL-12 was lower in monocytes from individuals with moderate to severe fibrosis, suggesting a protective role of this cytokine in the development of fibrosis. Our data support the hypothesis that the three different monocyte populations participate in the immunopathogenesis of periportal fibrosis, since they express high levels of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines and low levels of regulatory markers.

  13. Hyper-activated pro-inflammatory CD16 monocytes correlate with the severity of liver injury and fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B.

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    Ji-Yuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extensive mononuclear cell infiltration is strongly correlated with liver damage in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB infection. Macrophages and infiltrating monocytes also participate in the development of liver damage and fibrosis in animal models. However, little is known regarding the immunopathogenic role of peripheral blood monocytes and intrahepatic macrophages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The frequencies, phenotypes, and functions of peripheral blood and intrahepatic monocyte/macrophage subsets were analyzed in 110 HBeAg positive CHB patients, including 32 immune tolerant (IT carriers and 78 immune activated (IA patients. Liver biopsies from 20 IA patients undergoing diagnosis were collected for immunohistochemical analysis. IA patients displayed significant increases in peripheral blood monocytes and intrahepatic macrophages as well as CD16(+ subsets, which were closely associated with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels and the liver histological activity index (HAI scores. In addition, the increased CD16(+ monocytes/macrophages expressed higher levels of the activation marker HLA-DR compared with CD16(- monocytes/macrophages. Furthermore, peripheral blood CD16(+ monocytes preferentially released inflammatory cytokines and hold higher potency in inducing the expansion of Th17 cells. Of note, hepatic neutrophils also positively correlated with HAI scores. CONCLUSIONS: These distinct properties of monocyte/macrophage subpopulations participate in fostering the inflammatory microenvironment and liver damage in CHB patients and further represent a collaborative scenario among different cell types contributing to the pathogenesis of HBV-induced liver disease.

  14. Recruitment of CD16(+) monocytes to endothelial cells in response to LPS-treatment and concomitant TNF release is regulated by CX3CR1 and interfered by soluble fractalkine.

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    Rennert, Knut; Heisig, Kerstin; Groeger, Marko; Wallert, Maria; Funke, Harald; Lorkowski, Stefan; Huber, Otmar; Mosig, Alexander S

    2016-07-01

    Fractalkine (FKN, CX3CL1) is a regulator of leukocyte recruitment and adhesion, and controls leukocyte migration on endothelial cells (ECs). We show that FKN triggers different effects in CD16(+) and CD16(-) monocytes, the two major subsets of human monocytes. In the presence of ECs a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulus led to a significant increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-secretion by CD16(+) monocytes, which depends on the interaction of CX3CR1 expressed on CD16(+) monocytes with endothelial FKN. Soluble FKN that was efficiently shed from the surface of LPS-activated ECs in response to binding of CD16(+) monocytes to ECs, diminished monocyte adhesion in down-regulating CX3CR1 expression on the surface of CD16(+) monocytes resulting in decreased TNF-secretion. In this process the TNF-converting enzyme (TACE) acts as a central player regulating FKN-shedding and TNFα-release through CD16(+) monocytes interacting with ECs. Thus, the release and local accumulation of sFKN represents a mechanism that limits the inflammatory potential of CD16(+) monocytes by impairing their interaction with ECs during the initial phase of an immune response to LPS. This regulatory process represents a potential target for therapeutic approaches to modulate the inflammatory response to bacterial components. PMID:27031442

  15. Differential expression of CD163 on monocyte subsets in healthy and HIV-1 infected individuals.

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    Emma Tippett

    Full Text Available CD163, a haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb scavenger receptor, expressed by monocytes and macrophages, is important in resolution of inflammation. Age-related non-AIDS co-morbidities in HIV-infected individuals, particularly dementia and cardiovascular disease, result in part from effects of HIV-1 infection on monocyte and macrophage biology. CD163 co-expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes has been proposed as a useful biomarker for HIV-1 disease progression and the presence of HIV associated dementia. Here we investigated CD163 expression on monocyte subsets ex vivo, on cultured macrophages, and soluble in plasma, in the setting of HIV-1 infection. Whole blood immunophenotyping revealed CD163 expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes but not on CD14+CD16++ monocytes (P = 0.004, supported by CD163 mRNA levels. Incubation with M-CSF induced CD163 protein expression on CD14+CD16++ monocytes to the same extent as CD14++CD16- monocytes. CD163 expression on CD14++CD16+ monocytes from HIV-infected subjects was significantly higher than from uninfected individuals, with a trend towards increased expression on CD14++CD16- monocytes (P = 0.019 and 0.069 respectively, which is accounted for by HIV-1 therapy including protease inhibitors. Shedding of CD163 was shown to predominantly occur from the CD14++CD16- subset after Ficoll isolation and LPS stimulation. Soluble CD163 concentration in plasma from HIV-1 infected donors was similar to HIV-1 uninfected donors. Monocyte CD163 expression in HIV-1 infected patients showed a complicated relationship with classical measures of disease progression. Our findings clarify technical issues regarding CD163 expression on monocyte subsets and further elucidates its role in HIV-associated inflammation by demonstrating that CD163 is readily lost from CD14++CD16- monocytes and induced in pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16++ monocytes by M-CSF. Our data show that all monocyte subsets are potentially capable of differentiating into CD

  16. Mycobacterial antigen driven activation of CD14++CD16- monocytes is a predictor of tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome.

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    Bruno B Andrade

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paradoxical tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS is an aberrant inflammatory response occurring in a subset of TB-HIV co-infected patients initiating anti-retroviral therapy (ART. Here, we examined monocyte activation by prospectively quantitating pro-inflammatory plasma markers and monocyte subsets in TB-HIV co-infected patients from a South Indian cohort at baseline and following ART initiation at the time of IRIS, or at equivalent time points in non-IRIS controls. Pro-inflammatory biomarkers of innate and myeloid cell activation were increased in plasma of IRIS patients pre-ART and at the time of IRIS; this association was confirmed in a second cohort in South Africa. Increased expression of these markers correlated with elevated antigen load as measured by higher sputum culture grade and shorter duration of anti-TB therapy. Phenotypic analysis revealed the frequency of CD14(++CD16(- monocytes was an independent predictor of TB-IRIS, and was closely associated with plasma levels of CRP, TNF, IL-6 and tissue factor during IRIS. In addition, production of inflammatory cytokines by monocytes was higher in IRIS patients compared to controls pre-ART. These data point to a major role of mycobacterial antigen load and myeloid cell hyperactivation in the pathogenesis of TB-IRIS, and implicate monocytes and monocyte-derived cytokines as potential targets for TB-IRIS prevention or treatment.

  17. The Kinetics of Circulating Monocyte Subsets and Monocyte-Platelet Aggregates in the Acute Phase of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

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    Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xin-Lin; Ji, Wen-Jie; Liu, Jun-Xiang; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Ren, Dong; Ma, Yong-Qiang; Zeng, Shan; Xu, Zhong-Wei; Li, Hong-Xia; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Zhang, Zhuoli; Li, Yu-Ming; Benefield, Brandon C.; Zawada, Adam M.; Thorp, Edward B.; Lee, Daniel C.; Heine, Gunnar H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In experimental myocardial infarction (MI), a rise in cell counts of circulating monocyte subsets contributes to impaired myocardial healing and to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization. In humans, the prognostic role of monocyte subsets in patients suffering ST-elevation MI (STEMI) is still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to determine the kinetics of the 3 monocyte subsets (classical CD14++CD16–, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes), as well as the subset-specific monocyte–platelet aggregates (MPA), in acute STEMI followed by primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and their relationships with cardiovascular outcomes during a 2-year follow-up. Monocyte subsets and MPA were measured in 100 STEMI patients receiving primary PCI on days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 of symptom onset, which were compared with 60 stable coronary heart disease patients and 35 healthy volunteers. From day 1 to day 7, significant increases in the counts of CD14++CD16+ monocytes and CD14++CD16+ MPA were observed, with peak levels on day 2. During a median follow-up of 2.0 years, 28 first cardiovascular events (defined as cardiovascular death, nonfatal ischemic stroke, recurrent MI, need for emergency or repeat revascularization, and rehospitalization for heart failure) were recorded. After adjustment for confounders, CD14++CD16+ monocytosis (day 1 [HR: 3.428; 95% CI: 1.597–7.358; P = 0.002], day 2 [HR: 4.835; 95% CI: 1.106–21.13; P = 0.04], day 3 [HR: 2.734; 95% CI: 1.138–6.564; P = 0.02], and day 7 [HR: 2.647; 95% CI: 1.196–5.861; P = 0.02]), as well as increased levels of CD14++CD16+ MPA measured on all time points (days 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7), had predictive values for adverse cardiovascular events. In conclusion, our data show the expansion of the CD14++CD16+ monocyte subset during acute phase of STEMI has predictive values for 2-year adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with primary PCI. Future studies

  18. Bezafibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, decreases circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Terasawa, Tomoko; Aso, Yoshimasa; Omori, Kyoko; Fukushima, Maiko; Momobayashi, Atsushi; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-02-01

    CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes are proinflammatory cells that produce tumor necrosis factor and interleukin (IL)-1β. The number of circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes is increased in patients with chronic renal failure or coronary artery disease. We investigated the effect of bezafibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α agonist, on circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Using cells isolated from type 2 diabetic subjects, we also examined the in vitro expression of CD16 messenger RNA (mRNA) by mononuclear cells (MNCs) exposed to bezafibrate. The percentage of CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes among all CD14(+) monocytes was significantly higher in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (P bezafibrate (400 mg/d) than in patients not taking it (P bezafibrate for 12 weeks significantly reduced the percentage of circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes from 45.4 ± 25.2% to 38.3 ± 21.8% (P = 0.0144). In an in vitro study, the expression of CD16 mRNA by MNCs from 6 diabetic subjects was decreased after 24 hours of treatment with 10 μg/mL of bezafibrate (P bezafibrate, whereas the IL-1β level in the culture supernatant was significantly decreased after treatment of MNCs with either 1 or 10 μg/mL of bezafibrate. In conclusion, bezafibrate decreased circulating CD14(+)CD16(+) monocytes in patients with type 2 diabetes, probably by inhibiting the expression of CD16 mRNA. PMID:25134759

  19. Comparison of two different strategies for human monocyte subsets gating within the large-scale prospective CARE FOR HOMe Study.

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    Zawada, Adam M; Fell, Lisa H; Untersteller, Kathrin; Seiler, Sarah; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Fliser, Danilo; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Heine, Gunnar H

    2015-08-01

    Monocytes are heterogeneous cells consisting of (at least) three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Correct enumeration of cell counts necessitates well-defined gating strategies, which are essentially based upon CD14 and CD16 expression. For the delineation of intermediate from nonclassical monocytes, a "rectangular gating (RG) strategy" and a "trapezoid gating (TG) strategy" have been proposed. We compared the two gating strategies in a well-defined clinical cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Within the ongoing CARE FOR HOMe study, monocyte subsets were reanalyzed in 416 CKD patients, who were followed 3.6 ± 1.6 years for the occurrence of a cardiovascular event. Gating was performed by either RG or TG. We analyzed the expression of surface markers, and compared the predictive role of cell counts of monocyte subsets, as defined by RG and TG, respectively. With both gating strategies, higher intermediate monocyte counts predicted the cardiovascular endpoint in Kaplan-Meier analyses (P strategy toward quartiles of intermediate monocytes counts with TG strategy. In expression analysis, those monocytes which are defined as intermediate monocytes by the RG strategy and as nonclassical monocytes by the TG strategy share characteristics of both subsets. In conclusion, intermediate monocytes were independent predictors of cardiovascular outcome irrespective of the applied gating strategy. Future studies should aim to identify markers that allow for an unequivocal definition of intermediate monocytes, which may further improve their power to predict cardiovascular events. PMID:26062127

  20. Transcriptome analysis in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis disclosing a key role for CD16+CX3CR1+ monocytes.

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    Eva Schepers

    Full Text Available The risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in chronic kidney disease; in this process micro-inflammation plays an essential role. Responsible mechanisms remain to a large extent unidentified. In this pilot study transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood monocytes was used to identify in an unprejudiced manner which factors could be discriminative for cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Forty gender- and age-matched, non-diabetic, non-smoking subjects with CRP 60 mL/min/1.73m2 and a history of cardiovascular event (CVE, 10 patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis without previous cardiovascular event (CKD5HD and 10 with a previous cardiovascular event (CKD5HD/CVE. Monocytes were isolated and their mRNA was submitted to focused transcriptome analysis using a macroarray platform containing ca. 700 genes associated with macrophage functional capacity. The macroarray data indicated 9 genes (8 upregulated and 1 downregulated with a significant differential expression in CKD5HD/CVE vs. CVE alone, after excluding genes differentially expressed in CKD5HD vs.For FCGR3A (CD16 and CX3CR1 (chemokine receptor the upregulation vs. control and vs. CVE could be confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for all CKD5HD patients. Furthermore, CX3CR1 relative expression on monocytes correlated with CRP. Flow cytometric analysis of purified monocytes confirmed a significant increase in the percentage of CD16 positive monocytes in all CKD5HD patients vs. control and CVE. The present study indicates the importance of a specific pro-inflammatory monocyte subpopulation, positive for CD16 and the co-expressed chemokine receptor, CX3CR1, discriminative for CKD5HD patients.

  1. Identification and characterization of a tumor infiltrating CD56(+)/CD16 (-) NK cell subset with specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines.

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    Frankel, Timothy L; Burns, William; Riley, John; Morgan, Richard A; Davis, Jeremy L; Hanada, Kenichi; Quezado, Martha; Rosenberg, Steven A; Royal, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    In a recent clinical trial, a patient exhibited regression of several pancreatic cancer metastases following the administration of the immune modulator Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody). We sought to characterize the immune cells responsible for this regression. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL-2742) and an autologous tumor line (TC-2742) were expanded from a regressing metastatic lesion excised from this patient. Natural killer (NK) cells predominated in the TIL (92% CD56(+)) with few T cells (12% CD3(+)). A majority (88%) of the NK cells were CD56(bright)CD16(-). TIL-2742 secreted IFN-γ and GM-CSF following co-culture with TC-2742 and major histocompatibility complex mismatched pancreatic tumor lines. After sorting TIL-2742, the purified CD56(+)CD16(-)CD3(-) subset showed reactivity similar to TIL-2742 while the CD56(-)CD16(-)CD3(+) cells exhibited no tumor recognition. In co-culture assays, TIL-2742 and the NK subset expressed high reactivity to several pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and could lyse the autologous tumor as well as pancreas and prostate cancer lines. Reactivity was partially abrogated by blockade of TRAIL. We thus identified a unique subset of NK cells (CD56(bright)CD16(dim)) isolated from a regressing metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient responding to Ipilimumab. This represents the first report of CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells with apparent specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and associated with tumor regression following the treatment with an immune modulating agent. PMID:20734041

  2. Mechanisms of HIV entry into the CNS: increased sensitivity of HIV infected CD14+CD16+ monocytes to CCL2 and key roles of CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM in diapedesis.

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    Dionna W Williams

    Full Text Available As HIV infected individuals live longer, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing, despite successful antiretroviral therapy. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes are critical to the neuropathogenesis of HIV as they promote viral seeding of the brain and establish neuroinflammation. The mechanisms by which HIV infected and uninfected monocytes cross the blood brain barrier and enter the central nervous system are not fully understood. We determined that HIV infection of CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes resulted in their highly increased transmigration across the blood brain barrier in response to CCL2 as compared to uninfected cells, which did not occur in the absence of the chemokine. This exuberant transmigration of HIV infected monocytes was due, at least in part, to increased CCR2 and significantly heightened sensitivity to CCL2. The entry of HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes into the brain was facilitated by significantly increased surface JAM-A, ALCAM, CD99, and PECAM-1, as compared to CD14(+ cells that are CD16 negative. Upon HIV infection, there was an additional increase in surface JAM-A and ALCAM on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes isolated from some individuals. Antibodies to ALCAM and JAM-A inhibited the transmigration of both HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes across the BBB, demonstrating their importance in facilitating monocyte transmigration and entry into the brain parenchyma. Targeting CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM present on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes that preferentially infiltrate the CNS represents a therapeutic strategy to reduce viral seeding of the brain as well as the ongoing neuroinflammation that occurs during HIV pathogenesis.

  3. Monocyte Subsets and Related Chemokines in Carotid Artery Stenosis and Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Gerrit M.; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J.; Teebken, Omke E.; Schuppner, Ramona; Dirks, Meike; Worthmann, Hans; Lichtinghagen, Ralf; Maye, Gerrit; Limbourg, Florian P.; Weissenborn, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Carotid stenosis (CS) is an important cause of ischemic stroke. However, reliable markers for the purpose of identification of high-risk, so-called vulnerable carotid plaques, are still lacking. Monocyte subsets are crucial players in atherosclerosis and might also contribute to plaque rupture. In this study we, therefore, aimed to investigate the potential role of monocyte subsets and associated chemokines as clinical biomarkers for vulnerability of CS. Patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic CS (n = 21), patients with cardioembolic ischemic strokes (n = 11), and controls without any cardiovascular disorder (n = 11) were examined. Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the Essen Stroke Risk Score (ESRS). Monocyte subsets in peripheral blood were measured by quantitative flow cytometry. Plaque specimens were histologically analyzed. Furthermore, plasma levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and fractalkine were measured. Intermediate monocytes (Mon2) were significantly elevated in symptomatic and asymptomatic CS-patients compared to controls. Mon2 counts positively correlated with the ESRS. Moreover, stroke patients showed an elevation of Mon2 compared to controls, independent of the ESRS. MCP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with symptomatic than in those with asymptomatic CS. Several histological criteria significantly differed between symptomatic and asymptomatic plaques. However, there was no association of monocyte subsets or chemokines with histological features of plaque vulnerability. Due to the multifactorial influence on monocyte subsets, the usability as clinical markers for plaque vulnerability seems to be limited. However, monocyte subsets may be critically involved in the pathology of CS. PMID:27023515

  4. Clinical significance of monocyte heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Brian K; Ingram, David A

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are primitive hematopoietic cells that primarily arise from the bone marrow, circulate in the peripheral blood and give rise to differentiated macrophages. Over the past two decades, considerable attention to monocyte diversity and macrophage polarization has provided contextual clues into the role of myelomonocytic derivatives in human disease. Until recently, human monocytes were subdivided based on expression of the surface marker CD16. "Classical" monocytes express surface markers denoted as CD14(++)CD16(-) and account for greater than 70% of total monocyte count, while "non-classical" monocytes express the CD16 antigen with low CD14 expression (CD14(+)CD16(++)). However, recognition of an intermediate population identified as CD14(++)CD16(+) supports the new paradigm that monocytes are a true heterogeneous population and careful identification of specific subpopulations is necessary for understanding monocyte function in human disease. Comparative studies of monocytes in mice have yielded more dichotomous results based on expression of the Ly6C antigen. In this review, we will discuss the use of monocyte subpopulations as biomarkers of human disease and summarize correlative studies in mice that may yield significant insight into the contribution of each subset to disease pathogenesis. PMID:25852821

  5. Nonclassical Patrolling Monocyte Function in the Vasculature

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Graham; Tacke, Robert; Hedrick, Catherine C.; Hanna, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Nonclassical patrolling monocytes are characterized by their unique ability to actively patrol the vascular endothelium under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Patrolling monocyte subsets (CX3CR1highLy6C− in mouse, and CX3CR1highCD14dimCD16+ in humans) are distinct from the classical monocyte subsets (CCR2highLy6C+ in mouse, and CCR2highCD14+CD16− in humans) and exhibit unique functions in the vasculature and inflammatory disease. Patrolling monocytes function in a number of disease se...

  6. Glucose transporter expression differs between bovine monocyte and macrophage subsets and is influenced by milk production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, M; Hussen, J; Koy, M; Dänicke, S; Schuberth, H-J; Breves, G

    2016-03-01

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is characterized by negative energy balance and higher incidences of infectious diseases such as mastitis or metritis. With the onset of lactation, milk production is prioritized and large amounts of glucose are transported into the mammary gland. Decreased overall energy availability might impair the function of monocytes acting as key innate immune cells, which give rise to macrophages and dendritic cells and link innate and adaptive immunity. Information on glucose requirements of bovine immune cells is rare. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate glucose transporter expression of the 3 bovine monocyte subsets (classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes) and monocyte-derived macrophages and to identify influences of the peripartal period. Blood samples were either collected from nonpregnant healthy cows or from 16 peripartal German Holstein cows at d -14, +7, and +21 relative to parturition. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to determine mRNA expression of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 in monocyte subsets and monocyte-derived macrophages. The low GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression in nonclassical monocytes was unaltered during differentiation into macrophages, whereas in classical and intermediate monocytes GLUT expression was downregulated. Alternatively activated M2 macrophages consumed more glucose compared with classically activated M1 macrophages. The GLUT4 mRNA was only detectable in unstimulated macrophages. Neither monocytes nor macrophages were insulin responsive. In the peripartum period, monocyte GLUT1 and GLUT3 expression and the GLUT3/GLUT1 ratio were negatively correlated with lactose production. The high-affinity GLUT3 transporter appears to be the predominant glucose transporter on bovine monocytes and macrophages, especially in the peripartal period when blood glucose levels decline. Glucose transporter expression in monocytes is downregulated as a function of lactose production, which

  7. Characterization and use of new monoclonal antibodies to CD11c, CD14, and CD163 to analyze the phenotypic complexity of ruminant monocyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaggar, Mahmoud M; Abdellrazeq, Gaber S; Mack, Victoria; Fry, Lindsay M; Davis, William C; Park, Kun Taek

    2016-10-01

    The sequencing of the bovine genome and development of mass spectrometry, in conjunction with flow cytometry (FC), have afforded an opportunity to complete the characterization of the specificity of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), only partially characterized during previous international workshops focused on antibody development for livestock (1991, Leukocyte Antigens in Cattle, Sheep, and Goats; 1993, Leukocyte Antigens of Cattle and Sheep; 1996, Third Workshop on Ruminant Leukocyte Antigens). The objective of this study was to complete the characterization of twelve mAbs incompletely characterized during the workshops that reacted with molecules predominantly expressed on bovine monocytes and use them to provide further information on the phenotypic complexity of monocyte subsets in ruminants. Analysis revealed that the mAbs could be grouped into three clusters that recognize three different molecules: CD11c, CD14, and CD163. Following characterization, comparison of the patterns of expression of CD14 and CD163 with expression of CD16, CD172a, and CD209 revealed the mononuclear cell population is comprised of multiple subsets with differential expression of these molecules. Further analysis revealed the epitopes recognized by mAbs to CD14 and CD163 are conserved on orthologues in sheep and goats. In contrast to CD14 that is also expressed on sheep and goat granulocytes, CD163 is a definitive marker for their monocytes. PMID:27496743

  8. Impacts of parturition and body condition score on glucose uptake capacity of bovine monocyte subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Melanie; Hussen, Jamal; Drong, Caroline; Meyer, Ulrich; von Soosten, Dirk; Frahm, Jana; Daenicke, Sven; Breves, Gerhard; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-15

    The peripartal period of dairy cows is associated with a higher incidence of infectious diseases like mastitis or metritis, particularly in high-yielding animals. The onset of lactation induces a negative energy balance and a shift of glucose distribution toward the udder. Glucose is used as primary fuel by monocytes which give rise to macrophages, key cells in the defense against pathogens. The aim of this study was to analyze whether animals with high or low body condition score (BCS) differ in composition and glucose uptake capacities of bovine monocyte subsets. Blood samples were taken from 27 dairy cows starting 42 days before parturition until day 56 after parturition. The cows were allocated to two groups according to their BCS. A feeding regime was applied, in which the BCS high group received higher amounts of concentrate before parturition and concentrate feeding was more restricted in the BCS high group after parturition compared with the BCS low group, to promote postpartal lipolysis and enhance negative energy balance in the BCS high group. Blood cell counts of classical (cM), intermediate (intM) and nonclassical monocytes (ncM) were increased at day 7 after calving. In the BCS low group intM numbers were significantly higher compared to the BCS high group at day 7 after parturition. Within the BCS low group cows suffering from mastitis or metritis showed significantly higher numbers of cM, intM and ncM at day 7 after parturition. Classical monocytes and intM showed similar glucose uptake capacities while values for ncM were significantly lower. Compared with antepartal capacities and irrespective of BCS and postpartal mastitis or metritis, glucose uptake of all monocyte subsets decreased after parturition. In conclusion, whereas glucose uptake capacity of bovine monocyte subsets is altered by parturition, it is not linked to the energy supply of the animals or to postpartal infectious diseases. PMID:25980551

  9. Histamine modulates multiple functional activities of monocyte-derived dendritic cell subsets via histamine receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tünde; Gogolák, Péter; Kis-Tóth, Katalin; Jelinek, Ivett; László, Valéria; Rajnavölgyi, Eva

    2012-02-01

    Expression of CD1a proteins in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) specifies functionally distinct subsets with different inflammatory properties. Histamine is recognized as an inflammatory mediator released by various cell types including DCs. The diverse biological effects of histamine are mediated by G-protein-coupled histamine receptors (HRs), which are able to modulate the functional activities of DC subsets. The goal of the present study was to compare the expression and activity of HRs in the CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) monocyte-derived DC subsets and to test the effects of histamine on the differentiation, activation and functional activities of these subsets. We show that H2R is present at high levels in both DC subsets, whereas H1R and H4R are expressed in a subset-specific manner. Histamine shifts DC differentiation to the development of CD1a(-) DCs and modulates DC activation through its inhibitory effect on CD1a(+) DC differentiation. Histamine-induced reduction of CD1a(+) DCs is associated with increased secretion of IL-6 and IL-10, up-regulation of a typical combination of chemokines, expression C5aR1 by the CD1a(-) DC subset and enhanced migration of both activated DC subsets supported by the production of MMP-9 and MMP-12 enzymes. All these effects were shown to be mediated in a H2R-specific manner as revealed by the specific antagonist of the receptor. As H2R is expressed at high levels in both DC subsets, we propose that it may dominate the regulation of multiple DC functions. In contrast, H1R and H4R with opposing subset-related expression may have a regulatory or fine-tuning role in histamine-induced functional activities. PMID:22232416

  10. Functional Langerinhigh-Expressing Langerhans-like Cells Can Arise from CD14highCD16- Human Blood Monocytes in Serum-Free Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picarda, Gaëlle; Chéneau, Coraline; Humbert, Jean-Marc; Bériou, Gaëlle; Pilet, Paul; Martin, Jérôme; Duteille, Franck; Perrot, Pierre; Bellier-Waast, Frédérique; Heslan, Michèle; Haspot, Fabienne; Guillon, Fabien; Josien, Regis; Halary, Franck Albert

    2016-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are epithelial APCs that sense danger signals and in turn trigger specific immune responses. In steady-state, they participate in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to self-antigens whereas under inflammation LCs efficiently trigger immune responses in secondary lymphoid organs. It has been demonstrated in mice that LC-deprived epithelia are rapidly replenished by short half-life langerin-expressing monocyte-derived LCs (MDLCs). These surrogate LCs are thought to be progressively replaced by langerin(high) LCs arising from self-renewing epithelial precursors of hematopoietic origin. How LCs arise from blood monocytes is not fully understood. Hence, we sought to characterize key factors that induce differentiation of langerin(high)-expressing monocyte-derived Langerhans-like cells. We identified GM-CSF and TGF-β1 as key cytokines to generate langerin(high)-expressing cells but only in serum-free conditions. These cells were shown to express the LC-specific TROP-2 and Axl surface markers and contained Birbeck granules. Surprisingly, E-cadherin was not spontaneously expressed by these cells but required a direct contact with keratinocytes to be stably induced. MDLCs induced stronger allogeneic T cell proliferations but released low amounts of inflammatory cytokines upon TLR stimulation compared with donor-paired monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Immature langerin(high) MDLCs were responsive to MIP-3β/CCL20 and CTAC/CCL27 chemokine stimulations. Finally, we demonstrated that those cells behaved as bona fide LCs when inserted in a three-dimensional rebuilt epithelium by becoming activated upon TLR or UV light stimulations. Collectively, these results prompt us to propose these langerin(high) MDLCs as a relevant model to address LC biology-related questions. PMID:27016604

  11. Transcriptome Analysis in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease on Hemodialysis Disclosing a Key Role for CD16+CX3CR1+ Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Schepers, Eva; Houthuys, Erica; Dhondt, Annemieke; De Meyer, Grimbert; Neirynck, Nathalie; Bernaert, Pascal; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Brouckaert, Peter; Vanholder, Raymond; Glorieux, Griet

    2015-01-01

    The risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in chronic kidney disease; in this process micro-inflammation plays an essential role. Responsible mechanisms remain to a large extent unidentified. In this pilot study transcriptome analysis of peripheral blood monocytes was used to identify in an unprejudiced manner which factors could be discriminative for cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis. Forty gender- and age-matched, non-diabet...

  12. Nonclassical patrolling monocyte function in the vasculature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Graham; Tacke, Robert; Hedrick, Catherine C; Hanna, Richard N

    2015-06-01

    Nonclassical patrolling monocytes are characterized by their unique ability to actively patrol the vascular endothelium under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Patrolling monocyte subsets (CX3CR1(high)Ly6C(-) in mouse and CX3CR1(high)CD14(dim)CD16(+) in humans) are distinct from the classical monocyte subsets (CCR2(high)Ly6C(+) in mouse and CCR2(high)CD14(+)CD16(-) in humans) and exhibit unique functions in the vasculature and inflammatory disease. Patrolling monocytes function in several disease settings to remove damaged cells and debris from the vasculature and have been associated with wound healing and the resolution of inflammation in damaged tissues. This review highlights the unique functions of these patrolling monocytes in the vasculature and during inflammation. PMID:25838429

  13. Monocyte-platelet interaction induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes.

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    Gabriella Passacquale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Activated platelets exert a pro-inflammatory action that can be largely ascribed to their ability to interact with leukocytes and modulate their activity. We hypothesized that platelet activation and consequent formation of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPA induces a pro-inflammatory phenotype in circulating monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: CD62P(+ platelets and MPA were measured, and monocytes characterized, by whole blood flow cytometry in healthy subjects, before and two days after receiving influenza immunization. Three monocytic subsets were identified: CD14(+CD16(-, CD14(highCD16(+and CD14(lowCD16(+. The increase in high sensitivity C-reactive protein post-immunization was accompanied by increased platelet activation and MPA formation (25.02±12.57 vs 41.48±16.81; p = 0.01, along with enhancement of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ cells (4.7±3.6 vs 10.4±4.8; p = 0.003, their percentage being linearly related to levels of CD62P(+-platelets (r(2 = 0.4347; p = 0.0008. In separate in vitro experiments, co-incubation of CD14(+CD16(- cells, isolated from healthy donor subjects, with autologous platelets gave rise to up-regulation of CD16 on monocytes as compared with those maintained in medium alone (% change in CD14(+CD16(+ cells following 48 h co-incubation of monocytes with platelets was +106±51% vs monocytes in medium alone; p<0.001. This effect correlated directly with degree of MPA formation (r(2 = 0.7731; p<0.0001 and was associated with increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells. P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 blocking antibody, which abrogates MPA formation, abolished these effects, as did the cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitor NS-398, aspirin and the EP1/EP2-selective antagonist AH6809. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that MPA formation, as occurs in the blood under pro-inflammatory conditions, expands the pool of circulating CD14(highCD16(+ monocytes in a

  14. High-Affinity Fc Receptor Expression Indicates Relative Immaturity in Human Monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanchy, Felix I L

    2016-05-01

    Within monocyte heterogeneity, subsets represent discrete, well-characterized phenotypes. Although many studies have highlighted differences between subsets, there is evidence that subpopulations represent contiguous stages in a maturational series. As CD14(hi)CD64(hi) monocytes have higher proliferative potential than CD14(hi)CD64(lo) monocytes, the surface marker profile on 4 subsets defined by CD14 and CD64 was measured. The profiles were compared to that of subsets defined by the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcɛRIα), CD16, and CD14; further differences in size, granularity, and buoyancy were measured in subsets delineated by these markers. There was a positive correlation between proliferative monocyte (PM) prevalence and CD64 expression on the classical monocyte subset, and also between PM prevalence and circulating FcɛRIα(+) monocytes. The expression of CD64, the high-affinity IgG receptor, on canonical human monocyte subsets was determined before and after short-term culture, and in response to interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interferon-γ; the influence of these cytokines on monocyte subset transition was also measured. The loss of FcɛRIα expression preceded an increase in CD16 expression in whole blood cultures. These data indicate that high-affinity Fc receptors are expressed on less mature monocytes and that FcɛRIα(+) monocytes are developmentally antecedent to the canonical classical and intermediate monocyte subsets. PMID:26714112

  15. Tumors induce a subset of inflammatory monocytes with immunosuppressive activity on CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Giovanna; Dolcetti, Luigi; Serafini, Paolo; Santo, Carmela De; Marigo, Ilaria; Colombo, Mario P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Brombacher, Frank; Borrello, Ivan; Zanovello, Paola; Bicciato, Silvio; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2006-01-01

    Active suppression of tumor-specific T lymphocytes can limit the efficacy of immune surveillance and immunotherapy. While tumor-recruited CD11b+ myeloid cells are known mediators of tumor-associated immune dysfunction, the true nature of these suppressive cells and the fine biochemical pathways governing their immunosuppressive activity remain elusive. Here we describe a population of circulating CD11b+IL-4 receptor α+ (CD11b+IL-4Rα+), inflammatory-type monocytes that is elicited by growing tumors and activated by IFN-γ released from T lymphocytes. CD11b+IL-4Rα+ cells produced IL-13 and IFN-γ and integrated the downstream signals of these cytokines to trigger the molecular pathways suppressing antigen-activated CD8+ T lymphocytes. Analogous immunosuppressive circuits were active in CD11b+ cells present within the tumor microenvironment. These suppressor cells challenge the current idea that tumor-conditioned immunosuppressive monocytes/macrophages are alternatively activated. Moreover, our data show how the inflammatory response elicited by tumors had detrimental effects on the adaptive immune system and suggest novel approaches for the treatment of tumor-induced immune dysfunctions. PMID:17016559

  16. Immunophenotyping of lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell subsets in normal rhesus macaques by 12-color flow cytometry: Clarification on DC heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Autissier, Patrick; Soulas, Caroline; Burdo, Tricia H.; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring changes in rhesus macaque immune cell populations during infectious disease is crucial. The aim of this work was to simultaneously analyze the phenotype of rhesus macaque lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets using a single 12-color flow cytometry panel. Blood from healthy non-infected rhesus macaques was labeled with a cocktail of 12 antibodies. Data were compared to three smaller lineage specific panels and absolute and relative percentages of cells were compared. ...

  17. Enhanced Apoptosis of Monocytes from Complication-Free Juvenile-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 May Be Ameliorated by TNF-α Inhibitors

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    Jolanta Myśliwska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with an enhanced apoptosis of different cells and tissues, accelerating occurrence of diabetic microvascular complications. The aim of our study was to determine spontaneous apoptotic potential of the monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 and to compare them with the corresponding values of the healthy. Moreover, we wanted to assess effects of TNF-R1 blocking agents and those of general TNF-α blocker (Infliximab on spontaneous apoptosis of monocytes. Sixty randomly selected DM1 patients (14.5 ± 3.2 years and 30 healthy (13.5 ± 2.8 years volunteers were enrolled in the study. Our results indicate that three monocyte subsets are distinguishable in the groups of young diabetic patients and the healthy, similarly to in the blood of adults. DM1 patients were characterized by higher values of apoptotic monocytes than the healthy. The manipulation with drugs inhibiting TNF-R1 expression diminished the pool of CD16+ apoptotic monocytes. Infliximab reduced the apoptotic CD16− cells. In conclusion, diabetes mellitus type 1 is associated with greater apoptosis of three monocyte subsets which may contribute to the development of microvascular complications. TNF-α modifiers appear to ameliorate monocyte apoptosis. They may be useful for controlling excessive monocyte apoptosis in diabetic patients.

  18. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  19. Clinical significance of monocyte heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Monocytes are primitive hematopoietic cells that primarily arise from the bone marrow, circulate in the peripheral blood and give rise to differentiated macrophages. Over the past two decades, considerable attention to monocyte diversity and macrophage polarization has provided contextual clues into the role of myelomonocytic derivatives in human disease. Until recently, human monocytes were subdivided based on expression of the surface marker CD16. “Classical” monocytes express surface marke...

  20. Deconvoluting post-transplant immunity: cell subset-specific mapping reveals pathways for activation and expansion of memory T, monocytes and B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy A Grigoryev

    Full Text Available A major challenge for the field of transplantation is the lack of understanding of genomic and molecular drivers of early post-transplant immunity. The early immune response creates a complex milieu that determines the course of ensuing immune events and the ultimate outcome of the transplant. The objective of the current study was to mechanistically deconvolute the early immune response by purifying and profiling the constituent cell subsets of the peripheral blood. We employed genome-wide profiling of whole blood and purified CD4, CD8, B cells and monocytes in tandem with high-throughput laser-scanning cytometry in 10 kidney transplants sampled serially pre-transplant, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Cytometry confirmed early cell subset depletion by antibody induction and immunosuppression. Multiple markers revealed the activation and proliferative expansion of CD45RO(+CD62L(- effector memory CD4/CD8 T cells as well as progressive activation of monocytes and B cells. Next, we mechanistically deconvoluted early post-transplant immunity by serial monitoring of whole blood using DNA microarrays. Parallel analysis of cell subset-specific gene expression revealed a unique spectrum of time-dependent changes and functional pathways. Gene expression profiling results were validated with 157 different probesets matching all 65 antigens detected by cytometry. Thus, serial blood cell monitoring reflects the profound changes in blood cell composition and immune activation early post-transplant. Each cell subset reveals distinct pathways and functional programs. These changes illuminate a complex, early phase of immunity and inflammation that includes activation and proliferative expansion of the memory effector and regulatory cells that may determine the phenotype and outcome of the kidney transplant.

  1. Altered Peripheral Blood Monocyte Phenotype and Function in Chronic Liver Disease: Implications for Hepatic Recruitment and Systemic Inflammation.

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    Victoria L Gadd

    Full Text Available Liver and systemic inflammatory factors influence monocyte phenotype and function, which has implications for hepatic recruitment and subsequent inflammatory and fibrogenic responses, as well as host defence.Peripheral blood monocyte surface marker (CD14, CD16, CD163, CSF1R, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CXCR3, CXCR4, CX3CR1, HLA-DR, CD62L, SIGLEC-1 expression and capacity for phagocytosis, oxidative burst and LPS-stimulated TNF production were assessed in patients with hepatitis C (HCV (n = 39 or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD (n = 34 (classified as non-advanced disease, compensated cirrhosis and decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls (n = 11 by flow cytometry.The selected markers exhibited similar monocyte-subset-specific expression patterns between patients and controls. Monocyte phenotypic signatures differed between NAFLD and HCV patients, with an increased proportion of CD16+ non-classical monocytes in NAFLD, but increased expression of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in HCV. In both cohorts, monocyte CCR2 expression was reduced and CCR4 elevated over controls. CD62L expression was specifically elevated in patients with decompensated cirrhosis and positively correlated with the model-for-end-stage-liver-disease score. Functionally, monocytes from patients with decompensated cirrhosis had equal phagocytic capacity, but displayed features of dysfunction, characterised by lower HLA-DR expression and blunted oxidative responses. Lower monocyte TNF production in response to LPS stimulation correlated with time to death in 7 (46% of the decompensated patients who died within 8 months of recruitment.Chronic HCV and NAFLD differentially affect circulating monocyte phenotype, suggesting specific injury-induced signals may contribute to hepatic monocyte recruitment and systemic activation state. Monocyte function, however, was similarly impaired in patients with both HCV and NAFLD, particularly in advanced disease, which likely contributes to the increased

  2. Minocycline inhibition of monocyte activation correlates with neuronal protection in SIV neuroAIDS.

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    Jennifer H Campbell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that has been proposed as a potential conjunctive therapy for HIV-1 associated cognitive disorders. Precise mechanism(s of minocycline's functions are not well defined. METHODS: Fourteen rhesus macaques were SIV infected and neuronal metabolites measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H MRS. Seven received minocycline (4 mg/kg daily starting at day 28 post-infection (pi. Monocyte expansion and activation were assessed by flow cytometry, cell traffic to lymph nodes, CD16 regulation, viral replication, and cytokine production were studied. RESULTS: Minocycline treatment decreased plasma virus and pro-inflammatory CD14+CD16+ and CD14(loCD16+ monocytes, and reduced their expression of CD11b, CD163, CD64, CCR2 and HLA-DR. There was reduced recruitment of monocyte/macrophages and productively infected cells in axillary lymph nodes. There was an inverse correlation between brain NAA/Cr (neuronal injury and circulating CD14+CD16+ and CD14(loCD16+ monocytes. Minocycline treatment in vitro reduced SIV replication CD16 expression on activated CD14+CD16+ monocytes, and IL-6 production by monocytes following LPS stimulation. CONCLUSION: Neuroprotective effects of minocycline are due in part to reduction of activated monocytes, monocyte traffic. Mechanisms for these effects include CD16 regulation, reduced viral replication, and inhibited immune activation.

  3. Analysis of Monocytic and Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Subsets in Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Their Clinical Significance

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    Gang Ning

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs have been shown to inhibit T-cell responses in many diseases, but, in hepatitis C virus (HCV infected patients, MDSCs are still poorly studied. In this assay, we investigated the phenotype and frequency of two new populations of MDSCs denoted as monocytic and granulocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs and G-MDSCs in HCV infected patients and analyzed their clinical significance in these patients respectively. We found that the frequency of CD14+HLA-DR-/low cells (M-MDSCs from HCV infected patients (mean ± SE, 3.134% ± 0.340% was significantly increased when compared to healthy controls (mean ± SE, 1.764% ± 0.461% (Z = −2.438, P = 0.015, while there was no statistical difference between the frequency of HLA-DR-/lowCD33+CD11b+CD15+ (G-MDSCs of HCV infected patients and healthy donors (0.201% ± 0.038% versus 0.096% ± 0.026%, P > 0.05, which suggested that HCV infection could cause the proliferation of M-MDSCs instead of G-MDSCs. Besides, we found that the frequency of M-MDSCs in HCV infected patients had certain relevance with age (r = 0.358, P = 0.003; patients older than 40 years old group (mean ± SE, 3.673% ± 0.456% had a significantly higher frequency of M-MDSCs than that of age less than 40 years old group (mean ± SE, 2.363% ± 0.482% (Z = −2.685, P = 0.007. The frequency of M-MDSCs, however, had no correlation with HCV RNA loads, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, and the level of liver inflammation degree.

  4. Role of ADAM10 and ADAM17 in CD16b Shedding Mediated by Different Stimulators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sha Guo; Min Peng; Qing Zhao; Wei Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the main proteinases responsible for CD16b shedding under different stimulators.Methods HEK293 cell line stably expressing CD16b was constructed by lentivirus system.The cell line was then overexpressed with a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 10 (ADAM10) or ADAM17,suppressed with short hairpin RNA of ADAM10 or ADAM17,and reconstituted with ADAMi0 or ADAM17,respectively.After each treatment,the cell line was stimulated with ionomycin or phorbol 12-myristate13-acetate (PMA) for 12 hours.The soluble CD 16b released from cell membrane was detected by immunoprecipition and immtmoblot.Quantitation was then implemented to compare the amount of soluble CD 16b in cell supernatant after stimulation.Results HEK293 cell line stably expressing CD16b was successfully established.When CD16b expressing cell line was overexpressed with ADAM1 0,shedding of CD 16b was increased after stimulation with ionomycin but not PMA; when the cell line overexpressed with ADAM 17,shedding of CD 16b was increased after stimulation with PMA but not ionomycin.Similarly,when ADAM10 was suppressed by short hairpin RNA,CD16b shedding was decreased after stimulation with ionomycin; when ADAM17 was suppressed by short hairpin RNA,CD16b shedding was decreased after stimulation with PMA.The shedding of CD16b was increased again when CD16b expressing cell line was reconstituted with ADAM10 and stimulated by ionomycin or reconstituted with ADAM 17 and stimulated by PMA.Conclusions Both ADAM10 and ADAM17 could shed CD16b,but they possess differed preferences.ADAM10 is the main sheddase under stimulation of ionomycin,while ADAM17 is the main sheddase under stimulation of PMA.

  5. Monocyte and macrophage differentiation: circulation inflammatory monocyte as biomarker for inflammatory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jiyeon; Zhang, Lixiao; Yu, Caijia; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes express various receptors, which monitor and sense environmental changes. Monocytes are highly plastic and heterogeneous, and change their functional phenotype in response to environmental stimulation. Evidence from murine and human studies has suggested that monocytosis can be an indicator of various inflammatory diseases. Monocytes can differentiate into inflammatory or anti-inflammatory subsets. Upon tissue damage or infection, monocytes are rapidly recruited to the tissue, where...

  6. Microarray analysis of human leucocyte subsets: the advantages of positive selection and rapid purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhry Afzal N

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For expression profiling to have a practical impact in the management of immune-related disease it is essential that it can be applied to peripheral blood cells. Early studies have used total peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and as a consequence the majority of the disease-related signatures identified have simply reflected differences in the relative abundance of individual cell types between patients and controls. To identify cell-specific changes in transcription it would be necessary to profile purified leucocyte subsets. Results We have used sequential rounds of positive selection to isolate CD4 and CD8 T cells, CD19 B cells, CD14 monocytes and CD16 neutrophils for microarray analysis from a single blood sample. We compared gene expression in cells isolated in parallel using either positive or negative selection and demonstrate that there are no significant consistent changes due to positive selection, and that the far inferior results obtained by negative selection are largely due to reduced purity. Finally, we demonstrate that storing cells prior to separation leads to profound changes in expression, predominantly in cells of the myeloid lineage. Conclusion Leukocyte subsets should be prepared for microarray analysis by rapid positive selection.

  7. ApoE Production in Human Monocytes and Its Regulation by Inflammatory Cytokines

    OpenAIRE

    Braesch-Andersen, Sten; Paulie, Staffan; Smedman, Christian; Mia, Sohel; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2013-01-01

    The apoE production by tissue macrophages is crucial for the prevention of atherosclerosis and the aim of this study was to further elucidate how this apolipoprotein is regulated by cytokines present during inflammation. Here we studied apoE production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and analysis was made with a newly developed apoE ELISpot assay. In PBMC, apoE secretion was restricted to monocytes with classical (CD14++CD16−) and intermediate (CD14+CD16+) monocytes being the mai...

  8. The Role of CD16+, CD56+, NK (CD16+/CD56+ and B CD20+ Cells in the Outcome of Pregnancy in Women with Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehri Ghafourian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion (RSA is the most common complication of pregnancy. It is considered as one of the most important issues of reproduction in the world. RSA is defined as having three or more miscarriages in the first trimester of pregnancy. Increase in peripheral blood lymphocytes may be associated with abortion; therefore,the study was aimed to investigate and compare the peripheral blood CD16+, CD56+, NK(CD16+/CD56+ and B CD20+ cells populations in diagnosis and on pregnancy outcome in women with abortion. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 25 non-pregnant women with at least 3 abortions without obvious reason and 25 non-pregnant women with a living child without history of previous abortion participated. Using monoclonal antibodies anti (CD16, CD56 and CD20 and flow cytometry method, the percentage of cells with these markers was determined. Data analysis was performed by with SPSS 15 software and T-test. Results: CD16+, CD56+ and NK (CD16+/CD56+ cells significantly increased in women with RSA compared with control group (P≤0.05 but there were no significant differences in the percentage of B CD20+ cells between the experimental and control groups (P>0.05. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, increased percentage of NK cells may be considered as a risk factor for RSA but involvement and the role of B CD20+ lymphocytes in RSA cannot be confirmed; however, in regard to important role of B and NK cell in the management of the immune responses, more studies are required to understand the behavior of these cells in the different stages of pregnancy more efficiently

  9. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Puchta, Alicja; Naidoo, Avee; Verschoor, Chris P.; Loukov, Dessi; Thevaranjan, Netusha; Mandur, Talveer S.; Nguyen, Phuong-son; Jordana, Manel; Loeb, Mark; Xing, Zhou; Kobzik, Lester; Larché, Maggie J.; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18–22 mo) mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this “age-associated inflammation” as they p...

  10. Functional role of CD11c+ monocytes in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monocyte activation and migration into the arterial wall are key events in atherogenesis associated with hypercholesterolemia. CD11c/CD18, a beta2 integrin expressed on human monocytes and a subset of mouse monocytes, has been shown to play a distinct role in human monocyte adhesion on endothelial c...

  11. Spontaneous and natural cytotoxicity receptor-mediated cytotoxicity are effector functions of distinct natural killer subsets in hepatitis C virus-infected chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstrepen, B E; Nieuwenhuis, I G; Mooij, P; Bogers, W M; Boonstra, A; Koopman, G

    2016-07-01

    In humans, CD16 and CD56 are used to identify functionally distinct natural killer (NK) subsets. Due to ubiquitous CD56 expression, this marker cannot be used to distinguish between NK cell subsets in chimpanzees. Therefore, functional analysis of distinct NK subsets during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has never been performed in these animals. In the present study an alternative strategy was used to identify four distinct NK subsets on the basis of the expression of CD16 and CD94. The expression of activating and inhibiting surface receptors showed that these subsets resemble human NK subsets. CD107 expression was used to determine degranulation of the different subsets in naive and HCV-infected chimpanzees. In HCV-infected chimpanzees increased spontaneous cytotoxicity was observed in CD94(high/dim) CD16(pos) and CD94(low) CD16(pos) subsets. By contrast, increased natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR)- mediated degranulation after NKp30 and NKp44 triggering was demonstrated in the CD94(dim) CD16(neg) subset. Our findings suggest that spontaneous and NCR-mediated cytotoxicity are effector functions of distinct NK subsets in HCV-infected chimpanzees. PMID:26850369

  12. CD16 and CD32 Gene Polymorphisms May Contribute to Risk of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiannan; Zhao, Liyun; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Qingxu; Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Epidemiological studies have evaluated the associations of CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R gene polymorphisms with the risk of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Published studies on CD16 158F>V and CD32 131H>R polymorphisms with susceptibility to ITP were systematically reviewed until April 1, 2014. The Cochrane Library Database, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) were used to search for relevant studies and then a meta-analysis was conducted by using Stata 12.0 software in order to produce consistent statistical results. RESULTS In total, 10 clinical case-control studies with 741 ITP patients and 1092 healthy controls were enrolled for quantitative data analysis. Results of this meta-analysis suggest that CD16 158F>V polymorphism had strong correlations with the susceptibility to ITP under 5 genetic models (all PR polymorphism and the susceptibility to ITP (all P>0.05). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity revealed that CD16 158F>V polymorphism was associated with the increased risk of ITP among both Caucasian and non-Caucasian populations. Nevertheless, no statistically significant correlations between CD32 131H>R polymorphism and the risk of ITP were observed among Caucasians and non-Caucasians (all P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that CD16 158F>V polymorphism may contribute to the increased risk of ITP, whereas CD32 131H>R polymorphism may not be an important risk factor for ITP. PMID:27315784

  13. Interaction of angiogenically stimulated intermediate CD163+ monocytes/macrophages with soft hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks with elastic moduli matched to that of human arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Anke; Kratz, Karl; Hiebl, Bernhard; Lendlein, Andreas; Jung, Friedrich

    2012-03-01

    The cell population of peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages (MO) is heterogeneous: The majority of the MO are CD14++ CD16- and named "classical" (= MO1). Furthermore, two other subpopulations were described: CD14++ CD16+ ("intermediate" = MO2) and CD14+ CD16++ ("non-classical" = MO3). It is reported that MO2 possess anti-inflammatory properties and express the MO lineage marker CD163. On a hydrophilic neutrally charged acrylamide-based hydrogel human intermediate (CD14++ CD16+ ), angiogenically stimulated CD163++ monocytes/macrophages (aMO2) maintained a proangiogenic and noninflammatory status for at least 14 days. Here, we explored whether this aMO2 subset adhered to hydrophobic poly(n-butyl acrylate) networks (cPnBA) and also remained in its proangiogenic and noninflammatory status. Because substrate elasticity can impact adherence, morphology, and function of cells, cPnBAs with different Young's modulus (250 and 1100 kPa) were investigated, whereby their elasticity was tailored by variation of the cross-linker content and matched to the elasticity of human arteries. The cPnBAs exhibited similar surface properties (e.g., surface roughness), which were maintained after ethylene oxide sterilization and exposure in serum-free cell culture medium for 18 h at 37°C. aMO2 were seeded on cPnBA samples (1.7 × 10(5) cells/1.33 cm(2) ) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM high glucose) supplemented with vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF-A(165) , 10 ng/mL) and fetal calf serum (10 vol%) for 3 and 72 h. On both polymeric samples (n = 3 each), the numbers of adherent cells per unit area were significantly higher (P < 0.01; cPnBA0250: 3 h 13 ± 5 cells/mm(2) , 72 h 234 ± 106 cells/mm(2) ; cPnBA1100: 3 h 14 ± 3 cells/mm(2) , 72 h 198 ± 113 cells/mm(2) ) compared to control cultures (glass, 3 h: 6 ± 3 cells/mm(2) , 72 h: 130 ± 83 cells/mm(2) ) and showed a typically spread morphology. The

  14. Monocyte subpopulations from pre-eclamptic patients are abnormally skewed and exhibit exaggerated responses to Toll-like receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-ofi, Ebtisam; Coffelt, Seth B; Anumba, Dilly O

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of pregnancy-associated mortality and morbidity is pre-eclampsia (PE). Although information regarding the etiology of this disease is scant, its pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal placentation, endothelial dysfunction as well as an exaggerated inflammatory response. Clinical evidence also indicates that the abundance of many immune cells at the feto-maternal interface and in the circulation of PE patients is abnormal, when compared with normal pregnant (NP) controls. In addition, the phenotype and function of some of these cells is altered. To further characterize the systemic effects of PE on circulating cells, we analyzed monocytic subpopulations in NP and PE patients by flow cytometry. We found that non-classical CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes are significantly increased in women with PE and they display irregular expression of several chemokine receptors and antigen presentation molecules. The most striking phenotypic difference among the cell surface molecules was the marked upregulation of TLR4 expression, where both CD14(high)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes demonstrated higher levels than their NP counterparts. Stimulation of PE monocytes with TLR ligands resulted in profound secretion of various cytokines in comparison with NP controls. These data suggest that PE monocytes are hyper-responsive to TLR ligands and this may contribute to exacerbation of the disease. PMID:22848746

  15. In-Vitro differentiation of mature dendritic cells from human blood monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Gieseler; Dirk Heise; Afsaneh Soruri; Peter Schwartz; J. Hinrich Peters

    1998-01-01

    Representing the most potent antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells (DC) can now be generated from human blood monocytes. We recently presented a novel protocol employing GM-CSF, IL-4, and IFN-γ to differentiate monocyte-derived DC in vitro. Here, such cells are characterized in detail. Cells in culture exhibited both dendritic and veiled morphologies, the former being adherent and the latter suspended. Phenotypically, they were CD1a-/dim, CD11a+, CD11b++, CD11c+, CD14dim/-, CD16a-/dim, CD...

  16. Identification of Siglec-9 as the receptor for MUC16 on human NK cells, B cells, and monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rancourt Claudine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MUC16 is a cell surface mucin expressed at high levels by epithelial ovarian tumors. Following proteolytic cleavage, cell surface MUC16 (csMUC16 is shed in the extracellular milieu and is detected in the serum of cancer patients as the tumor marker CA125. csMUC16 acts as an adhesion molecule and facilitates peritoneal metastasis of ovarian tumors. Both sMUC16 and csMUC16 also protect cancer cells from cytotoxic responses of natural killer (NK cells. In a previous study we demonstrated that sMUC16 binds to specific subset of NK cells. Here, we identify the csMUC16/sMUC16 binding partner expressed on immune cells. Results Analysis of immune cells from the peripheral blood and peritoneal fluid of ovarian cancer patients indicates that in addition to NK cells, sMUC16 also binds to B cells and monocytes isolated from the peripheral blood and peritoneal fluid. I-type lectin, Siglec-9, is identified as the sMUC16 receptor on these immune cells. Siglec-9 is expressed on approximately 30-40% of CD16pos/CD56dim NK cells, 20-30% of B cells and >95% of monocytes. sMUC16 binds to the majority of the Siglec-9pos NK cells, B cells and monocytes. sMUC16 is released from the immune cells following neuraminidase treatment. Siglec-9 transfected Jurkat cells and monocytes isolated from healthy donors bind to ovarian tumor cells via Siglec-9-csMUC16 interaction. Conclusions Recent studies indicate that csMUC16 can act as an anti-adhesive agent that blocks tumor-immune cell interactions. Our results demonstrate that similar to other mucins, csMUC16 can also facilitate cell adhesion by interacting with a suitable binding partner such as mesothelin or Siglec-9. Siglec-9 is an inhibitory receptor that attenuates T cell and NK cell function. sMUC16/csMUC16-Siglec-9 binding likely mediates inhibition of anti-tumor immune responses.

  17. Peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations in patients with syphilis%梅毒患者外周血单核细胞亚群的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩俊燕; 曾辉; 伦文辉; 闫会文; 刘彦春; 王蓓蓓; 宋映雪; 吴焱

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the changes in peripheral blood monocyte subpopulations in patients with primary, secondary and latent syphilis. Methods Flow cytometry was used to detect CD14highCD16- and CD14+CD16+ monocyte subpopulations in peripheral blood from 58 patients with untreated syphilis, including 36 cases of latent syphilis,8 cases of primary syphilis and 14 cases of secondary syphilis, as well as from 65 normal human controls. Restflts Compared with the normal controls, the proportion of CD14+CD16+ monocytes among total monocytes was significantly elevated (12.0% ± 5.0% vs 6.0% ± 3.3%, t = 7.25, P 0.05). Conclusions The changes in peripheral blood monocyte subpopulation in patients with untreated syphilis may be associated with the permanent infection of Treponema pallidum, but have no obvious correlation with clinical stage of syphilis.%目的 探讨未经治疗的一期、二期和隐性梅毒患者外周血单核细胞亚群的变化.方法 流式细胞仪检测58例未经治疗的梅毒患者(包括隐性梅毒36例,一期梅毒8例,二期梅毒14例)的外周血单核细胞CD14highSCD16-亚群和CD14+CD16+亚群.结果 与正常人对照组相比.梅毒患者CD14+CD16+单核细胞所占比例明显升高,所占总单核细胞比例为12.0%±5.0%,而CD14highCD16-Mo亚群明显降低.为88.0%±5.1%,二者差异均有统计学意义.隐性梅毒、一期梅毒、二期梅毒之间CD14highCD16-亚群和CD14+CD16+亚群差异无统计学意义.结论 未经治疗的梅毒患者外周血单核细胞亚群的变化可能与梅毒螺旋体的持续感染有关,与各临床分期相关性不明显.

  18. TNF Drives Monocyte Dysfunction with Age and Results in Impaired Anti-pneumococcal Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Puchta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte phenotype and output changes with age, but why this occurs and how it impacts anti-bacterial immunity are not clear. We found that, in both humans and mice, circulating monocyte phenotype and function was altered with age due to increasing levels of TNF in the circulation that occur as part of the aging process. Ly6C+ monocytes from old (18-22 mo mice and CD14+CD16+ intermediate/inflammatory monocytes from older adults also contributed to this "age-associated inflammation" as they produced more of the inflammatory cytokines IL6 and TNF in the steady state and when stimulated with bacterial products. Using an aged mouse model of pneumococcal colonization we found that chronic exposure to TNF with age altered the maturity of circulating monocytes, as measured by F4/80 expression, and this decrease in monocyte maturation was directly linked to susceptibility to infection. Ly6C+ monocytes from old mice had higher levels of CCR2 expression, which promoted premature egress from the bone marrow when challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although Ly6C+ monocyte recruitment and TNF levels in the blood and nasopharnyx were higher in old mice during S. pneumoniae colonization, bacterial clearance was impaired. Counterintuitively, elevated TNF and excessive monocyte recruitment in old mice contributed to impaired anti-pneumococcal immunity since bacterial clearance was improved upon pharmacological reduction of TNF or Ly6C+ monocytes, which were the major producers of TNF. Thus, with age TNF impairs inflammatory monocyte development, function and promotes premature egress, which contribute to systemic inflammation and is ultimately detrimental to anti-pneumococcal immunity.

  19. Differential migration and activation profile of monocytes after trophoblast interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Grasso

    Full Text Available Macrophages at the maternal-placental interface coordinate opposite demands under the control of trophoblast cells such as the response against pathogens on one hand, and apoptotic cell clearance and wound healing with the production of suppressor cytokines. Here, we investigated whether trophoblast cells induce maternal monocyte activation towards an alternative activated macrophage profile and whether bacterial or viral stimuli modulate their migratory properties. We used an in vitro model of the maternal-placental interface represented by co-cultures of CD14+ cells isolated from fertile women with first trimester trophoblast cell line (Swan-71 cells in the presence or absence of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP stimuli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, peptidoglycan (PGN or poly [I:C]. Maternal CD14+ cells showed increased CD16 and CD39 expression, both markers associated to an alternative activation profile, with no changes in CD80 expression after trophoblast cell interaction. These changes were accompanied by increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 production by CD14+ cells. After stimulation with LPS, PGN or poly [I:C], monocytes co-cultured with trophoblast cells had lower production of TNF-α and IL-1β compared with non co-cultured monocytes. Interestingly, monocyte migration towards trophoblast cells was prevented in the presence of LPS or PGN but not after 24h of stimulation with poly [I:C]. LPS or PGN also decreased CCR5, CXCL-8 and CCL5 expression. Finally, trophoblast cells co-cultured with monocytes in the presence of pathological stimuli failed to increase chemokine expression, indicating a bidirectional effect. In conclusion, trophoblast might 'instruct' maternal monocytes to express an alternative activation profile and restrain their early recruitment under pathological threats as one of the first strategies to avoid potential tissue damage at the maternal-placental interface.

  20. The role of monocytes in ischemic stroke pathobiology: New avenues to explore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman eElAli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke accounts for the majority of stroke cases and constitutes a major cause of death and disability in the industrialized world. Inflammation has been reported to constitute a major component of ischemic stroke pathobiology. In the acute phase of ischemic stroke, microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, are activated, followed by several infiltration waves of different circulating immune cells into the brain. Among these circulating immune cells, monocytes have been shown to play a particularly important role. Following their infiltration, monocytes differentiate into potent phagocytic cells, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs in the ischemic brain. Initially, the presence of these cells was considered as marker of an exacerbated inflammatory response that contributes to brain damage. However, the recent reports are suggesting a more complex and multiphasic roles of these cells in ischemic stroke pathobiology. Monocytes constitute a heterogeneous group of cells, which comprises two major subsets in rodent and three major subsets in human. In both species, two equivalent subsets exist, the pro-inflammatory subset and the anti-inflammatory subset. Recent data have demonstrated that ischemic stroke differentially regulate monocyte subsets, which directly affect ischemic stroke pathobiology and may have direct implications in ischemic stroke therapies. Here we review the recent findings that addressed the role of different monocyte subsets in ischemic stroke pathobiology, and the implications on therapies.

  1. Factoring groups into subsets

    CERN Document Server

    Szabo, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Decomposing an abelian group into a direct sum of its subsets leads to results that can be applied to a variety of areas, such as number theory, geometry of tilings, coding theory, cryptography, graph theory, and Fourier analysis. Focusing mainly on cyclic groups, Factoring Groups into Subsets explores the factorization theory of abelian groups. The book first shows how to construct new factorizations from old ones. The authors then discuss nonperiodic and periodic factorizations, quasiperiodicity, and the factoring of periodic subsets. They also examine how tiling plays an important role in n

  2. Unsupervised Feature Subset Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndberg-Madsen, Nicolaj; Thomsen, C.; Pena, Jose

    This paper studies filter and hybrid filter-wrapper feature subset selection for unsupervised learning (data clustering). We constrain the search for the best feature subset by scoring the dependence of every feature on the rest of the features, conjecturing that these scores discriminate some...... irrelevant features. We report experimental results on artificial and real data for unsupervised learning of naive Bayes models. Both the filter and hybrid approaches perform satisfactorily....

  3. On best subset regression

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Shifeng

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the variable selection method from \\ell0-norm constrained regression, which is equivalent to the problem of finding the best subset of a fixed size. Our study focuses on two aspects, consistency and computation. We prove that the sparse estimator from such a method can retain all of the important variables asymptotically for even exponentially growing dimensionality under regularity conditions. This indicates that the best subset regression method can efficiently shri...

  4. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells in innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Beatriz; Ardavín, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Monocytes have been classically considered essential elements in relation with innate immune responses against pathogens, and inflammatory processes caused by external aggressions, infection and autoimmune disease. However, although their potential to differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs) was discovered 14 years ago, their functional relevance with regard to adaptive immune responses has only been uncovered very recently. Studies performed over the last years have revealed that monocyte-derived DCs play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, due to their microbicidal potential, capacity to stimulate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses and ability to regulate Immunoglobulin production by B cells. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs not only constitute a subset of DCs formed at inflammatory foci, as previously thought, but also comprise different subsets of DCs located in antigen capture areas, such as the skin and the intestinal, respiratory and reproductive tracts. PMID:18362945

  5. Subset selection in regression

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Originally published in 1990, the first edition of Subset Selection in Regression filled a significant gap in the literature, and its critical and popular success has continued for more than a decade. Thoroughly revised to reflect progress in theory, methods, and computing power, the second edition promises to continue that tradition. The author has thoroughly updated each chapter, incorporated new material on recent developments, and included more examples and references. New in the Second Edition:A separate chapter on Bayesian methodsComplete revision of the chapter on estimationA major example from the field of near infrared spectroscopyMore emphasis on cross-validationGreater focus on bootstrappingStochastic algorithms for finding good subsets from large numbers of predictors when an exhaustive search is not feasible Software available on the Internet for implementing many of the algorithms presentedMore examplesSubset Selection in Regression, Second Edition remains dedicated to the techniques for fitting...

  6. Inflammatory monocytes and the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Rachael L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monocytes are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that are recruited to sites of infection and inflammation in many models of human diseases, including those of the central nervous system (CNS. Ly6Chi/CCR2hi inflammatory monocytes have been identified as the circulating precursors of brain macrophages, dendritic cells and arguably microglia in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis; Alzheimer’s disease; stroke; and more recently in CNS infection caused by Herpes simplex virus, murine hepatitis virus, Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and West Nile virus. The precise differentiation pathways and functions of inflammatory monocyte-derived populations in the inflamed CNS remains a contentious issue, especially in regard to the existence of monocyte-derived microglia. Furthermore, the contributions of monocyte-derived subsets to viral clearance and immunopathology are not well-defined. Thus, understanding the pathways through which inflammatory monocytes migrate to the brain and their functional capacity within the CNS is critical to inform future therapeutic strategies. This review discusses some of the key aspects of inflammatory monocyte trafficking to the brain and addresses the role of these cells in viral encephalitis.

  7. Immature monocytes recruited to the ischemic mouse brain differentiate into macrophages with features of alternative activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró-Mur, Francesc; Pérez-de-Puig, Isabel; Ferrer-Ferrer, Maura; Urra, Xabier; Justicia, Carles; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2016-03-01

    Acute stroke induces a local inflammatory reaction causing leukocyte infiltration. Circulating monocytes are recruited to the ischemic brain and become tissue macrophages morphologically indistinguishable from reactive microglia. However, monocytes are a heterogeneous population of cells with different functions. Herein, we investigated the infiltration and fate of the monocyte subsets in a mouse model of focal brain ischemia by permanent occlusion of the distal portion of the middle cerebral artery. We separated two main subtypes of CD11b(hi) monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers Ly6C and CD43. Using adoptive transfer of reporter monocytes and monocyte depletion, we identified the pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo)CCR2(+) subset as the predominant monocytes recruited to the ischemic tissue. Monocytes were seen in the leptomeninges from where they entered the cortex along the penetrating arterioles. Four days post-ischemia, they had invaded the infarcted core, where they were often located adjacent to blood vessels. At this time, Iba-1(-) and Iba-1(+) cells in the ischemic tissue incorporated BrdU, but BrdU incorporation was rare in the reporter monocytes. The monocyte phenotype progressively changed by down-regulating Ly6C, up-regulating F4/80, expressing low or intermediate levels of Iba-1, and developing macrophage morphology. Moreover, monocytes progressively acquired the expression of typical markers of alternatively activated macrophages, like arginase-1 and YM-1. Collectively, the results show that stroke mobilized immature pro-inflammatory Ly6C(hi)CD43(lo) monocytes that acutely infiltrated the ischemic tissue reaching the core of the lesion. Monocytes differentiated to macrophages with features of alternative activation suggesting possible roles in tissue repair during the sub-acute phase of stroke. PMID:26275369

  8. The impact of Ly6Clow monocytes after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Jean-Philippe; Pimentel-Coelho, Pedro Moreno; Tremblay, Yannick; Rivest, Serge

    2014-01-01

    After an ischemic stroke, mononuclear phagocytic cells such as microglia, macrophages, and monocytes migrate to the lesion site and coordinate an immune response. Monocytes, which are recruited from the bloodstream after ischemic brain injury, can be categorized into two subsets in mice: inflammatory and patrolling monocytes. Although inflammatory monocytes (Ly6Chi) seem to have a protective role in stroke progression, the impact of patrolling monocytes (Ly6Clow) is unknown. To address the role of Ly6Clow monocytes in stroke, we generated bone marrow chimeric mice in which their hematopoietic system was replaced by Nr4a1−/− cells, allowing the complete and permanent ablation of Ly6Clow monocytes without affecting the Ly6Chi subset. We then subjected adult mice to cerebral hypoxia-ischemia using the Levine/Vannucci model. Functional outcomes after stroke such as body weight change, neurologic score, motor functions and spatial learning were not affected. Moreover, depletion in Ly6Clow monocytes did not change significantly the total infarct size, cell loss, atrophy, the number, or the activation state of microglia/macrophages at the lesion site. These data suggest that Ly6Clow patrolling monocytes are redundant in the progression and recovery of ischemic stroke. PMID:24780898

  9. Development and characterization of two porcine monocyte-derived macrophage cell lines☆

    OpenAIRE

    Chitko-McKown, Carol G.; Chapes, Stephen K.; Miller, Laura C; Riggs, Penny K.; Ortega, M. Teresa; Benedict T. Green; McKown, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell lines CΔ2+ and CΔ2− were developed from monocytes obtained from a 10-month-old, crossbred, female pig. These cells morphologically resembled macrophages, stained positively for α-naphthyl esterase and negatively for peroxidase. The cell lines were bactericidal and highly phagocytic. Both cell lines expressed the porcine cell-surface molecules MHCI, CD11b, CD14, CD16, CD172, and small amounts of CD2; however, only minimal amounts of CD163 were measured. The lines were negative for the mou...

  10. Aged mice have increased inflammatory monocyte concentration and altered expression of cell-surface functional receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kelley Strohacker; Whitney L Breslin; Katie C Carpenter; Brian K McFarlin

    2012-03-01

    The expression of monocyte cell-surface receptors represents one index of immune dysfunction, which is common with aging. Although mouse models of aging are prevalent, monocyte subset assessment is rare. Our purpose was to compare cell receptor expression on classic (CD115+/Gr-1high) and non-classic (CD115+/Gr-1low) monocytes from 80- or 20-week-old CD-1 mice. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to determine the concentration of monocyte subsets and their respective cell-surface expression of TLR2, TLR4, CD80, CD86, MHC II and CD54. These receptors were selected because they have been previously associated with altered monocyte function. Data were analysed with independent -tests; significance was set at < 0.05. Old mice had a greater concentration of both classic (258%, =0.003) and non-classic (70%, =0.026) monocytes. The classic : non-classic monocyte ratio doubled in old as compared with that in young mice (=0.006), indicating a pro-inflammatory shift. TLR4 ($\\downarrow$27%, =0.001) and CD80 ($\\downarrow$37%, =0.004) were decreased on classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. TLR2 ($\\uparrow$24%, =0.002) and MHCII ($\\downarrow$21%, =0.026) were altered on non-classic monocytes from old as compared with those from young mice. The increased classic : non-classic monocyte ratio combined with changes in the cell-surface receptor expression on both monocyte subsets is indicative of immune dysfunction, which may increase age-associated disease risk.

  11. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSC...

  12. Monocyte functions in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Almdal, T; Bennedsen, J;

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of monocytes obtained from 14 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those of monocytes from healthy individuals. It was found that the total number of circulating monocytes in the 14 diabetic patients was lower than that from the...... elucidation of concomitant infections in diabetic patients are discussed....

  13. Using image-based flow cytometry to measure monocyte oxidized LDL phagocytosis: A potential risk factor for CVD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Andrea L; Venable, Adam S; Prado, Eric A; Best Sampson, Jill N; McFarlin, Brian K

    2015-08-01

    Obesity and cardiovascular disease is a worldwide health concern that has been a major focus in research for several decades. Among these diseases, atherosclerosis is one of the leading causes of death and disability nationwide. Circulating monocytes are believed to be primary cells responsible for foam cell formation. The present report describes a novel method for measuring monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis capacity using image-based flow cytometry. Human venous blood monocytes were incubated with different concentrations of oxLDL for different lengths of time to optimize the assay. High (post-meal) and low (pre-meal) responder samples were generated by feeding human subjects a high-fat (~85% of daily fat allowance), high-calorie (~65% of daily calorie needs) meal. This is a relevant model with respect to obesity and risk of developing atherogenesis. After the functional assay, classic (CD14+/CD16-) and pro-inflammatory (CD14+/CD16+) monocytes were assessed for oxLDL uptake, adhesion molecule expression (CD11b and CD18), and scavenger receptor expression (CD36) using an image-based flow cytometer (FlowSight). The present method represents a novel advance in methods available to detect the propensity of circulating monocytes to become intima foam cells. We found the assay to be most effective at separating high from low responder samples when using a fixed oxLDL concentration (120 μL/mL) and incubation length (1-h). In a clinical application, this method demonstrated that consuming a single high-fat meal causes an increase in the proportion of monocyte oxLDL phagocytosis and their adhesion capacity, suggesting a higher propensity to become foam cells. PMID:25858228

  14. Prediction based on mean subset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Brown, P. J.; Madsen, Henrik;

    2002-01-01

    the coefficient vectors from each subset should be weighted. It is not computationally feasible to calculate the mean subset coefficient vector for larger problems, and thus we suggest an algorithm to find an approximation to the mean subset coefficient vector. In a comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study...

  15. Angiopoietin-2 regulates gene expression in TIE2-expressing monocytes and augments their inherent proangiogenic functions

    OpenAIRE

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Tal, Andrea O.; Scholz, Alexander; De Palma, Michele; Patel, Sunil; Urbich, Carmen; Biswas, Subhra K.; Murdoch, Craig; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Lewis, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEM) are a highly proangiogenic subset of myeloid cells in tumors. Here, we show that circulating human TEMs are already preprogrammed in the circulation to be more angiogenic and express higher levels of such proangiogenic genes as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), VEGFA, COX-2, and WNT5A than TIE2(-) monocytes. Additionally, angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) markedly enhanced the proangiogenic activity of TEMs and increased their expression of two proangiogenic...

  16. Organophosphates and monocyte esterase deficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To examine the possibility that monocyte esterase deficiency (MED) could be caused by exposure to organophosphates. METHODS--Pseudocholinesterase, paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were measured in the serum and acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the red cells of a group of monocyte esterase deficient subjects and compared with the enzyme activities of a control group of monocyte esterase positive subjects. RESULTS--No significant difference was found between the enzyme...

  17. Peripheral monocyte functions and activation in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Schwarzmaier

    Full Text Available Recent developments suggest a causal link between inflammation and impaired bacterial clearance in Crohn's disease (CD due to alterations of intestinal macrophages. Studies suggest that excessive inflammation is the consequence of an underlying immunodeficiency rather than the primary cause of CD pathogenesis. We characterized phenotypic and functional features of peripheral blood monocytes of patients with quiescent CD (n = 18 and healthy controls (n = 19 by analyses of cell surface molecule expression, cell adherence, migration, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and cytokine expression and secretion with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS priming. Peripheral blood monocytes of patients with inactive CD showed normal expression of cell surface molecules (CD14, CD16, CD116, adherence to plastic surfaces, spontaneous migration, chemotaxis towards LTB4, phagocytosis of E. coli, and production of reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, peripheral blood monocytes of CD patients secreted higher levels of IL1β (p<.05. Upon LPS priming we found a decreased release of IL10 (p<.05 and higher levels of CCL2 (p<.001 and CCL5 (p<.05. The expression and release of TNFα, IFNγ, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL13, IL17, CXCL9, and CXCL10 were not altered compared to healthy controls. Based on our phenotypic and functional studies, peripheral blood monocytes from CD patients in clinical remission were not impaired compared to healthy controls. Our results highlight that defective innate immune mechanisms in CD seems to play a role in the (inflamed intestinal mucosa rather than in peripheral blood.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of monocyte-HIV interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Huyen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During HIV infection and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART, monocytes and macrophages exhibit a wide range of dysfunctions which contribute significantly to HIV pathogenesis and therapy-associated complications. Nevertheless, the molecular components which contribute to these dysfunctions remain elusive. We therefore applied a parallel approach of genome-wide microarray analysis and focused gene expression profiling on monocytes from patients in different stages of HIV infection and/or ART to further characterise these dysfunctions. Results Processes involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, lipid metabolism, proteasome function, protein trafficking and transcriptional regulation were identified as areas of monocyte dysfunction during HIV infection. Individual genes potentially contributing to these monocyte dysfunctions included several novel factors. One of these is the adipocytokine NAMPT/visfatin, which we show to be capable of inhibiting HIV at an early step in its life cycle. Roughly half of all genes identified were restored to control levels under ART, while the others represented a persistent dysregulation. Additionally, several candidate biomarkers (in particular CCL1 and CYP2C19 for the development of the abacavir hypersensitivity reaction were suggested. Conclusions Previously described areas of monocyte dysfunction during HIV infection were confirmed, and novel themes were identified. Furthermore, individual genes associated with these dysfunctions and with ART-associated disorders were pinpointed. These genes form a useful basis for further functional studies concerning the contribution of monocytes/macrophages to HIV pathogenesis. One such gene, NAMPT/visfatin, represents a possible novel restriction factor for HIV. Background Both macrophages and T lymphocyte subsets express the CD4 receptor and either the CXCR4 and/or the CCR5 coreceptor which confer susceptibility to infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus

  19. Elevated atherosclerosis-related gene expression, monocyte activation and microparticle-release are related to increased lipoprotein-associated oxidative stress in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Hjuler Nielsen

    Full Text Available Animal and in vitro studies have suggested that hypercholesterolemia and increased oxidative stress predisposes to monocyte activation and enhanced accumulation of oxidized LDL cholesterol (oxLDL-C through a CD36-dependent mechanism. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that elevated oxLDL-C induce proinflammatory monocytes and increased release of monocyte-derived microparticles (MMPs, as well as up-regulation of CD36, chemokine receptors and proinflammatory factors through CD36-dependent pathways and that this is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis in subjects with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, in particular in the presence of Achilles tendon xanthomas (ATX.We studied thirty FH subjects with and without ATX and twenty-three healthy control subjects. Intima-media thickness (IMT and Achilles tendon (AT thickness were measured by ultrasonography. Monocyte classification and MMP analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Monocyte expression of genes involved in atherosclerosis was determined by quantitative PCR. IMT and oxLDL-C were increased in FH subjects, especially in the presence of ATX. In addition, FH subjects had elevated proportions of intermediate CD14++CD16+ monocytes and higher circulating MMP levels. Stepwise linear regression identified oxLDL-C, gender and intermediate monocytes as predictors of MMPs. Monocyte expression of pro-atherogenic and pro-inflammatory genes regulated by oxLDL-C-CD36 interaction was increased in FH, especially in ATX+ subjects. Monocyte chemokine receptor CX3CR1 was identified as an independent contributor to IMT.Our data support that lipoprotein-associated oxidative stress is involved in accelerated atherosclerosis in FH, particularly in the presence of ATX, by inducing pro-inflammatory monocytes and increased release of MMPs along with elevated monocyte expression of oxLDL-C-induced atherosclerosis-related genes.

  20. Ly6C- Monocytes Regulate Parasite-Induced Liver Inflammation by Inducing the Differentiation of Pathogenic Ly6C+ Monocytes into Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Morias

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes consist of two well-defined subsets, the Ly6C+ and Ly6C- monocytes. Both CD11b+ myeloid cells populations have been proposed to infiltrate tissues during inflammation. While infiltration of Ly6C+ monocytes is an established pathogenic factor during hepatic inflammation, the role of Ly6C- monocytes remains elusive. Mice suffering experimental African trypanosome infection die from systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS that is initiated by phagocytosis of parasites by liver myeloid cells and culminates in apoptosis/necrosis of liver myeloid and parenchymal cells that reduces host survival. C57BL/6 mice are considered as trypanotolerant to Trypanosoma congolense infection. We have reported that in these animals, IL-10, produced among others by myeloid cells, limits the liver damage caused by pathogenic TNF-producing Ly6C+ monocytes, ensuring prolonged survival. Here, the heterogeneity and dynamics of liver myeloid cells in T. congolense-infected C57/BL6 mice was further dissected. Moreover, the contribution of Ly6C- monocytes to trypanotolerance was investigated. By using FACS analysis and adoptive transfer experiments, we found that the accumulation of Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages in the liver of infected mice coincided with a drop in the pool of Ly6C+ monocytes. Pathogenic TNF mainly originated from Ly6C+ monocytes while Ly6C- monocytes and macrophages were major and equipotent sources of IL-10 within myeloid cells. Moreover, Nr4a1 (Nur77 transcription factor-dependent Ly6C- monocytes exhibited IL-10-dependent and cell contact-dependent regulatory properties contributing to trypanotolerance by suppressing the production of TNF by Ly6C+ monocytes and by promoting the differentiation of the latter cells into macrophages. Thus, Ly6C- monocytes can dampen liver damage caused by an extensive Ly6C+ monocyte-associated inflammatory immune response in T. congolense trypanotolerant animals. In a more general context, Ly6C- or Ly6C

  1. Subset sums in abelian groups

    OpenAIRE

    Balandraud, Eric; Girard, Benjamin; Griffiths, Simon; Hamidoune, Yahya Ould

    2011-01-01

    Denoting by Sigma(S) the set of subset sums of a subset S of a finite abelian group G, we prove that |Sigma(S)| >= |S|(|S|+2)/4-1 whenever S is symmetric, |G| is odd and Sigma(S) is aperiodic. Up to an additive constant of 2 this result is best possible, and we obtain the stronger (exact best possible) bound in almost all cases. We prove similar results in the case |G| is even. Our proof requires us to extend a theorem of Olson on the number of subset sums of anti-symmetric subsets S from the...

  2. Sialoadhesin expressed on IFN-induced monocytes binds HIV-1 and enhances infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infection dysregulates the immune system and alters gene expression in circulating monocytes. Differential gene expression analysis of CD14(+ monocytes from subjects infected with HIV-1 revealed increased expression of sialoadhesin (Sn, CD169, Siglec 1, a cell adhesion molecule first described in a subset of macrophages activated in chronic inflammatory diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes by flow cytometry and found significantly higher expression in subjects with elevated viral loads compared to subjects with undetectable viral loads. In cultured CD14(+ monocytes isolated from healthy individuals, sialoadhesin expression was induced by interferon-alpha and interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha. Using a stringent binding assay, sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes adsorbed HIV-1 through interaction with the sialic acid residues on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120. Furthermore, monocytes expressing sialoadhesin facilitated HIV-1 trans infection of permissive cells, which occurred in the absence of monocyte self-infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased sialoadhesin expression on CD14(+ monocytes occurred in response to HIV-1 infection with maximum expression associated with high viral load. We show that interferons induce sialoadhesin in primary CD14(+ monocytes, which is consistent with an antiviral response during viremia. Our findings suggest that circulating sialoadhesin-expressing monocytes are capable of binding HIV-1 and effectively delivering virus to target cells thereby enhancing the distribution of HIV-1. Sialoadhesin could disseminate HIV-1 to viral reservoirs during monocyte immunosurveillance or migration to sites of inflammation and then facilitate HIV-1 infection of permissive cells.

  3. Efficient Feature Subset Selection and Subset Size Optimization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Somol, Petr; Novovičová, Jana; Pudil, Pavel

    Vukovar, Croatia: In-Teh, 2010 - (Herout, A.), s. 75-98 ISBN 978-953-7619-90-9 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0572; GA ČR GA102/08/0593; GA ČR GA102/07/1594 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 2C06019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : dimensionality reduction * pattern recognition * machine learning * feature selection * optimization * subset search * classification Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2010/RO/somol-efficient feature subset selection and subset size optimization.pdf

  4. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05. The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01. In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  5. Monocytes of individual human subjects display heterogeneous bacterial uptake and antilisterial activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Zerlauth, G; Chehadeh, H E; Maier, E; Schaff, Z.; Eibl, M M; Mannhalter, J W

    1996-01-01

    Peripheral blood monocytes (Mo) of normal human donors simultaneously exhibit two subsets differing in their functional activity towards the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. One subset (on average, 25% of total Mo) was characteristically able to ingest a large number of L. monocytogenes bacteria and permitted intracellular growth of these bacteria. The other Mo subpopulation (on average, 75% of total Mo) was far less active in phagocytosing L. monocytogenes and rest...

  6. Monocytes in inflammatory bowel disease: absolute monocyte counts.

    OpenAIRE

    Mee, A. S.; Berney, J.; Jewell, D P

    1980-01-01

    Using a cytochemical staining technique, peripheral blood monocytes have been precisely identified and enumerated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and compared with healthy and disease control subjects. For ulcerative colitis there was a significant monocytosis, which was closely correlated with the total white cell count and with the activity of the disease. For patients with Crohn's disease, the peripheral blood monocyte count was also raised compared with that of the control gro...

  7. Specific subsets of immune cells in human decidua differ between normal pregnancy and preeclampsia - a prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rieger Lorenz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in the balance of decidual leucocyte populations may lead to an unfavourable uterine microenvironment which may be associated with the development of preeclampsia (PE. In this study, we therefore investigated the leucocyte subpopulations in decidual tissues of 33 women with preeclampsia and 66 control patients. Methods Decidua was either obtained via curettage during cesarean section or dissected from the surface of the basal plate of the placenta after spontaneous delivery. We used FACS analysis to quantify decidual leukocytes (CD45, NK cells (CD56+/CD16+ and CD56++/CD16-, antigen presenting cells (HLA-DR, DC-Sign, CD14 and T/B cells (CD8, CD4, alpha-beta-T-cell receptor, gamma-delta-T-cell receptor, CD25, CD19. Results The number of decidual cytotoxic CD8+T-lymphocytes (P < 0.02, alpha-beta -T-cell receptor positive T cells (P < 0.03 and of CD56+/CD16+ NK cells (P < 0.03 was lower in decidua from women with PE than in decidua from control patients. Conclusion The observed reduction of specific leucocyte subsets could create a microenvironment which is unfavourable for an appropriate placentation and could thereby be involved in the development of preeclamptic symptoms.

  8. CCR2 inhibition sequesters multiple subsets of leukocytes in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Naoki; Xu, Baohui; Dalman, Jackson; Deng, Hongping; Aoyama, Kohji; Dalman, Ronald L

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor CCR2 mediates monocyte mobilization from the bone marrow (BM) and subsequent migration into target tissues. The degree to which CCR2 is differentially expressed in leukocyte subsets, and the contribution of CCR2 to these leukocyte mobilization from the BM are poorly understood. Using red fluorescence protein CCR2 reporter mice, we found heterogeneity in CCR2 expression among leukocyte subsets in varying tissues. CCR2 was highly expressed by inflammatory monocytes, dendritic cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells and NK cells in all tissues. Unexpectedly, more than 60% of neutrophils expressed CCR2, albeit at low levels. CCR2 expression in T cells, B cells and NK T cells was greatest in the BM compared to other tissues. Genetic CCR2 deficiency markedly sequestered all leukocyte subsets in the BM, with reciprocal reduction noted in the peripheral blood and spleen. CCR2 inhibition via treatment with CCR2 signaling inhibitor propagermanium produced similar effects. Propagermanium also mitigated lipopolysaccharide-induced BM leukocyte egress. Consistent with its functional significance, CCR2 antibody staining revealed surface CCR2 expression within a subset of BM neutrophils. These results demonstrate the central role CCR2 plays in mediating leukocyte mobilization from the BM, and suggest a role for CCR2 inhibition in managing monocytes/macrophages-mediated chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26206182

  9. Evidence for unfolded protein response activation in monocytes from individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2010-04-15

    The hereditary disorder alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency results from mutations in the SERPINA1 gene and presents with emphysema in young adults and liver disease in childhood. The most common form of AAT deficiency occurs because of the Z mutation, causing the protein to fold aberrantly and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). This leads to ER stress and contributes significantly to the liver disease associated with the condition. In addition to hepatocytes, AAT is also synthesized by monocytes, neutrophils, and epithelial cells. In this study we show for the first time that the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in quiescent monocytes from ZZ individuals. Activating transcription factor 4, X-box binding protein 1, and a subset of genes involved in the UPR are increased in monocytes from ZZ compared with MM individuals. This contributes to an inflammatory phenotype with ZZ monocytes exhibiting enhanced cytokine production and activation of the NF-kappaB pathway when compared with MM monocytes. In addition, we demonstrate intracellular accumulation of AAT within the ER of ZZ monocytes. These are the first data showing that Z AAT protein accumulation induces UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. These findings change the current paradigm regarding lung inflammation in AAT deficiency, which up until now was derived from the protease-anti-protease hypothesis, but which now must include the exaggerated inflammatory response generated by accumulated aberrantly folded AAT in circulating blood cells.

  10. Tie2 Expressing Monocytes in the Spleen of Patients with Primary Myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, Rita; Fois, Gabriela; Catarsi, Paolo; Poletto, Valentina; Villani, Laura; Erba, Benedetta Gaia; Maddaluno, Luigi; Jemos, Basilio; Salmoiraghi, Silvia; Guglielmelli, Paola; Abbonante, Vittorio; Di Buduo, Christian Andrea; Balduini, Alessandra; Iurlo, Alessandra; Barosi, Giovanni; Rosti, Vittorio; Massa, Margherita

    2016-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is a Philadelphia-negative (Ph-) myeloproliferative disorder, showing abnormal CD34+ progenitor cell trafficking, splenomegaly, marrow fibrosis leading to extensive extramedullary haematopoiesis, and abnormal neoangiogenesis in either the bone marrow or the spleen. Monocytes expressing the angiopoietin-2 receptor (Tie2) have been shown to support abnormal angiogenic processes in solid tumors through a paracrine action that takes place in proximity to the vessels. In this study we investigated the frequency of Tie2 expressing monocytes in the spleen tissue samples of patients with PMF, and healthy subjects (CTRLs), and evaluated their possible role in favouring spleen angiogenesis. We show by confocal microscopy that in the spleen tissue of patients with PMF, but not of CTRLs, the most of the CD14+ cells are Tie2+ and are close to vessels; by flow cytometry, we found that Tie2 expressing monocytes were Tie2+CD14lowCD16brightCDL62-CCR2- (TEMs) and their frequency was higher (p = 0.008) in spleen tissue-derived mononuclear cells (MNCs) of patients with PMF than in spleen tissue-derived MNCs from CTRLs undergoing splenectomy for abdominal trauma. By in vitro angiogenesis assay we evidenced that conditioned medium of immunomagnetically selected spleen tissue derived CD14+ cells of patients with PMF induced a denser tube like net than that of CTRLs; in addition, CD14+Tie2+ cells sorted from spleen tissue derived single cell suspension of patients with PMF show a higher expression of genes involved in angiogenesis than that found in CTRLs. Our results document the enrichment of Tie2+ monocytes expressing angiogenic genes in the spleen of patients with PMF, suggesting a role for these cells in starting/maintaining the pathological angiogenesis in this organ. PMID:27281335

  11. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-01-01

    The elicitation of efficient antitumor immune responses requires the optimal activation of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs). Our comparison of the effect of various immunostimulatory treatments on DCs revealed that the best predictor of the success of immunotherapy is not the activation of existing DC populations, but the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DC in tumor-draining lymph nodes.

  12. The radioactive labeling of monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the aim of studying a possible relationship between circulating monocytes and Sternberg-Reed cells investigations were started on the specific labeling of monocytes. In this thesis the literature on the pertinent data has been reviewed and a series of experiments on the monocyte labeling procedure has been described. The principles of cell labeling with radioactive compounds were discussed. 1. Total separation of the particular cell population to be labeled and subsequent labeling with a non-specific radiopharmaceutical. 2. Specific cell labeling in a mixture of cell types based on a well defined affinity of the cell under study for the radiopharmaceutical used. Next the radionuclides that can be used for cell labeling purposes were discussed with special attention for 111In and its chelates. The principles of radiodosimetry were also discussed shortly. This section was focussed on the radiation dose the labeled cells receive because of the intracellular localized radioactivity. The radiation burden is high in comparison to amounts of radiation known to affect cell viability. A newly developed method for labeling monocytes specifically by phagocytosis of 111In-Fe-colloid without apparent loss of cells was described in detail. (Auth.)

  13. THE FEATURE SUBSET SELECTION ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yongguo; Li Xueming; Wu Zhongfu

    2003-01-01

    The motivation of data mining is how to extract effective information from huge data in very large database. However, some redundant and irrelevant attributes, which result in low performance and high computing complexity, are included in the very large database in general.So, Feature Subset Selection (FSS) becomes one important issue in the field of data mining. In this letter, an FSS model based on the filter approach is built, which uses the simulated annealing genetic algorithm. Experimental results show that convergence and stability of this algorithm are adequately achieved.

  14. Exponentially generic subsets of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gilman, Robert; Osin, Denis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the generic, i.e., typical, behavior of finitely generated subgroups of hyperbolic groups and also the generic behavior of the word problem for amenable groups. We show that a random set of elements of a nonelementary word hyperbolic group is very likely to be a set of free generators for a nicely embedded free subgroup. We also exhibit some finitely presented amenable groups for which the restriction of the word problem is unsolvable on every sufficiently large subset of words.

  15. What are the roles of macrophages and monocytes in human pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mao-Xing; Hu, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Zhao-Zhao; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Liao, Ai-Hua

    2015-11-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the semi-allogeneic fetus, which leads to systemic and local immunity. Systemic immunity, including enhanced innate immunity with increased activation of monocytes, is induced by various placental factors. Maternal immune adaptations are most evident at the feto-maternal interface, where macrophages are enriched and communicate with various decidual leukocytes. These cells are not only contributing to the protection of the growing fetus from microorganisms, but also aiding placental development by promoting trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling, and the parturition process. Thus, monocytes and macrophages concurrently play important roles throughout the trimesters. Dysregulation of these cells may thus lead to pregnancy complications, such as pre-eclampsia and preterm labor. In this review, monocytes and macrophage subsets and their roles in normal and pathological pregnancies are reviewed. PMID:26340023

  16. Differentiation and function of mouse monocyte-derived dendritic cells in steady state and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Pilar M; Ardavín, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    Although monocytes were originally described as precursors to all the different subpopulations of macrophages found in the steady state and formed under inflammatory and infectious conditions, recent data have demonstrated conclusively that monocytes can also differentiate into dendritic cells (DCs). Monocytes are the precursors to different subsets of DCs, such as Langerhans cells and DCs found in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal, respiratory, and urogenital tracts. In addition, monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs), newly formed during inflammatory reactions, appear to fulfill an essential role in defense mechanisms against pathogens by participating in the induction of both adaptive and innate immune responses. In this regard, moDCs have the capacity to activate antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses and to cross-prime CD8(+) T cells, during viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. In addition, monocytes have been recently described as the precursors to a subset of DCs specialized in innate immunity against pathogens, named TipDCs [for TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor-alpha)-iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase)-producing DCs] that display a remarkable microbicidal activity and also provide iNOS-dependent help for antibody production by B cells. Importantly, in contrast to DCs developing in the steady state, moDCs formed during inflammatory and infectious processes are subjected to diverse soluble mediators that determine the multiple functional specificities displayed by moDCs, as a result of the remarkable developmental plasticity of monocytes. In this review, we discuss recent findings dealing with the differentiation and functional relevance of moDCs that have widened the frontiers of DC immunobiology in relation to innate and adaptive immunity and the etiology of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:20193014

  17. Monocyte dysfunction in Sydenham's chorea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Karen C; Dutra, Walderez O; de Rezende, Vitor Bortolo; Cardoso, Francisco; Gollob, Kenneth J; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2010-04-01

    Until now, there are no conclusive data about the mechanisms involved in motor symptoms of Sydenham's chorea (SC). Taking into account the autoreactive antibody-mediated hypothesis of SC pathogenesis, the SC may be associated with uncontrolled immune mechanisms. Besides the antibody hypothesis, the innate immune system has been underappreciated. Hence, we evaluated the activation state of monocytes, cells that are precursors of macrophages, to characterize the inflammation profile of patients. We assessed the surface molecules CD80, CD86, and human leukocyte antigen DR expression in patients with SC by flow cytometry analysis. Our results showed a decreased CD14(+) (monocyte) frequency, with concomitant increased CD14(-) frequency inside monocyte population. Although monocyte population showed a decreased human leukocyte antigen DR and CD86 frequencies, the CD14(-) population showed an increased frequency of CD80(+) monocyte from SC compared with controls. These data suggest that monocytes showed a reduced costimulatory potential in SC. PMID:20080141

  18. A human dendritic cell subset receptive to the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived replicon particle constitutively expresses IL-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Kevin P; Laust, Amanda K; Nelson, Edward L

    2008-09-15

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a diverse population with the capacity to respond to a variety of pathogens. Because of their critical role in pathogenesis and Ag-specific adaptive immune responses, DCs are the focus of extensive study and incorporation into a variety of immunotherapeutic strategies. The diversity of DC subsets imposes a substantial challenge to the successful development of DC-based therapies, requiring identification of the involved subset(s) and the potential roles each contributes to the immunologic responses. The recently developed and promising Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particle (VRP) vector system has conserved tropism for a subset of myeloid DCs. This immunotherapeutic vector permits in situ targeting of DCs; however, it targets a restricted subset of DCs, which are heretofore uncharacterized. Using a novel technique, we isolated VRP-receptive and -nonreceptive populations from human monocyte-derived DCs. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed significant differential gene expression, supporting the existence of two distinct DC populations. Further analysis identified constitutive expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-32 as a distinguishing characteristic of VRP-receptive DCs. IL-32 transcript was exclusively expressed (>50 fold) in the VRP-receptive DC population relative to the background level of expression in the nonreceptive population. The presence of IL-32 transcript was accompanied by protein expression. These data are the first to identify a subset of immature monocyte-derived DCs constitutively expressing IL-32 and they provide insights into both DC biology and potential mechanisms employed by this potent vector system. PMID:18768856

  19. Mining Representative Subset Based on Fuzzy Clustering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongfang; FENG Boqin; L(U) Lintao

    2007-01-01

    Two new concepts-fuzzy mutuality and average fuzzy entropy are presented. Then based on these concepts, a new algorithm-RSMA (representative subset mining algorithm) is proposed, which can abstract representative subset from massive data.To accelerate the speed of producing representative subset, an improved algorithm-ARSMA(accelerated representative subset mining algorithm) is advanced, which adopt combining putting forward with backward strategies. In this way, the performance of the algorithm is improved. Finally we make experiments on real datasets and evaluate the representative subset. The experiment shows that ARSMA algorithm is more excellent than RandomPick algorithm either on effectiveness or efficiency.

  20. Lymphocyte and monocyte flow cytometry immunophenotyping as a diagnostic tool in uncharacteristic inflammatory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grip Olof

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with uncharacteristic inflammatory symptoms such as long-standing fatigue or pain, or a prolonged fever, constitute a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The aim of the present study was to determine if an extended immunophenotyping of lymphocytes and monocytes including activation markers can define disease-specific patterns, and thus provide valuable diagnostic information for these patients. Methods Whole blood from patients with gram-negative bacteraemia, neuroborreliosis, tuberculosis, acute mononucleosis, influenza or a mixed connective tissue disorders, as diagnosed by routine culture and serology techniques was analysed for lymphocyte and monocyte cell surface markers using a no-wash, no-lyse protocol for multi-colour flow cytometry method. The immunophenotyping included the activation markers HLA-DR and CD40. Plasma levels of soluble TNF alpha receptors were analysed by ELISA. Results An informative pattern was obtained by combining two of the analysed parameters: (i, the fractions of HLA-DR-expressing CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells, respectively, and (ii, the level of CD40 on CD14+ CD16- monocytes. Patients infected with gram-negative bacteria or EBV showed a marked increase in monocyte CD40, while this effect was less pronounced for tuberculosis, borrelia and influenza. The bacterial agents could be distinguished from the viral agents by the T cell result; CD4+ T cells reacting in bacterial infection, and the CD8+ T cells dominating for the viruses. Patients with mixed connective tissue disorders also showed increased activation, but with similar engagement of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Analysis of soluble TNF alpha receptors was less informative due to a large inter-individual variation. Conclusion Immunophenotyping including the combination of the fractions of HLA-DR expressing T cell subpopulations with the level of CD40 on monocytes produces an informative pattern, differentiating between infections of

  1. Reference ranges and age-related changes of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in Chinese healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yang; QIU ZhiFeng; XIE Jing; LI DongJing; LI TaiSheng

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to build region-specific reference ranges of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets for Chinese healthy adults from the young to the elderly and analyze the trends of changes in lymphocyte subsets for evaluating the impact of age on the values. 151 healthy adults aged 19-86 were recruited based on the SENIEUR protocol. Three sets of reference ranges were finally built applicable for the healthy young (19-44 years), middle-aged (45-64 years) and elder adults (>65). Comparisons in parameters among the three cohorts showed that e statistically significant increase in CD16CD56+ NK cell was observed between the middle-aged and elder cohorts, whereas for the majority of the parameters, a significant decline was observed between the young and the middle-aged cohorts.Further results showed that inverse correlations were observed between the age and CD19+ B, CD3+T,CD3+CD4+1, CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+ naTve T cell and CD4+CD28+/CD4+, while the positive one was identified between the age end the NK cell. These significant changes of the most of immune parameters provided evidence for immunosenescence. Notably, T cell activation markers of CD8+CD38+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ showed reverse trends of association with age, which provides a clue for further researches on the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical clinical presentation of the elder patients.

  2. Low Counts of B Cells, Natural Killer Cells, Monocytes, Dendritic Cells, Basophils, and Eosinophils are Associated with Postengraftment Infections after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorny, Peter J; Pratt, Laura M; Liu, Yiping; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Luider, Joanne; Auer-Grzesiak, Iwona; Mansoor, Adnan; Williamson, Tyler S; Ugarte-Torres, Alejandra; Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Khan, Faisal M; Larratt, Loree; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Stewart, Douglas A; Russell, James A; Daly, Andrew; Storek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients are immunocompromised and thus predisposed to infections. We set out to determine the deficiency of which immune cell subset(s) may predispose to postengraftment infections. We determined day 28, 56, 84, and 180 blood counts of multiple immune cell subsets in 219 allogeneic transplant recipients conditioned with busulfan, fludarabine, and Thymoglobulin. Deficiency of a subset was considered to be associated with infections if the low subset count was significantly associated with subsequent high infection rate per multivariate analysis in both discovery and validation cohorts. Low counts of monocytes (total and inflammatory) and basophils, and low IgA levels were associated with viral infections. Low plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) counts were associated with bacterial infections. Low inflammatory monocyte counts were associated with fungal infections. Low counts of total and naive B cells, total and CD56(high) natural killer (NK) cells, total and inflammatory monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs), PDCs, basophils and eosinophils, and low levels of IgA were associated with any infections (due to any pathogen or presumed). In conclusion, deficiencies of B cells, NK cells, monocytes, MDCs, PDCs, basophils, eosinophils, and/or IgA plasma cells appear to predispose to postengraftment infections. PMID:26363444

  3. Increase in Peripheral CD3-CD56brightCD16- Natural Killer Cells in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Associated with HHV-6 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Rotola, Antonella; Cassai, Enzo; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Di Luca, Dario; Caselli, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is a very common autoimmune disease of the thyroid. In addition to genetic background, several viruses, including herpesviruses, have been suggested to play a role as possible environmental triggers of disease, but conclusive data are still lacking. Previous results showed that HT patients have an increased cellular immune response directed against the HHV-6 U94 protein and increased NK activity directed against HHV-6 infected thyrocytes.In this study, we characterized the antiviral antibody response and the NK cells activity and subtype in HHV-6 infected HT patients. The results showed that HT subjects have increased prevalence and titer of anti-U94 antibodies and a higher amount of CD3-CD56(bright)CD16(-)NK cell percentages compared to controls. Furthermore, the cell activation of CD3(-)CD56(bright) NK cells in HT patients significantly correlates with TPO and Tg Ab levels.The results suggest that HHV-6 might contribute to HT development, increasing NK cell secretion of inflammatory cytokines that could sustain the persistence of an inflammatory status in HT patients. PMID:26566646

  4. Cluster Chemistry in Electron-Poor Ae-Pt-Cd Systems (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba): (Sr,Ba)Pt2Cd4, Ca6Pt8Cd16, and Its Known Antitype Er6Pd16Sb8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samal, Saroj L. [Ames Laboratory; Gulo, Fakhili [Ames Laboratory; Corbett, John D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-02-18

    Three new ternary polar intermetallic compounds, cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16, and tetragonal (Sr, Ba)Pt2Cd4 have been discovered during explorations of the Ae–Pt–Cd systems. Cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16 (Fm-3m, Z = 4, a = 13.513(1) Å) contains a 3D array of separate Cd8 tetrahedral stars (TS) that are both face capped along the axes and diagonally bridged by Pt atoms to generate the 3D anionic network Cd8[Pt(1)]6/2[Pt(2)]4/8. The complementary cationic surface of the cell consists of a face-centered cube of Pt(3)@Ca6 octahedra. This structure is an ordered ternary variant of Sc11Ir4 (Sc6Ir8Sc16), a stuffed version of the close relative Na6Au7Cd16, and a network inverse of the recent Er6Sb8Pd16 (compare Ca6Pt8Cd16). The three groups of elements each occur in only one structural version. The new AePt2Cd4, Ae = Sr, Ba, are tetragonal (P42/mnm,Z = 2, a ≈ 8.30 Å, c ≈ 4.47 Å) and contain chains of edge-sharing Cd4 tetrahedra along c that are bridged by four-bonded Ba/Sr. LMTO-ASA and ICOHP calculation results and comparisons show that the major bonding (Hamilton) populations in Ca6Pt8Cd16 and Er6Sb8Pd16 come from polar Pt–Cd and Pd–Sb interactions, that Pt exhibits larger relativistic contributions than Pd, that characteristic size and orbital differences are most evident for Sb 5s, Pt8, and Pd16, and that some terms remain incomparable, Ca–Cd versus Er–Pd.

  5. Comparative genomics as a tool to reveal functional equivalences between human and mouse dendritic cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozat, Karine; Guiton, Rachel; Guilliams, Martin; Henri, Sandrine; Baranek, Thomas; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Malissen, Bernard; Dalod, Marc

    2010-03-01

    During evolution, vertebrates have developed an adaptive immune system able to cope with a variety of pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are central to this process. DCs integrate information derived from pathogens or endogenous danger signals and convey them to T lymphocytes. Most of the present knowledge on DCs was generated in mice or by using human DCs differentiated in vitro from monocytes. In both species, several DC subsets have been identified in vivo based on differences in their phenotypes, anatomical locations or functions. In mice, protective immunity against intracellular pathogens or tumors can be induced most efficiently by targeting antigens to the CD8 alpha(+) DCs, a subset of DCs which resides in lymphoid tissues and is especially efficient at cross-presenting exogenous antigens to CD8(+) T lymphocytes. In contrary, harnessing human DC subsets for medical purposes is currently hampered by insufficient knowledge about these cells. To overcome this cognitive gap, we are using comparative genomics as a tool for designing hypotheses and experiments to further characterize DC subset functions and their molecular control, including the investigation of the functional equivalences that might exist between human and mouse DC subsets. PMID:20193019

  6. Development of a Synchronous Subset of AADL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filali, Mamoun; Lawall, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We study the definition and the mapping of an AADL subset: the so called synchronous subset. We show that the data port protocol used for delayed and immediate connections between periodic threads can be interpreted in a  synchronous way. In this paper, we formalize this interpretation and study...

  7. MONOCYTE ADHESION MOLECULES EXPRESSION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND LIVER CIRRHOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora E.I. El-Bassiouni

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Chronic viral hepatitis is histologically characterized by predominantly periportal infiltration of mononuclear cells, including monocytes/macrophages. Intralobular infiltration of these inflammatory cells is an ominous sign of deterioration and a criterion for disease activity. We aimed to study the expression of monocytes adhesion molecules and their endothelial ligands in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC and liver cirrhosis (LC. The influence of cytokines and chemokine on monocyte adhesion was also taken into account. Material and Methods: The current study included 30 cases of CHC, 30 cases of LC and 15 normal healthy controls. Flow cytometric quantification of CD11a, CD11b and CD49d monocyte surface antigen expression was performed. Circulating sE-selectin, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, TNF-α, IL-1 and MCP-1 were measured by ELISA kits. Results: The expression of CD11b, CD49d, and the serum level of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, TNF-α showed progressive increase from non-cirrhotic to cirrhotic patients. correlation was found between monocyte adhesion molecules CD11a, CD11b and CD49d and each of sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 Conclusions: These findings suggest that the modulation of monocyte-subset recruitment into the liver via adhesion molecules or cytokines/cytokine receptors may represent promising approaches for therapeutic interventions in human liver fibrosis. Measurement of serum soluble adhesion molecules may be useful for monitoring progression of liver inflammation and fibrosis during CHC.

  8. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S; Moesgaard, F

    1994-01-01

    no adjuvant treatment (n = 13). Blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis and chemiluminescence were analyzed before the operation and on postoperative days 1, 3, and 9. RESULTS: Monocyte chemotaxis to C5a in the 13 control patients was significantly decreased on day 1 compared with day 0. Chemotaxis...... chemiluminescence to zymosan insignificantly on day 1 (P < .07 between groups). Five of the 13 control patients developed postoperative infectious complications, which were related to decreased monocyte chemotaxis to C5a and increased neutrophil chemiluminescence to zymosan, compared with noninfected patients. A...

  9. Strenuous physical exercise adversely affects monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czepluch, Frauke S; Barres, Romain; Caidahl, Kenneth;

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is important for proper cardiovascular function and disease prevention, but it may influence the immune system. We evaluated the effect of strenuous exercise on monocyte chemotaxis. Monocytes were isolated from blood of 13 young, healthy, sedentary individuals participating...... in a three-week training program which consisted of repeated exercise bouts. Monocyte chemotaxis and serological biomarkers were investigated at baseline, after three weeks training and after four weeks recovery. Chemotaxis towards vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and transforming growth factor...

  10. Monocyte Phenotype and Polyfunctionality Are Associated With Elevated Soluble Inflammatory Markers, Cytomegalovirus Infection, and Functional and Cognitive Decline in Elderly Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pablo-Bernal, Rebeca Sara; Cañizares, Julio; Rosado, Isaac; Galvá, María Isabel; Alvarez-Ríos, Ana Isabel; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio; Ferrando-Martínez, Sara; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Rafii-El-Idrissi Benhnia, Mohammed; Pacheco, Yolanda María; Ramos, Raquel; Leal, Manuel; Ruiz-Mateos, Ezequiel

    2016-05-01

    Monocytes are mediators of the inflammatory response and include three subsets: classical, intermediate, and nonclassical. Little is known about the phenotypical and functional age-related changes in monocytes and their association with soluble inflammatory biomarkers, cytomegalovirus infection, and functional and mental decline. We assayed the activation ex vivo and the responsiveness to TLR2 and TLR4 agonists in vitro in the three subsets and assessed the intracellular production of IL1-alpha (α), IL1-beta (β), IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-10 of elderly adults (median 83 [67-90] years old;n= 20) compared with young controls (median 35 [27-40] years old;n= 20). Ex vivo, the elderly adults showed a higher percentage of classical monocytes that expressed intracellular IL1-α (p= .001), IL1-β (p= .001), IL-6 (p= .002), and IL-8 (p= .007). Similar results were obtained both for the intermediate and nonclassical subsets and in vitro. Polyfunctionality was higher in the elderly adults. The functionality ex vivo was strongly associated with soluble inflammatory markers. The activation phenotype was independently associated with the anti-cytomegalovirus IgG levels and with functional and cognitive decline. These data demonstrate that monocytes are key cell candidates for the source of the high soluble inflammatory levels. Our findings suggest that cytomegalovirus infection might be a driving force in the activation of monocytes and is associated with the functional and cognitive decline. PMID:26286603

  11. Biologic therapy improves psoriasis by decreasing the activity of monocytes and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Keiichi; Umezawa, Yoshinori; Yamagiwa, Akisa; Saeki, Hidehisa; Kondo, Makoto; Gabazza, Esteban C; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2014-08-01

    Therapy with monoclonal antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the interleukin (IL)-12/23 p40 subunit has significantly improved the clinical outcome of patients with psoriasis. These antibodies inhibit the effects of the target cytokines and thus the major concern during their use is the induction of excessive immunosuppression. Recent studies evaluating the long-term efficacy and safety of biologic therapy in psoriasis have shown no significant appearance of serious adverse effects including infections and malignancies. However, the immunological consequence and the mechanism by which the blockade of a single cytokine by biologics can successfully control the activity of psoriasis remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the effect of biologic therapy on cytokine production of various lymphocytes and on the activity of monocytes and neutrophils in psoriatic patients. Neutrophils, monocytes and T cells were purified from heparinized peripheral venous blood by Ficoll density gradient centrifugation, and γ-interferon, TNF-α and IL-17 production from lymphocytes was measured by flow cytometer. The activation maker of neutrophils and the activated subsets of monocytes were also analyzed. Biologic therapy induced no significant changes in the cytokine production by lymphocytes from the skin and gut-homing T cells. However, neutrophil activity and the ratio of activated monocyte population increased in severely psoriatic patients were normalized in psoriatic patients receiving biologic therapy. The present study showed that biologic therapy ameliorates clinical symptoms and controls the immune response in patients with psoriasis. PMID:25099154

  12. CXCR6 marks a novel subset of T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) natural killer cells residing in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegmann, Kerstin A; Robertson, Francis; Hansi, Navjyot; Gill, Upkar; Pallant, Celeste; Christophides, Theodoros; Pallett, Laura J; Peppa, Dimitra; Dunn, Claire; Fusai, Giuseppe; Male, Victoria; Davidson, Brian R; Kennedy, Patrick; Maini, Mala K

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells (NK) are highly enriched in the human liver, where they can regulate immunity and immunopathology. We probed them for a liver-resident subset, distinct from conventional bone-marrow-derived NK. CXCR6+ NK were strikingly enriched in healthy and diseased liver compared to blood (p bright)CD16-CD57-), and expressed the tissue-residency marker CD69. CXCR6+ NK produced fewer cytotoxic mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines than the non-liver-specific CXCR6- fraction. Instead CXCR6+ NK could upregulate TRAIL, a key death ligand in hepatitis pathogenesis. CXCR6 demarcated liver NK into two transcriptionally distinct populations: T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo)(CXCR6-) and T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi)(CXCR6+); the latter was virtually absent in the periphery. The small circulating CXCR6+ subset was predominantly T-bet(hi)Eomes(lo), suggesting its lineage was closer to CXCR6- peripheral than CXCR6+ liver NK. These data reveal a large subset of human liver-resident T-bet(lo)Eomes(hi) NK, distinguished by their surface expression of CXCR6, adapted for hepatic tolerance and inducible anti-viral immunity. PMID:27210614

  13. Monocyte scintigraphy in rheumatoid arthritis: the dynamics of monocyte migration in immune-mediated inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier M Thurlings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Macrophages are principal drivers of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, a prototype immune-mediated inflammatory disease. Conceivably, synovial macrophages are continuously replaced by circulating monocytes in RA. Animal studies from the 1960s suggested that macrophage replacement by monocytes is a slow process in chronic inflammatory lesions. Translation of these data into the human condition has been hampered by the lack of available techniques to analyze monocyte migration in man. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a technique that enabled us to analyze the migration of labelled autologous monocytes in RA patients using single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT. We isolated CD14+ monocytes by CliniMACS in 8 patients and labeled these with technetium-99m (99mTc-HMPAO. Monocytes were re-infused into the same patient. Using SPECT we calculated that a very small but specific fraction of 3.4 x 10(-3 (0.95-5.1 x 10(-3 % of re-infused monocytes migrated to the inflamed joints, being detectable within one hour after re-infusion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate monocytes migrate continuously into the inflamed synovial tissue of RA patients, but at a slow macrophage-replacement rate. This suggests that the rapid decrease in synovial macrophages that occurs after antirheumatic treatment might rather be explained by an alteration in macrophage retention than in monocyte influx and that RA might be particularly sensitive to treatments targeting inflammatory cell retention.

  14. Spermine inhibition of monocyte activation and inflammation.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, M.; Borovikova, L. V.; Wang, H.; Metz, C.; Tracey, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    The innate immune system functions as a defensive front line against pathogenic invasion, but the proinflammatory products of activated monocytes and macrophages (e.g., TNF and NO) can also injure normal cells. Anti-inflammatory mediators restrain the innate immune response and prevent excessive collateral tissue damage. Spermine, a ubiquitous biogenic polyamine, specifically and reversibly suppresses the synthesis of monocyte proinflammatory cytokines. This may provide a counterregulatory me...

  15. Monocyte activation in early onset rheumatoid arthritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii, I.; Shingu, M; Nobunaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    Monocytes from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with definite and classic rheumatoid arthritis spontaneously produced significantly greater amounts of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) than samples of peripheral blood from normal controls. Peripheral blood monocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced significantly greater amounts of PGE2 than control samples when stimulated with lipopolysaccharide. There were no sig...

  16. HIV-1 Latency in Monocytes/Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 targets CD4+ T cells and cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. HIV pathogenesis is characterized by the depletion of T lymphocytes and by the presence of a population of cells in which latency has been established called the HIV-1 reservoir. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has significantly improved the life of HIV-1 infected patients. However, complete eradication of HIV-1 from infected individuals is not possible without targeting latent sources of infection. HIV-1 establishes latent infection in resting CD4+ T cells and findings indicate that latency can also be established in the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Monocyte/macrophage lineage includes among others, monocytes, macrophages and brain resident macrophages. These cells are relatively more resistant to apoptosis induced by HIV-1, thus are important stable hideouts of the virus. Much effort has been made in the direction of eliminating HIV-1 resting CD4+ T-cell reservoirs. However, it is impossible to achieve a cure for HIV-1 without considering these neglected latent reservoirs, the cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage. In this review we will describe our current understanding of the mechanism of latency in monocyte/macrophage lineage and how such cells can be specifically eliminated from the infected host.

  17. Subsets of configurations and canonical partition functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloch, J.; Bruckmann, F.; Kieburg, M.;

    2013-01-01

    We explain the physical nature of the subset solution to the sign problem in chiral random matrix theory: the subset sum over configurations is shown to project out the canonical determinant with zero quark charge from a given configuration. As the grand canonical chiral random matrix partition f...... function is independent of the chemical potential, the zero-quark-charge sector provides the full result. © 2013 American Physical Society....

  18. Whole Blood Activation Results in Altered T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production Profiles by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Sams, Clarence F.

    2001-01-01

    An excellent monitor of the immune balance of peripheral circulating cells is to determine their cytokine production patterns in response to stimuli. Using flow cytometry, a positive identification of cytokine producing cells in a mixed culture may be achieved. Recently, the ability to assess cytokine production following a whole-blood activation culture has been described. In this study, whole blood activation was compared to traditional PBMC activation and the individual cytokine secretion patterns for both T cells, T cell subsets and monocytes was determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS: For T cell cytokine assessment (IFNg/IL-10 and IL-21/L-4) following PMA +ionomycin activation: (1) a Significantly greater percentages of T cells producing IFNgamma and IL-2 were observed following whole-blood culture and (2) altered T cell cytokine production kinetics were observed by varying whole blood culture times. Four-color analysiS was used to allow assessment of cytokine production by specific T cell subsets. It was found that IFNgamma production was significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8+ T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8- population following five hours of whole blood activation. Conversely, IL-2 and IL-10 production were Significantly elevated in the CD3+/CD8- T cell population as compared to the CD3+/CD8+ population. Monocyte cytokine production was assessed in both culture systems following LPS activation for 24 hours. A three-color flow cytometric was used to assess two cytokines (IL-1a/IL-12 and TNFa/IL-10) in conjunction with CD14. Nearly all monocytes were stimulated to produce IL-1a, IL-12 and TNFa. equally well in both culture systems, however monocyte production of IL-10 was significantly elevated in whole blood culture as compared to PBMC culture. IL-12 producing monocytes appeared to be a distinct subpopulation of the IL-1a producing set, whereas IL-10 and TNFa producing monocytes were largely mutually exclusive. IL-10 and TNFa producing

  19. Loss of CCR7 expression on CD56(bright NK cells is associated with a CD56(dimCD16⁺ NK cell-like phenotype and correlates with HIV viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henoch S Hong

    Full Text Available NK cells are pivotal sentinels of the innate immune system and distinct subpopulations in peripheral blood have been described. A number of studies addressed HIV-induced alterations of NK cell phenotype and functionality mainly focusing on CD56(dimCD16⁺ and CD56⁻CD16⁺ NK cells. However, the impact of HIV-infection on CD56(bright NK cells is less well understood. Here we report a rise of CD56(bright NK cells in HIV-infected individuals, which lack CCR7-expression and strongly correlate with HIV viral load. CCR7⁻CD56(bright NK cells were characterized by increased cytolytic potential, higher activation states and a more differentiated phenotype. These cells thus acquired a number of features of CD56(dimCD16⁺ NK cells. Furthermore, CD56(bright NK cells from HIV patients exhibited higher degranulation levels compared to uninfected individuals. Thus, chronic HIV-infection is associated with a phenotypic and functional shift of CD56(bright NK cells, which provides a novel aspect of HIV-associated pathogenesis within the NK cell compartment.

  20. IFN priming is necessary but not sufficient to turn on a migratory dendritic cell program in lupus monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Pla, Alicia; Patel, Pinakeen; Maecker, Holden T; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Baldwin, Nicole; Bennett, Lynda; Cantrell, Victoria; Baisch, Jeanine; Punaro, Marilynn; Gotte, Alisa; Nassi, Lorien; Wright, Tracey; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia

    2014-06-15

    Blood monocytes from children with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) behave similar to dendritic cells (DCs), and SLE serum induces healthy monocytes to differentiate into DCs in a type I IFN-dependent manner. In this study, we found that these monocytes display significant transcriptional changes, including a prominent IFN signature, compared with healthy controls. Few of those changes, however, explain DC function. Exposure to allogeneic T cells in vitro reprograms SLE monocytes to acquire DC phenotype and function, and this correlates with both IFN-inducible (IP10) and proinflammatory cytokine (IL-1β and IL6) expression. Furthermore, we found that both IFN and SLE serum induce the upregulation of CCR7 transcription in these cells. CCR7 protein expression, however, requires a second signal provided by TLR agonists such as LPS. Thus, SLE serum "primes" a subset of monocytes to readily (<24 h) respond to TLR agonists and acquire migratory DC properties. Our findings might explain how microbial infections exacerbate lupus. PMID:24829414

  1. HIV-1 infection is associated with changes in nuclear receptor transcriptome, pro-inflammatory and lipid profile of monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renga Barbara

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent residual immune activation and lipid dysmetabolism are characteristics of HIV positive patients receiving an highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. Nuclear Receptors are transcription factors involved in the regulation of immune and metabolic functions through the modulation of gene transcription. The objective of the present study was to investigate for the relative abundance of members of the nuclear receptor family in monocytic cells isolated from HIV positive patients treated or not treated with HAART. Methods Monocytes isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC were used for analysis of the relative mRNA expressions of FXR, PXR, LXR, VDR, RARα, RXR, PPARα, PPARβ, PPARγ and GR by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The expression of a selected subset of inflammatory and metabolic genes MCP-1, ICAM-1, CD36 and ABCA1 was also measured. Results Monocytes isolated from HIV infected patients expressed an altered pattern of nuclear receptors characterized by a profound reduction in the expressions of FXR, PXR, PPARα, GR, RARα and RXR. Of interest, the deregulated expression of nuclear receptors was not restored under HAART and was linked to an altered expression of genes which supports both an immune activation and altered lipid metabolism in monocytes. Conclusions Altered expression of genes mediating reciprocal regulation of lipid metabolism and immune function in monocytes occurs in HIV. The present findings provide a mechanistic explanation for immune activation and lipid dysmetabolism occurring in HIV infected patients and could lead to the identification of novel potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Subset construction strategy for ordered-subset expectation-maximization reconstruction in compton camera imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Mee [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Soo Jin [Paichai University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In this study, the expectation maximization (EM) and ordered subset EM (OSEM) reconstruction algorithms have been applied to the Compton projection data. For OSEM, we propose the several methods for constructing subsets and compare the impact of the each method on the reconstructed images to choose the proper subset construction method. A Compton camera was consisted of three pairs of scatterer and absorber detectors which were parallel to each other. The detector pairs were positioned along the x-, y-, and z-axes at the radial offset of 10 em. The 3-directional projection data of 5-cylinder software phantom (64x64x64 array, 1.56mm) was obtained from a Compton projector. In this study, we used the iterative reconstruction algorithms such as EM and OSEM. For application of OSEM algorithm to the Compton camera, we proposed three strategies for constructing the exclusive subsets; scattering angle-based subsets (OSEM-SA), detector-position-based subsets (OSEM-DP), and both scattering angle- and detector-position-based subsets (OSEM-AP). The OSEM with 16, 64 and 128 subsets were performed through 16, 4, and 2 iterations, respectively. The OSEM with 16 subsets and 4 iterations was equivalent to the EM with 64 iterations, but the computation time was approximately reduced by 14 times. All the three schemes for choosing the subsets in OSEM algorithm yielded similar results in computation time, but the percent error for OSEM-SA was slightly larger than others. No significant change of percent error as the subset number increased up to 128 was observed. The simulation results showed that the EM reconstruction algorithm is applicable to the Compton camera data with sufficient counting statistics. OSEM significantly improved the computational efficiency and maintained the image quality of the standard EM reconstruction. The OSEM algorithm which included subsets on the detection positions (OSEM-DP and OSEM-AP) provided slightly better results than OSEM-SA.

  3. Subset construction strategy for ordered-subset expectation-maximization reconstruction in compton camera imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the expectation maximization (EM) and ordered subset EM (OSEM) reconstruction algorithms have been applied to the Compton projection data. For OSEM, we propose the several methods for constructing subsets and compare the impact of the each method on the reconstructed images to choose the proper subset construction method. A Compton camera was consisted of three pairs of scatterer and absorber detectors which were parallel to each other. The detector pairs were positioned along the x-, y-, and z-axes at the radial offset of 10 em. The 3-directional projection data of 5-cylinder software phantom (64x64x64 array, 1.56mm) was obtained from a Compton projector. In this study, we used the iterative reconstruction algorithms such as EM and OSEM. For application of OSEM algorithm to the Compton camera, we proposed three strategies for constructing the exclusive subsets; scattering angle-based subsets (OSEM-SA), detector-position-based subsets (OSEM-DP), and both scattering angle- and detector-position-based subsets (OSEM-AP). The OSEM with 16, 64 and 128 subsets were performed through 16, 4, and 2 iterations, respectively. The OSEM with 16 subsets and 4 iterations was equivalent to the EM with 64 iterations, but the computation time was approximately reduced by 14 times. All the three schemes for choosing the subsets in OSEM algorithm yielded similar results in computation time, but the percent error for OSEM-SA was slightly larger than others. No significant change of percent error as the subset number increased up to 128 was observed. The simulation results showed that the EM reconstruction algorithm is applicable to the Compton camera data with sufficient counting statistics. OSEM significantly improved the computational efficiency and maintained the image quality of the standard EM reconstruction. The OSEM algorithm which included subsets on the detection positions (OSEM-DP and OSEM-AP) provided slightly better results than OSEM-SA

  4. Reference ranges and age-related changes of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in Chinese healthy adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to build region-specific reference ranges of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets for Chinese healthy adults from the young to the elderly and analyze the trends of changes in lymphocyte subsets for evaluating the impact of age on the values.151 healthy adults aged 19-86 were recruited based on the SENIEUR protocol.Three sets of reference ranges were finally built applicable for the healthy young(19-44 years),middle-aged(45-64 years) and elder adults(≥65).Comparisons in parameters among the three cohorts showed that a statistically significant increase in CD16CD56+ NK cell was observed between the middle-aged and elder cohorts,whereas for the majority of the parameters,a significant decline was observed between the young and the middle-aged cohorts.Further results showed that inverse correlations were observed between the age and CD19+ B,CD3+ T,CD3+CD4+ T,CD4+CD45RA+CD62L+ nave T cell and CD4+CD28+/CD4+,while the positive one was identified between the age and the NK cell.These significant changes of the most of immune parameters provided evidence for immunosenescence.Notably,T cell activation markers of CD8+CD38+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ showed reverse trends of association with age,which provides a clue for further researches on the mechanisms underlying the paradoxical clinical presentation of the elder patients.

  5. Variable and subset selection in PLS regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høskuldsson, Agnar

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some useful methods for introductory analysis of variables and subsets in relation to PLS regression. We present here methods that are efficient in finding the appropriate variables or subset to use in the PLS regression. The general conclusion...... is that variable selection is important for successful analysis of chemometric data. An important aspect of the results presented is that lack of variable selection can spoil the PLS regression, and that cross-validation measures using a test set can show larger variation, when we use different subsets of X, than...... obtained by different methods. We also present an approach to orthogonal scatter correction. The procedures and comparisons are applied to industrial data. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  6. Subset sum phase transitions and data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Merhav, Neri

    2011-01-01

    We propose a rigorous analysis approach for the subset sum problem in the context of lossless data compression, where the phase transition of the subset sum problem is directly related to the passage between ambiguous and non-ambiguous decompression, for a compression scheme that is based on specifying the sequence composition. The proposed analysis lends itself to straightforward extensions in several directions of interest, including non-binary alphabets, incorporation of side information at the decoder (Slepian-Wolf coding), and coding schemes based on multiple subset sums. It is also demonstrated that the proposed technique can be used to analyze the critical behavior in a more involved situation where the sequence composition is not specified by the encoder.

  7. Monocyte chemoattractants in pigeon aortic atherosclerosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Denholm, E. M.; Lewis, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    Atherosclerosis occurs in the aorta of White Carneau pigeons proximal to the celiac bifurcation, where monocyte adhesion and migration into lesions have been demonstrated. This study documents chemoattractants that might be responsible for monocyte adherence and migration. Ten-week-old pigeons were fed either a cholesterol-free (normal) diet or a 0.4% cholesterol diet for 12 or 24 weeks. Birds with a normal diet did not have lesions in the lesion-prone area of the aorta, whereas birds fed a c...

  8. Concomitant detection of IFNα signature and activated monocyte/dendritic cell precursors in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated subjects at early times after repeated local cytokine treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizza Paola

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons alpha (IFNα are the cytokines most widely used in clinical medicine for the treatment of cancer and viral infections. Among the immunomodulatory activities possibly involved in their therapeutic efficacy, the importance of IFNα effects on dendritic cells (DC differentiation and activation has been considered. Despite several studies exploiting microarray technology to characterize IFNα mechanisms of action, there is currently no consensus on the core signature of these cytokines in the peripheral blood of IFNα-treated individuals, as well as on the existence of blood genomic and proteomic markers of low-dose IFNα administered as a vaccine adjuvant. Methods Gene profiling analysis with microarray was performed on PBMC isolated from melanoma patients and healthy individuals 24 hours after each repeated injection of low-dose IFNα, administered as vaccine adjuvant in two separate clinical trials. At the same time points, cytofluorimetric analysis was performed on CD14+ monocytes, to detect the phenotypic modifications exerted by IFNα on antigen presenting cells precursors. Results An IFNα signature was consistently observed in both clinical settings 24 hours after each repeated administration of the cytokine. The observed modulation was transient, and did not reach a steady state level refractory to further stimulations. The molecular signature observed ex vivo largely matched the one detected in CD14+ monocytes exposed in vitro to IFNα, including the induction of CXCL10 at the transcriptional and protein level. Interestingly, IFNα ex vivo signature was paralleled by an increase in the percentage and expression of costimulatory molecules by circulating CD14+/CD16+ monocytes, indicated as natural precursors of DC in response to danger signals. Conclusions Our results provide new insights into the identification of a well defined molecular signature as biomarker of IFNα administered as immune adjuvants, and

  9. Patrolling Monocytes Control Tumor Metastasis to the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Richard N.; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Graham D. Thomas; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. For example, classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis; however, how nonclassical “patrolling” monocytes interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that patrolling monocytes are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack patrolling monocytes, showed increased ...

  10. Programming of Human Monocytes by the Uteroplacental Environment

    OpenAIRE

    McIntire, Ramsey H.; Ganacias, Karen G.; Hunt, Joan S.

    2008-01-01

    During human pregnancy, monocytes recruited to the uterus (decidua) are modified to promote immune defense and semiallogeneic pregnancy. The purpose of this study was to identify decidual factors involved in programming of monocytes into decidual macrophages by comparing the surface and secretory phenotypes of resting and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)–activated monocytes, unfractionated decidual cells, purified term decidual macrophages, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Surface markers for antigen pr...

  11. Ordered subsets algorithms for transmission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, H; Fessler, J A

    1999-11-01

    The ordered subsets EM (OSEM) algorithm has enjoyed considerable interest for emission image reconstruction due to its acceleration of the original EM algorithm and ease of programming. The transmission EM reconstruction algorithm converges very slowly and is not used in practice. In this paper, we introduce a simultaneous update algorithm called separable paraboloidal surrogates (SPS) that converges much faster than the transmission EM algorithm. Furthermore, unlike the 'convex algorithm' for transmission tomography, the proposed algorithm is monotonic even with nonzero background counts. We demonstrate that the ordered subsets principle can also be applied to the new SPS algorithm for transmission tomography to accelerate 'convergence', albeit with similar sacrifice of global convergence properties as for OSEM. We implemented and evaluated this ordered subsets transmission (OSTR) algorithm. The results indicate that the OSTR algorithm speeds up the increase in the objective function by roughly the number of subsets in the early iterates when compared to the ordinary SPS algorithm. We compute mean square errors and segmentation errors for different methods and show that OSTR is superior to OSEM applied to the logarithm of the transmission data. However, penalized-likelihood reconstructions yield the best quality images among all other methods tested. PMID:10588288

  12. Subset Selection by Local Convex Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Sadegh, Payman; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    subset selection problem so as to guarantee positive definiteness of the Hessian term, hence avoiding numerical instability. The backward Elemination type algorithm attempts to improve the results upon termination of the modified Newton-Raphson search by sing the current solution as an initial guess. The...

  13. Subset specification of central serotonergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten P Smidt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The last decade the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT system has received enormous attention due to its role in regulation of behavior, exemplified by the discovery that increased 5-HT tone in the central nervous system is able to alleviate affective disorders. Here, we review the developmental processes, with a special emphasis on subset specification, leading to the formation of the 5-HT system in the brain. Molecular classification of 5-HT neuronal groups leads to the definition of two independent rostral groups positioned in rhombomere 1 and 2/3 and a caudal group in rhombomere 5-8. In addition, more disperse refinement of these subsets is present as shown by the selective expression of the 5-HT1A autoreceptor, indicating functional diversity between 5-HT subsets. The functional significance of the molecular coding differences is not well known and the molecular basis of described specific connectivity patterns remain to be elucidated. Recent developments in genetic lineage tracing models will provide these data and form a major step-up towards the full understanding of the importance of developmental programming and function of 5-HT neuronal subsets.

  14. Labeling monocytes for imaging chronic inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With growing interest in cell-based scintigraphic diagnosis or therapy monitoring, there is an increasing demand for non-invasive observation and quantification of cell trafficking in the preclinical and clinical setting. Monocytes are members of the human mononuclear phagocyte system originating from a myeloid precursor in the bone. Labeled monocytes are being used for investigation of pathogenesis like atherosclerosis and for monitoring of therapeutic intervention in inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Labeling mononuclear cells at high specific activity without affecting their biological functions allows (delayed) non-invasive imaging with g or PET cameras. Monocytes labeled before their final differentiation into macrophages or dendritic cells may reveal centers of inflammation in a patient and, thereby, contribute to scintigraphic diagnosis. Macrophages or dendritic cells may be in vitro cultured and by means of genetic transformation specified towards specific targets prior to re-injection, an approach with therapeutic potency. This review addresses issues on autologous monocytes, particularly their properties and labeling for non-invasive in vivo radionuclide imaging of chronic inflammation.

  15. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B;

    2014-01-01

    bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have an...

  16. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Gutierrez, Carolina G; Solorzano-Santos, Fortino; Walker, David H; Torres, Javier; Serrano, Carlos A; Gordillo-Perez, Guadalupe

    2016-05-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels. PMID:27088220

  17. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Gutierrez, Carolina G.; Solorzano-Santos, Fortino; Walker, David H.; Torres, Javier; Serrano, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels. PMID:27088220

  18. Selective uptake of single-walled carbon nanotubes by circulating monocytes for enhanced tumour delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Ghosn, Eliver Eid Bou; Rallapalli, Harikrishna; Prescher, Jennifer A.; Larson, Timothy; Herzenberg, Leonore A.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-06-01

    In cancer imaging, nanoparticle biodistribution is typically visualized in living subjects using `bulk' imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging, computerized tomography and whole-body fluorescence. Accordingly, nanoparticle influx is observed only macroscopically, and the mechanisms by which they target cancer remain elusive. Nanoparticles are assumed to accumulate via several targeting mechanisms, particularly extravasation (leakage into tumour). Here, we show that, in addition to conventional nanoparticle-uptake mechanisms, single-walled carbon nanotubes are almost exclusively taken up by a single immune cell subset, Ly-6Chi monocytes (almost 100% uptake in Ly-6Chi monocytes, below 3% in all other circulating cells), and delivered to the tumour in mice. We also demonstrate that a targeting ligand (RGD) conjugated to nanotubes significantly enhances the number of single-walled carbon nanotube-loaded monocytes reaching the tumour (P < 0.001, day 7 post-injection). The remarkable selectivity of this tumour-targeting mechanism demonstrates an advanced immune-based delivery strategy for enhancing specific tumour delivery with substantial penetration.

  19. In vivo imaging of monocyte trafficking with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose labeled monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the ability to monitor in vivo monocyte trafficking would contribute to our understanding of the pathophysiology of various inflammatory disorders, we investigated the feasibility of labeling human monocytes with 18F-FDG. Human monocytes were separated by Ficoll/Hypaque gradient and purity was assessed by flow cytometry. The influence of insulin and/or glucose on labeling efficiency was evaluated. Cell viability and activation was measured with trypan blue exclusion and hydrogen peroxide assays, respectively. Label stability was measured for up to 18 hr, and the effect of insulin pre-incubation on FDG washout was investigated. PET images were acquired in SD rats at various time points after injection of FDG labeled monocytes. Monocytes were >85% pure, and labeling efficiency was 35% for 1x106 cells after 40 min incubation with 2 mCi 18F-FDG without insulin. Pre-incubation with 10∼100 nM insulin significantly increased FDG uptake which reached 400% of baseline levels, whereas presence of glucose or serum decreased FDG uptake. Labeled cells were >90% viable for up to 22 hr, and the labeling process did appear to significantly activate cells, Washout studies however, demonstrated gradual washout of the FDG from monocytes after initial uptake PET images of FDG labeled monocytes in SD rats showed consistent findings. Utilizing insulin effects on cellular glucose metabolism may be a feasible way of labeling monocytes with 18F-FDG for PET imaging. However, gradual washout of FDG after initial uptake poses as a potential problem which needs to be addressed before practical application

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Comparison of Lymphocytes Transduced with a Human CD16 or with a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Reveals Potential Off-Target Interactions due to the IgG2 CH2-CH3 CAR-Spacer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Clémenceau

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to compare two mechanisms of cellular recognition based on Ab specificity: firstly, when the anti-HER2 mAb trastuzumab bridges target cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a Fc receptor (ADCC and, secondly, when HER2 positive target cells are directly recognized by cytotoxic lymphocytes armed with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. To compare these two mechanisms, we used the same cellular effector (NK-92 and the same signaling domain (FcεRIγ. The NK-92 cytotoxic cell line was transfected with either a FcγRIIIa-FcεRIγ (NK-92CD16 or a trastuzumab-based scFv-FcεRIγ chimeric receptor (NK-92CAR. In vitro, the cytotoxic activity against HER2 positive target cells after indirect recognition by NK-92CD16 was always inferior to that observed after direct recognition by NK-92CAR. In contrast, and somehow unexpectedly, in vivo, adoptive transfer of NK-92CD16 + trastuzumab but not of NK-92CAR induced tumor regression. Analysis of the in vivo xenogeneic system suggested that the human CH2-CH3 IgG2 used as a spacer in our construct was able to interact with the FcR present at the cell surface of the few NSG-FcR+ remaining immune cells. This interaction, leading to blockage of the NK-92CAR in the periphery of the engrafted tumor cells, stresses the critical role of the composition of the spacer domain.

  1. Whole Blood Activation Results in Enhanced Detection of T Cell and Monocyte Cytokine Production by Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Crucian, Brian E.

    2001-01-01

    TNFa producing monocytes may represent functionally different monocyte subsets with distinct functions. Whole blood culture eliminates the need to purify cell populations prior to culture and may have significant utility for the routine monitoring of the cytokine balances of the peripheral blood T cell and monocyte populations. In addition, there are distinct advantages to performing whole-blood (WB) activation as compared to PBMC activation. These advantages would include retaining all various cell-cell interactions as well as any soluble factors present in serum that influence cell activation. It is likely that the altered cytokine production observed following whole blood culture more accurately represents the in-vivo immune balance.

  2. Stat1 nuclear translocation by nucleolin upon monocyte differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Jerke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Members of the signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat family of transcription factors traverse the nuclear membrane through a specialized structure, called the nuclear pore complex (NPC, which represents a selective filter for the import of proteins. Karyophilic molecules can bind directly to a subset of proteins of the NPC, collectively called nucleoporins. Alternatively, the transport is mediated via a carrier molecule belonging to the importin/karyopherin superfamily, which transmits the import into the nucleus through the NPC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we provide evidence for an alternative Stat1 nuclear import mechanism, which is mediated by the shuttle protein nucleolin. We observed Stat1-nucleolin association, nuclear translocation and specific binding to the regulatory DNA element GAS. Using expression of nucleolin transgenes, we found that the nuclear localization signal (NLS of nucleolin is responsible for Stat1 nuclear translocation. We show that this mechanism is utilized upon differentiation of myeloid cells and is specific for the differentiation step from monocytes to macrophages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data add the nucleolin-Stat1 complex as a novel functional partner for the cell differentiation program, which is uniquely poised to regulate the transcription machinery via Stat1 and nuclear metabolism via nucleolin.

  3. Mycobacterium leprae upregulates IRGM expression in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Degang; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Linglin; Cha, Zhanshan; Han, Song; Shi, Weiwei; Ding, Ru; Ma, Lan; Xiao, Hong; Shi, Chao; Jing, Zhichun; Song, Ningjing

    2014-08-01

    Leprosy is caused by the infection of Mycobacterium leprae, which evokes a strong inflammatory response and leads to nerve damage. Immunity-related GTPase family M protein (IRGM) plays critical roles in controlling inflammation. The objective of the study was to investigate whether IRGM is involved in the infection of M. leprae. Levels of IRGM were assessed in M. leprae-infected CD4(+) T cells, monocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Data revealed that both protein and mRNA levels of IRGM were increased in monocytes after M. leprae infection. Interestingly, monocyte-derived macrophages showed more prominent IRGM expression with M. leprae infection, whereas the bacteria did not affect IRGM in CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we assessed levels of IRGM in CD4(+) T cells and monocytes from 78 leprosy patients and 40 healthy controls, and observed upregulated protein level of IRGM in the monocytes from leprosy patients. Also, IRGM expression was inversely correlated with the severity of the disease. These findings suggested a close involvement of IRGM in M. leprae infection and indicated a potential mechanism of defending M. leprae infection. PMID:24469081

  4. Product-free subsets of profinite groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bardestani, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Gowers in his paper on quasirandom groups studies a question of Babai and Sos asking whether there exists a constant $c > 0$ such that every finite group $G$ has a product-free subset of size at least $c|G|$. Answering the question negatively, he proves that for sufficiently large prime $p$, the group $\\mathrm{PSL}_2(\\mathbb{F}_p)$ has no product-free subset of size $cn^{8/9}$, where $n$ is the order of $\\mathrm{PSL}_2(\\mathbb{F}_p)$. We will consider the problem for compact groups and in particular for profinite groups $\\SL_k(\\ZZ_p)$ obtain lower and upper exponential bounds for the supremal measure of the product-free sets. The proof involves establishing a lower bound for the dimension of non-trivial representations of the finite groups $\\SL_k(\\Z{p^n})$.

  5. Calibration with empirically weighted mean subset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øjelund, Henrik; Madsen, Henrik; Thyregod, Poul

    2002-01-01

    is obtained by calculating the weighted mean of all coefficient vectors for subsets of the same size. The weighting is proportional to SSgamma-omega, where SSgamma is the residual sum of squares from a linear regression with subset gamma and omega is a weighting parameter estimated using cross......-squares regression (iPLS). It is found that EMS improves on the prediction performance over PLS in terms of the mean squared errors and is more robust than iPLS. Furthermore, by investigating the estimated coefficient vector of EMS, knowledge about the important spectral regions can be gained. The EMS solution......-validation. This construction of the weighting implies that even if some coefficients will become numerically small, none will become exactly zero. An efficient algorithm has been implemented in MATLAB to calculate the EMS solution and the source code has been made available on the Internet....

  6. Competitive Market Structures: A Subset Selection Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    P. K. Kannan; Sanchez, Susan M.

    1994-01-01

    Market structure models are used to identify submarkets or to test for the presence of submarkets where within-group competition is much stronger than across group competition. The implicit assumption in such models is that the brands in a submarket compete on the basis of their shared product features. However, if significant variety-seeking effect exist in the market, such an assumption may not be valid. We present a model based on a subset selection procedure for analyzing competitive mark...

  7. Th Subset Balance in Lupus Nephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Katsuhisa Miyake; Mitsuteru Akahoshi; Hitoshi Nakashima

    2011-01-01

    Lupus nephritis, which has various histological patterns and variable clinical outcomes, is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus nephritis (SLE). This pathogenetic mechanism in each histologically different type of lupus nephritis (LN) remains unclear. Although SLE is suggested to be a Th2-driven disease, elevation of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines occurs in both humans and mice, suggesting that SLE is a complex disease driven by different lymphocyte subsets with high heterog...

  8. Median Selection Subset Aggregation for Parallel Inference

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiangyu; Peng, Peichao; Dunson, David

    2014-01-01

    For massive data sets, efficient computation commonly relies on distributed algorithms that store and process subsets of the data on different machines, minimizing communication costs. Our focus is on regression and classification problems involving many features. A variety of distributed algorithms have been proposed in this context, but challenges arise in defining an algorithm with low communication, theoretical guarantees and excellent practical performance in general settings. We propose...

  9. Homocysteine alters monocyte-endothelial interaction in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether homocysteine induced endothelial damage through monocyte-endothelial interaction and to characterize both cell types in vitro.Methods Radiomethods were performed on monocyte adhesion to/through endothelium and endothelial damage experiments. Results Homocysteine-treated endothelial cells increased monocyte adhesion and transmigration. Homocysteine-treated monocytes induced endothelial detachment, but this effect was blocked by catalase. These effects were increased with higher concentrations of homocysteine. Monocyte surface glycoprotein antibodies CD11b/CD18 and CD14 inhibited these processes.Conclusions Homocysteine alters monocyte-endothelial interaction in vitro, eventually bringing about endothelial damage through release of H2O2. These phenomena are mediated through monocyte surface glycoproteins CD11b/CD18 and CD14. Upregulation of these processes in vivo may contribute to acceleration of atherosclerosis in patients with elevated plasma homocysteine levels.

  10. Prostaglandin E2 and thromboxane B2 release from human monocytes treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the capacity of counterflow-isolated human monocytes to independently synthesize thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) when stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Independent metabolism was confirmed by establishing different specific activities (dpm/ng) of TxB2 and PGE2 released from LPS-treated cells. For metabolites released during the initial 2-hr treatment period, the specific activity of PGE2 was approximately threefold higher than that of TxB2 regardless of labeling with [3H]arachidonic acid (AA) or [14C]AA. Cells that were pulse-labeled for 2 hr with [3H]AA demonstrated a decreasing PGE2 specific activity over 24 hr, whereas the TxB2 specific activity remained unchanged. In contrast, cells continuously exposed to [14C]AA demonstrated an increasing TxB2 specific activity that approached the level of PGE2 by 24 hr. These results suggest the presence of at least 2 cyclooxygenase metabolic compartments in counterflow-isolated monocytes. Although freshly isolated monocytes have been reported to contain variable numbers of adherent platelets, additional experiments demonstrated that counterflow-isolated platelets are not capable of releasing elevated levels of TxB2 or PGE2 when treated with LPS. It is proposed from these findings that at least two subsets of monocytes exist in peripheral blood that can be distinguished on the basis of independent conversion of AA to TxB2 and PGE2

  11. In Celiac Disease, a Subset of Autoantibodies against Transglutaminase Binds Toll-Like Receptor 4 and Induces Activation of Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Zanoni, Giovanna; Navone, Riccardo; Lunardi, Claudio; Tridente, Giuseppe; Bason, Caterina; Sivori, Simona; Beri, Ruggero; Dolcino, Marzia; Valletta, Enrico; Corrocher, Roberto; Puccetti, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background. Celiac disease is an autoimmune, digestive disorder in which the small intestine (the part of the gut that absorbs nutrients from food) is damaged. In autoimmune diseases, the immune system, which normally provides protection against foreign invaders, attacks a person's own tissues. In celiac disease, this attack is triggered by eating food containing gluten, a mixture of proteins found in wheat, barley, and rye. To avoid malnutrition, people with celiac disease—a...

  12. Natural killer cell (NK) subsets and NK-like T-cell populations in acute myeloid leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, N; Swerdlow, S H; TenEyck, S P; Boyiadzis, M; Felgar, R E

    2016-07-01

    The impact of the immune microenvironment on the behavior and therapeutic strategies for hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasms is being increasingly recognized. Many functional studies of natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic responses in myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) exist, but with limited data on these lymphocyte proportions and related T-cell subsets. The proportions of these cells and their prognostic implications were therefore investigated in 89 AML, 51 MDS, and 20 control marrows by flow cytometry. The median proportion of NK cells (relative to the total lymphocytes) was lower in AML versus controls (P = 0.01). Among AML, a lower proportion of NK cells predicted better survival, whereas a higher NK cell proportion was associated with the poor prognostic AML category (P = 0.002). NK cell proportions were similar in MDS, MDS subgroups, and control marrows. The relative proportion of the mature NK cell subset (CD56(dim) CD16/57(bright) ) was lower in AML and MDS versus controls (P = 0.006, P = 0.0002, respectively). The proportion of mature NK cells was not a prognostic indicator although fewer were seen in poor prognosis AML. In contrast, a lower proportion of mature NK cells correlated with worse survival in MDS (P = 0.027). A higher proportion of NK-like T-cells (of total lymphoid cells) was found in MDS compared to controls (P = 0.01). A lower proportion of NK-like T-cells predicted better survival in AML but not in MDS. Thus, the proportions of NK, NK-cell subsets, and NK-like T-cells vary in myeloid neoplasms, may potentially impact immunomodulatory therapies, and may impact outcome. © 2016 International Clinical Cytometry Society. PMID:26648320

  13. HIV migration between blood plasma and cellular subsets before and after HIV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun Yong; Chaillon, Antoine; Oh, Jin Ok; Ahn, Jin Young; Ann, Hae Won; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi-Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ku, Nam Su; Smith, Davey M; Kim, June Myung

    2016-04-01

    The cellular source of HIV RNA circulating in blood plasma remains unclear. Here, we investigated whether sequence analysis of HIV RNA populations circulating before combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and HIV DNA populations in cellular subsets (CS) after cART could identify the cellular sources of circulating HIV RNA. Blood was collected from five subjects at cART initiation and again 6 months later. Naïve CD4+ T cells, resting central memory and effector memory CD4+ T cells, activated CD4+ T cells, monocytes, and natural killer cells were sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. HIV-1 env C2V3 sequences from HIV RNA in blood plasma and HIV DNA in CSs were generated using single genome sequencing. Sequences were evaluated for viral compartmentalization (Fst test) and migration events (MEs; Slatkin Maddison and cladistic measures) between blood plasma and each CS. Viral compartmentalization was observed in 88% of all cellular subset comparisons (range: 77-100% for each subject). Most observed MEs were directed from blood plasma to CSs (52 MEs, 85.2%). In particular, there was only viral movement from plasma to NK cells (15 MEs), monocytes (seven MEs), and naïve cells (five ME). We observed a total of nine MEs from activated CD4 cells (2/9 MEs), central memory T cells (3/9 MEs), and effector memory T cells (4/9 MEs) to blood plasma. Our results revealed that the HIV RNA population in blood plasma plays an important role in seeding various cellular reservoirs and that the cellular source of the HIV RNA population is activated central memory and effector memory T cells. J. Med. Virol. 88:606-613, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26348372

  14. Monocyte and macrophage regulation of pulmonary fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I examined the role of circulating monocytes and lung macrophages in the pathogenesis of the early fibrotic, progressive fibrotic and resolution phases of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary fibrosis with destruction of lung architecture and consequent respiratory failure and death represents a massive worldwide health burden. Although idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is the archetypal and most common cause of lung fibrosis, numerous respiratory diseases can prog...

  15. Prion protein induced signaling cascades in monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prion proteins play a central role in transmission and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The cellular prion protein (PrPC), whose physiological function remains elusive, is anchored to the surface of a variety of cell types including neurons and cells of the lymphoreticular system. In this study, we investigated the response of a mouse monocyte/macrophage cell line to exposure with PrPC fusion proteins synthesized with a human Fc-tag. PrPC fusion proteins showed an attachment to the surface of monocyte/macrophages in nanomolar concentrations. This was accompanied by an increase of cellular tyrosine phosphorylation as a result of activated signaling pathways. Detailed investigations exhibited activation of downstream pathways through a stimulation with PrP fusion proteins, which include phosphorylation of ERK1,2 and Akt kinase. Macrophages opsonize and present antigenic structures, contact lymphocytes, and deliver cytokines. The findings reported here may become the basis of understanding the molecular function of PrPC in monocytes and macrophages

  16. Statins attenuate polymethylmethacrylate-mediated monocyte activation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Laing, Alan J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Periprosthetic osteolysis precipitates aseptic loosening of components, increases the risk of periprosthetic fracture and, through massive bone loss, complicates revision surgery and ultimately is the primary cause for failure of joint arthroplasty. The anti-inflammatory properties of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors belonging to the statin family are well recognized. We investigated a possible role for status in initiating the first stage of the osteolytic cycle, namely monocytic activation. METHODS: We used an in vitro model of the human monocyte\\/macrophage inflammatory response to poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles after pretreat-ing cells with cerivastatin, a potent member of the statin family. Cell activation based upon production of TNF-alpha and MCP-1 cytokines was analyzed and the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK signal transduction pathway was evaluated using western blot analysis, to identify its role in cell activation and in any cerivastatin effects observed. RESULTS: We found that pretreatment with cerivastatin significantly abrogates the production of inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and MCP-1 by human monocytes in response to polymethylmethacrylate particle activation. This inflammatory activation and attenuation appear to be mediated through the intracellular Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. INTERPRETATION: We propose that by intervening at the upstream activation stage, subsequent osteoclast activation and osteolysis can be suppressed. We believe that the anti-inflammatory properties of statins may potentially play a prophylactic role in the setting of aseptic loosening, and in so doing increase implant longevity.

  17. Review: the Multiple Roles of Monocytic Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Ahmad Tarmizi Abdul; Ariffin, Nur Azrah Fazera Mohd; Azlan, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    Monocytic microparticles (mMP) are microparticles derived from human monocytes either under in vivo or in vitro conditions. The size of mMP is between 0.1 and 1.0 μm. Apart from the size range, mMPs are also identified based on phosphatidylserine and CD14 expression on their surface, though this is not always the case. Monocytic MP are critical players in inflammation, endothelial cell function, and blood coagulation. They exhibit dual function by either helping the progression of such conditions or limiting it, depending on certain factors. Furthermore, the numbers of mMP are elevated in some autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and metabolic disorders. However, it is unknown whether mMP play an active role in these diseases or are simply biomarkers. The mechanism of mMP modulation is yet to be identified. In this review, we highlight the mechanism of mMP formation and the roles that they play in inflammation, blood coagulation, and different disease settings. PMID:27216803

  18. Circulating CD14+ monocytes in patients with aortic stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara Shimoni; Valery Meledin; Iris Bar; Jacob Fabricant; Gera Gandelman; Jacob George

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCalcific aortic stenosis (AS) is an active process sharing similarities with atherosclerosis and chronic inflammation. The pathophysiology of AS is notable for three cardinal components: inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Monocytes play a role in each of these processes. The role of circulating monocytes in AS is not clear. The aim of the present study was to study an association between cir-culating apoptotic and non apoptotic CD14+ monocytes and AS features.MethodsWe assessed the number of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes in 54 patients with significant AS (aortic valve area 0.74 ± 0.27 cm2) and compared them to 33 patients with similar risk factors and no valvular disease. The level of CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry.ResultsThere was no difference in the risk factor profile and known coronary or peripheral vascular diseases between patients with AS and controls.Pa-tients with AS exhibited increased numbers of CD14+ monocytes as compared to controls (9.9% ± 4.9%vs. 7.7% ± 3.9%,P= 0.03). CD14+ monocyte number was related to age and the presence and severity of AS. In patients with AS, both CD14+ monocytes and apoptotic mono-cytes were inversely related to aortic valve area.ConclusionsPatients with significant AS have increased number of circulating CD14+ monocytes and there is an inverse correlation between monocyte count and aortic valve area. These findings may suggest that inflammation is operative not only in early valve injury phase, but also at later developed stages such as calcification when AS is severe.

  19. Sampling to estimate arbitrary subset sums

    OpenAIRE

    Duffield, Nick; Lund, Carsten; Thorup, Mikkel

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a set of weighted items, we want to create a generic sample of a certain size that we can later use to estimate the total weight of arbitrary subsets. For this purpose, we propose priority sampling which tested on Internet data performed better than previous methods by orders of magnitude. Priority sampling is simple to define and implement: we consider a steam of items i=0,...,n-1 with weights w_i. For each item i, we generate a random number r_i in (0,1) and create a priority ...

  20. Phenotypic studies of natural killer cell subsets in human transporter associated with antigen processing deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Zimmer

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood natural killer (NK cells from patients with transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP deficiency are hyporesponsive. The mechanism of this defect is unknown, but the phenotype of TAP-deficient NK cells is almost normal. However, we noticed a high percentage of CD56(bright cells among total NK cells from two patients. We further investigated TAP-deficient NK cells in these patients and compared them to NK cells from two other TAP-deficient patients with no clinical symptoms and to individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases other than TAP deficiency (chronic lung diseases or vasculitis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from venous blood were stained with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies and the phenotype of NK cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, (51Chromium release assays were performed to assess the cytotoxic activity of NK cells. In the symptomatic patients, CD56(bright NK cells represented 28% and 45%, respectively, of all NK cells (higher than in healthy donors. The patients also displayed a higher percentage of CD56(dimCD16(- NK cells than controls. Interestingly, this unusual NK cell subtype distribution was not found in the two asymptomatic TAP-deficient cases, but was instead present in several of the other patients. Over-expression of the inhibitory receptor CD94/NKG2A by TAP-deficient NK cells was confirmed and extended to the inhibitory receptor ILT2 (CD85j. These inhibitory receptors were not involved in regulating the cytotoxicity of TAP-deficient NK cells. We conclude that expansion of the CD56(bright NK cell subtype in peripheral blood is not a hallmark of TAP deficiency, but can be found in other diseases as well. This might reflect a reaction of the immune system to pathologic conditions. It could be interesting to investigate the relative distribution of NK cell subsets in various respiratory and autoimmune diseases.

  1. Establishing porcine monocyte-derived macrophage and dendritic cell systems for studying the interaction with PRRSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eSingleton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC are two model systems well established in human and rodent systems that can be used to study the interaction of pathogens with host cells. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is known to infect myeloid cells, such as macrophages (MØ and dendritic cells (DC. Therefore, this study aimed to establish systems for the differentiation and characterization of MoMØ and MoDC for subsequent infection with PRRSV-1. M-CSF differentiated monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMØ were stimulated with activators for classical (M1 or alternative (M2 activation. GM-CSF and IL-4 generated monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC were activated with the well established maturation cocktail containing PAMPs and cytokines. In addition, MoMØ and MoDC were treated with dexamethasone and IL-10, which are known immuno-suppressive reagents. Cells were characterized by morphology, phenotype and function and porcine MØ subsets highlighted some divergence from described human counterparts, while MoDC, appeared more similar to mouse and human DCs. The infection with PRRSV-1 strain Lena demonstrated different replication kinetics between MoMØ and MoDC and within subsets of each cell type. While MoMØ susceptibility was significantly increased by dexamethasone and IL-10 with an accompanying increase in CD163/CD169 expression, MoDC supported only a minimal replication of PRRSV These findings underline the high variability in the susceptibility of porcine myeloid cells towards PRRSV-1 infection.

  2. MMP-2, MMP-9 and their inhibitors TIMP-2 and TIMP-1 production by human monocytes in vitro in the presence of different forms of hydroxyapatite particles.

    OpenAIRE

    Laquerriere, Patrice; Grandjean-Laquerriere, Alexia; Addadi-Rebbah, Salima; Jallot, Edouard; Laurent-Maquin, Dominique; Frayssinet, Patrick; Guenounou, Moncef

    2004-01-01

    After calcium-phosphates biomaterials based implantation like hydroxyapatite (HA) coating, particles are released in the periprosthetic tissues. Wear-debris induced fibrous membranes contain macrophage subsets that can produce metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are considered to be key enzymes in extra-cellular matrix turnover. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are important regulator of MMPs activity. Interleukin-1 mainly produced by monocytes can also regulate MMPs production. I...

  3. Effect of prostaglandin I2 analogs on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human monocyte and macrophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Ming-Kai; Hsieh, Chong-Chao; Kuo, Hsuan-Fu; Lee, Min-Sheng; Huang, Ming-Yii; Kuo, Chang-Hung; Hung, Chih-Hsing

    2015-08-01

    Chemokines play essential roles during inflammatory responses and in pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) is a critical chemokine in the development of atherosclerosis and acute cardiovascular syndromes. MCP-1, by its chemotactic activity, causes diapedesis of monocytes from the lumen to the subendothelial space that leads to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Prostaglandin I2 (PGI2) analogs are used clinically for patients with pulmonary hypertension and have anti-inflammatory effects. However, little is known about the effect of PGI2 analogs on the MCP-1 production in human monocytes and macrophages. We investigated the effects of three conventional (iloprost, beraprost and treprostinil) and one new (ONO-1301) PGI2 analogs, on the expression of MCP-1 expression in human monocytes and macrophages. Human monocyte cell line, THP-1 cell, was treated with PGI2 analogs after LPS stimulation. Supernatants were harvested to measure MCP-1 levels and measured by ELISA. To explore which receptors involved the effects of PGI2 analogs on the expression of MCP-1 expression, IP and EP, PPAR-α and PPAR-γ receptor antagonists were used. Forskolin, a cAMP activator, was used to further confirm the involvement of cAMP on MCP-1 production in human monocytes. Three PGI2 analogs suppressed LPS-induced MCP-1 production in THP-1 cells and THP-1-induced macrophages. Higher concentrations of ONO-1301 also had the suppressive effect. CAY 10449, an IP receptor antagonist, could reverse the effects on MCP-1 production of iloprost on THP-1 cells. Other reported PGI2 receptor antagonists including EP1, EP2, EP4, PPAR-α and PPAR-γ antagonists could not reverse the effect. Forskolin, a cAMP activator, also suppressed MCP-1 production in THP-1 cells. PGI2 analogs suppressed LPS-induced MCP-1 production in human monocytes and macrophages via the IP receptor and cAMP pathway. The new PGI2 analog (ONO-1301) was not better than conventional PGI2 analog in

  4. Functional activity of monocytes and macrophages in HTLV-1 infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila F Amorim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infects predominantly T cells, inducing proliferation and lymphocyte activation. Additionally, HTLV-1 infected subjects are more susceptible to other infections caused by other intracellular agents. Monocytes/macrophages are important cells in the defense against intracellular pathogens. Our aims were to determine the frequency of monocytes subsets, expression of co-stimulatory molecules in these cells and to evaluate microbicidal ability and cytokine and chemokine production by macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. Participants were 23 HTLV-1 carriers (HC, 22 HAM/TSP patients and 22 healthy subjects (HS not infected with HTLV-1. The frequencies of monocyte subsets and expression of co-stimulatory molecules were determined by flow cytometry. Macrophages were infected with L. braziliensis or stimulated with LPS. Microbicidal activity of macrophages was determined by optic microscopy. Cytokines/chemokines from macrophage supernatants were measured by ELISA. HAM/TSP patients showed an increase frequency of intermediate monocytes, but expression of co-stimulatory molecules was similar between the groups. Macrophages from HTLV-1 infected individuals were infected with L. braziliensis at the same ratio than macrophages from HS, and all the groups had the same ability to kill Leishmania parasites. However, macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects produced more CXCL9 and CCL5, and less IL-10 than cells from HS. While there was no correlation between IFN-γ and cytokine/chemokine production by macrophages, there was a correlation between proviral load and TNF and CXCL10. These data showed a dissociation between the inflammatory response and microbicidal ability of macrophages from HTLV-1 infected subjects. While macrophages ability to kill an intracellular pathogen did not differ among HTLV-1 infected subjects, these cells secreted high amount of chemokines even in unstimulated cultures. Moreover the

  5. Role of granulocytes and monocytes in experimental Escherichia coli endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Meddens, M J; Thompson, J.; Bauer, W C; van Furth, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of granulocytes and monocytes during the induction and course of Escherichia coli endocarditis was investigated in rabbits by selectively depleting monocytes from the circulation with the drug VP16-213 and granulocytes and monocytes with nitrogen mustard. For induction, the number of E. coli needed to infect the vegetations in 50% of the rabbits was significantly lower in rabbits with combined granulocytopenia and monocytopenia than in those with selective monocytopenia or in control...

  6. Maximal Symmetric Difference-Free Families of Subsets of $[n]$

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Travis G.; Godbole, Anant P.

    2010-01-01

    Union-free families of subsets of $[n]=\\{1,... n\\}$ have been studied in \\cite{FF}. In this paper, we provide a complete characterization of maximal {\\it symmetric difference}-free families of subsets of $[n]$.

  7. Human circulating monocytes can express receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and differentiate into functional osteoclasts without exogenous stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seta, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Yuka; Kuwana, Masataka

    2008-07-01

    Osteoclast formation from mononuclear precursors is believed to require accessory cells expressing receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). We recently identified a human cell population originated from circulating CD14(+) monocytes, called monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs), which can differentiate into several distinct mesenchymal cells, neuron and endothelial cells. This study was undertaken to examine whether MOMCs can differentiate into functional osteoclasts. MOMCs prepared from peripheral blood of healthy volunteers cultured on fibronectin for 7 days at high density (8 x 10(5) cells cm(-2)), but not at regular density (2 x 10(4) cells cm(-2)), resulted in the appearance of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive giant multi-nucleated cells forming actin ring without exogenous osteoclastogenic factors. A subset of these cells showed bone resorption capacity on dentine slices and expression of genes for cathepsin K and calcitonin receptor, characteristic of functional osteoclasts. Such osteoclast differentiation was not observed in high-density culture of circulating monocytes, macrophages or dendritic cells, or the high-density culture of MOMCs on type I collagen. Among cells of the monocyte lineage, untreated MOMCs exclusively showed gene and protein expression of RANKL. When osteoprotegerin/IgG1 Fc chimera was added to high-density MOMC cultures, osteoclast formation was completely inhibited by neutralizing the endogenous RANKL. These results indicate that human MOMCs derived from circulating monocytes can express RANKL and differentiate into functional osteoclasts without RANKL-expressing accessory cells. PMID:18301383

  8. Lymphocytic subsets and low-dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigations proved the differential radiosensitivity of lymphocytic subpopulations: From in vivo and in vitro irradiations it may be followed that the most sensitive subset are CD8 positive suppressor T cells. CD4/CD8 ratios are increased both in peripheral blood and after mitogen stimulation of lymphocytes of exposed persons. The decrease in B cells is pronounced only at higher radiation doses. Though the rate of DNA synthesis after mitogen stimulation was reduced in some exposed persons, that was no general phenomenon. Especially after tritium exposure, the observed lymphopenia correlated with an increased stimulation by PHA and an increased rate of DNA synthesis in some probands. Thus the present investigations indicate that - despite an inhibition of some immune parameters by radioexposure - the body is able to maintain its immunological homoeostasis. (authors)

  9. Feature Subset Optimization through the Fireworks Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tad Gonsalves

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Software estimation models are vital in the software industry, given the fact that most software development projects over-run the time and budget limits. Recently, data mining algorithms have been applied to further improve the prediction accuracy of the software cost estimation models that are routinely used in industry. This paper introduces a novel Swarm Intelligence technique to fine-tune such models. It chooses the Feature Selection Method (FSS to reduce the number of input parameters in the dataset. Further, it applies the Fireworks Algorithm (FWA to deal with the combinatorial explosion problem in determining the optimal subset of features. The FWA-FSS method improves the prediction accuracy when tested on publicly available software development project datasets.

  10. Isolation of Human Skin Dendritic Cell Subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, Merry; Jardine, Laura; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized leukocytes with antigen-processing and antigen-presenting functions. DCs can be divided into distinct subsets by anatomical location, phenotype and function. In human, the two most accessible tissues to study leukocytes are peripheral blood and skin. DCs are rare in human peripheral blood (Nestle et al., J Immunol 151:6535-6545, 1993). These factors led to the extensive use of skin DCs as the "prototype" migratory DCs in human studies. In this chapter, we detail the protocols to isolate DCs and resident macrophages from human skin. We also provide a multiparameter flow cytometry gating strategy to identify human skin DCs and to distinguish them from macrophages. PMID:27142012

  11. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  12. Th Subset Balance in Lupus Nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhisa Miyake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis, which has various histological patterns and variable clinical outcomes, is one of the most important complications of systemic lupus nephritis (SLE. This pathogenetic mechanism in each histologically different type of lupus nephritis (LN remains unclear. Although SLE is suggested to be a Th2-driven disease, elevation of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines occurs in both humans and mice, suggesting that SLE is a complex disease driven by different lymphocyte subsets with high heterogeneity of clinical manifestations and organ involvement. Recent findings in LN elucidate an essential role for the Th1, IL-17 producing T cells and Th17 cells in the development of diffuse proliferative lupus nephritis (DPLN, and Th2 cytokine in that of membranous lupus nephritis (MLN. These data support the hypothesis that individual Th1/Th2 balance is one of the critical determinants for histopathology of LN.

  13. Sensor Placement for Modal Parameter Subset Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Bernal, Dionisio; Damkilde, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The present paper proposes an approach for deciding on sensor placements in the context of modal parameter estimation from vibration measurements. The approach is based on placing sensors, of which the amount is determined a priori, such that the minimum Fisher information that the frequency...... responses carry on the selected modal parameter subset is, in some sense, maximized. The approach is validated in the context of a simple 10-DOF mass-spring-damper system by computing the variance of a set of identified modal parameters in a Monte Carlo setting for a set of sensor configurations, whose......). It is shown that the widely used Effective Independence (EI) method, which uses the modal amplitudes as surrogates for the parameters of interest, provides sensor configurations yielding theoretical lower bound variances whose maxima are up to 30 % larger than those obtained by use of the max-min approach....

  14. Ranitidine improves postoperative monocyte and neutrophil function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Nielsen, H; Jensen, S; Moesgaard, F

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The histamine H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine hydrochloride has been shown to improve trauma-, blood transfusion-, and sepsis-induced immunosuppression. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of ranitidine on postoperative impairment in monocyte and neutrophil function. METHODS: Twenty......-four patients undergoing major elective abdominal surgery were randomized to receive adjuvant treatment with ranitidine hydrochloride (100 mg) administered twice a day intravenously from skin incision for 4 days, followed by oral ranitidine hydrochloride (150 mg) administered twice a day for 5 days (n = 11), or...

  15. Monocyte activation in HIV/HCV coinfection correlates with cognitive impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Rempel

    Full Text Available Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV challenges the immune system with two viruses that elicit distinct immune responses. Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and an accurate indicator of disease progression. Suppressing HIV viremia by antiretroviral therapy (ART effectively prolongs life and significantly improves immune function. HIV/HCV coinfected individuals have peripheral immune activation despite effective ART control of HIV viral load. Here we examined freshly isolated CD14 monocytes for gene expression using high-density cDNA microarrays and analyzed T cell subsets, CD4 and CD8, by flow cytometry to characterize immune activation in monoinfected HCV and HIV, and HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects. To determine the impact of coinfection on cognition, subjects were evaluated in 7 domains for neuropsychological performance, which were summarized as a global deficit score (GDS. Monocyte gene expression analysis in HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects identified 43 genes that were elevated greater than 2.5 fold. Correlative analysis of subjects' GDS and gene expression found eight genes with significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Correlative expression of six genes was confirmed by qPCR, five of which were categorized as type 1 IFN response genes. Global deficit scores were not related to plasma lipopolysaccharide levels. In the T cell compartment, coinfection significantly increased expression of activation markers CD38 and HLADR on both CD4 and CD8 T cells but did not correlate with GDS. These findings indicate that coinfection is associated with a type 1 IFN monocyte activation profile which was further found to correlate with cognitive impairment, even in subjects with controlled HIV infection. HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects with controlled HIV viral load experiencing immune activation could benefit significantly from successful anti-HCV therapy and may be

  16. Functional regulation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells by microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yifan; Wu, Li

    2012-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) as a rare type of leukocytes play an important role in bridging the innate and adaptive immune system. A subset of DCs, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), exists in very low numbers at steady state but become abundant in inflammatory states. These inflammation-associated DCs are potent producers of pro-inflammatory cytokines and potent inducers of T helper differentiation. They behave as a "double-edge" sword so that they not only mediate protective immunity but also immuno-pathology. It is still incompletely understood how their function is regulated. Emerging evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), as a new class of gene regulators, potently regulate the function of moDCs. Here we summarize recent progress in this area. PMID:22773340

  17. Heme-mediated SPI-C induction promotes monocyte differentiation into iron-recycling macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Malay; Kohyama, Masako; So, Alex Yick-Lun; Kc, Wumesh; Wu, Xiaodi; Briseño, Carlos G; Satpathy, Ansuman T; Kretzer, Nicole M; Arase, Hisashi; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S; Wang, Li; Egawa, Takeshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Baltimore, David; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2014-03-13

    Splenic red pulp macrophages (RPM) degrade senescent erythrocytes and recycle heme-associated iron. The transcription factor SPI-C is selectively expressed by RPM and is required for their development, but the physiologic stimulus inducing Spic is unknown. Here, we report that Spic also regulated the development of F4/80(+)VCAM1(+) bone marrow macrophages (BMM) and that Spic expression in BMM and RPM development was induced by heme, a metabolite of erythrocyte degradation. Pathologic hemolysis induced loss of RPM and BMM due to excess heme but induced Spic in monocytes to generate new RPM and BMM. Spic expression in monocytes was constitutively inhibited by the transcriptional repressor BACH1. Heme induced proteasome-dependent BACH1 degradation and rapid Spic derepression. Furthermore, cysteine-proline dipeptide motifs in BACH1 that mediate heme-dependent degradation were necessary for Spic induction by heme. These findings are the first example of metabolite-driven differentiation of a tissue-resident macrophage subset and provide new insights into iron homeostasis. PMID:24630724

  18. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  19. The blood-brain barrier induces differentiation of migrating monocytes into Th17-polarizing dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Kébir, Hania; Bernard, Monique; Wosik, Karolina; Dodelet-Devillers, Aurore; Cayrol, Romain; Arbour, Nathalie; Prat, Alexandre

    2008-03-01

    Trafficking of antigen-presenting cells into the CNS is essential for lymphocyte reactivation within the CNS compartment. Although perivascular dendritic cells found in inflammatory lesions are reported to polarize naive CD4+ T lymphocytes into interleukin-17-secreting-cells, the origin of those antigen-presenting cells remains controversial. We demonstrate that a subset of CD14+ monocytes migrate across the inflamed human blood-brain barrier (BBB) and differentiate into CD83+CD209+ dendritic cells under the influence of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. We also demonstrate that these dendritic cells secrete interleukin-12p70, transforming growth factor-beta and interleukin-6 and promote the proliferation and expansion of distinct populations of interferon-gamma-secreting Th1 and interleukin-17-secreting Th17 CD4+ T lymphocytes. We further confirmed the abundance of such dendritic cells in situ, closely associated with microvascular BBB-endothelial cells within acute multiple sclerosis lesions, as well as a significant number of CD4+ interleukin-17+ T lymphocytes in the perivascular infiltrate. Our data support the notion that functional perivascular myeloid CNS dendritic cells arise as a consequence of migration of CD14+ monocytes across the human BBB, through the concerted actions of BBB-secreted transforming growth factor-beta and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. PMID:18156156

  20. Respective roles and interactions of T-lymphocyte and PGE2-mediated monocyte suppressive activities in human newborns and mothers at the time of delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the concept of a poorly functional humoral immune response in the newborn was proposed. Data have been presented indicating that the impaired newborn B cell maturation, as shown in vitro in a pokeweed mitogen-induced B cell maturation system, is due both to an immaturity of lymphocyte subsets and to an increased suppressive T activity. In the present work, we present evidence that there exists a predominance of a naturally occurring T lymphocyte suppressive activity in the cord blood in that the removal of the suppressive activity by irradiation allows a normal maturation of newborn B cells. Such normal maturation of newborn B cells can also be obtained using mixed cultures of adult T cells and newborn B cells. Newborn suppressor T cells belong to both EA gamma (+) and EA gamma (-) fractions, and it is not known whether these two groups do or do not belong to different subsets. The PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity does not play any role in the suppression observed in newborns since newborn monocytes are poorly suppressive and since they produce a smaller amount of PGE2 than adult monocytes. Some observations suggest, on the contrary, that the suppressive T lymphocytes can regulate the level of the PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activity. It should be noticed that similar observations about T lymphocyte and PGE2-dependent monocyte suppressive activities have been made at the same time using mothers' cells. These observations suggest the possibility that such changes in B cell immune regulation may result from an interaction between maternal and fetal lymphoid cells

  1. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    CD163 and CD91 are scavenging receptors with highly increased expression during the differentiation of monocytes into the anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype. In addition, CD91 is expressed in monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs), where the receptor is suggested to be important for...... internalization of CD91-targeted antigens to be presented on the dendritic cell surface for T-cell stimulation. Despite their overlap in functionality, the expression of CD91 and CD163 has never been compared and the expression of CD163 in the monocyte-dendritic cell lineage is not yet characterized. CD163...... expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...

  2. A Single HIV-1 Cluster and a Skewed Immune Homeostasis Drive the Early Spread of HIV among Resting CD4+ Cell Subsets within One Month Post-Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avettand-Fenoël, Véronique; Nembot, Georges; Mélard, Adeline; Blanc, Catherine; Lascoux-Combe, Caroline; Slama, Laurence; Allegre, Thierry; Allavena, Clotilde; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Duvivier, Claudine; Katlama, Christine; Goujard, Cécile; Seksik, Bao Chau Phung; Leplatois, Anne; Molina, Jean-Michel; Meyer, Laurence; Autran, Brigitte; Rouzioux, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing therapeutic strategies for an HIV cure requires better understanding the characteristics of early HIV-1 spread among resting CD4+ cells within the first month of primary HIV-1 infection (PHI). We studied the immune distribution, diversity, and inducibility of total HIV-DNA among the following cell subsets: monocytes, peripheral blood activated and resting CD4 T cells, long-lived (naive [TN] and central-memory [TCM]) and short-lived (transitional-memory [TTM] and effector-memory cells [TEM]) resting CD4+T cells from 12 acutely-infected individuals recruited at a median 36 days from infection. Cells were sorted for total HIV-DNA quantification, phylogenetic analysis and inducibility, all studied in relation to activation status and cell signaling. One month post-infection, a single CCR5-restricted viral cluster was massively distributed in all resting CD4+ subsets from 88% subjects, while one subject showed a slight diversity. High levels of total HIV-DNA were measured among TN (median 3.4 log copies/million cells), although 10-fold less (p = 0.0005) than in equally infected TCM (4.5), TTM (4.7) and TEM (4.6) cells. CD3−CD4+ monocytes harbored a low viral burden (median 2.3 log copies/million cells), unlike equally infected resting and activated CD4+ T cells (4.5 log copies/million cells). The skewed repartition of resting CD4 subsets influenced their contribution to the pool of resting infected CD4+T cells, two thirds of which consisted of short-lived TTM and TEM subsets, whereas long-lived TN and TCM subsets contributed the balance. Each resting CD4 subset produced HIV in vitro after stimulation with anti-CD3/anti-CD28+IL-2 with kinetics and magnitude varying according to subset differentiation, while IL-7 preferentially induced virus production from long-lived resting TN cells. In conclusion, within a month of infection, a clonal HIV-1 cluster is massively distributed among resting CD4 T-cell subsets with a flexible inducibility, suggesting that

  3. Oral Wild-Type Salmonella Typhi Challenge Induces Activation of Circulating Monocytes and Dendritic Cells in Individuals Who Develop Typhoid Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta, Franklin R; Bernal, Paula J; Fresnay, Stephanie; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-06-01

    A new human oral challenge model with wild-type Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) was recently developed. In this model, ingestion of 104 CFU of Salmonella resulted in 65% of subjects developing typhoid fever (referred here as typhoid diagnosis -TD-) 5-10 days post-challenge. TD criteria included meeting clinical (oral temperature ≥38°C for ≥12 h) and/or microbiological (S. Typhi bacteremia) endpoints. One of the first lines of defense against pathogens are the cells of the innate immune system (e.g., monocytes, dendritic cells -DCs-). Various changes in circulating monocytes and DCs have been described in the murine S. Typhimurium model; however, whether similar changes are present in humans remains to be explored. To address these questions, a subset of volunteers (5 TD and 3 who did not develop typhoid despite oral challenge -NoTD-) were evaluated for changes in circulating monocytes and DCs. Expression of CD38 and CD40 were upregulated in monocytes and DCs in TD volunteers during the disease days (TD-0h to TD-96h). Moreover, integrin α4β7, a gut homing molecule, was upregulated on monocytes but not DCs. CD21 upregulation was only identified in DCs. These changes were not observed among NoTD volunteers despite the same oral challenge. Moreover, monocytes and DCs from NoTD volunteers showed increased binding to S. Typhi one day after challenge. These monocytes showed phosphorylation of p38MAPK, NFkB and Erk1/2 upon stimulation with S. Typhi-LPS-QDot micelles. In contrast, monocytes from TD volunteers showed only a moderate increase in S. Typhi binding 48 h and 96 h post-TD, and only Erk1/2 phosphorylation. This is the first study to describe different activation and migration profiles, as well as differential signaling patterns, in monocytes and DCs which relate directly to the clinical outcome following oral challenge with wild type S. Typhi. PMID:26065687

  4. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets to Design Novel Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banchereau, Jacques; Klechevsky, Eynav; Schmitt, Nathalie; Morita, Rimpei; Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) orchestrate a repertoire of immune responses that endow resistance to infection and tolerance to self. DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the quality of elicited immune responses. Different DC subsets display different receptors and surface molecules, and express different sets of cytokines/chemokines, all of which lead to distinct immunological outcomes. Recent findings on human DC subsets and their functional specialization have provided insights for the design of novel human vaccines. PMID:19769733

  5. Protection of human myeloid dendritic cell subsets against influenza A virus infection is differentially regulated upon TLR stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Bieder, Andrea; Hellmér, Maria; Volz, Julia; Sandgren, Kerrie J; McInerney, Gerald M; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Mellman, Ira; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2015-05-01

    The proinflammatory microenvironment in the respiratory airway induces maturation of both resident and infiltrating dendritic cells (DCs) upon influenza A virus (IAV) infection. This results in upregulation of antiviral pathways as well as modulation of endocytic processes, which affect the susceptibility of DCs to IAV infection. Therefore, it is highly relevant to understand how IAV interacts with and infects mature DCs. To investigate how different subsets of human myeloid DCs (MDCs) involved in tissue inflammation are affected by inflammatory stimulation during IAV infection, we stimulated primary blood MDCs and inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) with TLR ligands, resulting in maturation. Interestingly, MDDCs but not MDCs were protected against IAV infection after LPS (TLR4) stimulation. In contrast, stimulation with TLR7/8 ligand protected MDCs but not MDDCs from IAV infection. The reduced susceptibility to IAV infection correlated with induction of type I IFNs. We found that differential expression of TLR4, TRIF, and MyD88 in the two MDC subsets regulated the ability of the cells to enter an antiviral state upon maturation. This difference was functionally confirmed using small interfering RNA and inhibitors. Our data show that different human MDC subsets may play distinct roles during IAV infection, as their capacity to induce type I IFNs is dependent on TLR-specific maturation, resulting in differential susceptibility to IAV infection. PMID:25801434

  6. Phenotypic and functional heterogeneity of macrophages and dendritic cell subsets in the healthy and atherosclerosis-prone aorta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElenaVGalkina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis continues to be the leading cause of cardiovascular disease. Development of atherosclerosis depends on chronic inflammation in the aorta and multiple immune cells are involved in this process. Importantly, resident macrophages and dendritic cells are present within the healthy aorta, but the functions of these cells remain poorly characterized. Local inflammation within the aortic wall promotes the recruitment of monocytes and dendritic cell precursors to the aorta and micro-environmental factors direct the differentiation of these emigrated cells into multiple subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. Recent data suggest that several populations of macrophages and dendritic cells can co-exist within the aorta. Although the functions of M1, M2, Mox and M4 macrophages are well characterized in vitro, there is a limited set of data on the role of these populations in atherogenesis in vivo. Recent studies on the origin and the potential role of aortic dendritic cells provide novel insights into the biology of aortic dendritic cell subsets and prospective mechanisms of the immune response in atherosclerosis. This review integrates the results of experiments analyzing heterogeneity of dendritic cells and macrophage subsets in healthy and diseased vessels and briefly discusses the known and potential functions of these cells in atherogenesis.

  7. Vascular Leakage in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Is Associated with Dengue Infected Monocytes, Monocyte Activation/Exhaustion, and Cytokines Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirichan Chunhakan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The vascular leakage was shown by the increment of hematocrit (Hct, dengue viral infected monocyte, monocyte status, and cytokines production in patients infected with dengue virus. Dengue viral antigens were demonstrated in monocytes (CD14+ from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The increased levels of Hct, interleukin- (IL- 10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α were detected in dengue fever (DF, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS patients as compared with other febrile illnesses (OFIs. The highest levels of Hct and IL-10 were detected in DSS patients as compared with other groups (P<0.05 especially on one day before and after defervescence. The unstimulated and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- stimulated monocytes from DSS patients showed the significantly decreased of intracellular IL-1β and TNF-α. In addition, the lowest level of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of CD11b expression on monocytes surface in DSS patients was also demonstrated. Furthermore, the negative correlations between IL-10 levels and intracellular IL-1β and MFI of CD11b expression in unstimulated and LPS-stimulated monocytes were also detected. Nevertheless, not only were the relationships between the prominent IL-10 and the suppression of intracellular monocyte secretion, namely, IL-1β, TNF-α, demonstrated but also the effect of vascular leakage was observed.

  8. Human peripheral blood monocyte separation with Nycodenz-NaCl density osmotic pressure medium centrifugation%Nycodenz-密度渗透压介质离心分离人外周血单核细胞研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹建平; 余谨; 王先广; 陈禹潭; 马威; 赵云斌

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究人外周血单核细胞分离方法.方法 采集24名健康志愿献血者外周血,分别以EDTA-K2、肝素钠、枸橼酸钠抗凝,将抗凝全血或单个核细胞悬液缓慢加入不同密度和渗透压组合的Nycodenz-NaCI溶液上层,离心分离单核细胞;EDTA抗凝血经Ficoll-Hypaque密度梯度离心获得的单个核细胞,再分别用Nycodenz-NaCl密度渗透压介质离心法、Percoll密度梯度离心法、贴壁法、MACS(抗CD-14磁珠)分离单核细胞.结果 如上4种方法 获得的单核细胞纯度和收获率中位数(M)分别为98.9%和68.5%、89.6%和64.5%、64.8%和60.5%、94.1%和73.5%,比较显示Nycodenz法获得的单核细胞纯度最高(P<0.01);吞噬指数和趋化指数分别为188.8±11.2和26.8±5.9、187.8±12.2和26.1±5.1、144.4 ±24.8和15.4±7.3、177.1 ±18.3和18.9±6.7.统计表明Percoll法和Nycodenz法获得的单核细胞的吞噬指数、趋化指数高于贴壁法和MACS法(P<0.05);单核细胞受LPS刺激分泌细胞因子IL-12p70、IL-10、TNF-α水平(pg/ml)分别为2 545±341、1 216±397、3.999±418,2 489±425、1080±277、3 891±446,2 147±223、794±180、3268±411,35±12、142±81、407±199,比较得知MACS的单核细胞受LPS刺激分泌细胞因子IL-12p70、IL-10、TNF-α水平非常显著低于其他方法 (P<0.01);单核细胞经典亚群CD14+CD16-HLA-DR+百分比和非经典亚群CD14+CD16+HLA-DR+百分比(M)分别为89%和5%、88%和1%、73%和1%、51%和36%,统计表明MACS法的单核细胞经典亚群百分比明显低于其他分离方法 (P<0.01),而非经典亚群百分比明显高于其他方法 (P<0.01).结论 Nycodenz-NaCl密度渗透压介质离心法能够分离获得较高纯度、较多经典型的单核细胞.%Objective To study separation methods of human peripheral blood monocytes. Methods Peripheral whole blood collected from 24 healthy volunteer donors wercare each anticoagulated respectively with EDTA-K2, heparin, and citrate sodium. The a

  9. T-lymphocyte subsets in recurrent aphthous ulceration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A; Klausen, B; Hougen, H P;

    1989-01-01

    Peripheral T-lymphocyte subsets: T-helper (OKT4) and T-suppressor (OKT8) cells were studied quantitatively in 20 patients with recurrent aphthous ulceration (RAU) in ulcerative, as well as inactive, stages of the disease. The figures were compared with T-lymphocyte subsets from matched control...

  10. Differential dependencies of monocytes and neutrophils on dectin-1, dectin-2 and complement for the recognition of fungal particles in inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline U McDonald

    Full Text Available We have re-investigated the role of the complement system and the non-opsonic pattern recognition receptors dectin-1 and dectin-2 in the recognition of fungal particles by inflammatory neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages. We have used in vivo and ex vivo models to study the recognition and response of these cells: i We confirm previous observations regarding the importance of complement to neutrophil but not monocytic responses; ii We show that dectin-1 is important for driving inflammatory cell recruitment to fungal stimuli and that it biases the immediate inflammatory response to one that favors neutrophil over monocyte recruitment; iii We show that dectin-2 contributes to the physical recognition of fungal particles by inflammatory monocytes/macrophages, but is also expressed on neutrophils, where we show it has the potential to contribute to cellular activation; iv Additionally, we show that serum-opsonization has the potential to interfere with non-opsonic recognition of fungal particles by dectin-1 and dectin-2, presumably through masking of ligands. Collectively these roles are consistent with previously described roles of dectin-1 and dectin-2 in driving inflammatory and adaptive immune responses and complement in containing fungal burdens. This study emphasizes the importance of heterogeneity of receptor expression across myeloid cell subsets in protective immune responses.

  11. TELOMERE SHORTENING IN MONOCYTES OF THE PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Borisov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Present study deals with size measurements of telomeric DNA from the human peripheral mononuclear immune cells in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. A method for measuring the relative telomere length by in situ hybridization followed by flow cytometric analysis (flow-FISH was used. Relative telomere length (RTL in monocytes was estimated as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of test cells divided by MFI values of internal control cells. Hybridization conditions for analysis of telomere length in monocytes have been optimized in advance. It has been shown that RTL of monocytes was significantly lower in RA patients compared to donors. Significant differences in telomere length of monocytes between RA patients and donors were revealed for the young persons under 30 years old. The findings obtained may be considered as an additional argument confirming the hypothesis on genetic defects of hematopoietic stem cells determining RA development.

  12. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.peter@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Rehli, Michael, E-mail: michael.rehli@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Singer, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.singer@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Renner-Sattler, Kathrin, E-mail: kathrin.renner-sattler@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Kreutz, Marina, E-mail: marina.kreutz@ukr.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); RCI Regensburg Center for Interventional Immunology, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauß-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2015-02-13

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors.

  13. Role of Monocytes and Bacteria in Staphylococcus epidermidis Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Bancsi, Maurice J. L. M. F.; Veltrop, Marcel H. A. M.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Thompson, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The endocardial vegetation which is formed in the course of bacterial endocarditis (BE) contains tissue factor (TF)-dependent procoagulant activity. Earlier studies showed that monocytes are the main source of TF in the vegetations. The TF activity (TFA) of vegetations isolated from Streptococcus sanguis-infected rabbits depended on the numbers of bacteria as well as monocytes in the vegetation. In this study, we investigated whether for Staphylococcus epidermidis, a frequent pathogen in BE, ...

  14. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10–50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  15. Lactic acid delays the inflammatory response of human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lactic acid (LA) accumulates under inflammatory conditions, e.g. in wounds or tumors, and influences local immune cell functions. We previously noted inhibitory effects of LA on glycolysis and TNF secretion of human LPS-stimulated monocytes. Here, we globally analyze the influence of LA on gene expression during monocyte activation. To separate LA-specific from lactate- or pH-effects, monocytes were treated for one or four hours with LPS in the presence of physiological concentrations of LA, sodium lactate (NaL) or acidic pH. Analyses of global gene expression profiles revealed striking effects of LA during the early stimulation phase. Up-regulation of most LPS-induced genes was significantly delayed in the presence of LA, while this inhibitory effect was attenuated in acidified samples and not detected after incubation with NaL. LA targets included genes encoding for important monocyte effector proteins like cytokines (e.g. TNF and IL-23) or chemokines (e.g. CCL2 and CCL7). LA effects were validated for several targets by quantitative RT-PCR and/or ELISA. Further analysis of LPS-signaling pathways revealed that LA delayed the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT) as well as the degradation of IκBα. Consistently, the LPS-induced nuclear accumulation of NFκB was also diminished in response to LA. These results indicate that the broad effect of LA on gene expression and function of human monocytes is at least partially caused by its interference with immediate signal transduction events after activation. This mechanism might contribute to monocyte suppression in the tumor environment. - Highlights: • Lactic acid broadly delays LPS-induced gene expression in human monocytes. • Expression of important monocyte effector molecules is affected by lactic acid. • Interference of lactic acid with TLR signaling causes the delayed gene expression. • The profound effect of lactic acid might contribute to immune suppression in tumors

  16. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nicola, Milena, E-mail: milena.de.nicola@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy); Mirabile Gattia, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.mirabile@enea.it [UTTMAT, ENEA-C.R. Casaccia (Italy); Traversa, Enrico, E-mail: Enrico.Traversa@kaust.edu.sa [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Division of Physical Science and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ghibelli, Lina, E-mail: ghibelli@uniroma2.it [University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Biology (Italy)

    2013-06-15

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 {mu}m) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses.

  17. Maturation and demise of human primary monocytes by carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    De Nicola, Milena D.

    2013-05-17

    The possibility of exploiting carbon nanotubes (CNT) in biomedical practices requires thorough analysis of the chemical or bulk effects they may exert on the immune system, the complex network that recognizes and eliminates foreign particles. In particular, the phagocytosing ability of cells belonging to the monocyte/macrophage lineage may render these immune cells an ideal toxicological target of pristine CNT, which may form aggregates of size exceeding monocyte/macrophage phagocytosing plasticity. To shed light on this issue, we analyzed the effects that pristine multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) without metal or biological impurities exert on survival and activation of freshly explanted human peripheral blood monocytes, analyzing in parallel the non-phagocytosing lymphocytes, and using graphite as control carbon material. MWCNT (diameter 10-50 nm, length up to 10 μm) exert two different toxic effects on mononuclear leukocytes: a minor apoptogenic effect (on lymphocytes > monocytes), and a major, apoptosis-independent effect that exclusively and deeply affect monocyte homeostasis. Analysis of monocyte number, adhesion, redox equilibrium, and the differentiation markers CD14 and CD11b reveals that MWCNT cause the selective disappearance of phagocytosis-competent monocytes by mechanisms related to the presence of large nanoparticle aggregates, suggesting phenomena of bulk toxicity possibly consisting of frustrated phagocytosis. At the same time, MWCNT stimulate adhesion of the phagocytosis-incompetent monocytes, and their differentiation toward a peculiar maturation asset. These observations point out novel mechanisms of CNT toxicity, renewing concerns that they may impair the innate immune system deranging the inflammatory responses. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  18. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  19. The change of lymphocyte subsets In the children of mycoplasmal pneumonia and its significance%支原体肺炎患儿淋巴细胞亚群的变化及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾咏梅; 黄莉

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察支原体肺炎患儿外周血淋巴细胞亚群的变化及临床意义.方法 采用流式细胞仪检测20例支原体肺炎患儿和14例健康儿童淋巴细胞亚群(CD3+、CD3+CD4+、CD3+CD8+、CD4+/CD8+、CD3-CD19+、CD3-CD(16+56)+).两组年龄、性别差异无统计学意义.结果 支原体肺炎患儿CD3+细胞明显降低(P<0.01)、CD3+CD8+细胞降低(P<0.05)、CD3-CD19+细胞升高(P<0.01),较对照组差异有统计学意义;CD3+CD4+、CD4+/CD8+、CD3-CD(16+56)+细胞较对照组差异无显著意义(P>0.05).结论 支原体肺炎患儿存在细胞免疫失调,主要表现为CD3+、CD3+CD8+细胞降低,CD3-CD19+细胞升高.%Objective To study the change and the clinical significance of lymphocyte subsets on peripheral blood mononuclear cells of children with suffered myeoplasmal pneumonia. Methods Twenty cases with mycoplasma pneumonias in acute stage( MP group) and 14 healthy children ( control group) were included in this study. The difference in age and sex between the two groups was not significant. The lymphocyte subsets CD3+、 CD3+CD4+、 CD3+ CD8+、 CD4+/CD8+、 CD3- CD19+、CD3- CD (16+56)+ on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were determined with flow cytometry. Conclusion There was disturbance of immune function when the children are infected with mycoplasma, which focused on the number of total T-lymphocyte and the CD8+ going down,the B-lymphocyte increasing.

  20. Modulation of monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokine and chemokine profile by persistent Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection leads to chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Mavromara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection presents a major public health problem, with more than 170 million people infected worldwide. Chronicity and persistence of infection constitute the hallmark of the disease. Although HCV is a hepatotropic virus, subsets of immune cells have been found to be permissive to infection and viral replication. Peripheral blood monocytes, attracted to the site of infection and differentiated into macrophages, and resident hepatic macrophages, known as Kupffer cells, are important mediators of innate immunity, through production of several chemokines and cytokines in addition to their phagocytic activity. HCV proteins have been shown to modulate the cytokine and chemokine production profile of monocytes/macrophages, as it is suggested by both in vitro and clinical studies. This modified expression profile appears crucial for the establishment of aberrant inflammation that leads to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  1. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) enhances lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tissue factor in human monocytes and monocyte-derived microvesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Julie C.; Thomas W Klein; Goldberger, Bruce A.; Sleasman, John W.; Mackman, Nigel; Goodenow, Maureen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunomodulatory effects in humans of Δ9−Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana are controversial. Tissue factor (TF), the activator of the extrinsic coagulation cascade, is increased on circulating activated monocytes and is expressed on microvesicles released from activated monocytes during inflammatory conditions, which perpetuate coagulopathies in a number of diseases. In view of the increased medicinal use of marijuana, effects of THC on human mono...

  2. TRAIL+ monocytes and monocyte-related cells cause lung damage and thereby increase susceptibility to influenza–Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Gregory T; Davidson, Sophia; Crotta, Stefania; Branzk, Nora; Papayannopoulos, Venizelos; Wack, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae coinfection is a major cause of influenza-associated mortality; however, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis or protection remain unclear. Using a clinically relevant mouse model, we identify immune-mediated damage early during coinfection as a new mechanism causing susceptibility. Coinfected CCR2−/− mice lacking monocytes and monocyte-derived cells control bacterial invasion better, show reduced epithelial damage and are overall more resistant than wild-type contr...

  3. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets in allergic asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Maazi, Hadi; Lam, Jonathan; Lombardi, Vincent; Akbari, Omid

    2013-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are major type-I interferon producing cells that play important roles in antiviral immunity and tolerance induction. These cells share a common DC progenitor with conventional DCs and Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand is essential for their development. Several subsets of pDCs have been identified to date including CCR9+, CD9+ and CD2+ pDCs. Recently, three subsets of pDCs were described namely, CD8α−β−, CD8α+β− and CD8α+β+ subsets. Interestingly, CD8α+β− a...

  4. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinchai, Darawan; Boughorbel, Sabri; Presnell, Scott; Quinn, Charlie; Chaussabel, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB). This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp. PMID:27158452

  5. Positively selected Leu-11a (CD16+) cells require the presence of accessory cells or factors for the lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected fibroblasts but not herpes simplex virus-infected Raji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P; Feldman, M; Curl, S; Schnell, J; Denny, T

    1989-08-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that human NK activity against HSV-infected fibroblasts (HSV-Fs) but not K562 targets was sensitive to treatment with anti-HLA-DR plus C. In the current study, we have selected Leu-11a+ (CD-16) cells by fluorescence activated cell sorting and found that although Leu-11a enriched populations lysed K562 targets in 14-h 51Cr-release assays, they were unable to kill HSV-Fs targets unless a Leu-11a-depleted population was added back to the effectors or unless known activators of NK cells (IFN-alpha or IL-2) were added to the assays. In contrast, Leu-11a-enriched populations were able to mediate ADCC against HSV-Fs in the presence of sera from HSV-seropositive individuals without the requirement for accessory cells. We have begun preliminary characterization of the accessory cells which allow lysis of HSV-Fs by NK cells: they are HLA-DR+ cells which enrich in the light density fractions of Metrizamide density gradients. They need be present in very small numbers for lysis to take place and are not MHC restricted in that heterologous add-backs between anti-HLA-DR plus C and anti-Leu-11b plus C-treated populations are capable of target cell lysis at levels similar to those achieved with the autologous add-backs. Further, the levels of lysis in heterologous add-back experiments reflected the lytic potential of the effector rather than the accessory cell donor. Finally, although the requirement for accessory cells for NK lysis has been demonstrated for fibroblasts infected with HSV-1, CMV, and VZV, lysis of HSV-infected Raji lymphoblastoid cells is relatively accessory-cell independent, indicating that the requirement for accessory cells for lysis by NK cells is not a property of all herpesvirus-infected targets. PMID:2526183

  6. STAT3 activation in monocytes accelerates liver cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an important transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in different cell types. STAT3 plays an essential role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Aberrantly hyper-activated STAT3 signaling in cancer cells and in the tumor microenvironment has been detected in a wide variety of human cancers and is considered an important factor for cancer initiation, development, and progression. However, the role of STAT3 activation in monocytes in the development of HCC has not been well understood. Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated STAT3 was performed on tissue microarray from HCC patients. Using a co-culture system in vivo, HCC cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo experiments were conducted with mice given diethylinitrosamine (DEN), which induces HCC was used to investigate the role of STAT3 expression in monocytes on tumor growth. Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression of cell proliferation and cell arrest associated genes in the tumor and nontumor tissue from liver. Phosphorylated STAT3 was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples and was expressed in tumor cells and also in monocytes. Phosphorylated STAT3 expression in monocyte was significantly correlated to advanced clinical stage of HCC and a poor prognosis. Using a co-culture system in vivo, monocytes promoted HCC cell growth via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. The STAT3 inhibitor, NSC 74859, significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo in mice with diethylinitrosamine (DEN)-induced HCC. In this animal model, blockade of STAT3 with NSC 74859 induced tumor cell apoptosis, while inhibiting both tumor cells and monocytes proliferation. Furthermore, NSC 74859 treatment suppressed cancer associated inflammation in DEN-induce HCC. Our data suggest constitutively activated STAT3 monocytes promote liver tumorigenesis in clinical patients and animal experiments. Thus, STAT3 in tumor

  7. STAT3 activation in monocytes accelerates liver cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wen-Yong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 is an important transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in different cell types. STAT3 plays an essential role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Aberrantly hyper-activated STAT3 signaling in cancer cells and in the tumor microenvironment has been detected in a wide variety of human cancers and is considered an important factor for cancer initiation, development, and progression. However, the role of STAT3 activation in monocytes in the development of HCC has not been well understood. Methods Immunohistochemical analysis of phosphorylated STAT3 was performed on tissue microarray from HCC patients. Using a co-culture system in vivo, HCC cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. In vivo experiments were conducted with mice given diethylinitrosamine (DEN, which induces HCC was used to investigate the role of STAT3 expression in monocytes on tumor growth. Real-time PCR was used to determine the expression of cell proliferation and cell arrest associated genes in the tumor and nontumor tissue from liver. Results Phosphorylated STAT3 was found in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue samples and was expressed in tumor cells and also in monocytes. Phosphorylated STAT3 expression in monocyte was significantly correlated to advanced clinical stage of HCC and a poor prognosis. Using a co-culture system in vivo, monocytes promoted HCC cell growth via the IL-6/STAT3 signaling pathway. The STAT3 inhibitor, NSC 74859, significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo in mice with diethylinitrosamine (DEN-induced HCC. In this animal model, blockade of STAT3 with NSC 74859 induced tumor cell apoptosis, while inhibiting both tumor cells and monocytes proliferation. Furthermore, NSC 74859 treatment suppressed cancer associated inflammation in DEN-induce HCC. Conclusion Our data suggest constitutively activated STAT3 monocytes promote liver tumorigenesis in clinical

  8. Random sum-free subsets of abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, József; Samotij, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    We characterize the structure of maximum-size sum-free subsets of a random subset of an abelian group $G$. In particular, we determine the threshold $p_c \\approx \\sqrt{\\log n / n}$ above which, with high probability as $|G| \\to \\infty$, each such subset is contained in a maximum-size sum-free subset of $G$, whenever $q$ divides $|G|$ for some (fixed) prime $q$ with $q \\equiv 2 \\pmod 3$. Moreover, in the special case $G = \\ZZ_{2n}$, we determine a sharp threshold for the above property. The proof uses recent 'transference' theorems of Conlon and Gowers, together with stability theorems for sum-free sets of abelian groups.

  9. Stream sampling for variance-optimal estimation of subset sums

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Edith; Duffield, Nick; Kaplan, Haim; Lund, Carsten; Thorup, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    From a high volume stream of weighted items, we want to maintain a generic sample of a certain limited size $k$ that we can later use to estimate the total weight of arbitrary subsets. This is the classic context of on-line reservoir sampling, thinking of the generic sample as a reservoir. We present an efficient reservoir sampling scheme, $\\varoptk$, that dominates all previous schemes in terms of estimation quality. $\\varoptk$ provides {\\em variance optimal unbiased estimation of subset sum...

  10. Sterile inflammation - do innate lymphoid cell subsets play a role?

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    PUBLISHED The recent identification of several novel innate lymphoid cell (iLC) subsets has increased our understanding of the mechanisms which link the innate and adaptive immune systems. While the contribution of these subsets toward the pathogenesis of human disease remains largely to be determined, it seems likely that they will play a particularly important role in sterile inflammatory settings where the innate response is seen as a critical mediator of inflammation. Several recent st...

  11. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets bas...

  12. Angiopoietin-2 regulates gene expression in TIE2-expressing monocytes and augments their inherent proangiogenic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffelt, Seth B; Tal, Andrea O; Scholz, Alexander; De Palma, Michele; Patel, Sunil; Urbich, Carmen; Biswas, Subhra K; Murdoch, Craig; Plate, Karl H; Reiss, Yvonne; Lewis, Claire E

    2010-07-01

    TIE2-expressing monocytes/macrophages (TEM) are a highly proangiogenic subset of myeloid cells in tumors. Here, we show that circulating human TEMs are already preprogrammed in the circulation to be more angiogenic and express higher levels of such proangiogenic genes as matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), VEGFA, COX-2, and WNT5A than TIE2(-) monocytes. Additionally, angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) markedly enhanced the proangiogenic activity of TEMs and increased their expression of two proangiogenic enzymes: thymidine phosphorylase (TP) and cathepsin B (CTSB). Three "alternatively activated" (or M2-like) macrophage markers were also upregulated by ANG-2 in TEMs: interleukin-10, mannose receptor (MRC1), and CCL17. To investigate the effects of ANG-2 on the phenotype and function of TEMs in tumors, we used a double-transgenic (DT) mouse model in which ANG-2 was specifically overexpressed by endothelial cells. Syngeneic tumors grown in these ANG-2 DT mice were more vascularized and contained greater numbers of TEMs than those in wild-type (WT) mice. In both tumor types, expression of MMP-9 and MRC1 was mainly restricted to tumor TEMs rather than TIE2(-) macrophages. Furthermore, tumor TEMs expressed higher levels of MRC1, TP, and CTSB in ANG-2 DT tumors than WT tumors. Taken together, our data show that although circulating TEMs are innately proangiogenic, exposure to tumor-derived ANG-2 stimulates these cells to exhibit a broader, tumor-promoting phenotype. As such, the ANG-2-TEM axis may represent a new target for antiangiogenic cancer therapies. PMID:20530679

  13. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) inhibits the intestinal-like differentiation of monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoettl, T; Hausmann, M; Herlyn, M; Gunckel, M; Dirmeier, A; Falk, W; Herfarth, H; Schoelmerich, J; Rogler, G

    2006-07-01

    Monocytes (MO) migrating into normal, non-inflamed intestinal mucosa undergo a specific differentiation resulting in a non-reactive, tolerogenic intestinal macrophage (IMAC). Recently we demonstrated the differentiation of MO into an intestinal-like macrophage (MAC) phenotype in vitro in a three-dimensional cell culture model (multi-cellular spheroid or MCS model). In the mucosa of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in addition to normal IMAC, a reactive MAC population as well as increased levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) is found. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of MCP-1 on the differentiation of MO into IMAC. MCS were generated from adenovirally transfected HT-29 cells overexpressing MCP-1, macrophage inflammatory protein 3 alpha (MIP-3alpha) or non-transfected controls and co-cultured with freshly elutriated blood MO. After 7 days of co-culture MCS were harvested, and expression of the surface antigens CD33 and CD14 as well as the intracellular MAC marker CD68 was determined by flow-cytometry or immunohistochemistry. MCP-1 and MIP-3alpha expression by HT-29 cells in the MCS was increased by transfection at the time of MCS formation. In contrast to MIP-3alpha, MCP-1 overexpression induced a massive migration of MO into the three-dimensional aggregates. Differentiation of IMAC was disturbed in MCP-1-transfected MCS compared to experiments with non-transfected control aggregates, or the MIP-3alpha-transfected MCS, as indicated by high CD14 expression of MO/IMAC cultured inside the MCP-1-transfected MCS, as shown by immunohistochemistry and FACS analysis. Neutralization of MCP-1 was followed by an almost complete absence of monocyte migration into the MCS. MCP-1 induced migration of MO into three-dimensional spheroids generated from HT-29 cells and inhibited intestinal-like differentiation of blood MO into IMAC. It may be speculated that MCP-1 could play a role in the disturbed IMAC differentiation in IBD mucosa

  14. Hydrodynamic regulation of monocyte inflammatory response to an intracellular pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar J Evani

    Full Text Available Systemic bacterial infections elicit inflammatory response that promotes acute or chronic complications such as sepsis, arthritis or atherosclerosis. Of interest, cells in circulation experience hydrodynamic shear forces, which have been shown to be a potent regulator of cellular function in the vasculature and play an important role in maintaining tissue homeostasis. In this study, we have examined the effect of shear forces due to blood flow in modulating the inflammatory response of cells to infection. Using an in vitro model, we analyzed the effects of physiological levels of shear stress on the inflammatory response of monocytes infected with chlamydia, an intracellular pathogen which causes bronchitis and is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. We found that chlamydial infection alters the morphology of monocytes and trigger the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6. We also found that the exposure of chlamydia-infected monocytes to short durations of arterial shear stress significantly enhances the secretion of cytokines in a time-dependent manner and the expression of surface adhesion molecule ICAM-1. As a functional consequence, infection and shear stress increased monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under flow and in the activation and aggregation of platelets. Overall, our study demonstrates that shear stress enhances the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection, suggesting that mechanical forces may contribute to disease pathophysiology. These results provide a novel perspective on our understanding of systemic infection and inflammation.

  15. Prognostic Significance of Monocytes and Monocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with R-CHOP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyang Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To evaluate the prognostic significance of monocytes and monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL under R-CHOP chemotherapy. Methods: Flow cytometry (FCM was applied to measure M-MDSCs (CD14+ HLA-DRlow/− M-MDSCs. Results: Analysis of 144 patients with DLBCL under R-CHOP treatment showed that the 5-year overall survival rate was 61.09% (95% CI: 43.72%-72.56% and the average survival time of patients with monocytes (% ≥ 8% was shorter than those with monocytes (% 2 (P = 0.0397, meanwhile, there was no significant difference in survival of patients with monocytes (% ≥ 8% compared to patients with monocytes (% Conclusion: Our results indicated that monocytes (% and M-MDSCs combined with R-IPI may be a simple and efficient immunological index to evaluate prognosis.

  16. Folate Receptor β Regulates Integrin CD11b/CD18 Adhesion of a Macrophage Subset to Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacek, Christian; Supper, Verena; Leksa, Vladimir; Mitulovic, Goran; Spittler, Andreas; Drbal, Karel; Suchanek, Miloslav; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Stockinger, Hannes

    2016-09-15

    Folate, also known as vitamin B9, is necessary for essential cellular functions such as DNA synthesis, repair, and methylation. It is supplied to the cell via several transporters and receptors, including folate receptor (FR) β, a GPI-anchored protein belonging to the folate receptor family. As FRβ shows a restricted expression to cells of myeloid origin and only a subset of activated macrophages and placental cells have been shown to express functional FRβ, it represents a promising target for future therapeutic strategies. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the protein microenvironment of FRβ in the plasma membrane of human FRβ(+) macrophages and FRβ-transduced monocytic THP-1 cells. In this manner, we identified a novel role of FRβ: that is, we report functional interactions of FRβ with receptors mediating cellular adhesion, in particular the CD11b/CD18 β2 integrin heterodimer complement receptor type 3/Mac-1. This interaction results in impeded adhesion of FRβ(+) human primary macrophages and THP-1 cells to collagen in comparison with their FRβ(-) counterparts. We further show that FRβ is only expressed by human macrophages when differentiated with M-CSF. These findings thus identify FRβ as a novel CD11b/CD18 regulator for trafficking and homing of a subset of macrophages on collagen. PMID:27534550

  17. Enhancing OPeNDAP for Multi-Source Subset Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulker, D. W.

    2012-12-01

    For nearly two decades, web services built on OPeNDAP methods have increased the practicality of accessing scientific data from multiple, disparate sources. Data accessible via the Data Access Protocol (DAP) now include public holdings at NOAA, NASA, and many other organizations whose disciplinary foci are diverse. Central to the DAP's utility is its domain-neutral data model, which includes simple mechanisms for retrieving user-specified subsets of the source data. Though DAP allows whole-dataset retrievals in principle, network limitations and other constraints often make subsetting essential. DAP subsetting is particularly efficient where data are organized as multidimensional arrays, common for many kinds of satellite imagery and model outputs. The current version (DAP2) lets users define which array elements are returned by specifying their indices, skipping some (decimation) and/or limiting their ranges. This permits, e.g., rapid selection of a 2-D slice from a dataset organized as a 4-D hypercube, whose axes might correspond to three dimensions of space and one of time. Despite its power, DAP2 subsetting has significant limitations in cases where the subset of interest is not nicely defined by lines or hyperplanes that parallel the axes of the source array. Though DAP2 servers can allow specification of subset boundaries by coordinate values, rather than indices, the resulting subsets nonetheless must take the form of subarrays whose shapes are tightly linked to those of the source arrays. Ways to overcome these limitations are being considered in a project dubbed OPULS (OPeNDAP-Unidata Linked Servers), funded by NOAA. Project goals include DAP4 (the DAP2 successor) and a new, experimental form of subsetting. The latter addresses the case where the source data and the desired subset are irregular meshes (AKA UGRIDS or unstructured grids), whose shapes are defined polygonally. Though the experiment is a special case, where client and server both are aware of

  18. Circulating monocytes from healthy individuals and COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piitulainen Eeva

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction associated with inflammation in which monocytes/macrophages are the predominant inflammatory cells. The only known genetic factor related to COPD is inherited PiZZ deficiency of α1-antitrypsin (AAT, an inhibitor of serine proteases. Methods We investigated the basal and LPS-stimulated release of pro-inflammatory molecules from blood monocytes isolated from age and gender matched healthy (n = 30 and COPD (n = 20 individuals with and without AAT deficiency. Results After 18 h of cell culture the basal release of MMP-9 was 2.5-fold, p Conclusions The basal and LPS-stimulated secretion of specific pro-inflammatory molecules from circulating monocytes differs between healthy and COPD subjects. These findings may be valuable for further studies on the mechanisms involved in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells in COPD.

  19. EFFECTS OF MYOCARDIAL CYTOSOLIC FRACTION AND LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE UPON MONOCYTIC FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Matveeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Complicated systemic inflammatory response syndrome in patients undergone open-heart surgery is an important issue of cardiac surgery. The conditions and trigger mechanisms leading to such a complication remain unclear.We studied the impact of mechanincal myocardial injury products released into blood during open-heart surgery, lipopolysaccharides and their combination on isolated monocytes.It was found that mechanically injured myocardial tissue can be a source of intracellular heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70. The content of Hsp70 in the cytosolic cardiomyocyte fraction responsible for mechanical myocardial injury modeling corresponds to the level of proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytes and the density of TLR4 surface expression. The study results confirm the synergy and potentiation of the combined impact of mechanical myocardial injury products and lipopolysaccharides on the levels of cytokine production by monocytes.

  20. Influence of phthalates on cytokine production in monocytes and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Bendtzen, Klaus; Boas, Malene; Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Claus H; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the present knowledge on the influence of phthalates on monocyte and macrophage production and secretion of cytokines, an influence which......-α secretion/production from monocytes or macrophages. A summary of cytokine measurements was not possible since few studies were comparable in study design and due to insufficient reporting of raw data for most of the included studies. CONCLUSION: Results from this review have suggested that at least one...... phthalate (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) has the ability to enhance tumour necrosis factor-α production/secretion from monocytes/macrophages in vitro, but also observed ex vivo. Influence of other phthalates on other cytokines has only been investigated in few studies. Thus, in vitro studies on primary human...

  1. Primary human monocyte differentiation regulated by Nigella sativa pressed oil

    OpenAIRE

    Mat Mahaya C; Mohamed Azman S; Hamid Shahrul S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Oxidized low density lipoprotein plays an important role in development of foam cells in atherosclerosis. The study was focused on regulation of primary human monocyte growth and CD11b expression in presence of Nigella sativa oil. Methods Primary human monocytes were isolated from whole blood and grown at 37°C and 5% CO2 saturation for five days prior to treatment with Nigella sativa oil. The cells were plated and washed before treatment with ox-LDL (10 μg/ml) as positive ...

  2. Monocyte cell membrane-derived nanoghosts for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Gnanasammandhan, M. K.; Xie, C.; Huang, K.; Cui, M. Y.; Chan, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines.Core-shell type `nanoghosts' were synthesized with a drug-loaded biodegradable PLGA core and a monocyte cell membrane-derived shell. The nanoghosts were monodisperse with an average size coated nanoparticle controls in metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07588b

  3. Variance optimal sampling based estimation of subset sums

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Edith; Kaplan, Haim; Lund, Carsten; Thorup, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    From a high volume stream of weighted items, we want to maintain a generic sample of a certain limited size $k$ that we can later use to estimate the total weight of arbitrary subsets. This is the classic context of on-line reservoir sampling, thinking of the generic sample as a reservoir. We present a reservoir sampling scheme providing variance optimal estimation of subset sums. More precisely, if we have seen $n$ items of the stream, then for any subset size $m$, our scheme based on $k$ samples minimizes the average variance over all subsets of size $m$. In fact, the optimality is against any off-line sampling scheme tailored for the concrete set of items seen: no off-line scheme based on $k$ samples can perform better than our on-line scheme when it comes to average variance over any subset size. Our scheme has no positive covariances between any pair of item estimates. Also, our scheme can handle each new item of the stream in $O(\\log k)$ time, which is optimal even on the word RAM.

  4. Fatal lymphoproliferation and acute monocytic leukemia-like disease following infectious mononucleosis in the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Hehlmann, R.; Walther, B; ZÖLLNER, N.; Wolf, Hans J.; Deinhardt, F; Schmid, M.

    1981-01-01

    Three elderly patients are reported, in whom serologically confirmed recent infectious mononucleosis is followed by fatal lymphoproliferation (case 1), by acute monocytic leukemia (case 2), and by acute probably monocytic leukemia (case 3).

  5. DMPD: Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17056121 Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Hasko G, Pacher...e Shaping of monocyte and macrophage function by adenosine receptors. Authors Hasko G, Pacher

  6. In vitro dendritic cell generation and lymphocyte subsets in myeloma patients: influence of thalidomide and high-dose chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Philipp; Buttkereit, Ulrike; Brandhorst, Dieter; Lindemann, Monika; Schmiedl, Sven; Grosse-Wilde, Hans; Seeber, Siegfried; Nowrousian, Mohammad Resa; Opalka, Bertram; Moritz, Thomas

    2005-05-01

    While vaccination with antigen-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) represents a promising therapeutic strategy in multiple myeloma (MM), clinical benefit, so far, has been limited to individual patients. To identify potential problems with this approach, we have analyzed the influence of treatment parameters, in particular high-dose chemotherapy (HD-CTX) and thalidomide, on in vitro DC generation and peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in MM patients. From a total of 25 MM patients, including 14 patients on thalidomide treatment and 11 after HD-CTX, in vitro DC generation from peripheral blood monocytes under serum-free condition was investigated. In addition, peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets were assessed in 17 patients including 10 patients on thalidomide treatment and 9 patients after HD-CTX. Efficient in vitro generation of DCs (median 7.1x10(6)/100 ml peripheral blood; range 0.1-42.5x10(6)/100 ml peripheral blood) expressing DC-typical surface markers was observed in 23 MM patients (92%), although reduced expression of CD1a, CD40, CD83, and HLA-DR was observed in patients treated with thalidomide. With respect to lymphocyte subsets, MM patients showed significantly (pthalidomide (usually in combination with CTX). CD8+ lymphocytes were significantly increased in MM patients. Thus, despite the well-known deficiencies in their immune system, adequate numbers of DCs can be generated in most myeloma patients. In patients treated with thalidomide, however, it remains to be seen whether the reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules has functional relevance. PMID:15750834

  7. Developmentally regulated monocyte recruitment and bone resorption are modulated by functional deletion of the monocytic chemoattractant protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, D T; Alsulaimani, F; Ding, Y; Marks, S C

    2002-08-01

    Tooth eruption involves the movement of a tooth from its site of development within the alveolar bone to its functional position in the oral cavity. Because this process is dependent upon monocytes and formation of osteoclasts, it represents an excellent model for examination of these processes under developmental regulation. We investigated the functional role of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in monocyte recruitment and its impact on bone resorption by examining each parameter in MCP-1(-/-) mice as compared with wild-type controls during tooth eruption. The peak number of monocytes occurred on day 5 in the MCP-1(-/-) mice and on day 9 in the wild-type mice. The peak number of osteoclasts followed the same pattern, occurring sooner in the MCP-1(-/-) (day 5) than in wild-type mice (day 9). Consistent with this, MCP-1(-/-) mice had an accelerated rate of tooth eruption in the early phase when the teeth first entered the oral cavity as compared with the wild-type mice. However, there was accelerated eruption in the wild-type group in the later phase of tooth eruption. When examined at the molecular level, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and interleukin-11 and -6 were expressed at considerably higher levels in the experimental group with accelerated tooth eruption. This is the first report identifying these factors as potential modulators of bone resorption that can accelerate the rate of tooth eruption. We conclude that, at early timepoints, monocyte recruitment occurs by MCP-1-independent mechanisms. However, at a later timepoint, MCP-1 may play a contributory role in the recruitment of monocytic cells, allowing the wild-type animals to catch up. PMID:12151080

  8. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA): studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ota, Zensuke

    1985-01-01

    We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC...

  9. Transcriptome Analysis on Monocytes from Patients with Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Grunin; Shira- Hagbi-Levi; Batya Rinsky; Yoav Smith; Itay Chowers

    2016-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MPs), including monocytes/macrophages, play complex roles in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. We reported altered gene-expression signature in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from AMD patients, and a chemokine receptor signature on AMD monocytes. To obtain comprehensive understanding of MP involvement, particularly in peripheral circulation in AMD, we performed global gene expression analysis in monocytes. We separated monocytes from treatment-na...

  10. Normal human monocytes exposed to glioma cells acquire myeloid-derived suppressor cell-like properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Jennifer C.; Gonzalez, Guido C.; Zhang, Lei; Ibrahim, George; Kelly, John J.; Gustafson, Michael P.; Yi LIN; Dietz, Allan B.; Forsyth, Peter A; Yong, V. Wee; Parney, Ian F.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma patients are immunosuppressed, yet glioblastomas are highly infiltrated by monocytes/macrophages. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC; immunosuppressive myeloid cells including monocytes) have been identified in other cancers and correlate with tumor burden. We hypothesized that glioblastoma exposure causes normal monocytes to assume an MDSC-like phenotype and that MDSC are increased in glioblastoma patients. Healthy donor human CD14+ monocytes were cultured with human gliobla...

  11. Optimal Orderings of k-subsets for Star Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Joerg H; Simões, Luís F; Izzo, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Finding the optimal ordering of k-subsets with respect to an objective function is known to be an extremely challenging problem. In this paper we introduce a new objective for this task, rooted in the problem of star identification on spacecrafts: subsets of detected spikes are to be generated in an ordering that minimizes time to detection of a valid star constellation. We carry out an extensive analysis of the combinatorial optimization problem, and propose multiple algorithmic solutions, offering different quality-complexity trade-offs. Three main approaches are investigated: exhaustive search (branch and prune), goal-driven (greedy scene elimination, minimally intersecting subsets), and stateless algorithms which implicitly seek to satisfy the problem's goals (pattern shifting, base unrank). In practical terms, these last algorithms are found to provide satisfactory approximations to the ideal performance levels, at small computational costs.

  12. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  13. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha is correlated with monocyte infiltration in mouse lipid lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckless, Jill; Rubin, Edward M.; Verstuyft, Judy B.; Metcalfe, James C.; Grainger, David J.

    1999-01-11

    The infiltration of monocytes into the vascular wall and their transformation into lipid-laden foam cells characterize early atherogenesis. This focal accumulation of lipids, together with smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, and the synthesis of extracellular matrix in the intima of large arteries result in the formation of an atherosclerotic plaque. The extent to which the plaque is infiltrated with monocytes appears to be an important determinant of plaque stability. It has been proposed that macrophages secrete an excess of matrix-degrading enzymes over their inhibitors, resulting in conversion of a stable plaque into anunstable plaque that is likely to rupture, resulting in acutemyocardial infarction. Macrophages and T cells constitute {approx}40 percent of the total population of cells in the lipid core region of atherosclerotic plaques. Their recruitment to the lesion may depend on alterations in the adhesive properties of the endothelial surface. Increased endothelial cell permeability and endothelial cell activation are among the earliest changes associated with developing lesions of atherosclerosis. Many of the cell adhesion molecules involved in monocyte recruitment are expressed at low or undetectable levels on normal endothelium but are substantially elevated on the endothelium overlaying atherosclerotic lesions In addition to endothelial cell activation, numerous chemotactic cytokines have also been postulated to be involved in monocyte recruitment. For example, interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-a) are direct chemoattractants for human monocytes but additionally induce cytoskeletal changes in the endothelium that result in increased permeability. This increased permeability, together with stimulated expression of adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, plays an important part in the local inflammation mediated by TNF-a and IL-1. In addition, a large number of other proinflammatory cytokines, including macrophage

  14. Subset Selection from Large Datasets for Kriging Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Rennen, G.

    2008-01-01

    When building a Kriging model, the general intuition is that using more data will always result in a better model. However, we show that when we have a large non-uniform dataset, using a uniform subset can have several advantages. Reducing the time necessary to fit the model, avoiding numerical inaccuracies and improving the robustness with respect to errors in the output data are some aspects which can be improved by using a uniform subset. We furthermore describe several new and current met...

  15. Targeting Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Improved Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hideki; Klechevsky, Eynav; Schmitt, Nathalie; Ni, Ling; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Zurawski, Sandra; Zurawski, Gerard; Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Oh, SangKon

    2011-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells (DCs) were discovered in 1973 by Ralph Steinman as a previously undefined cell type in the mouse spleen and are now recognized as a group of related cell populations that induce and regulate adaptive immune responses. Studies of the past decade show that, both in mice and humans, DCs are composed of subsets that differ in their localization, phenotype, and functions. These progresses in our understanding of DC biology provide a new framework for improving human health. In this review, we discuss human DC subsets in the context of their medical applications, with a particular focus on DC targeting. PMID:21277223

  16. Aminopeptidase N/CD13 is associated with raft membrane microdomains in monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navarrete Santos, A; Roentsch, J; Danielsen, E M; Langner, J; Riemann, D

    2000-01-01

    fractions of monocytes were characterized by the presence of GM1 ganglioside as raft marker molecule and by the high level of tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. Furthermore, similar to polarized cells, rafts in monocytic cells lack Na(+), K(+)-ATPase. Cholesterol depletion of monocytes by methyl...

  17. DMPD: LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11257452 LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Guha M, Mackman N. Ce...ll Signal. 2001 Feb;13(2):85-94. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show LPS induction of gene expression in human... monocytes. PubmedID 11257452 Title LPS induction of gene expression in human monocytes. Authors Guha M, Ma

  18. DMPD: Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12960230 Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Kim WK, Corey S, ...Show Monocyte/macrophage traffic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. PubmedID 12960230 Title Monocyte/macrophage tr...affic in HIV and SIV encephalitis. Authors Kim WK, Corey S, Alvarez X, Williams K

  19. Selective Expansion of the Monocytic Lineage Directed by Bacterial Infection1

    OpenAIRE

    Serbina, Natalya V.; Hohl, Tobias M.; Cherny, Mathew; Pamer, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    CCR2-mediated recruitment of Ly6Chigh monocytes is essential for defense against a range of microbial pathogens. Although our understanding of monocyte trafficking to inflammatory sites is increasing, how innate immune inflammation influences monocyte development and maturation during microbial infection remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes specifically and selectively promotes monopoiesis. Systemic infection...

  20. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Monocytes [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. Plasma of pregnant and preeclamptic women activates monocytes in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, M.M.; Donker, R.B.; van Pampus, M.G.; Huls, A.M.; Salomons, J.; de Vos, P.; Aarnoudse, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that factors circulating in the plasma of pregnant women and women with preeclampsia activate monocytes. STUDY DESIGN: Blood samples were taken from patients with early-onset severe preeclampsia (n = 9), healthy pregnant women (n = 9),

  12. Activation of human monocytes with proteolytic gliadin fragments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínková, L.; Tučková, Ludmila; Tlaskalová, Helena

    Elsevier. 02, č. 1 (2002), s. 91. ISSN 1568-9972. [Presentations at the International Congress on Autoimmunity /3./. 01.02.2002-02.02.2002, Geneva] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : activation * monocytes * proteolytic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  13. [The effects of PEMF on the activation of human monocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Han, Xiaoyu; Wang, Qian; Wu, Wenchao; Liu, Xiaojing

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) on the activation of human monocytes (THP-1). Cultured THP-1 cells were exposed to PEMF stimulation with radiation of 32Hz or 64Hz respectively, using sinusoidal wave, and 1mT, twice a day, 30 minutes each time, with an interval of 8 hours, for 3 days. Those with 0Hz stimulation served as the controls. Monocytes activation was monitored by measuring both the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) from monocytes and their adhesion to monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs was evaluated by cell counting method. The secretion of MCP-1 from THP-1 cells was detected by ELISA and MCP-1 mRNA expression was assessed by real time quantitative RT-PCR. The data showed that exposure to PEMF with above parameters could significantly inhibit the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs and decrease the MCP-1 mRNA and protein expression. The results demonstrated that exposure to PEMF of 1mT, 32Hz or 64Hz for 3 days could significantly inhibit the activation of THP-1 cells. PMID:23016400

  14. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Özcan;

    2011-01-01

    Standard cell culture plastic was surface modified by passive adsorption or covalent attachment of interleukin (IL)-4 and investigated for its ability to induce differentiation of human monocytes into mature dendritic cells, a process dose-dependently regulated by IL-4. Covalent attachment of IL-4...

  15. Altered monocyte function in experimental preeclampsia in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Broekema, M; Moes, H; van der Schaaf, G; Heineman, MJ; de Vos, P

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, we evaluated functional activity of monocytes in experimental preeclampsia induced by low-dose endotoxin infusion. Study design: Pregnant (n = 12) and cyclic rats (n = 12) were equipped with a permanent jugular vein cannula and infused with either low-dose endotoxin

  16. Vitamin d-directed rheostatic regulation of monocyte antibacterial responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, John S; Ren, Songyang; Liu, Philip T;

    2009-01-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D) enhances innate immunity by inducing the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (hCAP). In monocytes/macrophages, this occurs primarily in response to activation of TLR, that induce expression of the vitamin D receptor and localized...

  17. Defective monocyte function in Legionnaires' disease complicating hairy cell leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Bangsborg, Jette Marie; Rechnitzer, C;

    1986-01-01

    We describe a case of Legionnaires' disease in a 64-year-old man, in which hairy cell leukaemia was diagnosed after the onset of the infection. Immunological studies revealed a complete suppression of blood monocyte chemotactic and oxidative burst activities. We suggest that in hairy cell leukaemia...

  18. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomás P

    2011-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  19. Measurement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in monocytes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carroll, Tomas P

    2012-02-01

    In mammalian cells, the primary function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is to synthesize and assemble membrane and secreted proteins. As the main site of protein folding and posttranslational modification in the cell, the ER operates a highly conserved quality control system to ensure only correctly assembled proteins exit the ER and misfolded and unfolded proteins are retained for disposal. Any disruption in the equilibrium of the ER engages a multifaceted intracellular signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore normal conditions in the cell. A variety of pathological conditions can induce activation of the UPR, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson\\'s disease, metabolic disorders such as atherosclerosis, and conformational disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Conformational disorders are characterized by mutations that modify the final structure of a protein and any cells that express abnormal protein risk functional impairment. The monocyte is an important and long-lived immune cell and acts as a key immunological orchestrator, dictating the intensity and duration of the host immune response. Monocytes expressing misfolded or unfolded protein may exhibit UPR activation and this can compromise the host immune system. Here, we describe in detail methods and protocols for the examination of UPR activation in peripheral blood monocytes. This guide should provide new investigators to the field with a broad understanding of the tools required to investigate the UPR in the monocyte.

  20. Monocyte and Blood Interleukin-12 Levels Patients with Obstructive Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    W. G. Jiang; Puntis, M. C. A.

    1996-01-01

    Patients with obstructive jaundice have an increased incidence of peri-operative complications and immune dysfunction. This study was to investigate interleukin (IL)-12 (a cellular immunity stimulant), levels in jaundiced patients. 23 jaundiced patients and 17 controls were studied. There was significantly increased monocyte IL-12 production in jaundice, as measured by an ELISA, compared with that in controls (p

  1. Cell culture plastics with immobilized interleukin-4 for monocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Met, Ozcan;

    2011-01-01

    Standard cell culture plastic was surface modified by passive adsorption or covalent attachment of interleukin (IL)-4 and investigated for its ability to induce differentiation of human monocytes into mature dendritic cells, a process dose-dependently regulated by IL-4. Covalent attachment of IL-...

  2. Clinical significance of CD4 +T cells and lymphocyte subsets in children with asthma%探究CD4+T细胞及淋巴细胞亚群在小儿哮喘中的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴百平; 张永刚

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significance of four subsets of CD 4 +T cells and lymphocyte subsets in children with asthma . Methods From September 2011 to September 2014 100 children with asthma treated in Guangrao County TCM Hospital were recruited in study group, and another 100 children taking health physical examination at the same period were selected in control group .Fasting venous blood samples (5mL) were collected in the morning in children of both groups , and they were processed within 3 hours.Flow cytometry instrument was used to measure peripheral blood Th 1, Th2, Th17, Treg and lymphocyte subsets .Results In the study group the percentage of peripheral blood Treg in CD4 +T cells was significantly higher than in the control group (t=4.01, P0.05).The percentage of Th2 and Th17 was obviously higher than the control group (t value was 5.32 and 6.94, respectively, both P0.05).Compared with the control group , the percentage of lymphocyte was lower but that of eosinophil and monocyte was higher in the study group ( t value was 7.99, 12.58 and 12.06, respectively, all P<0.05).Conclusion cytokines (Th1/Th2/Th17), Treg and lymphocyte subsets in CD4+T lymphocytes , can be taken as judgment standard for asthma immune response , which are important to valuate the diagnosis , prevention , treatment and curative effect of diseases .%目的:探究CD4+T细胞四大亚群及淋巴细胞亚群在小儿哮喘中的临床意义。方法以2011年9月至2014年9月在广饶县中医院儿科进行治疗的哮喘患儿100例作为研究组,选取同期进行健康体检的儿童100例作为对照组。两组儿童均在早晨空腹情况下抽取静脉血5mL于3小时内进行标本处理,利用流式细胞仪器测量外周血中Th1、Th2、Th17、外周血Treg及淋巴细胞亚群。结果研究组患儿外周血Treg占CD4+T细胞的比率明显高于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(t=4.01,P<0.05);Th1占CD4+T细胞的比率在两

  3. Induction of proliferation and monocytic differentiation of human CD34+ cells by CD137 ligand signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dongsheng; Yue, Pei Shan Eunice; Drenkard, Daniela; Schwarz, Herbert

    2008-09-01

    CD137 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family and is involved in the regulation of activation, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death of leukocytes. Bidirectional signaling exists for the CD137 receptor/ligand system, as CD137 ligand, which is expressed as a transmembrane protein, can also transduce signals into the cells on which it is expressed. In this study, we have identified expression of CD137 in human bone marrow and expression of CD137 ligand on a subset of CD34+ cells. Cross-linking of CD137 ligand on CD34+ cells by CD137 ligand agonists induces activation, prolongation of survival, proliferation, and colony formation. CD137 ligand agonists induce differentiation of early hematopoietic progenitor cells to colony-forming units-granulocyte/macrophage and subsequently to monocytes and macrophages but not to dendritic cells. These data uncover a novel function of CD137 and CD137 ligand by showing their participation in the growth and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:18566330

  4. No evidence for histamine H4 receptor in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kristin; Neumann, Detlef; Buschauer, Armin; Seifert, Roland

    2014-12-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a classic pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi protein-coupled receptor that mediates increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). The presence of H4R in human eosinophils has been rigorously documented by several independent groups. It has also been suggested that H4R is expressed in human monocytes, but this suggestion hinges in part on H4R antibodies with questionable specificity. This situation prompted us to reinvestigate H4R expression in human monocytes. As positive control, we studied human embryonic kidney 293T cells stably expressing the human H4R (hH4R). In these cells, histamine (HA) and the H4R agonist UR-PI376 (2-cyano-1-[4-(1H-imidazol-4-yl)butyl]-3-[(2-phenylthio)ethyl]guanidine) induced pertussis toxin-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i increases. However, in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction studies we failed to detect hH4R mRNA in human monocytes and U937 promonocytes. In human monocytes, ATP and N-formyl-l-methionyl-l-leucyl-l-phenylalanine increased [Ca(2+)]i, but HA, UR-PI376, and 5-methylhistamine (a dual H4R/H2 receptor agonist) did not. In U937 promonocytes and differentiated U937 cells, HA increased [Ca(2+)]i, but this increase was mediated via HA H1 receptor. In conclusion, there is no evidence for the presence of H4R in human monocytes. PMID:25273276

  5. Modelling subset multivariate ARCH model via the AIC principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of identifying a parsimonious subset multivariate ARCH model based on the AIC principle. The proposed approach can reduce the number of parameters in the final ARCH specification and allows for non-constant correlations between the components. Some simulation results illustrate the viability of the proposed procedure.

  6. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  7. A community study of T lymphocyte subsets and malaria parasitaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Aaby, P; Whittle, H;

    1994-01-01

    In a community survey of 312 children aged 3-6 years in urban Guinea-Bissau, we examined Plasmodium falciparum parasitaemia and T cell subsets. 183 children (59%) had parasites in their blood, 13 had fever > or = 37.5 degrees C, and 9 (3%) had fever and a parasite density > 5000/microL (clinical ...

  8. T-lymphocyte subsets, thymic size and breastfeeding in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, Helle; Lisse, Ida M;

    2004-01-01

    We followed the changes in concentration of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ cells) in peripheral blood and thymus size during infancy. Previous studies have found increased thymus size in breastfed infants. The present study analyzed the association between breastfeeding and the number of CD4...

  9. A SOAP Web Service for accessing MODIS land product subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SanthanaVannan, Suresh K [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL; Pan, Jerry Yun [ORNL; Wilson, Bruce E [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing data from satellites have provided valuable information on the state of the earth for several decades. Since March 2000, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites have been providing estimates of several land parameters useful in understanding earth system processes at global, continental, and regional scales. However, the HDF-EOS file format, specialized software needed to process the HDF-EOS files, data volume, and the high spatial and temporal resolution of MODIS data make it difficult for users wanting to extract small but valuable amounts of information from the MODIS record. To overcome this usability issue, the NASA-funded Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a Web service that provides subsets of MODIS land products using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The ORNL DAAC MODIS subsetting Web service is a unique way of serving satellite data that exploits a fairly established and popular Internet protocol to allow users access to massive amounts of remote sensing data. The Web service provides MODIS land product subsets up to 201 x 201 km in a non-proprietary comma delimited text file format. Users can programmatically query the Web service to extract MODIS land parameters for real time data integration into models, decision support tools or connect to workflow software. Information regarding the MODIS SOAP subsetting Web service is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://daac.ornl.gov/modiswebservice.

  10. Monocyte derived IL 10 and PGE2 are associated with the absence of Th 1 cells and in vitro T cell suppression in lepromatous leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, N; Selvakumar, M; Singh, S; Bharadwaj, M; Ramesh, V; Misra, R S; Nath, I

    1995-12-01

    Our previous studies had shown that the clinicopathological spectrum in leprosy was associated with discrete T cell subsets in circulation, with tuberculoid patients having antigen-induced Th 1, whereas lepromatous leprosy patients with antigen-specific T cell anergy possessed Th 2 cells. The present study shows that infected monocytes from lepromatous but not tuberculoid leprosy patients released soluble factors (MoF(s)) containing IL-10 and PGE2 which inhibited M. leprae induced in vitro lymphoproliferation of previously sensitised healthy or tuberculoid leprosy subjects. A strong negative correlation was observed between adherent cell derived IL-10 and IL-2 at the level of both the product and cytokine mRNA. Moreover, anti-IL-10 antibodies and indomethacin partially reversed the suppressor effects of MoF(s). Taken together these studies indicate that infected monocytes contribute to the development of T cell anergy by releasing factors that affect regulatory cytokines and T cell subset differentiation in lepromatous leprosy. PMID:8719110

  11. Deregulated Fcγ receptor expression in patients with CIDP

    OpenAIRE

    Quast, Isaak; Cueni, Flavio; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Tackenberg, Björn; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs) before and during clinically effective therapy with IV immunoglobulin (IVIg) in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Methods: Peripheral blood leukocyte subsets, including classical CD14highCD16− and nonclassical inflammatory CD14lowCD16+ monocytes as well as naive CD19+CD27− and memory CD19+CD27+ B cells, were obtained at baseline and monitored at 2 and 4–8 weeks a...

  12. Differential induction from X-irradiated human peripheral blood monocytes to dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are a type of antigen-presenting cell which plays an essential role in the immune system. To clarify the influences of ionizing radiation on the differentiation to DCs, we focused on human peripheral blood monocytes and investigated whether X-irradiated monocytes can differentiate into DCs. The non-irradiated monocytes and 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were induced into immature DCs (iDCs) and mature DCs (mDCs) with appropriate cytokine stimulation, and the induced cells from each monocyte expressed each DC-expressing surface antigen such as CD40, CD86 and HLA-DR. However, the expression levels of CD40 and CD86 on the iDCs derived from the 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes were higher than those of iDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. Furthermore, the mDCs derived from 5 Gy-irradiated monocytes had significantly less ability to stimulate allogeneic T cells in comparison to the mDCs derived from non-irradiated monocytes. There were no significant differences in the phagocytotic activity of the iDCs and cytokines detected in the supernatants conditioned by the DCs from the non-irradiated and irradiated monocytes. These results suggest that human monocytes which are exposed to ionizing radiation can thus differentiate into DCs, but there is a tendency that X-irradiation leads to an impairment of the function of DCs. (author)

  13. A reassessment of IgM memory subsets in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors we performed high-throughput V-h sequencing of human B-cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD+CD27+ (“MZ”), IgD−CD27+(“memory”, including IgM (“IgM-only”), IgG and IgA) and IgD−CD27− cells (“double-negative”, including IgM, IgG and IgA). 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for Vh-gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and Vh/Jh usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin, for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency, and lower Vh4 and higher Jh6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (between MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The “IgM-only” subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27+ switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells, and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  14. Follicular dendritic-like cells derived from human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters J Hinrich

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs play a central role in controlling B-cell response maturation, isotype switching and the maintenance of B-cell memory. These functions are based on prolonged preservation of antigen and its presentation in its native form by FDCs. However, when entrapping entire pathogens, FDCs can turn into dangerous long-term reservoirs that may preserve viruses or prions in highly infectious form. Despite various efforts, the ontogeny of FDCs has remained elusive. They have been proposed to derive either from bone marrow stromal cells, myeloid cells or local mesenchymal precursors. Still, differentiating FDCs from their precursors in vitro may allow addressing many unsolved issues associated with the (patho- biology of these important antigen-presenting cells. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that FDC-like cells can be deduced from monocytes, and to develop a protocol in order to quantitatively generate them in vitro. Results Employing highly purified human monocytes as a starter population, low concentrations of Il-4 (25 U/ml and GM-CSF (3 U/ml in combination with Dexamethasone (Dex (0.5 μM in serum-free medium trigger the differentiation into FDC-like cells. After transient de-novo membrane expression of alkaline phosphatase (AP, such cells highly up-regulate surface expression of complement receptor I (CD35. Co-expression of CD68 confirms the monocytic origin of both, APpos and CD35pos cells. The common leukocyte antigen CD45 is strongly down-regulated. Successive stimulation with TNF-α up-regulates adhesion molecules ICAM-1 (CD54 and VCAM (CD106. Importantly, both, APpos as well as APneg FDC-like cells, heterotypically cluster with and emperipolese B cells and exhibit the FDC characteristic ability to entrap functionally preserved antigen for prolonged times. Identical characteristics are found in monocytes which were highly expanded in vitro by higher doses of GM-CSF (25 U/ml in the absence of

  15. Auditing Complex Concepts in Overlapping Subsets of SNOMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Wei, Duo; Xu, Junchuan; Elhanan, Gai; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Chen, Yan; Spackman, Kent A.; Hripcsak, George

    2008-01-01

    Limited resources and the sheer volume of concepts make auditing a large terminology, such as SNOMED CT, a daunting task. It is essential to devise techniques that can aid an auditor by automatically identifying concepts that deserve attention. A methodology for this purpose based on a previously introduced abstraction network (called the p-area taxonomy) for a SNOMED CT hierarchy is presented. The methodology algorithmically gathers concepts appearing in certain overlapping subsets, defined exclusively with respect to the p-area taxonomy, for review. The results of applying the methodology to SNOMED’s Specimen hierarchy are presented. These results are compared against a control sample composed of concepts residing in subsets without the overlaps. With the use of the double bootstrap, the concept group produced by our methodology is shown to yield a statistically significant higher proportion of error discoveries. PMID:18998838

  16. Multiple Features Subset Selection using Meta-Heuristic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Maurya

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper is being presented on Multiple Features Subset Selection Using Meta-heuristic Function. Classification problems require selection of a subset of attributes or features from a much larger dataset to represent the patterns to be classified. Many excellent multiple feature selection method such as Hill Climbing (HC, Simulated Annealing (SA, Genetic Algorithms (GAs, Tabu Search (TS has been prevalent amongst research community. However, these approaches still encounter when the multiple feature of dataset is available and it need to choose those attribute which is best amongst the available features. So, in this paper basically considering the issue of multiple features are analyzed as well as implemented and tested on different dataset. The experiment is being conducted abalone dataset. It may conclude that the algorithm shows highest accuracy amongst all other method which is being used in this paper, Therefore we are focusing on the classification of multiple features

  17. Implementing Modifed Burg Algorithms in Multivariate Subset Autoregressive Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alexandre Trindade

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The large number of parameters in subset vector autoregressive models often leads one to procure fast, simple, and efficient alternatives or precursors to maximum likelihood estimation. We present the solution of the multivariate subset Yule-Walker equations as one such alternative. In recent work, Brockwell, Dahlhaus, and Trindade (2002, show that the Yule-Walker estimators can actually be obtained as a special case of a general recursive Burg-type algorithm. We illustrate the structure of this Algorithm, and discuss its implementation in a high-level programming language. Applications of the Algorithm in univariate and bivariate modeling are showcased in examples. Univariate and bivariate versions of the Algorithm written in Fortran 90 are included in the appendix, and their use illustrated.

  18. Feature Subset Selection for Software Cost Modelling and Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Papatheocharous, Efi; Papadopoulos, Harris; Andreou, Andreas S.

    2012-01-01

    Feature selection has been recently used in the area of software engineering for improving the accuracy and robustness of software cost models. The idea behind selecting the most informative subset of features from a pool of available cost drivers stems from the hypothesis that reducing the dimensionality of datasets will significantly minimise the complexity and time required to reach to an estimation using a particular modelling technique. This work investigates the appropriateness of attri...

  19. Human NK Cell Subset Functions Are Differentially Affected by Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, Lena; Engeli, Stefan; Christiane D Wrann; Goudeva, Lilia; Laue, Tobias; Kielstein, Heike

    2013-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a risk factor for various types of infectious diseases and cancer. The increase in adipose tissue causes alterations in both adipogenesis and the production of adipocyte-secreted proteins (adipokines). Since natural killer (NK) cells are the host’s primary defense against virus-infected and tumor cells, we investigated how adipocyte-conditioned medium (ACM) affects functions of two distinct human NK cell subsets. Methods: Isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell...

  20. Ordered subsets convex algorithm for 3D terahertz transmission tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Recur, Benoît; Balacey, Hugo; Bou Sleiman, Joyce; Perraud, Jean-Baptiste; Guillet, Jean-Paul; Kingston, Andrew; Mounaix, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    International audience We investigate in this paper a new reconstruction method in order to perform 3D Terahertz (THz) tomography using a continuous wave acquisition setup in transmission mode. This method is based on the Maximum Likelihood for TRansmission tomography (ML-TR) first developed for X-ray imaging. We optimize the Ordered Subsets Convex (OSC) implementation of the ML-TR by including the Gaussian propagation model of THz waves and take into account the intensity distributions of...

  1. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror;

    2015-01-01

    neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... REST is active in pancreas progenitors where it gates the activation of part of the beta cell differentiation program....

  2. The separator of a subset of a semigroup

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Attila

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new notion by the help of the idealizer. This new notion is the separator of a subset of a semigroup. We investigate the properties of the separator in an arbitrary semigroup and characterize the unitary subsemigroups and the prime ideals by the help of their separator. The last section of this paper treats the separator of a free subsemigroup of a free semigroup.

  3. Patrolling monocytes control tumor metastasis to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Richard N; Cekic, Caglar; Sag, Duygu; Tacke, Robert; Thomas, Graham D; Nowyhed, Heba; Herrley, Erica; Rasquinha, Nicole; McArdle, Sara; Wu, Runpei; Peluso, Esther; Metzger, Daniel; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Shaked, Iftach; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Biswas, Subhra K; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2015-11-20

    The immune system plays an important role in regulating tumor growth and metastasis. Classical monocytes promote tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis, but how nonclassical "patrolling" monocytes (PMo) interact with tumors is unknown. Here we show that PMo are enriched in the microvasculature of the lung and reduce tumor metastasis to lung in multiple mouse metastatic tumor models. Nr4a1-deficient mice, which specifically lack PMo, showed increased lung metastasis in vivo. Transfer of Nr4a1-proficient PMo into Nr4a1-deficient mice prevented tumor invasion in the lung. PMo established early interactions with metastasizing tumor cells, scavenged tumor material from the lung vasculature, and promoted natural killer cell recruitment and activation. Thus, PMo contribute to cancer immunosurveillance and may be targets for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26494174

  4. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings. PMID:27139609

  5. Targeted liposomal drug delivery to monocytes and macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciara Kelly; Caroline Jefferies; Sally-Ann Cryan

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can ha...

  6. Role of Monocytes in Experimental Staphylococcus aureus Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Veltrop, Marcel H. A. M.; Bancsi, Maurice J. L. M. F.; Bertina, Rogier M.; Thompson, Jan

    2000-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of bacterial endocarditis (BE), the clotting system plays a cardinal role in the formation and maintenance of the endocardial vegetations. The extrinsic pathway is involved in the activation of the coagulation pathway with tissue factor (TF) as the key protein. Staphylococcus aureus is a frequently isolated bacterium from patients with BE. We therefore investigated whether S. aureus can induce TF activity (TFA) on fibrin-adherent monocytes, used as an in vitro model of BE....

  7. Cellular Effects of Insulin in Human THP-1 Monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Naderi, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Excess of insulin in the circulating blood relative to the level of glucose (Hyperinsulinemia) may be linked to systemic low-grade inflammation and some chronic disease such as the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes (T2D), and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The function of high levels of insulin in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), and macrophages in relation to CVD has been investigated, but exact role of high insulin levels in monocytes, as an important cel...

  8. NOD2 gene expression in Paneth cells and monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lala, S. G.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Mutations in the NOD2 gene are associated with the development of Crohn's disease, an inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The NOD2 protein induces cellular activation in response to the bacterial antigen muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The NOD2 gene is mainly expressed by circulating blood monocytes although NOD2-associated Crohn's disease involves mainly the terminal ileum. Paneth cells, which are most numerous in the terminal ileum, are specialised intestinal epithel...

  9. Phagocytic ability of neutrophils and monocytes in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantagos Stephanos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections by a variety of pathogens are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality during perinatal period. The susceptibility of neonates to bacterial infections has been attributed to immaturity of innate immunity. It is considered that one of the impaired mechanisms is the phagocytic function of neutrophils and monocytes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the phagocytic ability of neonates at birth. Methods The phagocytic ability of neutrophils and monocytes of 42 neonates was determined using the Phagotest flow cytometry method, that assesses the intake of E. Coli by phagocytes, in cord blood and in peripheral blood 3 days after birth. Fifteen healthy adults were included in the study as controls. Results The phagocytic ability of neutrophils in the cord blood of neonates was significantly reduced compared to adults. The 3rd postnatal day the reduction of phagocytic ability of neutrophils was no longer significant compared to adults. The phagocytic ability of monocytes did not show any difference from that of adults either at birth or the 3rd postnatal day. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the intake of E. Coli by phagocytes is impaired at birth in both preterm and full term neonates compared to adults. This defect is transient, with the phagocytic ability in neonates reaching that of the adults 3 days after birth.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide regulated protein expression is only partly impaired in monocytes from patients with type I diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abke Sabine

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes play an important role in innate immunity and atherosclerosis. A disturbed secretion of cytokines in lipopolysaccharide (LPS activated monocytes from type 1 diabetes (T1D patients has been described and may contribute to the impaired inflammatory response in these individuals. In the present study the influence of LPS on five different proteins with a function in immunity and atherosclerosis was analyzed in monocytes from controls and T1D patients. Methods Monocytes were isolated from controls and T1D patients and the LPS-stimulated increase of IL-6, CXCL8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (CCL2, MCP-1 and superoxide dismutase (SOD 2, as well as the LPS-mediated decrease of apolipoprotein E (Apo E in primary human monocytes from controls and T1D patients was determined. Results CCL2 and IL-6 secretion in response to LPS was found significantly reduced in monocytes from T1D patients when compared to controls whereas basal CCL2 release was similar in control and T1D cells. In contrast, CXCL8 and apolipoprotein E secretion and SOD 2 expression upon LPS stimulation is similar from T1D and control monocytes. Conclusion These data indicate that LPS-mediated protein expression is only partly disturbed in monocytes from T1D patients. Reduced secretion of IL-6 and CCL2 in activated monocytes of these patients may contribute to an impaired inflammatory response and vascular disease.

  11. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Expression and regulation of Schlafen (SLFN family members in primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells and T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Puck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schlafen (SLFN/Slfn family members have been investigated for their involvement in fundamental cellular processes including growth regulation, differentiation and control of viral replication. However, most research has been focused on the characterization of Slfns within the murine system or in human cell lines. Since little is known about SLFNs in primary human immune cells, we set out to analyze the expression and regulation of the six human SLFN genes in monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs and T cells. Comparison of SLFN gene expression across these three cell types showed high mRNA expression of SLFN11 in monocytes and moDCs and high SLFN5 expression in T cells, indicating functional importance within these cell types. Differentiation of monocytes to moDCs leads to the gradual upregulation of SLFN12L and SLFN13 while SLFN12 levels were decreased by differentiation stimuli. Stimulation of moDCs via human rhinovirus, lipopolysaccharide, or IFN-α lead to strong upregulation of SLFN gene expression, while peptidoglycan poorly stimulated regulation of both SLFNs and the classical interferon-stimulated gene MxA. T cell activation was found to downregulate the expression of SLFN5, SLFN12 and SLFN12L, which was reversible upon addition of exogenous IFN-α. In conclusion, we demonstrate, that SLFN gene upregulation is mainly dependent on autocrine type I interferon signaling in primary human immune cells. Rapid decrease of SLFN expression levels following T cell receptor stimulation indicates a role of SLFNs in the regulation of human T cell quiescence.

  13. Effects of spray-dried porcine plasma and plant extracts on intestinal morphology and on leukocyte cell subsets of weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofrarías, M; Manzanilla, E G; Pujols, J; Gibert, X; Majó, N; Segalés, J; Gasa, J

    2006-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of a 6% spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) and a plant extracts mixture (XT; 5% carvacrol, 3% cinnamaldehyde, and 2% capsicum oleoresin) on the productive performance, intestinal morphology, and leukocyte cell subsets of early-weaned pigs compared with a control group. Morphometry of the jejunum, ileum, and colon, and immune cell analysis of blood, ileocolic lymph node (LN), and ileal Peyer's patches were done in 24 weaned pigs (20 +/- 2 d) at 19 or 21 d postweaning. Although SDPP and XT treatments did not increase ADG or ADFI, SDPP improved the G:F ratio (P = 0.024) compared with the control group. Dietary SDPP reduced the percentages of blood monocytes (P = 0.006) and macrophages in ileal Peyer's patches and LN (P = 0.04), of B lymphocytes (P = 0.04) and gammadelta+ T cells in LN (P = 0.009), and of intraepithelial lymphocytes (P = 0.026) as well as the density of lamina propria cells in the colon (P < 0.01). Dietary XT reduced intraepithelial lymphocyte numbers in jejunum (P = 0.034) and the percentages of blood cytotoxic cells (P = 0.07) and B lymphocytes in LN (P = 0.03); however, XT increased blood monocytes (P = 0.038) and the density of lamina propria lymphocytes in the colon (P = 0.003). These results indicate that dietary SDPP and plant extracts can affect intestinal morphology and immune cell subsets of gut tissues and blood in weaned pigs. Furthermore, the effects of SDPP suggest lower activation of the immune system of the piglets. PMID:16971575

  14. Targeting monocytes and macrophages by means of SPECT and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monocytes have been isolated from patient’s blood and directly radiolabelled in vitro using a variety of radiopharmaceuticals such as 99mTc-HMPAO, 111In-oxine, 99mTc-colloids and 18F-FDG. Overall, the best labeling results were obtained using 99mTc-HMPAO. The wide availability of 99mTc and of the ligand HMPAO in kit-formulation makes it the most versatile procedure for imaging localized inflammation using in-vitro labeling. Injection of 99mTc-HMPAO labeled monocytes in adult patients has proven safe with an effective dose of 0.011 mSv/Mbq, equivalent to that of 99mTc-HMPAO labeled mixed white blood cells. Furthermore, in a proof of concept studies, in-vitro labeled monocytes were shown to specifically accumulate in the bowels of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease as well as in inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Inversely, the decrease in disease activity of inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients treated by Adalimumab could not be substantiated using 99mTc-HMPAO labelled monocytes suggesting this type of treatment does not reduce monocyte influx. In spite of their wide availability, in-vitro labeling procedures are cumbersome and time-consuming. Furthermore, cell activation may occur during the labeling process and it cannot be excluded that the radiopharmaceuticals used for labelling interfere with ongoing cellular processes. As such, various authors turned towards the development of radiopharmaceuticals for in-vivo labeling of both monocytes and more importantly macrophages, many of which were subsequently validated in animal models. Targets studied in this regard include amongst others the folate receptor, the mannose receptor, the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor as well as more general characteristics of macrophages such as phagocytosis. Various of these novel molecules appear promising and clinical studies using these radiopharmaceuticals are awaited in the near future. Some of these radiopharmaceuticals also

  15. Survival and signaling changes in antigen presenting cell subsets after radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer Janell

    examine co-stimulatory receptor activation, pro-inflammatory cytokine release, and T cell proliferation with and without radiation and inhibition of the NFkappaB pathway, demonstrated that NEMO is necessary for the activation, maturation, and enhanced responsiveness of human subsets of antigen presenting cells that occur after radiation. These findings provided insight into the mechanism of action of radiation-enhanced promotion of the antigen presenting cell responses. The methods of analysis employed can be used for monitoring immune changes that impact immune modulation in transplantation and tumor vaccines studies. Furthermore, NFkappaB pathway proteins have the potential to serve as biomarkers for optimal antitumor responses. The NBD peptide may also have usefulness as a therapeutic agent for inhibition of graft versus host disease (GVHD) in patients who have undergone transplantation. While the first set of experiments focused on antigen presenting cell responsiveness, the second set of experiments were designed to enhance our understanding of why antigen presenting cells, specifically monocytes and dendritic cells, are more radioresistant than conventional T cells. Flow cytometric analysis of various surface markers and intracellular signaling markers were used to examine the mechanisms behind the radioresistance of antigen presenting cells. The experiments described here showed a hierarchy of radiosensitivity among T cells, with naive CD8 T cells being the most radiosensitive and CD4 memory T cells being the most radioresistant. Antigen presenting cells were found to be significantly more radioresistant than T cell subsets (survival may have importance for the generation of anti-tumor immunity and post-transplantation immune sequelae such as GVHD. In addition, elucidation of the mechanism of death of APC and T cell subsets, as described in chapter 3, provides potential markers of cell death that can be correlated to good graft versus tumor (GVT) effects versus bad

  16. A subset of human plasmacytoid dendritic cells expresses CD8α upon exposure to herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Philipp; Thomann, Sabrina; Werner, Maren; Vollmer, Jörg; Schmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Classical and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DC) play important roles in the defense against murine and human infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV). So far, CD8α expression has only been reported for murine DC. CD8α(+) DC have prominent cross-presenting activities, which are enhanced by murine CD8α(+) PDC. The human orthologue of murine CD8α(+) DC, the CD141 (BDCA3)(+) DC, mainly cross-present after TLR3 ligation. We report here the serendipitous finding that a subset of human PDC upregulates CD8α upon HSV-1 stimulation, as shown by gene array and flow cytometry analyses. CD8α, not CD8ß, was expressed upon exposure. Markers of activation, migration, and costimulation were upregulated on CD8α-expressing human PDC. In these cells, increased cytokine and chemokine levels were detected that enhance development and function of T, B, and NK cells, and recruit immature DC, monocytes, and Th1 cells, respectively. Altogether, human CD8α(+) PDC exhibit a highly activated phenotype and appear to recruit other immune cells to the site of inflammation. Further studies will show whether CD8α-expressing PDC contribute to antigen cross-presentation, which may be important for immune defenses against HSV infections in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26082771

  17. Activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway enhances monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium has been reported to be one of the early processes in the development of atherosclerosis. In an attempt to develop strategies to prevent or delay atherosclerosis progression, we analyzed effects of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway on monocyte adhesion to various human endothelial cells. Adhesion of fluorescein-labeled monocytes to various human endothelial cells was analyzed under a fluorescent microscope. Unlike sodium chloride, lithium chloride enhanced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β or proteosome enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion. Results of semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated that activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway did not change expression levels of mRNA for adhesion molecules. In conclusion, the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway enhanced monocyte-endothelial cell adhesion without changing expression levels of adhesion molecules

  18. Efficient mRNA-Based Genetic Engineering of Human NK Cells with High-Affinity CD16 and CCR7 Augments Rituximab-Induced ADCC against Lymphoma and Targets NK Cell Migration toward the Lymph Node-Associated Chemokine CCL19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsten, Mattias; Levy, Emily; Karambelkar, Amrita; Li, Linhong; Reger, Robert; Berg, Maria; Peshwa, Madhusudan V.; Childs, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    For more than a decade, investigators have pursued methods to genetically engineer natural killer (NK) cells for use in clinical therapy against cancer. Despite considerable advances in viral transduction of hematopoietic stem cells and T cells, transduction efficiencies for NK cells have remained disappointingly low. Here, we show that NK cells can be genetically reprogramed efficiently using a cGMP-compliant mRNA electroporation method that induces rapid and reproducible transgene expression in nearly all transfected cells, without negatively influencing their viability, phenotype, and cytotoxic function. To study its potential therapeutic application, we used this approach to improve key aspects involved in efficient lymphoma targeting by adoptively infused ex vivo-expanded NK cells. Electroporation of NK cells with mRNA coding for the chemokine receptor CCR7 significantly promoted migration toward the lymph node-associated chemokine CCL19. Further, introduction of mRNA coding for the high-affinity antibody-binding receptor CD16 (CD16-158V) substantially augmented NK cell cytotoxicity against rituximab-coated lymphoma cells. Based on these data, we conclude that this approach can be utilized to genetically modify multiple modalities of NK cells in a highly efficient manner with the potential to improve multiple facets of their in vivo tumor targeting, thus, opening a new arena for the development of more efficacious adoptive NK cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:27047492

  19. Human NK cell subset functions are differentially affected by adipokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Huebner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a risk factor for various types of infectious diseases and cancer. The increase in adipose tissue causes alterations in both adipogenesis and the production of adipocyte-secreted proteins (adipokines. Since natural killer (NK cells are the host's primary defense against virus-infected and tumor cells, we investigated how adipocyte-conditioned medium (ACM affects functions of two distinct human NK cell subsets. METHODS: Isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were cultured with various concentrations of human and murine ACM harvested on two different days during adipogenesis and analyzed by fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS. RESULTS: FACS analyses showed that the expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL, granzyme A (GzmA and interferon (IFN-γ in NK cells was regulated in a subset-specific manner. ACM treatment altered IFN-γ expression in CD56(dim NK cells. The production of GzmA in CD56(bright NK cells was differentially affected by the distinct adipokine compositions harvested at different states of adipogenesis. Comparison of the treatment with either human or murine ACM revealed that adipokine-induced effects on NK cell expression of the leptin receptor (Ob-R, TRAIL and IFN-γ were species-specific. CONCLUSION: Considering the growing prevalence of obesity and the various disorders related to it, the present study provides further insights into the roles human NK cell subsets play in the obesity-associated state of chronic low-grade inflammation.

  20. Soluble Groups with a Condition on Infinite Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadir Trabelsi

    2002-01-01

    We prove that a finitely generated soluble group G is nilpotent-by-finite (respectively, finite-by-nilpotent) if every infinite subset of G contains two elements x,y generating a nilpotent-by-finite (respectively, finite-by-nilpotent)group.Moreover,for a positive integer k,if we suppose is (nipotent of class k)-by-finite (respectively, finite-by-(nilpotent of class k)), then there is an integer c =c(k) such that G is (nilpotent of class c)-by-finite (respectively, finiteby-(nilpotent of class c)).

  1. Hedging Basket Options by Using a Subset of Underlying Assets

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xia

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes two-step static hedging strategies for European basket options by using only plain-vanilla options on a subset of underlying assets. The basic idea is stimulated from a static super-hedging strategy dependent on the whole basket. However, it would be too complicated to handle when there is a large number of assets in the basket. It becomes even worse when some of the underlying assets are illiquid or not available for trading. Meanwhile, this strategy completely neglects t...

  2. Individual discriminative face recognition models based on subsets of features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Gomez, David Delgado; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    face recognition problem. The elastic net model is able to select a subset of features with low computational effort compared to other state-of-the-art feature selection methods. Furthermore, the fact that the number of features usually is larger than the number of images in the data base makes feature...... selection techniques such as forward selection or lasso regression become inadequate. In the experimental section, the performance of the elastic net model is compared with geometrical and color based algorithms widely used in face recognition such as Procrustes nearest neighbor, Eigenfaces, or Fisher...

  3. A novel cell subset: Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JiongKun; XING FeiYue

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells (IKDCs). IKDCs not only secret type Ⅰ and type Ⅱ interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-Ⅱ molecules to present antigens. Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  4. Statistical mechanics of an NP-complete problem: subset sum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the statistical properties of an NP-complete problem, the subset sum, using the methods and concepts of statistical mechanics. The problem is a generalization of the number partitioning problem, which is also an NP-complete problem and has been studied in the physics literature. The asymptotic expressions for the number of solutions are obtained. These results, applied to the number partitioning problem as a special case, are compared with those which were previously obtained by a different method. We discuss the limit of applicability of the techniques of statistical mechanics to the present problem. (author)

  5. A novel cell subset:Interferon-producing killer dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports introduce a novel cell subset of DCs with antigenic phenotypes shared by both NK cells and B cells, but without surface markers of pDCs and T cells, appearing to be a chimera of NK cells and DCs, namely interferon-producing killer dendritic cells(IKDCs).IKDCs not only secret type I and type II interferons to recognize and kill tumor cells effectively, but also express MHC-II molecules to present antigens.Thus, IKDCs are considered as important immunosurveilance cells for tumors, providing a link between innate and adaptive immunity.

  6. Optimum unambiguous discrimination between subsets of non-orthogonal states

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Y; Hillery, M; Sun, Yuqing; Bergou, Janos; Hillery, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Unambiguous discrimination among non-orthogonal but linearly independent quantum states is possible with a certain probability of success. Here we consider a variant of that problem; rather than discriminating among all of the different states, we shall discriminate between two subsets of them. In particular, for the case of 3 states, we find the optimal strategy to distinguish one from the other two. This procedure has a higher probability of success than distinguishing all 3 states. We show how to construct generalized interferometers that provide an implementation of the optimal strategy.

  7. Peripheral Blood Monocyte Gene Expression Profile Clinically Stratifies Patients With Recent-Onset Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Irvine, Katharine M.; Gallego, Patricia; An, Xiaoyu; Best, Shannon E.; Thomas, Gethin; Wells, Christine; Harris, Mark; Cotterill, Andrew; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2012-01-01

    Novel biomarkers of disease progression after type 1 diabetes onset are needed. We profiled peripheral blood (PB) monocyte gene expression in six healthy subjects and 16 children with type 1 diabetes diagnosed ∼3 months previously and analyzed clinical features from diagnosis to 1 year. Monocyte expression profiles clustered into two distinct subgroups, representing mild and severe deviation from healthy control subjects, along the same continuum. Patients with strongly divergent monocyte gen...

  8. Interleukin-1α activation and localization in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing; Kjærsgaard, Pernille; Jørgensen, Trine Lykke; Foldbjerg, Rasmus; Nielsen, Mads Lausen; Guldbæk Poulsen, Thomas Bouet; Zabieglo, Katarzyna; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    2015-01-01

    - 1α in inflammation is only partly understood. Results: Human macrophages/monocytes, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were analyzed for production and localization of IL-1α by use of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) generated against IL-1α pro piece. We found that IL-1α propiece was detected...... being a marker for monocytes. Conclusions: Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, a method to visualize and measure the production of IL-1α in both human monocytes and macrophages....

  9. The glial scar-monocyte interplay: a pivotal resolution phase in spinal cord repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravid Shechter

    Full Text Available The inflammatory response in the injured spinal cord, an immune privileged site, has been mainly associated with the poor prognosis. However, recent data demonstrated that, in fact, some leukocytes, namely monocytes, are pivotal for repair due to their alternative anti-inflammatory phenotype. Given the pro-inflammatory milieu within the traumatized spinal cord, known to skew monocytes towards a classical phenotype, a pertinent question is how parenchymal-invading monocytes acquire resolving properties essential for healing, under such unfavorable conditions. In light of the spatial association between resolving (interleukin (IL-10 producing monocytes and the glial scar matrix chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG, in this study we examined the mutual relationship between these two components. By inhibiting the de novo production of CSPG following spinal cord injury, we demonstrated that this extracellular matrix, mainly known for its ability to inhibit axonal growth, serves as a critical template skewing the entering monocytes towards the resolving phenotype. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated that this matrix alone is sufficient to induce such monocyte polarization. Reciprocal conditional ablation of the monocyte-derived macrophages concentrated at the lesion margins, using diphtheria toxin, revealed that these cells have scar matrix-resolving properties. Replenishment of monocytic cell populations to the ablated mice demonstrated that this extracellular remodeling ability of the infiltrating monocytes requires their expression of the matrix-degrading enzyme, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13, a property that was found here to be crucial for functional recovery. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the glial scar-matrix, a known obstacle to regeneration, is a critical component skewing the encountering monocytes towards a resolving phenotype. In an apparent feedback loop, monocytes were found to regulate scar resolution. This

  10. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  11. Estimation of Discriminative Feature Subset Using Community Modularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guodong; Liu, Sanming

    2016-04-01

    Feature selection (FS) is an important preprocessing step in machine learning and data mining. In this paper, a new feature subset evaluation method is proposed by constructing a sample graph (SG) in different k-features and applying community modularity to select highly informative features as a group. However, these features may not be relevant as an individual. Furthermore, relevant in-dependency rather than irrelevant redundancy among the selected features is effectively measured with the community modularity Q value of the sample graph in the k-features. An efficient FS method called k-features sample graph feature selection is presented. A key property of this approach is that the discriminative cues of a feature subset with the maximum relevant in-dependency among features can be accurately determined. This community modularity-based method is then verified with the theory of k-means cluster. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, the proposed approach is more effective, as verified by the results of several experiments.

  12. Fast Edge Detection Based on the Combination of Fuzzy Subsets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TuChengyuan; ZengYanjun; PeiWei; XieJian

    2005-01-01

    A fast edge detection method basing on the combination of fuzzy subsets is developed, in which the detection of an edge as a classification problem will be considered, partitioning the image into two portions: the edge portion and the non-edge portion. The latter one, as the main constituent of an image, consists of the object and its background. Removing the non-edge portion from an image, the remainder is nothing but the edge of this image. As far as the fuzziness of the edge of an image is concerned, some fuzzy operations can be made. In this paper, the gray level histogram is partitioned into several sub-regions, and some operations are performed with the associated fuzzy subsets corresponding to those sub-edges in the sub-regions on the gray-level-square-difference histogrmn, and the edge of this image is finally obtained. Practical examples in this paper illustrate that, the described method is simple and effective to achieve an ideal edge image.

  13. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror; Mao, Chai-An; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2015-09-15

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3(+) progenitors, decreases beta and alpha cell mass by E18.5, and triggers diabetes in adulthood. Conditional inactivation of Rest in Pdx1(+) progenitors is not sufficient to trigger endocrine differentiation but up-regulates a subset of differentiation genes. Our results show that the transcriptional repressor REST is active in pancreas progenitors where it gates the activation of part of the beta cell differentiation program. PMID:26156633

  14. Estimation of Discriminative Feature Subset Using Community Modularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guodong; Liu, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    Feature selection (FS) is an important preprocessing step in machine learning and data mining. In this paper, a new feature subset evaluation method is proposed by constructing a sample graph (SG) in different k-features and applying community modularity to select highly informative features as a group. However, these features may not be relevant as an individual. Furthermore, relevant in-dependency rather than irrelevant redundancy among the selected features is effectively measured with the community modularity Q value of the sample graph in the k-features. An efficient FS method called k-features sample graph feature selection is presented. A key property of this approach is that the discriminative cues of a feature subset with the maximum relevant in-dependency among features can be accurately determined. This community modularity-based method is then verified with the theory of k-means cluster. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, the proposed approach is more effective, as verified by the results of several experiments. PMID:27121171

  15. Peripheral blood and milk leukocytes subsets of lactating Sarda ewes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Bonelli

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes subpopulations in blood and milk of lactating Sarda ewes were investigated. Animals characterized by a SSC level <500×103cells/mL and a negative bacteriological examination were sampled in early, mid and late lactation. Milk differential cell count evidenced that macrophage represented the main population (42.8%±3.5 followed by lymphocytes (40.2%±3.4 and neutrophils (8,6%±2.1. Flow cytometry analysis showed that lymphocytes subsets in milk were quite different from blood. High CD8+ and low CD4+ lymphocytes percentages determined a CD4/CD8 ratio inversion in milk compared to blood (0.3%±0.03 vs 1.8%±0.08. CD8+ decreased while, conversely, CD4+ increased in late lactation. γδ T cells were more represented in milk (12.6%±1.3 than in blood (6.8%±0.3 and their proportions appeared similar throughout lactation in both compartments. IL-2 receptor was mainly expressed in milk on T cytotoxic lymphocytes. Data obtained in uninfected mammary glands could allow an early discrimination between physiological and pathological changes occurring in ewe milk. Further phenotypical and functional studies on milk leukocytes subsets might help to understand defense mechanisms of the ovine mammary gland against IMI.

  16. Estimation of Discriminative Feature Subset Using Community Modularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guodong; Liu, Sanming

    2016-01-01

    Feature selection (FS) is an important preprocessing step in machine learning and data mining. In this paper, a new feature subset evaluation method is proposed by constructing a sample graph (SG) in different k-features and applying community modularity to select highly informative features as a group. However, these features may not be relevant as an individual. Furthermore, relevant in-dependency rather than irrelevant redundancy among the selected features is effectively measured with the community modularity Q value of the sample graph in the k-features. An efficient FS method called k-features sample graph feature selection is presented. A key property of this approach is that the discriminative cues of a feature subset with the maximum relevant in-dependency among features can be accurately determined. This community modularity-based method is then verified with the theory of k-means cluster. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, the proposed approach is more effective, as verified by the results of several experiments. PMID:27121171

  17. Differential effects of chronic monocyte depletion on macrophage populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The administration of the bone-seeking isotope, 89Sr, to mice results in severe monocytopenia without any apparent effect on the numbers of resident peritoneal macrophages (M luminal diameter). An explanation for this dichotomy was sought by determining whether the residual blood monocytes were still an effective source of M luminal diameter after 89Sr treatment. Stem cell enumeration showed that a 90% fall in bone marrow macrophage colony-forming cells after 89Sr was accompanied by a 10-fold rise in splenic M-CFC. Splenectomy performed before 89Sr treatment, however, resulted in little additional monocytopenia and had no affect on the numbers of resident peritoneal M luminal diameter even when sampling was extended to 31 days, an interval beyond the accepted half-time for peritoneal M luminal diameter. Intraperitoneal injections of thioglycollate or Corynebacterium parvum elicited few or no monocyte-M luminal diameter during respective intervals of 4 and 7 days. Elicitation with thioglycollate was attempted in tritiated thymidine-labeled mice 26 days after 89Sr. Four days later only a 2-fold increase in labeled peritoneal M luminal diameter was found in the 89Sr-treated mice compared with a 150-fold increase in the controls. Studies of the ectoenzymes 5'-nucleotidase, alkaline phosphodiesterase I, and leucine aminopeptidase in such elicitation experiments suggested that the observed changes in activities reflected the direct stimulation of resident M luminal diameter rather than monocyte immigration. Overall, the results indicate that treatment with 89Sr distinguishes two large populations of M luminal diameter on the basis of their dependence on bone marrow. M luminal diameter of inflammation reflect the monocytopenia and are severely and rapidly depleted by such treatment

  18. Differential Tropism and Chemokine Receptor Expression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Neonatal Monocytes, Monocyte-Derived Macrophages, and Placental Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Fear, Warwick R.; Kesson, Alison M.; Naif, Hassan; Lynch, Garry W.; Cunningham, Anthony L.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory-adapted (LA) macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates (e.g., HIV-1Ba-L) and low-passage primary (PR) isolates differed markedly in tropism for syngeneic neonatal monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs), and placental macrophages (PMs). Newly adherent neonatal monocytes and cultured PMs were highly refractory to infection with PR HIV-1 isolates yet were permissive for LA M-tropic isolates. Day 4 MDMs were also permissive for LA M-tropi...

  19. Moesin Functions as a Lipopolysaccharide Receptor on Human Monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Ziad N.; Amar, Salomon; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]), a glycolipid found in the outer membranes of gram-negative bacteria, induces the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 by monocytes/macrophages. The secretion of these biologically active compounds leads to multiple pathological conditions, such as septic shock. There is substantial evidence that chronic exposure to LPS mediates, at least in part, the tissue destruction associated with gram-negative infection. CD14, a 55-kDa protein, has been identified as an LPS receptor. In conjunction with a serum protein, LPS binding protein (LBP), LPS-CD14 interactions mediate many LPS functions in the inflammatory response. However, CD14 lacks a cytoplasmic domain, or any known signal transduction sequence motif, suggesting the existence of another cell surface domain capable of transducing signals. In this paper, we report a second, CD14-independent LPS binding site, which, based on biological activity, appears to be a functional LPS receptor. Cross-linking experiments were performed to identify LPS binding sites. Two molecules were identified: a 55-kDa protein (CD14) and a second, 78-kDa band. Sequencing of the 78-kDa protein by mass spectroscopic analysis revealed 100% homology with moesin (membrane-organizing extension spike protein). Antibody to CD14 induced partial blocking of the LPS response. However, antimoesin monoclonal antibody completely blocked the LPS-induced TNF-α response in human monocytes, without blocking CD14 binding of LPS. Irrelevant isotype controls had no effect. Additional experiments were performed to evaluate the specificity of the antimoesin blocking. Separate experiments evaluated antimoesin effects on monocyte chemotaxis, IL-1 production in response to IL-1 stimulation, and TNF-α secretion in response to Staphylococcus aureus stimulation. Antimoesin blocked only LPS-mediated events. The data suggest that moesin

  20. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dong; ZHU Su-wen; LIU Dong-juan; LIU Guo-liang; SHAN Zhong-yan

    2005-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes has been recognized as an organ specific autoimmune disease owing to the immune destruction of pancreatic islet β cells in genetically susceptible individuals.In both human and rodent models of type 1 diabetes, such as nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, biobreeding rats, the disease has a distinct stage characterized by immune cells infiltrating in the pancreas (insulitis).The major populations of infiltrating cells are macrophages and T lymphocytes.Therefore, immune cell infiltration of pancreatic islets may be a crucial step in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 can specifically attract monocytes in vivo.Interferon induced protein-10 has chemoattractant effects on the activated lymphocytes.In this study, we analysed the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of mice and interferon inducible protein-10 mRNA in the pancreas of NOD mice, and discussed their possible role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.Methods The immunohistochemical method and immunoelectronmicroscopy were used to evaluate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in the pancreas of NOD mice and BALB/c mice.RT-PCR was used to evaluate the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon inducible protein mRNA in NOD mice.Results Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was positive in the pancreas of NOD mice, whereas negative in the pancreas of BALB/C mice.RT-PCR showed that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interferon inducible protein-10 mRNA could be found in the pancreas of NOD mice.Immunoelectronmicroscopy demonstrated that monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was produced by β cells and stored in the cytoplasm of the cells.Conclusions Pancreatic islet β cells produce monocyte chemoattractantprotein-1 in NOD mice.Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 may play an important part in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes by attracting monocytes/macrophages to infiltrate pancreatic

  1. Changes in T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yulu Miao; Mingxia Zhang; Yulin Nie; Wan Zhao; Bin Huang; Zhengming Jiang; Shaoxiong Yu; Zhibin Huang; Hongjin Fu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Besides local changes of cranial parenchymal cells, hemorrhage, etc., severe traumatic brain injuries also cause the changes of total body fluid and various functions, and the changes of lymphocytes and T lymphocyte subsets should be paid more attention to.OBJECTIVE: To reveal the changing laws of T lymphocyte subsets after severe traumatic brain injury, and compare with mild to moderate brain injury.DESIGN: A comparative observation.SETTINGS: Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City;Central Laboratory of Shenzhen Hospital of Prevention and Cure for Chronic Disease.PARTICIPANTS: All the subjects were selected from the Department of Neurosurgery, Longgang District Buji People's Hospital of Shenzhen City from August 2002 to August 2005. Thirty patients with severe brain injury, whose Glasgow coma score (GCS) was ≤ 8 points, were taken as the experimental group, including 21 males and 9 females, aging 16 - 62 years. Meanwhile, 30 patients with mild traumatic brain injury were taken as the control group (GCS ranged 14 - 15 points), including 18 males and 12 females, aging 15 - 58 years. All the subjects were in admission at 6 hours after injury, without disease of major organs before injury.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients or their relatives.conditions of pulmonaryinfections were observed at 4 days after injury. The differences of measurement data were compared with the t test.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes of T lymphocytes subsets at 1 - 14 days after severe and mild or moderate traumatic injury.RESULTS: Finally, 28 and 25 patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury, whereas 25 and 21 patients with severe traumatic brain injury were analyzed at 7 and 14 days respectively, and the missed ones CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8 began to decrease, whereas CD8 increased in the experimental group, which were very significantly different from those in the control group (t =2.77 - 3.26, P < 0

  2. Supervised Feature Subset Selection based on Modified Fuzzy Relative Information Measure for classifier Cart

    OpenAIRE

    K.SAROJINI,; Dr. K.THANGAVEL; D.DEVAKUMARI

    2010-01-01

    Feature subset selection is an essential task in data mining. This paper presents a new method for dealing with supervised feature subset selection based on Modified Fuzzy Relative Information Measure (MFRIM). First, Discretization algorithm is applied to discretize numeric features to construct the membership functions of each fuzzy sets of a feature. Then the proposed MFRIM is applied to select the feature subset focusing on boundary samples. The proposed method can select feature subset wi...

  3. Interleukin-22 binding protein (IL-22BP) is constitutively expressed by a subset of conventional dendritic cells and is strongly induced by retinoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J C J; Bériou, G; Heslan, M; Chauvin, C; Utriainen, L; Aumeunier, A; Scott, C L; Mowat, A; Cerovic, V; Houston, S A; Leboeuf, M; Hubert, F X; Hémont, C; Merad, M; Milling, S; Josien, R

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is mainly produced at barrier surfaces by T cells and innate lymphoid cells and is crucial to maintain epithelial integrity. However, dysregulated IL-22 action leads to deleterious inflammation and is involved in diseases such as psoriasis, intestinal inflammation, and cancer. IL-22 binding protein (IL-22BP) is a soluble inhibitory IL-22 receptor and may represent a crucial regulator of IL-22. We show both in rats and mice that, in the steady state, the main source of IL-22BP is constituted by a subset of conventional dendritic cells (DCs) in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. In mouse intestine, IL-22BP was specifically expressed in lamina propria CD103(+)CD11b(+) DC. In humans, IL-22BP was expressed in immature monocyte-derived DC and strongly induced by retinoic acid but dramatically reduced upon maturation. Our data suggest that a subset of immature DCs may actively participate in the regulation of IL-22 activity in the gut by producing high levels of IL-22BP. PMID:23653115

  4. Seronegative necrolytic acral erythema: A distinct clinical subset?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient was referred to us with asymptomatic, erythematous, nonitchy, scaly lesions present bilaterally on the dorsa of his feet and toes since the last 2 months. Both the legs had pitting edema as well. There were hyperkeratosis, focal parakeratosis, acanthosis and scattered spongiosis in the epidermis, and proliferation of capillaries with perivascular infiltration of lymphomononuclear cells in the dermis. There was no serological evidence of hepatitis C virus. Laboratory investigations revealed hypoalbuminemia and low-normal serum zinc. On clinicopathological correlation, we made a diagnosis of necrolytic acral erythema (NAE. The lesions responded dramatically to oral zinc sulfate and topical clobetasol propionate within 3 weeks with disappearance of edema and scaling and only a minimal residual erythema. This is the first reported case of NAE from Eastern India. NAE with negative serology for hepatitis C may be viewed as a distinct subset of the condition that had been originally described.

  5. T-lymphocyte subsets, thymic size and breastfeeding in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, Helle; Lisse, Ida M;

    2004-01-01

    We followed the changes in concentration of T-lymphocyte subsets (CD4+ and CD8+ cells) in peripheral blood and thymus size during infancy. Previous studies have found increased thymus size in breastfed infants. The present study analyzed the association between breastfeeding and the number of CD4......+ and CD8+ cells. Two different populations of infants between birth and 1 year of age were examined. Study Group I: infants with a variable duration of breastfeeding. Study Group II: long-term breastfed infants. In both groups a correlation was found between CD8+ cells and the thymic index at 10 months...... from 8 to 10 months of age; and a positive correlation between the number of breastfeedings per day at 8 months of age, and an increase in CD4+ cells from 8 to 10 months of age (p <0.01). In conclusion, a correlation was found between thymus size and CD8+ cells. Breastfeeding might have both a current...

  6. Plasticity of T helper cell subsets: Implications in periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Avaneendra; Arun, K V; Kumar, T S S; Clements, Jasmine

    2013-05-01

    T helper (Th) cells have an important role in host defence as well in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Th cells differentiate from naive cells into various subsets, each of which is associated with a set of inducing and effector cytokines. Previously, it was thought that this differentiation was an irreversible event. Recent evidence suggest that even differentiated Th cells, retain the flexibility to transform from one lineage to another, a phenomenon referred to as plasticity. This plasticity is thought to be brought about by epigenetic modifications that are regulated by external and internal signals in the micro-environment of these cells. The factors and mechanisms which affect the plasticity of these cells and their potential role in the etio-pathogenesis of periodontal disease has been described in this article. PMID:24049327

  7. Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, N; Hassanpour, S; Borenstein, A; Sima, C; Oveisi, M; Scholey, J; Cherney, D; Glogauer, M

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact with and contain the oral microflora without eliciting a marked inflammatory response. Based on a high-throughput screen of neutrophil CD (cluster of differentiation) marker expression and a thorough literature review, we developed multicolor flow cytometry panels to determine the surface marker signatures of oral neutrophil subsets in periodontal health and disease. We define here 3 distinct neutrophil subsets: resting/naive circulatory neutrophils, parainflammatory neutrophils found in the healthy oral cavity, and proinflammatory neutrophils found in the oral cavity during chronic periodontal disease. Furthermore, parainflammatory neutrophils manifest as 2 distinct subpopulations-based on size, granularity, and expression of specific CD markers-and exhibit intermediate levels of activation as compared with the proinflammatory oral neutrophils. These intermediately activated parainflammatory populations occur in equal proportions in the healthy oral cavity, with a shift to one highly activated proinflammatory neutrophil population in chronic periodontal disease. This work is the first to identify and characterize oral parainflammatory neutrophils that interact with commensal biofilms without inducing an inflammatory response, thereby demonstrating that not all neutrophils trafficking through periodontal tissues are fully activated. In addition to establishing possible diagnostic and treatment monitoring biomarkers, this oral neutrophil phenotype model builds on existing literature suggesting that the healthy periodontium may be in a parainflammatory state. PMID:27270666

  8. Tachykinins stimulate a subset of mouse taste cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Grant

    Full Text Available The tachykinins substance P (SP and neurokinin A (NKA are present in nociceptive sensory fibers expressing transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1. These fibers are found extensively in and around the taste buds of several species. Tachykinins are released from nociceptive fibers by irritants such as capsaicin, the active compound found in chili peppers commonly associated with the sensation of spiciness. Using real-time Ca(2+-imaging on isolated taste cells, it was observed that SP induces Ca(2+ -responses in a subset of taste cells at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. These responses were reversibly inhibited by blocking the SP receptor NK-1R. NKA also induced Ca(2+-responses in a subset of taste cells, but only at concentrations in the high nanomolar range. These responses were only partially inhibited by blocking the NKA receptor NK-2R, and were also inhibited by blocking NK-1R indicating that NKA is only active in taste cells at concentrations that activate both receptors. In addition, it was determined that tachykinin signaling in taste cells requires Ca(2+-release from endoplasmic reticulum stores. RT-PCR analysis further confirmed that mouse taste buds express NK-1R and NK-2R. Using Ca(2+-imaging and single cell RT-PCR, it was determined that the majority of tachykinin-responsive taste cells were Type I (Glial-like and umami-responsive Type II (Receptor cells. Importantly, stimulating NK-1R had an additive effect on Ca(2+ responses evoked by umami stimuli in Type II (Receptor cells. This data indicates that tachykinin release from nociceptive sensory fibers in and around taste buds may enhance umami and other taste modalities, providing a possible mechanism for the increased palatability of spicy foods.

  9. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS, particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation.

  10. Burkholderia pseudomallei induces IL-23 production in primary human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsantiwong, Panthong; Pudla, Matsayapan; Boondit, Jitrada; Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Dunachie, Susanna J; Chantratita, Narisara; Utaisincharoen, Pongsak

    2016-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, a gram-negative intracellular bacterium, is a causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium has been shown to induce the innate immune response, particularly pro-inflammatory cytokine production in several of both mouse and human cell types. In the present study, we investigate host immune response in B. pseudomallei-infected primary human monocytes. We discover that wild-type B. pseudomallei is able to survive and multiply inside the primary human monocytes. In contrast, B. pseudomallei LPS mutant, a less virulent strain, is susceptible to host killing during bacterial infection. Moreover, microarray result showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei but not B. pseudomallei LPS mutant is able to activate gene expression of IL-23 as demonstrated by the up-regulation of p19 and p40 subunit expression. Consistent with gene expression analysis, the secretion of IL-23 analyzed by ELISA also showed that wild-type B. pseudomallei induces a significantly higher level of IL-23 secretion than that of B. pseudomallei LPS mutant. These results implied that IL-23 may be an important cytokine for the innate immune response during B. pseudomallei infection. The regulation of IL-23 production may drive the different host innate immune responses between patients and may relate to the severity of melioidosis. PMID:26563410

  11. Inhibition of monocyte esterase activity by organophosphate insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M J; Waters, H C

    1977-11-01

    Organophosphate insecticides, such as Vapona, Naled, and Rabon, are highly potent inhibitors of an enzyme found in human monocytes. The enzyme, a specific monocyte esterase, could be inhibited by Vapona in blood samples via airborne contamination at levels easily achieved from commercial slow-release insecticide strips. Fifty percent inhibition (I50)--as measured on the Hemalog D (Technicon Corp.)--occurred at solution concentrations of 0.22, 1.5, and 2.6 X 10(-6) g/liter for Vapona, Rabon, and Naled, respectively. Parathion (a thiophosphate) and Baygon (a carbamate) were less potent, with I50 values of 3.7 X 10(-5) and 1.5 X 10(-4) g/liter, respectively. Dursban (another thiophosphate) and Carbaryl (a carbamate) showed only marginal inhibition. Eserine, malathion, nicotine and pyrethrum had no inhibitory effect up to 0.5 g/liter. The occurrence of this effect in vivo has not yet been shown, nor is it clear what the implications of such an effect would be. The inhibition of this enzyme by airborne contaminants, however, may interfere with the proper functioning of the Hemalog D. PMID:907842

  12. A case of human monocytic ehrlichiosis in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsić Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Ehrlichiosis is a bacterial zoonosis transmitted by hematophagous arthropods - ticks. In humans, it occurs as monocytic, granulocytic, and ewingii ehrlichiosis. Pathological process is based on parasitic presence of Ehrlichia organisms within peripheral blood cells - monocytes and granulocytes. Case Outline. Fifty-two year old patient was admitted to hospital due to high fever of over 40°C that lasted two days, accompanied with chills, muscle aches, malaise, loss of appetite, headache, confusion, breathing difficulties, and mild dry cough. The history suggested tick bite that occurred seven days before the onset of disease. Doxycycline was introduced and administered for 14 days, causing the disease to subside. Indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to analyze three serum samples obtained from this patient for Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies, and peripheral blood smear was evaluated for the presence of Ehrlichia and Ehrlichia aggregation into morulae. Conclusion. Ehrlichiosis should be considered in each case where there is a history of tick bite together with the clinical picture (high fever, chills, muscle aches, headache, generalized weakness and malaise, and possible maculopapular rash. The presence of Ehrlichia chaffeensis antibodies was confirmed in a patient with the history of tick bite, appropriate clinical picture and indirect immunofluorescence assay. This confirmed the presence of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis, a disease that is uncommonly identified in our country.

  13. TRIGGERING OF A CYTOLYTIC FACTOR WITH TNF-LIKE ACTIVITY FROM HUMAN MONOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monocytes have a nonoxidative mechanism of tumor cytolysis operative in CGD and in normal monocytes under anaerobic conditions. The absence of competitive inhibition provides negative evidence for a contact-independent mechanism of cytolysis, confirmed by the demonstration of a s...

  14. The immune theory of psychiatric diseases : a key role for activated microglia and circulating monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, Wouter; Gibney, Sinead M.; Drexhage, Roosmarijn C.; Pont-Lezica, Lorena; Doorduin, Janine; Klein, Hans C.; Steiner, Johann; Connor, Thomas J.; Harkin, Andrew; Versnel, Marjan A.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes a key role for mononuclear phagocytes in the pathogenesis of major psychiatric disorders. There is accumulating evidence for activation of microglia (histopathology and PET scans) and circulating monocytes (enhanced gene expression of immune genes, an overproduction of monocyte

  15. Induction of endothelial cell proliferation by angiogenic factors released by activated monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Cell-cell interaction is an essential component of atherosclerotic plaque development. Activated monocytes appear to play a central role in the development of atherosclerosis, not only through foam cell formation but also via the production of various growth factors that induce proliferation of different cell types that are involved in the plaque development. Using serum free co-culture method, we determined the effect of monocytes on endothelial cell proliferation. Methods: Endothelial cell proliferation is determined by the amount of [3H]thymidine incorporated in to the DNA. Basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels in the conditioned medium were determined by ELISA. Results: Conditioned medium from unactivated monocytes partially inhibited endothelial cell proliferation, whereas conditioned medium from activated monocytes promoted endothelial cell proliferation. The mitogenic effect of conditioned medium derived from activated monocytes is due to the presence of b-FGF, VEGF and IL-8. Neutralizing antibodies against b-FGF, VEGF and IL-8 partially reversed the mitogenic effect of conditioned medium derived from activated monocytes. When b-FGF, VEGF and IL-8 were immunoprecipitated from conditioned medium derived from activated monocytes, it is less mitogenic to endothelial cells. Conclusion: Activated monocytes may play an important role in the development of atherosclerotic plaque by producing endothelial cell growth factors

  16. High glucose-induced oxidative stress increases transient receptor potential channel expression in human monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wuensch, Tilo; Thilo, Florian; Krueger, Katharina; Scholze, Alexandra; Ristow, Michael; Tepel, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channel-induced cation influx activates human monocytes, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high glucose-induced oxidative stress on TRP channel expression in human monocytes....

  17. Monocyte function and plasma levels of interleukin-8 in acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, A J; Reis, A; Buggle, F; Al-Khalaf, A; Werle, E; Valois, N; Bertram, M; Becher, H; Grond-Ginsbach, C

    2001-11-15

    Activated monocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ischemic stroke. We tested the hypothesis that release products and procoagulant activity of monocytes are increased in acute ischemic stroke. In patients on days 1, 3 and 7 after ischemic stroke and in age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects, we assessed plasma levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) and neopterin (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA) and investigated superoxidanion release (ferricytochrome C reduction), procoagulant activity (one-stage clotting assay) and tissue factor (TF) gene transcription (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) by monocytes. As compared to control subjects (n=23), IL-8 levels were increased on day 1 after stroke (n=22; p=0.005) and remained elevated on days 3 and 7. Neopterin levels were elevated on days 3 and 7 (p<0.05, respectively) but not on day 1. Neopterin and IL-8 were not correlated with monocyte counts. Superoxid anion production by stimulated and unstimulated monocytes was not different between groups. TF mRNA could neither be detected in monocytes from patients investigated within 12 h after ischemia (n=12) nor in control subjects (n=10) and procoagulant activity of cells was similar in both groups. Our results indicate increased monocyte activation after ischemic stroke although not all activation parameters were elevated. We found no support for the hypothesis that circulating monocytes express TF and possess increased procoagulant activity. Elevated IL-8 may contribute to stroke pathophysiology by activating polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) activation early after ischemia. PMID:11701151

  18. Reticuloendothelial cell function in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA: studies on the mechanism of peripheral monocyte activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunada,Mitsutoshi

    1985-10-01

    Full Text Available We examined the activity of peripheral blood monocytes in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA using an in vitro assay of monocyte-macrophage interaction with erythrocytes and an antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC assay. The monocytes of AIHA patients in the hemolyzing period phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells and anti-D coated red cells more avidly than normal control monocytes. There was no significant relationship between phagocytic activity and ADCC activity. The activated monocytes phagocytized autologous sensitized red cells, but had no ADCC activity in a short time 51Cr release assay. Phagocytic activity of the patients' monocytes against autologous erythrocytes rapidly decreased after treatment with prednisolone even though the red cell sensitization with antibody remained almost the same as during the hemolyzing period. We postulated that the activation of monocytes in AIHA was due to the "arming" effect of anti-erythrocyte antibody, but we think that other mechanisms may also be involved in the activation of monocytes.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of monocyte infiltration in an animal model of multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Engberink, R.D.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study neuroinflammatory processes and more specifically the infiltration of monocytes in the central nervous system (CNS) in an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Monocytes play a key role in MS pathology, and the study of

  20. Ly6C(+) monocyte efferocytosis and cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, S R; Atif, S M; Gibbings, S L; Thomas, S M; Prabagar, M G; Danhorn, T; Leach, S M; Henson, P M; Jakubzick, C V

    2016-06-01

    Recently it was shown that circulating Ly6C(+) monocytes traffic from tissue to the draining lymph nodes (LNs) with minimal alteration in their overall phenotype. Furthermore, in the steady state, Ly6C(+) monocytes are as abundant as classical dendritic cells (DCs) within the draining LNs, and even more abundant during inflammation. However, little is known about the functional roles of constitutively trafficking Ly6C(+) monocytes. In this study we investigated whether Ly6C(+) monocytes can efferocytose (acquire dying cells) and cross-present cell-associated antigen, a functional property particularly attributed to Batf3(+) DCs. We demonstrated that Ly6C(+) monocytes intrinsically efferocytose and cross-present cell-associated antigen to CD8(+) T cells. In addition, efferocytosis was enhanced upon direct activation of the Ly6C(+) monocytes through its corresponding TLRs, TLR4 and TLR7. However, only ligation of TLR7, and not TLR4, enhanced cross-presentation by Ly6C(+) monocytes. Overall, this study outlines two functional roles, among others, that Ly6C(+) monocytes have during an adaptive immune response. PMID:26990659

  1. Blood monocyte oxidative burst activity in acute P. falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Theander, T G

    1989-01-01

    The release of superoxide anion from blood monocytes was studied in eight patients with acute primary attack P. falciparum malaria. Before treatment a significant enhancement of the oxidative burst prevailed, which contrasts with previous findings of a depressed monocyte chemotactic responsivenes...

  2. Phenotypic, functional, and quantitative characterization of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Bueno

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The yield as well as phenotypic and functional parameters of canine peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages were analyzed. The cells that remained adherent to Teflon after 10 days of culture had high phagocytic activity when inoculated with Leishmania chagasi. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that more than 80% of cultured cells were positive for the monocyte/macrophage marker CD14.

  3. Comparative analysis of signature genes in PRRSV-infected porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells at differential activation statuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation statuses of monocytic cells including monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are critically important for antiviral immunity. In particular, some devastating viruses, including porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), are capable of directly infecting these c...

  4. Correlation between frequencies of blood monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells and negative prognostic markers in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; Køllgaard, Tania; Kongsted, Per;

    2014-01-01

    function of immune suppressive cell subsets in the peripheral blood of 41 patients with prostate cancer (PC) and 36 healthy donors (HD) showed a significant increase in circulating CD14(+) HLA-DR(low/neg) monocytic MDSC (M-MDSC) and Tregs in patients with PC compared to HD. Furthermore, M-MDSC frequencies......Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are believed to play a role in immune suppression and subsequent failure of T cells to mount an efficient anti-tumor response, by employing both direct T-cell inhibition as well as induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Investigating the frequency and...... correlated positively with Treg levels. In vitro proliferation assay with autologous T cells confirmed M-MDSC-mediated T-cell suppression, and intracellular staining of immune suppressive enzyme iNOS revealed a higher expression in M-MDSC from patients with PC. Increased frequencies of M-MDSC correlated with...

  5. Suppression of blood monocyte and neutrophil chemotaxis in acute human malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H; Kharazmi, A; Theander, T G

    1986-01-01

    tested monocyte chemotactic responsiveness in 19 patients with acute primary attack malaria. In addition, the neutrophil chemotaxis was measured in 12 patients. Before the initiation of antimalarial treatment a significant depression of monocyte chemotaxis was observed in approximately half of the...... suppressed. The monocyte chemotaxis was followed in 14 of the patients, during treatment and after complete recovery. After 3 days of treatment the response had improved in most of the patients, and after 7 days all patients had a normal monocyte chemotaxis, which remained normal after one month. No...... significant differences between P. falciparum and P. vivax/ovale malaria was observed with respect to blood monocyte chemotactic responsiveness. Neutrophil chemotaxis in patients with P. falciparum infections was similarly suppressed before treatment (54% of controls), was still defective after 3 days of...

  6. Localisation of the monocyte-binding region on human immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, J M; Partridge, L J; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1986-03-01

    Earlier studies, which provided indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain of human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in human monocyte binding, have been extended to further localise the site of interaction on human IgG. A number of IgGs from several different species and fragments of human IgGs were assayed for ability to inhibit the interaction of radio-labelled human IgG and the human monocyte. By comparison of the amino-acid sequences of those IgGs found to exhibit relatively tight, intermediate or weak binding to human monocyte Fc receptors we are able to postulate a possible monocyte-binding site on human IgG. In addition, the results have implications for the applicability of monoclonal antibodies and antisera when used in the presence of human monocytes and possibly macrophages. PMID:3487030

  7. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR) regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP) was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma. The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB) isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions. GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003), which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001) and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04), rather than into dendritic cells, as in control animals. Treatment with GCLRP did not result in a significant change in survival of mice bearing a tumor. In vitro and in vivo activation of monocytes was achieved by administration of GCLR to mice. GCLRP-activated blood monocytes were recruited to the brain and exhibited specific phenotypes corresponding with tumor region (glioma, peritumoral zone, and contralateral glioma-free hemisphere). GCLRP treatment alone was associated with increased glioma mass as the result of the infiltration of phagocytic cells. Regional specificity for MDCB may have

  8. Yolk Sac Macrophages, Fetal Liver, and Adult Monocytes Can Colonize an Empty Niche and Develop into Functional Tissue-Resident Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Lianne; Saelens, Wouter; De Prijck, Sofie; Martens, Liesbet; Scott, Charlotte L; Van Isterdael, Gert; Hoffmann, Eik; Beyaert, Rudi; Saeys, Yvan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Guilliams, Martin

    2016-04-19

    Tissue-resident macrophages can derive from yolk sac macrophages (YS-Macs), fetal liver monocytes (FL-MOs), or adult bone-marrow monocytes (BM-MOs). The relative capacity of these precursors to colonize a niche, self-maintain, and perform tissue-specific functions is unknown. We simultaneously transferred traceable YS-Macs, FL-MOs, and BM-MOs into the empty alveolar macrophage (AM) niche of neonatal Csf2rb(-/-) mice. All subsets produced AMs, but in competition preferential outgrowth of FL-MOs was observed, correlating with their superior granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) reactivity and proliferation capacity. When transferred separately, however, all precursors efficiently colonized the alveolar niche and generated AMs that were transcriptionally almost identical, self-maintained, and durably prevented alveolar proteinosis. Mature liver, peritoneal, or colon macrophages could not efficiently colonize the empty AM niche, whereas mature AMs could. Thus, precursor origin does not affect the development of functional self-maintaining tissue-resident macrophages and the plasticity of the mononuclear phagocyte system is largest at the precursor stage. PMID:26992565

  9. Interleukin-10 Regulates the Tissue Factor Activity of Monocytes in an In Vitro Model of Bacterial Endocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Veltrop, Marcel H. A. M.; Langermans, Jan A. M.; Thompson, Jan; Bancsi, Maurice J. L. M. F.

    2001-01-01

    Monocytes are important effector cells in the pathogenesis of bacterial endocarditis since they provide the tissue factor that activates the coagulation system and maintains established vegetations. Monocytes secrete cytokines that can modulate monocyte tissue factor activity (TFA), thereby affecting the formation and maintenance of vegetations. In this study, we show that monocytes cultured for 4 h on a Streptococcus sanguis-infected fibrin matrix mimicking the in vivo vegetational surface e...

  10. Proteomic Analysis of Circulating Monocytes Identifies Cathepsin D as A Potential Novel Plasma Marker of Acute Coronary Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Vivanco; Jesús Egido; José Tuñón; Lorenzo Lopez-Bescos; Gloria Alvarez-Llamas; Julio Jiménez-Narcher; Luis Miguel Blanco-Colio; Jose Luis Martin-Ventura; Fernando de la Cuesta; Verónica M. Dardé; Maria G Barderas

    2008-01-01

    We have performed a proteomic analysis of peripheral blood monocytes from ACS patients in comparison with healthy subjects and stable coronary patients in order to search novel biomarkers of ACS in circulating monocytes. Monocytes were isolated from blood of patients with non-ST elevation ACS (n = 27) at day 0, 2 and 6 months, and from patients with stable coronary disease (n = 10) and matched healthy controls (n = 11). The proteomic analysis of monocytes from ACS patients at day 0 showed ...

  11. A curated compendium of monocyte transcriptome datasets of relevance to human monocyte immunobiology research [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darawan Rinchai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Systems-scale profiling approaches have become widely used in translational research settings. The resulting accumulation of large-scale datasets in public repositories represents a critical opportunity to promote insight and foster knowledge discovery. However, resources that can serve as an interface between biomedical researchers and such vast and heterogeneous dataset collections are needed in order to fulfill this potential. Recently, we have developed an interactive data browsing and visualization web application, the Gene Expression Browser (GXB. This tool can be used to overlay deep molecular phenotyping data with rich contextual information about analytes, samples and studies along with ancillary clinical or immunological profiling data. In this note, we describe a curated compendium of 93 public datasets generated in the context of human monocyte immunological studies, representing a total of 4,516 transcriptome profiles. Datasets were uploaded to an instance of GXB along with study description and sample annotations. Study samples were arranged in different groups. Ranked gene lists were generated based on relevant group comparisons. This resource is publicly available online at http://monocyte.gxbsidra.org/dm3/landing.gsp.

  12. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) and HBV Co-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z; Nishikawa, S; Gao, S; Eksteen, J B; Czub, M; Gill, M J; Osiowy, C; van der Meer, F; van Marle, G; Coffin, C S

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets by the HBV. Aims To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells) in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals. Methods Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy) and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy) were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc)-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing. Results All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (P<0.04). In the CD4+ and CD56+ subset of 2 HBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R) were detected in a minor percentage of the population. Summary HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation. PMID:26390290

  13. A Short Note on Disjointness Conditions for Triples of Group Subsets Satisfying the Triple Product Property

    CERN Document Server

    Murthy, Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    We deduce some elementary pairwise disjointness and semi-disjointness conditions on triples of subsets in arbitrary groups satisfying the so-called triple product property (TPP) as originally defined by H. Cohn and C. Umans in 2003. This property TPP for a triple of group subsets, called a TPP triple, allows the group to "realize" matrix multiplication of dimensions the sizes of the subsets, with the subsets acting as indexing sets for input matrices which are embedded into the regular algebra of the group. We derive nine different disjointness casetypes for an arbitrary TPP triple, and classify these into four different disjointness classes based on an integer measure of the degree of pairwise disjointness among the subsets. Finally, we derive lower and upper bounds for the sum of sizes of the subsets forming a TPP triple, which is the additive equivalent of the multiplicative bounds originally derived by Cohn and Umans for the product of sizes of subsets forming a TPP triple.

  14. DMPD: Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-13. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534111 Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-4 and IL-1...):575-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Differential responses of human monocytes and macrophages to IL-...4 and IL-13. PubmedID 10534111 Title Differential responses of human monocytes an

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  3. Evaluating the Use of Monocytes with a Degradable Polyurethane for Vascular Tissue Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Kyle Giovanni

    Monocytes are one of the first cell types present following the implantation of a biomaterial or tissue engineered construct. Depending on the monocyte activation state supported by the biomaterial, monocytes and their derived macrophages (MDMs) can act as positive contributors to tissue regeneration and wound healing, or conversely promote a chronic inflammatory response that leads to fibrous encapsulation and implant rejection. A degradable polar hydrophobic iconic polyurethane (D-PHI) has been shown to reduce pro-inflammatory monocyte/macrophage response compared to tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), a substrate routinely used for in vitro culture of cells, as well as poly(lactide- co-glycolide) (PLGA), a standard synthetic biodegradable biomaterial in the tissue engineering field. D-PHI has also shown properties suitable for use in a vascular tissue engineering context. In order to understand the mechanism through which D-PHI attenuates pro-inflammatory monocyte response, this thesis investigated the ability of D-PHI to modulate interactions with adsorbed serum proteins and the properties of D-PHI that were important for this activity. D-PHI was shown to regulate protein adsorption in a manner that produced divergent monocyte responses compared to TCPS and PLGA when coated with the serum proteins alpha2-macroglobulin or immunoglobulin G (IgG). In the case of IgG, D-PHI was shown to reduce pro-inflammatory binding site exposure as a function of the material's polar, hydrophobic, and ionic character. Due to the favourable monocyte activation state supported by D-PHI, and the importance of monocytes/macrophages in regulating the response of tissue-specific cell types in vivo, the ability of a D-PHI-stimulated monocyte/macrophage activation state to contribute to modulating the response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in a vascular tissue engineering context was investigated. D-PHI- stimulated monocytes promoted VSMC growth and migration through biomolecule

  4. Application of subset simulation in reliability estimation of underground pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a computational framework for implementing an advanced Monte Carlo simulation method, called Subset Simulation (SS) for time-dependent reliability prediction of underground flexible pipelines. The SS can provide better resolution for low failure probability level of rare failure events which are commonly encountered in pipeline engineering applications. Random samples of statistical variables are generated efficiently and used for computing probabilistic reliability model. It gains its efficiency by expressing a small probability event as a product of a sequence of intermediate events with larger conditional probabilities. The efficiency of SS has been demonstrated by numerical studies and attention in this work is devoted to scrutinise the robustness of the SS application in pipe reliability assessment and compared with direct Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method. Reliability of a buried flexible steel pipe with time-dependent failure modes, namely, corrosion induced deflection, buckling, wall thrust and bending stress has been assessed in this study. The analysis indicates that corrosion induced excessive deflection is the most critical failure event whereas buckling is the least susceptible during the whole service life of the pipe. The study also shows that SS is robust method to estimate the reliability of buried pipelines and it is more efficient than MCS, especially in small failure probability prediction

  5. Optimal Features Subset Selection and Classification for Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabir Bhattacharya

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The selection of the optimal features subset and the classification have become an important issue in the field of iris recognition. We propose a feature selection scheme based on the multiobjectives genetic algorithm (MOGA to improve the recognition accuracy and asymmetrical support vector machine for the classification of iris patterns. We also suggest a segmentation scheme based on the collarette area localization. The deterministic feature sequence is extracted from the iris images using the 1D log-Gabor wavelet technique, and the extracted feature sequence is used to train the support vector machine (SVM. The MOGA is applied to optimize the features sequence and to increase the overall performance based on the matching accuracy of the SVM. The parameters of SVM are optimized to improve the overall generalization performance, and the traditional SVM is modified to an asymmetrical SVM to treat the false accept and false reject cases differently and to handle the unbalanced data of a specific class with respect to the other classes. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of SVM as a classifier is better than the performance of the classifiers based on the feedforward neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, and the Hamming and the Mahalanobis distances. The proposed technique is computationally effective with recognition rates of 99.81% and 96.43% on CASIA and ICE datasets, respectively.

  6. Optimal Features Subset Selection and Classification for Iris Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The selection of the optimal features subset and the classification have become an important issue in the field of iris recognition. We propose a feature selection scheme based on the multiobjectives genetic algorithm (MOGA to improve the recognition accuracy and asymmetrical support vector machine for the classification of iris patterns. We also suggest a segmentation scheme based on the collarette area localization. The deterministic feature sequence is extracted from the iris images using the 1D log-Gabor wavelet technique, and the extracted feature sequence is used to train the support vector machine (SVM. The MOGA is applied to optimize the features sequence and to increase the overall performance based on the matching accuracy of the SVM. The parameters of SVM are optimized to improve the overall generalization performance, and the traditional SVM is modified to an asymmetrical SVM to treat the false accept and false reject cases differently and to handle the unbalanced data of a specific class with respect to the other classes. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of SVM as a classifier is better than the performance of the classifiers based on the feedforward neural network, the k-nearest neighbor, and the Hamming and the Mahalanobis distances. The proposed technique is computationally effective with recognition rates of 99.81% and 96.43% on CASIA and ICE datasets, respectively.

  7. Regulatory T cells subsets in filarial infection and their function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eMetenou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Filarial infections in humans are chronic infections that cause significant morbidity. The chronic nature of these infections with continuous antigen release is associated with a parasite-specific T cell hypo-responsiveness that may over time also affect the immune responses to bystander antigens. Previous studies have shown the filarial parasite antigen-specific T cells hypo-responsiveness is mediated by regulatory cytokines -- IL-10 and TGF-β in particular. Recent studies have suggested that the modulated/regulated T cell responses associated with patent filarial infection may reflect an expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs that include both Tregs induced in peripheral circulation or pTregs and the thymus-derived Tregs or tTregs. Although much is known about the phenotype of these regulatory populations, the mechanisms underlying their expansion and their mode of action in filarial and other infections remain unclear. Nevertheless there are data to suggest that while many of these regulatory cells are activated in an antigen-specific manner the ensuing effectors of this activation are relatively non-specific and may affect a broad range of immune cells. This review will focus on the subsets and function of regulatory T cells in filarial infection.

  8. Alteration of peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miroslawa Pietruczuk; Milena I Dabrowska; Urszula Wereszczynska-Siemiatkowska; Andrzej Dabrowski

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate peripheral blood lymphocyte subsets in patients with acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: Twenty patients with mild AP (M-AP) and 15 with severe AP (S-AP) were included in our study. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were examined at d 1-3, 5,10 and 30 by means of flow cytometry.RESULTS: A significant depletion of circulating lymphocytes was found in AP. In the early AP, the magnitude of depletion was similar for T- and B- lymphocytes. In the late course of S-AP, B-lymphocytes were much more depleted than T-lymphocytes. At d 10, strong shift in the CD7+/CD19+ ratio implicating predominance of Tover B-lymphocytes in S-AP was found. Among T-lymphocytes, the significant depletion of the CD4+ population was observed in M-AP and S-AP, while CD8+ cells were in the normal range. Lymphocytes were found to strongly express activation markers: CD69, CD25, CD28,CD38 and CD122. Serum interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5,IL-10, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) levels were significantly increased in both forms of AP. The magnitude of elevation of cytokines known to be produced by Th2 was much higher than cytokines produced by Th1 cells.CONCLUSION: AP in humans is characterized by significant reduction of peripheral blood T- and B-lymphocytes.

  9. Bayesian Subset Modeling for High-Dimensional Generalized Linear Models

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a new prior setting for high-dimensional generalized linear models, which leads to a Bayesian subset regression (BSR) with the maximum a posteriori model approximately equivalent to the minimum extended Bayesian information criterion model. The consistency of the resulting posterior is established under mild conditions. Further, a variable screening procedure is proposed based on the marginal inclusion probability, which shares the same properties of sure screening and consistency with the existing sure independence screening (SIS) and iterative sure independence screening (ISIS) procedures. However, since the proposed procedure makes use of joint information from all predictors, it generally outperforms SIS and ISIS in real applications. This article also makes extensive comparisons of BSR with the popular penalized likelihood methods, including Lasso, elastic net, SIS, and ISIS. The numerical results indicate that BSR can generally outperform the penalized likelihood methods. The models selected by BSR tend to be sparser and, more importantly, of higher prediction ability. In addition, the performance of the penalized likelihood methods tends to deteriorate as the number of predictors increases, while this is not significant for BSR. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  10. Lymphocyte subsets and response to PHA among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to elucidate the effect of radiation exposure on immune competence in man, the number of lymphocytes, lymphocyte subsets, and the percentage of phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced transformation of lymphocytes were determined in 66 cancer patients, 25 of whom were exposed to atomic radiation at ≤ 2,000 m from ground zero and 41 others were not exposed. The number of lymphocytes was decreased with increasing age at exposure. The percentage of OKT3-positive cells tended to be lower in exposed patients who were in their twenties at the time of exposure than the non-exposed patients. Among patients in their teens and twenties at the time of exposure, there was a tendency toward decreased percentage of OKT4-positive cells (T4) and increased percentage of OKT8-positive cells (T8). The T4/T8 ratio was reduced. Patients who were in their first decade of life at the time of exposure tended to have decreased OKIa 1-positive cells, and increased Leulla-positive cells. Patients exposed in their twenties and thirties had slightly decreased percentage of PHA-induced transformation of lymphocytes. (Namekawa, K.)

  11. Toxicity of silver nanoparticles in monocytes and keratinocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orłowski, Piotr; Krzyzowska, Malgorzata; Winnicka, Anna;

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles are of interest to be used as antimicrobial agents in wound dressings and coatings in medical devices, but potential adverse effects have been reported in the literature. The possible local inflammatory response to silver nanoparticles and the role of cell death in determining...... these effects are largely unknown. Effects of the mixture of silver nanoparticles of different sizes were compared in in vitro assays for cytotoxicity, caspase-1 and caspase-9 activity and bax expression. In all tested concentrations, silver nanoparticles were more toxic for RAW 264.7 monocytes than for...... 291.03C keratinocytes and induced significant caspase-1 activity and necrotic cell death. In keratinocytes, more significantly than in macrophages, silver nanoparticles led to increase of caspase-9 activity and apoptosis. These results indicate that effects of silver nanoparticles depend on the type...

  12. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Druszczynska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms.

  13. Role of cytochemical staining in diagnosis of monocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the role of cytochemical staining in MIC(morphology ,immunology and cytogenetics) typing of acute monocytic leukemia (AML-M5) and acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AML-M4). Methods: The authors analyzed the characteristics of morphology, immunology and cytogenetics in 47 cases of diagnosed AML. Results: Eventually, they were diagnosed with MIC. There were 25 cases with AML-M5, 19 cases with AML-M4(consisted of 5 cases diagnosed AML-M4Eo), 2 cases with acute myeloid leukemia with t(8:21) and 1 case with T-ALL. Conclusions: During MIC typing of AML-M4 and AML-M5, the diagnostic value of morphology remains important, for immunophenotype, cytogenetics and morphology are interdependent. Immunophenotype and cytogenetics are necessary for improvement of the accuracy rate of diagnosis. (authors)

  14. The connection of monocytes and reactive oxygen species in pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Hackel

    Full Text Available The interplay of specific leukocyte subpopulations, resident cells and proalgesic mediators results in pain in inflammation. Proalgesic mediators like reactive oxygen species (ROS and downstream products elicit pain by stimulation of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. The contribution of leukocyte subpopulations however is less clear. Local injection of neutrophilic chemokines elicits neutrophil recruitment but no hyperalgesia in rats. In meta-analyses the monocytic chemoattractant, CCL2 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1; MCP-1, was identified as an important factor in the pathophysiology of human and animal pain. In this study, intraplantar injection of CCL2 elicited thermal and mechanical pain in Wistar but not in Dark Agouti (DA rats, which lack p47(phox, a part of the NADPH oxidase complex. Inflammatory hyperalgesia after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA as well as capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia and capsaicin-induced current flow in dorsal root ganglion neurons in DA were comparable to Wistar rats. Macrophages from DA expressed lower levels of CCR2 and thereby migrated less towards CCL2 and formed limited amounts of ROS in vitro and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE in the tissue in response to CCL2 compared to Wistar rats. Local adoptive transfer of peritoneal macrophages from Wistar but not from DA rats reconstituted CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia in leukocyte-depleted DA and Wistar rats. A pharmacological stimulator of ROS production (phytol restored CCL2-induced hyperalgesia in vivo in DA rats. In Wistar rats, CCL2-induced hyperalgesia was completely blocked by superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase or tempol. Likewise, inhibition of NADPH oxidase by apocynin reduced CCL2-elicited hyperalgesia but not CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. In summary, we provide a link between CCL2, CCR2 expression on macrophages, NADPH oxidase, ROS and the development CCL2-triggered hyperalgesia, which is different from CFA-induced hyperalgesia. The study

  15. Immunomodulation of monocytes by probiotic and selected lactic Acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Drømtorp, Signe Marie; Axelsson, Lars; Grimmer, Stine

    2015-03-01

    Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially bacteria belonging to the genus Lactobacillus, are recognized as common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and have received considerable attention in the last decades due to their postulated health-promoting effects. LAB and probiotic bacteria can modulate the host immune response. However, much is unknown about the mediators and mechanisms responsible for their immunological effect. Here, we present a study using cytokine secretion from the monocytic cell line THP-1 and NF-κB activation in the monocytic cell line U937-3xkB-LUC to elucidate immune stimulating abilities of LAB in vitro. In this study, we investigate both commercially available and potential probiotic LAB strains, and the role of putative surface proteins of L. reuteri using mutants. L. reuteri strains induced the highest cytokine secretion and the highest NF-κB activation, whereas L. plantarum strains and L. rhamnosus GG were low inducers/activators. One of the putative L. reuteri surface proteins, Hmpref0536_10802, appeared to be of importance for the stimulation of THP-1 cells and the activation of NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells. Live and UV-inactivated preparations resulted in different responses for two of the strains investigated. Our results add to the complexity in the interaction between LAB and human cells and suggest the possible involvement of secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators of LAB. It is likely that it is the sum of bacterial surface proteins and bacterial metabolites and/or secreted proteins that induce cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells and activate NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells in this study. PMID:25331988

  16. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  17. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles. PMID:25934926

  18. Epigenetic regulation of extracellular-superoxide dismutase in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Tetsuro; Machiura, Masatomo; Makino, Junya; Hara, Hirokazu; Hozumi, Isao; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-08-01

    Extracellular-superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is a major SOD isozyme mainly present in the vascular wall and plays an important role in normal redox homeostasis. We previously showed the significant reduction or induction of EC-SOD during human monocytic U937 or THP-1 cell differentiation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), respectively; however, its cell-specific expression and regulation have not been fully elucidated. It has been reported that epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation and histone modification, are involved in several kinds of gene regulation. In this study, we investigated the involvement of epigenetic factors in EC-SOD expression and determined high levels of DNA methylation within promoter and coding regions of EC-SOD in THP-1 cells compared to those in U937 cells. Moreover, treatment with a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-azacytidine, significantly induced the expression of EC-SOD in THP-1 cells, indicating the importance of DNA methylation in the suppression of EC-SOD expression; however, the DNA methylation status did not change during THP-1 cell differentiation induced by TPA. On the other hand, we detected histone H3 and H4 acetylation during differentiation. Further, pretreatment with histone acetyltransferase inhibitors, CPTH2 or garcinol, significantly suppressed the TPA-inducible EC-SOD expression. We also determined the epigenetic suppression of EC-SOD in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)/granulocyte-CSF induced that expression. Overall, these findings provide novel evidence that cell-specific and TPA-inducible EC-SOD expression are regulated by DNA methylation and histone H3 and H4 acetylation in human monocytic cells. PMID:23602908

  19. Characterization of lymphocyte subsets over a 24-hour period in Pineal-Associated Lymphoid Tissue (PALT in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNulty John A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeostatic trafficking of lymphocytes in the brain has important relevance to the understanding of CNS disease processes. The pineal gland of the chicken contains large accumulations of lymphocytes that suggest an important role related to homeostatic circadian neuro-immune interactions. The purpose of this initial study was to characterize the lymphocyte subsets in the pineal gland and quantitate the distribution and frequency of lymphocyte phenotypes at two time points over the 24-hour light:dark cycle. Results PALT comprised approximately 10% of the total pineal area. Image analysis of immunocytochemically stained sections showed that the majority of lymphocytes were CD3+ (80% with the remaining 20% comprising B-cells and monocytes (Bu-1+, which tended to distribute along the periphery of the PALT. T-cell subsets in PALT included CD4+ (75–80%, CD8+ (20–25%, TCRαβ/Vβ1+ (60%, and TCRγδ+ (15%. All of the T-cell phenotypes were commonly found within the interfollicular septa and follicles of the pineal gland. However, the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ within the pineal tissue were each 1:1, in contrast to the PALT where the ratios of CD8+/CD4+ and TCRγδ+/TCRαβ/Vβ1+ each approximated 1:4. Bu-1+ cells were only rarely seen in the pineal interstitial spaces, but ramified Bu-1+ microglia/macrophages were common in the pineal follicles. Effects of the 24-h light:dark cycle on these lymphocyte-pineal interactions were suggested by an increase in the area of PALT, a decline in the density of TCRαβ/Vβ1+ cells, and a decline in the area density of Bu-1+ microglia at the light:dark interphase (1900 h compared to the dark:light interphase (0700 h. Conclusion The degree of lymphocyte infiltration in the pineal suggests novel mechanisms of neuro-immune interactions in this part of the brain. Our results further suggest that these interactions have a temporal component related to the 24-hour light

  20. Peripheral monocytes are functionally altered and invade the CNS in ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondler, Lisa; Müller, Kathrin; Khalaji, Samira; Bliederhäuser, Corinna; Ruf, Wolfgang P; Grozdanov, Veselin; Thiemann, Meinolf; Fundel-Clemes, Katrin; Freischmidt, Axel; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Strobel, Benjamin; Weydt, Patrick; Witting, Anke; Thal, Dietmar R; Helferich, Anika M; Hengerer, Bastian; Gottschalk, Kay-Eberhard; Hill, Oliver; Kluge, Michael; Ludolph, Albert C; Danzer, Karin M; Weishaupt, Jochen H

    2016-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting primarily the upper and lower motor neurons. A common feature of all ALS cases is a well-characterized neuroinflammatory reaction within the central nervous system (CNS). However, much less is known about the role of the peripheral immune system and its interplay with CNS resident immune cells in motor neuron degeneration. Here, we characterized peripheral monocytes in both temporal and spatial dimensions of ALS pathogenesis. We found the circulating monocytes to be deregulated in ALS regarding subtype constitution, function and gene expression. Moreover, we show that CNS infiltration of peripheral monocytes correlates with improved motor neuron survival in a genetic ALS mouse model. Furthermore, application of human immunoglobulins or fusion proteins containing only the human Fc, but not the Fab antibody fragment, increased CNS invasion of peripheral monocytes and delayed the disease onset. Our results underline the importance of peripheral monocytes in ALS pathogenesis and are in agreement with a protective role of monocytes in the early phase of the disease. The possibility to boost this beneficial function of peripheral monocytes by application of human immunoglobulins should be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26910103

  1. Silver nanoparticles impede phorbol myristate acetate-induced monocyte-macrophage differentiation and autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Wang, Liming; Bai, Ru; Zhang, Tianlu; Chen, Chunying

    2015-09-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are important constituents of the innate immune system. Monocyte-macrophage differentiation is not only crucial for innate immune responses, but is also related to some cardiovascular diseases. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most widely used nanomaterials because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. However, the effect of AgNPs on the functions of blood monocytes is scarcely reported. Here, we report the impedance effect of AgNPs on THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and that this effect was mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal impairment. Firstly, AgNPs inhibit phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced monocyte differentiation by down-regulating both expression of surface marker CD11b and response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Secondly, autophagy is activated during PMA-induced THP-1 monocyte differentiation, and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) can inhibit this process. Thirdly, AgNPs block the degradation of the autophagy substrate p62 and induce autophagosome accumulation, which demonstrates the blockade of autophagic flux. Fourthly, lysosomal impairments including alkalization and decrease of lysosomal membrane stability were observed in AgNP-treated THP-1 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the impedance of monocyte-macrophage differentiation by AgNPs is mediated by autophagy blockade and lysosomal dysfunction. Our results suggest that crosstalk exists in different biological effects induced by AgNPs.

  2. Monocytes of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia show alterations in cholesterol metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soufi Muhidien

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plasma cholesterol promotes the formation of atherosclerotic lesions in which monocyte-derived lipid-laden macrophages are frequently found. To analyze, if circulating monocytes already show increased lipid content and differences in lipoprotein metabolism, we compared monocytes from patients with Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH with those from healthy individuals. Methods Cholesterol and oxidized cholesterol metabolite serum levels of FH and of healthy, gender/age matched control subjects were measured by combined gas chromatography – mass spectroscopy. Monocytes from patients with FH and from healthy subjects were isolated by antibody-assisted density centrifugation. Gene expression profiles of isolated monocytes were measured using Affymetrix HG-U 133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. We compared monocyte gene expression profiles from FH patients with healthy controls using a Welch T-test with correction for multiple testing (p Results Using microarray analysis we found in FH patients a significant up-regulation of 1,617 genes and a down-regulation of 701 genes compared to monocytes from healthy individuals. These include genes of proteins that are involved in the uptake, biosynthesis, disposition, and cellular efflux of cholesterol. In addition, plasma from FH patients contains elevated amounts of sterols and oxysterols. An increased uptake of oxidized as well as of native LDL by FH monocytes combined with a down-regulation of NPC1 and ABCA1 explains the lipid accumulation observed in these cells. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that circulating FH monocytes show differences in cell physiology that may contribute to the early onset of atherosclerosis in this disease.

  3. Changes in the host lymphocyte subsets during chemical carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in small lymphocyte subsets in the lymphoid organs of young C3H mice were studied following i.m. injection of a carcinogenic dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (mc). Using monoclonal anti-Lyt antibodies and a sandwich radiolabeling method with 125I-labeled rabbit anti-mouse Immunoglobulin, the lymphocyte subpopulations in the thymus, spleen, and draining lymph node were examined by radioautography. During the fifth week following the administration of the carcinogen a sharp decrease in the level of Ly-1,2+ small lymphocyte population in the thymus was noted which coincided with a considerable increase (10-fold) in the Ly-2+. During the same period, a similar increase in the Ly-2+ population was also observed in the draining. The high levels of Ly-2+ cells lasted for more than 4 weeks in the thymus while, in the draining node, they lasted for 2 weeks and dropped to normal levels (0 to 2%) simultaneously with the appearance of tumor cells identified in histological preparations. These systemic increases coincided with the appearance of macroscopic tumor nodules. The mixed lymphocyte reaction response of the draining node cells, but not of the spleen, was suppressed during the period of increased level of Ly-2+ cells. Furthermore, during this period, s.c. transplantation of a syngeneic mammary tumor in the same leg resulted in enhanced local growth as well as metastatic spread of the tumor to the lungs in mc treated mice. These findings suggest that a localized immunosuppression associated with the rise in the Ly-2+ cells may be of functional significance during carcinogen-induced tumor development

  4. Changes in the host lymphocyte subsets during chemical carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodt, P.; Lala, P.K.

    1983-09-01

    Changes in small lymphocyte subsets in the lymphoid organs of young C3H mice were studied following i.m. injection of a carcinogenic dose of 3-methylcholanthrene (mc). Using monoclonal anti-Lyt antibodies and a sandwich radiolabeling method with /sup 125/I-labeled rabbit anti-mouse Immunoglobulin, the lymphocyte subpopulations in the thymus, spleen, and draining lymph node were examined by radioautography. During the fifth week following the administration of the carcinogen a sharp decrease in the level of Ly-1,2+ small lymphocyte population in the thymus was noted which coincided with a considerable increase (10-fold) in the Ly-2+. During the same period, a similar increase in the Ly-2+ population was also observed in the draining. The high levels of Ly-2+ cells lasted for more than 4 weeks in the thymus while, in the draining node, they lasted for 2 weeks and dropped to normal levels (0 to 2%) simultaneously with the appearance of tumor cells identified in histological preparations. These systemic increases coincided with the appearance of macroscopic tumor nodules. The mixed lymphocyte reaction response of the draining node cells, but not of the spleen, was suppressed during the period of increased level of Ly-2+ cells. Furthermore, during this period, s.c. transplantation of a syngeneic mammary tumor in the same leg resulted in enhanced local growth as well as metastatic spread of the tumor to the lungs in mc treated mice. These findings suggest that a localized immunosuppression associated with the rise in the Ly-2+ cells may be of functional significance during carcinogen-induced tumor development.

  5. Genetic Diversity in A Core Subset of Wild Barley Germplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bi Fu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wild barley [Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum (C. Koch Thell.] is a part of the primary gene pool with valuable sources of beneficial genes for barley improvement. This study attempted to develop a core subset of 269 accessions representing 16 countries from the Plant Gene Resources of Canada (PGRC collection of 3,782 accessions, and to characterize them using barley simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. Twenty-five informative primer pairs were applied to screen all samples and 359 alleles were detected over seven barley chromosomes. Analyses of the SSR data showed the effectiveness of the stratified sampling applied in capturing country-wise SSR variation. The frequencies of polymorphic alleles ranged from 0.004 to 0.708 and averaged 0.072. More than 24% or 7% SSR variation resided among accessions of 16 countries or two regions, respectively. Accessions from Israel and Jordan were genetically most diverse, while accessions from Lebanon and Greece were most differentiated. Four and five optimal clusters of accessions were obtained using STRUCTURE and BAPS programs and partitioned 16.3% and 20.3% SSR variations, respectively. The five optimal clusters varied in size from 15 to 104 and two clusters had only country-specific accessions. A genetic separation was detected between the accessions east and west of the Zagros Mountains only at the country, not the individual, level. These SSR patterns enhance our understanding of the wild barley gene pool, and are significant for conserving wild barley germplasm and exploring new sources of useful genes for barley improvement.

  6. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 plays a key role in type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Li; Guoliang Liu

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease resulting from the selective destruction of β cells in the pancreatic islets.In both human and rodent models of type 1 diabetes, the clinical disease is preceded by a progressive mononuclear cell invasion of the pancreatic islets (insulitis). In the early stage of insulitis, the major components are monocyte/macrophages, and the recruitment of mononuclear cells is a critical step in the pathogenesis of the type 1 diabetes. Studies have revealed that Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1)specifically recruits monocytes/macrophages into pancreas and plays an important role in the development of insulitis and diabetes.

  7. Lymphokines Enhance the Capacity of Human Monocytes to Secrete Reactive Oxygen Intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawara, Akira; Desantis, Nancy M.; Nogueira, Nadia; Carl F Nathan

    1982-01-01

    Supernatants from mitogen- or antigen-stimulated human blood mononuclear cells enhanced the capacity of human monocytes or monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) to release H2O2 or O2̇̄ in response to phorbol myristate acetate or zymosan. The stimulatory effect of lymphokines (LK) lasted ∼5 d, regardless of the time of their addition. However, the magnitude of stimulation depended on whether LK were added to freshly explanted monocytes or to MDM. When LK were added on day 0 of culture, they enhan...

  8. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  9. Extracellular HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in monocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lin; YANG Yi-da; LU Guo-cai; SALVATO Maria S

    2005-01-01

    In our previous work we reported that HIV Tat and 6 cysteine rich peptides of Tat induce tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) in human monocytes (Yang et al., 2003). Here our results showed that HIV Tat and Tat cysteine rich peptide increase CCR5 expression in human monocytes, and this activity is inhibited by rabbit anti-Tat. Boiled Tat does not increase CCR5 expression in monocytes. These results provide insight into a new mechanism by which HIV Tat plays a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection.

  10. Supervised Feature Subset Selection based on Modified Fuzzy Relative Information Measure for classifier Cart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.SAROJINI,

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Feature subset selection is an essential task in data mining. This paper presents a new method for dealing with supervised feature subset selection based on Modified Fuzzy Relative Information Measure (MFRIM. First, Discretization algorithm is applied to discretize numeric features to construct the membership functions of each fuzzy sets of a feature. Then the proposed MFRIM is applied to select the feature subset focusing on boundary samples. The proposed method can select feature subset with minimum number of features, which are relevant to get higher average classification accuracy for datasets. The experimental results with UCI datasets show that the proposed algorithm is effective and efficient in selecting subset with minimum number of features getting higher average classification accuracy than the consistency based feature subset selection method.

  11. [Subpopulations and phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, E V; Malanicheva, T G; Denisova, S N

    2013-01-01

    There was conducted a study of the phagocytic activity, immunophenotype and peripheral blood monocytes by flow cytometry in children with chronic gastroduodenitis associated with Helicobacter pylori, as well as the association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida and markers of secondary immune deficiency. The differential changes in the structure of circulating profile of monocytes were revealed, that indicate the pathogenetic significance of these disorders in chronic gastroduodenitis with H. pylori etiology, as well as at association of Helicobacter pylori with fungi of the genus Candida. Violations of the phagocytic activity of monocytes in chronic gastroduodenitis in children are associated with depression of different stages of phagocytosis--capture functions, mobilization, killing, intracellular biocidity. A severe depression in phagocytic activity of monocytes occurs in CGD associated with Hp and fungi of the genus Candida. PMID:24501955

  12. Inhibition of human monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on human monocyte function was examined. Mononuclear cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals were incubated with various concentrations of elastase, and the chemotactic activity and chemiluminescence response of these ...

  13. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine;

    2008-01-01

    rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept is......During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown to...... mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...

  14. Monocyte targeting and activation by cationic liposomes formulated with a TLR7 agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Pia Thermann; Zucker, Daniel; Parhamifar, Ladan;

    2015-01-01

    induction of IL-6 and IL-12p40, and differentiation into CD14+ and DC-SIGN+ DCs.Conclusion: Our present liposomes selectively target monocytes in fresh blood, enabling delivery of TLR7 agonists to the intracellular TLR7 receptor, with subsequent monocyte activation and boost in secretion of proinflammatory...... surface chemistry.Methods: Liposomes were extruded at 100 nm, incubated with fresh blood, followed by leukocyte analyses by FACS. Liposomes with and without the TLR7 agonist TMX-202 were incubated with fresh blood, and monocyte activation measured by cytokine secretion by ELISA and CD14 and DC......-SIGN expression.Results: The liposonnes target nnonocytes specifically over lymphocytes and granulocytes in human whole blood, and show association with 75 - 95% of the nnonocytes after 1 h incubation. Formulations of TMX-202 in cationic liposomes were potent in targeting and activation of monocytes, with strong...

  15. Cyclic dinucleotides modulate human T-cell response through monocyte cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosolini, Marie; Pont, Frédéric; Verhoeyen, Els; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2015-12-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides, a class of microbial messengers, have been recently identified in bacteria, but their activity in humans remains largely unknown. Here, we have studied the function of cyclic dinucleotides in humans. We found that c-di-AMP and cGAMP, two adenosine-based cyclic dinucleotides, activated T lymphocytes in an unusual manner through monocyte cell death. c-di-AMP and cGAMP induced the selective apoptosis of human monocytes, and T lymphocytes were activated by the direct contact with these dying monocytes. The ensuing T-cell response comprised cell-cycle exit, phenotypic maturation into effector memory cells and proliferation arrest, but not cell death. This quiescence was transient since T cells remained fully responsive to further restimulation. Together, our results depict a novel activation pattern for human T lymphocytes: a transient quiescence induced by c-di-AMP- or cGAMP-primed apoptotic monocytes. PMID:26460927

  16. Characteristic DNA methylation profiles in peripheral blood monocytes are associated with inflammatory phenotypes of asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Gunawardhana, Lakshitha P; Gibson, Peter G; Simpson, Jodie L.; Benton, Miles C.; Rodney A. Lea; Baines, Katherine J

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic changes including DNA methylation caused by environmental exposures may contribute to the heterogeneous inflammatory response in asthma. Here we investigate alterations in DNA methylation of purified blood monocytes that are associated with inflammatory phenotypes of asthma. Peripheral blood was collected from adults with eosinophilic asthma (EA; n = 21), paucigranulocytic asthma (PGA; n = 22), neutrophilic asthma (NA; n = 9), and healthy controls (n = 10). Blood monocytes were iso...

  17. MITOCHONDRIA in Monocytes and Macrophages-Implications for Translational and Basic Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Saranya; Mitchell, Tanecia; Kramer, Philip; Chacko, Balu; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2014-01-01

    The mitochondrion plays a crucial role in the immune system particularly in regulating the responses of monocytes and macrophages to tissue injury, pathogens, and inflammation. In systemic diseases such as atherosclerosis and chronic kidney disease (CKD) it has been established that disruption to monocyte and macrophage function can lead to chronic inflammation. Polarization of macrophages into the pro-inflammatory (M1) and anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotypes results in distinct metabolic repro...

  18. Osteoclasts and monocytes have similar cytoskeletal structures and adhesion property in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Zallone, A Z; Teti, A; Primavera, M V; Naldini, L; Marchisio, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of some cytoskeletal structures (microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments) has been studied by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and affinity purified antibodies in osteoclasts isolated from medullary bone of laying hens and in hen blood monocytes cultured in vitro. Both cell types show similar patterns of distribution of cytoskeletal structures and this further supports the concept that these cells are closely related. Osteoclasts and monocytes are also simi...

  19. Localized CCR2 Activation in the Bone Marrow Niche Mobilizes Monocytes by Desensitizing CXCR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosung Jung

    Full Text Available Inflammatory (classical monocytes residing in the bone marrow must enter the bloodstream in order to combat microbe infection. These monocytes express high levels of CCR2, a chemokine receptor whose activation is required for them to exit the bone marrow. How CCR2 is locally activated in the bone marrow and how their activation promotes monocyte egress is not understood. Here, we have used double transgenic lines that can visualize CCR2 activation in vivo and show that its chemokine ligand CCL2 is acutely released by stromal cells in the bone marrow, which make direct contact with CCR2-expressing monocytes. These monocytes also express CXCR4, whose activation immobilizes cells in the bone marrow, and are in contact with stromal cells expressing CXCL12, the CXCR4 ligand. During the inflammatory response, CCL2 is released and activates the CCR2 on neighboring monocytes. We demonstrate that acutely isolated bone marrow cells co-express CCR2 and CXCR4, and CCR2 activation desensitizes CXCR4. Inhibiting CXCR4 by a specific receptor antagonist in mice causes CCR2-expressing cells to exit the bone marrow in absence of inflammatory insults. Taken together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby the local activation of CCR2 on monocytes in the bone marrow attenuates an anchoring signalling provided by CXCR4 expressed by the same cell and mobilizes the bone marrow monocyte to the blood stream. Our results also provide a generalizable model that cross-desensitization of chemokine receptors fine-tunes cell mobility by integrating multiple chemokine signals.

  20. Inhibition of dengue virus entry and multiplication into monocytes using RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdelfatah Alhoot

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dengue infection ranks as one of the most significant viral diseases of the globe. Currently, there is no specific vaccine or antiviral therapy for prevention or treatment. Monocytes/macrophages are the principal target cells for dengue virus and are responsible for disseminating the virus after its transmission. Dengue virus enters target cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis after the viral envelope protein E attaches to the cell surface receptor. This study aimed to investigate the effect of silencing the CD-14 associated molecule and clathrin-mediated endocytosis using siRNA on dengue virus entry into monocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression analysis showed a significant down-regulation of the target genes (82.7%, 84.9 and 76.3% for CD-14 associated molecule, CLTC and DNM2 respectively in transfected monocytes. The effect of silencing of target genes on dengue virus entry into monocytes was investigated by infecting silenced and non-silenced monocytes with DENV-2. Results showed a significant reduction of infected cells (85.2%, intracellular viral RNA load (73.0%, and extracellular viral RNA load (63.0% in silenced monocytes as compared to non-silenced monocytes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Silencing the cell surface receptor and clathrin mediated endocytosis using RNA interference resulted in inhibition of the dengue virus entry and subsequently multiplication of the virus in the monocytes. This might serve as a novel promising therapeutic target to attenuate dengue infection and thus reduce transmission as well as progression to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  1. Effect of Legionella pneumophila cytotoxic protease on human neutrophil and monocyte function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rechnitzer, C; Kharazmi, A

    1992-01-01

    protease on the chemotactic activity of neutrophils was demonstrated by the continued inhibition of neutrophil chemotaxis when the protease was removed following pre-incubation of the cells. In contrast, the enzyme had no effect on monocyte chemotaxis. The protease inhibited, also in a concentration...... activity of L. pneumophila protease on neutrophil chemotaxis and on the listericidal activity of human neutrophils and monocytes demonstrated in this study provides evidence for a role of this enzyme in the pathogenesis of Legionnaires' disease....

  2. Insulin-induced NADPH oxidase activation promotes proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase activation in monocytes/macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    San-Jose, G. (Gorka); Bidegain, J. (J.); Robador, P.A. (Pablo A.); J. Diez; Fortuño, A. (Ana); Zalba, G. (Guillermo)

    2009-01-01

    Insulin stimulates superoxide (O(2)(-)) production in monocytes and macrophages. However, the mechanisms through which insulin induces O(2)(-) production are not completely understood. In this study, we (a) characterized the enzyme and the pathways involved in insulin-stimulated O(2)(-) production in human monocytes and murine macrophages, and (b) analyzed the consequences of insulin-stimulated O(2)(-) production on the cellular phenotype in these cells. We showed that insulin stimulated O(2)...

  3. Mucin AgC10 from Trypanosoma cruzi Interferes with L-Selectin-Mediated Monocyte Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaide, P.; Lim, Y. C.; Luscinskas, F. W.; Fresno, M

    2010-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has evolved sophisticated systems to evade the immune response. An important requirement for a productive immune response is recruitment of the appropriate immune cells from the bloodstream to the sites of infection. Here, we show that a mucin expressed and secreted by the metacyclic infective form of T. cruzi, AgC10, is able to interfere with L-selectin-mediated monocyte adhesion. Thus, incubation of U937 monocytic cells stably expressing L-selectin (...

  4. Effect of Zinc and Nitric Oxide on Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells under Shear Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Shah, Ankit K.; Schildmeyer, Lisa A.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm2 or 1 dyne/cm2) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm2) for 24 hours. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike o...

  5. Modulation of human monocyte/macrophage activity by tocilizumab, abatacept and etanercept: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeng, Joyce Afrakoma; Amoruso, Angela; Camaschella, Gian Luca Ermanno; Sola, Daniele; Brunelleschi, Sandra; Fresu, Luigia Grazia

    2016-06-01

    Tocilizumab, etanercept and abatacept are biological drugs used in the therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Their mechanism of action is well documented but their direct effects on human monocytes/macrophages have not been fully investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of these drugs on monocytes/macrophages from healthy volunteers. Human monocytes were isolated from healthy anonymous volunteers and cultured as such or differentiated to monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs). The effect of tocilizumab, etanercept and abatacept (at concentrations similar to those in plasma of patients) on superoxide anion production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene expression and activity, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor (PPAR)γ expression and cell phenotype was evaluated. Exposure of monocytes/macrophages to tocilizumab, etanercept or abatacept resulted in a significant decrease of the PMA-induced superoxide anion production. Interestingly, the expression of PPARγ was significantly increased only by tocilizumab, while etanercept was the only one able to significantly reduce MMP-9 gene expression and inhibit the LPS-induced MMP-9 activity in monocytes. When etanercept and abatacept were added to the differentiating medium, both significantly reduced the amount of CD206(+)MDM. This study demonstrates that etanercept, abatacept and tocilizumab affect differently human monocytes/macrophages. In particular, the IL-6 antagonist tocilizumab seems to be more effective in inducing an anti-inflammatory phenotype of monocytes/macrophages compared to etanercept and abatacept, also in light of the up-regulation of PPARγ whose anti-inflammatory effects are well recognised. PMID:26997366

  6. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of CD13 Regulates Inflammatory Cell-Cell Adhesion and Monocyte Trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    Subramani, Jaganathan; Ghosh, Mallika; Rahman, M. Mamunur; Caromile, Leslie A.; Gerber, Claire; Rezaul, Karim; David K. Han; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2013-01-01

    CD13 is a large cell surface peptidase expressed on the monocytes and activated endothelial cells important for homing to and resolving the damaged tissue at sites of injury. We have previously shown that crosslinking of human monocytic CD13 with activating antibodies induces strong adhesion to endothelial cells in a tyrosine kinase- and microtubule-dependent manner. In the current study we examined the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations in vitro and in vivo. We found that cro...

  7. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine; Grant, Christina L.; Vogel, Lotte K.; Rodriguez-Pinto, Daniel; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Ortega, Enrique; Shapiro, Linda H.

    2008-01-01

    During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myelo...

  8. The impact of ranitidine on monocyte responses in the context of solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila-Leahey, Ava; Rogers, Dakota; Marshall, Jean S

    2016-03-01

    Monocytes and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been implicated on the regulation of tumor growth. Histamine is also important for regulating MDSC responses. Oral administration of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine can inhibit breast tumor growth and metastasis. In the current study, we examined the impact of oral ranitidine treatment, at a clinically relevant dose, on multiple murine tumor models. The impact of ranitidine on monocyte responses and the role of CCR2 in ranitidine-induced tumor growth inhibition were also investigated. Oral ranitidine treatment did not reduce tumor growth in the B16-F10 melanoma, LLC1 lung cancer and EL4 thymoma models. However, it consistently reduced E0771 primary tumor growth and metastasis in the 4T1 model. Ranitidine had no impact on E0771 tumor growth in mice deficient in CCR2, where monocyte recruitment to tumors was limited. Analysis of splenic monocytes also revealed an elevated ratio of H2 versus H1 expression from tumor-bearing compared with naïve mice. More detailed examination of the role of ranitidine on monocyte development demonstrated a decrease in monocyte progenitor cells following ranitidine treatment. Taken together, these results reveal that H2 signaling may be a novel target to alter the monocyte population in breast tumor models, and that targeting H2 on monocytes via oral ranitidine treatment impacts effective tumor immunity. Ranitidine is widely used for control of gastrointestinal disorders. The potential role of ranitidine as an adjunct to immunotherapies for breast cancer and the potential impact of H2 antagonists on breast cancer outcomes should be considered. PMID:26863636

  9. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    OpenAIRE

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Anand K. Ramasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynam...

  10. Proinflammatory cytokine expression contributes to brain injury provoked by chronic monocyte activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sirén, A. L.; McCarron, R.; Wang, L.; Garcia-Pinto, P.; Ruetzler, C.; Martin, D.; Hallenbeck, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have proposed that an increased interaction between monocyte/macrophages and blood vessel endothelium predisposes subjects to strokes. The effect of chronic monocyte activation on the development of cerebral infarcts was thus studied in rats after provocation of a modified local Swartzman reaction, in brain vasculature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two weeks after an IV bolus of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), we studied spontaneous superoxide production, integrin expression, endothe...

  11. iPLA2β: front and center in human monocyte chemotaxis to MCP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Ravi S.; Carnevale, Kevin A.; Cathcart, Martha K.

    2008-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) directs migration of blood monocytes to inflamed tissues. Despite the central role of chemotaxis in immune responses, the regulation of chemotaxis by signal transduction pathways and their in vivo significance remain to be thoroughly deciphered. In this study, we examined the intracellular location and functions of two recently identified regulators of chemotaxis, Ca2+-independent phospholipase (iPLA2β) and cytosolic phospholipase (cPLA2α), and subst...

  12. Effect of extracellular serum in the stimulation of intracellular killing of streptococci by human monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Leijh, P C; van Zwet, T L; Furth, R. van

    1980-01-01

    This study shows that the intracellular killing of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus faecalis, and Streptococcus pneumoniae by human monocytes is stimulated by the extracellular presence of both heat-stable and heat-labile serum factors. A similar kind of stimulation of monocytes has been described in respect of catalase-positive microorganisms. However, killing of these bacteria is negligible in the absence of extracellular serum factors, whereas a large proportion of the ingested catala...

  13. HIV-1 Infection of Placental Cord Blood Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    FOLCIK, RENEE M.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Li, Yuan; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Douglas, Steven D.; STARR, STUART E.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), have been implicated as the initial targets of HIV infection in skin and mucosal surfaces. DC can be generated in vitro from blood-isolated CD14+ monocytes or CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells in the presence of various cytokines. In this study, we investigated whether monocytes obtained from placental cord blood are capable of differentiation into dendritic cells when cultured with a combination of cytokines—granulocyte...

  14. CCR5 Expression and β-Chemokine Production During Placental Neonatal Monocyte Differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Zylla, Dylan; Li, Yuan; BERGENSTAL, EMILY; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Douglas, Steven D.; MOONEY, KATHY; GUO, CHANG-JIANG; Song, Li; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2003-01-01

    The stage of maturation of monocytes affects their susceptibility to HIV infection. The β-chemokines and their receptor CCR5 play a crucial role in inflammatory reactions and HIV infection. We therefore examined the correlation between the expression of CCR5 and β-chemokine production and the susceptibility to HIV infection during cord monocyte (CM) differentiation into macrophages. CM and CM-derived macrophages (CMDM) were examined for β-chemokine and CCR5 expression. The susceptibility of t...

  15. Arginine-Rich Cationic Polypeptides Amplify Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Monocyte Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Bosshart, Herbert; Heinzelmann, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The human neutrophil-derived cationic protein CAP37, also known as azurocidin or heparin-binding protein, enhances the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in isolated human monocytes. We measured the release of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) in human whole blood and found that in addition to CAP37, other arginine-rich cationic polypeptides, such as the small structurally related protamines, enhance LPS-induced monocyte activation....

  16. Innate Immune Activity Conditions the Effect of Regulatory Variants upon Monocyte Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Fairfax, B. P.; Humburg, P.; Makino, S.; Naranbhai, V; Wong, D.; Lau, E; Jostins, L; Plant, K.; Andrews, R; McGee, C.; Knight, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    To systematically investigate the impact of immune stimulation upon regulatory variant activity, we exposed primary monocytes from 432 healthy Europeans to interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or differing durations of lipopolysaccharide and mapped expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). More than half of cis-eQTLs identified, involving hundreds of genes and associated pathways, are detected specifically in stimulated monocytes. Induced innate immune activity reveals multiple master regulatory trans-eQTL...

  17. Hyperketonemia increases monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells and is mediated by LFA-1 expression in monocytes and ICAM-1 expression in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rains, Justin L.; Jain, Sushil K.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent episodes of hyperketonemia are associated with a higher incidence of vascular disease. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that hyperketonemia increases monocyte-endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and the development of vascular disease in diabetes. Human U937 and THP-1 monocyte cell lines and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured with acetoacetate (AA) (0–10 mM) or β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) (0–10 mM) for 24 h prior to evaluating adhesion and a...

  18. Monocyte galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine-specific C-type lectin receptor stimulant immunotherapy of an experimental glioma. Part 1: stimulatory effects on blood monocytes and monocyte-derived cells of the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushchayev SV

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sergiy V Kushchayev,1 Tejas Sankar,1 Laura L Eggink,4,5 Yevgeniya S Kushchayeva,5 Philip C Wiener,1,5 J Kenneth Hoober,5,6 Jennifer Eschbacher,3 Ruolan Liu,2 Fu-Dong Shi,2 Mohammed G Abdelwahab,4 Adrienne C Scheck,4 Mark C Preul11Neurosurgery Research Laboratory, 2Neuroimmunology Laboratory, 3Department of Pathology, 4Neurooncology Research, Barrow Neurological Institute, St Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, 5School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, 6Susavion Biosciences, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USAObjectives: Immunotherapy with immunostimulants is an attractive therapy against gliomas. C-type lectin receptors specific for galactose/N-acetylgalactosamine (GCLR regulate cellular differentiation, recognition, and trafficking of monocyte-derived cells. A peptide mimetic of GCLR ligands (GCLRP was used to activate blood monocytes and populations of myeloid-derived cells against a murine glioblastoma.Methods: The ability of GCLRP to stimulate phagocytosis by human microglia and monocyte-derived cells of the brain (MDCB isolated from a human glioblastoma was initially assessed in vitro. Induction of activation markers on blood monocytes was assayed by flow cytometry after administration of GCLRP to naive mice. C57BL/6 mice underwent stereotactic intracranial implantation of GL261 glioma cells and were randomized for tumor size by magnetic resonance imaging, which was also used to assess increase in tumor size. Brain tumor tissues were analyzed using flow cytometry, histology, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with respect to tumor, peritumoral area, and contralateral hemisphere regions.Results: GCLRP exhibited strong stimulatory effect on MDCBs and blood monocytes in vitro and in vivo. GCLRP was associated with an increased percentage of precursors of dendritic cells in the blood (P = 0.003, which differentiated into patrolling macrophages in tumoral (P = 0.001 and peritumoral areas (P = 0.04, rather than into dendritic cells

  19. Interleukin-10 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced upregulation of tissue factor in canine peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Seigo; Stokol, Tracy

    2012-08-15

    The potentially fatal hemostatic disorder of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is initiated in bacterial sepsis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tissue factor (TF) expression on monocytes. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent inhibitory cytokine that downregulates monocyte inflammatory and procoagulant responses. We hypothesized that canine recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) would inhibit LPS-induced TF upregulation on canine monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), obtained by double-density gradient centrifugation, and monocytes, purified from PBMC by immunomagnetic bead separation with an anti-canine CD14 antibody (Ab), were stimulated in suspension with LPS (0.1-1000 ng/mL) for various times. Recombinant IL-10 (10-5000 pg/mL) was added with LPS or up to 2h later. Tissue factor procoagulant activity was measured by cleavage of a chromogenic substrate by activated Factor X generated by the TF-factor VII complex. We found that rIL-10, when given concurrently or 1h after LPS, strongly inhibited LPS-induced TF procoagulant activity in canine PBMC and monocytes. This inhibition was dose-dependent and blocked by an anti-canine IL-10 Ab. Our results indicate that rIL-10 effectively inhibits LPS-induced TF upregulation in canine monocytes and could potentially be useful in limiting the development of DIC in dogs with endotoxemia. PMID:22609246

  20. Irradiation Enhances the Ability of Monocytes as Nanoparticle Carrier for Cancer Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shin Jiang

    Full Text Available The tumor-homing ability of monocytes renders them a potential cellular delivery system for alternative cancer therapies, although their migratory ability can be impaired following reagent uptake. Approaches that enhance monocyte tumor homing and promote their migration will improve the clinical value of these cells as cellular carriers. Previous studies have shown that irradiation (IR can promote macrophage aggregation in hypoxic regions. To investigate whether IR enhances the infiltration of bone marrow-derived monocytes (BMDMs into tumors, the infiltration of BMDMs from GFP-transgenic mice in a murine prostate adenocarcinoma TRAMP-C1 model was examined by fluorescence microscopy. IR did not increase the number of BMDMs that infiltrated initially, but did increase monocyte retention within IR-treated tumors for up to 2 weeks. We also showed that BMDMs can take up various imaging and therapeutic agents, although the mobility of BMDMs decreased with increasing load. When BMDMs were differentiated in IR-treated tumor-conditioned medium (IR-CM in vitro, the nanoparticle load-mediated inhibition of migration was attenuated. These IR-CM-differentiated BMDMs delivered polymer vesicles encapsulating doxorubicin to radiation therapy (RT-induced hypoxic tumor regions, and enhanced the efficacy of RT. The prolonged retention of monocytes within irradiated tumor tissues and the ability of IR-CM to enhance the migratory ability of cargo-laden BMDMs suggest that monocytes pre-conditioned by IR-CM can potentially act as cellular carriers for targeted therapy following conventional RT.

  1. Platelet and monocyte activity markers and mediators of inflammation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirzer, Rainer; Elmas, Elif; Haghi, Dariusch; Lippert, Christiane; Kralev, Stefan; Lang, Siegfried; Borggrefe, Martin; Kälsch, Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    Patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often present with symptoms similar to those of myocardial infarction (MI). We analyzed blood concentrations of mediators of inflammation and platelet- and monocyte-activity markers in patients with TC and MI for significant differences. Clinical data of patients with TC (n = 16) and acute MI (n = 16) were obtained. Serial blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (t(0)), after 2-4 days (t(1)) and after 4-7 weeks (t(2)), respectively. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were determined with an ELISA. Tissue factor binding on monocytes, platelet-activation marker CD62P, platelet CD40-ligand (CD40L), and platelet-monocyte aggregates were measured using flow cytometry. Expression of CD62P on platelets and IL-6 plasma levels were significantly lower in patients with TC compared to MI at the time of hospital admission. IL-7 plasma levels were significantly elevated in patients with TC compared to patients with MI at 2-4 days after hospital admission. No significant differences were observed concerning sCD40L and MCP-1 plasma levels, tissue factor binding on monocytes, CD40L expression on platelets, and platelet-monocyte aggregates at any point in time. Our results indicate that inflammatory mediators and platelet-activity markers contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of MI and TC. PMID:21416113

  2. Dendritic Cells and Monocytes with Distinct Inflammatory Responses Reside in Lung Mucosa of Healthy Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharom, Faezzah; Thomas, Saskia; Rankin, Gregory; Lepzien, Rico; Pourazar, Jamshid; Behndig, Annelie F; Ahlm, Clas; Blomberg, Anders; Smed-Sörensen, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Every breath we take contains potentially harmful pathogens or allergens. Dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages are essential in maintaining a delicate balance of initiating immunity without causing collateral damage to the lungs because of an exaggerated inflammatory response. To document the diversity of lung mononuclear phagocytes at steady-state, we performed bronchoscopies on 20 healthy subjects, sampling the proximal and distal airways (bronchial wash and bronchoalveolar lavage, respectively), as well as mucosal tissue (endobronchial biopsies). In addition to a substantial population of alveolar macrophages, we identified subpopulations of monocytes, myeloid DCs (MDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs in the lung mucosa. Intermediate monocytes and MDCs were highly frequent in the airways compared with peripheral blood. Strikingly, the density of mononuclear phagocytes increased upon descending the airways. Monocytes from blood and airways produced 10-fold more proinflammatory cytokines than MDCs upon ex vivo stimulation. However, airway monocytes were less inflammatory than blood monocytes, suggesting a more tolerant nature. The findings of this study establish how to identify human lung mononuclear phagocytes and how they function in normal conditions, so that dysregulations in patients with respiratory diseases can be detected to elucidate their contribution to immunity or pathogenesis. PMID:27183618

  3. Ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes in peripheral blood in patients diagnosed with active tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes in peripheral blood could reflect an indi- vidual's immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes and clinical status of patients with active tuberculosis.Methods:This was a retrospective review of data collected from the clinical database of The Fifth People's Hospital of Wuxi, Medical College of Jiangnan University. A total of 419 patients who had newly diagnosed active tuberculosis and 108 cases from 419 patients with tuberculosis therapy either near completion or completed were selected. Controls were 327 healthy donors.Results:Median ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes was 0.36 (IQR, 0.22-0.54 in patients before treatment, and 0.16 (IQR, 0.12-0.20 in controls (p25% was significant predictors for active tuberculosis (OR = 114.73, 95% CI, 39.80-330.71; OR = 89.81, 95% CI, 53.18-151.68, respectively. After treatment, the median ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes recovered to be nearly normal. Compared to other patients, patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis and of age >60 years were more likely to have extreme ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes (AOR = 2.57, 95% CI, 1.08-6.09; AOR = 4.36, 95% CI, 1.43-13.29, respectively.Conclusions:Ratio of monocytes to lymphocytes 25% is predictive of active tuberculosis.

  4. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  5. Relationship of blood monocytes with chronic lymphocytic leukemia aggressiveness and outcomes: a multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daphne R; Sibley, Alexander B; Owzar, Kouros; Chaffee, Kari G; Slager, Susan; Kay, Neil E; Hanson, Curtis A; Ding, Wei; Shanafelt, Tait D; Weinberg, J Brice; Wilcox, Ryan A

    2016-07-01

    Monocyte-derived cells, constituents of the cancer microenvironment, support chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cell survival in vitro via direct cell-cell interaction and secreted factors. We hypothesized that circulating absolute monocyte count (AMC) reflects the monocyte-derived cells in the microenvironment, and that higher AMC is associated with increased CLL cell survival in vivo and thus inferior CLL patient outcomes. We assessed the extent to which AMC at diagnosis of CLL is correlated with clinical outcomes, and whether this information adds to currently used prognostic markers. We evaluated AMC, clinically used prognostic markers, and time to event data from 1,168 CLL patients followed at the Mayo Clinic, the Duke University Medical Center, and the Durham VA Medical Center. Elevated AMC was significantly associated with inferior clinical outcomes, including time to first therapy (TTT) and overall survival (OS). AMC combined with established clinical and molecular prognostic markers significantly improved risk-stratification of CLL patients for TTT. As an elevated AMC at diagnosis is associated with accelerated disease progression, and monocyte-derived cells in the CLL microenvironment promote CLL cell survival and proliferation, these findings suggest that monocytes and monocyte-derived cells are rational therapeutic targets in CLL. Am. J. Hematol. 91:687-691, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27037726

  6. Differential Oxidative Stress Induced by Dengue Virus in Monocytes from Human Neonates, Adult and Elderly Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Nereida; Mosquera, Jesús; Añez, Germán; Levy, Alegria; Marcucci, Rafael; de Mon, Melchor Alvarez

    2013-01-01

    Changes in immune response during lifespan of man are well known. These changes involve decreased neonatal and elderly immune response. In addition, it has been shown a relationship between immune and oxidative mechanisms, suggesting that altered immune response could be associated to altered oxidative response. Increased expression of nitric oxide (NO) has been documented in dengue and in monocyte cultures infected with different types of dengue virus. However, there is no information about the age-dependent NO oxidative response in humans infected by dengue virus. In this study, monocyte cultures from neonatal, elderly and adult individuals (n = 10 each group) were infected with different dengue virus types (DENV- 1 to 4) and oxidative/antioxidative responses and apoptosis were measured at days 1 and 3 of culture. Increased production of NO, lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic anti-oxidative responses in dengue infected monocyte cultures were observed. However, neonatal and elderly monocytes had lower values of studied parameters when compared to those in adult-derived cultures. Apoptosis was present in infected monocytes with higher values at day 3 of culture. This reduced oxidant/antioxidant response of neonatal and elderly monocytes could be relevant in the pathogenesis of dengue disease. PMID:24069178

  7. Monocyte matrix metalloproteinase production in Type 2 diabetes and controls – a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Isabel R

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary plaque rupture may result from localised over expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs within the plaque by infiltrating monocyte – macrophages. As MMP expression can be promoted by the modified lipoproteins, oxidative stress and hyperglycaemia that characterises Type 2 diabetes, we hypothesised that peripheral monocytes in these patients, exposed to these factors in vivo, would demonstrate increased MMP production compared to controls. Methods We examined peripheral venous monocyte expression of MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1 in 18 controls and 22 subjects with Type 2 diabetes and no previous cardiovascular complications. Results No significant difference in MMP-1, 3 or 9 or TIMP-1 production was observed between control and diabetes groups. Conclusions Monocyte MMP-1, 3, and 9, and TIMP-1, production are not abnormal in Type 2 diabetes. This data cannot be extrapolated to monocyte – macrophage behaviour in the vessel wall, but it does suggest MMP and TIMP-1 expression prior to monocyte infiltration and transformation are not abnormal in Type 2 diabetes.

  8. Studies on the metabolism of triphenylphosphate by carboxylesterases and human monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resin workers exposed to triphenylphosphate (TPP), an organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and plasticizer, had a decreased expression of carboxylesterase (CBE) activity in their peripheral blood monocytes. The mechanisms of CBE inhibition by TPP were investigated using purified hog liver CBE and intact human monocytes. TPP inactivated hog liver CBE in a time and dose dependent manner, and this inhibition was partially reversed by alkaline phosphatase (AP). Analysis of [14C]TPP metabolites from the enzymatic reaction by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GM-C) identified phenol as the hydrolytic metabolite of TPP. Human monocytes cultured with [14C]TPP also released phenol. In addition to phenol, several phenol metabolites, such as catechol, hydroquinone, 2,2 biphenol and 4,4 biphenol were also generated by monocytes. An identical pattern of these metabolites was also formed from monocytes incubated with radiolabelled phenol. This cellular degradation of TPP was inhibited by diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not observed in neutrophil or lymphocyte cultures. Activation of monocytes with gamma interferon (IFN-g), f-Met-Leu-Phe, and serum treated zymosan (STZ) enhanced the levels of phenolic metabolites and, further, shifted the metabolism of TPP towards the formation of the biphenolic metabolites

  9. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 μM, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-α synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs

  10. β2-Agonist clenbuterol hinders human monocyte differentiation into dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Luciana; Cuzziol, Noemi; Del Pinto, Tamara; Sanchez, Massimo; Maccari, Sonia; Massimi, Alessia; Pietraforte, Donatella; Viora, Marina

    2015-12-10

    Clenbuterol (CLB) is a beta2-adrenergic agonist commonly used in asthma therapy, but is also a non-steroidal anabolic drug often abused in sport doping practices. Here we evaluated the in vitro impact of CLB on the physiology and function of human monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), instrumental in the development of immune responses. We demonstrate that CLB inhibits the differentiation of monocytes into DCs and this effect is specific and dependent on β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) activation. We found that CLB treatment reduced the percentage of CD1a(+) immature DCs, while increasing the frequency of monocytes retaining CD14 surface expression. Moreover, CLB inhibited tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) enhanced IL-(interleukin)-10 and IL-6 production. In contrast, CLB did not modulate the phenotypic and functional properties of monocytes and DCs, such as the surface expression of HLA-DR, CD83, CD80 and CD86 molecules, cytokine production, immunostimulatory activity and phagocytic activity. Moreover, we found that CLB did not modulate the activation of NF-kB in DCs. Moreover, we found that the differentiation of monocytes into DCs was associated with a significant decrease of β2-ARs mRNA expression. These results provide new insights on the effect of CLB on monocyte differentiation into DCs. Considering the frequent illegal use of CLB in doping, our work suggests that this drug is potentially harmful to immune responses decreasing the supply of DCs, thus subverting immune surveillance. PMID:26524508

  11. NK cell-mediated killing of AML blasts. Role of histamine, monocytes and reactive oxygen metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brune, M.; Mellqvist, U.H. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Medicine, Haematology Section, Goeteborg (Sweden); Hansson, M.; Hermodsson, S.; Hellstrand, K. [Sahlgren`s Univ. Hospital, Dept. of Virology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Blasts recovered from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) were lysed by heterologeous natural killer (NK) cells treated with NK cell-activating cytokine-induced killing of AML blasts was inhibited by monocytes, recovered from peripheral blood by counterflow centrifugal elutriation. Histamine, at concentrations exceeding 0.1 {mu}M, abrogated the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cells; thereby, histamine and IL-2 or histamine and IFN-{alpha} synergistically induced NK cell-mediated destruction of AML blasts. The effect of histamine was completely blocked by the histamine H2-receptor (H2R) antagonist ranitidine but not by its chemical control AH20399AA. Catalase, a scavenger of reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), reversed the monocyte-induced inhibition of NK cell-mediated killing of blast cells, indicating that the inhibitory signal was mediated by products of the respiratory burst of monocytes. It is concluded that (i) monocytes inhibit anti-leukemic properties of NK cells, (ii) the inhibition is conveyed by monocyte-derived ROM, and (iii) histamine reverses the inhibitory signal and, thereby, synergizes with NK cell-activating cytokines to induce killing of AML blasts. (au) 19 refs.

  12. Age-related dynamics of constitutive cytokine transcription levels of feline monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipar, A; Baptiste, K; Meli, M L; Barth, A; Knietsch, M; Reinacher, M; Lutz, H

    2005-03-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are central mediators of inflammation and immunity and therefore of major interest in the study of immunosenescence. In healthy adult cats, monocytes have been shown to constitutively transcribe pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. However, in order to characterize the effect of age, feline monocyte functions were examined for changes in cytokine transcription levels in early stages of immunosenescence. For this purpose, isolated, short-term cultured monocytes from barrier-maintained adult cats of different ages (15 mo to 10 yr) were examined for transcription of IL-1 beta, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 p40 and TNF-alpha by real-time PCR. Transcription levels of cytokines varied and were generally highest for IL-1 beta. For IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-12 p40, both young and old cats exhibited highest levels. The age association was significant. TNF-alpha appeared to be transcribed at similar levels over the examination period, whereas IL-10 tended to decline with age but without any statistical significant differences. The observed age association of the constitutive transcription of some cytokines indicates a drop in monocyte activities from youth to middle age, which is then followed by a (progressive) increase with increasing age. This provides evidence that monocytes are in part responsible for the pro-inflammatory status observed with ageing. PMID:15763402

  13. CLINICAL VALUE OF DETECTING T LYMPHOCYTE SUBSET AND NK CELL ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长安; 管增伟; 孙武; 邵玉霞; 李卓; 贾廷珍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study on the expression and clinical significance of T lymphocyte subset and NK cell activity (NKA) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Fifty-seven cancer patients and 33 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. T lymphocyte subset was measured by SAP technique and NKA by LDH release assay based on K562 cells, which served as target cells.

  14. Filamin A regulates monocyte migration through Rho small GTPases during osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Roland; Wang, Yongqiang; Cuddy, Karl; Sun, Chunxiang; Magalhaes, Joyce; Grynpas, Marc; Glogauer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Osteoclastogenesis (OCG) results from the fusion of monocytes after stimulation with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Migration of monocytes into close proximity precedes critical fusion events that are required for osteoclast formation. Cellular migration requires leading-edge actin cytoskeleton assembly that drives cellular locomotion. Filamin A (FLNa) cross-links F-actin filaments in the leading edge of migrating cells and also has been shown to regulate signal transduction during cell migration. However, little is known about the possible role of FLNa in osteoclastogenesis. Our objective in this study was to investigate the role of FLNa in osteoclastogenesis. Bone marrow monocytes isolated from the tibiae and femora of wild type (WT) and Flna-null mice were cultured for 6 days with M-CSF and RANKL, and osteoclasts were identified by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) staining. The Flna-null mouse skeletal phenotype was characterized using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to analyze the skeleton, as well as tests on blood chemistry. Osteoclast levels in vivo were quantified by counting of TRACP-stained histologic sections of distal femora. To elucidate the mechanisms by which Flna regulates osteoclastogenesis, migration, actin polymerization, and activation of Rho GTPases, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA were assessed in monocytes during in vitro OCG. Deficiencies in migration were rescued using constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 TAT fusion proteins. The RANKL signaling pathway was evaluated for activation by monitoring nuclear translocation of NF kappaB and c-jun and expression of key osteoclast genes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Our results show that Flna-null monocytes formed fewer osteoclasts in vitro, and those that were formed were smaller with fewer nuclei. Decreased OCG was reflected in vivo in TRACP-stained histologic bone sections. Flna

  15. Monocytes infiltrate the pancreas via the MCP-1/CCR2 pathway and differentiate into stellate cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuko Ino

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that monocytes possess pluripotent plasticity. We previously reported that monocytes could differentiate into hepatic stellate cells. Although stellate cells are also present in the pancreas, their origin remains unclear. An accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP(+CD45(- cells was observed in the pancreases and livers of chimeric mice, which were transplanted with a single hematopoietic stem cell isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice and treated with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4. Because the vast majority of EGFP(+CD45(- cells in the pancreas expressed stellate cell-associated antigens such as vimentin, desmin, glial fibrillary acidic protein, procollagen-I, and α-smooth muscle actin, they were characterized as pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs. EGFP(+ PaSCs were also observed in CCl4-treated mice adoptively transferred with monocytes but not with other cell lineages isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. The expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and angiotensin II (Ang II increased in the pancreas of CCl4-treated mice and their respective receptors, C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 and Ang II type 1 receptor (AT1R, were expressed on Ly6C(high monocytes isolated from EGFP-transgenic mice. We examined the effect of an AT1R antagonist, irbesartan, which is also a CCR2 antagonist, on the migration of monocytes into the pancreas. Monocytes migrated toward MCP-1 but not Ang II in vitro. Irbesartan inhibited not only their in vitro chemotaxis but also in vivo migration of adoptively transferred monocytes from peripheral blood into the pancreas. Irbesartan treatment significantly reduced the numbers of EGFP(+F4/80(+CCR2(+ monocytic cells and EGFP(+ PaSCs in the pancreas of CCl4-treated chimeric mice receiving EGFP(+ bone marrow cells. A specific CCR2 antagonist RS504393 inhibited the occurrence of EGFP(+ PaSCs in injured mice. We propose that CCR2(+ monocytes migrate into the pancreas possibly via the

  16. Immunosuppressive CD11b+Ly6Chi monocytes in pristane-induced lupus mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huijuan; Wan, Suigui; Xia, Chang-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells with immunosuppressive functions have been described to be associated with one of the mechanisms by which malignant tumors escape immune surveillance. However, little is known about the role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in autoimmunity. In the current study, when we attempted to characterize the peritoneal cells in pristane-induced lupus model, as reported previously, we observed that there were markedly increased CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes. Surprisingly, this type of monocytes was almost phenotypically identical to the reported monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Further analysis on how these CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) cells affected T cell response showed that they strongly suppressed T cell proliferation in vitro in a manner dependent on cell-cell contact, NO, and PGE2. In addition, we found that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes inhibited Th1 differentiation but enhanced development of forkhead box p3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells. Consistent with the in vitro experimental results, the in vivo adoptive cell transfer study showed that infusion of pristane-treated syngeneic CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes significantly suppressed the production of anti-keyhole limpet hemocyanin antibodies induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin immunization. In addition, we found that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes were also increased significantly in spleen and peripheral blood and showed immunosuppressive characteristics similar to their peritoneal counterparts. Our findings indicate that CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes in a pristane-induced lupus mouse model are monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells instead of inflammatory monocytes, as demonstrated previously. To our knowledge, this is the first to describe myeloid-derived suppressor cells in a pristane-induced lupus mouse model, which may lead to a better understanding of the role of CD11b(+)Ly6C(hi) monocytes in this specific pristane-induced lupus model. PMID:26657791

  17. HIV-1 induces IL-10 production in human monocytes via a CD4-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jiaxiang; Sahu, Gautam K; Braciale, Vivian L; Cloyd, Miles W

    2005-06-01

    In HIV-infected patients, increased levels of IL-10, mainly produced by virally infected monocytes, were reported to be associated with impaired cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we investigated how HIV-1 induces IL-10 production in human monocytes. We found that CD14(+) monocytes infected by either HIV-1(213) (X4) or HIV-1(BaL) (R5) produced IL-10, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and to a lesser extent, IFN-gamma. However, the capacity of HIV-1 to induce these cytokines was not dependent on virus replication since UV-inactivated HIV-1 induced similar levels of these cytokines. In addition, soluble HIV-1 gp160 could induce CD14(+) monocytes to produce IL-10 but at lower levels. Cross-linking CD4 molecules (XLCD4) with anti-CD4 mAbs and goat anti-mouse IgG (GAM) resulted in high levels of IL-6, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma but no IL-10 production by CD14(+) monocytes. Interestingly, neither anti-CD4 mAbs nor recombinant soluble CD4 (sCD4) receptor could block IL-10 secretion induced by HIV-1(213), HIV-1(BaL) or HIV-1 gp160 in CD14(+) monocytes, whereas anti-CD4 mAb or sCD4 almost completely blocked the secretion of the other cytokines. Furthermore, HIV-1(213) could induce IL-10 mRNA expression in CD14(+) monocytes while XLCD4 by anti-CD4 mAb and GAM failed to do so. As with IL-10 protein levels, HIV-1(213)-induced IL-10 mRNA expression in CD14(+) monocytes could not be inhibited by anti-CD4 mAb or sCD4. Taken together, HIV-1 binding to CD14(+) monocytes can induce CD4-independent IL-10 production at both mRNA and protein levels. This finding suggests that HIV induces the immunosuppressive IL-10 production in monocytes and is not dependent on CD4 molecules and that interference with HIV entry through CD4 molecules may have no impact on counteracting the effects of IL-10 during HIV infection. PMID:15937058

  18. A comparison of monocyte oxidative responses in leprosy patients and healthy subjects as influenced by mycobacterial lipid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachula, M; Worobec, S; Andersen, B R

    1990-09-01

    Superoxide anion (O2-) release by monocytes from leprosy patients in a paired study was lower than that released by monocytes from healthy controls. Pretreatment of healthy control monocytes with phenolic glycolipid-I (PGL-I) of Mycobacterium leprae resulted in the release of less O2- than released by buffer-treated cells or cells pretreated with structurally similar lipids. However, pretreatment of patient monocytes with PGL-I did not affect the O2- generation, perhaps because the cells already had a lower capacity to produce O2-. Upon further examination of the data from the patient population, monocytes from lepromatous patients released significantly less O2- than cells from normal controls, while tuberculoid patient cells released O2- in amounts similar to that generated by cells from normal controls. In addition, monocytes from patients with a high bacterial index had a lower capacity to generate O2- when compared to cells from healthy individuals. PMID:2169513

  19. Interaction studies reveal specific recognition of an anti-inflammatory polyphosphorhydrazone dendrimer by human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledall, Jérémy; Fruchon, Séverine; Garzoni, Matteo; Pavan, Giovanni M.; Caminade, Anne-Marie; Turrin, Cédric-Olivier; Blanzat, Muriel; Poupot, Rémy

    2015-10-01

    Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory properties leading to efficient therapeutic control of inflammatory diseases in animal models. These properties are mainly prompted through activation of monocytes. Here, we disclose new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory activation of human monocytes by ABP-capped PPH dendrimers. Following an interdisciplinary approach, we have characterized the physicochemical and biological behavior of the lead ABP dendrimer with model and cell membranes, and compared this experimental set of data to predictive computational modelling studies. The behavior of the ABP dendrimer was compared to the one of an isosteric analog dendrimer capped with twelve azabiscarboxylate (ABC) end groups instead of twelve ABP end groups. The ABC dendrimer displayed no biological activity on human monocytes, therefore it was considered as a negative control. In detail, we show that the ABP dendrimer can bind both non-specifically and specifically to the membrane of human monocytes. The specific binding leads to the internalization of the ABP dendrimer by human monocytes. On the contrary, the ABC dendrimer only interacts non-specifically with human monocytes and is not internalized. These data indicate that the bioactive ABP dendrimer is recognized by specific receptor(s) at the surface of human monocytes.Dendrimers are nano-materials with perfectly defined structure and size, and multivalency properties that confer substantial advantages for biomedical applications. Previous work has shown that phosphorus-based polyphosphorhydrazone (PPH) dendrimers capped with azabisphosphonate (ABP) end groups have immuno-modulatory and anti

  20. The gene region UL128-UL131A of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is essential for monocyte infection and block of migration - Characterisation of the infection of primary human monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Straschewski, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes are targets of HCMV infection and vehicles for viral dissemination in vivo. By using two TB40E-derived BAC clones expressing the full-length (BAC4) or a truncated form of pUL128 (BAC1), the role of UL128 for infection and motility of monocytes has been investigated. Like TB40E, BAC4 was able to infect and to express IE gene products in monocytes. BAC4-infected monocytes exhibited normal cytoskeleton architecture but a complete inability to migrate in response to chemokines as a cons...

  1. Galectin-3 Binding Protein Secreted by Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Monocyte-Derived Fibrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael J V; Roife, David; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-08-15

    To metastasize, tumor cells often need to migrate through a layer of collagen-containing scar tissue which encapsulates the tumor. A key component of scar tissue and fibrosing diseases is the monocyte-derived fibrocyte, a collagen-secreting profibrotic cell. To test the hypothesis that invasive tumor cells may block the formation of the fibrous sheath, we determined whether tumor cells secrete factors that inhibit monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. We found that the human metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 secretes activity that inhibits human monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, whereas less aggressive breast cancer cell lines secrete less of this activity. Purification indicated that Galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) is the active factor. Recombinant LGALS3BP inhibits monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation, and immunodepletion of LGALS3BP from MDA-MB 231 conditioned media removes the monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation-inhibiting activity. LGALS3BP inhibits the differentiation of monocyte-derived fibrocytes from wild-type mouse spleen cells, but not from SIGN-R1(-/-) mouse spleen cells, suggesting that CD209/SIGN-R1 is required for the LGALS3BP effect. Galectin-3 and galectin-1, binding partners of LGALS3BP, potentiate monocyte-derived fibrocyte differentiation. In breast cancer biopsies, increased levels of tumor cell-associated LGALS3BP were observed in regions of the tumor that were invading the surrounding stroma. These findings suggest LGALS3BP and galectin-3 as new targets to treat metastatic cancer and fibrosing diseases. PMID:26136428

  2. Microbial translocation is associated with increased monocyte activation and dementia in AIDS patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela Ancuta

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an indicator of microbial translocation from the gut, is a likely cause of systemic immune activation in chronic HIV infection. LPS induces monocyte activation and trafficking into brain, which are key mechanisms in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD. To determine whether high LPS levels are associated with increased monocyte activation and HAD, we obtained peripheral blood samples from AIDS patients and examined plasma LPS by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL assay, peripheral blood monocytes by FACS, and soluble markers of monocyte activation by ELISA. Purified monocytes were isolated by FACS sorting, and HIV DNA and RNA levels were quantified by real time PCR. Circulating monocytes expressed high levels of the activation markers CD69 and HLA-DR, and harbored low levels of HIV compared to CD4(+ T-cells. High plasma LPS levels were associated with increased plasma sCD14 and LPS-binding protein (LBP levels, and low endotoxin core antibody levels. LPS levels were higher in HAD patients compared to control groups, and were associated with HAD independently of plasma viral load and CD4 counts. LPS levels were higher in AIDS patients using intravenous heroin and/or ethanol, or with Hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection, compared to control groups. These results suggest a role for elevated LPS levels in driving monocyte activation in AIDS, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of HAD, and provide evidence that cofactors linked to substance abuse and HCV co-infection influence these processes.

  3. Activated monocytes in peritumoral stroma of hepatocellular carcinoma foster immune privilege and disease progression through PD-L1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Zhao, Qiyi; Peng, Chen; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Jing-Ping; Wu, Changyou; Zheng, Limin

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages (Mφ) are prominent components of solid tumors and exhibit distinct phenotypes in different microenvironments. We have recently found that tumors can alter the normal developmental process of Mφ to trigger transient activation of monocytes in peritumoral stroma. We showed that a fraction of monocytes/Mφ in peritumoral stroma, but not in cancer nests, expresses surface PD-L1 (also termed B7-H1) molecules in tumors from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Monocytes activate...

  4. Replication-incompetent herpesvirus vector delivery of an interferon alpha gene inhibits human immunodeficiency virus replication in human monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Weir, J P; Elkins, K L

    1993-01-01

    Human monocytes and macrophages are nondividing cells that serve as a major reservoir for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) at all stages of infection. To investigate viral-mediated gene delivery as a means of inhibiting HIV replication in human monocytes, a replication-incompetent herpes simplex virus vector was developed that expressed human interferon alpha. Monocytes infected with this herpes simplex virus vector and then challenged with HIV showed dramatically reduced cytopathic effects...

  5. β-catenin/TCF-4 signaling regulates susceptibility of macrophages and resistance of monocytes to HIV-1 productive infection

    OpenAIRE

    Aljawai, Yosra; Richards, Maureen H.; Seaton, Melanie S.; Narasipura, Srinivas D.; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are an important target for HIV-1 infection. They are often at anatomical sites linked to HIV-1 transmission and are an important vehicle for disseminating HIV-1 throughout the body, including the central nervous system. Monocytes do not support extensive productive HIV-1 replication, but they become more susceptible to HIV-1 infection as they differentiate into macrophages. The mechanisms guiding susceptibility of HIV-1 replication in monocytes versus...

  6. miRNA Profiles of Monocyte-Lineage Cells Are Consistent with Complicated Roles in HIV-1 Restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Clements, Janice E.; Sisk, Jeanne M.; Witwer, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs include tissue macrophages. Monocyte-derived macrophages are more susceptible to infection and more permissive to HIV-1 replication than monocytes for reasons that may include the effects of different populations of miRNAs in these two cell classes. Specifically, miRs-28-3p, -150, -223, -198, and -382 exert direct or indirect negative effects on HIV-1 and are reportedly downmodulated during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation. Here, new experimental results are ...

  7. Impact of brief exercise on circulating monocyte gene and microRNA expression: implications for atherosclerotic vascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Radom-Aizik, Shlomit; Zaldivar, Frank P.; Haddad, Fadia; Cooper, Dan M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity can prevent and/or attenuate atherosclerosis, a disease clearly linked to inflammation. Paradoxically, even brief exercise induces a stress response and increases inflammatory cells like monocytes in the circulation. We hypothesized that exercise would regulate the expression of genes, gene pathways, and microRNAs in monocytes in a way that could limit pro-inflammatory function and drive monocytes to prevent, rather than contribute to, atherosclerosis. Twelve healthy men (22...

  8. Ursolic acid protects monocytes against metabolic stress-induced priming and dysfunction by preventing the induction of Nox4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Ullevig

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: UA protects THP-1 monocytes against dysfunction by suppressing metabolic stress-induced Nox4 expression, thereby preventing the Nox4-dependent dysregulation of redox-sensitive processes, including actin turnover and MAPK-signaling, two key processes that control monocyte migration and adhesion. This study provides a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory and athero- and renoprotective properties of UA and suggests that dysfunctional blood monocytes may be primary targets of UA and related compounds.

  9. Binding of Streptococcus mutans SR protein to human monocytes: production of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soell, M; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, R D; Klein, J P

    1994-05-01

    To examine the possible implication of protein SR, an I/II-related antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (serotype f), in inflammatory reactions, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of protein SR on human monocytes. Using biotinylated protein, we provide evidence that protein SR binds to human monocytes in dose-, time-, and calcium-dependent manners through specific interactions. These results were confirmed by competition experiments using either soluble human monocyte extract or anti-SR immunoglobulin G. Binding occurred through lectin-like interactions between SR and carbohydrate portions of monocyte membrane glycoproteins, since binding could be inhibited by several sugars, especially fucose and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), which were confirmed by ligand blotting to be the primer ligands recognized by SR on human monocyte extracts. The ability of protein SR to stimulate the production of cytokines by human circulating monocytes was then examined. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 is time and dose dependent and not affected by the addition of polymyxin B. Activation of monocytes resulted from specific binding of SR to NANA and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins since TNF-alpha release could be inhibited by sialidase and pronase treatment of monocytes and by NANA and fucose. These results confirm that sialic acid and fucose present on cell surface macromolecules and especially glycoproteins are needed for the binding of SR to monocytes and for the release of TNF-alpha. PMID:8168943

  10. Fibronectin and serum amyloid P component stimulate C3b- and C3bi- mediated phagocytosis in cultured human monocytes

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) and serum amyloid P component (SAP) markedly enhance phagocytosis mediated by the C3b and C3bi receptors of cultured human monocytes but not of granulocytes. (The C3b and C3bi receptors of granulocytes can be activated by treatment of these phagocytes with PMA.) Activation of monocyte C3 receptors by FN is developmentally regulated: Freshly explanted monocytes respond to FN with a small increase in C3 receptor-mediated phagocytosis while monocytes matured in culture exhibit a...

  11. HIV-1 infection of in vitro cultured human monocytes: early events and influence of anti HIV-1 antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Olofsson, S; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    To characterize the role of the humoral immune response on HIV-1 infection of monocytes and macrophages (M phi s) we examined the susceptibility of in vitro cultured monocyte/M phi s to various HIV-1 isolates and the influence of heterologous and particularly autologous anti HIV-1 sera on this...... infection. Depending on the period of in vitro cultivation and the virus isolate used different patterns of susceptibility were detected. One week old monocyte/M phi s were highly susceptible to HIV-1 infection, in contrast to monocyte/M phi s cultured 4 weeks. The infection by virus isolated immediately...

  12. T-lymphocyte subsets in West African children: impact of age, sex, and season

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisse, I M; Aaby, P; Whittle, H;

    1997-01-01

    determinants of T-lymphocyte subset levels. METHODS: A total of 803 healthy West African children younger than 6 years were included in the three community studies of T-lymphocyte subsets among twins and singletons, after measles infection and after measles immunization. We used the immunoalkaline phosphatase...... method to determine T-lymphocyte subsets. RESULTS: We found differences by age, sex, and season, whereas there were no significant differences by birth order, twinning, or ethnic group. The CD4+ percentage declined from birth to age 2 years, at which time it started to increase to higher levels at age 4...

  13. Maximal subset of pairwise non-commuting elements of finite minimal non-Abelian groups

    OpenAIRE

    Fouladi, S.; Orfi, R.; Azad, A.

    2014-01-01

    Let G be a group. A subset X of G is a set of pairwise non-commuting elements if xy is not equal to yx for any two distinct elements x and y in X. If |X|>=|Y| for any other set of pairwise non-commuting elements Y in G, then X is said to be a maximal subset of pairwise non-commuting elements. In this paper we determine the cardinality of a maximal subset of pairwise non-commuting elements for finite minimal non-abelian groups.

  14. Interferon-beta induces distinct gene expression response patterns in human monocytes versus T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Henig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monocytes, which are key players in innate immunity, are outnumbered by neutrophils and lymphocytes among peripheral white blood cells. The cytokine interferon-β (IFN-β is widely used as an immunomodulatory drug for multiple sclerosis and its functional pathways in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs have been previously described. The aim of the present study was to identify novel, cell-specific IFN-β functions and pathways in tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α-activated monocytes that may have been missed in studies using PBMCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole genome gene expression profiles of human monocytes and T cells were compared following in vitro priming to TNF-α and overnight exposure to IFN-β. Statistical analyses of the gene expression data revealed a cell-type-specific change of 699 transcripts, 667 monocyte-specific transcripts, 21 T cell-specific transcripts and 11 transcripts with either a difference in the response direction or a difference in the magnitude of response. RT-PCR revealed a set of differentially expressed genes (DEGs, exhibiting responses to IFN-β that are modulated by TNF-α in monocytes, such as RIPK2 and CD83, but not in T cells or PBMCs. Known IFN-β promoter response elements, such as ISRE, were enriched in T cell DEGs but not in monocyte DEGs. The overall directionality of the gene expression regulation by IFN-β was different in T cells and monocytes, with up-regulation more prevalent in T cells, and a similar extent of up and down-regulation recorded in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By focusing on the response of distinct cell types and by evaluating the combined effects of two cytokines with pro and anti-inflammatory activities, we were able to present two new findings First, new IFN-β response pathways and genes, some of which were monocytes specific; second, a cell-specific modulation of the IFN-β response transcriptome by TNF-α.

  15. Capacity of human monocytes to phagocytose approved iron oxide MR contrast agents in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Technical University Munich, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Munich (Germany); Bonaterra, Gabriel [Ruprecht-Karls-University, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Heidelberg (Germany); Rudelius, Martina [Technical University Munich, Department of Pathology, Munich (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    To evaluate the capacity of human monocytes to phagocytose various approved iron oxide based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents and to optimize in vitro labeling of these cells. Human monocytes were incubated with two superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) as well as two ultrasmall SPIO (USPIO) at varying iron oxide concentrations and incubation times. Iron uptake in monocytes was proven by histology, quantified by atomic emission absorption spectrometry and depicted with T2* weighted fast field echo (FFE) MR images at 1.5 T. Additionally, induction of apoptosis in iron oxide labeled monocytes was determined by YO-PRO-1 staining. Cellular iron uptake was significantly (P<0.01) higher after incubation with SPIO compared with USPIO. For SPIO, the iron oxide uptake was significantly (P<0.01) higher after incubation with the ionic Ferucarbotran as compared with the non-ionic Ferumoxides. Efficient cell labeling was achieved after incubation with Ferucarbotran at concentrations {>=}500 {mu}g Fe/ml and incubation times {>=}1 h, resulting in a maximal iron oxide uptake of up to 50 pg Fe/cell without impairment of cell viability. In vitro labeling of human monocytes for MR imaging is most effectively obtained with the approved SPIO Ferucarbotran. Potential subsequent in vivo cell tracking applications comprise, e.g. specific targeting of inflammatory processes. (orig.)

  16. Capacity of human monocytes to phagocytose approved iron oxide MR contrast agents in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the capacity of human monocytes to phagocytose various approved iron oxide based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents and to optimize in vitro labeling of these cells. Human monocytes were incubated with two superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) as well as two ultrasmall SPIO (USPIO) at varying iron oxide concentrations and incubation times. Iron uptake in monocytes was proven by histology, quantified by atomic emission absorption spectrometry and depicted with T2* weighted fast field echo (FFE) MR images at 1.5 T. Additionally, induction of apoptosis in iron oxide labeled monocytes was determined by YO-PRO-1 staining. Cellular iron uptake was significantly (P<0.01) higher after incubation with SPIO compared with USPIO. For SPIO, the iron oxide uptake was significantly (P<0.01) higher after incubation with the ionic Ferucarbotran as compared with the non-ionic Ferumoxides. Efficient cell labeling was achieved after incubation with Ferucarbotran at concentrations ≥500 μg Fe/ml and incubation times ≥1 h, resulting in a maximal iron oxide uptake of up to 50 pg Fe/cell without impairment of cell viability. In vitro labeling of human monocytes for MR imaging is most effectively obtained with the approved SPIO Ferucarbotran. Potential subsequent in vivo cell tracking applications comprise, e.g. specific targeting of inflammatory processes. (orig.)

  17. Effect of HSV-2 Infected Monocytes on the Production of TNF- α and IL-6

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    敖俊红; 周礼义; 陈兴平; 杨蓉娅; 王文玲

    2003-01-01

    Objectiwe: In order to detect the role of monocytes in HSV-2 infection, we studied the effect of herpes sim-plex Virus-2 infection on the production of tumor ne-crosis factor (TNF- α ), interleukin-6 (IL-6) secreted by monocytes. Methods: Monocytes were infected by HSV-2 (333 Strain). Culture supernatants were collected at 1, 3,5, 7 days post-infection. The levels of TNF- α, IL-6 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent as-say (ELISA). Results: The levels of TNF- α secretion by mono-cytes significantly decreased on first day post-infection. The levels of IL-6 significantly decreased on first and third days post-infection, and then gradu-ally increased to the control on seventh day post-infection.Conclusions: TNF- α and IL-6 production by mono-cytes was inhibited during HSV-2 infection. The pro-duction of cytokines may play an important role in herpes simplex viurs-2 pathogenicity and immunity.

  18. The role of hepatocyte growth factor in the differentiation of dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to find out the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in the development of dendritic cells (DC) from the peripheral monocytes. The study was carried out in Black Sea Technical Hospital, Trabzon, Turkey between 2003-2004. Seven different cytokines combinations were employed to assess phenotypical and functional differences of DCs from the peripheral monocytes in serum free culture media. Peripheral monocytes were incubated in media with cytokines for 5 days. The tumor necrosis factor-aplha (TNF-alpha) was added to the cell culture on day 5 and incubated for another 2 days. Surface and co-stimulating molecules on the cells were assessed by flowcytometry. The functional capacity of the DCs was evaluated on day 7 by purified protein derivative loading and subsequent lymphoproliferation test using methyl tetrazolium staining. On the 5th day of incubation DC development was observed in all cytokine groups, but cells were superior in cultures maintained in the presence of interleukin-4 combinations with granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or with GM-CSF+HGF. Moreover, the expression of surface and co-stimulating molecules increased significantly after incubation with TNF-alpha. The effect of PPD loaded-DCs on proliferation of lymphocytes was more striking in HGF containing groups. It was concluded that HGF supplemented cultures exert some additive effects in relation to function of monocyte-derived DCs. But HGF alone does not seem to augment monocyte-derived DC proliferation and maturation significantly. (author)

  19. Altered monocyte activation markers in Tourette’s syndrome: a case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matz Judith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infections and immunological processes are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of Tourette’s syndrome (TS. To determine possible common underlying immunological mechanisms, we focused on innate immunity and studied markers of inflammation, monocytes, and monocyte-derived cytokines. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we used current methods to determine the number of monocytes and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in 46 children, adolescents, and adult patients suffering from TS and in 43 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha, interleukin 6 (IL-6, soluble CD14 (sCD14, IL1-receptor antagonist (IL1-ra, and serum neopterin were detected by immunoassays. Results We found that CRP and neopterin levels and the number of monocytes were significantly higher in TS patients than in healthy controls. Serum concentrations of TNF-alpha, sIL1-ra, and sCD14 were significantly lower in TS patients. All measured values were within normal ranges and often close to detection limits. Conclusions The present results point to a monocyte dysregulation in TS. This possible dysbalance in innate immunity could predispose to infections or autoimmune reactions.

  20. Cytokine and Eicosanoid Production by Cultured Human Monocytes Exposed to Titanium Particulate Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Timothy M.; Manley, Paul A.; Sims, Paul A.; Albrecht, Ralph; Darien, Benjamin J.

    1999-10-01

    Phagocytosis of particulate wear debris from arthroplasties by macrophages induces an inflammatory response that has been linked to implant loosening and premature failure of artificial joints. Inflammatory mediators released by phagocytic macrophages such as tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-[alpha]), interleukin-1[beta] (IL-1[beta]), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The objective of this study was to characterize titanium alloy particulates that closely match wear debris found around joint arthroplasties and to study their effects on the biosynthesis of inflammatory mediators by cultured monocytes. Peripheral blood monocytes were isolated from healthy human volunteers. Monocytes were cultured in 96-well plates for 24 h, washed, and exposed to three concentrations of titanium particulates and controls from 18Ð24 h. Supernatants were assayed for TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], IL-6, and PGE2 activity. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) verified the titanium alloy to be Ti6A14V. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed significant titanium particulate heterogeneity with approximately 95% of the particles titanium particulates utilized for in vitro models of titanium-induced cytokine release by monocytes. Incubation of titanium particulates (in concentrations similar to those found around loosened prosthetic joints) with cultured monocytes significantly increased their production of TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and PGE2.

  1. CD14+ monocytes promote the immunosuppressive effect of human umbilical cord matrix stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here, the effect of CD14+ monocytes on human umbilical cord matrix stem cell (hUC-MSC)-mediated immunosuppression was studied in vitro. hUC-MSCs exerted a potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion capacities of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in response to anti-CD3/CD28 stimulation. Transwell co-culture system revealed that the suppressive effect was primarily mediated by soluble factors. Addition of prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors (indomethacin or NS-398) almost completely abrogated the immunosuppression activity of hUC-MSCs, identifying prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as an important soluble mediator. CD14+ monocytes were found to be able to enhance significantly the immunosuppressive effect of hUC-MSCs in a dose-dependent fashion. Moreover, the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, either exogenously added or produced by CD14+ monocytes in culture, could trigger expression of high levels of PGE2 by hUC-MSCs, whereas inclusion of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) in the culture down-regulated not only PGE2 expression, but also reversed the promotional effect of CD14+ monocytes and partially restored CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Our data demonstrate an important role of monocytes in the hUC-MSC-induced immunomodulation, which may have important implications in future efforts to explore the clinical potentials of hUC-MSCs.

  2. Transcriptome profiling of primary murine monocytes, lung macrophages and lung dendritic cells reveals a distinct expression of genes involved in cell trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohmeyer Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo originate from the bone marrow, circulate in the blood and emigrate into various organs where they differentiate into tissue resident cellular phenotypes of the mononuclear phagocyte system, including macrophages (Mϕ and dendritic cells (DC. Like in other organs, this emigration and differentiation process is essential to replenish the mononuclear phagocyte pool in the lung under both inflammatory and non-inflammatory steady-state conditions. While many studies have addressed inflammation-driven monocyte trafficking to the lung, the emigration and pulmonary differentiation of PBMo under non-inflammatory conditions is much less understood. Methods In order to assess the transcriptional profile of circulating and lung resident mononuclear phagocyte phenotypes, PBMo, lung Mϕ and lung DC from naïve mice were flow-sorted to high purity, and their gene expression was compared by DNA microarrays on a genome-wide scale. Differential regulation of selected genes was validated by quantitative PCR and on protein level by flow cytometry. Results Differentially-expressed genes related to cell traffic were selected and grouped into the clusters (i matrix metallopeptidases, (ii chemokines/chemokine receptors, and (iii integrins. Expression profiles of clustered genes were further assessed at the mRNA and protein levels in subsets of circulating PBMo (GR1- vs GR1+ and lung resident macrophages (alveolar vs interstitial Mϕ. Our data identify differentially activated genetic programs in circulating monocytes and their lung descendents. Lung DC activate an extremely diverse set of gene families but largely preserve a mobile cell profile with high expression levels of integrin and chemokine/chemokine receptors. In contrast, interstitial and even more pronounced alveolar Mϕ, stepwise downregulate gene expression of these traffic relevant communication molecules, but strongly upregulate a distinct set of

  3. mIL-2R, T cell subsets and hepatitis C

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chao-Pin; Wang, Ke-Xia; Wang, Jian; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the levels of membrane interleukin-2 receptor (mIL-2R) and T cell subsets in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with hepatitis C and their role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C.

  4. NK ACTIVITY OF LYMPHOCYTE SUBSETS AND THE EFFECTS OF LOW DOSE RADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin; Xu Yingdong; Geng Yongzhi

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the NK activity of lymphocyte subsets and the effects of low dose radiation.Methods: Lymphocyte subsets were separated by monoclonal antibodies. The NK activity of each subset on tumor cells was detected by radioactive release method.Results: The results showed that besides NK cells, CD4,CD8 and B cells alone can kill tumor cells. But the cellkilling activity of NK cells appeared to be strongest.There was synergistic effect between CD4 and NK cells.The activity of mixed lymphocytes was more than that of only one subset. The effect of low dose radiation (LDR)on NK activity of panlymphocytes or NK cells was different. Conclusion: This paper demonstrated that NK activity of mononuclear cells was called "NK activity of lymphocytes", but it is not true. Only when NK cells were separated by monoclonal antibodies, its killer activity can be called "activity of NK cells".

  5. Circulating monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in women with gestational diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Kuzmicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1 has been implicated as a key factor in the recruitment and activation of peripheral blood leukocytes in atherosclerotic lesions and adipose tissue. Elevated levels of circulating MCP-1 have been found in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, as well as with coronary artery disease. In this study we compared serum MCP-1 concentrations between pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (NGT, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM and non-pregnant healthy women. The group studied consisted of 62 patients with GDM (mean age 30.1 +/- 5.0 years at 29.0 +/- 3.5 week of gestation, 64 pregnant women with NGT (mean age 30.0 +/- 4.7 years at 29.2 +/- 2.9 week of gestation and 34 non-pregnant healthy women (mean age 29.8 +/- 4.7 years. Serum MCP-1 concentration was measured using an enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay. Median MCP-1 concentrations did not differ significantly between women with GDM (median 342.3 [interquartile range 267.9-424.4] pg/ml and NGT (338.0 [274.7-408.2] pg/ml, but were markedly lower than those found in non-pregnant women (485.2 [409.6-642.4] pg/ml, p<0.0001. After adjusting for glucose, the difference between pregnant and non-pregnant women remained highly significant (p<0.0001. In GDM patients MCP-1 levels correlated significantly with fasting glucose (r=0.2665, p=0.0363, insulin (r=0.4330, p=0.0004, HOMA-IR (r=0.4402, p=0.0003, ISQUICKI (r=-0.4402, p=0.0003, HbA1c (r=0.2724, p=0.0322, as well as with prepregnancy and current BMI (r=0.3501, p=0.0057 and r=0.3250, p=0.0106, respectively. Multiple regression analysis revealed that MCP1 concentrations were significantly predicted only by plasma glucose ( beta=0.3489, p=0.00004. Our results suggest that MCP1 levels are decreased in pregnant women, irrespective of their glucose tolerance status.

  6. Effects of low dose radiation on regulatory function between lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four kinds of McAbs (anti CD4, CD8, CD19 and CD57) were used to separate CD4, CD8, CD19 (B) and CD57 (NK) lymphocyte subsets from human peripheral blood by 'Panning-direct' method. First the natural killing activity of each subsets and the regulatory functions between CD57 and other subsets were studied. Then the effects of low dose radiation on the function of CD57 cells and the regulatory functions between CD57 and other subsets were studied. The results showed that the NK activity was found in all of the four subsets, with CD57 cell having the strongest activity. When CD4 and CD57 cells were co-cultured, the total NK activity was higher than that of the sum of these two single subsets, i.e. there was synergistic effect between CD4 and CD57 cells. When CD8 or CD19 cells were co-cultured separately with CD57 cells, no synergistic effect was found. Irradiation by gamma rays at doses of 50 cGy and 80 cGy was able to stimulate the function of CD57 cells. After Cd4 or CD57 cells were irradiated, the total NK activity of their co-culture increased significantly. This phenomenon was not found in other subsets. This suggested that low dose radiation can enhance the synergistic action between CD4 and CD57 cells. So at least four subsets (CD4, CD8, CD19, CD57) contribute to the total NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. (15 refs., 4 tabs.)

  7. Sterile inflammation – do innate lymphoid cell subsets play a role?

    OpenAIRE

    Shane E Russell; Walsh, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    The recent identification of several novel innate lymphoid cell (iLC) subsets has increased our understanding of the mechanisms which link the innate and adaptive immune systems. While the contribution of these subsets toward the pathogenesis of human disease remains largely to be determined, it seems likely that they will play a particularly important role in sterile inflammatory settings where the innate response is seen as a critical mediator of inflammation. Several recent studies have hi...

  8. Sterile Inflammation-Do innate lymphoid cell subsets play a role?

    OpenAIRE

    Shane E Russell; Walsh, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    The recent identification of several novel innate lymphoid cell subsets (iLCs) has increased our understanding of the mechanisms which link the innate and adaptive immune systems. While the contribution of these subsets towards the pathogenesis of human disease remains largely to be determined, it seems likely that they will play a particularly important role in sterile inflammatory settings where the innate response is seen as a critical mediator of inflammation. Several recent studies have ...

  9. Clinical application of a rapid flow-cytometric immunofluorescence method for studing lymphocyte subsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we report a clinical application of a rapid flow-cytometric immunofluorescence method for studing lymphocyte subsets in whole blood by using fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibodies OKT 3, OKT 4, OKT 8, OKI a 1, OKT 6, OKT 11, OKT 9, OKT 10 and OKM 1. Changes in the relative percentages and absolute counts of various lymphocyte subsets during radiotherapy of cancer patients were evaluated by this method. (author)

  10. Characterizing a subset of the PPS maintaining the reference hyperplane of the radial projection point

    OpenAIRE

    N Nasrabadi; A Dehnokhalaji; M Soleimani-damaneh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize a subset of the production possibility set consisting of production points whose radial projection points lie on the same supporting hyperplane of the production possibility set (PPS). To this end, we consider the CCR and BCC models1 and establish some theoretical results by utilizing linear programming-based techniques. Determining such a subset of the PPS provides a means to perform sensitivity analysis of inefficient units. This allows us to categorize DMUs i...

  11. Interval-valued fuzzy ideals generated by an interval-valued fuzzy subset in ordered semigroups

    OpenAIRE

    M. Shabir; Israr, Ali Khan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we de ne the concept of interval-valued fuzzy left (right, two sided, interior, bi-) ideal in ordered semigroups. We show that the interval- valued fuzzy subset J is an interval-valued fuzzy left (right, two sided, interior, bi-) ideal generated by an interval-valued fuzzy subset A i J and J + are fuzzy left (right, two sided, interior, bi-) ideals generated by A and A + respectively Peer Reviewed

  12. TCR repertoire and Foxp3 expression define functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ Treg cells1

    OpenAIRE

    Kuczma, Michal; Pawlikowska, Iwona; Kopij, Magdalena; Podolsky, Robert; Rempala, Grzegorz A.; Kraj, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive research efforts to characterize peripheral regulatory T cells (Treg) expressing transcription factor Foxp3, their subset complexity, phenotypic characteristics, TCR repertoire and antigen specificities remain ambiguous. Here, we identify and define two subsets of peripheral Treg cells differing in Foxp3 expression level and TCR repertoires. Treg cells expressing a high level of Foxp3 and TCRs not utilized by naive CD4+ T cells present a stable suppressor phenotype and domin...

  13. Homocysteine induces production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-8 in cultured human whole blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-kun ZENG; Daniel G REMICK; Xian WANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether increased plasma L-homocysteine (Hcy) level could promote monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in cultured whole blood. METHODS: Human whole blood or different type of peripheral blood cells from health volunteers were incubated with Hcy and/or the inhibitors. MCP- 1 and IL-8 level were measured by ELISA assay. RESULTS: Hcy 10-1000 μmol/L induced production of MCP-1 and IL-8 in cultured human whole blood (P<0.05). The major cellular source of these chemokines comed from monocytes.Meanwhile,Hcy also promoted the upregulation of MPO level even at the 10 μmol/L in the cultured whole blood.secretion in cultured human whole blood, especially in monocytes via oxidative stress mechanism.

  14. The effect of short-chain fatty acids on human monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nastasi, Claudia; Candela, Marco; Bonefeld, Charlotte Menné;

    2015-01-01

    negligible effects, while both butyrate and propionate strongly modulated gene expression in both immature and mature human monocyte-derived DC. An Ingenuity pathway analysis based on the differentially expressed genes suggested that propionate and butyrate modulate leukocyte trafficking, as SCFA strongly......The gut microbiota is essential for human health and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetate, butyrate and propionate, are end-products of microbial fermentation of macronutrients that distribute systemically via the blood....... The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of immature and LPS-matured human monocyte-derived DC to SCFA. Our data revealed distinct effects exerted by each individual SCFA on gene expression in human monocyte-derived DC, especially in the mature ones. Acetate only exerted...

  15. An evaluation of exact methods for the multiple subset maximum cardinality selection problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Michael J; Köhn, Hans-Friedrich; Steinley, Douglas

    2016-05-01

    The maximum cardinality subset selection problem requires finding the largest possible subset from a set of objects, such that one or more conditions are satisfied. An important extension of this problem is to extract multiple subsets, where the addition of one more object to a larger subset would always be preferred to increases in the size of one or more smaller subsets. We refer to this as the multiple subset maximum cardinality selection problem (MSMCSP). A recently published branch-and-bound algorithm solves the MSMCSP as a partitioning problem. Unfortunately, the computational requirement associated with the algorithm is often enormous, thus rendering the method infeasible from a practical standpoint. In this paper, we present an alternative approach that successively solves a series of binary integer linear programs to obtain a globally optimal solution to the MSMCSP. Computational comparisons of the methods using published similarity data for 45 food items reveal that the proposed sequential method is computationally far more efficient than the branch-and-bound approach. PMID:27027582

  16. Role of distinct CD4(+) T helper subset in pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Dunfang; Han, Qi; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Xu, Yi; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Qianming

    2016-07-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is one of the most common chronic inflammatory oral mucosal diseases with T-cell-mediated immune pathogenesis. In subepithelial and lamina propria of OLP local lesions, the presence of CD4(+) T helper (CD4(+) Th) cells appeared as the major lymphocytes. These CD4(+) T lymphocytes can differentiate into distinct Th cell types such as Th1, Th2, Treg, Th17, Th22, Th9, and Tfh within the context of certain cytokines environment. Growing evidence indicated that Th1/Th2 imbalance may greatly participate into the cytokine network of OLP immunopathology. In addition, Th1/Th2 imbalance can be regulated by the Treg subset and also greatly influenced by the emerging novel CD4(+) Th subset Th17. Furthermore, the presence of novel subsets Th22, Th9 and Tfh in OLP patients is yet to be clarified. All these Th subsets and their specific cytokines may play a critical role in determining the character, extent and duration of immune responses in OLP pathogenesis. Therefore, we review the roles of distinct CD4(+) Th subsets and their signature cytokines in determining disease severity and susceptibility of OLP and also reveal the novel therapeutic strategies based on T lymphocytes subsets in OLP treatment. PMID:26693958

  17. Non-suppressive regulatory T cell subset expansion in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sada, Yoshiharu; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Uga, Sayuri; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been reported to play a pivotal role in the vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Recent studies have revealed that Tregs are heterogeneous and can be characterized by three phenotypically and functionally different subsets. In this study, we investigated the roles of Treg subsets in the pathogenesis of PAH in eight patients with PAH and 14 healthy controls. Tregs and their subsets in peripheral blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry. Treg subsets were defined as CD4(+)CD45RA(+)FoxP3(low) resting Tregs (rTregs), CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(high) activated Tregs (aTregs), and CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(low) non-suppressive Tregs (non-Tregs). The proportion of Tregs among CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in PAH patients than in controls (6.54 ± 1.10 vs. 3.81 ± 0.28 %, p Tregs was significantly elevated in PAH patients compared with controls (4.06 ± 0.40 vs. 2.79 ± 0.14 %, p Tregs (p Treg subset was expanded and functionally activated in peripheral lymphocytes obtained from IPAH patients. We hypothesize that immunoreactions involving the specific activation of the non-Treg subset might play a role in the vascular remodeling of PAH. PMID:26319442

  18. Comparison of the quantities and subset distributions of natural killer cells among different races

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yan-meng; ZHANG Rui-jun; ZHU Hong; PENG Hong; ZHOU Xiao-ping; HONG Kun-xue; LIU Jian-li; CHEN Jian-ping; SHAO Yi-ming

    2010-01-01

    Background Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in host immune defense, while the quantities and subset distributions may vary among different races. To address the difference, we compared these variables among Chinese Han, the Caucasians and the Blacks. The study may provide critical background information for both basic research and clinical investigation.Methods Blood samples collected from populations of different races were tested within 12 hours after collection and subsets of NK cells were characterized using flow cytometry.Results The absolute NK count in the Chinese Han was significantly higher than that in the Caucasian. The Han and Caucasian groups showed higher percentages of cytotoxic subset compared to that of the Black group. The percentage of cytokine-producing subset of Chinese Han group was lower than that of Caucasian and Black groups. Black group had a higher percentage of function-unknown NK subset than that of the Hah and Caucasian groups.Conclusion Our data indicated that NK cell count and the distribution of different subsets varied among different races,which should be taken into consideration in related investigations.

  19. Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor-treated monocyte inhibits human CD4(+) lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Maffía, Paulo C; Reiteri, Romina M; Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Villalonga, Ximena; Sanchez, Mercedes L; Estein, Silvia M; Garcia, Verónica E; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, Héctor E

    2011-08-01

    Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor produced by epithelial cells and has been shown to be a pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory and microbicidal activities. However, the role of SLPI on the adaptive immune response is not well established. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of SLPI on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were treated with mitogens plus SLPI and proliferation was assessed by [(3) H]thymidine uptake. The SLPI decreased the lymphocyte proliferation induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) or OKT3 monoclonal antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was not observed when depleting monocytes from the PBMC and it was restored by adding monocytes and SLPI. SLPI-treated monocyte slightly decreased MHC II and increased CD18 expression, and secreted greater amounts of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants. SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant inhibited the CD4(+) lymphocyte proliferation but did not affect the proliferation of CD8(+) cells. Moreover, IL-2 increased T-bet expression and the presence of SLPI significantly decreased it. Finally, SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant dramatically decreased interferon-γ but increased IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the presence of IL-2-treated T cells. Our results demonstrate that SLPI target monocytes, which in turn inhibit CD4 lymphocyte proliferation and T helper type 1 cytokine secretion. Overall, these results suggest that SLPI is an alarm protein that modulates not only the innate immune response but also the adaptive immune response. PMID:21574992

  20. Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor-treated monocyte inhibits human CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Diego; Tateosian, Nancy L; Maffía, Paulo C; Reiteri, Romina M; Amiano, Nicolás O; Costa, María J; Villalonga, Ximena; Sanchez, Mercedes L; Estein, Silvia M; Garcia, Verónica E; Sallenave, Jean-Michel; Chuluyan, Héctor E

    2011-01-01

    Serine leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is the main serine proteinase inhibitor produced by epithelial cells and has been shown to be a pleiotropic molecule with anti-inflammatory and microbicidal activities. However, the role of SLPI on the adaptive immune response is not well established. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of SLPI on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were treated with mitogens plus SLPI and proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine uptake. The SLPI decreased the lymphocyte proliferation induced by interleukin-2 (IL-2) or OKT3 monoclonal antibodies in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition was not observed when depleting monocytes from the PBMC and it was restored by adding monocytes and SLPI. SLPI-treated monocyte slightly decreased MHC II and increased CD18 expression, and secreted greater amounts of IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the cell culture supernatants. SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant inhibited the CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation but did not affect the proliferation of CD8+ cells. Moreover, IL-2 increased T-bet expression and the presence of SLPI significantly decreased it. Finally, SLPI-treated monocyte culture supernatant dramatically decreased interferon-γ but increased IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in the presence of IL-2-treated T cells. Our results demonstrate that SLPI target monocytes, which in turn inhibit CD4 lymphocyte proliferation and T helper type 1 cytokine secretion. Overall, these results suggest that SLPI is an alarm protein that modulates not only the innate immune response but also the adaptive immune response. PMID:21574992