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Sample records for cd146 mesenchymal stromal

  1. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of surface markers for prospective isolation of functionally homogenous populations of human skeletal (stromal, mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) is highly relevant for cell therapy protocols. Thus, we examined the possible use of CD146 to subtype a heterogeneous h......MSC population. METHODS: Using flow cytometry and cell sorting, we isolated two distinct hMSC-CD146(+) and hMSC-CD146(-) cell populations from the telomerized human bone marrow-derived stromal cell line (hMSC-TERT). Cells were examined for differences in their size, shape and texture by using high......-content analysis and additionally for their ability to differentiate toward osteogenesis in vitro and form bone in vivo, and their migrational ability in vivo and in vitro was investigated. RESULTS: In vitro, the two cell populations exhibited similar growth rate and differentiation capacity to osteoblasts...

  2. CD146 expression on mesenchymal stem cells is associated with their vascular smooth muscle commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espagnolle, Nicolas; Guilloton, Fabien; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Sensébé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are plastic adherent cells that can differentiate into various tissue lineages, including osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. However, this progenitor property is not shared by all cells within the MSC population. In addition, MSCs vary in their proliferation capacity and expression of markers. Because of heterogeneity of CD146 expression in the MSC population, we compared CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) cells under clonal conditions and after sorting of the non-clonal cell population to determine whether this expression is associated with specific functions. CD146(-/Low) and CD146(High) bone marrow MSCs did not differ in colony-forming unit-fibroblast number, osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation or in vitro haematopoietic-supportive activity. However, CD146(-/Low) clones proliferated slightly but significantly faster than did CD146(High) clones. In addition, a strong expression of CD146 molecule was associated with a commitment to a vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lineage characterized by a strong up-regulation of calponin-1 and SM22α expression and an ability to contract collagen matrix. Thus, within a bone marrow MSC population, certain subpopulations characterized by high expression of CD146, are committed towards a VSMC lineage.

  3. CD146/MCAM defines functionality of human bone marrow stromal stem cell populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid; Ditzel, Nicholas;

    2016-01-01

    significantly increased migration ability as demonstrated by bioluminescence imaging. Conclusion Our studies demonstrate that CD146 defines a subpopulation of hMSCs capable of bone formation and in vivo trans-endothelial migration and thus represents a population of hMSCs suitable for use in clinical protocols...

  4. CD146 expression on primary nonhematopoietic bone marrow stem cells is correlated with in situ localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tormin, Ariane; Li, Ou; Brune, Jan Claas;

    2011-01-01

    Nonhematopoietic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are of central importance for bone marrow stroma and the hematopoietic environment. However, the exact phenotype and anatomical distribution of specified MSC populations in the marrow are unknown. We characterized the phenotype...... phenotype and genotype, gave rise to typical cultured stromal cells, and formed bone and hematopoietic stroma in vivo. Interestingly, CD146 was up-regulated in normoxia and down-regulated in hypoxia. This was correlated with in situ localization differences, with CD146 coexpressing reticular cells located...... in perivascular regions, whereas bone-lining MSCs expressed CD271 alone. In both regions, CD34⁺ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were located in close proximity to MSCs. These novel findings show that the expression of CD146 differentiates between perivascular versus endosteal localization of non...

  5. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May;

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  6. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    initiated. As there has been a precedent for the use of bone marrow stem cells in the treatment of hematological malignancies and ischemic heart diseases through randomized clinical safety and efficacy trials, the development of new therapies based on culture-expanded human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs......Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have been......) opens up new possibilities for cell therapy. To facilitate these applications, cryopreservation and long-term storage of MSCs becomes an absolute necessity. As a result, optimization of this cryopreservation protocol is absolutely critical. The major challenge during cellular cryopreservation...

  7. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A.; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M.; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Wells, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonl...

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Viral Infection

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    Maytawan Thanunchai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs are a subset of nonhematopoietic adult stem cells, readily isolated from various tissues and easily culture-expanded ex vivo. Intensive studies of the immune modulation and tissue regeneration over the past few years have demonstrated the great potential of MSCs for the prevention and treatment of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD, immune-related disorders, and viral diseases. In immunocompromised individuals, the immunomodulatory activities of MSCs have raised safety concerns regarding the greater risk of primary viral infection and viral reactivation, which is a major cause of mortality after allogeneic transplantation. Moreover, high susceptibilities of MSCs to viral infections in vitro could reflect the destructive outcomes that might impair the clinical efficacy of MSCs infusion. However, the interplay between MSCs and virus is like a double-edge sword, and it also provides beneficial effects such as allowing the proliferation and function of antiviral specific effector cells instead of suppressing them, serving as an ideal tool for study of viral pathogenesis, and protecting hosts against viral challenge by using the antimicrobial activity. Here, we therefore review favorable and unfavorable consequences of MSCs and virus interaction with the highlight of safety and efficacy for applying MSCs as cell therapy.

  9. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial cell

  10. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  11. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Updates and Therapeutic Outlook in Rheumatic Diseases

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    Christian Jorgensen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells exhibiting functional properties that have opened the way for cell-based clinical therapies. MSCs have been reported to exhibit immunosuppressive as well as healing properties, improving angiogenesis and preventing apoptosis or fibrosis through the secretion of paracrine mediators. This review summarizes recent progress on the clinical application of stem cells therapy in some inflammatory and degenerative rheumatic diseases. To date, most of the available data have been obtained in preclinical models and clinical efficacy needs to be evaluated through controlled randomized double-blind trials.

  12. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Gang; Xu, Jun-jun; Deng, Zhi-Hong; Feng, Jie; Jin, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs) were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmM...

  13. The mesenchymal stromal cell magic bullet finds yet another target

    OpenAIRE

    Masterson, Claire; O’Toole, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Rojas and colleagues have presented an exciting paper demonstrating yet another relevant preclinical setting in which the mesenchymal stromal cell has a potential therapeutic application. What is particularly interesting about this study is that it addresses a disease, blood-borne systemic sepsis, which has multiple complex host responses and involves a variety of disparate organs and immune cell types. Here, the authors focus on how this injury relates more specifically to the lung, with qui...

  14. The Cell Surface Proteome of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Niehage; Charlotte Steenblock; Theresia Pursche; Martin Bornhäuser; Denis Corbeil; Bernard Hoflack

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are considered as promising biological tools for regenerative medicine. Their antibody-based isolation relies on the identification of reliable cell surface markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain a comprehensive view of the cell surface proteome of bone marrow-derived hMSCs, we have developed an analytical pipeline relying on cell surface biotinylation of intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-bio...

  15. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

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    Francesca Cammarota

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs, endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM. The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs. Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease.

  16. Stromal mesenchyme cell genes of the human prostate and bladder

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    Pascal Laura E

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal mesenchyme cells play an important role in epithelial differentiation and likely in cancer as well. Induction of epithelial differentiation is organ-specific, and the genes responsible could be identified through a comparative genomic analysis of the stromal cells from two different organs. These genes might be aberrantly expressed in cancer since cancer could be viewed as due to a defect in stromal signaling. We propose to identify the prostate stromal genes by analysis of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells, and to examine their expression in prostate cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry using antibodies to cluster designation (CD cell surface antigens was first used to characterize the stromas of the prostate and bladder. Stromal cells were prepared from either prostate or bladder tissue for cell culture. RNA was isolated from the cultured cells and analyzed by DNA microarrays. Expression of candidate genes in normal prostate and prostate cancer was examined by RT-PCR. Results The bladder stroma was phenotypically different from that of the prostate. Most notable was the presence of a layer of CD13+ cells adjacent to the urothelium. This structural feature was also seen in the mouse bladder. The prostate stroma was uniformly CD13-. A number of differentially expressed genes between prostate and bladder stromal cells were identified. One prostate gene, proenkephalin (PENK, was of interest because it encodes a hormone. Secreted proteins such as hormones and bioactive peptides are known to mediate cell-cell signaling. Prostate stromal expression of PENK was verified by an antibody raised against a PENK peptide, by RT-PCR analysis of laser-capture microdissected stromal cells, and by database analysis. Gene expression analysis showed that PENK expression was down-regulated in prostate cancer. Conclusion Our findings show that the histologically similar stromas of the prostate and

  17. Supernatant of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induces Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Possessing Mesenchymal Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu, Jun-jun Xu, Zhi-hong Deng, Jie Feng, Yan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence shows that some cells from peripheral blood fibroblast-like mononuclear cells have the capacity to differentiate into mesenchymal lineages. However, the insufficiency of these cells in the circulation challenges the cell isolation and subsequently limits the clinical application of these cells. In the present study, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (pbMNCs were isolated from wound animals and treated with the supernatant of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (bmMSCs. Results showed these pbMNCs were fibroblast-like, had stromal morphology, were negative for CD34 and CD45, but positive for Vimentin and Collagen I, and had the multipotency to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. We named these induced peripheral blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ipbMSCs. Skin grafts in combination with ipbMSCs and collagen I were applied for wound healing, and results revealed ipbMSC exhibited similar potency and effectiveness in the promotion of wound healing to the bmMSCs. Hereafter, we speculate that the mixture of growth factors and chemokines secreted by bmMSCs may play an important roles in the induction of the proliferation and mesenchymal differentiation of mononuclear cells. Our results are clinically relevant because it provide a new method for the acquisition of MSCs which can be used as a candidate for the wound repair.

  18. Low Reactive Level Laser Therapy for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Therapies

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    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low reactive level laser therapy (LLLT is mainly focused on the activation of intracellular or extracellular chromophore and the initiation of cellular signaling by using low power lasers. Over the past forty years, it was realized that the laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain and inflammation. In recent years, the term LLLT has become widely recognized in the field of regenerative medicine. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms of action of LLLT at a cellular level and introduce the application to mesenchymal stem cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs therapies. Finally, our recent research results that LLLT enhanced the MSCs differentiation to osteoblast will also be described.

  19. Hypoxia-controlled EphA3 marks a human endometrium-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell that supports vascular growth.

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    Catherine To

    Full Text Available Eph and ephrin proteins are essential cell guidance cues that orchestrate cell navigation and control cell-cell interactions during developmental tissue patterning, organogenesis and vasculogenesis. They have been extensively studied in animal models of embryogenesis and adult tissue regeneration, but less is known about their expression and function during human tissue and organ regeneration. We discovered the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3, an Eph family member with critical functions during human tumour progression, in the vascularised tissue of regenerating human endometrium and on isolated human endometrial multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (eMSCs, but not in other highly vascularised human organs. EphA3 affinity-isolation from human biopsy tissue yielded multipotent CD29+/CD73+/CD90+/CD146+ eMSCs that can be clonally propagated and respond to EphA3 agonists with EphA3 phosphorylation, cell contraction, cell-cell segregation and directed cell migration. EphA3 silencing significantly inhibited the ability of transplanted eMSCs to support neovascularisation in immunocompromised mice. In accord with established roles of Eph receptors in mediating interactions between endothelial and perivascular stromal cells during mouse development, our findings suggest that HIF-1α-controlled expression of EphA3 on human MSCs functions during the hypoxia-initiated early stages of adult blood vessel formation.

  20. Functional Characteristics of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pituitary Adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megnis, Kaspars; Mandrika, Ilona; Petrovska, Ramona; Stukens, Janis; Rovite, Vita; Balcere, Inga; Jansone, Laima Sabine; Peculis, Raitis; Pirags, Valdis; Klovins, Janis

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are one of the most common endocrine and intracranial neoplasms. Although they are theoretically monoclonal in origin, several studies have shown that they contain different multipotent cell types that are thought to play an important role in tumor initiation, maintenance, and recurrence after therapy. In the present study, we isolated and characterized cell populations from seven pituitary somatotroph, nonhormonal, and lactotroph adenomas. The obtained cells showed characteristics of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells as observed by cell morphology, cell surface marker CD90, CD105, CD44, and vimentin expression, as well as differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. They are capable of growth and passaging under standard laboratory cell culture conditions and do not manifest any hormonal cell characteristics. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells are present in pituitary adenomas regardless of their clinical manifestation and show no considerable expression of somatostatin 1-5 and dopamine 2 receptors. Most likely obtained cells are a part of tissue-supportive cells in pituitary adenoma microenvironment. PMID:27340409

  1. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh; Wells, Christine A

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  2. Good manufacturing practices production of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Tarte, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are important tools for treating immune disorders and for tissue repair. The increasing use of MSCs has led to production processes that need to be in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). In cellular therapy, safety remains one of the main concerns and refers to donor validation, choice of starting material, processes, and the controls used, not only at the batch release level but also during the development of processes. The culture processes should be reproducible, robust, and efficient. Moreover, they should be adapted to closed systems that are easy to use. Implementing controls during the manufacturing of clinical-grade MSCs is essential. The controls should ensure microbiological safety but also avoid potential side effects linked to genomic instability driving transformation and senescence or decrease of cell functions (immunoregulation, differentiation potential). In this rapidly evolving field, a new approach to controls is needed.

  3. [Multipotent mesenchymal stromal and immune cells interaction: reciprocal effects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, E R; Buravkova, L B

    2012-12-01

    Adult multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs) are considered now as one of the key players in physiological and pathological tissue remodeling. Clarification of the mechanisms that mediate MMSC functions, is one of the most intriguing issues in modern cell physiology. Present Review summarizes current understanding of the MMSC effects on different types of immune cells. The realization of MMSC immunomodulatory capacity is considered as a contribution of direct cell-to-cell contacts, soluble mediators and of local microenvironmental factors, the most important of which is the partial pressure of oxygen. MMSCs and immune cells interaction is discussed in the terms of reciprocal effects, modifying properties of all "partner cells". Special attention is paid to the influence of immune cells on the MMSCs. "Immunosuppressive" phenomenon of MMSCs is considered as the integral part of the "response to injury" mechanism. PMID:23461191

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells and chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algeri, M; Conforti, A; Pitisci, A; Starc, N; Tomao, L; Bernardo, M E; Locatelli, F

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental findings have shown the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to home to damaged tissues and to produce paracrine factors with anti-inflammatory properties, potentially resulting in reduction of inflammation and functional recovery of the damaged tissues. Prompted by these intriguing properties and on the basis of encouraging preclinical data, MSCs are currently being studied in several immune-mediated disorders. Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) represent a setting in which MSCs-based therapy has been extensively investigated. Phase I and II studies have documented the safety and feasibility of MSCs. However, efficacy results have so far been conflicting. In this review, we will discuss the biologic rationale that makes MSCs a promising therapeutic tool for IBD, and analyze recent experimental and clinical findings, highlighting current limitations and future perspectives of MSCs-related immunotherapy for IBD. PMID:26170204

  5. Human Fallopian Tube Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Enhance Bone Regeneration in a Xenotransplanted Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jazedje, Tatiana; Bueno, Daniela F; Almada, Bruno V. P.; Caetano, Heloisa; Czeresnia, Carlos E.; Perin, Paulo M.; Halpern, Silvio; Maluf, Mariangela; Evangelista, Lucila P.; Nisenbaum, Marcelo G.; Martins, Marília T.; Passos-Bueno, Maria R.; Zatz, Mayana

    2011-01-01

    We have recently reported that human fallopian tubes, which are discarded during surgical procedures of women submitted to sterilization or hysterectomies, are a rich source of human fallopian tube mesenchymal stromal cells (htMSCs). It has been previously shown that human mesenchymal stromal cells may be useful in enhancing the speed of bone regeneration. This prompted us to investigate whether htMSCs might be useful for the treatment of osteoporosis or other bone diseases, since they presen...

  6. CD146(+) cells are essential for kidney vasculature development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halt, Kimmo J; Pärssinen, Heikki E; Junttila, Sanna M; Saarela, Ulla; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Koivunen, Peppi; Myllyharju, Johanna; Quaggin, Susan; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Vainio, Seppo J

    2016-08-01

    The kidney vasculature is critical for renal function, but its developmental assembly mechanisms remain poorly understood and models for studying its assembly dynamics are limited. Here, we tested whether the embryonic kidney contains endothelial cells (ECs) that are heterogeneous with respect to VEGFR2/Flk1/KDR, CD31/PECAM, and CD146/MCAM markers. Tie1Cre;R26R(YFP)-based fate mapping with a time-lapse in embryonic kidney organ culture successfully depicted the dynamics of kidney vasculature development and the correlation of the process with the CD31(+) EC network. Depletion of Tie1(+) or CD31(+) ECs from embryonic kidneys, with either Tie1Cre-induced diphtheria toxin susceptibility or cell surface marker-based sorting in a novel dissociation and reaggregation technology, illustrated substantial EC network regeneration. Depletion of the CD146(+) cells abolished this EC regeneration. Fate mapping of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-marked CD146(+)/CD31(-) cells indicated that they became CD31(+) cells, which took part in EC structures with CD31(+) wild-type ECs. EC network development depends on VEGF signaling, and VEGF and erythropoietin are expressed in the embryonic kidney even in the absence of any external hypoxic stimulus. Thus, the ex vivo embryonic kidney culture models adopted here provided novel ways for targeting renal EC development and demonstrated that CD146(+) cells are critical for kidney vasculature development. PMID:27165833

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Lívia Maria Mendonça Augusto; Diego Pinheiro Aguiar; Danielle Cabral Bonfim; Amanda dos Santos Cavalcanti; Priscila Ladeira Casado; Maria Eugênia Leite Duarte

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. METHODS: Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at -80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. RESULTS: The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone...

  8. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

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    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  9. Cryopreservation and Revival of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Ekblond, Annette; Kastrup, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising and innovative new treatment for different degenerative and autoimmune diseases, and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the bone marrow have demonstrated great therapeutic potential due to their immunosuppressive and regenerative capacities.The establishment of methods for large-scale expansion of clinical-grade MSCs in vitro has paved the way for their therapeutic use in clinical trials. However, the clinical application of MSCs also requires cryopreservation and banking of the cell products. To preserve autologous or allogeneic MSCs for future clinical applications, a reliable and effective cryopreservation method is required.Developing a successful cryopreservation protocol for clinical stem cell products, cryopreservation media, cryoprotectant agents (CPAs), the freezing container, the freezing temperature, and the cooling and warming rate are all aspects which should be considered.A major challenge is the selection of a suitable cryoprotectant which is able to penetrate the cells and yet has low toxicity.This chapter focuses on recent technological developments relevant for the cryopreservation of MSCs using the most commonly used cryopreservation medium containing DMSO and animal serum or human-derived products for research use and the animal protein-free cryopreservation media CryoStor (BioLife Solutions) for clinical use.

  10. Mesenchymal stromal cells in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

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    Dorottya K. De Vries

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is an inevitable consequence of organ transplantation and a major determinant of patient and graft survival in kidney transplantation. Renal I/R injury can lead to fibrosis and graft failure. Although the exact sequence of events in the pathophysiology of I/R injury remains unknown, the role of inflammation has become increasingly clear. In this perspective, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are under extensive investigation as potential therapy for I/R injury, since MSCs are able to exert immune regulatory and reparative effects. Various preclinical studies indicate the beneficial effects of MSCs in ameliorating renal injury and accelerating tissue repair. These versatile cells have been shown to migrate to sites of injury and to enhance repair by paracrine mechanisms instead of by differentiating and replacing the injured cells. The first phase I studies of MSCs in human renal I/R injury and kidney transplantation have been started, and results are awaited soon. In this review, preliminary results and opportunities of MSCs in human renal I/R injury are summarized. We might be heading towards a cell-based paradigm shift in the treatment of renal I/R injury.

  11. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients. PMID:27059199

  12. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials. PMID:27079322

  13. Mechanisms of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spees, Jeffrey L; Lee, Ryang Hwa; Gregory, Carl A

    2016-01-01

    The past decade has seen an explosion of research directed toward better understanding of the mechanisms of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) function during rescue and repair of injured organs and tissues. In addition to delineating cell-cell signaling and molecular controls for MSC differentiation, the field has made particular progress in defining several other mechanisms through which administered MSCs can promote tissue rescue/repair. These include: 1) paracrine activity that involves secretion of proteins/peptides and hormones; 2) transfer of mitochondria by way of tunneling nanotubes or microvesicles; and 3) transfer of exosomes or microvesicles containing RNA and other molecules. Improved understanding of MSC function holds great promise for the application of cell therapy and also for the development of powerful cell-derived therapeutics for regenerative medicine. Focusing on these three mechanisms, we discuss MSC-mediated effects on immune cell responses, cell survival, and fibrosis and review recent progress with MSC-based or MSC-derived therapeutics. PMID:27581859

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Maria Ester; Fibbe, Willem E

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of multipotent cells that can be isolated from various human tissues and culture-expanded ex vivo for clinical use. Due to their immunoregulatory properties and their ability to secrete growth factors, MSCs play a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis and in the modulation of immune responses against allo- and autoantigens. In light of these properties, MSCs have been employed in clinical trials in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to facilitate engraftment of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and to prevent graft failure, as well as to treat steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). The available clinical evidence derived from these studies indicates that MSC administration is safe. Moreover, promising preliminary results in terms of efficacy have been reported in some clinical trials, especially in the treatment of acute GvHD. In this review we critically discuss recent advances in MSC therapy by reporting on the most relevant studies in the field of HSCT.

  15. The cell surface proteome of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Niehage

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs are considered as promising biological tools for regenerative medicine. Their antibody-based isolation relies on the identification of reliable cell surface markers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain a comprehensive view of the cell surface proteome of bone marrow-derived hMSCs, we have developed an analytical pipeline relying on cell surface biotinylation of intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin to enrich the plasma membrane proteins and mass spectrometry for identification with extremely high confidence. Among the 888 proteins identified, we found ≈200 bona fide plasma membrane proteins including 33 cell adhesion molecules and 26 signaling receptors. In total 41 CD markers including 5 novel ones (CD97, CD112, CD239, CD276, and CD316 were identified. The CD markers are distributed homogenously within plastic-adherent hMSC populations and their expression is modulated during the process of adipogenesis or osteogenesis. Moreover, our in silico analysis revealed a significant difference between the cell surface proteome of hMSCs and that of human embryonic stem cells reported previously. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our analytical methods not only provide a basis for further studies of mechanisms maintaining the multipotency of hMSCs within their niches and triggering their differentiation after signaling, but also a toolbox for a refined antibody-based identification of hMSC populations from different tissues and their isolation for therapeutic intervention.

  16. A relativity concept in mesenchymal stromal cell manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ivan; De Boer, Jan; Sensebe, Luc

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are being experimentally tested in several biological systems and clinical settings with the aim of verifying possible therapeutic effects for a variety of indications. MSCs are also known to be heterogeneous populations, with phenotypic and functional features that depend heavily on the individual donor, the harvest site, and the culture conditions. In the context of this multidimensional complexity, a recurrent question is whether it is feasible to produce MSC batches as "standard" therapeutics, possibly within scalable manufacturing systems. Here, we provide a short overview of the literature on different culture methods for MSCs, including those employing innovative technologies, and of some typically assessed functional features (e.g., growth, senescence, genomic stability, clonogenicity, etc.). We then offer our perspective of a roadmap on how to identify and refine manufacturing systems for MSCs intended for specific clinical indications. We submit that the vision of producing MSCs according to a unique standard, although commercially attractive, cannot yet be scientifically substantiated. Instead, efforts should be concentrated on standardizing methods for characterization of MSCs generated by different groups, possibly covering a vast gamut of functionalities. Such assessments, combined with hypotheses on the therapeutic mode of action and associated clinical data, should ultimately allow definition of in-process controls and measurable release criteria for MSC manufacturing. These will have to be validated as predictive of potency in suitable pre-clinical models and of therapeutic efficacy in patients.

  17. Osteogenic differentiation of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their bone regeneration potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipino, Caterina; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2015-05-26

    In orthopedics, tissue engineering approach using stem cells is a valid line of treatment for patients with bone defects. In this context, mesenchymal stromal cells of various origins have been extensively studied and continue to be a matter of debate. Although mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow are already clinically applied, recent evidence suggests that one may use mesenchymal stromal cells from extra-embryonic tissues, such as amniotic fluid, as an innovative and advantageous resource for bone regeneration. The use of cells from amniotic fluid does not raise ethical problems and provides a sufficient number of cells without invasive procedures. Furthermore, they do not develop into teratomas when transplanted, a consequence observed with pluripotent stem cells. In addition, their multipotent differentiation ability, low immunogenicity, and anti-inflammatory properties make them ideal candidates for bone regenerative medicine. We here present an overview of the features of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their potential in the osteogenic differentiation process. We have examined the papers actually available on this regard, with particular interest in the strategies applied to improve in vitro osteogenesis. Importantly, a detailed understanding of the behavior of amniotic fluid mesenchymal stromal cells and their osteogenic ability is desirable considering a feasible application in bone regenerative medicine.

  18. PROSPECTS FOR APPLICATION OF Aplysinidae FAMILY MARINE SPONGE SKELETONS AND MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS IN TISSUE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Yu. Rogulska

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Development of the new types of tissue engineered structures is one of the promising trends of current biotechnology. The study was directed to the assessment of prospects for the application of chitin-based skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family (Aplysina fulva and Aplysina aerophoba for creation of bioengineered constructs based on human mesenchymal stromal cells. After cleaning and demineralization procedures, sponge skeletons appeared as three-dimensional macroporous matrices formed by intersecting chitin fibrils. After seeding into chitin-based matrices the cells were attached to the surface of the fibrils and were able to spread and proliferate. Mesenchymal stromal cells within Aplysina fulva differentiated into osteogenic and adipogenic directions under the influence of appropriate inductors. Demineralized skeletons derived from marine sponges of Aplysinidae family could be used as scaffolds for mesenchymal stromal cells which provides new opportunities for the creation of adipose and bone tissue engineered structures.

  19. Radiation rescue: mesenchymal stromal cells protect from lethal irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lange

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Successful treatment of acute radiation syndromes relies on immediate supportive care. In patients with limited hematopoietic recovery potential, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation is the only curative treatment option. Because of time consuming donor search and uncertain outcome we propose MSC treatment as an alternative treatment for severely radiation-affected individuals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Mouse mesenchymal stromal cells (mMSCs were expanded from bone marrow, retrovirally labeled with eGFP (bulk cultures and cloned. Bulk and five selected clonal mMSCs populations were characterized in vitro for their multilineage differentiation potential and phenotype showing no contamination with hematopoietic cells. Lethally irradiated recipients were i.v. transplanted with bulk or clonal mMSCs. We found a long-term survival of recipients with fast hematopoietic recovery after the transplantation of MSCs exclusively without support by HSCs. Quantitative PCR based chimerism analysis detected eGFP-positive donor cells in peripheral blood immediately after injection and in lungs within 24 hours. However, no donor cells in any investigated tissue remained long-term. Despite the rapidly disappearing donor cells, microarray and quantitative RT-PCR gene expression analysis in the bone marrow of MSC-transplanted animals displayed enhanced regenerative features characterized by (i decreased proinflammatory, ECM formation and adhesion properties and (ii boosted anti-inflammation, detoxification, cell cycle and anti-oxidative stress control as compared to HSC-transplanted animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our data revealed that systemically administered MSCs provoke a protective mechanism counteracting the inflammatory events and also supporting detoxification and stress management after radiation exposure. Further our results suggest that MSCs, their release of trophic factors and their HSC-niche modulating activity rescue endogenous hematopoiesis

  20. Simvastatin modulates mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation and gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Lucíola Zanette

    Full Text Available Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR. These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential.

  1. Essential components for ex vivo proliferation of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Natalie; Rojewski, Markus Thomas; Lotfi, Ramin; Schrezenmeier, Hubert

    2014-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are highly interesting candidates for clinical applications in regenerative medicine. Due to their low occurrence in human tissues, extensive in vitro expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient cell numbers applicable as a clinical dose in the context of cellular therapy. Current cell culture media formulations for the isolation and expansion of MSCs include fetal calf serum (FCS), human AB serum (ABS), or human platelet lysate (PL) as a supplement. However, these established supplements are inherently ill-defined formulations that contain a variety of bioactive molecules in varying batch-to-batch compositions and the risk of transmitting pathogens that escape routine screening procedures. In this study, we have comparatively characterized the capacity of commonly used basal media, such as the Minimum Essential Medium alpha (αMEM), Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM), and RPMI 1640 as well as human- and animal-derived supplements, that is, PL, ABS, and FCS to stimulate cell proliferation. MSC proliferation was observed to be optimal in the PL-supplemented αMEM. Using a combinatorial approach, we then assessed a library of soluble factors, including mitogens (TGF-β1, Activin A, bFGF, EGF, IGF-I, PDGF-BB, and VEGF), chemokines (CCL21, CCL25, CXCL12, and RANTES), proteins (human serum albumin), lipids (e.g., oleic acid, linoleic acid, and arachidonic acid), and hormones (dexamethasone, insulin, and TSH), to create a defined medium as well as coating of cell culture surfaces to promote robust MSC proliferation in vitro. A combination of recombinant human factors partially met the nutritional requirements of bone marrow-derived MSCs, and was able to promote cell proliferation comparable to about 5% PL if supplemented with auxiliary 0.6%-1.2% PL. Maximal MSC proliferation was achieved by combining 5% PL with a cocktail of recombinant factors and did not depend on coating of cell

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Dependent Regression of Pulmonary Metastasis from Ewing's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Anita Hayes-Jordan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ewing’s sarcoma (ES is the second most common bone tumor in children. Survival has not improved over the last decade and once pulmonary metastatic disease is present, survival is dismal. Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC therapy has shown potential benefit for Kaposi's sarcoma; however, the role of progenitor cell therapies for cancer remains controversial. MSC treatment of ES or pulmonary metastatic disease has not been demonstrated. We have developed an orthotopic xenograft model of ES in which animals develop spontaneous pulmonary metastases. Within this model, we demonstrate the use of MSCs to target ES lung metastasis. Materials and MethodsHuman ES cells were transfected with luciferase and injected into the rib of nude mice. Development of pulmonary metastases was confirmed by imaging. After flow cytometry based characterization, MSC’s were injected into the tail vein of nude mice with established local ES tumor or pulmonary metastasis. Mice were treated with intravenous MSCs weekly followed by bioluminescent imaging.ResultsThe intravenous injection of MSCs in an ES model decreases the volume of pulmonary metastatic lesions; however, no effect on primary chest wall tumor size is observed. Thus verifying the MSC preferential homing to the lung. MSCs are found to ‘home to’ the pulmonary parenchyma and remain engrafted up to 5 days after delivery. DiscussionMSC treatment of ES slows growth of pulmonary metastasis. MSC’s have more affinity for pulmonary metastasis and can effect a greater decrease in tumor growth in the lungs compared to the primary tumor site

  3. Immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stromal cells-derived exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wancheng; Huang, Yukai; Han, Jiaochan; Yu, Lili; Li, Yanli; Lu, Ziyuan; Li, Hongbo; Liu, Zenghui; Shi, Chenyan; Duan, Fengqi; Xiao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying immunomodulatory ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) remain unknown. Recently, studies suggested that the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs is largely mediated by paracrine factors. Among which, exosome is considered to play a major role in the communication between MSCs and target tissue. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of MSCs-derived exosome on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), especially T cells. We find that the MSCs-derived exosome extracted from healthy donors' bone marrow suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-1β, but increased the concentration of anti-inflammatory factor TGF-β during in vitro culture. In addition, exosome may induce conversion of T helper type 1 (Th1) into T helper type 2 (Th2) cells and reduced potential of T cells to differentiate into interleukin 17-producing effector T cells (Th17). Moreover, the level of regulatory T cells (Treg) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 were also increased. These results suggested that MSC-derived exosome possesses the immunomodulatory properties. However, it showed no effects on the proliferation of PBMCs or CD3+ T cells, but increases the apoptosis of them. In addition, indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) was previously shown to mediate the immunoregulation of MSCs, which was increased in PBMCs co-cultured with MSCs. In our study, IDO showed no significant changes in PBMCs exposed to MSCs-derived exosome. We conclude that exosome and MSCs might differ in their immune-modulating activities and mechanisms. PMID:27115513

  4. The Origin of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Dictates Their Reparative Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naftali-Shani, Nili; Itzhaki-Alfia, Ayelet; Landa-Rouben, Natalie;

    2013-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair.......Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) from adipose cardiac tissue have attracted considerable interest in regard to cell-based therapies. We aimed to test the hypothesis that hMSCs from the heart and epicardial fat would be better cells for infarct repair....

  5. Platelet Lysate as Replacement for Fetal Bovine Serum in Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Bieback, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) emerged as highly attractive in cell-based regenerative medicine. Initially thought to provide cells capable of differentiation towards mesenchymal cell types (osteoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes etc.), by and by potent immunoregulatory and pro-regenerative activities have been discovered, broadening the field of potential applications from bone and cartilage regeneration to wound healing and treatment of autoimmune diseases. Due to the limited frequency in m...

  6. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, J.; Siddappa, R.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effe

  7. Different wound healing properties of dermis, adipose, and gingiva mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Boink; L.J. van den Broek; S. Roffel; K. Nazmi; J.G.M. Bolscher; A. Gefen; E.C.I. Veerman; S. Gibbs

    2016-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with better scar quality than skin wounds. Deep skin wounds where adipose tissue is exposed, have a greater risk of forming hypertrophic scars. Differences in wound healing and final scar quality might be related to differences in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their

  8. Current research situation of correlation between CD146 and melanoma%CD146与黑色素瘤相关性的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷星; 宋扬; 曲彦隆

    2013-01-01

    目的:总结CD146对黑色素瘤多方面生物特征的影响,揭示靶向抑制CD146可能在未来人类黑色素瘤的预防和治疗中发挥作用.方法:应用Medline、PubMed及CNKI期刊全文数据库检索系统,以“CD146和黑色素瘤”为关键词,检索自建库至2012-04的相关文献.纳入标准:1)CD146与黑色素瘤的相关性;2)CD146的结构;3)黑色素瘤的治疗及预后.符合分析的文献31篇.结果:CD146作为最近发现的免疫球蛋白家族成员,对调节黑色素瘤的多种生物学特征有重要作用.CD146虽然不影响体外瘤细胞增殖,但能增强体外瘤细胞的侵袭性、运动性、转移性、黏附性和在裸鼠体内的致瘤性及增加瘤内血管的密度,从而促进黑色素瘤的发生和发展.结论:通过阐述CD146对黑色素瘤多方面的作用,有助于揭示黑色素瘤的发病机制和为研发有效治疗方案提供依据.%OBJECTIVE:To summarize articles related to the effect of CD146 on various biological characteristics of melanoma and reveal the possibility of targeting CD146 in the design of future strategies for the prevention and treatment of human melanoma. METHODS: The related works were searched by "CD146, melanoma" as key words in Medline, PubMed and CNKI database until April 2012. Totally 31 papers were selected and analyzed according to the inclusion cri teria as follows: 1) the correlation between CD146 and melanoma; 2) the construction of CD146; 3) the treatment and prognosis of melanoma. RESULTS: CD146 as a recently identified member of immunoglobulin gene superfamily,plays an important role in various biological characteristics of melanoma. Though CD146 does not affect the proliferation of melano ma cells in vitro,it can reinforce the invasion,motion,metastasis,adhesion and tumorigenicity in nude mice,and augment the angiogenesis in vivo or vessel-like tube formation in vitro. CONCLUSTION: The research of the role of CD146 in vari ous biological characteristics

  9. Identification of CD146 Expression in Human and Mouse Preimplantation Embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-bo WANG; Xuan DU; Ya-hui XU; Ze-hua WANG

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether CD146, a cell adhesion molecule, is expressed in mouse and human preimplantation blastocysts and to localize CD146 in the layer of trophectoderm(TE) and/or inner cell mass(ICM). Methods Human and mouse embryos were collected. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR), the expression of CD146 mRNA in blastocyst was evaluated in human and mouse embryos. Single embryo immunohistochemical staining was applicated in the examination of the expression of CD146 in protein level. The statistical significance of the data was analyzed using t-test. Results CD146 transcript was detected in all human and mouse preimplantation morula and blastocyst. The expression of CD146 was found to localize in human and mouse compacted morula stage embryos and the TE and ICM of the expanded blastocysts. Conclusion mRNA and protein of CD146 was expressed in preimplantation embryos,which may have a profound influence on early preimplantation development for the differentiation of the trophectoderm and the morphogenesis of the blastocyst.Furthermore, the expression of CD146 in blastocyst stage may be implicated in the assistance of embryo implantation.

  10. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.;

    2008-01-01

    used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008......OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells for cardiovascular repair: current status and future challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    of treatments in patients with heart failure, the 1-year mortality is still approximately 20% after the diagnosis has been established. Treatment with stem cells with the potential to regenerate the damaged myocardium is a relatively new approach. Mesenchymal stromal cells are a promising source of stem cells...... for regenerative therapy. Clinical studies on stem cell therapy for cardiac regeneration have shown significant improvements in ventricular pump function, ventricular remodeling, myocardial perfusion, exercise potential and clinical symptoms compared with conventionally treated control groups. The results of most...... studies are promising, but there are still many unanswered questions. In this review, we explore present preclinical and clinical knowledge regarding the use of stem cells in cardiovascular regenerative medicine, with special focus on mesenchymal stromal cells. We take a closer look at sources of stem...

  12. Conditioned Medium From Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Limits Infarct Size and Enhances Angiogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to elucidate whether human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts. In particular, the administration of hAMC-conditioned medium repaired ischemic damage through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Finally, several putative active paracrine mediators that might account for the effects observed were identified by gene and protein arrays.

  13. Improved isolation protocol for equine cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

      BACKGROUND AIMS: A robust methodology for the isolation of cord blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (CB-MSCs) from fresh umbilical cord blood has not been reported in any species. The objective of this study was to improve the isolation procedure for equine CB-MSCs. METHODS: Pre......Cyte-EQ medium is superior to Ficoll-Paque PREMIUM density medium for the isolation of putative equine CB MSC and that MSC-qualified FBS may improve the isolation efficiency....

  14. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Eder Zucconi; Natassia Moreira Vieira; Carlos Roberto Bueno; Mariane Secco; Tatiana Jazedje; Marcos Costa Valadares; Miriam Fussae Suzuki; Paolo Bartolini; Mariz Vainzof; Mayana Zatz

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs), independently of the specific gene mutati...

  15. Isolation and characterization of equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    OpenAIRE

    Armando de M. Carvalho; Ana Lucia M. Yamada; Juliana R.B. Martins; Leandro Maia; Marjorie de A Golim; Elenice Deffune; Carlos A. Hussni; Ana Liz G. Alves

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to isolate, cultivate and characterize equine peripheral blood-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (PbMSCs). Peripheral blood was collected, followed by the isolation of mononuclear cells using density gradient reagents, and the cultivation of adherent cells. Monoclonal mouse anti-horse CD13, mouse anti-horse CD44, and mouse anti-rat CD90 antibodies were used for the immunophenotypic characterization of the surface of the PbMSCs. These cells were also ...

  16. Aspiration, but not injection, decreases cultured equine mesenchymal stromal cell viability

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Lynn B.; Russell, Keith A.; Koenig, Judith B.; Thomas G. Koch

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, equine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have received significant attention as therapy for various conditions due to their proposed regenerative and immune-modulating capacity. MSC are commonly administered to the patient through a hypodermic needle. Currently, little information is available on the effect of such injection has on equine MSC immediate and delayed viability. We hypothesize that viability of equine MSC is not correlated with needle diameter durin...

  17. Microencapsulated equine mesenchymal stromal cells promote cutaneous wound healing in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Bussche, Leen; Harman, Rebecca M.; Syracuse, Bethany A; Plante, Eric L; Lu, Yen-Chun; Curtis, Theresa M; Ma, Minglin; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of impaired cutaneous wound healing is high and treatment is difficult and often ineffective, leading to negative social and economic impacts for our society. Innovative treatments to improve cutaneous wound healing by promoting complete tissue regeneration are therefore urgently needed. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been reported to provide paracrine signals that promote wound healing, but (i) how they exert their effects on target cells is unclear and (ii...

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells reset the scatter factor system and cytokine network in experimental kidney transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Gregorini, Marilena; Bosio, Francesca; Rocca, Chiara; Corradetti, Valeria; Valsania, Teresa; Pattonieri, Eleonora Francesca; Esposito, Pasquale; Bedino, Giulia; Collesi, Chiara; Libetta, Carmelo; Frassoni, Francesco; Canton, Antonio Dal; Rampino, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Background In former studies we showed in a rat model of renal transplantation that Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) prevent acute rejection in an independent way of their endowing in the graft. In this study we investigated whether MSC operate by resetting cytokine network and Scatter Factor systems, i.e. Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF), Macrophage Stimulating Protein (MSP) and their receptors Met and RON, respectively. Methods MSC were injected into the renal artery soon after reperfusion. Co...

  19. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Attenuate Organ Injury Induced by LPS and Burn

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Kitagawa, Yuko; Tilles, Arno W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Yarmush, Martin L

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppress immune cell responses and have beneficial effects in various inflammatory-related immune disorders. A therapeutic modality for systemic inflammation and its consequences is not available yet. Thus, this work investigates the therapeutic effects of MSCs in injury-models induced by Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or burn. Gene expression was analyzed in MSCs when exposed to inflammatory serum from injured animals and it showed remarkable alteration...

  20. Biodistribution of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in a Preclinical Setting

    OpenAIRE

    Luc Sensebé; Sandrine Fleury-Cappellesso

    2013-01-01

    Due to their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are important tools for treatment of immune disorders and tissue repair. The increasing uses of MSCs lead to the development of production processes that need to be in accordance with good manufacturing practices (GMP). In Europe, MSCs are somatic cell-therapy products, referred to as advanced-therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and in the United States MSCs must comply with current good ti...

  1. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as Cell-Based Therapeutics for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Malhotra; Hu, Michael S.; Marshall, Clement D.; Tripp Leavitt; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Gonzalez, Jennifer G.; Harleen Kaur; Peter Lorenz, H.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a source of substantial morbidity for patients and are a major financial burden for the healthcare system. There are no current therapies that reliably improve nonhealing wounds or reverse pathological scarring. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising source of novel cell-based therapies due to the ease of their harvest and their integral role in the native wound repair process. Recent work has addressed the problems of loss of plasticity and off-target delivery th...

  2. Transcriptomic portrait of human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem cells isolated from bone marrow and placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Roson-Burgo, Beatriz; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; del Cañizo, Consuelo; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent cells that behave in a highly plastic manner, inhabiting the stroma of several tissues. The potential utility of MSCs is nowadays strongly investigated in the field of regenerative medicine and cell therapy, although many questions about their molecular identity remain uncertain. Results MSC primary cultures from human bone marrow (BM) and placenta (PL) were derived and verified by their immunophenotype standard patt...

  3. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Georgi, N.; Taipaleenmaeki, H.; Raiss, C.C.; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, K.K.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.; Boer, de J.; Post, J.N.; Wijnen, van A.; Karperien, H.B.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Because the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarke

  4. Mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated with bovine tendon extract acquire the phenotype of mature tenocytes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, Lívia Maria Mendonça; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; dos Santos Cavalcanti, Amanda; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Duarte, Maria Eugênia Leite

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated in vitro differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow, in tenocytes after treatment with bovine tendon extract. Methods Bovine tendons were used for preparation of the extract and were stored at −80 °C. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the bone marrow of three donors were used for cytotoxicity tests by means of MTT and cell differentiation by means of qPCR. Results The data showed that mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow treated for up to 21 days in the presence of bovine tendon extract diluted at diminishing concentrations (1:10, 1:50 and 1:250) promoted activation of biglycan, collagen type I and fibromodulin expression. Conclusion Our results show that bovine tendon extract is capable of promoting differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in tenocytes. PMID:26962503

  5. Secretion of interleukin-17 by CD8+ T cells expressing CD146 (MCAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagur, Pradeep K; Biancotto, Angélique; Stansky, Elena; Sen, H Nida; Nussenblatt, Robert B; McCoy, J Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. CD4+ T cells secreting IL-17 are termed Th17 cells. CD8+ T cells, designated Tc17 cells, are also capable of secreting IL-17. Here we describe a population of Tc17 cells characterized by the expression of surface CD146, an endothelial adhesion molecule. These cells display signatures of a human Tc17 genotype and phenotype. Circulating CD8+CD146+ T cells are present in low levels in healthy adults. Elevations in CD8+CD146+ T cells are found in Behcet's disease and birdshot retinochoroidopathy, which have been reported to have HLA class I associations. Sarcoidosis does not have a class I association and displays an increase in CD4+ CD146+ T cells but not in CD8+CD146+ T cells. CD146 on these cells may facilitate their ability to bind to, and migrate through, endothelium, as has been reported for CD4+CD146+ T cells. PMID:24681356

  6. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Tissue-Specific Progenitor Cells: Their Role in Tissue Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Klimczak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs reside in many human organs and comprise heterogeneous population of cells with self-renewal ability. These cells can be isolated from different tissues, and their morphology, immunophenotype, and differentiation potential are dependent on their tissue of origin. Each organ contains specific population of stromal cells which maintain regeneration process of the tissue where they reside, but some of them have much more wide plasticity and differentiate into multiple cells lineage. MSCs isolated from adult human tissues are ideal candidates for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. However, MSCs do not only contribute to structurally tissue repair but also MSC possess strong immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties and may influence in tissue repair by modulation of local environment. This paper is presenting an overview of the current knowledge of biology of tissue-resident mesenchymal stromal and progenitor cells (originated from bone marrow, liver, skeletal muscle, skin, heart, and lung associated with tissue regeneration and tissue homeostasis.

  7. Detection of the cancer marker CD146 expression in melanoma cells with semiconductor quantum dot label.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Chen, Guangchun; DeLouise, Lisa A; Lou, Ziyang

    2010-08-01

    The use of highly specific and highly sensitive quantum dots immunofluorescent label is a promising approach for biomedical imaging in cancer cells. Human melanoma cell adhesion molecule CD146, overexpressed on the surface of melanoma cells, is an important target for melanoma diagnostics. We synthesized PEG-COOH capped highly fluorescent CdSe/ZnS QDs and conjugated them with streptavidin to prepare QD-SA label. Then, we used QD-SA to link with biotinylated goat anti-mouse IgG and mouse anti-human CD146 to label CD146 overexpressed on live and fixed cells by FACS and Confocal microscopy. Labeling of target cells was shown to have high brightness, photostability, and specificity. Advantages of QD conjugates over FITC conjugates are discussed. The results indicate that construction based on QD-SA label, biotinylated IgG and CD146 antibody can be successfully used for detection of melanoma cells for biomedical applications. PMID:21323102

  8. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun;

    2012-01-01

    for regenerative therapy to replace injured tissue by creating new blood vessels and cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. The aim of this special report is to review the present preclinical data leading to clinical stem cell therapy using ADSCs in patients with ischemic heart disease....... In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  9. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-02-29

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo.

  10. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. RESULTS CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (Pcancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (Papoptosis (Pcancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  11. Reciprocal upregulation of Notch signaling molecules in hematopoietic progenitor and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuchi Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs play pivotal supportive roles in hematopoiesis, how they interact with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs is not well understood. We investigated the interaction between HSCs and surrogate MSCs (C3H10T1/2 stromal cells, focusing on the molecular events induced by cell contact of these bipartite populations. C3H10T1/2 is a mesenchymal stromal cell line that can be induced to differentiate into preadipocytes (A54 and myoblasts (M1601. The stromal cell derivatives were cocultured with murine HSCs (Lineage-Sca1+, and gene expression profiles in stromal cells and HSCs were compared before and after the coculture. HSCs gave rise to cobblestone areas only on A54 cells, with ninefold more progenitors than on M1601 or undifferentiated C3H10T1/2 cells. Microarray-based screening and a quantitative reverse transcriptase directed-polymerase chain reaction showed that the levels of Notch ligands (Jagged1 and Delta-like 3 were increased in A54 cells upon interaction with HSCs. On the other hand, the expression of Notch1 and Hes1 was upregulated in the HSCs cocultured with A54 cells. A transwell assay revealed that the reciprocal upregulation was dependent on cell-to-cell contact. The result suggested that in the hematopoietic niche, HSCs help MSCs to produce Notch ligands, and in turn, MSCs help HSCs to express Notch receptor. Such a reciprocal upregulation would reinforce the downstream signaling to determine the fate of hematopoietic cell lineage. Clarification of the initiating events on cell contact should lead to the identification of specific molecular targets to facilitate HSC engraftment in transplantation therapy.

  12. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Validation Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Bolis, Sara; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    The present chapter focuses on the validation of the following analytical methods for the control of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for cell therapy clinical trials: Microbiological control for cellular product Endotoxin assay Mycoplasma assay Cell count and viability Immunophenotype Clonogenic potential (CFU-F assay) In our lab, these methods are in use for product release, process control or control of the biological starting materials. They are described in detail in the accompanying Chapter 19.For each method, validation goals and strategy are presented, and a detailed experimental scheme is proposed. PMID:27236682

  13. BM mesenchymal stromal cell–derived exosomes facilitate multiple myeloma progression

    OpenAIRE

    Roccaro, Aldo M.; Sacco, Antonio; Maiso, Patricia; Azab, Abdel Kareem; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Reagan, Michaela; Azab, Feda; Flores, Ludmila M.; Campigotto, Federico; Weller, Edie; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Scadden, David T.; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    BM mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) support multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth, but little is known about the putative mechanisms by which the BM microenvironment plays an oncogenic role in this disease. Cell-cell communication is mediated by exosomes. In this study, we showed that MM BM-MSCs release exosomes that are transferred to MM cells, thereby resulting in modulation of tumor growth in vivo. Exosomal microRNA (miR) content differed between MM and normal BM-MSCs, with a lower content ...

  14. Isolation and Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renuka P; Hanley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with both regenerative and immunomodulatory capacities. These unique properties make them appealing as a biologic, with multiple phase 1-3 clinical trials currently testing their safety and efficacy. Although expanding MSCs does not require extensive manipulation, expanding MSCs for use in clinical trials does require the knowledge and safety that are delineated in current good manufacturing practices (GMPs). Here we briefly detail the characteristics of MSCs and considerations for expanding them for clinical use. We then include a step-by-step protocol for expanding MSCs for early phase clinical trials, with important notes to consider during the expansion of these MSCs. PMID:27236680

  15. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  16. Soluble melanoma cell adhesion molecule (sMCAM/sCD146) promotes angiogenic effects on endothelial progenitor cells through angiomotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, Jimmy; Harhouri, Karim; Hubert, Lucas; Subrini, Caroline; Lafitte, Daniel; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Elganfoud, Nadia; Robert, Stéphane; Foucault-Bertaud, Alexandrine; Kaspi, Elise; Sabatier, Florence; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Bardin, Nathalie; Holmgren, Lars; Dignat-George, Françoise; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel

    2013-03-29

    The melanoma cell adhesion molecule (CD146) contains a circulating proteolytic variant (sCD146), which is involved in inflammation and angiogenesis. Its circulating level is modulated in different pathologies, but its intracellular transduction pathways are still largely unknown. Using peptide pulldown and mass spectrometry, we identified angiomotin as a sCD146-associated protein in endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Interaction between angiomotin and sCD146 was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence, and binding of sCD146 on both immobilized recombinant angiomotin and angiomotin-transfected cells. Silencing angiomotin in EPC inhibited sCD146 angiogenic effects, i.e. EPC migration, proliferation, and capacity to form capillary-like structures in Matrigel. In addition, sCD146 effects were inhibited by the angiomotin inhibitor angiostatin and competition with recombinant angiomotin. Finally, binding of sCD146 on angiomotin triggered the activation of several transduction pathways that were identified by antibody array. These results delineate a novel signaling pathway where sCD146 binds to angiomotin to stimulate a proangiogenic response. This result is important to find novel target cells of sCD146 and for the development of therapeutic strategies based on EPC in the treatment of ischemic diseases. PMID:23389031

  17. Sequential cultivation of human epidermal keratinocytes and dermal mesenchymal like stromal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahabal, Shyam; Konala, Vijay Bhaskar Reddy; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Kanafi, Mohammad Mahboob; Mishra, Suniti; Shankar, Krupa; Pal, Rajarshi; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Human skin has continuous self-renewal potential throughout adult life and serves as first line of defence. Its cellular components such as human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) and dermal mesenchymal stromal cells (DMSCs) are valuable resources for wound healing applications and cell based therapies. Here we show a simple, scalable and cost-effective method for sequential isolation and propagation of HEKs and DMSCs under defined culture conditions. Human skin biopsy samples obtained surgically were cut into fine pieces and cultured employing explant technique. Plated skin samples attached and showed outgrowth of HEKs. Gross microscopic examination displayed polygonal cells with a granular cytoplasm and H&E staining revealed archetypal HEK morphology. RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry authenticated the presence of key HEK markers including trans-membrane protein epithelial cadherin (E-cadherin), keratins and cytokeratin. After collection of HEKs by trypsin-EDTA treatment, mother explants were left intact and cultured further. Interestingly, we observed the appearance of another cell type with fibroblastic or stromal morphology which were able to grow up to 15 passages in vitro. Growth pattern, expression of cytoskeletal protein vimentin, surface proteins such as CD44, CD73, CD90, CD166 and mesodermal differentiation potential into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes confirmed their bonafide mesenchymal stem cell like status. These findings albeit preliminary may open up significant opportunities for novel applications in wound healing. PMID:25698160

  18. Comparison between Stromal Vascular Fraction and Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Remodeling Hypertrophic Scars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maumus, Marie; Toupet, Karine; Frouin, Eric; Rigau, Valérie; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Magalon, Guy; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTS) are characterized by excessive amount of collagen deposition and principally occur following burn injuries or surgeries. In absence of effective treatments, the use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, which have been shown to attenuate fibrosis in various applications, seems of interest. The objectives of the present study were therefore to evaluate the effect of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASC) on a pre-existing HTS in a humanized skin graft model in Nude mice and to compare the efficacy of hASCs versus stromal vascular fraction (SVF). We found that injection of SVF or hASCs resulted in an attenuation of HTS as noticed after clinical evaluation of skin thickness, which was associated with lower total collagen contents in the skins of treated mice and a reduced dermis thickness after histological analysis. Although both SVF and hASCs were able to significantly reduce the clinical and histological parameters of HTS, hASCs appeared to be more efficient than SVF. The therapeutic effect of hASCs was attributed to higher expression of TGFβ3 and HGF, which are important anti-fibrotic mediators, and to higher levels of MMP-2 and MMP-2/TIMP-2 ratio, which reflect the remodelling activity responsible for fibrosis resorption. These results demonstrated the therapeutic potential of hASCs for clinical applications of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:27227960

  19. [The influence of extreme factors on homing multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklakova, I Yu; Grebnev, Y D; Yastrebov, A P

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we studied homing multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells under influence of extreme factors: after radiation exposure, acute blood loss. Absorbed dose ionizing radiation amounted to 4.0 C (causes acute radiation sickness in mice), acute blood loss was caused by bleeding from the tail vein of the mouse in the amount of 2% of the body weight of the animal. Label MMSC used fluorochrome DAPI, ready to use. The experiments were performed on 60 Mature mice (males) age 6-8 months, weighing 20-25 g. Experiments on the culture of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from the placenta (chorion) performed on laboratory mice female at the age of 3-4 months in the gestation period of 14 days. Introduction suspensions of MMSC was carried out at a dose of 6 million cells/mouse, suspended in 0.2 ml 0.9% NaCl solution. The control group of laboratory animals MMSC transplantation was carried out also in the amount of 6 million cells/mouse. The assessment was made of tissue chimerism in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, spleen, small intestine, liver, lung, kidney, heart after 1 and 24 hours after transplantation of labeled cells. It was found a significant decrease in the content of labeled MMSC in the peripheral blood at extreme impact, indicating a migration of the transplanted cells in the damaged tissue. Homing transplanted MMSC is realized mainly in those tissues that underwent the most damage. PMID:27116883

  20. Scalable microcarrier-based manufacturing of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Soure, António M; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-10-20

    Due to their unique features, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) have been exploited in clinical settings as therapeutic candidates for the treatment of a variety of diseases. However, the success in obtaining clinically-relevant MSC numbers for cell-based therapies is dependent on efficient isolation and ex vivo expansion protocols, able to comply with good manufacturing practices (GMP). In this context, the 2-dimensional static culture systems typically used for the expansion of these cells present several limitations that may lead to reduced cell numbers and compromise cell functions. Furthermore, many studies in the literature report the expansion of MSC using fetal bovine serum (FBS)-supplemented medium, which has been critically rated by regulatory agencies. Alternative platforms for the scalable manufacturing of MSC have been developed, namely using microcarriers in bioreactors, with also a considerable number of studies now reporting the production of MSC using xenogeneic/serum-free medium formulations. In this review we provide a comprehensive overview on the scalable manufacturing of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, depicting the various steps involved in the process from cell isolation to ex vivo expansion, using different cell tissue sources and culture medium formulations and exploiting bioprocess engineering tools namely microcarrier technology and bioreactors.

  1. Comparison of mesenchymal stromal cells from young healthy donors and patients with severe chronic coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Tina; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed;

    2011-01-01

    It has been questioned whether bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from patients with ischemic heart disease are suitable for use in regenerative stem cell therapy. We compared MSCs from patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD) and MSCs from young healthy donors...

  2. Comparison of mesenchymal stromal cells from young healthy donors and patients with severe chronic coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Tina; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Hansen, Susanne Kofoed;

    2011-01-01

    It has been questioned whether bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from patients with ischemic heart disease are suitable for use in regenerative stem cell therapy. We compared MSCs from patients with chronic coronary artery disease (CAD) and MSCs from young healthy donors with r...

  3. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected 111In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbaek, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus S; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2010-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  4. Serial in vivo imaging of the porcine heart after percutaneous, intramyocardially injected (111)In-labeled human mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana;

    2009-01-01

    This pilot trial aimed to investigate the utilization of (111)In-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for in vivo tracking after intramyocardial transplantation in a xenotransplantation model with gender mismatched cells. Human male MSC were expanded ex vivo and labeled with (111)In...

  5. Ultrastructural characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells labeled with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles for clinical tracking studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Louise; Hansen, Alastair B; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To evaluate survival and engraftment of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in vivo, it is necessary to track implanted cells non-invasively with a method, which does not influence cellular ultrastructure and functional characteristics. Iron-oxide particles have been applied for cell...

  6. Atomized Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Direct Delivery to the Airway for Treatment of Lung Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Sally Yunsun; Burgess, Janette K; Wang, Yiwei; Kable, Eleanor P W; Weiss, Daniel J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current treatment regimens for inhalation injury are mainly supportive and rely on self-regeneration processes for recovery. Cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is increasingly being investigated for the treatment of inhalation injury. Human amniotic MSCs (hAMSCs) were use

  7. Isolation and characterisation of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in the ovine endometrium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Letouzey

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC were recently discovered in the human endometrium. These cells possess key stem cell properties and show promising results in small animal models when used for preclinical tissue engineering studies. A small number of surface markers have been identified that enrich for MSC from bone marrow and human endometrium, including the Sushi Domain-containing 2 (SUSD2; W5C5 and CD271 markers. In preparation for developing a large animal preclinical model for urological and gynecological tissue engineering applications we aimed to identify and characterise MSC in ovine endometrium and determine surface markers to enable their prospective isolation.Ovine endometrium was obtained from hysterectomised ewes following progesterone synchronisation, dissociated into single cell suspensions and tested for MSC surface markers and key stem cell properties. Purified stromal cells were obtained by flow cytometry sorting with CD49f and CD45 to remove epithelial cells and leukocytes respectively, and MSC properties investigated.There was a small population CD271+ stromal cells (4.5 ± 2.3% in the ovine endometrium. Double labelling with CD271 and CD49f showed that the sorted CD271+CD49f- stromal cell population possessed significantly higher cloning efficiency, serial cloning capacity and a qualitative increased ability to differentiate into 4 mesodermal lineages (adipocytic, smooth muscle, chondrocytic and osteoblastic than CD271-CD49f- cells. Immunolabelling studies identified an adventitial perivascular location for ovine endometrial CD271+ cells.This is the first study to characterise MSC in the ovine endometrium and identify a surface marker profile identifying their location and enabling their prospective isolation. This knowledge will allow future preclinical studies with a large animal model that is well established for pelvic organ prolapse research.

  8. Transcriptomic comparisons between cultured human adipose tissue-derived pericytes and mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, sometimes called mesenchymal stem cells, are cultured cells able to give rise to mature mesenchymal cells such as adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes, and to secrete a wide range of trophic and immunomodulatory molecules. Evidence indicates that pericytes, cells that surround and maintain physical connections with endothelial cells in blood vessels, can give rise to MSCs (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2008 [1]; Caplan and Correa, 2011 [2]. We have compared the transcriptomes of highly purified, human adipose tissue pericytes subjected to culture-expansion in pericyte medium or MSC medium, with that of human adipose tissue MSCs isolated with traditional methods to test the hypothesis that their transcriptomes are similar (da Silva Meirelles et al., 2015 [3]. Here, we provide further information and analyses of microarray data from three pericyte populations cultured in pericyte medium, three pericyte populations cultured in MSC medium, and three adipose tissue MSC populations deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus under accession number GSE67747.

  9. Mast Cell-activated Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Regulate Proliferation and Lineage Commitment of CD34+ Progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoulfia eAllakhverdi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shortly after allergen exposure, the number of bone marrow and circulating CD34+ progenitors increases. We aim to analyze the possible mechanism whereby the allergic reaction stimulates bone marrow to release these effector cells in increased numbers. We hypothesize that mast cells may play a predominant role in this process. Objective: To examine the effect of IgE-activated mast cells on bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells which regulate proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ progenitors. Methods: Primary mast cells were derived from CD34+ precursors and activated with IgE/anti-IgE. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells were co-cultured with CD34+ progenitor cells and stimulated with IL1/TNF or IgE/anti-IgE activated mast cells in Transwell system. Results: Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells produce low level of TSLP under steady state conditions, which is markedly increased by stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF or IgE-activated mast cells. The latter also triggers BM-MSCs production of G-CSF, and GM-CSF while inhibiting SDF-1. Mast cell-activated mesenchymal stromal cells stimulate CD34+ cells to proliferate and to regulate their expression of early allergy-associated genes. Conclusion and Clinical Relevance: This in vitro study indicates that IgE-activated mast cells trigger bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells to release TSLP and hematopoietic growth factors and to regulate the proliferation and lineage commitment of CD34+ precursor cells. The data predict that the effective inhibition of mast cells should impair mobilization and accumulation of allergic effector cells and thereby reduce the severity of allergic diseases.

  10. Secretion of Interleukin-17 by CD8+ T Cells Expressing CD146 (MCAM)

    OpenAIRE

    Dagur, Pradeep K; Biancotto, Angélique; Stansky, Elena; Sen, H. Nida; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; McCoy, J. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune diseases. CD4+ T cells secreting IL-17 are termed Th17 cells. CD8+ T cells, designated Tc17 cells, are also capable of secreting IL-17. Here we describe a population of Tc17 cells characterized by the expression of surface CD146, an endothelial adhesion molecule. These cells display signatures of a human Tc17 genotype and phenotype. Circulating CD8+CD146+ T cells are present in low levels in healthy adults...

  11. Collagen cross-linking by adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and scar-derived mesenchymal cells : Are mesenchymal stromal cells involved in scar formation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J.; van der Veen, Vincent C.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.; Reijnen, Linda; Verkerk, Michelle; Bank, Ruud A.; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M. W.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, different fibroblast-like (mesenchymal) cell populations that might be involved in wound healing were characterized and their involvement in scar formation was studied by determining collagen synthesis and processing. Depending on the physical and mechanical properties of the tissues,

  12. In vivo therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells depends on the source and the isolation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ukovich, Laura; Razban, Vahid; Martinelli, Valentina; Ruozi, Giulia; Pelos, Barbara; Dore, Franca; Giacca, Mauro; Zacchigna, Serena

    2015-03-10

    Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation. PMID:25660405

  13. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem;

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...... bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106 and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of h...

  14. The Control of Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Osteogenic Differentiation through Modified Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Logan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells continue to receive widespread attention due to their potential to revolutionise treatments in the fields of both tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Adult stem cells, specifically mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, play a vital role in the natural events surrounding bone healing and osseointegration through being stimulated to differentiate along their osteogenic lineage and in doing so, they form new cortical and trabecular bone tissue. Understanding how to control, manipulate, and enhance the intrinsic healing events modulated through osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by the use of modified surfaces and biomaterials could potentially advance the fields of both orthopaedics and dentistry. This could be by either using surface modification to generate greater implant stability and more rapid healing following implantation or the stimulation of MSCs ex vivo for reimplantation. This review aims to gather publications targeted at promoting, enhancing, and controlling the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs through biomaterials, nanotopographies, and modified surfaces for use in implant procedures.

  15. Pleiotropic effects of cancer cells' secreted factors on human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz; Almajed, Mohammed;

    2013-01-01

    exposed to tumor CM, which was found to be positively regulated by FAK and MAPK signaling and negatively regulated by TGFβ signaling. Thus, our data support a model where MSCs could promote cancer progression through becoming pro-inflammatory cells within the cancer stroma.......INTRODUCTION: Studying cancer tumors' microenvironment may reveal a novel role in driving cancer progression and metastasis. The biological interaction between stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) and cancer cells remains incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the effects of tumor...... cells' secreted factors as represented by a panel of human cancer cell lines (breast (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231); prostate (PC-3); lung (NCI-H522); colon (HT-29) and head & neck (FaDu)) on the biological characteristics of MSCs. METHODS: Morphological changes were assessed using fluorescence microscopy...

  16. Human fallopian tube mesenchymal stromal cells enhance bone regeneration in a xenotransplanted model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazedje, Tatiana; Bueno, Daniela F; Almada, Bruno V P; Caetano, Heloisa; Czeresnia, Carlos E; Perin, Paulo M; Halpern, Silvio; Maluf, Mariangela; Evangelista, Lucila P; Nisenbaum, Marcelo G; Martins, Marília T; Passos-Bueno, Maria R; Zatz, Mayana

    2012-06-01

    We have recently reported that human fallopian tubes, which are discarded during surgical procedures of women submitted to sterilization or hysterectomies, are a rich source of human fallopian tube mesenchymal stromal cells (htMSCs). It has been previously shown that human mesenchymal stromal cells may be useful in enhancing the speed of bone regeneration. This prompted us to investigate whether htMSCs might be useful for the treatment of osteoporosis or other bone diseases, since they present a pronounced capacity for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Based on this prior knowledge, our aim was to evaluate, in vivo, the osteogenic capacity of htMSCs to regenerate bone through an already described xenotransplantation model: nonimmunosuppressed (NIS) rats with cranial defects. htMSCs were obtained from five 30-50 years old healthy women and characterized by flow cytometry and for their multipotenciality in vitro capacity (osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic differentiations). Two symmetric full-thickness cranial defects on each parietal region of seven NIS rats were performed. The left side (LS) of six animals was covered with CellCeram (Scaffdex)-a bioabsorbable ceramic composite scaffold that contains 60% hydroxyapatite and 40% β-tricalciumphosphate-only, and the right side (RS) with the CellCeram and htMSCs (10(6) cells/scaffold). The animals were euthanized at 30, 60 and 90 days postoperatively and cranial tissue samples were taken for histological analysis. After 90 days we observed neobone formation in both sides. However, in animals euthanized 30 and 60 days after the procedure, a mature bone was observed only on the side with htMSCs. PCR and immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the presence of human DNA and thus that human cells were not rejected, which further supports the imunomodulatory property of htMSCs. In conclusion, htMSCs can be used successfully to enhance bone regeneration in vivo, opening a new field for future treatments of osteoporosis

  17. Transcriptome analysis of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with primary myelofibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Martinaud

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary myelofibrosis (PMF is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm whose severity and treatment complexity are attributed to the presence of bone marrow (BM fibrosis and alterations of stroma impairing the production of normal blood cells. Despite the recently discovered mutations including the JAK2V617F mutation in about half of patients, the primitive event responsible for the clonal proliferation is still unknown. In the highly inflammatory context of PMF, the presence of fibrosis associated with a neoangiogenesis and an osteosclerosis concomitant to the myeloproliferation and to the increase number of circulating hematopoietic progenitors suggests that the crosstalk between hematopoietic and stromal cells is deregulated in the PMF BM microenvironmental niches. Within these niches, mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSC play a hematopoietic supportive role in the production of growth factors and extracellular matrix which regulate the proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. A transcriptome analysis of BM-MSC in PMF patients will help to characterize their molecular alterations and to understand their involvement in the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell deregulation that features PMF.

  18. In vitro differentiation of human skin-derived multipotent stromal cells into putative endothelial-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnubalaji Radhakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multipotent stem cells have been successfully isolated from various tissues and are currently utilized for tissue-engineering and cell-based therapies. Among the many sources, skin has recently emerged as an attractive source for multipotent cells because of its abundance. Recent literature showed that skin stromal cells (SSCs possess mesoderm lineage differentiation potential; however, the endothelial differentiation and angiogenic potential of SSC remains elusive. In our study, SSCs were isolated from human neonatal foreskin (hNFSSCs and adult dermal skin (hADSSCs using explants cultures and were compared with bone marrow (hMSC-TERT and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs for their potential differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. Results Concordant with previous studies, both MSCs and SSCs showed similar morphology, surface protein expression, and were able to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Using an endothelial induction culture system combined with an in vitro matrigel angiogenesis assay, hNFSSCs and hADSSCs exhibited the highest tube-forming capability, which was similar to those formed by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, with hNFSSCs forming the most tightly packed, longest, and largest diameter tubules among the three cell types. CD146 was highly expressed on hNFSSCs and HUVEC followed by hADSSCs, and hMSC-TERT, while its expression was almost absent on hADMSCs. Similarly, higher vascular density (based on the expression of CD31, CD34, vWF, CD146 and SMA was observed in neonatal skin, followed by adult dermal skin and adipose tissue. Thus, our preliminary data indicated a plausible relationship between vascular densities, and the expression of CD146 on multipotent cells derived from those tissues. Conclusions Our data is the first to demonstrate that human dermal skin stromal cells can be differentiated into endothelial lineage. Hence, SSCs

  19. Human mesenchymal stromal cells reduce influenza A H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michael C W; Kuok, Denise I T; Leung, Connie Y H; Hui, Kenrie P Y; Valkenburg, Sophie A; Lau, Eric H Y; Nicholls, John M; Fang, Xiaohui; Guan, Yi; Lee, Jae W; Chan, Renee W Y; Webster, Robert G; Matthay, Michael A; Peiris, J S Malik

    2016-03-29

    Influenza can cause acute lung injury. Because immune responses often play a role, antivirals may not ensure a successful outcome. To identify pathogenic mechanisms and potential adjunctive therapeutic options, we compared the extent to which avian influenza A/H5N1 virus and seasonal influenza A/H1N1 virus impair alveolar fluid clearance and protein permeability in an in vitro model of acute lung injury, defined the role of virus-induced soluble mediators in these injury effects, and demonstrated that the effects are prevented or reduced by bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. We verified the in vivo relevance of these findings in mice experimentally infected with influenza A/H5N1. We found that, in vitro, the alveolar epithelium's protein permeability and fluid clearance were dysregulated by soluble immune mediators released upon infection with avian (A/Hong Kong/483/97, H5N1) but not seasonal (A/Hong Kong/54/98, H1N1) influenza virus. The reduced alveolar fluid transport associated with down-regulation of sodium and chloride transporters was prevented or reduced by coculture with mesenchymal stromal cells. In vivo, treatment of aged H5N1-infected mice with mesenchymal stromal cells increased their likelihood of survival. We conclude that mesenchymal stromal cells significantly reduce the impairment of alveolar fluid clearance induced by A/H5N1 infection in vitro and prevent or reduce A/H5N1-associated acute lung injury in vivo. This potential adjunctive therapy for severe influenza-induced lung disease warrants rapid clinical investigation. PMID:26976597

  20. Glioblastoma Therapy with Cytotoxic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Optimized by Bioluminescence Imaging of Tumor and Therapeutic Cell Response

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Alieva; Bagó, Juli R.; Elisabet Aguilar; Carolina Soler-Botija; Vila, Olaia F.; Joan Molet; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Nuria Rubio; Jerónimo Blanco

    2012-01-01

    Genetically modified adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMSCs) with tumor homing capacity have been proposed for localized therapy of chemo- and radiotherapy resistant glioblastomas. We demonstrate an effective procedure to optimize glioblastoma therapy based on the use of genetically modified hAMSCs and in vivo non invasive monitoring of tumor and therapeutic cells. Glioblastoma U87 cells expressing Photinus pyralis luciferase (Pluc) were implanted in combination with hAMSCs ...

  1. Human mesenchymal stromal cells improve scar thickness without enhancing cardiac function in a chronic ischaemic heart failure model

    OpenAIRE

    Dayan, Victor; Yannarelli, Gustavo; Filomeno, Paola; Keating, Armand

    2012-01-01

    Few data address the role of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the management of chronic ischaemic heart failure. We assessed their effect in immune-deficient animals. MSCs were cultured from bone marrow of human volunteers. Non-obese diabetes severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) gamma null mice were randomly assigned to intramyocardial injection of human MSCs or phosphate-buffered saline 4 weeks after induction of acute myocardial infarction (MI). Echocardiography was performe...

  2. Human Allogeneic Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cell Reactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E.; Franquesa, Marcella; Engela, Anja U; Korevaar, Sander S; Roelofs, Helene; Genever, Paul G; IJzermans, Jan NM; Betjes, Michiel GH; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction For clinical applications, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) can be isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue of autologous or allogeneic origin. Allogeneic cell usage has advantages but may harbor the risk of sensitization against foreign HLA. Therefore, we evaluated whether bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC are capable of inducing HLA-specific alloreactivity. Methods MSC were isolated from healthy human Bone Marrow (BM-MSC) and adipose tissue (ASC) donors. Peripheral ...

  3. Interaction between immobilized polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles and human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woltmann B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Woltmann,1 Bernhard Torger,2,3 Martin Müller,2,3,* Ute Hempel1,*1Dresden University of Technology, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden, Germany; 2Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research Dresden, Department of Polyelectrolytes and Dispersions, Dresden, Germany; 3Dresden University of Technology, Department of Chemistry and Food Chemistry, Dresden, Germany*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Implant loosening or deficient osseointegration is a major problem in patients with systemic bone diseases (eg, osteoporosis. For this reason, the stimulation of the regional cell population by local and sustained drug delivery at the bone/implant interface to induce the formation of a mechanical stable bone is promising. The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of polymer-based nanoparticles with human bone marrow-derived cells, considering nanoparticles’ composition and surface net charge.Materials and methods: Polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles (PECNPs composed of the polycations poly(ethyleneimine (PEI, poly(L-lysine (PLL, or (N,N-diethylaminoethyldextran (DEAE in combination with the polyanions dextran sulfate (DS or cellulose sulfate (CS were prepared. PECNPs’ physicochemical properties (size, net charge were characterized by dynamic light scattering and particle charge detector measurements. Biocompatibility was investigated using human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs cultured on immobilized PECNP films (5–50 nmol·cm-2 by analysis for metabolic activity of hMSCs in dependence of PECNP surface concentration by MTS (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-5-[3-carboxymethoxyphenyl]-2-[4-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt assay, as well as cell morphology (phase contrast microscopy.Results: PECNPs ranging between ~50 nm and 150 nm were prepared. By varying the ratio of polycations and polyanions, PECNPs with a slightly positive (PEC+NP or negative (PEC

  4. Dermal Substitutes Support the Growth of Human Skin-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Potential Tool for Skin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, Talita da Silva; Machado, Rafaela Grecco; Visoni, Silvia Beatriz Coutinho; Pereima, Maurício José; Leonardi, Dilmar Francisco; Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    New strategies for skin regeneration are needed in order to provide effective treatment for cutaneous wounds and disease. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because of their prolonged self-renewal capacity, multipotentiality, and ability to release active molecules important for tissue repair. In this paper, we show that human skin-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SD-MSCs) display similar characteristics to the multipotent MSCs. We also evaluate their growth in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system with dermal substitutes (Integra and Pelnac). When cultured in monolayers, SD-MSCs expressed mesenchymal markers, such as CD105, Fibronectin, and α-SMA; and neural markers, such as Nestin and βIII-Tubulin; at transcriptional and/or protein level. Integra and Pelnac equally supported the adhesion, spread and growth of human SD-MSCs in 3D culture, maintaining the MSC characteristics and the expression of multilineage markers. Therefore, dermal substitutes support the growth of mesenchymal stromal cells from human skin, promising an effective tool for tissue engineering and regenerative technology. PMID:24586857

  5. Defining the expression of marker genes in equine mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Deborah J Guest

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deborah J Guest1, Jennifer C Ousey1, Matthew RW Smith21Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU; 2Reynolds House Referrals, Greenwood Ellis and Partners, 166 High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 9WS, UKAbstract: Mesenchymal stromal (MS cells have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood. To date these cells have been investigated for their differentiation potential and are currently being used to treat damage to horse musculoskeletal tissues. However, no work has been done in horse MS cells to examine the expression profile of proteins and cell surface antigens that are expressed in human MS cells. The identification of such profiles in the horse will allow the comparison of putative MS cells isolated from different laboratories and different tissues. At present it is difficult to ascertain whether equivalent cells are being used in different reports. Here, we report on the expression of a range of markers used to define human MS cells. Using immunocytochemistry we show that horse MS cells homogenously express collagens, alkaline phosphatase activity, CD44, CD90 and CD29. In contrast, CD14, CD79α and the embryonic stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA (stage specific embryonic antigen -1, -3, -4, TRA (tumor rejection antigen -1–60 and -1–81 are not expressed. The MS cells also express MHC class I antigens but do not express class II antigens, although they are inducible by treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, equine, gene expression

  6. Tracking mesenchymal stromal cells using an ultra-bright TAT-functionalized plasmonic-active nanoplatform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Gomez, Jose A; Chien, Jennifer S; Zhang, Lunan; Wilson, Christy M; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald A; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution tracking of stem cells remains a challenging task. An ultra-bright contrast agent with extended intracellular retention is suitable for in vivo high-resolution tracking of stem cells following the implantation. Here, a plasmonic-active nanoplatform was developed for tracking mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in mice. The nanoplatform consisted of TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS) that emit ultra-bright two-photon photoluminescence capable of tracking MSCs under high-resolution optical imaging. In vitro experiment showed TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs retained a similar differentiability to that of non-labeled MSCs controls. Due to their star shape, TAT-GNS exhibited greater intracellular retention than that of commercial Q-Tracker. In vivo imaging of TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs five days following intra-arterial injections in mice kidneys showed possible MSCs implantation in juxta-glomerular (JG) regions, but non-specifically in glomeruli and afferent arterioles as well. With future design to optimize GNS labeling specificity and clearance, plasmonic-active nanoplatforms may be a useful intracellular tracking tool for stem cell research. An ultra-bright intracellular contrast agent is developed using TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS). It poses minimal influence on the stem cell differentiability. It exhibits stronger two-photon photoluminescence and superior labeling efficiency than commercial Q-Tracker. Following renal implantation, some TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs permeate blood vessels and migrate to the juxta-glomerular region. PMID:27095616

  7. Biodistribution of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in a Preclinical Setting

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    Luc Sensebé

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are important tools for treatment of immune disorders and tissue repair. The increasing uses of MSCs lead to the development of production processes that need to be in accordance with good manufacturing practices (GMP. In Europe, MSCs are somatic cell-therapy products, referred to as advanced-therapy medicinal products (ATMPs, and in the United States MSCs must comply with current good tissue practice requirements. The safety and efficacy of MSCs must be ensured, whatever the cell source, and studies of dose and biodistribution are important aspects of safety testing. Preclinical data on biodistribution and pharmacodynamics are mandatory for approval. It is important to demonstrate that MSCs do not have unwanted homing that could drive to inappropriate differentiation in some organ or to support cancer development as suggested in some experiments. All these aspects should be addressed in a risk-based approach according to recently published guidelines by EMA. In the present article, we summarize the main approaches for labeling and tracking of infused MSCs, report on current animal models, and give an overview of available results on biodistribution.

  8. Bottlenecks in the Efficient Use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products Based on Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Escacena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been established as promising candidate sources of universal donor cells for cell therapy due to their contributions to tissue and organ homeostasis, repair, and support by self-renewal and multidifferentiation, as well as by their anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, trophic, and proangiogenic properties. Various diseases have been treated by MSCs in animal models. Additionally, hundreds of clinical trials related to the potential benefits of MSCs are in progress. However, although all MSCs are considered suitable to exert these functions, dissimilarities have been found among MSCs derived from different tissues. The same levels of efficacy and desired outcomes have not always been achieved in the diverse studies that have been performed thus far. Moreover, autologous MSCs can be affected by the disease status of patients, compromising their use. Therefore, collecting information regarding the characteristics of MSCs obtained from different sources and the influence of the host (patient medical conditions on MSCs is important for assuring the safety and efficacy of cell-based therapies. This review provides relevant information regarding factors to consider for the clinical application of MSCs.

  9. Bottlenecks in the Efficient Use of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products Based on Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escacena, Natalia; Quesada-Hernández, Elena; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Soria, Bernat; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been established as promising candidate sources of universal donor cells for cell therapy due to their contributions to tissue and organ homeostasis, repair, and support by self-renewal and multidifferentiation, as well as by their anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, immunomodulatory, trophic, and proangiogenic properties. Various diseases have been treated by MSCs in animal models. Additionally, hundreds of clinical trials related to the potential benefits of MSCs are in progress. However, although all MSCs are considered suitable to exert these functions, dissimilarities have been found among MSCs derived from different tissues. The same levels of efficacy and desired outcomes have not always been achieved in the diverse studies that have been performed thus far. Moreover, autologous MSCs can be affected by the disease status of patients, compromising their use. Therefore, collecting information regarding the characteristics of MSCs obtained from different sources and the influence of the host (patient) medical conditions on MSCs is important for assuring the safety and efficacy of cell-based therapies. This review provides relevant information regarding factors to consider for the clinical application of MSCs.

  10. miR-141-3p inhibits human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Weimin; Kassem, Moustapha

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling determines human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation fate into the osteoblast or adipocyte lineage. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules of 21-25 nucleotides that regulate many aspects of osteoblast biology. Thus, we examined miRNAs regulated by Wnt signaling...... in hMSC. We identified miRNA (miR)-141-3p as a Wnt target which in turn inhibited Wnt signaling. Moreover, miR-141-3p inhibited hMSC proliferation by arresting cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. miR-141-3p inhibited osteoblast differentiation of hMSC as evidenced by reduced alkaline phosphatase...... activity, gene expression and in vitro mineralized matrix formation. Bioinformatic studies, Western blot analysis and 3'UTR reporter assay demonstrated that cell division cycle 25A (CDC25A) is a direct target of miR-141-3p. siRNA-mediated knock-down of CDC25A inhibited hMSC proliferation and osteoblast...

  11. Type I Interferons Exert Anti-tumor Effect via Reversing Immunosuppression Mediated by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Peishun; Chen, Qing; Jiang, Jingting; Xu, Chunliang; Zhang, Jimin; Zheng, Chunxing; Jiang, Menghui; Velletri, Tania; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yin; Yang, Qian; Han, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Liying; Wei, Lixin; Rabson, Arnold B.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are strongly immunosuppressive via producing nitric oxide (NO) and known to migrate into tumor sites to promote tumor growth, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we found that IFNα-secreting MSCs showed more dramatic inhibition effect on tumor progression than that of IFNα alone. Interestingly, IFNα-primed MSCs could also effectively suppress tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that both IFNα and IFNβ (type I IFNs) reversed the immunosuppressive effect of MSCs on splenocyte proliferation. This effect of type I IFNs was exerted through inhibiting iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expression in IFNγ and TNFα-stimulated MSCs. Notably, only NO production was inhibited by IFNα; production of other cytokines or chemokines tested was not suppressed. Furthermore, IFNα promoted the switch from Stat1 homodimers to Stat1-Stat2 heterodimers. Studies using the luciferase reporter system and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that IFNα suppressed iNOS transcription through inhibiting the binding of Stat1 to iNOS promoter. Therefore, the synergistic anti-tumor effects of type I IFNs and MSCs were achieved by inhibiting NO production. This study provides essential information for understanding the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunosuppression and for the development of better clinical strategies using IFNs and MSCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27109100

  12. Phenotypic and Cytogenetic Characterization of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonasekera, H. W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are vital in hematopoiesis. Whether BM-MSCs alter their characteristics in Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) is still controversial. We characterized MSCs of de novo MDS patients in Sri Lanka who have not been reported previously in the literature. We also analyzed MSCs derived from different MDS subtypes. MSCs were culture-expanded, characterized by flow cytometry, and induced towards osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation. Growth properties were determined using growth curves and population doubling times. Karyotyping and FISH were performed on MSCs. Cell morphology, differentiation potential, and CD marker expression of MDS-MSCs of all subtypes were comparable to those of control-MSCs. No significant growth differences were observed between control MSCs and MDS-MSCs of all subtypes (p > 0.05). 31% of MDS-MSCs had chromosomal aberrations (der(3),del(6q),del(7p), loss of chromosomes) whose BM karyotypes were normal. Highest percentage of karyotypic abnormalities was observed in RCMD-MSCs. Patients with abnormal BM karyotypes had no aberrant MSC clones. Results show that in spite of presence of genetically abnormal clones in MDS-MSC populations, in vitro phenotypic and growth characteristics of MSCs in MDS remain unchanged. Further, the occurrence of genetic abnormalities in BM-MSCs in MDS could be considered as an autonomous event from that of their hematopoietic counterparts. PMID:27660743

  13. Conditioned medium from human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells limits infarct size and enhances angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara; Cervio, Elisabetta; Calvillo, Laura; Copes, Francesco; Pisano, Federica; Mura, Manuela; Kleijn, Lennaert; de Boer, Rudolf A; Viarengo, Gianluca; Rosti, Vittorio; Spinillo, Arsenio; Roccio, Marianna; Gnecchi, Massimiliano

    2015-05-01

    The paracrine properties of human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hAMCs) have not been fully elucidated. The goal of the present study was to elucidate whether hAMCs can exert beneficial paracrine effects on infarcted rat hearts, in particular through cardioprotection and angiogenesis. Moreover, we aimed to identify the putative active paracrine mediators. hAMCs were isolated, expanded, and characterized. In vitro, conditioned medium from hAMC (hAMC-CM) exhibited cytoprotective and proangiogenic properties. In vivo, injection of hAMC-CM into infarcted rat hearts limited the infarct size, reduced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and ventricular remodeling, and strongly promoted capillary formation at the infarct border zone. Gene array analysis led to the identification of 32 genes encoding for the secreted factors overexpressed by hAMCs. Among these, midkine and secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine were also upregulated at the protein level. Furthermore, high amounts of several proangiogenic factors were detected in hAMC-CM by cytokine array. Our results strongly support the concept that the administration of hAMC-CM favors the repair process after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:25824141

  14. Optimization of Femtosecond Laser Polymerized Structural Niches to Control Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Fate in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela T. Raimondi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We applied two-photon polymerization to fabricate 3D synthetic niches arranged in complex patterns to study the effect of mechano-topological parameters on morphology, renewal and differentiation of rat mesenchymal stromal cells. Niches were formed in a photoresist with low auto-fluorescence, which enabled the clear visualization of the fluorescence emission of the markers used for biological diagnostics within the internal niche structure. The niches were structurally stable in culture up to three weeks. At three weeks of expansion in the niches, cell density increased by almost 10-fold and was 67% greater than in monolayer culture. Evidence of lineage commitment was observed in monolayer culture surrounding the structural niches, and within cell aggregates, but not inside the niches. Thus, structural niches were able not only to direct stem cell homing and colony formation, but also to guide aggregate formation, providing increased surface-to-volume ratios and space for stem cells to adhere and renew, respectively.

  15. Controlled Inhibition of the Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Pro-inflammatory Secretome via Microparticle Engineering

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    Sudhir H. Ranganath

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are promising therapeutic candidates given their potent immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory secretome. However, controlling the MSC secretome post-transplantation is considered a major challenge that hinders their clinical efficacy. To address this, we used a microparticle-based engineering approach to non-genetically modulate pro-inflammatory pathways in human MSCs (hMSCs under simulated inflammatory conditions. Here we show that microparticles loaded with TPCA-1, a small-molecule NF-κB inhibitor, when delivered to hMSCs can attenuate secretion of pro-inflammatory factors for at least 6 days in vitro. Conditioned medium (CM derived from TPCA-1-loaded hMSCs also showed reduced ability to attract human monocytes and prevented differentiation of human cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, compared with CM from untreated or TPCA-1-preconditioned hMSCs. Thus, we provide a broadly applicable bioengineering solution to facilitate intracellular sustained release of agents that modulate signaling. We propose that this approach could be harnessed to improve control over MSC secretome post-transplantation, especially to prevent adverse remodeling post-myocardial infarction.

  16. Packed Bed Bioreactor for the Isolation and Expansion of Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, Michael J; Michl, Thomas D; Kul Babur, Betul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B; Griesser, Hans J; Doran, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are required for clinical relevant doses to treat a number of diseases. To economically manufacture these MSCs, an automated bioreactor system will be required. Herein we describe the development of a scalable closed-system, packed bed bioreactor suitable for large-scale MSCs expansion. The packed bed was formed from fused polystyrene pellets that were air plasma treated to endow them with a surface chemistry similar to traditional tissue culture plastic. The packed bed was encased within a gas permeable shell to decouple the medium nutrient supply and gas exchange. This enabled a significant reduction in medium flow rates, thus reducing shear and even facilitating single pass medium exchange. The system was optimised in a small-scale bioreactor format (160 cm2) with murine-derived green fluorescent protein-expressing MSCs, and then scaled-up to a 2800 cm2 format. We demonstrated that placental derived MSCs could be isolated directly within the bioreactor and subsequently expanded. Our results demonstrate that the closed system large-scale packed bed bioreactor is an effective and scalable tool for large-scale isolation and expansion of MSCs. PMID:26660475

  17. Forskolin enhances in vivo bone formation by human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorn, Joyce; Siddappa, Ramakrishnaiah; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2012-03-01

    Activation of the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (db-cAMP) was recently shown to enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) in vitro and bone formation in vivo. The major drawback of this compound is its inhibitory effect on proliferation of hMSCs. Therefore, we investigated whether fine-tuning of the dose and timing of PKA activation could enhance bone formation even further, with minimum effects on proliferation. To test this, we selected two different PKA activators (8-bromo-cAMP (8-br-cAMP) and forskolin) and compared their effects on proliferation and osteogenic differentiation with those of db-cAMP. We found that all three compounds induced alkaline phosphatase levels, bone-specific target genes, and secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1, although 8-br-cAMP induced adipogenic differentiation in long-term cultures and was thus considered unsuitable for further in vivo testing. All three compounds inhibited proliferation of hMSCs in a dose-dependent manner, with forskolin inhibiting proliferation most. The effect of forskolin on in vivo bone formation was tested by pretreating hMSCs before implantation, and we observed greater amounts of bone using forskolin than db-cAMP. Our data show forskolin to be a novel agent that can be used to increase bone formation and also suggests a role for PKA in the delicate balance between adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation. PMID:21942968

  18. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived PTX3 Promotes Wound Healing via Fibrin Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappuzzello, Claudia; Doni, Andrea; Dander, Erica; Pasqualini, Fabio; Nebuloni, Manuela; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto; Biondi, Andrea; Garlanda, Cecilia; D'Amico, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Although mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) can promote wound healing in different clinical settings, the underlying mechanism of MSC-mediated tissue repair has yet to be determined. Because a nonredundant role of pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in tissue repair and remodeling has been recently described, here we sought to determine whether MSC-derived PTX3 might play a role in wound healing. Using a murine model of skin repair, we found that Ptx3-deficient (Ptx3(-/-)) MSCs delayed wound closure and reduced granulation tissue formation compared with wt MSCs. At day 2, confocal microscopy revealed a dramatic reduction in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Ptx3(-/-) MSCs recruited to the wound, where they appeared to be not only poorly organized in bundles but also scattered in the extracellular matrix. These findings were further confirmed by quantitative biochemical analysis of GFP content in wound extracts. Furthermore, Ptx3(-/-) MSC-treated skins displayed increased levels of fibrin and lower levels of D-dimer, suggesting delayed fibrin-rich matrix remodeling compared with control skins. Consistently, both pericellular fibrinolysis and migration through fibrin were found to be severely affected in Ptx3(-/-) MSCs. Overall, our findings identify an essential role of MSC-derived PTX3 in wound repair underscoring the beneficial potential of MSC-based therapy in the management of intractable wounds.

  19. Recent insights: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Shahd; Laffey, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) causes respiratory failure, which is associated with severe inflammation and lung damage and has a high mortality and for which there is no therapy. Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are adult multi-progenitor cells that can modulate the immune response and enhance repair of damaged tissue and thus may provide a therapeutic option for ARDS. MSCs demonstrate efficacy in diverse in vivo models of ARDS, decreasing bacterial pneumonia and ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury while enhancing repair following ventilator-induced lung injury. MSCs reduce the pro-inflammatory response to injury while augmenting the host response to bacterial infection. MSCs appear to exert their effects via multiple mechanisms—some are cell interaction dependent whereas others are paracrine dependent resulting from both soluble secreted products and microvesicles/exosomes derived from the cells. Strategies to further enhance the efficacy of MSCs, such as by overexpressing anti-inflammatory or pro-repair molecules, are also being investigated. Encouragingly, early phase clinical trials of MSCs in patients with ARDS are under way, and experience with these cells in trials for other diseases suggests that the cells are well tolerated. Although considerable translational challenges, such as concerns regarding cell manufacture scale-up and issues regarding cell potency and batch variability, must be overcome, MSCs constitute a highly promising potential therapy for ARDS.

  20. Intraperitoneal Infusion of Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Prevents Experimental Autoimmune Uveitis in Mice

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    Joo Youn Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune uveitis is one of the leading causes of blindness. We here investigated whether intraperitoneal administration of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs might prevent development of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU in mice. Time course study showed that the number of IFN-γ- or IL-17-expressing CD4+ T cells was increased in draining lymph nodes (DLNs on the postimmunization day 7 and decreased thereafter. The retinal structure was severely disrupted on day 21. An intraperitoneal injection of hMSCs at the time of immunization protected the retina from damage and suppressed the levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the eye. Analysis of DLNs on day 7 showed that hMSCs decreased the number of Th1 and Th17 cells. The hMSCs did not reduce the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-23 which are the cytokines that drive Th1/Th17 differentiation. Also, hMSCs did not induce CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. However, hMSCs increased the level of an immunoregulatory cytokine IL-10 and the population of IL-10-expressing B220+CD19+ cells. Together, data demonstrate that hMSCs attenuate EAU by suppressing Th1/Th17 cells and induce IL-10-expressing B220+CD19+ cells. Our results support suggestions that hMSCs may offer a therapy for autoimmune diseases mediated by Th1/Th17 responses.

  1. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

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    Eder Zucconi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs, independently of the specific gene mutation. Therefore, preclinical studies in different models of muscular dystrophies are of utmost importance. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate if umbilical cord MSCs have the potential to reach and differentiate into muscle cells in vivo in two animal models of PMDs. In order to address this question we injected (1 human umbilical cord tissue (hUCT MSCs into the caudal vein of SJL mice; (2 hUCT and canine umbilical cord vein (cUCV MSCs intra-arterially in GRMD dogs. Our results here reported support the safety of the procedure and indicate that the injected cells could engraft in the host muscle in both animal models but could not differentiate into muscle cells. These observations may provide important information aiming future therapy for muscular dystrophies.

  2. [The influence of low partial oxygen pressure on the biolodical process of mesenchymal stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovskyĭ, V Ia; Plotnikova, L M; Vesel'skyĭ, S P; Litovka, I H

    2014-01-01

    The influence of low partial oxygen pressure (Po2) on the amino acid composition in culture medium of human mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) lines 4BL has been studied. At 23 mm Hg (3% oxygen), a significant decrease (by 31%) in the concentration of proline and hydroxyproline was registered. Under these conditions, the concentration of serine and aspartic acid decreased by 45% compared to the control. Maximum consumption of free amino acids from the culture medium required for the synthesis of collagen (proline and hydroxyproline by 42%, serine and aspartic acid by 62%) was observed at a gas-phase Po2 of 38 mm Hg (5% O2). At Po2 76 mm Hg (10% O2), a lack of amino acids proline and hydroxyproline was only 21%, while that of glutamine and alanine amounted 12% compared to the control. This intensity ratio of consumption of amino acids may indicate that the maximum of MSC vital functions occurs at Po2 38 mm Hg. PMID:25095672

  3. Packed Bed Bioreactor for the Isolation and Expansion of Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, Michael J; Michl, Thomas D; Kul Babur, Betul; Kabiri, Mahboubeh; Atkinson, Kerry; Lott, William B; Griesser, Hans J; Doran, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Large numbers of Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are required for clinical relevant doses to treat a number of diseases. To economically manufacture these MSCs, an automated bioreactor system will be required. Herein we describe the development of a scalable closed-system, packed bed bioreactor suitable for large-scale MSCs expansion. The packed bed was formed from fused polystyrene pellets that were air plasma treated to endow them with a surface chemistry similar to traditional tissue culture plastic. The packed bed was encased within a gas permeable shell to decouple the medium nutrient supply and gas exchange. This enabled a significant reduction in medium flow rates, thus reducing shear and even facilitating single pass medium exchange. The system was optimised in a small-scale bioreactor format (160 cm2) with murine-derived green fluorescent protein-expressing MSCs, and then scaled-up to a 2800 cm2 format. We demonstrated that placental derived MSCs could be isolated directly within the bioreactor and subsequently expanded. Our results demonstrate that the closed system large-scale packed bed bioreactor is an effective and scalable tool for large-scale isolation and expansion of MSCs.

  4. Human mesenchymal stromal cells response to biomimetic octacalcium phosphate containing strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Zeinab Tahmasebi; Malhotra, Angad; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of bioinorganics into synthetic biomaterials is a promising approach to improve the biological performance of bone graft substitutes, while still retaining their synthetic nature. Among these bioinorganics, strontium ions (Sr(2+) ) have reported enhanced bone formation, and a reduced risk of bone fractures. While previous results have been encouraging, more detailed studies are needed to further develop specific applications. This study demonstrates the effects of Sr(2+) on the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) when introduced as either a dissolved salt, or incorporated into biomimetic calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Upon attachment, hMSCs seeded in the presence of higher Sr(2+) concentrations presented with a more elongated shape as compared to the controls without Sr(2+) . Both Sr(2+) as a dissolved salt in the medium, or incorporated into CaP coatings, positively influenced hMSC alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in a dose-dependent manner. At the mRNA level, the expression of osteogenic markers ALP, bone sialoprotein, bone morphogenetic protein 2, osteopontin, and osteoclacin were increased in the presence of Sr(2+) , independent of the delivery method. Overall, this study demonstrates the positive effects of strontium on the osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs, and supports the use of strontium-incorporated CaPs for bone regeneration applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1946-1960, 2016. PMID:27012665

  5. Tissue-specific Differentiation Potency of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Perinatal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ahlm; Kim, Yonggoo; Kim, Myungshin; Kim, Jiyeon; Choi, Hayoung; Jekarl, Dong Wook; Lee, Seungok; Kim, Jung Min; Shin, Jong-Chul; Park, In Yang

    2016-04-05

    Human perinatal tissue is an abundant source of mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) and lacks the ethical concerns. Perinatal MSCs can be obtained from various tissues as like amnion, chorion, and umbilical cord. Still, little is known of the distinct nature of each MSC type. In this study, we successfully isolated and cultured MSCs from amnion(AMSCs), chorion(CMSCs), and umbilical cord(UC-MSCs). Proliferation potential was different among them, that AMSCs revealed the lowest proliferation rate due to increased Annexin V and senescence-associated β-galactosidase positive cells. We demonstrated distinct characteristic gene expression according to the source of the original tissue using microarray. In particular, genes associated with apoptosis and senescence including CDKN2A were up-regulated in AMSCs. In CMSCs, genes associated with heart morphogenesis and blood circulation including HTR2B were up-regulated. Genes associated with neurological system processes including NPY were up-regulated in UC-MSCs. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the gene expression data. And in vitro differentiation of MSCs demonstrated that CMSCs and UC-MSCs had a more pronounced ability to differentiate into cardiomyocyte and neural cells, respectively. This study firstly demonstrated the innate tissue-specific differentiation potency of perinatal MSCs which can be helpful in choosing more adequate cell sources for better outcome in a specific disease.

  6. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells: Tissue Localization, Characterization, and Heterogeneity

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    Patrick C. Baer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue as a stem cell source is ubiquitously available and has several advantages compared to other sources. It is easily accessible in large quantities with minimal invasive harvesting procedure, and isolation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (ASCs yields a high amount of stem cells, which is essential for stem-cell-based therapies and tissue engineering. Several studies have provided evidence that ASCs in situ reside in a perivascular niche, whereas the exact localization of ASCs in native adipose tissue is still under debate. ASCs are isolated by their capacity to adhere to plastic. Nevertheless, recent isolation and culture techniques lack standardization. Cultured cells are characterized by their expression of characteristic markers and their capacity to differentiate into cells from meso-, ecto-, and entodermal lineages. ASCs possess a high plasticity and differentiate into various cell types, including adipocytes, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes, hepatocytes, neural cells, and endothelial and epithelial cells. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that ASCs are a heterogeneous mixture of cells containing subpopulations of stem and more committed progenitor cells. This paper summarizes and discusses the current knowledge of the tissue localization of ASCs in situ, their characterization and heterogeneity in vitro, and the lack of standardization in isolation and culture methods.

  7. Three dimensional alginate-fucoidan composite hydrogel augments the chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanithi, Puvanan; Murali, Malliga Raman; Samuel, Shani; Raghavendran, Hanumanantha Rao Balaji; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-08-20

    Presence of sulfated polysaccharides like heparan sulphate has often been implicated in the regulation of chondrogenesis. However, recently there has been a plethora of interest in the use of non-animal extracted analogs of heparan sulphate. Here we remodeled alginate (1.5%) by incorporating fucoidan (0.5%), a natural sulphated polysaccharide extracted from seaweeds to form a composite hydrogel (Al-Fu), capable of enhancing chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). We confirmed the efficiency of fucoidan incorporation by FTIR and EDX analysis. Further, its ability to support hMSC attachment and chondrogenic differentiation was confirmed by SEM, biochemical glycosaminoglycan quantification, real-time quantitative PCR and immunocytochemical analyses of chondrogenic markers Sox-9, Collagen II, Aggrecan and COMP. Effect of Al-Fu hydrogel on hMSC hypertrophy was also confirmed by the downregulation of hypertrophic genes Collagen X and Runx2. This composite scaffold can hence be used as a cartilage biomimetic biomaterial to drive hMSC chondrogenesis and for other cartilage repair based therapies. PMID:27178935

  8. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells-a key mediator for regeneration after perinatal morbidity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Martin; Wolfs, Tim G A; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Gavilanes, Antonio W D; Surbek, Daniel; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal complications in both term- and preterm-born infants are a leading cause of neonatal morbidities and mortality. Infants face different challenges in the neonatal intensive care unit with long-term morbidities such as perinatal brain injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia being particularly devastating. While advances in perinatal medicine have improved our understanding of the pathogenesis, effective therapies to prevent and/or reduce the severity of these disorders are still lacking. The potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) therapy has emerged during the last two decades, and an increasing effort is conducted to address brain- and lung-related morbidities in neonates at risk. Various studies support the notion that MSCs have protective effects. MSCs are an easy source and may be readily available after birth in a clinical setting. MSCs' mechanisms of action are diverse, including migration and homing, release of growth factors and immunomodulation, and the potential to replace injured cells. Here, we review the pathophysiology of perinatally acquired brain and lung injuries and focus on MSCs as potential candidates for therapeutic strategies summarizing preclinical and clinical evidence. PMID:26869264

  9. Extracellular vesicles derived from mesenchymal stromal cells: a therapeutic option in respiratory diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Soraia C; Weiss, Daniel J; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are plasma membrane-bound fragments released from several cell types, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), constitutively or under stimulation. EVs derived from MSCs and other cell types transfer molecules (such as DNA, proteins/peptides, mRNA, microRNA, and lipids) and/or organelles with reparative and anti-inflammatory properties to recipient cells. The paracrine anti-inflammatory effects promoted by MSC-derived EVs have attracted significant interest in the regenerative medicine field, including for potential use in lung injuries. In the present review, we describe the characteristics, biological activities, and mechanisms of action of MSC-derived EVs. We also review the therapeutic potential of EVs as reported in relevant preclinical models of acute and chronic respiratory diseases, such as pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, asthma, and pulmonary arterial hypertension. Finally, we discuss possible approaches for potentiating the therapeutic effects of MSC-derived EVs so as to enable use of this therapy in clinical practice. PMID:27075363

  10. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells from Discarded Neonatal Sternal Tissue: In Vitro Characterization and Angiogenic Properties

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    Shuyun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and nonautologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs are being evaluated as proangiogenic agents for ischemic and vascular disease in adults but not in children. A significant number of newborns and infants with critical congenital heart disease who undergo cardiac surgery already have or are at risk of developing conditions related to inadequate tissue perfusion. During neonatal cardiac surgery, a small amount of sternal tissue is usually discarded. Here we demonstrate that MSCs can be isolated from human neonatal sternal tissue using a nonenzymatic explant culture method. Neonatal sternal bone MSCs (sbMSCs were clonogenic, had a surface marker expression profile that was characteristic of bone marrow MSCs, were multipotent, and expressed pluripotency-related genes at low levels. Neonatal sbMSCs also demonstrated in vitro proangiogenic properties. Sternal bone MSCs cooperated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to form 3D networks and tubes in vitro. Conditioned media from sbMSCs cultured in hypoxia also promoted HUVEC survival and migration. Given the neonatal source, ease of isolation, and proangiogenic properties, sbMSCs may have relevance to therapeutic applications.

  11. Production of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells according to good manufacturing practices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensebé, Luc; Gadelorge, Mélanie; Fleury-Cappellesso, Sandrine

    2013-06-07

    Because of their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are important tools for treating immune disorders and for tissue repair. The increasing use of MSCs, their definition as advanced-therapy medicinal products in European regulations, and the US Food and Drug Administration requirements for their production and use imply the use of production processes that should be in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs). Complying with GMPs requires precisely defining the production process (es) as well as the multiple criteria required for a quality final product. Such variables include the environment, staff training and qualification, and controls. Developing processes based on well-defined or completely defined media and operating in closed systems or bioreactors is important and will increase safety and reproducibility. One of the most challenging issues remains implementation of relevant and reproducible controls for safety and efficacy. A linking of researchers, research and development teams, producers, and clinicians is mandatory to achieve GMP-compliant processes with relevant controls for producing well-defined, safe, and efficient MSCs.

  12. Octanoate in Human Albumin Preparations Is Detrimental to Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Culture

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    Way-Wua Wong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapies hold great promise as the next major advance in medical treatment. To enable safe, effective ex vivo culture whilst maintaining cell phenotype, growth media constituents must be carefully controlled. We have used a chemically defined mesenchymal stromal cell culture medium to investigate the influence of different preparations of human serum albumin. We examined two aspects of cell culture, growth rate as measured by population doubling time and colony forming ability which is a representative measure of the stemness of the cell population. Albumin preparations showed comparative differences in both of these criteria. Analysis of the albumin bound fatty acids also showed differences depending on the manufacturing procedure used. We demonstrated that octanoate, an additive used to stabilize albumin during pasteurization, slows growth and lowers colony forming ability during ex vivo culture. Further to this we also found the level of Na+/K+ ATPase, a membrane bound cation pump inhibited by octanoate, is increased in cells exposed to this compound. We conclude that the inclusion of human serum albumin in ex vivo growth media requires careful consideration of not only the source of albumin, but also the associated molecular cargo, for optimal cell growth and behavior.

  13. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system. PMID:23420706

  14. Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Crohn’s Disease

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    Ilse Molendijk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to suppress immune responses combined with their potential to actively participate in tissue repair provides a strong rationale for the use of MSCs as a new treatment option in diseases characterized by inflammation and severe tissue damage, such as Crohn’s disease (CD and perianal fistulas. Multiple studies have shown that MSCs suppress a range of immune cells, such as dendritic cells (DC, naïve and effector T cells, and natural killer (NK cells. Recently published papers attribute the immunosuppressive capacity of MSCs to soluble factors produced by MSCs, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO. Promising results are obtained from phase I and II clinical trials with autologous and allogeneic MSCs as treatment for refractory CD and perianal fistulas; however the question remains: what are the molecular mechanisms underlying the immunomodulating properties of MSCs? This paper highlights the present knowledge on the immunosuppressive effects of MSCs and its complexity in relation to CD and perianal fistulas.

  15. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from various tissues: Biological, clinical and cryopreservation aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Curtis, Leah A; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; McGann, Locksley E; Elliott, Janet A W

    2015-10-01

    Originally isolated from bone marrow, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have since been obtained from various fetal and post-natal tissues and are the focus of an increasing number of clinical trials. Because of their tremendous potential for cellular therapy, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, it is desirable to cryopreserve and bank MSCs to increase their access and availability. A remarkable amount of research and resources have been expended towards optimizing the protocols, freezing media composition, cooling devices and storage containers, as well as developing good manufacturing practices in order to ensure that MSCs retain their therapeutic characteristics following cryopreservation and that they are safe for clinical use. Here, we first present an overview of the identification of MSCs, their tissue sources and the properties that render them suitable as a cellular therapeutic. Next, we discuss the responses of cells during freezing and focus on the traditional and novel approaches used to cryopreserve MSCs. We conclude that viable MSCs from diverse tissues can be recovered after cryopreservation using a variety of freezing protocols, cryoprotectants, storage periods and temperatures. However, alterations in certain functions of MSCs following cryopreservation warrant future investigations on the recovery of cells post-thaw followed by expansion of functional cells in order to achieve their full therapeutic potential. PMID:26186998

  16. Preclinical Studies with Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Different Animal Models for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Eder; Vieira, Natassia Moreira; Bueno, Carlos Roberto; Secco, Mariane; Jazedje, Tatiana; Costa Valadares, Marcos; Fussae Suzuki, Miriam; Bartolini, Paolo; Vainzof, Mariz; Zatz, Mayana

    2011-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been widely investigated for cell-based therapy studies as an alternative source to bone marrow transplantation. Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of MSCs with potential to derivate at least muscle, cartilage, fat, and bone cells in vitro. The possibility to replace the defective muscle cells using cell therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of progressive muscular dystrophies (PMDs), independently of the specific gene mutation. Therefore, preclinical studies in different models of muscular dystrophies are of utmost importance. The main objective of the present study is to evaluate if umbilical cord MSCs have the potential to reach and differentiate into muscle cells in vivo in two animal models of PMDs. In order to address this question we injected (1) human umbilical cord tissue (hUCT) MSCs into the caudal vein of SJL mice; (2) hUCT and canine umbilical cord vein (cUCV) MSCs intra-arterially in GRMD dogs. Our results here reported support the safety of the procedure and indicate that the injected cells could engraft in the host muscle in both animal models but could not differentiate into muscle cells. These observations may provide important information aiming future therapy for muscular dystrophies. PMID:21785565

  17. Human mesenchymal stromal cell-enhanced osteogenic differentiation by contact interaction with polyethylene terephthalate nanogratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, Sara; Meucci, Sandro; Parchi, Paolo; Pacini, Simone; Montali, Marina; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele; Cecchini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Among the very large number of polymeric materials that have been proposed in the field of orthopedics, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of the most attractive thanks to its flexibility, thermal resistance, mechanical strength and durability. Several studies have been proposed that interface nano- or micro-structured surfaces with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), demonstrating the potential of this technology for promoting osteogenesis. All these studies were carried out on biomaterials other than PET, which remains almost uninvestigated in terms of cell shaping, alignment and differentiation. Here, we study the effect of PET 350-depth nanogratings (NGs) with a ridge and lateral groove size of 500 nm (T1) or 1 μm (T2), on bone marrow-derived human MSC (hMSC) differentiation in relation to the osteogenic fate. We demonstrate that these substrates, especially T2, can promote the osteogenic phenotype more efficiently than standard flat surfaces and that this effect is more marked if cells are cultured in osteogenic medium than in basal medium. Finally, we show that the shape and disposition of calcium hydroxyapatite granules on the different substrates was influenced by the substrate symmetry, being more elongated and spatially organized on NGs than on flat surfaces. PMID:27388559

  18. Active control of the nucleation temperature enhances freezing survival of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterboeck, L; Hofmann, N; Mueller, T; Glasmacher, B

    2015-12-01

    Cryopreservation is a technique that has been extensively used for storage of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in regenerative medicine. Therefore, improving current cryopreservation procedures in terms of increasing cell viability and functionality is important. In this study, we optimized the cryopreservation protocol of MSCs derived from the common marmoset Callithrix jacchus (cj), which can be used as a non-human primate model in various pathological and transplantation studies and have a great potential for regenerative medicine. We have investigated the effect of the active control of the nucleation temperature using induced nucleation at a broad range of temperatures and two different dimethylsulfoxide concentrations (Me2SO, 5% (v/v) and 10%, (v/v)) to evaluate the overall effect on the viability, metabolic activity and recovery of cells after thawing. Survival rate and metabolic activity displayed an optimum when ice formation was induced at -10 °C. Cryomicroscopy studies indicated differences in ice crystal morphologies as well as differences in intracellular ice formation with different nucleation temperatures. High subzero nucleation temperatures resulted in larger extracellular ice crystals and cellular dehydration, whereas low subzero nucleation temperatures resulted in smaller ice crystals and intracellular ice formation. PMID:26499840

  19. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

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    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  20. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

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    Drenka Trivanović

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available State of tumor microenvironment (TME is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system.

  1. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system.

  2. Cardiac migration of endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Lucke, Caroline; Escher, Felicitas; Van Linthout, Sophie; Kühl, Uwe; Miteva, Kapka; Ringe, Jochen; Zobel, Thomas; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Tschöpe, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi). Methods. In 29 patients with (n = 23) or without (n = 6) CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB), transcardiac gradients (TCGs) of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD90(+) cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025-0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC) and as CD45(-)CD34(-)CD11b(-)CD73(+)CD105(+) cells for 0.019 [0.0026-0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% (P TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45(-)CD34(-)CD90(+)CD105(+)) in EMB (r = -0.73, P < 0.005). SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P < 0.005, multivariate analysis). Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation. PMID:25814787

  3. Efficient expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells in a disposable fixed bed culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela D; Caruso, Sâmia R; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas T; Swiech, Kamilla

    2013-01-01

    The need for efficient and reliable technologies for clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) has led to the use of disposable bioreactors and culture systems. Here, we evaluate the expansion of cord blood-derived MSC in a disposable fixed bed culture system. Starting from an initial cell density of 6.0 × 10(7) cells, after 7 days of culture, it was possible to produce of 4.2(±0.8) × 10(8) cells, which represents a fold increase of 7.0 (±1.4). After enzymatic retrieval from Fibra-Cell disks, the cells were able to maintain their potential for differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes and were positive for many markers common to MSC (CD73, CD90, and CD105). The results obtained in this study demonstrate that MSC can be efficiently expanded in the culture system. This novel approach presents several advantages over the current expansion systems, based on culture flasks or microcarrier-based spinner flasks and represents a key element for MSC cellular therapy according to GMP compliant clinical-scale production system.

  4. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourin Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials.

  5. Culture and Use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Phase I and II Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Bourin; Luc, Sensebé; Valérie, Planat-Bénard; Jérôme, Roncalli; Alessandra, Bura-Rivière; Louis, Casteilla

    2010-01-01

    Present in numerous tissues, mesenchymal stem cells/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) can differentiate into different cell types from a mesoderm origin. Their potential has been extended to pluripotency, by their possibility of differentiating into tissues and cells of nonmesodermic origin. Through the release of cytokines, growth factors and biologically active molecules, MSCs exert important paracrine effects during tissue repair and inflammation. Moreover, MSCs have immunosuppressive properties related to non-HLA restricted immunosuppressive capacities. All these features lead to an increasing range of possible applications of MSCs, from treating immunological diseases to tissue and organ repair, that should be tested in phase I and II clinical trials. The most widely used MSCs are cultured from bone marrow or adipose tissue. For clinical trial implementation, BM MSCs and ADSCs should be produced according to Good Manufacturing Practices. Safety remains the major concern and must be ensured during culture and validated with relevant controls. We describe some applications of MSCs in clinical trials. PMID:21052537

  6. Pre-differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in combination with a microstructured nerve guide supports peripheral nerve regeneration in the rat sciatic nerve model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boecker, Arne Hendrik; van Neerven, Sabien Geraldine Antonia; Scheffel, Juliane; Tank, Julian; Altinova, Haktan; Seidensticker, Katrin; Deumens, Ronald; Tolba, Rene; Weis, Joachim; Brook, Gary Anthony; Pallua, Norbert; Bozkurt, Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Many bioartificial nerve guides have been investigated pre-clinically for their nerve regeneration-supporting function, often in comparison to autologous nerve transplantation, which is still regarded as the current clinical gold standard. Enrichment of these scaffolds with cells intended to support axonal regeneration has been explored as a strategy to boost axonal regeneration across these nerve guides Ansselin et al. (1998). In the present study, 20 mm rat sciatic nerve defects were implanted with a cell-seeded microstructured collagen nerve guide (Perimaix) or an autologous nerve graft. Under the influence of seeded, pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells, axons regenerated well into the Perimaix nerve guide. Myelination-related parameters, like myelin sheath thickness, benefitted from an additional seeding with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. Furthermore, both the number of retrogradely labelled sensory neurons and the axon density within the implant were elevated in the cell-seeded scaffold group with pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells. However, a pre-differentiation had no influence on functional recovery. An additional cell seeding of the Perimaix nerve guide with mesenchymal stromal cells led to an extent of functional recovery, independent of the differentiation status, similar to autologous nerve transplantation. These findings encourage further investigations on pre-differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells as a cellular support for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26296589

  7. Regenerative potential of human schneiderian membrane: progenitor cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derjac-Aramă, A I; Sarafoleanu, C; Manea, C M; Nicolescu, M I; Vrapciu, A D; Rusu, M C

    2015-12-01

    An innate osteogenic potential of the Schneiderian membrane (SM) is progressively assessed in studies ranging from non-human species to human subjects. It has relevance for endosteal placement and osseointegration. Nestin-expressing osteogenic progenitor cells are allegedly involved in bone formation and remodelling. Nestin phenotype was not assessed previously in human SM. We therefore aimed to fill that particular gap in the literature. Bioptic samples of human adult SM were obtained during surgery from eight adult patients, operated for non-malignant pathologies. Immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded tissue samples used primary antibodies against nestin, CD45, CD146, cytokeratin 7 (CK7), and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). Nestin expression was consistently found in endothelial cells, and was scarcely encountered in pericytes, putative stromal stem/progenitor cells, as well as in glandular epithelial cells. Moreover, woven bone formation in the periosteal layer of the SM can also be regarded as evidence of the osteogenic potential of this membrane. Nestin and CD45 expression in cells of the primary bone supports the osteogenic potential of SM nestin-expressing cells and a possible involvement of hematopoietic stem cells in maxillary sinus floor remodeling. CD146, a known inducer of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), was expressed in epithelia, as was CK7. Isolated stromal cells were found expressing CD146, CK7 and α-SMA, suggesting that regenerative processes happening in the SM may also involve processes of EMT which generate stem/progenitor cells. This study provides additional evidence for the regenerative potential of the Schneiderian membrane and identifies potential roles for cells of its stem niche in osteogenesis. PMID:26414809

  8. Human Stromal (Mesenchymal) Stem Cells from Bone Marrow, Adipose Tissue and Skin Exhibit Differences in Molecular Phenotype and Differentiation Potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Nbaheen, May; Vishnubalaji, Radhakrishnan; Ali, Dalia;

    2013-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent stem cells with ability to differentiate into mesoderm-type cells e.g. osteoblasts and adipocytes and thus they are being introduced into clinical trials for tissue regeneration. Traditionally, hMSCs have been isolated from bone marrow......, but the number of cells obtained is limited. Here, we compared the MSC-like cell populations, obtained from alternative sources for MSC: adipose tissue and skin, with the standard phenotype of human bone marrow MSC (BM-MSCs). MSC from human adipose tissue (human adipose stromal cells (hATSCs)) and human skin......, MSC populations obtained from different tissues exhibit significant differences in their proliferation, differentiation and molecular phenotype, which should be taken into consideration when planning their use in clinical protocols....

  9. Altered features and increased chemosensitivity of human breast cancer cells mediated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent heterogeneous cell population suitable for cell therapies in regenerative medicine. MSCs can also substantially affect tumor biology due to their ability to be recruited to the tumor stroma and interact with malignant cells via direct contacts and paracrine signaling. The aim of our study was to characterize molecular changes dictated by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) and the effects on drug responses in human breast cancer cells SKBR3. The tumor cells were either directly cocultured with AT-MSCs or exposed to MSCs-conditioned medium (MSC-CM). Changes in cell biology were evaluated by kinetic live cell imaging, fluorescent microscopy, scratch wound assay, expression analysis, cytokine secretion profiling, ATP-based viability and apoptosis assays. The efficiency of cytotoxic treatment in the presence of AT-MSCs or MSCs-CM was analyzed. The AT-MSCs altered tumor cell morphology, induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, increased mammosphere formation, cell confluence and migration of SKBR3. These features were attributed to molecular changes induced by MSCs-secreted cytokines and chemokines in breast cancer cells. AT-MSCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of SKBR3 cells in direct cocultures which was shown to be dependent on the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling axis. MSC-CM-exposed SKBR3 or SKBR3 in direct coculture with AT-MSCs exhibited increased chemosensitivity and induction of apoptosis in response to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil. Our work further highlights the multi-level nature of tumor-stromal cell interplay and demonstrates the capability of AT-MSCs and MSC-secreted factors to alter the anti-tumor drug responses

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Differentiating to Adipocytes Accumulate Autophagic Vesicles Instead of Functional Lipid Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruia, Alexandra T; Suciu, Maria; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Azghadi, Seyed Mohammad Reza; Cristea, Mirabela I; Nica, Dragos V; Vaduva, Adrian; Muntean, Danina; Mic, Ani Aurora; Mic, Felix A

    2016-04-01

    Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) can easily be differentiated into a variety of cells. In vivo transplantation of BMSCs-differentiated cells has had limited success, suggesting that these cells may not be fully compatible with the cells they are intended to replace in vivo. We investigated the structural and functional features of BMSCs-derived adipocytes as compared with adipocytes from adipose tissue, and the structure and functionality of lipid vesicles formed during BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry showed fatty acid composition of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and adipocytes from the adipose tissue to be very different, as is the lipid rafts composition, caveolin-1 expression, caveolae distribution in their membranes, and the pattern of expression of fatty acid elongases. Confocal microscopy confirmed the absence from BMSCs-derived adipocytes of markers of lipid droplets. BMSCs-derived adipocytes cannot convert deuterated glucose into deuterated species of fatty acids and cannot uptake the deuterated fatty acid-bovine serum albumin complexes from the culture medium, suggesting that intra-cellular accumulation of lipids does not occur by lipogenesis. We noted that BMSCs differentiation to adipocytes is accompanied by an increase in autophagy. Autophagic vesicles accumulate in the cytoplasm of BMSCs-derived adipocytes and their size and distribution resembles that of Nile Red-stained lipid vesicles. Stimulation of autophagy in BMSCs triggers the intra-cellular accumulation of lipids, while inhibition of autophagy prevents this accumulation. In conclusion, differentiation of BMSCs-derived adipocytes leads to intra-cellular accumulation of autophagic vesicles rather than functional lipid droplets, suggesting that these cells are not authentic adipocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 863-875, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26332160

  11. Effect of Nano-HA/Collagen Composite Hydrogels on Osteogenic Behavior of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Astghik; Bongio, Matilde; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C G; Jansen, John A; van den Beucken, Jeroen J J P

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to comparatively evaluate the in vitro effect of nanosized hydroxyapatite and collagen (nHA/COL) based composite hydrogels (with different ratios of nHA and COL) on the behavior of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), isolated from either adipose tissue (AT-MSCs) or bone marrow (BM-MSCs). We hypothesized that (i) nHA/COL composite hydrogels would promote the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs in an nHA concentration dependent manner, and that (ii) AT-MSCs would show higher osteogenic potential compared to BM-MSCs, due to their earlier observed higher proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential in 2D in vitro cultures [1]. The obtained results indicated that AT-MSCs show indeed high proliferation, differentiation and mineralization capacities in nHA/COL constructs compared to BM-MSCs, but this effect was irrespective of nHA concentration. Based on the results of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) protein level, the osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs started in the beginning of the culture period and for AT-MSCs at the end of the culture period. At a molecular level, both cell types showed high expression of osteogenic markers (bone morphogenic protein 2 [BMP2], runt-related transcription factor 2 [RUNX2], OCN or COL1) in both an nHA concentration and time dependent manner. In conclusion, AT-MSCs demonstrated higher osteogenic potential in nHA/COL based 3D micro-environments compared to BM-MSCs, in which proliferation and osteogenic differentiation were highly promoted in a time dependent manner, irrespective of nHA amount in the constructs. The fact that AT-MSCs showed high proliferation and mineralization potential is appealing for their application in future pre-clinical research as an alternative cell source for BM-MSCs. PMID:26803618

  12. [Therapeutic potential of human mesenchymal stromal cells secreted components: a problem with standartization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaradze, G D; Grigorieva, O A; Efimenko, A Yu; Chaplenko, A A; Suslina, S N; Sysoeva, V Yu; Kalinina, N I; Akopyan, Zh A; Tkachuk, V A

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine approaches, such as replacement of damaged tissue by ex vivo manufactured constructions or stimulation of endogenous reparative and regenerative processes to treat different diseases, are actively developing. One of the major tools for regenerative medicine are stem and progenitor cells, including multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Because the paracrine action of bioactive factors secreted by MSC is considered as a main mechanism underlying MSC regenerative effects, application of MSC extracellular secreted products could be a promising approach to stimulate tissue regeneration; it also has some advantages compared to the injection of the cells themselves. However, because of the complexity of composition and multiplicity of mechanisms of action distinguished the medicinal products based on bioactive factors secreted by human MSC from the most of pharmaceuticals, it is important to develop the approaches to their standardization and quality control. In the current study, based on the literature data and guidelines as well as on our own experimental results, we provided rationalization for nomenclature and methods of quality control for the complex of extracellular products secreted by human adipose-derived MSC on key indicators, such as "Identification", "Specific activity" and "Biological safety". Developed approaches were tested on the samples of conditioned media contained products secreted by MSC isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissue of 30 donors. This strategy for the standardization of innovative medicinal products and biomaterials based on the bioactive extracellular factors secreted by human MSC could be applicable for a wide range of bioactive complex products, produced using the different types of stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26716748

  13. Cardiac Migration of Endogenous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Patients with Inflammatory Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Schmidt-Lucke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC have immunomodulatory features. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and homing potential of endogenous circulating MSC in virus negative inflammatory cardiomyopathy (CMi. Methods. In 29 patients with n=23 or without n=6 CMi undergoing endomyocardial biopsies (EMB, transcardiac gradients (TCGs of circulating MSC were measured by flow cytometry from blood simultaneously sampled from aorta and coronary sinus. The presence of MSC in EMB, cardiac inflammation, and SDF-1α mRNA expression were detected via immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. Results. MSC defined as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD90+ cells accounted for 0.010 [0.0025–0.048]%/peripheral mononuclear cell (PMNC and as CD45−CD34−CD11b−CD73+CD105+ cells for 0.019 [0.0026–0.067]%/PMNC, both with similar counts in patients with or without cardiac inflammation. There was a 29.9% P<0.01 transcardiac reduction of circulating MSC in patients with CMi, correlating with the extent of cardiac inflammation (P<0.05, multivariate analysis. A strong correlation was found between the TCG of circulating MSC and numbers of MSC (CD45−CD34−CD90+CD105+ in EMB (r=-0.73, P<0.005. SDF-1α was the strongest predictor for increased MSC in EMB (P<0.005, multivariate analysis. Conclusions. Endogenous MSC continuously migrate to the heart in patients with CMi triggered by cardiac inflammation.

  14. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells stimulate skeletal myoblast proliferation through the paracrine release of VEGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sassoli

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are the leading cell candidates in the field of regenerative medicine. These cells have also been successfully used to improve skeletal muscle repair/regeneration; however, the mechanisms responsible for their beneficial effects remain to be clarified. On this basis, in the present study, we evaluated in a co-culture system, the ability of bone-marrow MSCs to influence C2C12 myoblast behavior and analyzed the cross-talk between the two cell types at the cellular and molecular level. We found that myoblast proliferation was greatly enhanced in the co-culture as judged by time lapse videomicroscopy, cyclin A expression and EdU incorporation. Moreover, myoblasts immunomagnetically separated from MSCs after co-culture expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of Notch-1, a key determinant of myoblast activation and proliferation, as compared with the single culture. Notch-1 intracellular domain and nuclear localization of Hes-1, a Notch-1 target gene, were also increased in the co-culture. Interestingly, the myoblastic response was mainly dependent on the paracrine release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF by MSCs. Indeed, the addition of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM to C2C12 cells yielded similar results as those observed in the co-culture and increased the phosphorylation and expression levels of VEGFR. The treatment with the selective pharmacological VEGFR inhibitor, KRN633, resulted in a marked attenuation of the receptor activation and concomitantly inhibited the effects of MSC-CM on C2C12 cell growth and Notch-1 signaling. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for a role of MSCs in stimulating myoblast cell proliferation and suggests that the functional interaction between the two cell types may be exploited for the development of new and more efficient cell-based skeletal muscle repair strategies.

  16. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Stimulate Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation through the Paracrine Release of VEGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellini, Flaminia; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Nistri, Silvia; Nosi, Daniele; Saccardi, Riccardo; Quercioli, Franco; Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra; Formigli, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are the leading cell candidates in the field of regenerative medicine. These cells have also been successfully used to improve skeletal muscle repair/regeneration; however, the mechanisms responsible for their beneficial effects remain to be clarified. On this basis, in the present study, we evaluated in a co-culture system, the ability of bone-marrow MSCs to influence C2C12 myoblast behavior and analyzed the cross-talk between the two cell types at the cellular and molecular level. We found that myoblast proliferation was greatly enhanced in the co-culture as judged by time lapse videomicroscopy, cyclin A expression and EdU incorporation. Moreover, myoblasts immunomagnetically separated from MSCs after co-culture expressed higher mRNA and protein levels of Notch-1, a key determinant of myoblast activation and proliferation, as compared with the single culture. Notch-1 intracellular domain and nuclear localization of Hes-1, a Notch-1 target gene, were also increased in the co-culture. Interestingly, the myoblastic response was mainly dependent on the paracrine release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by MSCs. Indeed, the addition of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM) to C2C12 cells yielded similar results as those observed in the co-culture and increased the phosphorylation and expression levels of VEGFR. The treatment with the selective pharmacological VEGFR inhibitor, KRN633, resulted in a marked attenuation of the receptor activation and concomitantly inhibited the effects of MSC-CM on C2C12 cell growth and Notch-1 signaling. In conclusion, this study provides novel evidence for a role of MSCs in stimulating myoblast cell proliferation and suggests that the functional interaction between the two cell types may be exploited for the development of new and more efficient cell-based skeletal muscle repair strategies. PMID:22815682

  17. In vivo fluorescence imaging reveals the promotion of mammary tumorigenesis by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chih Ke

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent adult stem cells which are recruited to the tumor microenvironment (TME and influence tumor progression through multiple mechanisms. In this study, we examined the effects of MSCs on the tunmorigenic capacity of 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells. It was found that MSC-conditioned medium increased the proliferation, migration, and efficiency of mammosphere formation of 4T1 cells in vitro. When co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, 4T1 cells showed enhanced tumor growth and generated increased spontaneous lung metastasis. Using in vivo fluorescence color-coded imaging, the interaction between GFP-expressing MSCs and RFP-expressing 4T1 cells was monitored. As few as five 4T1 cells could give rise to tumor formation when co-injected with MSCs into the mouse mammary fat pad, but no tumor was formed when five or ten 4T1 cells were implanted alone. The elevation of tumorigenic potential was further supported by gene expression analysis, which showed that when 4T1 cells were in contact with MSCs, several oncogenes, cancer markers, and tumor promoters were upregulated. Moreover, in vivo longitudinal fluorescence imaging of tumorigenesis revealed that MSCs created a vascularized environment which enhances the ability of 4T1 cells to colonize and proliferate. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the promotion of mammary cancer progression by MSCs was achieved through the generation of a cancer-enhancing microenvironment to increase tumorigenic potential. These findings also suggest the potential risk of enhancing tumor progression in clinical cell therapy using MSCs. Attention has to be paid to patients with high risk of breast cancer when considering cell therapy with MSCs.

  18. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  19. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  20. Extracardiac-Lodged Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Propel an Inflammatory Response Against Myocardial Infarction via Paracrine Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yi; Pan, Wei; Ou, Yali; Xu, Weifang; Kaelber, Sussannah; Borlongan, Cesario V; Sun, Meiqin; Yu, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of stem cells, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), improves the recovery of cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) in experimental studies using animal models and in patients. However, the improvement of cardiac function following MSC transplantation remains suboptimal in both preclinical and clinical studies. Understanding the mechanism of cell therapy may improve its therapeutic outcomes, but the mode of action mediating stem cell promotion of cardiac repair is complex and not fully understood. Recent studies suggest that the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs on the macrophage M1/M2 subtype transition allow the transplanted stem cells to inhibit inflammation-induced injury and promote cardiac repair in acute MI. However, equally compelling evidence shows that there is poor survival and minimal graft persistence of transplanted MSCs within the infarcted heart tissues, negating the view that graft survival per se is required for the observed high rate and long duration of the transition from proinflammatory M1 to reparative M2 macrophages in the infarcted myocardium. Therefore, we raised a novel hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of MSC transplantation for acute MI depends not primarily on the grafted cells in infarct myocardium, but that MSCs migrating to and being lodged in the extracardiac organs, demonstrating good graft survival and persistence, may render the therapeutic effects in MI. More specifically, MSC transplantation promotes the transition from M1 to M2 in extracardiac organs, such as spleen and bone marrow, and therapeutic effects are conferred to the infarcted myocardium via paracrine effects. In MSC transplantation, the conversion from proinflammatory M1 to anti-inflammatory M2 monocytes may occur remotely from the heart and may serve as one of the major pathways in regulating the dual effects of inflammation. This hypothesis, if proven valid, may represent an important new mechanism of action to be considered

  1. Long term maintenance of myeloid leukemic stem cells cultured with unrelated human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa Ito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs support the growth and differentiation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Here we studied the ability of MSCs to support the growth and survival of leukemic stem cells (LSCs in vitro. Primary leukemic blasts isolated from the peripheral blood of 8 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML were co-cultured with equal numbers of irradiated MSCs derived from unrelated donor bone marrow, with or without cytokines for up to 6 weeks. Four samples showed CD34+CD38− predominance, and four were predominantly CD34+CD38+. CD34+ CD38− predominant leukemia cells maintained the CD34+ CD38− phenotype and were viable for 6 weeks when co-cultured with MSCs compared to co-cultures with cytokines or medium only, which showed rapid differentiation and loss of the LSC phenotype. In contrast, CD34+ CD38+ predominant leukemic cells maintained the CD34+CD38+ phenotype when co-cultured with MSCs alone, but no culture conditions supported survival beyond 4 weeks. Cell cycle analysis showed that MSCs maintained a higher proportion of CD34+ blasts in G0 than leukemic cells cultured with cytokines. AML blasts maintained in culture with MSCs for up to 6 weeks engrafted NSG mice with the same efficiency as their non-cultured counterparts, and the original karyotype persisted after co-culture. Chemosensitivity and transwell assays suggest that MSCs provide pro-survival benefits to leukemic blasts through cell–cell contact. We conclude that MSCs support long-term maintenance of LSCs in vitro. This simple and inexpensive approach will facilitate basic investigation of LSCs and enable screening of novel therapeutic agents targeting LSCs.

  2. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Meagan; Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Eisenhauer, Philip; Ziats, Nicholas P; LeClair, Laurie; Poynter, Matthew E; Steele, Chad; Rincon, Mercedes; Weiss, Daniel J

    2011-07-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) mitigate inflammation in mouse models of acute lung injury. However, specific mechanisms of BMSC actions on CD4 T lymphocyte-mediated inflammation in vivo remain poorly understood. Limited data suggests promotion of Th2 phenotype in models of Th1-mediated diseases. However, whether this might alleviate or worsen Th2-mediated diseases such as allergic asthma is unknown. To ascertain the effects of systemic administration of BMSCs in a mouse model of Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airways inflammation was induced in wild-type C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice as well as in interferon-γ (IFNγ) receptor null mice. Effects of systemic administration during antigen sensitization of either syngeneic or allogeneic BMSC on airways hyperreactivity, lung inflammation, antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes, and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Both syngeneic and allogeneic BMSCs inhibited airways hyperreactivity and lung inflammation through a mechanism partly dependent on IFNγ. However, contrary to existing data, BMSCs did not affect antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte proliferation but rather promoted Th1 phenotype in vivo as assessed by both OVA-specific CD4 T lymphocyte cytokine production and OVA-specific circulating immunoglobulins. BMSCs treated to prevent release of soluble mediators and a control cell population of primary dermal skin fibroblasts only partly mimicked the BMSC effects and in some cases worsened inflammation. In conclusion, BMSCs inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation by influencing antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocyte differentiation. Promotion of a Th1 phenotype in antigen-specific CD4 T lymphocytes by BMSCs is sufficient to inhibit Th2-mediated allergic airways inflammation through an IFNγ-dependent process. PMID:21544902

  3. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Methods for ATMP Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Bolis, Sara; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for the development of cell-based therapies for various diseases and are currently being evaluated in a number of clinical trials (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014). MSC for therapeutic applications are classified as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) (Regulation (EC) No 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004) and must be prepared according to good manufacturing practices ( http://ec.europa.eu/health/documents/eudralex/vol-4 ). They may be derived from different starting materials (mainly bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, or cord blood) and applied as fresh or cryopreserved products, in the autologous as well as an allogeneic context (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014; Sensebé and Bourin, Transplantation 87(9 Suppl):S49-S53, 2009). In any case, they require an approved and well-defined panel of assays in order to be released for clinical use.This chapter describes analytical methods implemented and performed in our cell factory as part of the release strategy for an ATMP consisting of frozen autologous BM-derived MSC. Such methods are designed to assess the safety (sterility, endotoxin, and mycoplasma assays) and identity/potency (cell count and viability, immunophenotype and clonogenic assay) of the final product. Some assays are also applied to the biological starting material (sterility) or carried out as in-process controls (sterility, cell count and viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic assay).The validation strategy for each analytical method is described in the accompanying Chapter 20 . PMID:27236681

  4. Human placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells modulate placenta angiogenesis through Slit2-Robo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Chin-Han; Chen, Chia-Yu; Wu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Chie-Pein

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether human placental multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (hPMSC)-derived Slit2 and endothelial cell Roundabout (Robo) receptors are involved in placental angiogenesis. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were studied for Slit2 and Robo receptor expression by immunoassay and RT-PCR. The effect of the conditioned medium of hPMSCs with or without Slit2 depletion on endothelial cells was investigated by in vitro angiogenesis using growth factor-reduced Matrigel. hPMSCs express Slit2 and both Robo1 and Robo4 are present in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells do not express Robo2 and Robo3. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and Slit2 recombinant protein significantly inhibit the endothelial cell migration, but not by the hPMSC-conditioned medium with Slit2 depletion. The hPMSC-conditioned medium and Slit2 significantly enhance endothelial tube formation with increased cumulated tube length, polygonal network number and vessel branching point number compared to endothelial cells alone. The tube formation is inhibited by the depletion of Slit2 from the conditioned medium, or following the expression of Robo1, Robo4, and both receptor knockdown using small interfering RNA. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation reveals Slit2 binds to Robo1 and Robo4. Robo1 interacts and forms a heterodimeric complex with Robo4. These results suggest the implication of both Robo receptors with Slit2 signaling, which is involved in endothelial cell angiogenesis. Slit2 in the conditioned medium of hPMSCs has functional effect on endothelial cells and may play a role in placental angiogenesis.

  5. Deterministic and stochastic approaches in the clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacini, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have enormous intrinsic clinical value due to their multi-lineage differentiation capacity, support of hemopoiesis, immunoregulation and growth factors/cytokines secretion. MSCs have thus been the object of extensive research for decades. After completion of many pre-clinical and clinical trials, MSC-based therapy is now facing a challenging phase. Several clinical trials have reported moderate, non-durable benefits, which caused initial enthusiasm to wane, and indicated an urgent need to optimize the efficacy of therapeutic, platform-enhancing MSC-based treatment. Recent investigations suggest the presence of multiple in vivo MSC ancestors in a wide range of tissues, which contribute to the heterogeneity of the starting material for the expansion of MSCs. This variability in the MSC culture-initiating cell population, together with the different types of enrichment/isolation and cultivation protocols applied, are hampering progress in the definition of MSC-based therapies. International regulatory statements require a precise risk/benefit analysis, ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments. GMP validation allows for quality certification, but the prediction of a clinical outcome after MSC-based therapy is correlated not only to the possible morbidity derived by cell production process, but also to the biology of the MSCs themselves, which is highly sensible to unpredictable fluctuation of isolating and culture conditions. Risk exposure and efficacy of MSC-based therapies should be evaluated by pre-clinical studies, but the batch-to-batch variability of the final medicinal product could significantly limit the predictability of these studies. The future success of MSC-based therapies could lie not only in rational optimization of therapeutic strategies, but also in a stochastic approach during the assessment of benefit and risk factors.

  6. Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches in the Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePacini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have enormous intrinsic clinical value due to their multi-lineage differentiation capacity, support of hemopoiesis, immunoregulation and growth factors/cytokines secretion. MSCs have thus been the object of extensive research for decades. After completion of many pre-clinical and clinical trials, MSC-based therapy is now facing a challenging phase. Several clinical trials have reported moderate, non-durable benefits, which caused initial enthusiasm to wane, and indicated an urgent need to optimize the efficacy of therapeutic, platform-enhancing MSC-based treatment. Recent investigations suggest the presence of multiple in vivo MSC ancestors in a wide range of tissues, which contribute to the heterogeneity of the starting material for the expansion of MSCs. This variability in the MSC culture-initiating cell population, together with the different types of enrichment/isolation and cultivation protocols applied, are hampering progress in the definition of MSC-based therapies. International regulatory statements require a precise risk/benefit analysis, ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments. GMP validation allows for quality certification, but the prediction of a clinical outcome after MSC-based therapy is correlated not only to the possible morbidity derived by cell production process, but also to the biology of the MSCs themselves, which is highly sensible to unpredictable fluctuation of isolating and culture conditions.Risk exposure and efficacy of MSC-based therapies should be evaluated by pre-clinical studies, but the batch-to-batch variability of the final medicinal product could significantly limit the predictability of these studies. The future success of MSC-based therapies could lie not only in rational optimization of therapeutic strategies, but also in a stochastic approach during the assessment of benefit and risk factors.

  7. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonio; Garcia-Gomez; Fermin; Sanchez-Guijo; M; Consuelo; del; Caizo; Jesus; F; San; Miguel; Mercedes; Garayoa

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy inwhich clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic le-sions due to increased osteoclast(OC) activity and sup-pressed osteoblast(OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells(MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma patho-physiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of my-eloma bone disease(MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients(pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts(dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibi-tory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and ac-tivity at various levels(i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncou-pling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augment-ed production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents(at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  8. Endogenous mesenchymal stromal cells in bone marrow are required to preserve muscle function in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Ryo; Tamai, Katsuto; Aikawa, Eriko; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Kikuchi, Yasushi; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2015-03-01

    The physiological role of "endogenous" bone marrow (BM) mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in tissue regeneration is poorly understood. Here, we show the significant contribution of unique endogenous BM-MSC populations to muscle regeneration in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mice (mdx). Transplantation of BM cells (BMCs) from 10-week-old mdx into 3-4-week-old mdx mice increased inflammation and fibrosis and reduced muscle function compared with mdx mice that received BMCs from 10-week-old wild-type mice, suggesting that the alteration of BMC populations in mdx mice affects the progression of muscle pathology. Two distinct MSC populations in BM, that is, hematopoietic lineage (Lin)(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) cells, were significantly reduced in 10-week-old mdx mice in disease progression. The results of a whole-transcriptome analysis indicated that these two MSC populations have distinct gene expression profiles, indicating that the Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) and Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(-) MSC populations are proliferative- and dormant-state populations in BM, respectively. BM-derived Lin(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs abundantly migrated to damaged muscles and highly expressed tumor necrosis factor-alpha-stimulated gene/protein-6 (TSG-6), an anti-inflammatory protein, in damaged muscles. We also demonstrated that TSG-6 stimulated myoblast proliferation. The injection of Lin(-) /ckit(-) /CD106(+) /CD44(+) MSCs into the muscle of mdx mice successfully ameliorated muscle dysfunction by decreasing inflammation and enhancing muscle regeneration through TSG-6-mediated activities. Thus, we propose a novel function of the unique endogenous BM-MSC population, which countered muscle pathology progression in a DMD model.

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar β1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation

  10. Susceptibility of human placenta derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells to human herpesviruses infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Avanzi

    Full Text Available Fetal membranes (FM derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs are higher in number, expansion and differentiation abilities compared with those obtained from adult tissues, including bone marrow. Upon systemic administration, ex vivo expanded FM-MSCs preferentially home to damaged tissues promoting regenerative processes through their unique biological properties. These characteristics together with their immune-privileged nature and immune suppressive activity, a low infection rate and young age of placenta compared to other sources of SCs make FM-MSCs an attractive target for cell-based therapy and a valuable tool in regenerative medicine, currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In the present study we investigated the permissivity of FM-MSCs to all members of the human Herpesviridae family, an issue which is relevant to their purification, propagation, conservation and therapeutic use, as well as to their potential role in the vertical transmission of viral agents to the fetus and to their potential viral vector-mediated genetic modification. We present here evidence that FM-MSCs are fully permissive to infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, Varicella zoster virus (VZV, and Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV, but not with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Human Herpesvirus-6, 7 and 8 (HHV-6, 7, 8 although these viruses are capable of entering FM-MSCs and transient, limited viral gene expression occurs. Our findings therefore strongly suggest that FM-MSCs should be screened for the presence of herpesviruses before xenotransplantation. In addition, they suggest that herpesviruses may be indicated as viral vectors for gene expression in MSCs both in gene therapy applications and in the selective induction of differentiation.

  11. Modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell characteristics by microcarrier culture in bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupfeld, Julia; Gorr, Ingo H; Schwald, Christian; Beaucamp, Nicola; Wiechmann, Kornelius; Kuentzer, Karin; Huss, Ralf; Rieger, Bernhard; Neubauer, Markus; Wegmeyer, Heike

    2014-11-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell therapy. Their therapeutic use requires extensive expansion to obtain a sufficiently high number of cells for clinical applications. State-of-the-art expansion systems, that is, primarily culture flask-based systems, are limited regarding scale-up, automation, and reproducibility. To overcome this bottleneck, microcarrier (MC)-based expansion processes have been developed. For the first time, MSCs from the perinatal sources umbilical cord (UC) and amniotic membrane (AM) were expanded on MCs. This study focuses on the comparison of flask- and Cytodex 1 MC-expanded MSCs by evaluating the influence of the expansion process on biological MSC characteristics. Furthermore, we tested the hypothesis to obtain more homogeneous MSC preparations by expanding cells on MCs in controlled large-scale bioreactors. MSCs were extensively characterized determining morphology, cell growth, surface marker expression, and functional properties such as differentiation capacity, secretion of paracrine factors, and gene expression. Based on their gene expression profile MSCs from different donors and sources clearly clustered in distinct groups solely depending on the expansion process-MC or flask culture. MC- and flask-expanded MSCs significantly differed from each other regarding surface markers and both paracrine factors and gene expression profiles. Furthermore, based on gene expression analysis, MC cultivation of MSCs in controlled bioreactor systems resulted in less heterogeneity between cells from different donors. In conclusion, MC-based MSC expansion in controlled bioreactors has the potential to reliably produce MSCs with altered characteristics and functions as compared to flask-expanded MSCs. These findings may be useful for the generation of MSCs with tailored properties for clinical applications.

  12. Multiple myeloma mesenchymal stromal cells: Contribution to myeloma bone disease and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin; Del Cañizo, M Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-07-26

    Multiple myeloma is a hematological malignancy in which clonal plasma cells proliferate and accumulate within the bone marrow. The presence of osteolytic lesions due to increased osteoclast (OC) activity and suppressed osteoblast (OB) function is characteristic of the disease. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) play a critical role in multiple myeloma pathophysiology, greatly promoting the growth, survival, drug resistance and migration of myeloma cells. Here, we specifically discuss on the relative contribution of MSCs to the pathophysiology of osteolytic lesions in light of the current knowledge of the biology of myeloma bone disease (MBD), together with the reported genomic, functional and gene expression differences between MSCs derived from myeloma patients (pMSCs) and their healthy counterparts (dMSCs). Being MSCs the progenitors of OBs, pMSCs primarily contribute to the pathogenesis of MBD because of their reduced osteogenic potential consequence of multiple OB inhibitory factors and direct interactions with myeloma cells in the bone marrow. Importantly, pMSCs also readily contribute to MBD by promoting OC formation and activity at various levels (i.e., increasing RANKL to OPG expression, augmenting secretion of activin A, uncoupling ephrinB2-EphB4 signaling, and through augmented production of Wnt5a), thus further contributing to OB/OC uncoupling in osteolytic lesions. In this review, we also look over main signaling pathways involved in the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs and/or OB activity, highlighting amenable therapeutic targets; in parallel, the reported activity of bone-anabolic agents (at preclinical or clinical stage) targeting those signaling pathways is commented.

  13. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm). PMID:27219645

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Sphincter Regeneration: Role of Laminin Isoforms upon Myogenic Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Seeger

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are well known for their tri-lineage potential and ability to differentiate in vitro into osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic lineages. By selecting appropriate conditions MSCs can also be differentiated in vitro into the myogenic lineage and are therefore a promising option for cell-based regeneration of muscle tissue such as an aged or damaged sphincter muscle. For the differentiation into the myogenic lineage there is still a need to evaluate the effects of extracellular matrix proteins such as laminins (LM which are crucial for different stem cell types and for normal muscle function. The laminin family consists of 16 functionally different isoforms with LM-211 being the most abundant isoform of adult muscle tissues. In the sphincter tissue a strong expression of the isoforms LM-211/221, LM-411/421 and LM-511/521 can be detected in the different cell layers. Bone marrow-derived MSCs in culture, however, mainly express the isoforms LM-411 and LM-511, but not LM-211. Even after myogenic differentiation, LM-211 can hardly be detected. All laminin isoforms tested (LM-211, LM-411, LM-511 and LM-521 showed a significant inhibition of the proliferation of undifferentiated MSCs but, with the exception of LM-521, they had no influence on the proliferation of MSCs cultivated in myogenic medium. The strongest cellular adhesion of MSCs was to LM-511 and LM-521, whereas LM-211 was only a weakly-adhesive substrate for MSCs. Myogenic differentiation of MSCs even reduced the interaction with LM-211, but it did not affect the interaction with LM-511 and LM-521. Since during normal myogenesis the latter two isoforms are the major laminins surrounding developing myogenic progenitors, α5 chain-containing laminins are recommended for further improvements of myogenic differentiation protocols of MSCs into smooth muscle cells.

  15. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Methods for ATMP Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Bolis, Sara; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for the development of cell-based therapies for various diseases and are currently being evaluated in a number of clinical trials (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014). MSC for therapeutic applications are classified as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) (Regulation (EC) No 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004) and must be prepared according to good manufacturing practices ( http://ec.europa.eu/health/documents/eudralex/vol-4 ). They may be derived from different starting materials (mainly bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, or cord blood) and applied as fresh or cryopreserved products, in the autologous as well as an allogeneic context (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014; Sensebé and Bourin, Transplantation 87(9 Suppl):S49-S53, 2009). In any case, they require an approved and well-defined panel of assays in order to be released for clinical use.This chapter describes analytical methods implemented and performed in our cell factory as part of the release strategy for an ATMP consisting of frozen autologous BM-derived MSC. Such methods are designed to assess the safety (sterility, endotoxin, and mycoplasma assays) and identity/potency (cell count and viability, immunophenotype and clonogenic assay) of the final product. Some assays are also applied to the biological starting material (sterility) or carried out as in-process controls (sterility, cell count and viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic assay).The validation strategy for each analytical method is described in the accompanying Chapter 20 .

  16. Direct intramyocardial mesenchymal stromal cell injections in patients with severe refractory angina - one year follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Friis, Tina; Mathiasen, Anders B;

    2013-01-01

    Aims: In patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and refractory angina we performed direct intra-myocardial injections of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and followed the safety and efficacy of the treatment for 12 months. Methods and Results: A total of 31 patients with st...... follow-up demonstrated, that it was safe to culture expand MSCs and use the cells for clinical treatment. The patients maximal metabolic equivalent (MET) during exercise increased from 4.23 MET at baseline to 4.72 MET at 12 months follow-up (p...

  17. Cell shape and spreading of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells cultured on fibronectin coated gold and hydroxyapatite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, Thomas Hartvig Lindkjær; Kolind, Kristian;

    2011-01-01

    In order to identify the cellular mechanisms leading to the biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite implants, we studied the interaction of human bone marrow derived stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSCs) with fibronectin-coated gold (Au) and hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces. The adsorption of fibronectin...... as compared to Au. Moreover, the results revealed that the morphology of cells cultured on fibronectin coated HA surfaces were less irregular. In summary we find that fibronectin adsorbs in a more activated state on the HA surfaces, resulting in a slightly different cellular response as compared...

  18. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Exposed to Ultrasmooth Tantalum vs. Titanium Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, C.; Bunger, C.; Overall, R. W.;

    2013-01-01

    Durable osseointegration of metallic bone implants requires that progenitor cells attach, proliferate and differentiate on the implant surface. Previously, we demonstrated superior biocompatibility of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) cultivated on ultrasmooth tantalum (Ta) as compared...... MSCs cultivated on plain sputter-coated surfaces of Ta or Ti for 1, 2, 4, and 8 days were hybridized to n = 16 U133 Plus 2.0 arrays (Affymetrix(A (R))). Functional annotation, cluster and pathway analyses were performed. The vast majority of genes were differentially regulated after 4 days...

  19. Low/Negative Expression of PDGFR-α Identifies the Candidate Primary Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Adult Human Bone Marrow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Hongzhe; Ghazanfari, Roshanak; Zacharaki, Dimitra;

    2014-01-01

    Human bone marrow (BM) contains a rare population of nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which are of central importance for the hematopoietic microenvironment. However, the precise phenotypic definition of these cells in adult BM has not yet been reported. In this study, we show...... that low/negative expression of CD140a (PDGFR-α) on lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD271(+) BM cells identified a cell population with very high MSC activity, measured as fibroblastic colony-forming unit frequency and typical in vitro and in vivo stroma formation and differentiation capacities. Furthermore, these cells...... exhibited high levels of genes associated with mesenchymal lineages and HSC supportive function. Moreover, lin(-)/CD45(-)/CD271(+)/CD140a(low/-) cells effectively mediated the ex vivo expansion of transplantable CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these data indicate that CD140a is a key...

  20. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells exhibit immature nucleus pulposus cell phenotype in a laminin-rich pseudo-three-dimensional culture system

    OpenAIRE

    Chon, Brian H; Lee, Esther J.; Jing, Liufang; Lori A Setton; Chen, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cell supplementation to the herniated or degenerated intervertebral disc (IVD) is a potential strategy to promote tissue regeneration and slow disc pathology. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (HUCMSCs) – originating from the Wharton’s jelly – remain an attractive candidate for such endeavors with their ability to differentiate into multiple lineages. Previously, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been studied as a potential source for disc tissue regeneration. Howev...

  1. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Barquinero, Jordi [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Banc de Sang i Teixits, Barcelona (Spain); Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Medical Oncology program, Vall d' Hebron Institute of Oncology, Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Poupon, Marie-France [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Morote, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Servei d' Urologia. Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reventos, Jaume [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Munell, Francina, E-mail: fmunell@ir.vhebron.net [Institut de Recerca Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  2. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Transplantation May Enhance or Inhibit 4T1 Murine Breast Adenocarcinoma through Different Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jazedje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs aiming to treat cancer has shown very contradictory results. In an attempt to clarify the contradictory results reported in the literature and the possible role of human fallopian tube Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (htMSCs against breast cancer, the aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of htMSCs in murine mammary adenocarcinoma using two different approaches: (1 coinjections of htMSCs and 4T1 murine tumor cell lineage and (2 injections of htMSCs in mice at the initial stage of mammary adenocarcinoma development. Coinjected animals had a more severe course of the disease and a reduced survival, while tumor-bearing animals treated with 2 intraperitoneal injections of 106 htMSCs showed significantly reduced tumor growth and increased lifespan as compared with control animals. Coculture of htMSCs and 4T1 tumor cells revealed an increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 and decreased VEGF production. For the first time, we show that MSCs isolated from a single source and donor when injected in the same animal model and tumor can lead to opposite results depending on the experimental protocol. Also, our results demonstrated that htMSCs can have an inhibitory effect on the development of murine mammary adenocarcinoma.

  3. In vitro epigenetic reprogramming of human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors.

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    Matteo Vecellio

    Full Text Available Adult human cardiac mesenchymal-like stromal cells (CStC represent a relatively accessible cell type useful for therapy. In this light, their conversion into cardiovascular precursors represents a potential successful strategy for cardiac repair. The aim of the present work was to reprogram CStC into functionally competent cardiovascular precursors using epigenetically active small molecules. CStC were exposed to low serum (5% FBS in the presence of 5 µM all-trans Retinoic Acid (ATRA, 5 µM Phenyl Butyrate (PB, and 200 µM diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide (DETA/NO, to create a novel epigenetically active cocktail (EpiC. Upon treatment the expression of markers typical of cardiac resident stem cells such as c-Kit and MDR-1 were up-regulated, together with the expression of a number of cardiovascular-associated genes including KDR, GATA6, Nkx2.5, GATA4, HCN4, NaV1.5, and α-MHC. In addition, profiling analysis revealed that a significant number of microRNA involved in cardiomyocyte biology and cell differentiation/proliferation, including miR 133a, 210 and 34a, were up-regulated. Remarkably, almost 45% of EpiC-treated cells exhibited a TTX-sensitive sodium current and, to a lower extent in a few cells, also the pacemaker I(f current. Mechanistically, the exposure to EpiC treatment introduced global histone modifications, characterized by increased levels of H3K4Me3 and H4K16Ac, as well as reduced H4K20Me3 and H3s10P, a pattern compatible with reduced proliferation and chromatin relaxation. Consistently, ChIP experiments performed with H3K4me3 or H3s10P histone modifications revealed the presence of a specific EpiC-dependent pattern in c-Kit, MDR-1, and Nkx2.5 promoter regions, possibly contributing to their modified expression. Taken together, these data indicate that CStC may be epigenetically reprogrammed to acquire molecular and biological properties associated with competent cardiovascular precursors.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of single co-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells after intracardial injection in mice

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    Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Peldschus, K. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Wicklein, D.; Schumacher, U. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. of Anatomy II: Experimental Morphology; Didie, M. [Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Pharmacology; Lange, C. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Bone Marrow Transplantation

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to establish co-labeling of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for the detection of single MSC in-vivo by MRI and histological validation. Materials and Methods: Mouse MSC were co-labeled with fluorescent iron oxide micro-particles and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE). The cellular iron content was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Cell proliferation and expression of characteristic surface markers were determined by flow cytometry. The chondrogenic differentiation capacity was assessed. Different amounts of cells (n1 = 5000, n2 = 15 000, n3 = 50 000) were injected into the left heart ventricle of 12 mice. The animals underwent sequential MRI on a clinical 3.0T scanner (Intera, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). For histological validation cryosections were examined by fluorescent microscopy. Results: Magnetic and fluorescent labeling of MSC was established (mean cellular iron content 23.6 ± 3 pg). Flow cytometry showed similar cell proliferation and receptor expression of labeled and unlabeled MSC. Chondrogenic differentiation of labeled MSC was verified. After cell injection MRI revealed multiple signal voids in the brain and fewer signal voids in the kidneys. In the brain, an average of 4.6 ± 1.2 (n1), 9.0 ± 3.6 (n2) and 25.0 ± 1.0 (n3) signal voids were detected per MRI slice. An average of 8.7 ± 3.1 (n1), 22.0 ± 6.1 (n2) and 89.8 ± 6.5 (n3) labeled cells per corresponding stack of adjacent cryosections could be detected in the brain. Statistical correlation of the numbers of MRI signal voids in the brain and single MSC found by histology revealed a correlation coefficient of r = 0.91. Conclusion: The study demonstrates efficient magnetic and fluorescent co-labeling of MSC and their detection on a single cell level in mice by in-vivo MRI and histology. The described techniques may broaden the methods for in-vivo tracking of MSC. (orig.)

  5. Neural differentiation potential of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: misleading marker gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montzka Katrin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to pluripotent embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells have been considered to be multipotent, being somewhat more restricted in their differentiation capacity and only giving rise to cell types related to their tissue of origin. Several studies, however, have reported that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are capable of transdifferentiating to neural cell types, effectively crossing normal lineage restriction boundaries. Such reports have been based on the detection of neural-related proteins by the differentiated MSCs. In order to assess the potential of human adult MSCs to undergo true differentiation to a neural lineage and to determine the degree of homogeneity between donor samples, we have used RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry to investigate the basal expression of a range of neural related mRNAs and proteins in populations of non-differentiated MSCs obtained from 4 donors. Results The expression analysis revealed that several of the commonly used marker genes from other studies like nestin, Enolase2 and microtubule associated protein 1b (MAP1b are already expressed by undifferentiated human MSCs. Furthermore, mRNA for some of the neural-related transcription factors, e.g. Engrailed-1 and Nurr1 were also strongly expressed. However, several other neural-related mRNAs (e.g. DRD2, enolase2, NFL and MBP could be identified, but not in all donor samples. Similarly, synaptic vesicle-related mRNA, STX1A could only be detected in 2 of the 4 undifferentiated donor hMSC samples. More significantly, each donor sample revealed a unique expression pattern, demonstrating a significant variation of marker expression. Conclusion The present study highlights the existence of an inter-donor variability of expression of neural-related markers in human MSC samples that has not previously been described. This donor-related heterogeneity might influence the reproducibility of transdifferentiation protocols as

  6. ipo13及CD146在子宫内膜息肉中的表达及意义%Expression of ipo13 and cd146 in endometrial polyps and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洪伟; 申旋

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of ipol3 and CD146 in endometrial polyps and normal endometrium and its clinicopathologic significance. Methods Forty sepcimens of endometrial polp tissues and 40 normal endometrial tissues were colletected in The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University from March to September in 2010. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of ipol3 and CD146 in those specimens. ResaultS The expression of ipol3 and CD146 in endometrial polyps group was lower than that of the normal endometrial tissues no matter if they were in the proliferative phase or secretory phase of the menstrual cycle.showing statitially significant differences (P<0.05). Conclusion The expression of ipol3 and CD146 in endometrial polps is significantly lower than that in normal endometrium tissues suggesting that endometrial stem/progenitior cells dysfunction is related to pathagenesis of endometrial polyps.%目的 探讨ipo13、CD146在子宫内膜息肉(endometrial polyp,EP)与正常子宫内膜中的表达及临床意义.方法 收集重庆医科大学附属第一医院2010年3~7月行宫腔镜手术取得的40例内膜息肉与因子宫肌瘤行子宫切除术的40例正常内膜组织,采用免疫组织化学S-P法检测ipo13、CD146蛋白在子宫内膜息肉及正常内膜中的表达.结果 无论在月经周期的增生期还是分泌期,EP中ipo13和CD146的表达均低于正常子宫内膜组织(P<0.05).结论 ip013、CD146在EP中表达下降,推测EP发病可能与子宫内膜干/祖细胞活性异常有关.

  7. PDX1- and NGN3-mediated in vitro reprogramming of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into pancreatic endocrine lineages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limbert, Catarina; Päth, Günter; Ebert, Regina;

    2011-01-01

    Reprogramming of multipotent adult bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) (BM-MSC) represents one of several strategies for cell-based therapy of diabetes. However, reprogramming primary BM-MSC into pancreatic endocrine lineages has not yet been consistently demonstrated....

  8. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W G; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-08-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy "3(rd)-party" donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cells from pooled mononuclear cells of multiple bone marrow donors as rescue therapy in pediatric severe steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease: a multicenter survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuçi, Zyrafete; Bönig, Halvard; Kreyenberg, Hermann; Bunos, Milica; Jauch, Anna; Janssen, Johannes W.G.; Škifić, Marijana; Michel, Kristina; Eising, Ben; Lucchini, Giovanna; Bakhtiar, Shahrzad; Greil, Johann; Lang, Peter; Basu, Oliver; von Luettichau, Irene; Schulz, Ansgar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Jarisch, Andrea; Soerensen, Jan; Salzmann-Manrique, Emilia; Seifried, Erhard; Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter; Kuçi, Selim

    2016-01-01

    To circumvent donor-to-donor heterogeneity which may lead to inconsistent results after treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease with mesenchymal stromal cells generated from single donors we developed a novel approach by generating these cells from pooled bone marrow mononuclear cells of 8 healthy “3rd-party” donors. Generated cells were frozen in 209 vials and designated as mesenchymal stromal cell bank. These vials served as a source for generation of clinical grade mesenchymal stromal cell end-products, which exhibited typical mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, trilineage differentiation potential and at later passages expressed replicative senescence-related markers (p21 and p16). Genetic analysis demonstrated their genomic stability (normal karyotype and a diploid pattern). Importantly, clinical end-products exerted a significantly higher allosuppressive potential than the mean allosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stromal cells generated from the same donors individually. Administration of 81 mesenchymal stromal cell end-products to 26 patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease in 7 stem cell transplant centers who were refractory to many lines of treatment, induced a 77% overall response at the primary end point (day 28). Remarkably, although the cohort of patients was highly challenging (96% grade III/IV and only 4% grade II graft-versus-host disease), after treatment with mesenchymal stromal cell end-products the overall survival rate at two years follow up was 71±11% for the entire patient cohort, compared to 51.4±9.0% in graft-versus-host disease clinical studies, in which mesenchymal stromal cells were derived from single donors. Mesenchymal stromal cell end-products may, therefore, provide a novel therapeutic tool for the effective treatment of severe acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27175026

  10. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells: An update on their phenotype in vivo and in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick; C; Baer

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a rich, ubiquitous and easily acces-sible source for multipotent stromal/stem cells and has, therefore, several advantages compared to other sourc-es of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells. Several studies have tried to identify the origin of the stromal/stem cell population within adipose tissue in situ. This is a complicated attempt because no marker has currently been described which unambiguously identifies native adipose-derived stromal/stem cells(ASCs). Isolated and cultured ASCs are a non-uniform preparation consisting of several subsets of stem and precursor cells. Cultured ASCs are characterized by their expression of a panel of markers(and the absence of others), whereas their in vitro phenotype is dynamic. Some markers were ex-pressed de novo during culture, the expression of some markers is lost. For a long time, CD34 expression was solely used to characterize haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, but now it has become evident that it is also a potential marker to identify an ASC subpopula-tion in situ and after a short culture time. Nevertheless, long-term cultured ASCs do not express CD34, perhaps due to the artificial environment. This review gives an update of the recently published data on the origin and phenotype of ASCs both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the composition of ASCs(or their subpopula-tions) seems to vary between different laboratories andpreparations. This heterogeneity of ASC preparationsmay result from different reasons. One of the main problems in comparing results from different laborato-ries is the lack of a standardized isolation and culture protocol for ASCs. Since many aspects of ASCs, suchas the differential potential or the current use in clinical trials, are fully described in other recent reviews, this review further updates the more basic research issues concerning ASCs’ subpopulations, heterogeneity andculture standardization.

  11. Flexible Yttrium-Stabilized Zirconia Nanofibers Offer Bioactive Cues for Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadafalch Gazquez, Gerard; Chen, Honglin; Veldhuis, Sjoerd A; Solmaz, Alim; Mota, Carlos; Boukamp, Bernard A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Ten Elshof, Johan E; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-28

    Currently, the main drawback of ceramic scaffolds used in hard tissue regeneration is their low mechanical strength. Stabilized zirconia, especially the tetragonal 3% yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) phase, has been considered as a bioinert ceramic material with high mechanical strength. In the present work, flexible nanofibrous YSZ scaffolds were prepared by electrospinning. The obtained scaffolds showed remarkable flexibility at the macroscopic scale, while retaining their stiffness at the microscopic scale. The surface nanoroughness of the scaffolds could be tailored by varying the heat treatment method. Our results demonstrate that the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of seeded human mesenchymal stromal cells were supported by the nanofibrous YSZ scaffolds, in contrast to the well-known bioinert behavior of bulk YSZ. These findings highlight that flexible ceramic scaffolds are an appealing alternative to the current brittle ceramics for bone tissue regeneration applications. PMID:27294434

  12. Mesenchymal stromal stem cell therapy in advanced interstitial lung disease - Anaphylaxis and short-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangakunam, Balamugesh; Christopher, Devasahayam Jesudas; Mathews, Vikram; Srivastava, Alok

    2015-01-01

    There are limited treatment options for advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD). We describe a patient of ILD treated with mesenchymal stromal stem cell infusion. The index patient had end-stage ILD due to a combination of insults including treatment with radiotherapy and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor Erlotinib. He was oxygen-dependent and this was hampering his quality of life. He tolerated the first infusion stem cells without any problem. During the second infusion he developed anaphylactic shock, which was appropriately managed. At 6-months follow-up he had no improvement in oxygenation, pulmonary function or CT scan parameters. In view of anaphylaxis, further infusions of MSC were withheld. A longer follow-up may reveal long-term benefits or side effects, if any. However the occurrence of anaphylaxis is of concern suggesting that further trials should be conducted with intensive monitoring. PMID:26628765

  13. Mesenchymal stromal stem cell therapy in advanced interstitial lung disease - Anaphylaxis and short-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balamugesh Thangakunam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are limited treatment options for advanced interstitial lung disease (ILD. We describe a patient of ILD treated with mesenchymal stromal stem cell infusion. The index patient had end-stage ILD due to a combination of insults including treatment with radiotherapy and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor Erlotinib. He was oxygen-dependent and this was hampering his quality of life. He tolerated the first infusion stem cells without any problem. During the second infusion he developed anaphylactic shock, which was appropriately managed. At 6-months follow-up he had no improvement in oxygenation, pulmonary function or CT scan parameters. In view of anaphylaxis, further infusions of MSC were withheld. A longer follow-up may reveal long-term benefits or side effects, if any. However the occurrence of anaphylaxis is of concern suggesting that further trials should be conducted with intensive monitoring.

  14. Risk of tumorigenicity in mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapies--bridging scientific observations and regulatory viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Lisbeth; Flory, Egbert; Jekerle, Veronika; Lucas-Samuel, Sophie; Ahnert, Peter; Bisset, Louise; Büscher, Dirk; Fibbe, Willem; Foussat, Arnaud; Kwa, Marcel; Lantz, Olivier; Mačiulaitis, Romaldas; Palomäki, Tiina; Schneider, Christian K; Sensebé, Luc; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tarte, Karin; Tosca, Lucie; Salmikangas, Paula

    2013-07-01

    In the past decade, the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been studied in various indications, thereby taking advantage of their immunosuppressive properties. Easy procurement from bone marrow, adipose tissue or other sources and conventional in vitro expansion culture have made their clinical use attractive. Bridging the gap between current scientific knowledge and regulatory prospects on the transformation potential and possible tumorigenicity of MSCs, the Cell Products Working Party and the Committee for Advanced Therapies organized a meeting with leading European experts in the field of MSCs. This meeting elucidated the risk of potential tumorigenicity related to MSC-based therapies from two angles: the scientific perspective and the regulatory point of view. The conclusions of this meeting, including the current regulatory thinking on quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects for MSCs, are presented in this review, leading to a clearer way forward for the development of such products.

  15. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bortolotti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation.

  16. In Vivo Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Depends on the Source and the Isolation Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotti, Francesca; Ukovich, Laura; Razban, Vahid; Martinelli, Valentina; Ruozi, Giulia; Pelos, Barbara; Dore, Franca; Giacca, Mauro; Zacchigna, Serena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over the last several years, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been isolated from different tissues following a variety of different procedures. Here, we comparatively assess the ex vivo and in vivo properties of MSCs isolated from either adipose tissue or bone marrow by different purification protocols. After MSC transplantation into a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia, clinical and histological analysis revealed that bone marrow MSCs purified on adhesive substrates exerted the best therapeutic activity, preserving tissue viability and promoting formation of new arterioles without directly transdifferentiating into vascular cells. In keeping with these observations, these cells abundantly expressed cytokines involved in vessel maturation and cell retention. These findings indicate that the choice of MSC source and purification protocol is critical in determining the therapeutic potential of these cells and warrant the standardization of an optimal MSC isolation procedure in order to select the best conditions to move forward to more effective clinical experimentation. PMID:25660405

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells from the human placenta promote neovascularization in a mouse model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzer, M; Hingerl, K; König, J; Reinisch, A; Strunk, D; Huppertz, B; Lang, I

    2014-07-01

    Cell transplantation is a promising strategy in regenerative medicine for revascularization of ischemic tissues. Based on our observation that placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PMSC) enhance endothelial cell viability in vitro via secretion of angiogenic factors, we asked whether PMSC support vascular growth in vivo. PMSC were isolated from amnion and placental endothelial cells (PLEC) from chorion and either separately or co-transplanted subcutaneously into immune-deficient mice. Co-transplantation resulted in a higher number of perfused human vessels (CD31+/vimentin+) containing mouse glycophorin A+ erythrocytes. Results indicate positive effects of PMSC on neovascularization in vivo, making them attractive candidates to create autologous PMSC/PLEC pairs for research and transplantation.

  18. Clinical-Grade Manufacturing of Therapeutic Human Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Microcarrier-Based Culture Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Carmelo, Joana G; da Silva, Cláudia Lobato; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) has triggered the need for high cell doses in a vast number of clinical applications. This demand requires the development of good manufacturing practices (GMP)-compliant ex vivo expansion protocols that should be effective to deliver a robust and reproducible supply of clinical-grade cells in a safe and cost-effective manner. Controlled stirred-tank bioreactor systems under xenogeneic (xeno)-free culture conditions offer ideal settings to develop and optimize cell manufacturing to meet the standards and needs of human MSC for cellular therapies. Herein we describe two microcarrier-based stirred culture systems using spinner flasks and controlled stirred-tank bioreactors under xeno-free conditions for the efficient ex vivo expansion of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSC. PMID:27236684

  19. Adhesion and proliferation of adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells on chitosan scaffolds with different degree of deacetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogulska O. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Selection of the optimal scaffold for the creation of tissue engineering constructs is a key challenge of biotechnology. In this study we investigated the biocompatibility of human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs within the three-dimensional matrices based on the chitosan with a different degree of deacetylation. Methods. MSCs were seeded on the chitosan scaffolds by a perfusion method and cultured for 7 days. The morphology, viability, metabolic activity and distribution of the cells within the matrices were analyzed. Results. The level of MSCs adhesion to the surface of the chitosan scaffolds with low degree of deacetylation (67 % was insignificant, the cells were round and formed aggregates. In the chitosan scaffolds with a high degree of deacetylation (82 % the cells attached to the surface of matrices, were able to spread and proliferate. Conclusions. The chitosan scaffolds with a high degree of deacetylation and the human adipose derived MSCs can be used for the creation of bioengineered structures.

  20. Multifunctional nanocrystalline calcium phosphates loaded with Tetracycline antibiotic combined with human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hASCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marycz, K; Pazik, R; Zawisza, K; Wiglusz, K; Maredziak, M; Sobierajska, P; Wiglusz, R J

    2016-12-01

    Osteoconductive drug delivery system composed of nanocrystalline calcium phosphates (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2/β-Ca3(PO4)2) co-doped with Yb(3+)/Er(3+) ions loaded with Tetracycline antibiotic (TC) was developed. Their effect on human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (hASCs) as a potential reconstructive biomaterial for bone tissue regeneration was studied. The XRD and TEM measurements were used in order to determine the crystal structure and morphology of the final products. The characteristics of nanocomposites with the TC and hASCs as potential regenerative materials as well as the antimicrobial activity of the nanoparticles against: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 as a model of the Gram-positive bacteria, Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 of the Gram-negative bacteria, were shown. These combinations can be a promising material for theranostic due to its regenerative, antimicrobial and fluorescent properties. PMID:27612684

  1. Manufacturing of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on Microcarriers in a Dynamic System for Clinical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Petry

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The great properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs make these cells an important tool in regenerative medicine. Because of the limitations of hMSCs derived from the bone marrow during isolation and expansion, hMSCs derived from the umbilical cord stroma are a great alternative to overcome these issues. For a large expansion of these cells, we performed a process transfer from static culture to a dynamic system. For this reason, a microcarrier selection out of five microcarrier types was made to achieve a suitable growth surface for the cells. The growth characteristics and metabolite consumption and production were used to compare the cells growth in 12-well plate and spinner flask. The goal to determine relevant process parameters to transfer the expansion process into a stirred tank bioreactor was achieved.

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François, E-mail: fberthia@rci.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β1 at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β1 is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β1

  4. The effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells transplantation after mannitol pretreatment on behavioral performance and synaptophysin expression in the CA3 region in hippocampus of vascular dementia rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    农伟东

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) transplantation after mannitol pretreatment on behavioral performance and synaptophysin expression in the CA3region in hippocampus of vascular dementia (VD) rats.Methods The

  5. Selective isolation and differentiation of a stromal population of human embryonic stem cells with osteogenic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda M; Mahmood, Amer; Ditzel, Nicholas;

    2011-01-01

    The derivation of osteogenic cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) has been hampered by the absence of easy and reproducible protocols. hESC grown in feeder-free conditions, often show a sub population of fibroblast-like, stromal cells growing between the colonies. Thus, we examined...... the possibility that these cells represent a population of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hESC-stromal). Two in house derived hES cell lines (Odense3 and KMEB3) as well as an externally derived cell line (Hues8) were transitioned to feeder-free conditions. A sub population of fibroblast-like cells established...... between the hESC colonies were isolated by selective adherence to hyaluronic acid-coated plates (100μg/ml) and were characterized using a combination of FACS analysis and staining. The cells were CD44(+), CD29(+), CD73(+), CD166(+), CD146(+), and CD105(+); and, Oct4(-), CD34(-), CD45(-) and CXCR4(-). When...

  6. Increased stromal-cell-derived factor 1 enhances the homing of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in dilated cardiomyopathy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-li; Michael Fu; ZHANG Hai-feng; LI Xin-li; DI Ruo-min; YAO Wen-ming; LI Dian-fu; FENG Jian-lin; HUANG Jun; CAO Ke-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Stem cell transplantation has been shown to have beneficial effects on dilated cardiomyopathy. However,mechanism for stem cell homing to cardiac tissue in dilated cardiomyopathy has not yet been elucidated.Methods Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from rat bone marrow, expanded in vitro, and labeled with 99mTc.Cardiomyopathy model was induced by doxorubicin in rats. 99mTc labeled cells were infused into the left ventricles in cardiomyopathy and control rats. Sixteen hours after injection, animals were sacrificed and different tissues were harvested to measure specific radioactivity. By use of real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry,Mrna and protein expressions for stromal-cell-derived factor 1 in cardiac tissue were measured.Results Labeling efficiency of mesenchymal stem cells was (70.0±11.2)%. Sixteen hours after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the heart-to-muscle radioactivity ratio was increased significantly in cardiomyopathy hearts as compared to control hearts. Both Mrna and rotein expressions of stromal-cell-derived factor 1 were up-regulated in cardiomyopathy hearts as compared with control hearts.Conclusion In dilated cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin up-regulated expression of stromal-cell-derived factor 1in heart may induce mesenchymal stem cells home to the heart.

  7. Stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) directed chemoattraction of transiently CXCR4 overexpressing mesenchymal stem cells into functionalized three-dimensional biomimetic scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieme, S; Ryser, Martin; Gentsch, Marcus;

    2009-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bone substitute material should not only serve as scaffold in large bone defects but also attract mesenchymal stem cells, a subset of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) that are able to form new bone tissue. An additional crucial step is to attract BMSCs from the surface...... into deeper structures of 3D porous bone substitute scaffolds. Here we show that transient overexpression of CXCR4 in human BMSCs induced by mRNA transfection enhances stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha)-directed chemotactic capacity to invade internal compartments of porous 3D bone substitute...

  8. Adenovector-mediated gene delivery to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells induces inner ear cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S; Staecker, Hinrich

    2013-02-01

    Hearing is one of our main sensory systems and having a hearing disorder can have a significant impact in an individual's quality of life. Sensory neural hearing loss (SNHL) is the most common form of hearing loss; it results from the degeneration of inner ear sensory hair cells and auditory neurons in the cochlea, cells that are terminally differentiated. Stem cell-and gene delivery-based strategies provide an opportunity for the replacement of these cells. In recent years, there has been an increasing interest in gene delivery to mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the potential of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUCMSCs) as a possible source for regenerating inner ear hair cells. The expression of Atoh1 induced the differentiation of hUCMSCs into cells that resembled inner ear hair cells morphologically and immunocytochemically, evidenced by the expression of hair cell-specific markers. The results demonstrated for the first time that hUCMSCs can differentiate into hair cell-like cells, thus introducing a new potential tissue engineering and cell transplantation approach for the treatment of hearing loss. PMID:23379581

  9. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from canine induced pluripotent stem cells by inhibition of the TGFβ/activin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Frith, Jessica E; Frith, Thomas J R; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Cooper-White, Justin J; Wolvetang, Ernst J

    2014-12-15

    In this study we have generated canine mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), also known as mesenchymal stem cells, from canine induced pluripotent stem cells (ciPSCs) by small-molecule inhibition of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/activin signaling pathway. These ciPSC-derived MSCs (ciPSC-MSCs) express the MSC markers CD73, CD90, CD105, STRO1, cPDGFRβ and cKDR, in addition to the pluripotency factors OCT4, NANOG and REX1. ciPSC-MSCs lack immunostaining for H3K27me3, suggesting that they possess two active X chromosomes. ciPSC-MSCs are highly proliferative and undergo robust differentiation along the osteo-, chondro- and adipogenic pathways, but do not form teratoma-like tissues in vitro. Of further significance for the translational potential of ciPSC-MSCs, we show that these cells can be encapsulated and maintained within injectable hydrogel matrices that, when functionalized with bound pentosan polysulfate, dramatically enhance chondrogenesis and inhibit osteogenesis. The ability to efficiently derive large numbers of highly proliferative canine MSCs from ciPSCs that can be incorporated into injectable, functionalized hydrogels that enhance their differentiation along a desired lineage constitutes an important milestone towards developing an effective MSC-based therapy for osteoarthritis in dogs, but equally provides a model system for assessing the efficacy and safety of analogous approaches for treating human degenerative joint diseases. PMID:25055193

  10. Evaluation of Tissue Homogenization to Support the Generation of GMP-Compliant Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from the Umbilical Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Emnett

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that the umbilical cord (UC is an excellent source of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. However, current protocols for extracting and culturing UC-MSCs do not meet current good manufacturing practice (cGMP standards, in part due to the use of xenogeneic reagents. To support the development of a cGMP-compliant method, we have examined an enzyme-free isolation method utilizing tissue homogenization (t-H followed by culture in human platelet lysate (PL supplemented media. The yield and viability of cells after t-H were comparable to those obtained after collagenase digestion (Col-D. Importantly, kinetic analysis of cultured cells showed logarithmic growth over 10 tested passages, although the rate of cell division was lower for t-H as compared to Col-D. This slower growth of t-H-derived cells was also reflected in their longer population doubling time. Interestingly, there was no difference in the expression of mesenchymal markers and trilineage differentiation potential of cells generated using either method. Finally, t-H-derived cells had greater clonogenic potential compared to Col-D/FBS but not Col-D/PL and were able to maintain CFU-F capacity through P7. This bench scale study demonstrates the possibility of generating therapeutic doses of good quality UC-MSCs within a reasonable length of time using t-H and PL.

  11. Evaluation of Sericin as a Fetal Bovine Serum-Replacing Cryoprotectant During Freezing of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Osteoblast-Like Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Verdanova, Martina; Pytlik, Robert; Kalbacova, Marie Hubalek

    2014-01-01

    A reliable, cryoprotective, xeno-free medium suitable for different cell types is highly desirable in regenerative medicine. There is danger of infection or allergic reaction with the use of fetal bovine serum (FBS), making it problematic for medical applications. The aim of the present study was to develop an FBS-free cryoprotective medium for human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs; primary cells) and immortalized human osteoblasts (SAOS-2 cell line). Furthermore, we endeavored to eliminate ...

  12. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal...

  13. In serum veritas—in serum sanitas? Cell non-autonomous aging compromises differentiation and survival of mesenchymal stromal cells via the oxidative stress pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Geißler, S; Textor, M; K Schmidt-Bleek; Klein, O; Thiele, M; Ellinghaus, A; Jacobi, D.; Ode, A; Perka, C; Dienelt, A; Klose, J.; Kasper, G; Duda, G. N.; Strube, P.

    2013-01-01

    Even tissues capable of complete regeneration, such as bone, show an age-related reduction in their healing capacity. Here, we hypothesized that this decline is primarily due to cell non-autonomous (extrinsic) aging mediated by the systemic environment. We demonstrate that culture of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in serum from aged Sprague–Dawley rats negatively affects their survival and differentiation ability. Proteome analysis and further cellular investigations strongly suggest that s...

  14. NOX1-induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species in abdominal fat-derived mesenchymal stromal cells impinges on long-term proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Sela, M; Tirza, G; Ravid, O; Volovitz, I; Solodeev, I; Friedman, O; Zipori, D; E. Gur; Krelin, Y; Shani, N

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and can be derived from different adult tissues including fat. Our repeated attempts to produce long-term proliferative cultures of rat abdominal adipose stem cells (aASCs) under normal oxygen concentration (21%) were unsuccessful. We set to examine the events controlling this cytostasis of aASCs and found that it resulted from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that led to apoptosis. ROS overproduction in aASCs was accompanied by ...

  15. Data on isolating mesenchymal stromal cells from human adipose tissue using a collagenase-free method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim Shebaby

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present dataset describes a detailed protocol to isolate mesenchymal cells from human fat without the use of collagenase. Human fat specimen, surgically cleaned from non-fat tissues (e.g., blood vessels and reduced into smaller fat pieces of around 1–3 mm size, is incubated in complete culture media for five to seven days. Then, cells started to spread out from the fat explants and to grow in cultures according to an exponential pattern. Our data showed that primary mesenchymal cells presenting heterogeneous morphology start to acquire more homogenous fibroblastic-like shape when cultured for longer duration or when subcultured into new flasks. Cell isolation efficiency as well as cell doubling time were also calculated throughout the culturing experimentations and illustrated in a separate figure thereafter. This paper contains data previously considered as an alternative protocol to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell published in “Proliferation and differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs into osteoblastic lineage are passage dependent” [1].

  16. Pro-inflammatory profile of preeclamptic placental mesenchymal stromal cells: new insights into the etiopathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rolfo

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether placental mesenchymal stromal cells (PDMSCs derived from normal and preeclamptic (PE chorionic villous tissue presented differences in their cytokines expression profiles. Moreover, we investigated the effects of conditioned media from normal and PE-PDMSCs on the expression of pro-inflammatory Macrophage migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF, soluble FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1 and free β-human Chorionic Gonadotropin (βhCG by normal term villous explants. This information will help to understand whether anomalies in PE-PDMSCs could cause or contribute to the anomalies typical of preeclampsia. METHODS: Chorionic villous PDMSCs were isolated from severe preeclamptic (n = 12 and physiological control term (n = 12 placentae. Control and PE-PDMSCs's cytokines expression profiles were determined by Cytokine Array. Control and PE-PDMSCs were plated for 72 h and conditioned media (CM was collected. Physiological villous explants (n = 48 were treated with control or PE-PDMSCs CM for 72 h and processed for mRNA and protein isolation. MIF, VEGF and sFlt-1 mRNA and protein expression were analyzed by Real Time PCR and Western Blot respectively. Free βhCG was assessed by immunofluorescent. RESULTS: Cytokine array showed increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PE relative to control PDMSCs. Physiological explants treated with PE-PDMSCs CM showed significantly increased MIF and sFlt-1 expression relative to untreated and control PDMSCs CM explants. Interestingly, both control and PE-PDMSCs media induced VEGF mRNA increase while only normal PDMSCs media promoted VEGF protein accumulation. PE-PDMSCs CM explants released significantly increased amounts of free βhCG relative to normal PDMSCs CM ones. CONCLUSIONS: Herein, we reported elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by PE-PDMSCs. Importantly, PE PDMSCs

  17. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem/Multipotent Stromal Cells From Decidua Parietalis of Human Term Placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumaree, Mohamed H; Abomaray, F M; Alshehri, N A; Almutairi, A; AlAskar, A S; Kalionis, B; Al Jumah, M A

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) from the human placenta show stem cell-like properties useful for regenerative medicine. Previously, we reported that MSCs isolated from the fetal part of human term placentae have characteristics, which make them a potential candidate for regenerative medicine. In this study, we characterized MSC isolated from the maternal part of human term placenta. The MSCs were isolated from the decidua parietalis (DPMSCs) of human placenta using a digestion method and characterized by colony-forming unit assay and the expression of MSC markers by flow cytometry technique. In addition, DPMSC differentiation into the 3 mesenchymal lineages was also performed. Moreover, the gene and protein expression profiles of DPMSCs were identified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry techniques, respectively. Furthermore, proteins secreted by DPMSCs were detected by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Finally, the proliferation and migration potentials of DPMSCs were also determined. The DPMSCs were positive for MSC markers and negative for hematopoietic and endothelial markers, as well as costimulatory molecules and HLA-DR. Functionally, DPMSCs formed colonies and differentiated into chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes. In addition, they proliferated and migrated in response to different stimuli. Finally, they expressed and secreted many biological and immunological factors with multiple functions. Here, we carry out an extensive characterization of DPMSCs of human placenta. We report that these cells express and secrete a wide range of molecules with multiple functions, and therefore, we suggest that these cells could be an attractive candidate for cell-based therapy. PMID:26902429

  18. MicroRNA Levels as Prognostic Markers for the Differentiation Potential of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Nicole; Taipaleenmaki, Hanna; Raiss, Christian C; Groen, Nathalie; Portalska, Karolina Janaeczek; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan; Post, Janine N; van Wijnen, Andre J; Karperien, Marcel

    2015-08-15

    The ability of human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs) to differentiate into various mesenchymal cell lineages makes them a promising cell source for the use in tissue repair strategies. Since the differentiation potential of hMSCs differs between donors, it is necessary to establish biomarkers for the identification of donors with high differentiation potential. In this study, we show that microRNA (miRNA) expression levels are effective for distinguishing donors with high differentiation potential from low differentiation potential. Twenty hMSC donors were initially tested for marker expression and differentiation potential. In particular, the chondrogenic differentiation potential was evaluated on the basis of histological matrix formation, mRNA expression levels of chondrogenic marker genes, and quantitative glycosaminoglycan deposition. Three donors out of twenty were identified as donors with high chondrogenic potential, whereas nine showed moderate and eight showed low chondrogenic potential. Expression profiles of miRNAs involved in chondrogenesis and cartilage homeostasis were used for the distinction between high-performance hMSCs and low-performance hMSCs. Global mRNA expression profiles of the donors before the onset of chondrogenic differentiation revealed minor differences in gene expression between low and high chondrogenic performers. However, analysis of miRNA expression during a 7-day differentiation period identified miR-210 and miR-630 as positive regulators of chondrogenesis. In contrast, miR-181 and miR-34a, which are negative regulators of chondrogenesis, were upregulated during differentiation in low-performing donors. In conclusion, profiling of hMSC donors for a specific panel of miRNAs may have a prognostic value for selecting donors with high differentiation potential to improve hMSC-based strategies for tissue regeneration.

  19. Intravenous Injections of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Modulated the Redox State in a Rat Model of Radiation Myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present study was to assess the antioxidative effects of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs in a rat model of radiation myelopathy. UC-MSCs were isolated from Wharton’s jelly (WJ of umbilical cords. An irradiated cervical spinal cord rat model (C2-T2 segment was generated using a 60Co irradiator to deliver 30 Gy of radiation. UC-MSCs were injected through the tail vein at 90 days, 97 days, 104 days, and 111 days after-irradiation. Histological damage was examined by cresyl violet/Nissl staining. The activities of two antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPX in the spinal cord were measured by the biomedical assay. In addition, the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2 in the spinal cord were determined by ELISA methods. Multiple injections of UC-MSCs through the tail vein ameliorated neuronal damage in the spinal cord, increased the activities of the antioxidant enzymes CAT and GPX, and increased the levels of VEGF and Ang-2 in the spinal cord. Our results suggest that multiple injections of UC-MSCs via the tail vein in the rat model of radiation myelopathy could significantly improve the antioxidative microenvironment in vivo.

  20. The influence of IL-10 and TNFα on chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagielski, Michal; Wolf, Johannes; Marzahn, Ulrike; Völker, Anna; Lemke, Marion; Meier, Carola; Ertel, Wolfgang; Godkin, Owen; Arens, Stephan; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2014-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D) culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL)-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D) culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA) scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls. PMID:25207597

  1. Neuroprotective Effects of Transplanted Mesenchymal Stromal Cells-derived Human Umbilical Cord Blood Neural Progenitor Cells in EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Rafieemehr

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of transplanted human umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells (UCB-MSC derived neural progenitor cell (MDNPC in EAE, an experimental model of MS. To initiate neuronal differentiation of UCB-MSCs, the pre-induction medium was removed and replaced with induction media containing retinoic acid, b FGF, h EGF, NGF, IBMX and ascorbic acid for one week. The expression of neural genes was examined in comparison to control group by real-time PCR assay. Then, experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE was induced using myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG, 35-55 peptides in 24 C57BL/6 mice. After induction, the mice were divided in four groups (n=6 as follows: healthy, PBS, UCB-MSCs and MDNPC, respectively. At the end of the study, disease status in all the groups was analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E staining of brain sections. We found that UCB-MSCs exhibit neuronal differentiation potential in vitro and transplanted MDNPC lowered clinical score and reduced CNS leukocyte infiltration compared to untreated mice. Our results showed that MDNPC from UCB may be a proper candidate for regenerative therapy in MS and other neurodegenerative diseases. 

  2. The Influence of IL-10 and TNFα on Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Three-Dimensional Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Jagielski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chondrogenic differentiated mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are a promising cell source for articular cartilage repair. This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of two three-dimensional (3D culture systems for chondrogenic MSC differentiation in comparison to primary chondrocytes and to assess the effect of Interleukin (IL-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNFα on chondrogenesis by MSCs in 3D high-density (H-D culture. MSCs were isolated from femur spongiosa, characterized using a set of typical markers and introduced in scaffold-free H-D cultures or non-woven polyglycolic acid (PGA scaffolds for chondrogenic differentiation. H-D cultures were stimulated with recombinant IL-10, TNFα, TNFα + IL-10 or remained untreated. Gene and protein expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, sox9 and TNFα were examined. MSCs expressed typical cell surface markers and revealed multipotency. Chondrogenic differentiated cells expressed cartilage-specific markers in both culture systems but to a lower extent when compared with articular chondrocytes. Chondrogenesis was more pronounced in PGA compared with H-D culture. IL-10 and/or TNFα did not impair the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs. Moreover, in most of the investigated samples, despite not reaching significance level, IL-10 had a stimulatory effect on the type II collagen, aggrecan and TNFα expression when compared with the respective controls.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Enhances Expansion of Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells without Diminishing Their Immunosuppressive Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery J. Auletta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the main curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies. Its potential relies on graft-versus-tumor effects which associate with graft-versus-host disease. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs possess immunomodulatory properties that make them attractive therapeutic alternatives. We evaluated the in vitro immunosuppressive activity of medium conditioned by human MSCs from 5 donors expanded 13 passages with or without FGF-2. FGF-2 supplementation increased expansion 3,500- and 240,000-fold by passages 7 and 13, respectively. There were no differences in immunosuppressive activity between media conditioned by passage-matched cells expanded under different conditions, but media conditioned by FGF-treated MSCs were superior to population doubling-matched controls. The immunosuppressive activity was maintained in three of the preparations but decreased with expansion in two. The proliferation induced by FGF-2 did not result in loss of immunosuppressive activity. However, because the immunosuppressive activity was not consistently preserved, caution must be exercised to ensure that the activity of the cells is sufficient after extensive expansion.

  4. Allogeneic amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cell transplantation in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Amniotic membrane contains a multipotential stem cell population and is expected to possess the machinery to regulate immunological reactions. We investigated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (AMSC transplantation in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia as a preclinical trial. Methods. Porcine AMSCs were isolated from amniotic membranes obtained by cesarean section just before delivery and were cultured to increase their numbers before transplantation. Chronic myocardial ischemia was induced by implantation of an ameroid constrictor around the left circumflex coronary artery. Four weeks after ischemia induction, nine swine were assigned to undergo either allogeneic AMSC transplantation or normal saline injection. Functional analysis was performed by echocardiography, and histological examinations were carried out by immunohistochemistry 4 weeks after AMSC transplantation. Results. Echocardiography demonstrated that left ventricular ejection fraction was significantly improved and left ventricular dilatation was well attenuated 4 weeks after AMSC transplantation. Histological assessment showed a significant reduction in percentage of fibrosis in the AMSC transplantation group. Injected allogeneic green fluorescent protein (GFP-expressing AMSCs were identified in the immunocompetent host heart without the use of any immunosuppressants 4 weeks after transplantation. Immunohistochemistry revealed that GFP colocalized with cardiac troponin T and cardiac troponin I. Conclusions. We have demonstrated that allogeneic AMSC transplantation produced histological and functional improvement in the impaired myocardium in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia. The transplanted allogeneic AMSCs survived without the use of any immunosuppressants and gained cardiac phenotype through either their transdifferentiation or cell fusion.

  5. Development of a flow cytometry-based potency assay for measuring the in vitro immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Andreia; Ritter, Thomas; Griffin, Matthew; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-09-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) have well-documented modulatory effects on multiple immune cell types. Although these effects are linked to their therapeutic benefit in diverse diseases, a reliable, quantitative assay of the immunomodulatory potency of individual human MSC preparations is lacking. The aims of this study were to develop an optimised rapid turnaround, flow cytometry-based whole-blood assay to monitor MSC potency and to validate its application to MSC immunomodulation. A protocol for short-term LPS stimulation of anti-coagulated whole blood samples followed by combined surface CD45/CD14 and intracellular TNF-α staining was initially developed for analysis on a 4 colour desktop cytometer. Optimal monocyte activation was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium ions thereby precluding the use of EDTA and sodium citrate as anticoagulants. Optimal assay conditions proved to be 1ng/mL ultrapure-LPS added to 10-fold diluted, heparin anti-coagulated whole blood incubated for 6h at 37°C. Under these conditions, addition of human bone marrow-derived MSC (hBM-MSC) from multiple donors resulted in a reproducible, dose-dependent inhibition of LPS-stimulated monocyte TNF-α expression. We conclude that this protocol represents a practical, quantitative assay of a clinically relevant functional effect of hBM-MSCs as well as other immunomodulatory agents. PMID:27451032

  6. Gradients in pore size enhance the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in three-dimensional scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Luca, Andrea; Ostrowska, Barbara; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Lepedda, Antonio; Swieszkowski, Wojcech; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Small fractures in bone tissue can heal by themselves, but in case of larger defects current therapies are not completely successful due to several drawbacks. A possible strategy relies on the combination of additive manufactured polymeric scaffolds and human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). The architecture of bone tissue is characterized by a structural gradient. Long bones display a structural gradient in the radial direction, while flat bones in the axial direction. Such gradient presents a variation in bone density from the cancellous bone to the cortical bone. Therefore, scaffolds presenting a gradient in porosity could be ideal candidates to improve bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we present a construct with a discrete gradient in pore size and characterize its ability to further support the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Furthermore, we studied the behaviour of hMSCs within the different compartments of the gradient scaffolds, showing a correlation between osteogenic differentiation and ECM mineralization, and pore dimensions. Alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content increased with increasing pore dimensions. Our results indicate that designing structural porosity gradients may be an appealing strategy to support gradual osteogenic differentiation of adult stem cells.

  7. Xenogeneic Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Improve Wound Healing and Modulate the Immune Response in an Extensive Burn Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliari-Oliveira, Carolina; Yaochite, Juliana Navarro Ueda; Ramalho, Leandra Náira Zambelli; Palma, Patrícia Vianna Bonini; Carlos, Daniela; Cunha, Fernando de Queiróz; De Souza, Daurea Abadia; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Malmegrim, Kelen Cristina Ribeiro; Oliveira, Maria Carolina; Voltarelli, Julio César

    2016-01-01

    Major skin burns are difficult to treat. Patients often require special care and long-term hospitalization. Besides specific complications associated with the wounds themselves, there may be impairment of the immune system and of other organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a recent therapeutic alternative to treat burns, mainly aiming to accelerate the healing process. Several MSC properties favor their use as therapeutic approach, as they promote angiogenesis, stimulate regeneration, and enhance the immunoregulatory function. Moreover, since patients with extensive burns require urgent treatment and because the expansion of autologous MSCs is a time-consuming process, in this present study we chose to evaluate the therapeutic potential of xenogeneic MSCs in the treatment of severe burns in rats. MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow, expanded in vitro, and intradermally injected in the periphery of burn wounds. MSC-treated rats presented higher survival rates (76.19%) than control animals treated with PBS (60.86%, p injected GFP(+) MSCs progressively decreased over time, and 60 days after injection, few MSCs were still detected in the skin of treated animals. This study demonstrates the therapeutic effectiveness of intradermal application of MSCs in a rat model of deep burns, providing basis for future regenerative therapies in patients suffering from deep burn injuries. PMID:25955320

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Secreted Sphingosine 1-Phosphate (S1P) Exerts a Stimulatory Effect on Skeletal Myoblast Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Alessia; Anderloni, Giulia; Pierucci, Federica; Matteini, Francesca; Chellini, Flaminia; Zecchi Orlandini, Sandra; Meacci, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P), a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK), blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration. PMID:25264785

  9. Mesenchymal stromal cell secreted sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P exerts a stimulatory effect on skeletal myoblast proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Sassoli

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have the potential to significantly contribute to skeletal muscle healing through the secretion of paracrine factors that support proliferation and enhance participation of the endogenous muscle stem cells in the process of repair/regeneration. However, MSC-derived trophic molecules have been poorly characterized. The aim of this study was to investigate paracrine signaling effects of MSCs on skeletal myoblasts. It was found, using a biochemical and morphological approach that sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P, a natural bioactive lipid exerting a broad range of muscle cell responses, is secreted by MSCs and represents an important factor by which these cells exert their stimulatory effects on C2C12 myoblast and satellite cell proliferation. Indeed, exposure to conditioned medium obtained from MSCs cultured in the presence of the selective sphingosine kinase inhibitor (iSK, blocked increased cell proliferation caused by the conditioned medium from untreated MSCs, and the addition of exogenous S1P in the conditioned medium from MSCs pre-treated with iSK further increased myoblast proliferation. Finally, we also demonstrated that the myoblast response to MSC-secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF involves the release of S1P from C2C12 cells. Our data may have important implications in the optimization of cell-based strategies to promote skeletal muscle regeneration.

  10. Whole-Genome Expression Analysis and Signal Pathway Screening of Synovium-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synovium-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (SMSCs may play an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and show promise for therapeutic applications in RA. In this study, a whole-genome microarray analysis was used to detect differential gene expression in SMSCs from RA patients and healthy donors (HDs. Our results showed that there were 4828 differentially expressed genes in the RA group compared to the HD group; 3117 genes were upregulated, and 1711 genes were downregulated. A Gene Ontology analysis showed significantly enriched terms of differentially expressed genes in the biological process, cellular component, and molecular function domains. A Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes analysis showed that the MAPK signaling and rheumatoid arthritis pathways were upregulated and that the p53 signaling pathway was downregulated in RA SMSCs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was applied to verify the expression variations of the partial genes mentioned above, and a western blot analysis was used to determine the expression levels of p53, p-JNK, p-ERK, and p-p38. Our study found that differentially expressed genes in the MAPK signaling, rheumatoid arthritis, and p53 signaling pathways may help to explain the pathogenic mechanism of RA and lead to therapeutic RA SMSC applications.

  11. [The immune status changes in patients with inflammatory bowel disease under the influence of mesenchymal stromal cells and infliximab therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, L B; Sagynbaeva, V É; Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Efremov, L I; Guseĭnzade, M D; Ruchkina, I N; Konopliannikov, A G; Iakovleva, M V; Astrelina, T A

    2011-01-01

    Out of 28 patients with inflammatory bowel disease in 11 (39.3%) revealed the presence of autoantibodies to gastric parietal cells. Appointment of MSC and infliximab did not lead to a reduction in antibody levels, in fact, in 6 (21.4%) patients had a further increase in the content of mentioned autoantibodies. Identification of autoantibodies to gastric parietal cells is considered as adherence to IBD autoimmune gastritis (formation of a systemic process) that requires use of corticosteroids. Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells in IBD reduces enhanced circulation of autoantibodies against antigens of neutrophils cytoplasmic structures, thereby reducing the severity of autoimmune reactions. Transplantation of MSCs reduces autoaggression in patients with ulcerative colitis, reducing the autoreactive clone of B lymphocytes (CD19+CD5+). Analysis effectiveness of the therapy. Transplantation of MSCs in IBD has a systemic immunoregulatory effect: on the one hand, stimulates oppressed cytokine synthesis, on the other--reduses the intensity of the autoimmune reactions and activity of pathological processes. Infliximab selectively blocks TNF-alpha, without affecting other proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:22629769

  12. Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells display a novel interaction between P-selectin and galectin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suila, H; Hirvonen, T; Kotovuori, A; Ritamo, I; Kerkelä, E; Anderson, H; Natunen, S; Tuimala, J; Laitinen, S; Nystedt, J; Räbinä, J; Valmu, L

    2014-07-01

    Human multipotent mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to exert immunomodulatory properties that have great potential in therapies for various inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, intravenous delivery of these cells is followed by massive cell entrapment in the lungs and insufficient homing to target tissues or organs. In targeting to tissues, MSCs and other therapeutic cells employ similar mechanisms as leucocytes, including a cascade of rolling and adhesion steps mediated by selectins, integrins and their ligands. However, the mechanisms of MSCs homing are not well understood. We discovered that P-selectin (CD62P) binds to umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived MSCs independently of the previously known sialyl Lewis x (sLex)-containing ligands such as P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1, CD162). By biochemical assays, we identified galectin-1 as a novel ligand for P-selectin. Galectin-1 has previously been shown to be a key mediator of the immunosuppressive effects of human MSCs. We conclude that this novel interaction is likely to play a major role in the immunomodulatory targeting of human UCB-derived MSCs.

  13. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells precondition lung monocytes/macrophages to produce tolerance against allo- and autoimmunity in the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Hwa; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jeong, Hyun Jeong; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Yoon, Sun-Ok; Choi, Hosoon; Prockop, Darwin J; Oh, Joo Youn

    2016-01-01

    Intravenously administered mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) engraft only transiently in recipients, but confer long-term therapeutic benefits in patients with immune disorders. This suggests that MSCs induce immune tolerance by long-lasting effects on the recipient immune regulatory system. Here, we demonstrate that i.v. infusion of MSCs preconditioned lung monocytes/macrophages toward an immune regulatory phenotype in a TNF-α-stimulated gene/protein (TSG)-6-dependent manner. As a result, mice were protected against subsequent immune challenge in two models of allo- and autoimmune ocular inflammation: corneal allotransplantation and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). The monocytes/macrophages primed by MSCs expressed high levels of MHC class II, B220, CD11b, and IL-10, and exhibited T-cell-suppressive activities independently of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. Adoptive transfer of MSC-induced B220(+)CD11b(+) monocytes/macrophages prevented corneal allograft rejection and EAU. Deletion of monocytes/macrophages abrogated the MSC-induced tolerance. However, MSCs with TSG-6 knockdown did not induce MHC II(+)B220(+)CD11b(+) cells, and failed to attenuate EAU. Therefore, the results demonstrate a mechanism of the MSC-mediated immune modulation through induction of innate immune tolerance that involves monocytes/macrophages.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Linked Delivery of Oncolytic and Apoptotic Adenoviruses to Non-small-cell Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyos, Valentina; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Yagyu, Shigeki; Ando, Miki; Dotti, Gianpietro; Suzuki, Masataka; Bouchier-Hayes, Lisa; Alemany, Ramon; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-09-01

    Oncolytic adenoviruses (OAdV) represent a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Despite their activity in preclinical models, to date the clinical efficacy remains confined to minor responses after intratumor injection. To overcome these limitations, we developed an alternative approach using the combination of the OAdv ICOVIR15 with a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying the suicide gene of inducible Caspase 9 (Ad.iC9), both of which are delivered by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). We hypothesized that coinfection with ICOVIR15 and Ad.iC9 would allow MSCs to replicate both vectors and deliver two distinct types of antitumor therapy to the tumor, amplifying the cytotoxic effects of the two viruses, in a non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) model. We showed that MSCs can replicate and release both vectors, enabling significant transduction of the iC9 gene in tumor cells. In the in vivo model using human NSCLC xenografts, MSCs homed to lung tumors where they released both viruses. The activation of iC9 by the chemical inducer of dimerization (CID) significantly enhanced the antitumor activity of the ICOVIR15, increasing the tumor control and translating into improved overall survival of tumor-bearing mice. These data support the use of this innovative approach for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26084970

  15. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for the Prophylaxis of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease—A Phase II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa A. Kuzmina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy and the safety of the administration of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MMSCs for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD prophylaxis following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HSCT were studied. This prospective clinical trial was based on the random patient allocation to the following two groups receiving (1 standard GVHD prophylaxis and (2 standard GVHD prophylaxis combined with MMSCs infusion. Bone marrow MMSCs from hematopoietic stem cell donors were cultured and administered to the recipients at doses of 0.9–1.3×106/kg when the blood counts indicated recovery. aGVHD of stage II–IV developed in 38.9% and 5.3% of patients in group 1 and group 2, respectively, (=0.002. There were no differences in the graft rejection rates, chronic GVHD development, or infectious complications. Overall mortality was 16.7% for patients in group 1 and 5.3% for patients in group 2. The efficacy and the safety of MMSC administration for aGVHD prophylaxis were demonstrated in this study.

  16. Fibronectin-Alginate microcapsules improve cell viability and protein secretion of encapsulated Factor IX-engineered human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Continuous delivery of proteins by engineered cells encapsu-lated in biocompatible polymeric microcapsules is of considerable therapeutic potential. However, this technology has not lived up to expectations due to inadequate cell--matrix interactions and subsequent cell death. In this study we hypoth-esize that the presence of fibronectin in an alginate matrix may enhance the viability and functionality of encapsulated human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) expressing the human Factor IX (FIX) gene. MSCs were encapsulated in alginate-PLL microcapsules containing 10, 100, or 500 μg/ml fibronectin to ameliorate cell survival. MSCs in microcapsules with 100 and 500 μg/ml fibronectin demonstrated improved cell viability and proliferation and higher FIX secretion compared to MSCs in non-supplemented microcapsules. In contrast, 10 μg/ml fibronectin did not significantly affect the viability and protein secretion from the encapsulated cells. Differentiation studies demonstrated osteogenic (but not chondrogenic or adipogenic) differentiation capability and efficient FIX secretion of the enclosed MSCs in the fibronectin-alginate suspension culture. Thus, the use of recombinant MSCs encapsulated in fibronectin-alginate microcapsules in basal or osteogenic cultures may be of practical use in the treatment of hemophilia B. PMID:24564349

  17. Decreased SIRT3 in aged human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Shao, Yong; Ma, Chong-Yi; Chen, Wei; Sun, Lu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yang; Fu, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Kai-Yu; Jia, Zhi-Bo; Xie, Bao-Dong; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Li, Ren-Ke; Tian, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized to mitochondria and linked to lifespan extension in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. As aged cells have less regenerative capacity and are more susceptible to oxidative stress, we investigated the effect of ageing on SIRT3 levels and its correlation with antioxidant enzyme activities. Here, we show that severe oxidative stress reduces SIRT3 levels in young human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Overexpression of SIRT3 improved hMSCs resistance to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. By activating manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT), SIRT3 protects hMSCs from apoptosis under stress. SIRT3 expression, levels of MnSOD and CAT, as well as cell survival showed little difference in old versus young hMSCs under normal growth conditions, whereas older cells had a significantly reduced capacity to withstand oxidative stress compared to their younger counterparts. Expression of the short 28 kD SIRT3 isoform was higher, while the long 44 kD isoform expression was lower in young myocardial tissues compared with older ones. These results suggest that the active short isoform of SIRT3 protects hMSCs from oxidative injury by increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of this short isoform decreases in cardiac tissue during ageing, leading to a reduced capacity for the heart to withstand oxidative stress. PMID:25210848

  18. Fetal mesenchymal stromal cells differentiating towards chondrocytes acquire a gene expression profile resembling human growth plate cartilage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy A van Gool

    Full Text Available We used human fetal bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hfMSCs differentiating towards chondrocytes as an alternative model for the human growth plate (GP. Our aims were to study gene expression patterns associated with chondrogenic differentiation to assess whether chondrocytes derived from hfMSCs are a suitable model for studying the development and maturation of the GP. hfMSCs efficiently formed hyaline cartilage in a pellet culture in the presence of TGFβ3 and BMP6. Microarray and principal component analysis were applied to study gene expression profiles during chondrogenic differentiation. A set of 232 genes was found to correlate with in vitro cartilage formation. Several identified genes are known to be involved in cartilage formation and validate the robustness of the differentiating hfMSC model. KEGG pathway analysis using the 232 genes revealed 9 significant signaling pathways correlated with cartilage formation. To determine the progression of growth plate cartilage formation, we compared the gene expression profile of differentiating hfMSCs with previously established expression profiles of epiphyseal GP cartilage. As differentiation towards chondrocytes proceeds, hfMSCs gradually obtain a gene expression profile resembling epiphyseal GP cartilage. We visualized the differences in gene expression profiles as protein interaction clusters and identified many protein clusters that are activated during the early chondrogenic differentiation of hfMSCs showing the potential of this system to study GP development.

  19. Effects of a ceramic biomaterial on immune modulatory properties and differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stromal cells of different origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Giulio; Guilloton, Fabien; Menard, Cedric; Di Trapani, Mariano; Deschaseaux, Frederic; Sensebé, Luc; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Giordano, Rosaria; Bourin, Philippe; Dominici, Massimo; Tarte, Karin; Krampera, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the immune modulatory properties of human mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), fat (ASCs), and cord blood (CB-MSCs) in the presence of a hydroxyapatite and tricalcium-phosphate (HA/TCP) biomaterial as a scaffold for MSC delivery. In resting conditions, a short-term culture with HA/TCP did not modulate the anti-apoptotic and suppressive features of the various MSC types toward T, B, and NK cells; in addition, when primed with inflammatory cytokines, MSCs similarly increased their suppressive capacities in the presence or absence of HA/TCP. The long-term culture of BM-MSCs with HA/TCP induced an osteoblast-like phenotype with upregulation of OSTERIX and OSTEOCALCIN, similar to what was obtained with dexamethasone and, to a higher extent, with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatment. MSC-derived osteoblasts did not trigger immune cell activation, but were less efficient than undifferentiated MSCs in inhibiting stimulated T and NK cells. Interestingly, their suppressive machinery included not only the activation of indoleamine-2,3 dioxygenase (IDO), which plays a central role in T-cell inhibition, but also cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) that was not significantly involved in the immune modulatory effect of human undifferentiated MSCs. Since COX-2 is significantly involved in bone healing, its induction by HA/TCP could also contribute to the therapeutic activity of MSCs for bone tissue engineering.

  20. Hospicells (ascites-derived stromal cells) promote tumorigenicity and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Marlene; Golzio, Muriel; Mery, Eliane; Rafii, Arash; Benabbou, Nadia; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Allal, Ben; Teissie, Justin; Mirshahi, Massoud; Couderc, Bettina

    2010-05-01

    The microenvironment is known to play a dominant role in cancer progression. Cells closely associated with tumoral cells, named hospicells, have been recently isolated from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients. Whilst these cells present no specific markers from known cell lineages, they do share some homology with bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166, HLA-1). We studied the role of hospicells in ovarian carcinoma progression. In vitro, these cells had no effect on the growth of human ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3, SKOV-1 and IGROV-1. In vivo, their co-injection with adenocarcinoma cells enhanced tumor growth whatever the tumor model used (subcutaneous and intraperitoneally established xenografts in athymic mice). In addition, their injection increased the development of ascites in tumor-bearing mice. Fluorescent macroscopy revealed an association between hospicells and ovarian adenocarcinoma cells within the tumor mass. Tumors obtained by coinjection of hospicells and human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells presented an increased microvascularization indicating that the hospicells could promote tumorigenicity of ovarian tumor cells in vivovia their action on angiogenesis. This effect on angiogenesis could be attributed to the increased HIF1alpha and VEGF expression associated with the presence of the hospicells. Collectively, these data indicate a role for these ascite-derived stromal cells in promoting tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis.

  1. A xenogeneic-free bioreactor system for the clinical-scale expansion of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Francisco; Campbell, Andrew; Fernandes-Platzgummer, Ana; Andrade, Pedro Z; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Wen, Yuan; Boucher, Shayne; Vemuri, Mohan C; da Silva, Cláudia L; Cabral, Joaquim M S

    2014-06-01

    The large cell doses (>1 × 10(6)  cells/kg) used in clinical trials with mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) will require an efficient production process. Moreover, monitoring and control of MSC ex-vivo expansion is critical to provide a safe and reliable cell product. Bioprocess engineering approaches, such as bioreactor technology, offer the adequate tools to develop and optimize a cost-effective culture system for the rapid expansion of human MSC for cellular therapy. Herein, a xenogeneic (xeno)-free microcarrier-based culture system was successfully established for bone marrow (BM) MSC and adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cell (ASC) cultivation using a 1L-scale controlled stirred-tank bioreactor, allowing the production of (1.1 ± 0.1) × 10(8) and (4.5 ± 0.2) × 10(7) cells for BM MSC and ASC, respectively, after 7 days. Additionally, the effect of different percent air saturation values (%Airsat ) and feeding regime on the proliferation and metabolism of BM MSC was evaluated. No significant differences in cell growth and metabolic patterns were observed under 20% and 9%Airsat . Also, the three different feeding regimes studied-(i) 25% daily medium renewal, (ii) 25% medium renewal every 2 days, and (iii) fed-batch addition of concentrated nutrients and growth factors every 2 days-yielded similar cell numbers, and only slight metabolic differences were observed. Moreover, the immunophenotype (positive for CD73, CD90 and CD105 and negative for CD31, CD80 and HLA-DR) and multilineage differentiative potential of expanded cells were not affected upon bioreactor culture. These results demonstrated the feasibility of expanding human MSC from different sources in a clinically relevant expansion configuration in a controlled microcarrier-based stirred culture system under xeno-free conditions. The further optimization of this bioreactor culture system will represent a crucial step towards an efficient GMP-compliant clinical-scale MSC

  2. Mesenchymal stromal cells in the development and therapy of bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Marius A; Rüdiger, Mario

    2016-12-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), the chronic lung disease of prematurity, remains a major healthcare burden. Despite great progresses in perinatal medicine over the past decades, no cure for BPD has been found. The complex pathophysiology of the disease further hampers the development of effective treatment strategies, but recent insights into the biology of mesenchymal stem (MSCs) and progenitor cells in lung development and disease have ignited the hope of preventing or even treating BPD. The promising results of pre-clinical studies have lead to the first early phase clinical trials. However, these treatments are experimental and much more needs to be learned about the mechanism of action and manufacturing of MSCs. In this mini review, we briefly summarize the role of resident and exogenous MSCs in the development and treatment of BPD. PMID:27142639

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in liver disease: opportunities and lessons to be learnt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Andrew; Newsome, Philip N

    2015-11-15

    End-stage liver disease is responsible for 30,000 deaths per year in the United States alone, and it is continuing to increase every year. With liver transplantation the only curative treatment currently available, new therapies are in great demand. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) offer an opportunity to both treat liver inflammatory damage, as well as reverse some of the changes that occur following chronic liver injury. With the ability to regulate both the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as both inhibit and promote apoptosis of effector inflammatory cells, there are numerous therapeutic opportunities for MSC in acute and chronic liver disease. This article critically appraises the potential therapeutic roles of MSC in liver disease, as well as the barriers to their adoption into clinical practice. PMID:26316587

  4. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W;

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...... differentiation. Interestingly, undifferentiated cells revealed a sole cytoplasmic distribution pattern of Collagen VI, which however changed to an extracellular matrix appearance upon osteogenic- and adipogenic differentiation. In relation to this, we found that STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(-) sorted hMSC contained...... fewer differentiated alkaline phosphatase(+) cells compared to STRO-1(+/-)/Collagen VI(+) hMSC, suggesting that Collagen VI on the cell membrane exclusively defines differentiated MSCs. In conclusion, we have generated a panel of high quality antibodies to be used for characterization of MSCs, and in...

  5. In vitro differentiation of human umbilical cord Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stromal cells to insulin producing clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekoei, Seideh Masoomeh; Azarpira, Negar; Sadeghi, Ladan; Kamalifar, Sulmaz

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the differentiation of human Wharton’s jelly derived mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ-MSCs) to insulin producing clusters (IPC) this study was conducted. METHODS: The umbilical cords samples were collected from full term caesarian section mothers and the WJ-MSCS were cultured from tissue explants in High glucose-Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (H-DMEM); H-DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) and antibiotics. The expression of CD90, CD44, CD105, CD34 and CD133 as well as osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of cells in appropriate medium were also evaluated. The cells were differentiated toward IPC with changing the culture medium and adding the small molecules such as nicotinic acid, epidermal growth factor, and exendin-4 during 3 wk period. The gene expression of PDX1, NGN3, Glut2, insulin was monitored by reveres transcription polymerase chain reaction method. The differentiated clusters were stained with Dithizone (DTZ) which confirms the presence of insulin granules. The insulin challenge test (low and high glucose concentration in Krebs-Ringer HEPES buffer) was also used to evaluate the functional properties of differentiated clusters. RESULTS: WJ-MSCS were positive for mesenchymal surface markers (CD90, CD44, CD105), and negative for CD34 and CD133. The accumulation of lipid vacuoles and deposition of calcium mineral in cells were considered as adipogenic and osteogenic potential of WJ-MSCS. The cells also expressed the transcriptional factors such as Nanog and OCT4. During this three step differentiation, the WJ-MSCS morphology was gradually changed from spindle shaped cells in to epithelioid cells and eventually to three dimensional clusters. The clusters expressed PDX1, NGN3, Glut2, and insulin. The cells became bright red color when stained with DTZ and the insulin secretion was also confirmed. In glucose challenge test a significant increase in insulin secretion from 0.91 ± 0.04 μIu/mL (2.8 mmol/L glucose) to

  6. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzobo, Kevin; Turnley, Taegyn; Wishart, Andrew; Rowe, Arielle; Kallmeyer, Karlien; van Vollenstee, Fiona A; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Chopera, Denis; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell-matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs) in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM) did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4), SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures. PMID:27527147

  7. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7+ satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration

  8. Defining the role of mesenchymal stromal cells on the regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in skeletal muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassoli, Chiara; Nosi, Daniele; Tani, Alessia; Chellini, Flaminia [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Mazzanti, Benedetta [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Haematology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-National Institute of Optics (INO), Largo Enrico Fermi 6, 50125 Arcetri-Florence (Italy); Zecchi-Orlandini, Sandra [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy); Formigli, Lucia, E-mail: formigli@unifi.it [Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine—Section of Anatomy and Histology, University of Florence, Largo Brambilla, 3, 50134, Florence (Italy)

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies indicate that mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation improves healing of injured and diseased skeletal muscle, although the mechanisms of benefit are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether MSCs and/or their trophic factors were able to regulate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression and activity in different cells of the muscle tissue. MSCs in co-culture with C2C12 cells or their conditioned medium (MSC-CM) up-regulated MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and function in the myoblastic cells; these effects were concomitant with the down-regulation of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP)-1 and -2 and with increased cell motility. In the single muscle fiber experiments, MSC-CM administration increased MMP-2/9 expression in Pax-7{sup +} satellite cells and stimulated their mobilization, differentiation and fusion. The anti-fibrotic properties of MSC-CM involved also the regulation of MMPs by skeletal fibroblasts and the inhibition of their differentiation into myofibroblasts. The treatment with SB-3CT, a potent MMP inhibitor, prevented in these cells, the decrease of α-smooth actin and type-I collagen expression induced by MSC-CM, suggesting that MSC-CM could attenuate the fibrogenic response through mechanisms mediated by MMPs. Our results indicate that growth factors and cytokines released by these cells may modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle repair/regeneration. - Highlights: • MSC-CM contains paracrine factors that up-regulate MMP expression and function in different skeletal muscle cells. • MSC-CM promotes myoblast and satellite cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. • MSC-CM negatively interferes with fibroblast-myoblast transition in primary skeletal fibroblasts. • Paracrine factors from MSCs modulate the fibrotic response and improve the endogenous mechanisms of muscle regeneration.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived From a Reproductive Tissue Niche Under Oxidative Stress Have High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Gina D; Abumaree, Mohamed H; Pertile, Mark D; Perkins, Anthony V; Brennecke, Shaun P; Kalionis, Bill

    2016-06-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) in regenerative medicine often requires MSC to function in environments of high oxidative stress. Human pregnancy is a condition where the mother's tissues, and in particular her circulatory system, are exposed to increased levels of oxidative stress. MSC in the maternal decidua basalis (DMSC) are in a vascular niche, and thus would be exposed to oxidative stress products in the maternal circulation. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a large family of enzymes which detoxify aldehydes and thereby protect stem cells against oxidative damage. A subpopulation of MSC express high levels of ALDH (ALDH(br)) and these are more potent in repairing and regenerating tissues. DMSC was compared with chorionic villous MSC (CMSC) derived from the human placenta. CMSC reside in vascular niche and are exposed to the fetal circulation, which is in lower oxidative state. We screened an ALDH isozyme cDNA array and determined that relative to CMSC, DMSC expressed high levels of ALDH1 family members, predominantly ALDH1A1. Immunocytochemistry gave qualitative confirmation at the protein level. Immunofluorescence detected ALDH1 immunoreactivity in the DMSC and CMSC vascular niche. The percentage of ALDH(br) cells was calculated by Aldefluor assay and DMSC showed a significantly higher percentage of ALDH(br) cells than CMSC. Finally, flow sorted ALDH(br) cells were functionally potent in colony forming unit assays. DMSC, which are derived from pregnancy tissues that are naturally exposed to high levels of oxidative stress, may be better candidates for regenerative therapies where MSC must function in high oxidative stress environments. PMID:26880140

  10. Changes in autophagy, proteasome activity and metabolism to determine a specific signature for acute and chronic senescent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Stefania; Alessio, Nicola; Squillaro, Tiziana; Di Bernardo, Giovanni; Melone, Mariarosa A; Cipollaro, Marilena; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2015-11-24

    A sharp definition of what a senescent cell is still lacking since we do not have in depth understanding of mechanisms that induce cellular senescence. In addition, senescent cells are heterogeneous, in that not all of them express the same genes and present the same phenotype. To further clarify the classification of senescent cells, hints may be derived by the study of cellular metabolism, autophagy and proteasome activity. In this scenario, we decided to study these biological features in senescence of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC). These cells contain a subpopulation of stem cells that are able to differentiate in mesodermal derivatives (adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes). In addition, they can also contribute to the homeostatic maintenance of many organs, hence, their senescence could be very deleterious for human body functions. We induced MSC senescence by oxidative stress, doxorubicin treatment, X-ray irradiation and replicative exhaustion. The first three are considered inducers of acute senescence while extensive proliferation triggers replicative senescence also named as chronic senescence. In all conditions, but replicative and high IR dose senescence, we detected a reduction of the autophagic flux, while proteasome activity was impaired in peroxide-treated and irradiated cells. Differences were observed also in metabolic status. In general, all senescent cells evidenced metabolic inflexibility and prefer to use glucose as energy fuel. Irradiated cells with low dose of X-ray and replicative senescent cells show a residual capacity to use fatty acids and glutamine as alternative fuels, respectively. Our study may be useful to discriminate among different senescent phenotypes. PMID:26540573

  11. Human adipose derived mesenchymal stromal cells transduced with GFP lentiviral vectors: assessment of immunophenotype and differentiation capacity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vollenstee, Fiona A; Jackson, Carlo; Hoffmann, Danie; Potgieter, Marnie; Durandt, Chrisna; Pepper, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    Adipose derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (ASCs) are a heterogeneous population characterized by (a) their ability to adhere to plastic; (b) immunophenotypic expression of certain cell surface markers, while lacking others; and (c) the capacity to differentiate into lineages of mesodermal origin including osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The long-term goal is to utilize these cells for clinical translation into cell-based therapies. However, preclinical safety and efficacy need to be demonstrated in animal models. ASCs can also be utilized as biological vehicles for vector-based gene delivery systems, since they are believed to home to sites of inflammation and infection in vivo. These factors motivated the development of a labelling system for ASCs using lentiviral vector-based green fluorescent protein (GFP) transduction. Human ASCs were transduced with GFP-expressing lentiviral vectors. A titration study determined the viral titer required to transduce the maximum number of ASCs. The effect of the transduced GFP lentiviral vector on ASC immunophenotypic expression of surface markers as well as their ability to differentiate into osteocytes and adipocytes were assessed in vitro. A transduction efficiency in ASC cultures of approximately 80 % was observed with an MOI of ~118. No significant immunophenotypic differences were observed between transduced and non-transduced cells and both cell types successfully differentiated into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. We obtained >80 % transduction of ASCs using GFP lentiviral vectors. Transduced ASCs maintained plastic adherence, demonstrated ASC immunophenotype and the ability to differentiate into cells of the mesodermal lineage. This GFP-ASC transduction technique offers a potential tracking system for future pre-clinical studies.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells mediate Aspergillus hyphal extract-induced allergic airway inflammation by inhibition of the Th17 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J; Brooks, Elice M; Bonenfant, Nick R; Sokocevic, Dino; Borg, Zachary D; Goodwin, Meagan; Loi, Roberto; Cruz, Fernanda; Dunaway, Chad W; Steele, Chad; Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Systemic administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppresses airway inflammation and methacholine-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in mouse models of T helper cell (Th) type 2-mediated eosinophilic allergic airway inflammation (AAI); however, the efficacy of MSCs in mouse models of severe Th17-mediated neutrophilic AAI has not yet been demonstrated. We assessed MSC effects in a mouse model of mixed Th2/Th17 AAI produced by mucosal exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus hyphal extract (AHE). Following sensitization produced by oropharyngeal AHE administration, systemic (tail vein) administration of syngeneic MSCs on the first day of challenge significantly reduced acute AHR predominantly through reduction of Th17-mediated airway inflammation. In parallel experiments, MSCs also mitigated AHR when administered during recurrent challenge 10 weeks after initial sensitization and challenge through reduction in systemic Th17-mediated inflammation. Investigation into potential mechanistic actions of MSCs in this model demonstrated that although T regulatory cells were increased in all AHE-treated mice, MSC administration did not alter T regulatory cell numbers in either the acute or recurrent model. Differential induction of interleukin-17a secretion was observed in ex vivo restimulation of mediastinal lymph node mixed-cell cytokine analyses. Although the mechanisms by which MSCs act to decrease inflammation and AHR in this model are not yet fully elucidated, decrease in Th17-mediated airway inflammation appears to play a significant role. These results provide a basis for further investigations of MSC administration as a potential therapeutic approach for severe refractory neutrophilic asthma. PMID:24436442

  13. Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Induces Chondrogenic Differentiation in Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs represent an area being intensively researched for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. MSCs may provide the opportunity to treat diseases and injuries that currently have limited therapeutic options, as well as enhance present strategies for tissue repair. The cellular environment has a significant role in cellular development and differentiation through cell–matrix interactions. The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of adipose-derived MSCs (ad-MSCs in the context of a cell-derived matrix so as to model the in vivo physiological microenvironment. The fibroblast-derived extracellular matrix (fd-ECM did not affect ad-MSC morphology, but reduced ad-MSC proliferation. Ad-MSCs cultured on fd-ECM displayed decreased expression of integrins α2 and β1 and subsequently lost their multipotency over time, as shown by the decrease in CD44, Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG gene expression. The fd-ECM induced chondrogenic differentiation in ad-MSCs compared to control ad-MSCs. Loss of function studies, through the use of siRNA and a mutant Notch1 construct, revealed that ECM-mediated ad-MSCs chondrogenesis requires Notch1 and β-catenin signaling. The fd-ECM also showed anti-senescence effects on ad-MSCs. The fd-ECM is a promising approach for inducing chondrogenesis in ad-MSCs and chondrogenic differentiated ad-MSCs could be used in stem cell therapy procedures.

  14. Structurally-diverse, PPARγ-activating environmental toxicants induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental obesogens are a newly recognized category of endocrine disrupting chemicals that have been implicated in contributing to the rising rates of obesity in the United States. While obesity is typically regarded as an increase in visceral fat, adipocyte accumulation in the bone has been linked to increased fracture risk, lower bone density, and osteoporosis. Exposure to environmental toxicants that activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a critical regulator of the balance of differentiation between adipogenesis and osteogenesis, may contribute to the increasing prevalence of osteoporosis. However, induction of adipogenesis and suppression of osteogenesis are separable activities of PPARγ, and ligands may selectively alter these activities. It currently is unknown whether suppression of osteogenesis is a common toxic endpoint of environmental PPARγ ligands. Using a primary mouse bone marrow culture model, we tested the hypothesis that environmental toxicants acting as PPARγ agonists divert the differentiation pathway of bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells towards adipogenesis and away from osteogenesis. The toxicants tested included the organotins tributyltin and triphenyltin, a ubiquitous phthalate metabolite (mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, MEHP), and two brominated flame retardants (tetrabromobisphenol-a, TBBPA, and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, METBP). All of the compounds activated PPARγ1 and 2. All compounds increased adipogenesis (lipid accumulation, Fabp4 expression) and suppressed osteogenesis (alkaline phosphatase activity, Osx expression) in mouse primary bone marrow cultures, but with different potencies and efficacies. Despite structural dissimilarities, there was a strong negative correlation between efficacies to induce adipogenesis and suppress osteogenesis, with the organotins being distinct in their exceptional ability to suppress osteogenesis. As human exposure to a mixture of

  15. Accumulation of apoptosis-insensitive human bone marrow-mesenchymal stromal cells after long-term expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sin-Gu; Cho, Goang-Won

    2016-07-01

    Cells undergo replicative senescence during in vitro expansion, which is induced by the accumulation of cellular damage caused by excessive reactive oxygen species. In this study, we investigated whether long-term-cultured human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are insensitive to apoptotic stimulation. To examine this, we established replicative senescent cells from long-term cultures of human bone marrow MSCs. Senescent cells were identified based on declining population doublings, increased expression of senescence markers p16 and p53 and increased senescence-associated β-gal activity. In cell viability assays, replicative senescent MSCs in late passages (i.e. 15-19 passages) resisted damage induced by oxidative stress more than those in early passages did (i.e. 7-10 passages). This resistance occurred via caspase-9 and caspase-3 rather than via caspase-8. The senescent cells are gradually accumulated during long-term expansion. The oxidative stress-sensitive proteins ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and p53 were phosphorylated, and the expression of apoptosis molecules Bax increased, and Bcl-2 decreased in early passage MSCs; however, the expression of the apoptotic molecules did less change in response to apoptotic stimulation in late-passage MSCs, suggesting that the intrinsic apoptotic signalling pathway was not induced by oxidative stress in long-term-cultured MSCs. Based on these results, we propose that some replicative senescent cells may avoid apoptosis signalling via impairment of signalling molecules and accumulation during long-term expansion. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27212655

  16. Role of PTHrP(1-34) Pulse Frequency Versus Pulse Duration to Enhance Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Ortel, Marlen; Hagmann, Sebastien; Hoeflich, Andreas; Richter, Wiltrud

    2016-12-01

    Generation of phenotypically stable, articular chondrocytes from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is still an unaccomplished task, with formation of abundant, hyaline extracellular matrix, and avoidance of hypertrophy being prime challenges. We recently demonstrated that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a promising factor to direct chondrogenesis of MSCs towards an articular phenotype, since intermittent PTHrP application stimulated cartilage matrix production and reduced undesired hypertrophy. We here investigated the role of frequency, pulse duration, total exposure time, and underlying mechanisms in order to unlock the full potential of PTHrP actions. Human MSC subjected to in vitro chondrogenesis for six weeks were exposed to 2.5 nM PTHrP(1-34) pulses from days 7 to 42. Application frequency was increased from three times weekly (3 × 6 h/week) to daily maintaining either the duration of individual pulses (6 h/day) or total exposure time (18 h/week; 2.6 h/day). Daily PTHrP treatment significantly increased extracellular matrix deposition regardless of pulse duration and suppressed alkaline-phosphatase activity by 87%. High total exposure time significantly reduced cell proliferation at day 14. Pulse duration was critically important to significantly reduce IHH expression, but irrelevant for PTHrP-induced suppression of the hypertrophic markers MEF2C and IBSP. COL10A1, RUNX2, and MMP13 expression remained unaltered. Decreased IGFBP-2, -3, and -6 expression suggested modulated IGF-I availability in PTHrP groups, while drop of SOX9 protein levels during the PTHrP-pulse may delay chondroblast formation and hypertrophy. Overall, the significantly optimized timing of PTHrP-pulses demonstrated a vast potential to enhance chondrogenesis of MSC and suppress hypertrophy possibly via superior balancing of IGF- and SOX9-related mechanisms. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2673-2681, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27548511

  17. Optimal labeling dose, labeling time, and magnetic resonance imaging detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle labeled mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Hansen, Louise; Friis, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron......-oxide (USPIO) labeled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Materials and Methods. 248 gel-phantoms were constructed and scanned on a 1.5T MRI-scanner. Phantoms contained human MSCs preincubated with USPIO nanoparticles for 2, 6, or 21 hours using 5 or 10  μ g USPIO/10(5) MSCs. In addition, porcine hearts were...

  18. Toxicity and oxidative stress of canine mesenchymal stromal cells from adipose tissue in different culture passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arícia Gomes Sprada

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Stem cells in regenerative therapy have received attention from researchers in recent decades. The culture of these cells allows studies about their behavior and metabolism. Thus, cell culture is the basis for cell therapy and tissue engineering researches. A major concern regarding the use of cultivated stem cell in human or veterinary clinical routine is the risk of carcinogenesis. Cellular activities require a balanced redox state. However, when there is an imbalance in this state, oxidative stress occurs. Oxidative stress contributes to cytotoxicity, which may result in cell death or genomic alterations, favoring the development of cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether there are differences in the behavior of cultured mesenchymal stem cells from canine adipose tissue according to its site of collection (omentum and subcutaneous evaluating the rate of proliferation, viability, level of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity over six passages. For this experiment, two samples of adipose tissue from subcutaneous and omentum where taken from a female dog corpse, 13 years old, Pitbull. The results showed greater levels of oxidative stress in the first and last passages of both groups, favoring cytotoxicity and cell death.

  19. Macrophage phagocytosis alters the MRI signal of ferumoxytol-labeled mesenchymal stromal cells in cartilage defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejadnik, Hossein; Lenkov, Olga; Gassert, Florian; Fretwell, Deborah; Lam, Isaac; Daldrup-Link, Heike E.

    2016-05-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are a promising tool for cartilage regeneration in arthritic joints. hMSC labeling with iron oxide nanoparticles enables non-invasive in vivo monitoring of transplanted cells in cartilage defects with MR imaging. Since graft failure leads to macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo whether nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs show distinct MR signal characteristics before and after phagocytosis by macrophages. We found that apoptotic nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were phagocytosed by macrophages while viable nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs were not. Serial MRI scans of hMSC transplants in arthritic joints of recipient rats showed that the iron signal of apoptotic, nanoparticle-labeled hMSCs engulfed by macrophages disappeared faster compared to viable hMSCs. This corresponded to poor cartilage repair outcomes of the apoptotic hMSC transplants. Therefore, rapid decline of iron MRI signal at the transplant site can indicate cell death and predict incomplete defect repair weeks later. Currently, hMSC graft failure can be only diagnosed by lack of cartilage defect repair several months after cell transplantation. The described imaging signs can diagnose hMSC transplant failure more readily, which could enable timely re-interventions and avoid unnecessary follow up studies of lost transplants.

  20. Gene expression pattern of functional neuronal cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

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    Bron Dominique

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal tissue has limited potential to self-renew or repair after neurological diseases. Cellular therapies using stem cells are promising approaches for the treatment of neurological diseases. However, the clinical use of embryonic stem cells or foetal tissues is limited by ethical considerations and other scientific problems. Thus, bone marrow mesenchymal stomal cells (BM-MSC could represent an alternative source of stem cells for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, many studies have demonstrated that MSC can give rise to neuronal cells as well as many tissue-specific cell phenotypes. Methods BM-MSC were differentiated in neuron-like cells under specific induction (NPBM + cAMP + IBMX + NGF + Insulin. By day ten, differentiated cells presented an expression profile of real neurons. Functionality of these differentiated cells was evaluated by calcium influx through glutamate receptor AMPA3. Results Using microarray analysis, we compared gene expression profile of these different samples, before and after neurogenic differentiation. Among the 1943 genes differentially expressed, genes down-regulated are involved in osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, adipogenesis, myogenesis and extracellular matrix component (tuftelin, AGC1, FADS3, tropomyosin, fibronectin, ECM2, HAPLN1, vimentin. Interestingly, genes implicated in neurogenesis are increased. Most of them are involved in the synaptic transmission and long term potentialisation as cortactin, CASK, SYNCRIP, SYNTL4 and STX1. Other genes are involved in neurite outgrowth, early neuronal cell development, neuropeptide signaling/synthesis and neuronal receptor (FK506, ARHGAP6, CDKRAP2, PMCH, GFPT2, GRIA3, MCT6, BDNF, PENK, amphiregulin, neurofilament 3, Epha4, synaptotagmin. Using real time RT-PCR, we confirmed the expression of selected neuronal genes: NEGR1, GRIA3 (AMPA3, NEF3, PENK and Epha4. Functionality of these neuron-like cells was demonstrated by Ca2+ influx through glutamate

  1. Hypoxic culture conditions for Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Wharton's jelly: a critical parameter to consider in a therapeutic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppel, Loic; Margossian, Talar; Yaghi, Layale; Moreau, Philippe; Mercier, Nathalie; Leger, Leonore; Hupont, Sebastien; Stoltz, Jean-Francois; Bensoussan, Daniele; Huselstein, Celine

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from human Wharton's jelly (WJ-MSC) are an abundant and interesting source of stem cells for applications in cell and tissue engineering. Their fetal origin confers specific characteristics compared to Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells isolated from human bone marrow (BM-MSC). The aim of this work was to optimize WJ-MSC culture conditions for their subsequent clinical use. We focused on the influence of oxygen concentration during monolayer expansion on several parameters to characterize MSC. Our work distinguished WJ-MSC from BM-MSC in terms of proliferation, telomerase activity and adipogenic differentiation. We also showed that hypoxia had a beneficial effect on proliferation potential, clonogenic capacity and to a lesser extent, on HLA-G expression of WJ-MSC during their expansion. Moreover, we reported for the first time an increase in chondrogenic differentiation when WJ-MSC were expanded under hypoxia. In an allogeneic therapeutic context, production of clinical batches requires generating high numbers of MSC whilst maintaining the cells' properties. Considering our results, hypoxia will be an important parameter to take into account. In addition, the clinical use of WJ-MSC would provide significant numbers of cells with maintenance of their proliferation and differentiation potential, particularly their chondrogenic potential. Due to their chondrogenic differentiation potential, WJ-MSC promise to be an interesting source of MSC for cell therapy or tissue engineering for cartilage repair and/or regeneration.

  2. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  3. Induction of adult human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells into functional astrocyte-like cells: potential for restorative treatment in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat-Stroomza, Merav; Barhum, Yael; Levy, Yossef S; Karpov, Olga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Melamed, Eldad; Offen, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder with its motor phenomena due mostly to loss of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. Pharmacological treatments aimed to increase the deficient dopaminergic neurotransmission are effective in ameliorating the cardinal symptoms, but none of these therapies is curative. It has been suggested that treatment with neurotrophic factors (NTFs) might protect and prevent death of the surviving dopaminergic neurons and induce proliferation of their axonal nerve terminals with reinnervations of the deafferented striatum. However, long-term delivery of such proteins into the CNS is problematic. We therefore aimed to differentiate ex vivo human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells into astrocyte-like cells, capable of generating NTFs for future transplantation into basal ganglia of PD patients. Indeed, mesenchymal stromal cells treated with our novel astrocyte differentiation medium, present astrocyte-like morphology and express the astrocyte markers S100beta, glutamine synthetase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. Moreover, these astrocyte-like cells produce and secrete significant amounts of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor as indicated by messenger RNA, real-time polymerase chain reaction, ELISA, and Western blot analyses. Such NTF-producing cells transplanted into the striatum of 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, a model of PD, produced a progressive reduction in the apomorphine-induced contralateral rotations as well as behavioral improvement in rotor-rod and the "sunflower seeds" eating motor tests. Histological assessments revealed that the engrafted cells survived and expressed astrocyte and human markers and acted to regenerate the damaged dopaminergic nerve terminal system. Findings indicate that our novel procedure to induce NTF-producing astrocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow stromal cells

  4. The role of human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UCX® in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ECBio has developed proprietary technology to consistently isolate, expand and cryopreserve a well-characterized population of stromal cells from human umbilical cord tissue (UCX® cells. The technology has recently been optimized in order to become compliant with Advanced Medicine Therapeutic Products. In this work we report the immunosuppressive capacity of UCX® cells for treating induced autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Methods UCX® cells were isolated using a proprietary method (PCT/IB2008/054067 that yields a well-defined number of cells using a precise proportion between tissue digestion enzyme activity units, tissue mass, digestion solution volume and void volume. The procedure includes three recovery steps to avoid non-conformities related to cell recovery. UCX® surface markers were characterized by flow cytometry and UCX® capacity to expand in vitro and to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells was evaluated. Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR assays were performed to evaluate the effect of UCX® cells on T-cell activation and Treg conversion assays were also performed in vitro. Furthermore, UCX® cells were administered in vivo in both a rat acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model and rat chronic adjuvant induced arthritis model for arthritic inflammation. UCX® anti-inflammatory activity was then monitored over time. Results UCX® cells stained positive for CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105; and negative for CD14, CD19 CD31, CD34, CD45 and HLA-DR; and were capable to differentiate into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteoblast-like cells. UCX® cells were shown to repress T-cell activation and promote the expansion of Tregs better than bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs. Accordingly, xenogeneic UCX® administration in an acute carrageenan-induced arthritis model showed that human UCX® cells can reduce paw edema in vivo more efficiently than BM-MSCs. Finally, in a chronic adjuvant

  5. Platelet-rich concentrate in serum free medium enhances osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thamil Selvee; Karunanithi, Puvanan; Naveen, Sangeetha Vasudevaraj; Murali, Malliga Raman; Abbas, Azlina A.; Kamarul, Tunku

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that platelet concentrates used in conjunction with appropriate growth media enhance osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). However, their potential in inducing osteogenesis of hMSCs when cultured in serum free medium has not been explored. Furthermore, the resulting osteogenic molecular signatures of the hMSCs have not been compared to standard osteogenic medium. We studied the effect of infrequent supplementation (8-day interval) of 15% non-activated platelet-rich concentrate (PRC) in serum free medium on hMSCs proliferation and differentiation throughout a course of 24 days, and compared the effect with those cultured in a standard osteogenic medium (OM). Cell proliferation was analyzed by alamar blue assay. Gene expression of osteogenic markers (Runx2, Collagen1, Alkaline Phosphatase, Bone morphogenetic protein 2, Osteopontin, Osteocalcin, Osteonectin) were analyzed using Q-PCR. Immunocytochemical staining for osteocalcin, osteopontin and transcription factor Runx2 were done at 8, 16 and 24 days. Biochemical assays for the expression of ALP and osteocalcin were also performed at these time-points. Osteogenic differentiation was further confirmed qualitatively by Alizarin Red S staining that was quantified using cetylpyridinium chloride. Results showed that PRC supplemented in serum free medium enhanced hMSC proliferation, which peaked at day 16. The temporal pattern of gene expression of hMSCs under the influence of PRC was comparable to that of the osteogenic media, but at a greater extent at specific time points. Immunocytochemical staining revealed stronger staining for Runx2 in the PRC-treated group compared to OM, while the staining for Osteocalcin and Osteopontin were comparable in both groups. ALP activity and Osteocalcin/DNA level were higher in the PRC group. Cells in the PRC group had similar level of bone mineralization as those cultured in OM, as reflected by the intensity of Alizarin red

  6. Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in highly porous alginate-foams supplemented with chondroitin sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhao [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Nooeaid, Patcharakamon [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Kohl, Benjamin [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Roether, Judith A.; Schubert, Dirk W. [Institute of Polymer Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Meier, Carola [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Institute of Biomaterials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany); Godkin, Owen; Ertel, Wolfgang; Arens, Stephan [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula, E-mail: gundula.schulze@pmu.ac.at [Department of Orthopaedic, Trauma and Reconstructive Surgery, Charité-Universitätsmedizin-Berlin Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Anatomy, Paracelsus Medical University, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    To overcome the limited intrinsic cartilage repair, autologous chondrocyte or bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (BM-MSC) was implanted into cartilage defects. For this purpose suitable biocompatible scaffolds are needed to provide cell retention, chondrogenesis and initial mechanical stability. The present study should indicate whether a recently developed highly porous alginate (Alg) foam scaffold supplemented with chondroitin sulfate (CS) allows the attachment, survival and chondrogenesis of BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes. The foams were prepared using a freeze-drying method; some of them were supplemented with CS and subsequently characterized for porosity, biodegradation and mechanical profile. BM-MSCs were cultured for 1–2 weeks on the scaffold either under chondrogenic or maintenance conditions. Cell vitality assays, histology, glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) assay, and type II and I collagen immunolabelings were performed to monitor cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis in the scaffolds. Scaffolds had a high porosity ~ 93–95% with a mean pore sizes of 237 ± 48 μm (Alg) and 197 ± 61 μm (Alg/CS). Incorporation of CS increased mechanical strength of the foams providing gradually CS release over 7 days. Most of the cells survived in the scaffolds. BM-MSCs and articular chondrocytes formed rounded clusters within the scaffold pores. The BM-MSCs, irrespective of whether cultured under non/chondrogenic conditions and chondrocytes produced an ECM containing sGAGs, and types II and I collagen. Total collagen and sGAG contents were higher in differentiated BM-MSC cultures supplemented with CS than in CS-free foams after 14 days. The cell cluster formation induced by the scaffolds might stimulate chondrogenesis via initial intense cell–cell contacts. - Highlights: • Alginate foam scaffolds revealed a high porosity and mean pore size of 197–237 μm. • Chondroitin sulfate was released over 14 days by the scaffolds. • Chondrocytes

  7. INFLUENCE OF BONE MARROW ALLOGENEIC MULTIPOTENT MESENCHYMAL STROMAL CELLS ON THE FORMATION OF ANTI-ISCHEMIC KIDNEY PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Mescherin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Аim of this work was to study the influence of intravenous injection times of bone marrow allogeneic multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM MMSCs on kidney function and morphology in modeled ischemicreperfusion injury of kidney (IRIK. Materials and methods. The study was conducted on 90 male Wistar rats. On the original IRI model of a single kidney (60 min, warm ischemia 4 groups of experiments were performed: in the first group the dose of 5 × 106 of BM MMSCs was administered intravenously 14 days before IRIK modeling; in the second group, the same dose of BM MMSCs was administered 7 days before IRIK; in the third group, the same dose of BM MMSCs was administered during kidney reperfusion after IRIK modeling; the fourth group served as the control group (IRIK without BM МMSCs. The study duration was 21 days since the start of IRIK modeling. In all groups the nitrogen secretory function of kidneys was examined and the histological condition of kidneys during the entire recovery period was evaluated. Besides, blood of rats of the first and the fourth groups was examined for proand anti-inflammatory cytokine levels and phagocytosis indices using the suspension of inactivated St. aureus. The significance of differences in these two groups was evaluated by Student's test at p < 0.05. Results. It has been demonstrated that the pretreatment with BM MMSCs (1 and 2 weeks before IRIK modeling increased the anti-ischemic resistance of kidney while the administration of BM MMSCs on the day of IRIK modeling (during reperfusion enhanced kidney damage, characterized by increased mortality, elevated levels of urea and creatinine in blood and structural injury of renal tissue, as compared to other groups. The comparative analysis of the first and fourth groups shows that BM MMSCs decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increase the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines, as well as enhance potential of antimicrobial protection. Conclusion

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Factors Promote Tissue Repair in a Small-for-Size Ischemic Liver Model but Do Not Protect against Early Effects of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.G. Fouraschen (Suomi M. G.); J.H. Wolf (Joshua H.); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); P.E. de Ruiter (Petra E.); W. Hancock; J.P. Van Kooten (Job P.); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); K.M. Olthoff (Kim); J. de Jonge (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractLoss of liver mass and ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) are major contributors to postresectional liver failure and small-for-size syndrome. Mesenchymal stromal cell-(MSC-) secreted factors are described to stimulate regeneration after partial hepatectomy. This study investigates if liv

  9. Comparison of human amniotic fluid-derived and umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells: Characterization and myocardial differentiation capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Bai; Yuan Hu; Yi-Ru Wang; Li-Feng Liu; Jie Chen; Shao-Ping Su; Yu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare the characterization and myocardial differentiation capacity of amniotic fluid-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AF MSCs) and umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (WJ MSCs). Methods The human AF MSCs were cultured from amniotic fluid samples obtained by amniocentesis. The umbilical cord WJ MSCs were obtained from Wharton's Jelly of umbilical cords of infants delivered full-term by normal labor. The morphology, growth curves, and analyses by flow cytometry of cell surface markers were compared between the two types of cells. Myocardial genes (GATA-4, c-TnT, α-actin, and Cx43) were detected by real-time PCR and the corresponding protein expressions were detected by Western blot analysis after myocardial induced in AF MSCs and WJ MSCs. Results Our findings revealed AF MSCs and WJ MSCs shared similar morphological characteristics of the fibroblastoid shape. The AF MSCs were easily obtained than the WJ MSCs and had a shorter time to reach adherence of 2.7 ± 1.6 days to WJ MSCs of 6.5 ± 1.8 days. The growth curves by MTT cytotoxic assay showed the AF MSCs had a similar proliferative capacity at passage 5 and passage 10. However, the proliferative capacities of WJ MSCs were decreased at 5 passage relative to 10 passage. Both AF stem cells and WJ stem cells had the characteristics of mesenchymal stromal cells with some characteristics of embryonic stem cells. They express CD29 and CD105, but not CD34. They were positive for Class I major histocompatibility (MHC I) antigens (HLA-ABC), and were negative, or mildly positive, for MHC Class II (HLA-DR) antigen. Oct-4 was positive in all the two cells types. Both AF MSCs and WJ MSCs could differentiate along myocardium. The differentiation capacities were detected by the expression of GATA-4, c-TnT, α-actin, Cx43 after myocardial induction. Conclusions Both AF MSCs and WJ MSCs have the potential clinical application for myogenesis in cardiac regenerative therapy.

  10. Characterization and Multilineage Differentiation of Domestic and Black-Footed Cat Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Abdominal and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Martha C; Qin, Qian; Biancardi, Monica N; Galiguis, Jason; Dumas, Cherie; MacLean, Robert A; Wang, Guoshun; Pope, C Earle

    2015-10-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow or adipose tissue is emerging as a promising tool for cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine in domestic and endangered animal species. Defining the differentiation capability of adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) collected from different depot sites of adipose tissue will be essential for developing strategies for cell replacement therapy. In the present study, we compared the biological characteristics of domestic cat AMSCs isolated from visceral fat of the abdominal cavity (AB) with AMSCs from subcutaneous (SQ) tissue, and the functional capability of domestic and black-footed cat (Felis nigripes) AMSCs to differentiate into other cell types. Our results showed that both domestic and black-footed cat adipose-derived stromal vascular fractions contained AMSCs. Both domestic cat AB- and SQ-AMSCs showed important clonogenic ability and the minimal MSC immunophenotype as defined by the International Society for Cellular Therapy in humans. However, domestic cat AB-AMSCs had higher percentages of cells positive for MSCs-associated cluster of differentiation (CD) markers CD90(+) and CD105(+) (92% and 80%, respectively) than those of SQ-AMSCs (77% and 58%, respectively). Although these results may suggest that AB-AMSCs may be more multipotent than SQ-AMSCs, both types of cells showed similar expression of pluripotent genes Oct-4 and Klf4, except for higher expression of Nanog than in AB-AMSCs, and equivalent in vitro multilineage differentiation. Under appropriate stimuli, the black-footed cat and both domestic cat AB- and SQ-AMSCs differentiated not only toward mesoderm cell lineages but also toward ectoderm cell lineage, such as neuron cell-like cells. Black-footed cat AMSCs had more capability to differentiate toward chondrocytes. These results suggest that the defined AMSC population (regardless of site of collection) could potentially be employed as a

  11. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell–cell interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48 h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell–cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells

  12. Activated human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells suppress metastatic features of MDA-MB-231 cells by secreting IFN-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, N; Park, M S; Shigemoto, T; Peltier, G; Lee, R H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study showed that human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs) are activated to express tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by exposure to TNF-α and these activated hMSCs effectively induce apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 (MDA) cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we further demonstrated that activated hMSCs not only induced apoptosis of MDA cells but also reduced metastatic features in MDA cells. These activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells showed reduced tumorigenicity and suppressed formation of lung metastasis when implanted in the mammary fat pad. Surprisingly, the activated hMSC-exposed MDA cells increased TRAIL expression, resulting in apoptosis in MDA cells. Interestingly, upregulation of TRAIL in MDA cells was mediated by interferon-beta (IFN-β) secreted from activated hMSCs. Furthermore, IFN-β in activated hMSCs was induced by RNA and DNA released from apoptotic MDA cells in absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) and IFN induced with helicase C domain 1 (IFIH1)-dependent manners. These observations were only seen in the TRAIL-sensitive breast cancer cell lines but not in the TRAIL-resistant breast cancer cell lines. Consistent with these results, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis also showed that lack of innate sensors detecting DNA or RNA is strongly associated with poor survival in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. In addition, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) isolated from a breast cancer patient were also able to express TRAIL and IFN-β upon DNA and RNA stimulation. Therefore, our results suggest that the crosstalk between TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells and stromal cells creates a tumor-suppressive microenvironment and further provide a novel therapeutic approach to target stromal cells within cancer microenvironment for TRAIL sensitive cancer treatment. PMID:27077807

  13. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell–cell interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietilä, Mika [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Lehenkari, Petri [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Institute of Clinical Medicine, Division of Surgery, University of Oulu and Clinical Research Centre, Department of Surgery and Intensive Care, Oulu University Hospital, Aapistie 5a, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Kuvaja, Paula [Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Oulu, Aapistie 7, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014 (Finland); Department of Pathology, Oulu University Hospital, P.O. Box 50, FIN-90029 OYS, Oulu (Finland); Kaakinen, Mika [Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 (Finland); Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan); Uemura, Toshimasa, E-mail: t.uemura@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced industrial Sciences and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305 8562 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48 h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell–cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  14. Bio-functionalized dense-silica nanoparticles for MR/NIRF imaging of CD146 in gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pu Wang,1,* Yazhuo Qu,2,* Chuan Li,3 Li Yin,2 Caifei Shen,1 Wei Chen,3 Shiming Yang,4 Xiuwu Bian,2 Dianchun Fang11Institute of Gastroenterology, 2Institute of Pathology, 3Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Gastroenterology, Xinqiao Hospital, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Nano dense-silica (dSiO2 has many advantages such as adjustable core–shell structure, multiple drug delivery, and controllable release behavior. Improving the gastric tumor-specific targeting efficiency based on the development of various strategies is crucial for anti-cancer drug delivery systems.Methods: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION were coated with dSiO2 as core–shell nanoparticles, and labeled with near infra-red fluorescence (NIRF dye 800ZW (excitation wavelength: 778 nm/­emission wavelength: 806 nm and anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody YY146 for magnetic resonance (MR/NIRF imaging study in xenograft gastric cancer model. The morphology and the size of pre- and postlabeling SPION@dSiO2 core–shell nanoparticles were characterized using transmission electron microscopy. Iron content in SPION@dSiO2 nanoparticles was measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter studies were carried out to confirm the binding specificity of YY146 and 800ZW–SPION@dSiO2–YY146 on MKN45 cells. In vivo and in vitro NIRF imaging, control (nanoparticles only and blocking studies, and histology were executed on MKN45 tumor-bearing nude mice to estimate the affinity of 800ZW–SPION@dSiO2–YY146 to target tumor CD146.Results: 800ZW–SPION@dSiO2–YY146 nanoparticles were uniformly spherical in shape and dispersed evenly in a cell culture medium. The diameter of the nanoparticle

  15. Concurrent hypermulticolor monitoring of CD31, CD34, CD45 and CD146 endothelial progenitor cell markers for acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Yumi [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Myung Hyun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Hyuk, Song Woo [Cardiology College of Medicine, Korea University (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soo Young [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Joon Myong, E-mail: jmsong@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We observe EPCs and HPCs in patient for AMI diagnosis. • We detect two EPC subtypes using quantum dot and AOTF. • Quantum dot has narrower emission wavelength range than fluorescence dye. • AOTF provide smaller spectral interference than bandpass filters. • Quantum dot and AOTF are suitable for detecting large number of molecular markers concurrently. - Abstract: The circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in blood of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patient have been monitored in many previous studies. The number of circulating EPC increases in the blood of patients at onset of the AMI. EPC is originated from bone marrow. It performs vessel regeneration. There are many markers used for detecting EPC. Four of these markers, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CD146, were concurrently detected at the single cell level for the identification of EPC in the present preliminary study. The CD45 negative cell sorting was performed to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) acquired from four AMI patients with a magnetic bead sorter, since, EPCs expressed CD45 negative or dim. The resultant PBMC eluents were treated with quantum-antibody conjugates for the probing four different markers of EPCs and then applied to a high-content single cell imaging cytometer using acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). The use of quantum dot, with narrow emission wavelength range and AOTF enabling cellular image at a particular single wavelength, is very advantageous for accurate high-content AMI diagnosis based on simultaneous monitoring of many markers. The number of EPC increased as compared with control in three of four AMI patients. In this approach, two EPC subtypes were found, CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(−) as early outgrowth EPCs and CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(+) as late outgrowth EPCs. Patient 1 had CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(+) cells whose percentage was 4.21% of cells. Patient 2 had 2.38% of CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Factors Promote Tissue Repair in a Small-for-Size Ischemic Liver Model but Do Not Protect against Early Effects of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fouraschen, Suomi M. G.; Wolf, Joshua H.; van der Laan, Luc J W; de Ruiter, Petra E.; Hancock, Wayne W.; van Kooten, Job P.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Olthoff, Kim M.; Jeroen de Jonge

    2015-01-01

    Loss of liver mass and ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) are major contributors to postresectional liver failure and small-for-size syndrome. Mesenchymal stromal cell- (MSC-) secreted factors are described to stimulate regeneration after partial hepatectomy. This study investigates if liver-derived MSC-secreted factors also promote liver regeneration after resection in the presence of IRI. C57BL/6 mice underwent IRI of 70% of their liver mass, alone or combined with 50% partial hepatectom...

  17. Optimal Seeding Densities for In Vitro Chondrogenesis of Two- and Three-Dimensional-Isolated and -Expanded Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells Within a Porous Collagen Scaffold

    OpenAIRE

    Bornes, Troy D.; Jomha, Nadr M; Mulet-Sierra, Aillette; Adesida, Adetola B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are a promising cell source for treating articular cartilage defects. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of cell seeding density within a collagen I scaffold on in vitro BMSC chondrogenesis following isolation and expansion in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments. It was hypothesized that both expansion protocols would produce BMSCs capable of hyaline-like chondrogenesis with an optimal seedin...

  18. Ultrasound-targeted stromal cell-derived factor-1-loaded microbubble destruction promotes mesenchymal stem cell homing to kidneys in diabetic nephropathy rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Shengzheng Wu,1 Lu Li,1 Gong Wang,1 Weiwei Shen,2 Yali Xu,1 Zheng Liu,1 Zhongxiong Zhuo,1 Hongmei Xia,1 Yunhua Gao,1 Kaibin Tan1 1Department of Ultrasound, 2Department of Orthopedics, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy has been considered a promising strategy to cure diabetic nephropathy (DN. However, insufficient MSCs can settle in injured kidneys, which constitute one of the major barriers to the effective implementation of MSC therapy. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 plays a vital role in MSC migration and involves activation, mobilization, homing, and retention, which are presumably related to the poor homing in DN therapy. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction has become one of the most promising strategies for the targeted delivery of drugs and genes. To improve MSC homing to DN kidneys, we present a strategy to increase SDF-1 via ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction. In this study, we developed SDF-1-loaded microbubbles (MBSDF-1 via covalent conjugation. The characterization and bioactivity of MBSDF-1 were assessed in vitro. Target release in the targeted kidneys was triggered with diagnostic ultrasound in combination with MBSDF-1. The related bioeffects were also elucidated. Early DN was induced in rats with streptozotocin. Green fluorescent protein-labeled MSCs were transplanted intravenously following the target release of SDF-1 in the kidneys of normal and DN rats. The homing efficacy was assessed by detecting the implanted exogenous MSCs at 24 hours. The in vitro results showed an impressive SDF-1 loading efficacy of 79% and a loading content of 15.8 µg/mL. MBSDF-1 remained bioactive as a chemoattractant. In the in vivo study, SDF-1 was successfully released in the targeted kidneys. The homing efficacy of MSCs to DN kidneys after the target release of SDF-1 was remarkably ameliorated at 24 hours compared with

  19. Post-thaw non-cultured and post-thaw cultured equine cord blood mesenchymal stromal cells equally suppress lymphocyte proliferation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn B Williams

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are receiving increased attention for their non-progenitor immunomodulatory potential. Cryopreservation is commonly used for long-term storage of MSC. Post-thaw MSC proliferation is associated with a lag-phase in vitro. How this lag-phase affect MSC immunomodulatory properties is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro there is no difference in lymphocyte suppression potential between quick-thawed cryopreserved equine cord blood (CB MSC immediately included in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR and same MSC allowed post-thaw culture time prior to inclusion in MLR. Cryopreserved CB-MSC from five unrelated foals were compared using two-way MLR. For each of the five unrelated MSC cultures, paired MLR assays of MSC allowed five days of post-thaw culture and MSC included in MLR assay immediately post-thawing were evaluated. We report no difference in the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by CB-MSC that had undergone post-thaw culture and MSC not cultured post-thaw (p<0.0001. Also, there was no inter-donor variability between the lymphocyte suppressive properties of MSC harvested from the five different donors (p = 0.13. These findings suggest that cryopreserved CB-MSC may have clinical utility immediately upon thawing. One implication hereof is the possibility of using cryopreserved CB-MSC at third party locations without the need for cell culture equipment or competencies.

  20. Mesenchymal stromal cells integrate and form longitudinally-aligned layers when delivered to injured spinal cord via a novel fibrin scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Alex J T; Wang, Difei; van Oterendorp, Christian; Fawcett, James W; Martin, Keith R

    2014-05-21

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to promote healing and regeneration in a number of CNS injury models and therefore there is much interest in the clinical use of these cells. For spinal cord injuries, a standard delivery method for MSCs is intraspinal injection, but this can result in additional injury and provides little control over how the cells integrate into the tissue. The present study examines the use of a novel fibrin scaffold as a new method of delivering MSCs to injured spinal cord. Use of the fibrin scaffold resulted in the formation of longitudinally-aligned layers of MSCs growing over the spinal cord lesion site. Host neurites were able to migrate into this MSC architecture and grow longitudinally. The length of the MSC bridge corresponded to the length of the fibrin scaffold. MSCs that were delivered via intraspinal injection were mainly oriented perpendicular to the plane of the spinal cord and remained largely restricted to the lesion site. Host neurites within the injected MSC graft were also oriented perpendicular to the plane of the spinal cord.

  1. Clinical-grade mesenchymal stromal cells produced under various good manufacturing practice processes differ in their immunomodulatory properties: standardization of immune quality controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Cedric; Pacelli, Luciano; Bassi, Giulio; Dulong, Joelle; Bifari, Francesco; Bezier, Isabelle; Zanoncello, Jasmina; Ricciardi, Mario; Latour, Maelle; Bourin, Philippe; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Sensebé, Luc; Tarte, Karin; Krampera, Mauro

    2013-06-15

    Clinical-grade mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are usually expanded from bone marrow (BMMSCs) or adipose tissue (ADSCs) using processes mainly differing in the use of fetal calf serum (FCS) or human platelet lysate (PL). We aimed to compare immune modulatory properties of clinical-grade MSCs using a combination of fully standardized in vitro assays. BMMSCs expanded with FCS (BMMSC-FCS) or PL (BMMSC-PL), and ADSC-PL were analyzed in quantitative phenotypic and functional experiments, including their capacity to inhibit the proliferation of T, B, and NK cells. The molecular mechanisms supporting T-cell inhibition were investigated. These parameters were also evaluated after pre-stimulation of MSCs with inflammatory cytokines. BMMSC-FCS, BMMSC-PL, and ADSC-PL displayed significant differences in expression of immunosuppressive and adhesion molecules. Standardized functional assays revealed that resting MSCs inhibited proliferation of T and NK cells, but not B cells. ADSC-PL were the most potent in inhibiting T-cell growth, a property ascribed to interferon-γ-dependent indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase activity. MSCs did not stimulate allogeneic T cell proliferation but were efficiently lysed by activated NK cells. The systematic use of quantitative and reproducible validation techniques highlights differences in immunological properties of MSCs produced using various clinical-grade processes. ADSC-PL emerge as a promising candidate for future clinical trials.

  2. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment. PMID:27628173

  3. A chitosan-hyaluronan-based hydrogel-hydrocolloid supports in vitro culture and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindborg, Beth A; Brekke, John H; Scott, Carolyn M; Chai, Yi Wen; Ulrich, Connor; Sandquist, Lee; Kokkoli, Efrosini; O'Brien, Timothy D

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture platforms are increasingly utilized due to their ability to more closely mimic the in vivo microenvironment compared to traditional two-dimensional methods. Limitations of currently available 3D materials include lack of cell attachment, long polymerization times, and inclusion of undefined xenobiotics, and cytotoxic cross-linkers. Evaluated here is a unique hydrogel comprised of polyelectrolytic complex (PEC) fibers formed by hyaluronic acid and chitosan (CT). When hydrated with fetal bovine serum containing human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (hMSCs), a hydrogel with an elastic modulus of 264±38 Pa formed in seconds with cells distributed throughout the matrix. Scanning electron microscopy showed a lattice-like meshwork of PEC fibers forming irregular compartments. hMSCs showed 48% viability during the first 24 h, with cell populations thereafter reaching a steady state for 14 days. hMSCs in the matrix were induced to differentiate to chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic phenotypes. Emergent features, at days 56 and 70, consisted of chondrogenesis on the surface of hydrogels induced to osteogenic and adipogenic phenotypes. Results indicate that this matrix may be useful for tissue engineering and disease modeling applications. PMID:25748146

  4. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium

  5. Osteogenic potential of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stromal cells cultured with umbilical cord blood-derived fibrin: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Yasuharu; Ishiguro, Masashi; Kumazawa, Kenichi; Aoyagi, Kazuya; Ikemoto, Shigehiro; Takeda, Akira; Uchinuma, Eiju

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the potential for osteogenesis via regenerative medicine using autologous tissues (umbilical cord (UC) and umbilical cord blood (UCB)) in nude mice. The study was designed to provide the three elements required for regenerative medicine (cell, scaffold, and growth factor) and autoserum for culture by means of autologous tissues. Mesenchymal stromal cells were obtained from UC (UC-MSCs). Fibrin, platelet-rich-plasma, and autoserum were obtained from UCB as scaffold, growth factor and serum for culture respectively. UC-MSCs were obtained from Wharton jelly and cultured with UCB-derived fibrin (UCB-fibrin) for 3-4 weeks to induce their differentiation into osteoblasts. They were implanted subcutaneously into the dorsum of male nude mice for 6 weeks prior to undergoing assessment. The assessments performed were haematoxylin and eosin, and alizarin red staining, immunohistochemical staining of human mitochondria, scanning electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction to assess the expressions of osteoblast markers. Consequently, the differentiation of UC-MSCs into osteoblasts and the production of hydroxyapatite were verified. This study suggested the possible formation of bone tissue using biomedical materials obtained from UC and UCB.

  6. Induction of miR-146a by multiple myeloma cells in mesenchymal stromal cells stimulates their pro-tumoral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Veirman, Kim; Wang, Jinheng; Xu, Song; Leleu, Xavier; Himpe, Eddy; Maes, Ken; De Bruyne, Elke; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Vanderkerken, Karin; Menu, Eline; Van Riet, Ivan

    2016-07-10

    Mutual communication between multiple myeloma (MM) cells and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) plays a pivotal role in supporting MM progression. In MM, MSC exhibit a different genomic profile and dysregulated cytokine secretion compared to normal MSC, however the mechanisms involved in these changes are not fully understood. Here, we examined the miRNA changes in human MSC after culture with conditioned medium of MM cells and found 19 dysregulated miRNAs, including upregulated miR-146a. Moreover, exosomes derived from MM cells contained miR-146a and could be transferred into MSC. After overexpressing miR-146a in MSC, secretion of several cytokines and chemokines including CXCL1, IL6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, and CCL-5 was elevated, resulting in the enhancement of MM cell viability and migration. DAPT, an inhibitor of the endogenous Notch pathway, was able to abrogate the miR-146a-induced increase of cytokines in MSC, suggesting the involvement of the Notch pathway. Taken together, our results demonstrate a positive feedback loop between MM cells and MSC: MM cells promote the increase of miR146a in MSC which leads to more cytokine secretion, which in turn favors MM cell growth and migration. PMID:27102001

  7. Human mesenchymal stromal cells could deliver erythropoietin and migrate to the basal layer of hair shaft when subcutaneously implanted in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, P L; Cheong, S K; Leong, C F; Chua, K H; Ainoon, O

    2012-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are an attractive cell-targeting vehicle for gene delivery. MIDGE (an acronym for Minimalistic, Immunologically Defined Gene Expression) construct is relatively safer than the viral or plasmid expression system as the detrimental eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene and sequences have been eliminated. The objective of this study was to test the ability of the human MSC (hMSC) to deliver the erythropoietin (EPO) gene in a nude mice model following nucleofection using a MIDGE construct. hMSC nucleofected with MIDGE encoding the EPO gene was injected subcutaneously in Matrigel at the dorsal flank of nude mice. Subcutaneous implantation of nucleofected hMSC resulted in increased hemoglobin level with presence of human EPO in the peripheral blood of the injected nude mice in the first two weeks post-implantation compared with the control groups. The basal layer of the hair shaft in the dermal layer was found to be significantly positive for immunohistochemical staining of a human EPO antibody. However, only a few basal layers of the hair shaft were found to be positively stained for CD105. In conclusion, hMSC harboring MIDGE-EPO could deliver and transiently express the EPO gene in the nude mice model. These cells could be localized to the hair follicle and secreted EPO protein might have possible role in hair regeneration.

  8. Optimal Labeling Dose, Labeling Time, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection Limits of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle Labeled Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Bruun Mathiasen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide (USPIO labeled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Materials and Methods. 248 gel-phantoms were constructed and scanned on a 1.5T MRI-scanner. Phantoms contained human MSCs preincubated with USPIO nanoparticles for 2, 6, or 21 hours using 5 or 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. In addition, porcine hearts were scanned after injection of USPIO labeled MSCs. Results. Using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs, labeled cells were clearly separated from unlabeled cells on MRI using 250.000 (P<0.001, 500.000 (P=0.007, and 1.000.000 MSCs (P=0.008. At lower incubation times and doses, neither labeled nor unlabeled cells could be separated. In porcine hearts labeled, but not unlabeled, MSCs were identified on MRI. Conclusions. As few as 250.000 MSCs can be detected on MRI using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. At lower incubation times and doses, several million cells are needed for MRI detection. USPIO labeled cells can be visualized by MRI in porcine myocardial tissue.

  9. Human mesenchymal stromal cells could deliver erythropoietin and migrate to the basal layer of hair shaft when subcutaneously implanted in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, P L; Cheong, S K; Leong, C F; Chua, K H; Ainoon, O

    2012-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are an attractive cell-targeting vehicle for gene delivery. MIDGE (an acronym for Minimalistic, Immunologically Defined Gene Expression) construct is relatively safer than the viral or plasmid expression system as the detrimental eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene and sequences have been eliminated. The objective of this study was to test the ability of the human MSC (hMSC) to deliver the erythropoietin (EPO) gene in a nude mice model following nucleofection using a MIDGE construct. hMSC nucleofected with MIDGE encoding the EPO gene was injected subcutaneously in Matrigel at the dorsal flank of nude mice. Subcutaneous implantation of nucleofected hMSC resulted in increased hemoglobin level with presence of human EPO in the peripheral blood of the injected nude mice in the first two weeks post-implantation compared with the control groups. The basal layer of the hair shaft in the dermal layer was found to be significantly positive for immunohistochemical staining of a human EPO antibody. However, only a few basal layers of the hair shaft were found to be positively stained for CD105. In conclusion, hMSC harboring MIDGE-EPO could deliver and transiently express the EPO gene in the nude mice model. These cells could be localized to the hair follicle and secreted EPO protein might have possible role in hair regeneration. PMID:22560724

  10. Platelet-Rich Plasma Obtained with Different Anticoagulants and Their Effect on Platelet Numbers and Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Behavior In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Amaral, Ronaldo José Farias Corrêa; da Silva, Nemias Pereira; Haddad, Natália Ferreira; Lopes, Luana Siqueira; Ferreira, Fábio Dias; Filho, Ricardo Bastos; Cappelletti, Paola Alejandra; de Mello, Wallace; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    There are promising results in the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for musculoskeletal tissue repair. However, the variability in the methodology for its obtaining may cause different and opposing findings in the literature. Particularly, the choice of the anticoagulant is the first definition to be made. In this work, blood was collected with sodium citrate (SC), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or anticoagulant citrate dextrose (ACD) solution A, as anticoagulants, prior to PRP obtaining. Hematological analysis and growth factors release quantification were performed, and the effects on mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) culture, such as cytotoxicity and cell proliferation (evaluated by MTT method) and gene expression, were evaluated. The use of EDTA resulted in higher platelet yield in whole blood; however, it induced an increase in the mean platelet volume (MPV) following the blood centrifugation steps for PRP obtaining. The use of SC and ACD resulted in higher induction of MSC proliferation. On the other hand, PRP obtained in SC presented the higher platelet recovery after the blood first centrifugation step and a minimal change in MSC gene expression. Therefore, we suggest the use of SC as the anticoagulant for PRP obtaining. PMID:27340410

  11. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Wodewotzky

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells protect against caspase 3-mediated apoptosis of CD19(+) peripheral B cells through contact-dependent upregulation of VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Marc E; Bergin, Ronan; Mahon, Bernard P; English, Karen

    2015-10-15

    The immune suppressive and anti-inflammatory capabilities of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) represent an innovative new tool in regenerative medicine and immune regulation. The potent immune suppressive ability of MSC over T cells, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells has been extensively characterized, however, the effect of MSC on B cell function has not yet been clarified. In this study, the direct effect of MSC on peripheral blood B cell function is defined and the mechanism utilized by MSC in enhancing B cell survival in vitro identified. Human MSC supported the activation, proliferation, and survival of purified CD19(+) B cells through a cell contact-dependent mechanism. These effects were not mediated through B cell activating factor or notch signaling. However, cell contact between MSC and B cells resulted in increased production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by MSC facilitating AKT phosphorylation within the B cell and inhibiting caspase 3-mediated apoptosis. Blocking studies demonstrated that this cell contact-dependent effect was not dependent on signaling through CXCR4-CXCL12 or through the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). These results suggest that direct cell contact between MSC and B cells supports B cell viability and function, suggesting that MSC may not represent a suitable therapy for B cell-mediated disease. PMID:26076727

  13. Recruitment of exogenous mesenchymal stem cells in mandibular distraction osteogenesis by the stromal cell-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor-4 pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Wang, Lei; Du, Zhao-jie; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Ya-bo; Sui, Jian-fu; Liu, Yan-pu; Lei, De-lin

    2013-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is widely used in orthopaedic and craniofacial surgery. However, its exact mechanism is still poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to find out whether there is systemic recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to the neocallus in the distraction gap by the stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis during osteogenesis. We examined the migration of MSC towards a gradient of SDF-1 in vitro. We also transplanted MSC labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) intravenously, with or without treatment with CXCR4-blocking antibody, into rats that had had unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis, and investigated the distribution of cells labelled with GFP in the soft callus after 24 h. We found that SDF-1 facilitated the migration potency of MSC both in vitro and in vivo, and this migration could be inhibited by AMD3100, an antagonist of CXCR4, and promoted by local infusion of exogenous SDF-1 into the distraction gap. This study provides a new insight into the molecular basis of how new bone is regenerated during distraction osteogenesis.

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells Do Not Ameliorate Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Are Not Detectable in the Central Nervous System of Transplanted Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowski, Pierre; Krasemann, Susanne; Ernst, Thomas; Lange, Claudia; Ittrich, Harald; Schweizer, Michaela; Zander, Axel R; Martin, Roland; Fehse, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) constitute progenitor cells that can be isolated from different tissues. Based on their immunomodulatory and neuroprotective functions, MSC-based cell-therapy approaches have been suggested to antagonize inflammatory activity and neuronal damage associated with autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS), for example, multiple sclerosis (MS). Intravenous MSC transplantation was reported to ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the murine model of MS, within days after transplantation. However, systemic distribution patterns and fate of MSCs after administration, especially their potential to migrate into inflammatory lesions within the CNS, remain to be elucidated. This question has of recent become particularly important, since therapeutic infusion of MSCs is now being tested in clinical trials with MS-affected patients. Here, we made use of the established EAE mouse model to investigate migration and therapeutic efficacy of murine bone marrow-derived MSCs. Applying a variety of techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging, immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in-situ hybridization, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction we found no evidence for immediate migration of infused MSC into the CNS of treated mice. Moreover, in contrast to other studies, transplanted MSCs did not ameliorate EAE. In conclusion, our data does not provide substantiation for a relevant migration of infused MSCs into the CNS of EAE mice supporting the hypothesis that potential therapeutic efficacy could be based on systemic effects. Evaluation of possible mechanisms underlying the observed discrepancies in MSC treatment outcomes between different EAE models demands further studies. PMID:27250994

  15. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Support CD34pos Hematopoietic Stem Cell Propagation and Suppress Inflammatory Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Moslem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs represent a promising cell source for research and therapeutic applications, but their restricted ex vivo propagation capabilities limit putative applications. Substantial self-renewing of stem cells can be achieved by reprogramming cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs that can be easily expanded as undifferentiated cells even in mass culture. Here, we investigated a differentiation protocol enabling the generation and selection of human iPSC-derived MSCs exhibiting relevant surface marker expression profiles (CD105 and CD73 and functional characteristics. We generated such iPSC-MSCs from fibroblasts and bone marrow MSCs utilizing two different reprogramming constructs. All such iPSC-MSCs exhibited the characteristics of normal bone marrow-derived (BM MSCs. In direct comparison to BM-MSCs our iPSC-MSCs exhibited a similar surface marker expression profile but shorter doubling times without reaching senescence within 20 passages. Considering functional capabilities, iPSC-MSCs provided supportive feeder layer for CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells’ self-renewal and colony forming capacities. Furthermore, iPSC-MSCs gained immunomodulatory function to suppress CD4+ cell proliferation, reduce proinflammatory cytokines in mixed lymphocyte reaction, and increase regulatory CD4+/CD69+/CD25+ T-lymphocyte population. In conclusion, we generated fully functional MSCs from various iPSC lines irrespective of their starting cell source or reprogramming factor composition and we suggest that such iPSC-MSCs allow repetitive cell applications for advanced therapeutic approaches.

  16. Regulating Chondrogenesis of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with a Retinoic Acid Receptor-Beta Inhibitor: Differential Sensitivity of Chondral Versus Osteochondral Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solvig Diederichs

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Main objective was to investigate whether the synthetic retinoic acid receptor (RAR-β antagonist LE135 is able to drive in vitro chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs or improve differentiation by suppressing hypertrophic chondrocyte development. Methods: Chondrogenesis of human bone marrow and adipose tissue-derived MSCs was induced in micromass pellet culture for six weeks. Effects of LE135 alone and in combinatorial treatment with TGF-β on deposition of cartilaginous matrix including collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans, on deposition of non-hyaline cartilage collagens type I and X, and on hypertrophy markers including alkaline phosphatase (ALP, indian hedghehog (IHH and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 were assessed. Results: LE135 was no inducer of chondrogenesis and failed to stimulate deposition of collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans. Moreover, addition of LE135 to TGF-β-treated pellets inhibited cartilaginous matrix deposition and gene expression of COL2A1. In contrast, non-hyaline cartilage collagens were less sensitive to LE135 and hypertrophy markers remained unaffected. Conclusion: This demonstrates a differential sensitivity of chondral versus endochondral differentiation pathways to RARβ signaling; however, opposite to the desired direction. The relevance of trans-activating versus trans-repressing RAR signaling, including effects on activator protein (AP-1 is discussed and implications for overcoming current limits of hMSC chondrogenesis are considered.

  17. Standardizing Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Translation to Clinical Use: Selection of GMP-Compliant Medium and a Simplified Isolation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J Robert; Pfeifer, Kyle; Petry, Florian; Powell, Natalie; Delzeit, Jennifer; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stromal cells (UC-MSCs) are a focus for clinical translation but standardized methods for isolation and expansion are lacking. Previously we published isolation and expansion methods for UC-MSCs which presented challenges when considering good manufacturing practices (GMP) for clinical translation. Here, a new and more standardized method for isolation and expansion of UC-MSCs is described. The new method eliminates dissection of blood vessels and uses a closed-vessel dissociation following enzymatic digestion which reduces contamination risk and manipulation time. The new method produced >10 times more cells per cm of UC than our previous method. When biographical variables were compared, more UC-MSCs per gram were isolated after vaginal birth compared to Caesarian-section births, an unexpected result. UC-MSCs were expanded in medium enriched with 2%, 5%, or 10% pooled human platelet lysate (HPL) eliminating the xenogeneic serum components. When the HPL concentrations were compared, media supplemented with 10% HPL had the highest growth rate, smallest cells, and the most viable cells at passage. UC-MSCs grown in 10% HPL had surface marker expression typical of MSCs, high colony forming efficiency, and could undergo trilineage differentiation. The new protocol standardizes manufacturing of UC-MSCs and enables clinical translation. PMID:26966439

  18. In vitro cultivation of canine multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells on collagen membranes treated with hyaluronic acid for cell therapy and tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wodewotzky, T.I.; Lima-Neto, J.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Pereira-Júnior, O.C.M. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Cirurgia e Anestesiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Sudano, M.J.; Lima, S.A.F. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Bersano, P.R.O. [Departamento de Patologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Yoshioka, S.A. [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Landim-Alvarenga, F.C. [Departamento de Reprodução Animal e Radiologia Veterinária, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2012-09-21

    Support structures for dermal regeneration are composed of biodegradable and bioresorbable polymers, animal skin or tendons, or are bacteria products. The use of such materials is controversial due to their low efficiency. An important area within tissue engineering is the application of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to reparative surgery. The combined use of biodegradable membranes with stem cell therapy may lead to promising results for patients undergoing unsuccessful conventional treatments. Thus, the aim of this study was to test the efficacy of using membranes composed of anionic collagen with or without the addition of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a substrate for adhesion and in vitro differentiation of bone marrow-derived canine MSCs. The benefit of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on the differentiation of cells in culture was also tested. MSCs were collected from dog bone marrow, isolated and grown on collagen scaffolds with or without HA. Cell viability, proliferation rate, and cellular toxicity were analyzed after 7 days. The cultured cells showed uniform growth and morphological characteristics of undifferentiated MSCs, which demonstrated that MSCs successfully adapted to the culture conditions established by collagen scaffolds with or without HA. This demonstrates that such scaffolds are promising for applications to tissue regeneration. bFGF significantly increased the proliferative rate of MSCs by 63% when compared to groups without the addition of the growth factor. However, the addition of bFGF becomes limiting, since it has an inhibitory effect at high concentrations in culture medium.

  19. 3D non-woven polyvinylidene fluoride scaffolds: fibre cross section and texturizing patterns have impact on growth of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Schellenberg

    Full Text Available Several applications in tissue engineering require transplantation of cells embedded in appropriate biomaterial scaffolds. Such structures may consist of 3D non-woven fibrous materials whereas little is known about the impact of mesh size, pore architecture and fibre morphology on cellular behavior. In this study, we have developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF non-woven scaffolds with round, trilobal, or snowflake fibre cross section and different fibre crimp patterns (10, 16, or 28 needles per inch. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs from adipose tissue were seeded in parallel on these scaffolds and their growth was compared. Initial cell adhesion during the seeding procedure was higher on non-wovens with round fibres than on those with snowflake or trilobal cross sections. All PVDF non-woven fabrics facilitated cell growth over a time course of 15 days. Interestingly, proliferation was significantly higher on non-wovens with round or trilobal fibres as compared to those with snowflake profile. Furthermore, proliferation increased in a wider, less dense network. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed that the MSCs aligned along the fibres and formed cellular layers spanning over the pores. 3D PVDF non-woven scaffolds support growth of MSCs, however fibre morphology and mesh size are relevant: proliferation is enhanced by round fibre cross sections and in rather wide-meshed scaffolds.

  20. Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells have contrasting effects on proliferation and phenotype of cancer stem cells from different subtypes of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Eramo, Adriana; Sette, Giovanni; Mauro, Annunziata; Macioce, Giampiero; Martinelli, Andrea; La Torre, Renato; Casalbore, Patrizia; Hassan, Hamisa Jane; Giampaolo, Adele

    2016-07-15

    Studies on the role of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) on tumor growth have reported both a tumor promoting and a suppressive effect. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of MSC isolated from Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord (WJMSC) on lung cancer stem cells (LCSC) derived from human lung tumors: two adenocarcinomas (AC) and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). LCSC derived from SCC and AC expressed, to varying extents, the more relevant stem cell markers. The effect of WJMSC on LCSC was investigated in vitro using conditioned medium (WJ-CM): a proliferation increase in AC-LCSC was observed, with an increase in the ALDH+ and in the CD133+ cell population. By contrast, WJ-CM hampered the growth of SCC-LCSC, with an increase in the pre-G1 phase indicating the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, the ALDH+ and CD133+ population was also reduced. In vivo, subcutaneous co-transplantation of AC-LCSC/WJMSC generated larger tumors than AC-LCSC alone, characterized by an increased percentage of CD133+ and CD166+ cells. By contrast, co-transplantation of WJMSC and SCC-LCSC did not affect the tumor size. Our results strongly suggest that WJMSC exert, both in vitro and in vivo, contrasting effects on LCSC derived from different lung tumor subtypes. PMID:27343631

  1. Molecular Imaging for Comparison of Different Growth Factors on Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells' Survival and Proliferation In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hongyu; Zhang, Ran; Gao, Lina; Guo, Yanjie; Wang, Jinda; Zhang, Rongqing; Li, Xiujuan; Li, Congye; Chen, Yundai; Cao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have emerged as promising cell candidates but with poor survival after transplantation. This study was designed to investigate the efficacy of VEGF, bFGF, and IGF-1 on BMSCs' viability and proliferation both in vivo and in vitro using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Methods. BMSCs were isolated from β-actin-Fluc+ transgenic FVB mice, which constitutively express firefly luciferase. Apoptosis was induced by hypoxia preconditioning for up to 24 h followed by flow cytometry and TUNEL assay. 106 BMSCs with/without growth factors were injected subcutaneously into wild type FVB mice's backs. Survival of BMSCs was longitudinally monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for 5 weeks. Protein expression of Akt, p-Akt, PARP, and caspase-3 was detected by Western blot. Results. Hypoxia-induced apoptosis was significantly attenuated by bFGF and IGF-1 compared with VEGF and control group in vitro (P < 0.05). When combined with matrigel, IGF-1 showed the most beneficial effects in protecting BMSCs from apoptosis in vivo. The phosphorylation of Akt had a higher ratio in the cells from IGF-1 group. Conclusion. IGF-1 could protect BMSCs from hypoxia-induced apoptosis through activation of p-Akt/Akt pathway. PMID:27419126

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Do Not Increase the Risk of Viral Reactivation Nor the Severity of Viral Events in Recipients of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lucchini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are tested in clinical trials to treat graft versus host disease (GvHD after stem cell transplantation (SCT. In vitro studies demonstrated MSC's broad immunosuppressive activity. As infections represent a major risk after SCT, it is important to understand the role of MSC in this context. We analyzed 24 patients (pts receiving MSC for GvHD in our Unit between 2009 and 2011. We recorded viral reactivations as measured in whole blood with polymerase chain reaction for 100 days following MSC administration. In patients with a documented viral reactivation in the first 3 days following MSCs infusion the frequency of virus-specific IFNgamma-producing cells was determined through enzyme-linked immunospot assay. In our cohort of patients viral reactivation after MSC infusion occurred in 45% of the cases, which did not significantly differ from the incidence in a historical cohort of patients affected by steroid resistant GvHD and treated with conventional immunosuppression. No patient presented severe form of infection. Two cases could be checked for immunological response to viral stimulus and demonstrated virus specific T-cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. In our experience MSC infusion did not prove to trigger more frequent or severer viral reactivations in the post transplantation setting.

  3. Macrophage interactions with polylactic acid and chitosan scaffolds lead to improved recruitment of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: a comprehensive study with different immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caires, Hugo R; Esteves, Tiago; Quelhas, Pedro; Barbosa, Mário A; Navarro, Melba; Almeida, Catarina R

    2016-09-01

    Despite the importance of immune cell-biomaterial interactions for the regenerative outcome, few studies have investigated how distinct three-dimensional biomaterials modulate the immune cell-mediated mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) recruitment and function. Thus, this work compares the response of varied primary human immune cell populations triggered by different model scaffolds and describes its functional consequence on recruitment and motility of bone marrow MSC. It was found that polylactic acid (PLA) and chitosan scaffolds lead to an increase in the metabolic activity of macrophages but not of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), natural killer (NK) cells or monocytes. PBMC and NK cells increase their cell number in PLA scaffolds and express a secretion profile that does not promote MSC recruitment. Importantly, chitosan increases IL-8, MIP-1, MCP-1 and RANTES secretion by macrophages while PLA stimulates IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 production, all chemokines that can lead to MSC recruitment. This secretion profile of macrophages in contact with biomaterials correlates with the highest MSC invasion. Furthermore, macrophages enhance stem cell motility within chitosan scaffolds by 44% but not in PLA scaffolds. Thus, macrophages are the cells that in contact with engineered biomaterials become activated to secrete bioactive molecules that stimulate MSC recruitment.

  4. Influence of particulate and dissociated metal-on-metal hip endoprosthesis wear on mesenchymal stromal cells in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Anastasia; Schoon, Janosch; Dienelt, Anke; John, Thilo; Textor, Martin; Duda, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Schulze, Frank; Ode, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    In hip arthroplasty the implants' articulating surfaces can be made of a cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloy. The use of these metal-on-metal (MoM) pairings can lead to the release of wear products such as metallic particles and dissociated metal species, raising concerns regarding their safety amongst orthopedic surgeons and the public. MoM-wear particles are reported to be heterogeneous in their physicochemical properties, are capable of inducing adverse effects on a cellular level and are thought to be involved in relevant clinical problems like aseptic osteolysis. Yet, it remains elusive how MoM-wear affects bone forming cells and their progenitors: bone marrow residing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). This study introduces an assessment of the in vivo exposure to particulate and dissociated Co and Cr and evaluates the effects of MoM-wear on MSCs. The exposure to MoM-wear products in vivo and in vitro leads to a decrease in MSCs' osteogenic matrix mineralization and alkaline phosphatase activity on a cellular and systemic level. In conclusion, MoM-wear products are released in the periprosthetic region and elevate bone marrow Co and Cr concentrations towards levels that impair osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Therefore, the ongoing use of CoCrMo alloys for articulating surfaces in joint replacement implants needs critical reconsideration. PMID:27179133

  5. Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1/CXCL12 increases homing of mesenchymal stem cells to injured myocardium and neovascularization following myocardial infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Yu; CHEN Xin; XU Ming; ZHANG Lei-yang; XIANG Fei

    2009-01-01

    Background Heart failure due to ischemic heart disease is still a major health problem. Myocardium regeneration emerges as a novel therapeutic method for treating myocardial infarction (MI). However, it is affected by many factors. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXCL12 on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) homing to injured myocardium in a rat myocardial infarction model. Methods A rat myocardial infarction model was established by permanent left anterior descending branch ligation. Mesenchymal stem cells from donor rats were cultured in IMDM and labeled with bromodeoxyuridine. The rats were divided into two groups. SDF-1 expression was measured by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in the sham operated or infarcted hearts at 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days post operation in the SDF-1 detection group. The rats in the intervention groups were injected with SDF-1, anti-SDF-1 antibody or saline 4 days after myocardial infarction. Then, a total of 5x106 cells in 2.5 ml of phosphate-buffered saline were injected through the tail vein. The number of the labeled MSCs in the infarcted hearts was counted on the 3rd clay post injection. Cardiac function and blood vessel density were assessed on the 28th day post injection. Results Self-generating SDF-1 expression was increased at the first day post MI, peaked at the 7th day and decreased thereafter while it remained unchanged in sham operated hearts. The MSCs enrichment in the host hearts were more abundant in the MI groups than in the non-MI group (P=0.000); the MSCs enrichment in the host hearts were more abundant in the SDF-1 injected group than in the anti-SDF-1 antibody and saline injected groups (P = 0.000). Cardiac function was improved more in the SDF-1 injected group than in the anti-SDF-1 antibody and saline injected groups (P = 0.000). Neovascularization in the SDF-1 injected group increased significantly compared to the other groups (P

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cell labeling by new uncoated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles in comparison with commercial Resovist – an initial in vitro study

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    Skopalik J

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Josef Skopalik,1 Katerina Polakova,2 Marketa Havrdova,2 Ivan Justan,1 Massimiliano Magro,3 David Milde,2 Lucia Knopfova,4 Jan Smarda,4 Helena Polakova,1 Eva Gabrielova,5 Fabio Vianello,2,3 Jaroslav Michalek,1 Radek Zboril21Department of Pharmacology, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 2Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry and Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; 3Department of Comparative Biomedicine and Food Science, University of Padua, Padova, Italy; 4Department of Experimental Biology, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic; 5Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech RepublicObjective: Cell therapies have emerged as a promising approach in medicine. The basis of each therapy is the injection of 1–100×106 cells with regenerative potential into some part of the body. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are the most used cell type in the cell therapy nowadays, but no gold standard for the labeling of the MSCs for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is available yet. This work evaluates our newly synthesized uncoated superparamagnetic maghemite nanoparticles (surface-active maghemite nanoparticles – SAMNs as an MRI contrast intracellular probe usable in a clinical 1.5 T MRI system.Methods: MSCs from rat and human donors were isolated, and then incubated at different concentrations (10–200 µg/mL of SAMN maghemite nanoparticles for 48 hours. Viability, proliferation, and nanoparticle uptake efficiency were tested (using fluorescence microscopy, xCELLigence analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and advanced microscopy techniques. Migration capacity, cluster of differentiation markers, effect of nanoparticles on long-term viability, contrast properties in MRI, and cocultivation of labeled cells with myocytes were also studied.Results: SAMNs do not

  7. Human Tubal-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Associated with Low Level Laser Therapy Significantly Reduces Cigarette Smoke-Induced COPD in C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peron, Jean Pierre Schatzmann; de Brito, Auriléia Aparecida; Pelatti, Mayra; Brandão, Wesley Nogueira; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Greiffo, Flávia Regina; da Silveira, Elaine Cristina; Oliveira-Junior, Manuel Carneiro; Maluf, Mariangela; Evangelista, Lucila; Halpern, Silvio; Nisenbaum, Marcelo Gil; Perin, Paulo; Czeresnia, Carlos Eduardo; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Aimbire, Flávio; Vieira, Rodolfo de Paula; Zatz, Mayana; de Oliveira, Ana Paula Ligeiro

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a very debilitating disease, with a very high prevalence worldwide, which results in a expressive economic and social burden. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches to treat these patients are of unquestionable relevance. The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is an innovative and yet accessible approach for pulmonary acute and chronic diseases, mainly due to its important immunoregulatory, anti-fibrogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic. Besides, the use of adjuvant therapies, whose aim is to boost or synergize with their function should be tested. Low level laser (LLL) therapy is a relatively new and promising approach, with very low cost, no invasiveness and no side effects. Here, we aimed to study the effectiveness of human tube derived MSCs (htMSCs) cell therapy associated with a 30mW/3J-660 nm LLL irradiation in experimental cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thus, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 75 days (twice a day) and all experiments were performed on day 76. Experimental groups receive htMSCS either intraperitoneally or intranasally and/or LLL irradiation either alone or in association. We show that co-therapy greatly reduces lung inflammation, lowering the cellular infiltrate and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and KC), which were followed by decreased mucus production, collagen accumulation and tissue damage. These findings seemed to be secondary to the reduction of both NF-κB and NF-AT activation in lung tissues with a concomitant increase in IL-10. In summary, our data suggests that the concomitant use of MSCs + LLLT may be a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD. PMID:26322981

  8. Human Tubal-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Associated with Low Level Laser Therapy Significantly Reduces Cigarette Smoke-Induced COPD in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Schatzmann Peron

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a very debilitating disease, with a very high prevalence worldwide, which results in a expressive economic and social burden. Therefore, new therapeutic approaches to treat these patients are of unquestionable relevance. The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is an innovative and yet accessible approach for pulmonary acute and chronic diseases, mainly due to its important immunoregulatory, anti-fibrogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic. Besides, the use of adjuvant therapies, whose aim is to boost or synergize with their function should be tested. Low level laser (LLL therapy is a relatively new and promising approach, with very low cost, no invasiveness and no side effects. Here, we aimed to study the effectiveness of human tube derived MSCs (htMSCs cell therapy associated with a 30mW/3J-660 nm LLL irradiation in experimental cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thus, C57BL/6 mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 75 days (twice a day and all experiments were performed on day 76. Experimental groups receive htMSCS either intraperitoneally or intranasally and/or LLL irradiation either alone or in association. We show that co-therapy greatly reduces lung inflammation, lowering the cellular infiltrate and pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and KC, which were followed by decreased mucus production, collagen accumulation and tissue damage. These findings seemed to be secondary to the reduction of both NF-κB and NF-AT activation in lung tissues with a concomitant increase in IL-10. In summary, our data suggests that the concomitant use of MSCs + LLLT may be a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  9. Monolithic calcium phosphate/poly(lactic acid) composite versus calcium phosphate-coated poly(lactic acid) for support of osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Habibovic, Pamela

    2016-03-01

    Calcium phosphates (CaPs), extensively used synthetic bone graft substitutes, are often combined with other materials with the aim to overcome issues related to poor mechanical properties of most CaP ceramics. Thin ceramic coatings on metallic implants and polymer-ceramic composites are examples of such hybrid materials. Both the properties of the CaP used and the method of incorporation into a hybrid structure are determinant for the bioactivity of the final construct. In the present study, a monolithic composite comprising nano-sized CaP and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and a CaP-coated PLA were comparatively investigated for their ability to support proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Both, the PLA/CaP composite, produced using physical mixing and extrusion and CaP-coated PLA, resulting from a biomimetic coating process at near-physiological conditions, supported proliferation of hMSCs with highest rates at PLA/CaP composite. Enzymatic alkaline phosphatase activity as well as the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic protein-2, osteopontin and osteocalcin were higher on the composite and coated polymer as compared to the PLA control, while no significant differences were observed between the two methods of combining CaP and PLA. The results of this study confirmed the importance of CaP in osteogenic differentiation while the exact properties and the method of incorporation into the hybrid material played a less prominent role. PMID:26787486

  10. Heterogeneity in Studies of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells to Treat or Prevent Graft-versus-Host Disease: A Scoping Review of the Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Mina; Monaghan, Madeline; Shorr, Risa; Kekre, Natasha; Bredeson, Christopher N; Allan, David S

    2016-08-01

    Effective treatments are lacking for the treatment of steroid-refractory graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have demonstrated promise but there is uncertainty regarding their clinical effectiveness. A systematic scoping review of the literature was performed to characterize the heterogeneity of published studies and identify opportunities for standardization. Thirty studies were identified, including 19 studies (507 patients) addressing the treatment of acute or chronic GVHD and 11 prevention studies (277 patients). Significant heterogeneity was observed in the age and diagnoses of study subjects, intensity and specifics of the conditioning regimens, degree of HLA matching, and source of hematopoietic cells. MSCs were derived from bone marrow (83% of studies), cord blood (13%), or adipose tissue (3%) and were cryopreserved from third-party allogeneic donors in the majority of studies (91% of prevention studies and 63% of treatment studies). Culture conditions and media supplements were highly variable and characterization of MSCs did not conform to all International Society for Cellular Therapy criteria in any study. MSCs were harvested from cell culture at passage 1 to 7 and the dosage of MSCs ranged from 0.3 to 10 × 10(6)/kg, using varying schedules of administration. Treatment response criteria were not standardized and effectiveness in controlled treatment studies (5 studies) was unconvincing. Details of actively recruiting trials suggest heterogeneity still persists with only 53% of registered trials describing the use of standard GVHD response criteria and few detailing methods of MSC manufacturing. Future studies will need to make substantial coordinated efforts to reduce study heterogeneity and clarify the role of MSCs in GVHD. PMID:27130504

  11. Evaluation of GMP-compliant culture media for in vitro expansion of human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuchter, Patrick; Vetter, Marcel; Saffrich, Rainer; Diehlmann, Anke; Bieback, Karen; Ho, Anthony D; Horn, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from human bone marrow serve as a resource for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications require standardized protocols according to good manufacturing practice (GMP) guidelines. Donor variability as well as the intrinsic heterogeneity of MSC populations must be taken into consideration. The composition of the culture medium is a key factor in successful MSC expansion. The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the efficiency of xeno-free human platelet lysate (HPL)-based cell expansion with two commercially available media-StemPro MSC SFM CTS (for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications) and MSCGM (non-GMP-compliant, for research only)-in an academic setting as the first optimization step toward GMP-compliant manufacturing. We report the feasibility of MSC expansion up to the yielded cell number with all three media. MSCs exhibited the typical fibroblastoid morphology, with distinct differences in cell size depending on the medium. The differentiation capacity and characteristic immunophenotype were confirmed for all MSC populations. Proliferation was highest using StemPro MSC SFM CTS, whereas HPL medium was more cost-effective and its composition could be adjusted individually according to the respective needs. In summary, we present a comprehensive evaluation of GMP-compatible culture media for MSC expansion. Both StemPro and HPL medium proved to be suitable for clinical application and allowed sufficient cell proliferation. Specific differences were observed and should be considered according to the intended use. This study provides a detailed cost analysis and tools that may be helpful for the establishment of GMP-compliant MSC expansion.

  12. Manufacturing and use of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for phase I clinical trials: Establishment and evaluation of a protocol

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    Ilić Nina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have been utilised in many clinical trials as an experimental treatment in numerous clinical settings. Bone marrow remains the traditional source tissue for MSCs but is relatively hard to access in large volumes. Alternatively, MSCs may be derived from other tissues including the placenta and adipose tissue. In an initial study no obvious differences in parameters such as cell surface phenotype, chemokine receptor display, mesodermal differentiation capacity or immunosuppressive ability, were detected when we compared human marrow derived- MSCs to human placenta-derived MSCs. The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a protocol and related processes for preparation placenta-derived MSCs for early phase clinical trials. Methods. A full-term placenta was taken after delivery of the baby as a source of MSCs. Isolation, seeding, incubation, cryopreservation of human placentaderived MSCs and used production release criteria were in accordance with the complex regulatory requirements applicable to Code of Good Manufacturing Practice manufacturing of ex vivo expanded cells. Results. We established and evaluated instructions for MSCs preparation protocol and gave an overview of the three clinical areas application. In the first trial, MSCs were co-transplanted iv to patient receiving an allogeneic cord blood transplant as therapy for treatmentrefractory acute myeloid leukemia. In the second trial, MSCs were administered iv in the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and without serious adverse effects. In the third trial, MSCs were injected directly into the site of tendon damage using ultrasound guidance in the treatment of chronic refractory tendinopathy. Conclusion. Clinical trials using both allogeneic and autologous cells demonstrated MSCs to be safe. A described protocol for human placenta-derived MSCs is appropriate for use in a clinical setting, relatively inexpensive and can be

  13. Effect of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) on chronic visceral hypersensitivity in a radio-induced colonic ulceration model in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients who undergo pelvic radiotherapy may develop significant incidence of undesirable chronic gastrointestinal complications resulting from radiation-induced damages around the tumour. Chronic visceral pain is one of the radiation-induced side effects that greatly affects the quality of life of 'cancer survivors'. The lack of effective analgesic treatment highlights the importance of novel and effective therapeutic strategies. In our laboratory, mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) based approach showed beneficial immunomodulatory and regenerative effects in a rat model of irreversible radiationinduced colonic ulcers. The goal of my work was to assess the relevance of this model to study radiation-induced visceral persistent hypersensitivity and its modulation by MSC treatment. We first demonstrated that this model is associated with long-lasting visceral hypersensitivity and central neuronal sensitization. In this context we showed then that mast cells (MC) are involved in the mechanism of peripheral sensitization. Moreover, we suggested the implication of the neuro-mediator NO. in the pathophysiology of persistent radiation-induced visceral hypersensitivity. We also suggested that MSC treatment reversed radiation-induced hypersensitivity by a mechanism that in part may involve the modulation of MC activation and/or the decrease in the number of MC and nerve fiber interactions. In addition, MSC treatment reduced the percentage of nitrinergic neurons, increased after irradiation, and restored colonic muscular contractibility. Such processes may promote the therapeutic benefit of MSC observed in our study. In conclusion, this work provided new insights on the therapeutic benefit of MSC in our study model and a new argument in favour of their use in a future clinical trial to cure abdomino-pelvic radiotherapy side effects. (author)

  14. The synergistic immunoregulatory effects of culture-expanded mesenchymal stromal cells and CD4(+25(+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells on skin allograft rejection.

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    Jung Ho Lee

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are seen as an ideal source of cells to induce graft acceptance; however, some reports have shown that MSCs can be immunogenic rather than immunosuppressive. We speculate that the immunomodulatory effects of regulatory T cells (Tregs can aid the maintenance of immunoregulatory functions of MSCs, and that a combinatorial approach to cell therapy can have synergistic immunomodulatory effects on allograft rejection. After preconditioning with Fludarabine, followed by total body irradiation and anti-asialo-GM-1(ASGM-1, tail skin grafts from C57BL/6 (H-2k(b mice were grafted onto the lateral thoracic wall of BALB/c (H-2k(d mice. Group A mice (control group, n = 9 did not receive any further treatment after preconditioning, whereas groups B and C (n = 9 received cell therapy with MSCs or Tregs, respectively, on days -1, +6 and +13 relative to the skin transplantation. Group D (n = 10 received cell therapy with MSCs and Tregs on days -1, +6 and +13. Cell suspensions were obtained from the spleens of five randomly chosen mice from each group on day +7, and the immunomodulatory effects of the cell therapy were evaluated by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Our results show that allograft survival was significantly longer in group D compared to the control group (group A. Flow cytometric analysis and real-time PCR for splenocytes revealed that the Th2 subpopulation in group D increased significantly compared to the group B. Also, the expression of Foxp3 and STAT 5 increased significantly in group D compared to the conventional cell therapy groups (B and C. Taken together, these data suggest that a combined cell therapy approach with MSCs and Tregs has a synergistic effect on immunoregulatory function in vivo, and might provide a novel strategy for improving survival in allograft transplantation.

  15. Microvescicles Derived from Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Are Not as Effective as Their Cellular Counterpart in the Ability to Modulate Immune Responses In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Antonella; Scarsella, Marco; Starc, Nadia; Giorda, Ezio; Biagini, Simone; Proia, Alessandra; Carsetti, Rita; Locatelli, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that possess broad immunomodulatory properties; the mechanisms underlying these properties have not been completely clarified. Aim of this study was to compare in vitro immunomodulatory effects of MSCs with those of microvesicles (MVs) released in supernatants from the same MSCs. MSCs were generated from bone marrow of 12 healthy donors (HDs) and MVs were isolated from their supernatant by serial ultracentrifugation according to two different procedures. Both MSCs and MVs were characterized by flow cytometry and incubated in vitro with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 12 HDs after stimulation with PHA and CpG. Growth factors and cytokines were quantified by ELISA. MVs were identified as 0.1–1 μm particles positive for CMFDA, CD107, and CD13. MSCs were significantly more capable to inhibit in vitro PHA-induced T-cell proliferation as compared with the corresponding MVs (Pactivity on B-cell proliferation (P=0.43 as compared with PBMCs/CpG/MSCs; MSC:PBMC ratio 1:10) they induced lower inhibitory effect on plasmacell differentiation and antibody secretion (P<0.05 as compared with PBMCs/CpG/MSCs). For both T and B cells, MSC co-colture induced a statistically significant increase in IL-10 and TGFβ and decrease of GM-CSF and IFNγ, as compared with MV incubation. Our data indicate a lower in vitro immunomodulatory effect of MVs on T-cell proliferation and antibody formation, as compared with their cellular counterpart. The relative clinical benefit of either MSCs or MVs needs to be compared in proper prospective studies. PMID:24937591

  16. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from pluripotent stem cells through a neural crest lineage using small molecule compounds with defined media.

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    Makoto Fukuta

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCCs are an embryonic migratory cell population with the ability to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types that contribute to the craniofacial skeleton, cornea, peripheral nervous system, and skin pigmentation. This ability suggests the promising role of NCCs as a source for cell-based therapy. Although several methods have been used to induce human NCCs (hNCCs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, further modifications are required to improve the robustness, efficacy, and simplicity of these methods. Chemically defined medium (CDM was used as the basal medium in the induction and maintenance steps. By optimizing the culture conditions, the combination of the GSK3β inhibitor and TGFβ inhibitor with a minimum growth factor (insulin very efficiently induced hNCCs (70-80% from hPSCs. The induced hNCCs expressed cranial NCC-related genes and stably proliferated in CDM supplemented with EGF and FGF2 up to at least 10 passages without changes being observed in the major gene expression profiles. Differentiation properties were confirmed for peripheral neurons, glia, melanocytes, and corneal endothelial cells. In addition, cells with differentiation characteristics similar to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were induced from hNCCs using CDM specific for human MSCs. Our simple and robust induction protocol using small molecule compounds with defined media enabled the generation of hNCCs as an intermediate material producing terminally differentiated cells for cell-based innovative medicine.

  17. Biological, functional and genetic characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from pediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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    Antonella Conforti

    Full Text Available Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs isolated from bone marrow (BM of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs at diagnosis (day+0 and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78, the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001 and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04 as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.. ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present, nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment.

  18. Allogeneic Transplantation of Periodontal Ligament-Derived Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Sheets in Canine Critical-Size Supra-Alveolar Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumanuma, Yuka; Iwata, Takanori; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Washio, Kaoru; Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Azusa; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Izumi, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that induces the destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, followed by tooth loss. Although several approaches have been applied to periodontal regeneration, complete periodontal regeneration has not been accomplished. Tissue engineering using a combination of cells and scaffolds is considered to be a viable alternative strategy. We have shown that autologous transplantation of periodontal ligament-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (PDL-MSC) sheets regenerates periodontal tissue in canine models. However, the indications for autologous cell transplantation in clinical situations are limited. Therefore, this study evaluated the safety and efficacy of allogeneic transplantation of PDL-MSC sheets using a canine horizontal periodontal defect model. Canine PDL-MSCs were labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and were cultured on temperature-responsive dishes. Three-layered cell sheets were transplanted around denuded root surfaces either autologously or allogeneically. A mixture of β-tricalcium phosphate and collagen gel was placed on the bone defects. Eight weeks after transplantation, dogs were euthanized and subjected to microcomputed tomography and histological analyses. RNA and DNA were extracted from the paraffin sections to verify the presence of EGFP at the transplantation site. Inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera were quantified using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Periodontal regeneration was observed in both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantation groups. The allogeneic transplantation group showed particularly significant regeneration of newly formed cementum, which is critical for the periodontal regeneration. Serum levels of inflammatory markers from peripheral blood sera showed little difference between the autologous and allogeneic groups. EGFP amplicons were detectable in the paraffin sections of the allogeneic group. These results suggest that

  19. Crucial role of IL1beta and C3a in the in vitro-response of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells to inflammatory mediators of polytrauma.

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    Nina-Emily Hengartner

    Full Text Available Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC exert immune-modulatory effects and support tissue regeneration in various local trauma models. In case of a polytrauma, high amounts of danger-associated molecular patterns are released, leading to a systemic increase of inflammatory mediators. The influence of such a complex inflammatory microenvironment on human MSC is mainly unknown so far. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a defined serum-free polytrauma "cocktail" containing IL beta, IL6, IL8 and the anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a, in concentrations corresponding to those measured in the blood of polytrauma patients, on human MSC in vitro. The polytrauma cocktail induced directed migration of MSC with C3a representing its major soluble chemoattractive agent. Furthermore, the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta upregulated the expression of MMP1 indicating a potential role of IL1beta to enhance MSC migration in the tissue context. COX2, PTGES and TSG6 were also found to be upregulated upon stimulation with the polytrauma cocktail or IL1beta, but not through other single factors of the polytrauma cocktail in pathophysiologically relevant concentrations. An RNA expression array of 84 inflammation-related genes revealed that both the polytrauma cocktail and IL1beta induced C3, CSF1, TLR3 and various chemokines without major qualitative or quantitative differences. These results indicate that IL1beta is a crucial mediator of the polytrauma cocktail in terms of immune-modulation and MMP1 expression. Thus, upon encountering the primary sterile, inflammatory milieu of a polytrauma, endogenous or systemically transfused MSC might be able to migrate to sites of injury, secrete TSG6 and PGE2 and to influence macrophage biology as observed in local trauma models.

  20. Platelet lysate as a substitute for animal serum for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Giuseppe; Amati, Eliana; Bambi, Franco; Bernardi, Martina; Chieregato, Katia; Schäfer, Richard; Sella, Sabrina; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a cell culture supplement is discouraged by regulatory authorities to limit the risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions in the transplanted host. Additionally, FBS production came under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns. Platelet derivatives have been proposed as FBS substitutes for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) since platelet-derived growth factors can promote MSC ex-vivo expansion. Platelet-derived growth factors are present in platelet lysate (PL) obtained after repeated freezing-thawing cycles of the platelet-rich plasma or by applying physiological stimuli such as thrombin or CaCl2.PL-expanded MSCs have been used already in the clinic, taking advantage of their faster proliferation compared with FBS-expanded preparations. Should PL be applied to other biopharmaceutical products, its demand is likely to increase dramatically. The use of fresh platelet units for the production of PL raises concerns due to limited availability of platelet donors. Expired units might represent an alternative, but further data are needed to define safety, including pathogen reduction, and functionality of the obtained PL. In addition, relevant questions concerning the definition of PL release criteria, including concentration ranges of specific growth factors in PL batches for various clinical indications, also need to be addressed. We are still far from a common definition of PL and standardized PL manufacture due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms that mediate PL-promoting cell growth. Here, we concisely discuss aspects of PL as MSC culture supplement as a preliminary step towards an agreed definition of the required characteristics of PL for the requirements of manufacturers and users. PMID:27411942

  1. Intravenous administration of mesenchymal stem cells exerts therapeutic effects on parkinsonian model of rats: Focusing on neuroprotective effects of stromal cell-derived factor-1α

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    Tayra Judith

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from bone marrow with secretory functions of various neurotrophic factors. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is also reported as one of chemokines released from MSCs. In this research, the therapeutic effects of MSCs through SDF-1α were explored. 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 20 μg was injected into the right striatum of female SD rats with subsequent administration of GFP-labeled MSCs, fibroblasts, (i.v., 1 × 107 cells, respectively or PBS at 2 hours after 6-OHDA injection. All rats were evaluated behaviorally with cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotation test for 1 month with consequent euthanasia for immunohistochemical evaluations. Additionally, to explore the underlying mechanisms, neuroprotective effects of SDF-1α were explored using 6-OHDA-exposed PC12 cells by using dopamine (DA assay and TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Rats receiving MSC transplantation significantly ameliorated behaviorally both in cylinder test and amphetamine-induced rotation test compared with the control groups. Correspondingly, rats with MSCs displayed significant preservation in the density of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-positive fibers in the striatum and the number of TH-positive neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc compared to that of control rats. In the in vitro study, SDF-1α treatment increased DA release and suppressed cell death induced by 6-OHDA administration compared with the control groups. Conclusions Consequently, MSC transplantation might exert neuroprotection on 6-OHDA-exposed dopaminergic neurons at least partly through anti-apoptotic effects of SDF-1α. The results demonstrate the potentials of intravenous MSC administration for clinical applications, although further explorations are required.

  2. Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Preconditioned Human Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Rescue Ischemic Rat Cortical Neurons by Enhancing Trophic Factor Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Seo; Noh, Min Young; Cho, Kyung Ah; Kim, Hyemi; Kwon, Min-Soo; Kim, Kyung Suk; Kim, Juhan; Koh, Seong-Ho; Kim, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) represent a promising tool for stem cell-based therapies. However, the majority of MSCs fail to reach the injury site and have only minimal therapeutic effect. In this study, we assessed whether hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) preconditioning of human BM-MSCs could increase their functional capacity and beneficial effect on ischemic rat cortical neurons. Human BM-MSCs were cultured under hypoxia (1% O2) and with long-term reoxygenation for various times to identify the optimal conditions for increasing their viability and proliferation. The effects of H/R preconditioning on the BM-MSCs were assessed by analyzing the expression of prosurvival genes, trophic factors, and cell migration assays. The functionally improved BM-MSCs were cocultured with ischemic rat cortical neurons to compare with normoxic cultured BM-MSCs. Although the cell viability and proliferation of BM-MSCs were reduced after 1 day of hypoxic culture (1% O2), when this was followed by 5-day reoxygenation, the BM-MSCs recovered and multiplied extensively. The immunophenotype and trilineage differentiation of BM-MSCs were also maintained under this H/R preconditioning. In addition, the preconditioning enhanced the expression of prosurvival genes, the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of various trophic factors and migration capacity. Finally, coculture with the H/R-preconditioned BM-MSCs promoted the survival of ischemic rat cortical neurons. H/R preconditioning of BM-MSCs increases prosurvival signals, trophic factor release, and cell migration and appears to increase their ability to rescue ischemic cortical neurons. This optimized H/R preconditioning procedure could provide the basis for a new strategy for stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke patients. PMID:25288154

  3. Combination of low O(2) concentration and mesenchymal stromal cells during culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells improves the maintenance and proliferative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Hammoud, Mohammad; Vlaski, Marija; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Lafarge, Xavier; Boiron, Jean-Michel; Praloran, Vincent; Brunet De La Grange, Philippe; Ivanovic, Zoran

    2012-06-01

    The physiological approach suggests that an environment associating the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and low O(2) concentration would be most favorable for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in course of ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic grafts. To test this hypothesis, we performed a co-culture of cord blood CD34(+) cells with or without MSC in presence of cytokines for 10 days at 20%, 5%, and 1.5% O(2) and assessed the impact on total cells, CD34(+) cells, committed progenitors (colony-forming cells-CFC) and stem cells activity (pre-CFC and Scid repopulating cells-SRC). Not surprisingly, the expansion of total cells, CD34(+) cells, and CFC was higher in co-culture and at 20% O(2) compared to simple culture and low O(2) concentrations, respectively. However, co-culture at low O(2) concentrations provided CD34(+) cell and CFC amplification similar to classical culture at 20% O(2) . Interestingly, low O(2) concentrations ensured a better pre-CFC and SRC preservation/expansion in co-culture. Indeed, SRC activity in co-culture at 1.5% O(2) was higher than in freshly isolated CD34(+) cells. Interleukin-6 production by MSC at physiologically low O(2) concentrations might be one of the factors mediating this effect. Our data demonstrate that association of co-culture and low O(2) concentration not only induces sufficient expansion of committed progenitors (with respect to the classical culture), but also ensures a better maintenance/expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), pointing to the oxygenation as a physiological regulatory factor but also as a cell engineering tool.

  4. Construction of engineering adipose-like tissue in vivo utilizing human insulin gene-modified umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells with silk fibroin 3D scaffolds.

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    Li, Shi-Long; Liu, Yi; Hui, Ling

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the use of a combination of human insulin gene-modified umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells (hUMSCs) with silk fibroin 3D scaffolds for adipose tissue engineering. In this study hUMSCs were isolated and cultured. HUMSCs infected with Ade-insulin-EGFP were seeded in fibroin 3D scaffolds with uniform 50-60 µm pore size. Silk fibroin scaffolds with untransfected hUMSCs were used as control. They were cultured for 4 days in adipogenic medium and transplanted under the dorsal skins of female Wistar rats after the hUMSCs had been labelled with chloromethylbenzamido-1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (CM-Dil). Macroscopical impression, fluorescence observation, histology and SEM were used for assessment after transplantation at 8 and 12 weeks. Macroscopically, newly formed adipose tissue was observed in the experimental group and control group after 8 and 12 weeks. Fluorescence observation supported that the formed adipose tissue originated from seeded hUMSCs rather than from possible infiltrating perivascular tissue. Oil red O staining of newly formed tissue showed that there was substantially more tissue regeneration in the experimental group than in the control group. SEM showed that experimental group cells had more fat-like cells, whose volume was larger than that of the control group, and degradation of the silk fibroin scaffold was greater under SEM observation. This study provides significant evidence that hUMSCs transfected by adenovirus vector have good compatibility with silk fibroin scaffold, and adenoviral transfection of the human insulin gene can be used for the construction of tissue-engineered adipose. PMID:23509085

  5. Low-density subculture: a technical note on the importance of avoiding cell-to-cell contact during mesenchymal stromal cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Richard; Richardson, Stephen M; Cartmell, Sarah H

    2015-10-01

    Numerous scientific studies and clinical trials are carried out each year exploring the use of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the effective and reliable expansion of this very important cell type remains a challenge. In this study the importance of cell-to-cell contact during expansion has been explored on the proliferation and differentiation potential of the produced cells. Cells were cultured up to passage 5 under conditions where cell-to-cell contact was either probable (40-70% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol A) or where it was unlikely (10-50% confluence; see supporting information, Protocol B). The effect of the two different conditions on expansion efficiency; proliferation rate and tri-lineage differentiation potential was assessed. Differences in immunophenotype, cell size and senescence were also investigated. Protocol B cultures expanded twice as fast as those cultured with Protocol A. In passage 5 experiments low confluence expanded cells displayed a 10% higher overall proliferation rate, and produced 23% more cells in growth, 12% more in osteogenic, 77% more in adipogenic, but 27% less in chondrogenic medium. Differentiation potential wasn't decisively affected at the mRNA level. However, Protocol B favoured bone and cartilage differentiation at the secretional level. Protocol A populations showed reduced purity, expressing CD105 in only 76% compared to the 96.7% in Protocol B cultures. Protocol A populations also contained significantly more (+4.2%) senescent cells, however, no difference was found in cell size between the two protocols. The findings of this study suggest that cell-to-cell contact, and therefore high confluence levels, is detrimental to MSC quality.

  6. Use of autologous human mesenchymal stromal cell/fibrin clot constructs in upper limb non-unions: long-term assessment.

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    Stefano Giannotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tissue engineering appears to be an attractive alternative to the traditional approach in the treatment of fracture non-unions. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are considered an appealing cell source for clinical intervention. However, ex vivo cell expansion and differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage, together with the design of a suitable scaffold have yet to be optimized. Major concerns exist about the safety of MSC-based therapies, including possible abnormal overgrowth and potential cancer evolution. AIMS: We examined the long-term efficacy and safety of ex vivo expanded bone marrow MSCs, embedded in autologous fibrin clots, for the healing of atrophic pseudarthrosis of the upper limb. Our research work relied on three main issues: use of an entirely autologous context (cells, serum for ex vivo cell culture, scaffold components, reduced ex vivo cell expansion, and short-term MSC osteoinduction before implantation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Bone marrow MSCs isolated from 8 patients were expanded ex vivo until passage 1 and short-term osteo-differentiated in autologous-based culture conditions. Tissue-engineered constructs designed to embed MSCs in autologous fibrin clots were locally implanted with bone grafts, calibrating their number on the extension of bone damage. Radiographic healing was evaluated with short- and long-term follow-ups (range averages: 6.7 and 76.0 months, respectively. All patients recovered limb function, with no evidence of tissue overgrowth or tumor formation. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that highly autologous treatment can be effective and safe in the long-term healing of bone non-unions. This tissue engineering approach resulted in successful clinical and functional outcomes for all patients.

  7. Platelet lysate as a substitute for animal serum for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Giuseppe; Amati, Eliana; Bambi, Franco; Bernardi, Martina; Chieregato, Katia; Schäfer, Richard; Sella, Sabrina; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a cell culture supplement is discouraged by regulatory authorities to limit the risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions in the transplanted host. Additionally, FBS production came under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns. Platelet derivatives have been proposed as FBS substitutes for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) since platelet-derived growth factors can promote MSC ex-vivo expansion. Platelet-derived growth factors are present in platelet lysate (PL) obtained after repeated freezing-thawing cycles of the platelet-rich plasma or by applying physiological stimuli such as thrombin or CaCl2.PL-expanded MSCs have been used already in the clinic, taking advantage of their faster proliferation compared with FBS-expanded preparations. Should PL be applied to other biopharmaceutical products, its demand is likely to increase dramatically. The use of fresh platelet units for the production of PL raises concerns due to limited availability of platelet donors. Expired units might represent an alternative, but further data are needed to define safety, including pathogen reduction, and functionality of the obtained PL. In addition, relevant questions concerning the definition of PL release criteria, including concentration ranges of specific growth factors in PL batches for various clinical indications, also need to be addressed. We are still far from a common definition of PL and standardized PL manufacture due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms that mediate PL-promoting cell growth. Here, we concisely discuss aspects of PL as MSC culture supplement as a preliminary step towards an agreed definition of the required characteristics of PL for the requirements of manufacturers and users.

  8. Scaffold preferences of mesenchymal stromal cells and adipose-derived stem cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice influence the tissue engineering of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Flade, Viktoria; Garbe, Annette I; Lauer, Günter; Labudde, Dirk

    2014-05-01

    We have analysed the growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) from bone marrow, and of adipose derived stem cells (ASC) from murine abdominal fat tissue, of green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic animals grown directly on two types of hydroxyapatite ceramic bone substitutes. BONITmatrix® and NanoBone® have specific mechanical and physiochemical properties such as porosity and an inner surface that influence cellular growth. Both MSC and ASC were separately seeded on 200mg of each biomaterial and cultured for 3 weeks under osteogenic differentiation conditions. The degree of mineralisation was assessed by alizarin red dye and the specific alkaline phosphatase activity of the differentiated cells. The morphology of the cells was examined by scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The osteoblastic phenotype of the cells was confirmed by analysing the expression of bone-specific genes (Runx2, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and osteonectin) by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Comparison of BONITmatrix® and NanoBone® showed cell type-specific preferences in terms of osteogenic differentiation. MSC-derived osteoblast-like cells spread optimally on the surface of NanoBone® but not BONITmatrix® granules. In contrast BONITmatrix® granules conditioned the growth of osteoblast-like cells derived from ASC. The osteoblastic phenotype of the cultured cells on all matrices was confirmed by specific gene expression. Our results show that the in vitro growth and osteogenic differentiation of murine MSC or ASC of GFP transgenic mice are distinctly influenced by the ceramic substratum. While NanoBone® granules support the proliferation and differentiation of murine MSC isolated from bone marrow, the growth of murine ASC is supported by BONITmatrix® granules. NanoBone® is therefore recommended for use as scaffold in tissue engineering that requires MSC, whereas ASC can be combined with BONITmatrix® for

  9. Biological, functional and genetic characterization of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from pediatric patients affected by acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  10. Combination treatment of hypothermia and mesenchymal stromal cells amplifies neuroprotection in primary rat neurons exposed to hypoxic-ischemic-like injury in vitro: role of the opioid system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Kaneko

    Full Text Available This study was designed to reveal the therapeutic regimen and mechanism of action underlying hypothermia treatment in combination with stem cell transplantation for ameliorating neonatal hypoxic-ischemic-like injury. Primary rat neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD, which produced hypoxic-ischemic-like injury in vitro, then incubated at 25°C (severe hypothermia, 34°C (moderate hypothermia, and 37°C (normothermia with or without subsequent co-culture with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Combination treatment of moderate hypothermia and MSCs significantly improved cell survival and mitochondrial activity after OGD exposure. The exposure of delta opioid human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293 to moderate hypothermia attenuated OGD-mediated cell alterations, which were much more pronounced in HEK293 cells overexpressing the delta opioid receptor. Further, the addition of delta opioid peptide to 34°C hypothermia and stem cell treatment in primary rat neurons showed synergistic neuroprotective effects against OGD which were significantly more robust than the dual combination of moderate hypothermia and MSCs, and were significantly reduced, but not completely abolished, by the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone altogether implicating a ligand-receptor mechanism of neuroprotection. Further investigations into non-opioid therapeutic signaling pathways revealed growth factor mediation and anti-apoptotic function accompanying the observed therapeutic benefits. These results support combination therapy of hypothermia and stem cells for hypoxic-ischemic-like injury in vitro, which may have a direct impact on current clinical trials using stand-alone hypothermia or stem cells for treating neonatal encephalopathy.

  11. Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells as a Promising Cellular Therapeutic Strategy for the Management of Graft-versus-Host Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. McGuirk

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT, a treatment option in hematologic malignancies and bone marrow failure syndromes, is frequently complicated by Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. The primary treatment for GVHD involves immune suppression by glucocorticoids. However, patients are often refractory to the steroid therapy, and this results in a poor prognosis. Therefore alternative therapies are needed to treat GVHD. Here, we review data supporting the clinical investigation of a novel cellular therapy using Wharton’s jelly (WJ-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs as a potentially safe and effective therapeutic strategy in the management of GVHD. Adult-derived sources of MSCs have demonstrated signals of efficacy in the management of GVHD. However, there are limitations, including: limited proliferation capacity; heterogeneity of cell sources; lengthy expansion time to clinical dose; expansion failure in vitro; and a painful, invasive, isolation procedure for the donor. Therefore, alternative MSC sources for cellular therapy are sought. The reviewed data suggests MSCs derived from WJ may be a safe and effective cellular therapy for GVHD. Laboratories investigated and defined the immune properties of WJ-MSCs for potential use in cellular therapy. These cells represent a more uniform cell population than bone marrow-derived MSCs, displaying robust immunosuppressive properties and lacking significant immunogenicity. They can be collected safely and painlessly from individuals at birth, rapidly expanded and stored cryogenically for later clinical use. Additionally, data we reviewed suggested licensing MSCs (activating MSCs by exposure to cytokines to enhance effectiveness in treating GVHD. Therefore, WJCs should be tested as a second generation, relatively homogeneous allogeneic cell therapy for the treatment of GVHD.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell recruitment by stromal derived factor-1-delivery systems based on chitosan/poly(γ-glutamic acid polyelectrolyte complexes

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    RM Gonçalves

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs have an enormous potential for tissue engineering and cell-based therapies. With a potential of differentiation into multiple lineages and immune-suppression, these cells play a key role in tissue remodelling and regeneration.Here a method of hMSC recruitment is described, based on the incorporation of a chemokine in Chitosan (Ch/Poly(γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA complexes. Ch is a non-toxic, cationic polysaccharide widely investigated. γ-PGA is a hydrophilic, non-toxic, biodegradable and negatively charged poly-amino acid. Ch and γ-PGA, being oppositely charged, can be combined through electrostatic interactions. These biocompatible structures can be used as carriers for active substances and can be easily modulated in order to control the delivery of drugs, proteins, DNA, etc.Using the layer-by-layer method, Ch and γ-PGA were assembled into polyelectrolyte multilayers films (PEMs with thickness of 120 nm. The chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 was incorporated in these complexes and was continuously released during 120 h. The method of SDF-1 incorporation is of crucial importance for polymers assembly into PEMs and for the release kinetics of this chemokine. The Ch/γ-PGA PEMs with SDF-1 were able to recruit hMSCs, increasing the cell migration up to 6 fold to a maximum of 16.2 ± 4.9 cells/mm2. The controlled release of SDF-1 would be of great therapeutic value in the process of hMSC homing to injured tissues. This is the first study suggesting Ch/γ-PGA PEMs as SDF-1 reservoirs to recruit hMSCs, describing an efficient method of chemokine incorporation that allows a sustained released up to 5 days and that can be easily scaled-up.

  13. Ultra-structural changes and expression of chondrogenic and hypertrophic genes during chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells in alginate beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtdar, Havva; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Balaji Raghavendran, Hanumantharao; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq Mahmod; Ahmad, Tunku Sara

    2016-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the form of pellet culture and encapsulation in alginate beads has been widely used as conventional model for in vitro chondrogenesis. However, comparative characterization between differentiation, hypertrophic markers, cell adhesion molecule and ultrastructural changes during alginate and pellet culture has not been described. Hence, the present study was conducted comparing MSCs cultured in pellet and alginate beads with monolayer culture. qPCR was performed to assess the expression of chondrogenic, hypertrophic, and cell adhesion molecule genes, whereas transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to assess the ultrastructural changes. In addition, immunocytochemistry for Collagen type II and aggrecan and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) analysis were performed. Our results indicate that pellet and alginate bead cultures were necessary for chondrogenic differentiation of MSC. It also indicates that cultures using alginate bead demonstrated significantly higher (p < 0.05) chondrogenic but lower hypertrophic (p < 0.05) gene expressions as compared with pellet cultures. N-cadherin and N-CAM1 expression were up-regulated in second and third weeks of culture and were comparable between the alginate bead and pellet culture groups, respectively. TEM images demonstrated ultrastructural changes resembling cell death in pellet cultures. Our results indicate that using alginate beads, MSCs express higher chondrogenic but lower hypertrophic gene expression. Enhanced production of extracellular matrix and cell adhesion molecules was also observed in this group. These findings suggest that alginate bead culture may serve as a superior chondrogenic model, whereas pellet culture is more appropriate as a hypertrophic model of chondrogenesis. PMID:26966647

  14. A robust and reproducible animal serum-free culture method for clinical-grade bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Anita; Oja, Sofia; Kilpinen, Lotta; Kaartinen, Tanja; Möller, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Efficient xenofree expansion methods to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based culture methods are strongly encouraged by the regulators and are needed to facilitate the adoption of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. In the current study we established a clinically-compliant and reproducible animal serum-free culture protocol for bone marrow-(BM-) MSCs based on an optimized platelet-derived supplement. Our study compared two different platelet-derived supplements, platelet lysate PL1 versus PL2, produced by two different methods and lysed with different amounts of freeze-thaw cycles. Our study also explored the effect of a low oxygen concentration on BM-MSCs. FBS-supplemented BM-MSC culture served as control. Growth kinetics, differentiation and immunomodulatory potential, morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype was analysed. Growth kinetics in long-term culture was also studied. Based on the initial results, we chose to further process develop the PL1-supplemented culture protocol at 20 % oxygen. The results from 11 individual BM-MSC batches expanded in the chosen condition were consistent, yielding 6.60 × 10(9) ± 4.74 × 10(9) cells from only 20 ml of bone marrow. The cells suppressed T-cell proliferation, displayed normal karyotype and typical MSC differentiation potential and phenotype. The BM-MSCs were, however, consistently HLA-DR positive when cultured in platelet lysate (7.5-66.1 %). We additionally show that culture media antibiotics and sterile filtration of the platelet lysate can be successfully omitted. We present a robust and reproducible clinically-compliant culture method for BM-MSCs based on platelet lysate, which enables high quantities of HLA-DR positive MSCs at a low passage number (p2) and suitable for clinical use. PMID:25777046

  15. Potential role of herbal remedies in stem cell therapy: proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalamaththa, Vindya Lankika; Jayasinghe, Chanika Dilumi; Udagama, Preethi Vidya

    2016-08-11

    Stem cell therapy has revolutionized modern clinical therapy with the potential of stem cells to differentiate into many different cell types which may help to replace different cell lines of an organism. Innumerous trials are carried out to merge new scientific knowledge and techniques with traditional herbal extracts that may result in less toxic, affordable, and highly available natural alternative therapeutics. Currently, mesenchyamal stromal cell (MSC) lines are treated with individual and mixtures of crude herbal extracts, as well as with purified compounds from herbal extracts, to investigate the mechanisms and effects of these on stem cell growth and differentiation. Human MSCs (hMSCs) possess multilineage, i.e., osteogenic, neurogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, and myogenic, differentiation abilities. The proliferative and differentiation properties of hMSCs treated with herbal extracts have shown promise in diseases such as osteoporosis, neurodegenerative disorders, and other tissue degenerative disorders. Well characterized herbal extracts that result in increased rates of tissue regeneration may be used in both stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for replacement therapy, where the use of scaffolds and vesicles with enhanced attaching and proliferative properties could be highly advantageous in the latter. Although the clinical application of herbal extracts is still in progress due to the variability and complexity of bioactive constituents, standardized herbal preparations will strengthen their application in the clinical context. We have critically reviewed the proliferative and differentiation effects of individual herbal extracts on hMSCs mainly derived from bone marrow and elaborated on the plausible underlying mechanisms of action. To be fruitfully used in reparative and regenerative therapy, future directions in this area of study should (i) make use of hMSCs derived from different non-traditional sources, including medical waste material

  16. Comparison of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Surface Markers from Bone Marrow Aspirates and Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan O; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J; Fredericks, Lisa Page; Kiefer, Kristina; Conzemius, Michael G; Griffon, Dominique J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to subjectively evaluate the harvest of two areas of adipose collection and three areas of bone marrow collection as potential sites for clinical harvest of adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and bone marrow concentrate for clinical use by quantifying the amount of tissue harvested, subjective ease of harvest, the variation of each site, and determining the cell surface marker characteristics using commercially available antibodies. Bone marrow and adipose tissue samples were collected from 10 adult mixed breed dogs. Adipose tissue was collected from the caudal scapular region and falciform fat ligament. Bone marrow aspirates were collected from the ilium, humerus, and tibia. Tissues were weighed (adipose) or measured by volume (bone marrow), processed to isolate the SVF or bone marrow concentrate, and flow cytometry was performed to quantitate the percentage of cells that were CD90, CD44 positive, and CD45 negative. Sites and tissue types were compared using matched pairs t-test. Subjectively subcutaneous fat collection was the most difficult and large amounts of tissue dissection were necessary. Additionally the subcutaneous area yielded less than the goal amount of tissue. The bone marrow harvest ranged from 10 to 27.5 ml. Adipose tissue had the highest concentration of cells with CD90(+), CD44(+), and CD45(-) markers (P adipose collection yielded more consistent results. These results describe the relative cellular components in the SVF of adipose tissue and bone marrow as defined by the biomarkers chosen. Although bone marrow yielded higher absolute cell numbers on average, adipose tissue yielded more consistent results. Fat from the falciform ligament was easily obtained with less dissection and therefore created less perceived relative patient trauma.

  17. Analysis of biodistribution and engraftment into the liver of genetically modified mesenchymal stromal cells derived from adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rocco, Giuliana; Gentile, Antonietta; Antonini, Annalisa; Truffa, Silvia; Piaggio, Giulia; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Toietta, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Presently, orthotopic liver transplant is the major therapeutic option for patients affected by primary liver diseases. This procedure is characterized by major invasive surgery, scarcity of donor organs, high costs, and lifelong immunosuppressive treatment. Transplant of hepatic precursor cells represents an attractive alternative. These cells could be used either for allogeneic transplantation or for autologous transplant after ex vivo genetic modification. We used stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue (AT-SCs) as platforms for autologous cell-mediated gene therapy. AT-SCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing firefly luciferase, allowing for transplanted cell tracking by bioluminescent imaging (BLI). As a complementary approach, we followed circulating human α1-antitrypsin (hAAT) levels after infusion of AT-SCs overexpressing hAAT. Cells were transplanted into syngeneic mice after CCl(4)-induced hepatic injury. Luciferase bioluminescence signals and serum hAAT levels were measured at different time points after transplantation and demonstrate persistence of transplanted cells for up to 2 months after administration. These data, along with immunohistochemical analysis, suggest engraftment and repopulation of injured livers by transplanted AT-SCs. Moreover, by transcriptional targeting using cellular tissue-specific regulatory sequences, we confirmed that AT-SCs differentiate towards a hepatogenic-like phenotype in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, in transplanted cells reisolated from recipient animals' livers, we detected activation of the α-fetoprotein (AFP) promoter. This promoter is normally transcriptionally silenced in adult tissues but can be reactivated during liver regeneration, suggesting commitment towards hepatogenic-like differentiation of engrafted cells in vivo. Our data support AT-SC-mediated gene therapy as an innovative therapeutic option for disorders of liver metabolism. PMID:22469297

  18. Differential effects of dexamethasone on the chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stromal cells: Influence of microenvironment, tissue origin and growth factor

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    N Shintani

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available nchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which reside within various tissues, are utilized in the engineering of cartilage tissue. Dexamethasone (DEX – a synthetic glucocorticoid – is almost invariably applied to potentiate the growth-factor-induced chondrogenesis of MSCs in vitro, albeit that this effect has been experimentally demonstrated only for transforming-growth-factor-beta (TGF-β-stimulated bone-marrow-derived MSCs. Clinically, systemic glucocorticoid therapy is associated with untoward side effects (e.g., bone loss and increased susceptibility to infection. Hence, the use of these agents should be avoided or limited. We hypothesize that the influence of DEX on the chondrogenesis of MSCs depends upon their tissue origin and microenvironment [absence or presence of an extracellular matrix (ECM], as well as upon the nature of the growth factor. We investigated its effects upon the TGF-β1- and bone-morphogenetic-protein 2 (BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis of MSCs as a function of tissue source (bone marrow vs. synovium and microenvironment [cell aggregates (no ECM vs. explants (presence of a natural ECM]. In aggregates of bone-marrow-derived MSCs, DEX enhanced TGF-β1-induced chondrogenesis by an up-regulation of cartilaginous genes, but had little influence on the BMP-2-induced response. In aggregates of synovial MSCs, DEX exerted no remarkable effect on either TGF-β1- or BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis. In synovial explants, DEX inhibited BMP-2-induced chondrogenesis almost completely, but had little impact on the TGF-β1-induced response. Our data reveal that steroids are not indispensable for the chondrogenesis of MSCs in vitro. Their influence is context dependent (tissue source of the MSCs, their microenvironment and the nature of the growth-factor. This finding has important implications for MSC based approaches to cartilage repair.

  19. Treatment of radio-induced colorectal lesions with Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC): part of the inflammatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the last decades, radiotherapy established as a major tool in the treatment of abdomino-pelvic cancers. Despite great technological evolutions, radiotherapy remains associated with side effects that can sometimes be really harmful, this being mainly due to the toxicity of ionizing radiations for healthy tissues surrounding the tumor. As part of abdomino-pelvic radio-therapies, these side effects mainly affect the gastrointestinal tract, which is very sensitive to radiations. The development of curative treatments thus became a priority. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) showed their immunomodulatory ability as well as their ability to regenerate tissue in many models. During my thesis, we aimed at giving rise to the therapeutic advantage brought by MSC in the treatment of radioinduced damage as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results allowed us to demonstrate the efficiency of our treatment with an effect both on the colic epithelial structure and on its contractile functions. We demonstrated that this therapeutical efficiency depends on two processes. Stimulation of the epithelial proliferation through the Wnt pathway allows the epithelial regeneration process to be enhanced. The increased local corticosterone secretion allows the number and the activation state of T lymphocytes to diminish. Our results moreover suggest the existence of a link between the two observed phenomenons thus providing with a new proof of the combinatory effects of MSC therapy. (author)

  20. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, Jennifer E., E-mail: Jennifer2.May@uwe.ac.uk; Morse, H. Ruth, E-mail: Ruth.Morse@uwe.ac.uk; Xu, Jinsheng, E-mail: Jinsheng.Xu@uwe.ac.uk; Donaldson, Craig, E-mail: Craig.Donaldson@uwe.ac.uk

    2012-09-15

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  1. A standardized procedure to obtain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from minimally manipulated dental pulp and Wharton's jelly samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, M; Fabre, H; Degoult, O; Atzeni, G; McGuckin, C; Forraz, N; Mallein-Gerrin, F; Perrier-Groult, E; Fargues, J C

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stem/stromalcells (MSCs) has emerged as an effectivemethod to treat diseased or damagedorgans and tissues, and hundreds of clinicaltrials using MSCs are currently under way todemonstrate the validity of such a therapeuticapproach. However, most MSCs used for clinicaltrials are prepared in research laboratorieswith insufficient manufacturing quality control.In particular, laboratories lack standardizedprocedures for in vitro isolation of MSCs fromtissue samples, resulting in heterogeneouspopulations of cells and variable experimentaland clinical results.MSCs are now referred to as Human CellularTissue-based Products or Advanced TherapyMedicinal Products, and guidelines fromthe American Code of Federal Regulation ofthe Food and Drug Administration (21 CFRPart 1271) and from the European MedicinesAgency (European Directive 1394/2007) definerequirements for appropriate production ofthese cells. These guidelines, commonly called"Good Manufacturing Practices" (GMP),include recommendations about laboratorycell culture procedures to ensure optimal reproducibility,efficacy and safety of the finalmedicinal product. In particular, the Food andDrug Administration divides ex vivo culturedcells into "minimally" and "more than minimally"manipulated samples, in function of theuse or not of procedures "that might alter thebiological features of the cells". Today, minimalmanipulation conditions have not beendefined for the collection and isolation ofMSCs (Torre et al. 2015)(Ducret et al. 2015).Most if not all culture protocols that have beenreported so far are unsatisfactory, becauseof the use of xeno- or allogeneic cell culturemedia, enzymatic treatment and long-termcell amplification that are known to alter thequality of MSCs.The aim of this study was to describe a standardizedprocedure for recovering MSCs withminimal handling from two promising sources,the dental pulp (DP) and the Wharton's jelly(WJ) of the umbilical cord. The quality and

  2. Development of a novel, physiologically relevant cytotoxicity model: Application to the study of chemotherapeutic damage to mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing need for development of physiologically relevant in-vitro models for testing toxicity, however determining toxic effects of agents which undergo extensive hepatic metabolism can be particularly challenging. If a source of such metabolic enzymes is inadequate within a model system, toxicity from prodrugs may be grossly underestimated. Conversely, the vast majority of agents are detoxified by the liver, consequently toxicity from such agents may be overestimated. In this study we describe the development of a novel in-vitro model, which could be adapted for any toxicology setting. The model utilises HepG2 liver spheroids as a source of metabolic enzymes, which have been shown to more closely resemble human liver than traditional monolayer cultures. A co-culture model has been developed enabling the effect of any metabolised agent on another cell type to be assessed. This has been optimised to enable the study of damaging effects of chemotherapy on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the supportive stem cells of the bone marrow. Several optimisation steps were undertaken, including determining optimal culture conditions, confirmation of hepatic P450 enzyme activity and ensuring physiologically relevant doses of chemotherapeutic agents were appropriate for use within the model. The developed model was subsequently validated using several chemotherapeutic agents, both prodrugs and active drugs, with resulting MSC damage closely resembling effects seen in patients following chemotherapy. Minimal modifications would enable this novel co-culture model to be utilised as a general toxicity model, contributing to the drive to reduce animal safety testing and enabling physiologically relevant in-vitro study. -- Highlights: ► An in vitro model was developed for study of drugs requiring hepatic metabolism ► HepG2 spheroids were utilised as a physiologically relevant source of liver enzymes ► The model was optimised to enable study of chemotherapeutic

  3. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Factors Promote Tissue Repair in a Small-for-Size Ischemic Liver Model but Do Not Protect against Early Effects of Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suomi M. G. Fouraschen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of liver mass and ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI are major contributors to postresectional liver failure and small-for-size syndrome. Mesenchymal stromal cell- (MSC- secreted factors are described to stimulate regeneration after partial hepatectomy. This study investigates if liver-derived MSC-secreted factors also promote liver regeneration after resection in the presence of IRI. C57BL/6 mice underwent IRI of 70% of their liver mass, alone or combined with 50% partial hepatectomy (PH. Mice were treated with MSC-conditioned medium (MSC-CM or unconditioned medium (UM and sacrificed after 6 or 24 hours (IRI group or after 48 hours (IRI + PH group. Blood and liver tissue were analyzed for tissue injury, hepatocyte proliferation, and gene expression. In the IRI alone model, serum ALT and AST levels, hepatic tissue damage, and inflammatory cytokine gene expression showed no significant differences between both treatment groups. In the IRI + PH model, significant reduction in hepatic tissue damage as well as a significant increase in hepatocyte proliferation was observed after MSC-CM treatment. Conclusion. Mesenchymal stromal cell-derived factors promote tissue regeneration of small-for-size livers exposed to ischemic conditions but do not protect against early ischemia and reperfusion injury itself. MSC-derived factors therefore represent a promising treatment strategy for small-for-size syndrome and postresectional liver failure.

  4. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Dental Pulp of Exfoliated Human Deciduous Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Nourbakhsh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The exfoliated human deciduous tooth (SHED contain multipotent stemcells that identified to be a population of highly proliferative and clonogenic .Thesecells are capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types including neural cells,adipocytes, and odontoblasts.Material and Methods: Normal exfoliated human deciduous incisors collected fromsix- to nine-years-old children. The pulp was separated from the crown and digestedwith collagenase .Single cell solutions were cultivated in α-MEM supplemented withES-FCS. After two to three days, the cells reached confluency and were trypsinizedand cultured for further passages. The passage-4 cells were analyzed with CD34,CD45, CD105, CD166, CD31, CD90 and CD146 markers that indicated these cellshad a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC identity. We examined the cells for AlkalinePhosphatase activity to investigate the mesenchymal (stromal nature.Finally, thecells were differentiated into the osteoblastic and adipocytic lineages in differentsubcultures and analysed by RT-PCR and different staining protocols.Results: Viable cells growing out of the explants showed elongated shapes inclusters. These cells showed alkaline phosphatase activity. Flow cytometry resultsrevealed high expression of pluripotent stem cell markers .In some area of theosteoinductive cultures nodule-like structures were observed that showed redmineralizing area upon staining with Alizarin Red.In adipogenic cultures lipid vesiclesappeared after five weeks of induction with Oil Red.Conclusion: This study show that pulp contains cells with high plasticity andproliferation capacity and can be easily isolated without any serious intervention.

  5. Response to intravenous allogeneic equine cord-blood-derived mesenchymal stromal cells administered from chilled or frozen state in serum and protein free media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Brandon Williams

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Equine Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC are commonly transported, chilled or frozen, to veterinary clinics. These MSC must remain viable and minimally affected by culture, transport, or injection processes. The safety of two carrier solutions developed for optimal viability and excipient use were evaluated in ponies, with and without allogeneic cord blood-derived (CB MSC. We hypothesized that neither the carrier solutions nor CB-MSC would elicit measurable changes in clinical, hematological, or biochemical parameters. In 9 ponies (study 1 a bolus of HypoThermosol® FRS (HTS-FRS, CryoStor® CS10 (CS10 or saline was injected IV (n=3/treatment. Study 2, following a one week washout period 5x107 pooled allogeneic CB-MSC were administered IV in HTS-FRS following 24h simulated chilled transport. Study 3, following another one week washout period 5x107 pooled allogeneic CB-MSC were administered IV in CS10 immediately after thawing. Nine ponies received CB-MSCs in study 2 and 3 and three ponies received the cell carrier media without cells. CB-MSCs were pooled in equal numbers from five unrelated donors. In all studies ponies were monitored with physical examination, and blood collection for 7 days following injection. CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte populations were also evaluated in each blood sample.In all three studies, physical exam, complete blood cell count, serum biochemistry, and coagulation panel did not deviate from established normal ranges. Proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes increased at 168h post injection in CB-MSC treatment groups regardless of the carrier solution. Decreases in CD4+/CD8+ double positive populations were observed at 24 h and 72 h in CB-MSC treated animals. There was no difference in viability between CB-MSC suspended in HTS-FRS or CS10.HTS-FRS and CS10 used for low volume excipient injection of MSC suspensions was not associated with short-term adverse reactions. HTS-FRS and CS10 both adequately maintain CB-MSC viability

  6. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Brun

    Full Text Available The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2, transgelin (TAGLN, calponin (CNN1, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11 according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion

  7. Transportation conditions for prompt use of ex vivo expanded and freshly harvested clinical-grade bone marrow mesenchymal stromal/stem cells for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Elena; Murgia, Alba; Caselli, Anna; Grisendi, Giulia; Piccinno, Maria Serena; Rasini, Valeria; Giordano, Rosaria; Montemurro, Tiziana; Bourin, Philippe; Sensebé, Luc; Rojewski, Markus T; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Layrolle, Pierre; Ginebra, Maria Pau; Panaitescu, Carmen Bunu; Gómez-Barrena, Enrique; Catani, Fabio; Paolucci, Paolo; Burns, Jorge S; Dominici, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    Successful preliminary studies have encouraged a more translational phase for stem cell research. Nevertheless, advances in the culture of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hBM-MSC) and osteoconductive qualities of combined biomaterials can be undermined if necessary cell transportation procedures prove unviable. We aimed at evaluating the effect of transportation conditions on cell function, including the ability to form bone in vivo, using procedures suited to clinical application. hBM-MSC expanded in current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) facilities (cGMP-hBM-MSC) to numbers suitable for therapy were transported overnight within syringes and subsequently tested for viability. Scaled-down experiments mimicking shipment for 18 h at 4°C tested the influence of three different clinical-grade transportation buffers (0.9% saline alone or with 4% human serum albumin [HSA] from two independent sources) compared with cell maintenance medium. Cell viability after shipment was >80% in all cases, enabling evaluation of (1) adhesion to plastic flasks and hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate osteoconductive biomaterial (HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold); (2) proliferation rate; (3) ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in contexts of 2D monolayers on plastic and 3D HA/β-TCP scaffolds; and (4) in vivo ectopic bone formation after subcutaneous implantation of cells with HA/β-TCP scaffold into NOD/SCID mice. Von Kossa staining was used to assess ex vivo osteogenic differentiation in 3D cultures, providing a quantifiable test of 3D biomineralization ex vivo as a rapid, cost-effective potency assay. Near-equivalent capacities for cell survival, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were found for all transportation buffers. Moreover, cGMP-hBM-MSC transported from a production facility under clinical-grade conditions of 4% HSA in 0.9% saline to a destination 18 h away showed prompt adhesion to HA/β-TCP 3D scaffold and subsequent in vivo bone formation

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: acute liquefaction necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromal tumors, together with leiomyomas and schwannomas, constitute the sol-called mesenchymal tumors of the intestinal wall. Stromal tumors are histologically differentiated from other mesenchymal tumors in that they are derived from the interstitial cell of Cajal. These tumors can be encountered at any point throughout the entire digestive tract, by usually develop in stomach or small bowel. the clinical presentation in anemia secondary to gastrointestinal bleeding. Acute abdomen due to perforation or necrosis is rare. We present a case of jejunal stromal tumors with massive liquefaction necrosis, a circumstance that resulted in the peculiar radiological features observed. (Author) 9 refs,

  9. Bovine endometrial stromal cells display osteogenic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavirani Sandro

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The endometrium is central to mammalian fertility. The endometrial stromal cells are very dynamic, growing and differentiating throughout the estrous cycle and pregnancy. In humans, stromal cells appear to have progenitor or stem cell capabilities and the cells can even differentiate into bone. It is not clear whether bovine endometrial stromal cells exhibit a similar phenotypic plasticity. So, the present study tested the hypothesis that bovine endometrial stromal cells could be differentiated along an osteogenic lineage. Pure populations of bovine stromal cells were isolated from the endometrium. The endometrial stromal cell phenotype was confirmed by morphology, prostaglandin secretion, and susceptibility to viral infection. However, cultivation of the cells in standard endometrial cell culture medium lead to a mesenchymal phenotype similar to that of bovine bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the endometrial stromal cells developed signs of osteogenesis, such as alizarin positive nodules. When the stromal cells were cultured in a specific osteogenic medium the cells rapidly developed the characteristics of mineralized bone. In conclusion, the present study has identified that stromal cells from the bovine endometrium show a capability for phenotype plasticity similar to mesenchymal progenitor cells. These observations pave the way for further investigation of the mechanisms of stroma cell differentiation in the bovine reproductive tract.

  10. Parameters in three-dimensional osteospheroids of telomerized human mesenchymal (stromal) stem cells grown on osteoconductive scaffolds that predict in vivo bone-forming potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Hansen, Pernille Lund; Larsen, Kenneth H;

    2010-01-01

    Osteoblastic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in monolayer culture is artefactual, lacking an organized bone-like matrix. We present a highly reproducible microwell protocol generating three-dimensional ex vivo multicellular aggregates of telomerized hMSC (hMSC-telomerase re...

  11. Isolation and characterization of Wharton’s jelly-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from bovine umbilical cord and maintained in a defined serum-free three-dimensional system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Tereza C

    2012-05-01

    bovine-derived UC-WJ cells was included in the culture which demonstrated the immunossupression profile typically observed among isolated mesenchymal cells from other species. After classified the UC-WJ cells as mesenchymal stromal phenotype the in vitro 3D cultures was performed using the AlgiMatrix® protocol. Based on the size of spheroids (283,07 μm ± 43,10 μm we found that three weeks of culture was the best period to growth the UC-WJ cells on 3D dimension. The initial cell density was measured and the best value was 1.5 × 106 cells/well. Conclusions We described for the first time the isolation and characterization of UC-WJ cells in a serum-free condition and maintenance of primitive mesenchymal phenotype. The culture was stable under 60 consecutive passages with no genetic abnormalities and proliferating ratios. Taken together all results, it was possible to demonstrate an easy way to isolate and culture of bovine-derived UC-WJ cells under 2D and 3D serum-free condition, from fetal adnexa with a great potential in cell therapy and biotechnology.

  12. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  13. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology

  14. Polyurethane/polylactide-based biomaterials combined with rat olfactory bulb-derived glial cells and adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for neural regenerative medicine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grzesiak, Jakub, E-mail: grzesiak.kuba@gmail.com [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Marycz, Krzysztof [Electron Microscopy Laboratory, University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Kozuchowska 5b, 51-631 Wroclaw (Poland); Szarek, Dariusz [Department of Neurosurgery, Lower Silesia Specialist Hospital of T. Marciniak, Emergency Medicine Center, Traugutta 116, 50-420 Wroclaw (Poland); Bednarz, Paulina [State Higher Vocational School in Tarnów, Mickiewicza 8, 33-100 Tarnów (Poland); Laska, Jadwiga [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Ceramics, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    Research concerning the elaboration and application of biomaterial which may support the nerve tissue regeneration is currently one of the most promising directions. Biocompatible polymer devices are noteworthy group among the numerous types of potentially attractive biomaterials for regenerative medicine application. Polylactides and polyurethanes may be utilized for developing devices for supporting the nerve regeneration, like nerve guide conduits or bridges connecting the endings of broken nerve tracts. Moreover, the combination of these biomaterial devices with regenerative cell populations, like stem or precursor cells should significantly improve the final therapeutic effect. Therefore, the composition and structure of final device should support the proper adhesion and growth of cells destined for clinical application. In current research, the three polymer mats elaborated for connecting the broken nerve tracts, made from polylactide, polyurethane and their blend were evaluated both for physical properties and in vitro, using the olfactory-bulb glial cells and mesenchymal stem cells. The evaluation of Young's modulus, wettability and roughness of obtained materials showed the differences between analyzed samples. The analysis of cell adhesion, proliferation and morphology showed that the polyurethane–polylactide blend was the most neutral for cells in culture, while in the pure polymer samples there were significant alterations observed. Our results indicated that polyurethane–polylactide blend is an optimal composition for culturing and delivery of glial and mesenchymal stem cells. - Highlights: • Polyurethane–polylactide blends exhibit different characteristics from pure polymers. • Pure PU and PLA negatively influence on morphology of glial and mesenchymal cells. • PU/PLA blend was neutral for glial and mesenchymal cell proliferation and morphology.

  15. Advanced glycation end product 3 (AGE3) suppresses the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells by increasing TGF-β expression and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notsu, Masakazu; Yamaguchi, Toru; Okazaki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Ogawa, Noriko; Kanazawa, Ippei; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    In diabetic patients, advanced glycation end products (AGEs) cause bone fragility because of deterioration of bone quality. We previously showed that AGEs suppressed the mineralization of mouse stromal ST2 cells. TGF-β is abundant in bone, and enhancement of its signal causes bone quality deterioration. However, whether TGF-β signaling is involved in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization during the osteoblast lineage remains unknown. We therefore examined the roles of TGF-β in the AGE-induced suppression of mineralization of ST2 cells and human mesenchymal stem cells. AGE3 significantly (P mineralization in both cell types, whereas transfection with small interfering RNA for the receptor for AGEs (RAGEs) significantly (P mineralization in both cell types. In contrast, SD208 intensified AGE3-induced suppression of cell proliferation as well as AGE3-induced apoptosis in proliferating ST2 cells. These findings indicate that, after cells become confluent, AGE3 partially inhibits the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblastic cells by binding to RAGE and increasing TGF-β expression and secretion. They also suggest that TGF-β adversely affects bone quality not only in primary osteoporosis but also in diabetes-related bone disorder.

  16. The anti-oxidative role of micro-vesicles derived from human Wharton-Jelly mesenchymal stromal cells through NOX2/gp91(phox suppression in alleviating renal ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyuan Zhang

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known as one of the main contributors in renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. Here we hypothesized that Micro-vesicles (MVs derived from human Wharton Jelly mesenchymal stromal cells (hWJMSCs could protect kidney against IRI through mitigating oxidative stress. MVs isolated from hWJMSCs conditioned medium were injected intravenously in rats immediately after unilateral kidney ischemia for 60 min. The animals were sacrificed at 24 h, 48 h and 2 weeks respectively after reperfusion. Our results show that the expression of NOX2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS in injured kidney tissues was declined and the oxidative stress was alleviated in MVs group at 24 h and 48 h in parallel with the reduced apoptosis and enhanced proliferation of cells. IRI-initiated fibrosis was abrogated by MVs coincident with renal function amelioration at 2 weeks. NOX2 was also found down-regulated by MVs both in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and NRK-52E cell line under hypoxia injury model in vitro. In conclusion, a single administration of hWJMSC-MVs might protect the kidney by alleviation of the oxidative stress in the early stage of kidney IRI through suppressing NOX2 expression. Moreover, it could reduce the fibrosis and improved renal function.

  17. Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dzobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton’s Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM on esophageal (WHCO1 and breast (MDA MB 231 cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells.

  18. Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Fibroblast-Derived Extracellular Matrix Synergistically Activate Apoptosis in a p21-Dependent Mechanism in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 Cancer Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzobo, Kevin; Vogelsang, Matjaz; Thomford, Nicholas E; Dandara, Collet; Kallmeyer, Karlien; Pepper, Michael S; Parker, M Iqbal

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment plays a crucial role in tumour progression and comprises tumour stroma which is made up of different cell types and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are part of the tumour stroma and may have conflicting effects on tumour growth. In this study we investigated the effect of Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) and a fibroblast-derived ECM (fd-ECM) on esophageal (WHCO1) and breast (MDA MB 231) cancer cells in vitro. Both WJ-MSCs and the fd-ECM, alone or in combination, downregulate PCNA, cyclin D1, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and MMPs and upregulate p53 and p21. p21 induction resulted in G2 phase cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data suggest that p21 induction is via p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms in WHCO1 and MDA MB 231 cells, respectively. Vascular endothelial growth factor, Akt, and Nodal pathways were downregulated in cancer cells cocultured with WJ-MSCs. We also demonstrate that WJ-MSCs effects on cancer cells appear to be short-lived whilst the fd-ECM effect is long-lived. This study shows the influence of tumour microenvironment on cancer cell behaviour and provides alternative therapeutic targets for potential regulation of tumour cells.

  19. Xeno-free culture condition for human bone marrow and umbilical cord matrix-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells using human umbilical cord blood serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeli, Azadeh; Moshrefi, Mojgan; Shamsara, Ali; Eftekhar-vaghefi, Seyed Hasan; Nematollahi-mahani, Seyed Noureddin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is widely used in cell culture laboratories, risk of zoonotic infections and allergic side effects create obstacles for its use in clinical trials. Therefore, an alternative supplement with proper inherent growth-promoting activities is demanded. Objective: To find FBS substitute, we tested human umbilical cord blood serum (hUCS) for proliferation of human umbilical cord matrix derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs) and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal cells (hBM-MSCs). Materials and Methods: Umbilical cord blood of healthy neonates, delivered by Caesarian section, was collected and the serum was separated. hUC-MSCs and hBM-MSCs were isolated and characterized by assessment of cell surface antigens by flow cytometry, alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic/adipogenic differentiation potential. The cells were then cultured in Iscove's Modified Dulbecco's Medium (IMDM) by conventional methods in three preparations: 1- with hUCS, 2- with FBS, and 3- without serum supplements. Cell proliferation was measured using WST-1 assay, and cell viability was assessed by trypan blue staining. Results: The cells cultured in hUCS and FBS exhibited similar morphology and mesenchymal stem cells properties. WST-1 proliferation assay data showed no significant difference between the proliferation rate of either cells following hUCS and FBS supplementation. Trypan blue exclusion dye test also revealed no significant difference for viability between hUCS and FBS groups. A significant difference was detected between the proliferation rate of stem cells cultured in serum-supplemented medium compared with serum-free medium. Conclusion: Our results indicate that human umbilical cord serum can effectively support proliferation of hBM-MSCS and hUC-MSCs in vitro and can be used as an appropriate substitute for FBS, especially in clinical studies. PMID:27738658

  20. Biphasic Polyurethane/Polylactide Sponges Doped with Nano-Hydroxyapatite (nHAp Combined with Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and bone tissue injuries are common targets in regenerative medicine. The degeneration of cartilage tissue results in tissue loss with a limited ability to regenerate. However, the application of mesenchymal stem cells in the course of such condition makes it possible to manage this disorder by improving the structure of the remaining tissue and even stimulating its regeneration. Nevertheless, in the case of significant tissue loss, standard local injection of cell suspensions is insufficient, due to the low engraftment of transplanted cells. Introduction of mesenchymal stem cells on the surface of a compatible biomaterial can be a promising tool for inducing the regeneration by both retaining the cells at the desired site and filling the tissue gap. In order to obtain such a cell-biomaterial hybrid, we developed complex, biphasic polymer blend biomaterials composed of various polyurethane (PU-to-polylactide (PLA ratios, and doped with different concentrations of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAp. We have determined the optimal blend composition and nano-hydroxyapatite concentration for adipose mesenchymal stem cells cultured on the biomaterial. We applied biological in vitro techniques, including cell viability assay, determination of oxidative stress factors level, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potentials as well as cell proteomic analysis. We have shown that the optimal composition of biphasic scaffold was 20:80 of PU:PLA with 20% of nHAp for osteogenic differentiation, and 80:20 of PU:PLA with 10% of nHAp for chondrogenic differentiation, which suggest the optimal composition of final biphasic implant for regenerative medicine applications.

  1. Vitamin D analog EB1089 could repair the defective bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-Jing; Sun, Yan-Bin; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Wang, Xiao-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involves multiple factors, which result in the breakdown of self-tolerance and development of autoimmunity with organ damage. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) from the patients with SLE showed an impaired proliferative capacity compared with that from normal controls. In this study, we isolated BMMSCs from the patients with SLE and found that Vitamin D analog EB1089 could induce BMMSCs proliferation and mineralization deposition. Furthermore, we found that the expression of p-Smad 1/5/8 was promoted in BMMSCs with EB1089 treatment. In conclusion, our results support the notion that EB1089 promoted proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of BMMSCs by Smad 1/5/8 signaling pathway.

  2. GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMOR (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eTornillo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild-type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other entities, have been discovered (e.g. succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data.

  3. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stromal cells and MSC conditioned medium in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS--in vitro evidence from primary motor neuron cultures, NSC-34 cells, astrocytes and microglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Sun

    Full Text Available Administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC improves functional outcome in the SOD1G93A mouse model of the degenerative motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS as well as in models of other neurological disorders. We have now investigated the effect of the interaction between MSC and motor neurons (derived from both non-transgenic and mutant SOD1G93A transgenic mice, NSC-34 cells and glial cells (astrocytes, microglia (derived again from both non-transgenic and mutant SOD1G93A ALS transgenic mice in vitro. In primary motor neurons, NSC-34 cells and astrocytes, MSC conditioned medium (MSC CM attenuated staurosporine (STS - induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Studying MSC CM-induced expression of neurotrophic factors in astrocytes and NSC-34 cells, we found that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF gene expression in astrocytes were significantly enhanced by MSC CM, with differential responses of non-transgenic and mutant astrocytes. Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF in NSC-34 cells was significantly upregulated upon MSC CM-treatment. MSC CM significantly reduced the expression of the cytokines TNFα and IL-6 and iNOS both in transgenic and non-transgenic astrocytes. Gene expression of the neuroprotective chemokine Fractalkine (CX3CL1 was also upregulated in mutant SOD1G93A transgenic astrocytes by MSC CM treatment. Correspondingly, MSC CM increased the respective receptor, CX3CR1, in mutant SOD1G93A transgenic microglia. Our data demonstrate that MSC modulate motor neuronal and glial response to apoptosis and inflammation. MSC therefore represent an interesting candidate for further preclinical and clinical evaluation in ALS.

  4. Biological response of human mesenchymal stromal cells to titanium grade 4 implants coated with PCL/ZrO{sub 2} hybrid materials synthesized by sol–gel route: in vitro evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catauro, M., E-mail: michelina.catauro@unina2.it [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (Italy); Bollino, F.; Papale, F. [Department of Industrial and Information Engineering, Second University of Naples, Via Roma 29, 81031 Aversa (Italy); Mozetic, P.; Rainer, A.; Trombetta, M. [Tissue Engineering Lab, Center for Integrated Research, “Università Campus Bio-Medico di Roma”, via Alvaro del Portillo, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2014-12-01

    The surface modification of implantable materials in order to improve their biological proprieties, including tissue tolerance and osseointegration ability, by means of functional coating deposition is a promising strategy to provide a firm fixation of the implants. In this study, organic/inorganic hybrid materials consisting of an inorganic zirconia-based matrix, in which a biocompatible polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), has been incorporated at different percentages, have been synthesized via sol–gel route. Developed materials have been used to coat titanium grade 4 substrates by means of dip coating technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the obtained coatings has shown that films crack-free can be obtained for high levels of PCL. Chemical composition and interactions between organic and inorganic moieties have been studied by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform InfraRed spectroscopy. The bone-bonding capability of the nanocomposite films has been evaluated in vitro by examining the appearance of an apatite layer on their surface when soaked in a simulated body fluid by means of SEM equipped with EDS microanalysis. In vitro biocompatibility assessment was performed in combination with human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs). Materials were found to be non-toxic and supporting cell proliferation. Additionally, the coating material was not hampering the differentiation of hMSCs in an osteogenic medium. - Highlights: • ZrO{sub 2}/PCL hybrid coatings on Ti grade 4 were obtained by sol–gel dip coating process. • The PCL acts as a plasticizer and allows us to prepare crack-free coatings. • Independent of PCL amount, the films improve the titanium substrates' bioactivity. • The coatings are non-toxic and supportive of cell proliferation at all compositions. • The coatings don't hamper hMSC differentiation in an osteogenic medium.

  5. A Novel Model for Acute Peripheral Nerve Injury in the Horse and Evaluation of the Effect of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Applied In Situ on Nerve Regeneration: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Villagrán, Claudia; Schumacher, Jim; Donnell, Robert; Dhar, Madhu S.

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to sites of experimentally created nerve injury in laboratory animals has shown promising results in restoring nerve function. This approach for nerve regeneration has not been reported in horses. In this study, we first evaluated the in vitro ability of equine bone marrow-derived MSCs (EBM-MSCs) to trans-differentiate into Schwann-like cells and subsequently tested the MSCs in vivo for their potential to regenerate a transected nerve after implantation. The EBM-MSCs from three equine donors were differentiated into SCLs for 7 days, in vitro, in the presence of specialized differentiation medium and evaluated for morphological characteristics, by using confocal microscopy, and for protein characteristics, by using selected Schwann cell markers (GFAP and S100b). The EBM-MSCs were then implanted into the fascia surrounding the ramus communicans of one fore limb of three healthy horses after a portion of this nerve was excised. The excised portion of the nerve was examined histologically at the time of transection, and stumps of the nerve were examined histologically at day 45 after transplantation. The EBM-MSCs from all donors demonstrated morphological and protein characteristics of those of Schwann cells 7 days after differentiation. Nerves implanted with EBM-MSCs after nerve transection did not show evidence of nerve regeneration at day 45. Examination of peripheral nerves collected 45 days after injury and stem cell treatment revealed no histological differences between nerves treated with MSCs and those treated with isotonic saline solution (controls). The optimal delivery of MSCs and the model suitable to study the efficacy of MSCs in nerve regeneration should be investigated. PMID:27695697

  6. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level

  7. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani [Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhassett, NY (United States); Gupta, Sanjeev [Departments of Medicine and Pathology, Marion Bessin Liver Research Center, Diabetes Center, Cancer Center, Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research, Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Singhal, Pravin C., E-mail: psinghal@nshs.edu [Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhassett, NY (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

  8. Decellularized matrix from tumorigenic human mesenchymal stem cells promotes neovascularization with galectin-1 dependent endothelial interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Kristiansen, Malthe; Kristensen, Lars P;

    2011-01-01

    . Histological analysis showed that cells of the most vascularized tumorigenic clone, -BD11 had a pericyte-like alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA+) and CD146+ positive phenotype. Upon serum withdrawal in culture, -BD11 cells formed cord-like structures mimicking capillary morphogenesis. In contrast, cells...... of the poorly tumorigenic clone, -BC8 did not stain for ASMA, tumours were less vascularized and serum withdrawal in culture led to cell death. By exploring the heterogeneity in hMSC-TERT20 clones we aimed to understand molecular mechanisms by which mesenchymal stem cells may promote neovascularization....

  9. Bone marrow stromal cell: mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    OpenAIRE

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic factors, enabling neuroprotection/tissue sparing in a rat model of spinal cord injury. In this model system, bone marrow stromal cell-mediated tissue sparing leads to motor and sensory function impr...

  10. Multiparameter Analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Identifies Distinct Immunomodulatory and Differentiation-Competent Subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. James (Sally); J. Fox (James); F. Afsari (Farinaz); J. Lee (Jennifer); S. Clough (Sally); C. Knight (Charlotte); J. Ashmore (James); P. Ashton (Peter); O. Preham (Olivier); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin); R.D.A.R. Ponzoni (Raquel De Almeida Rocha); Y. Hancock; M. Coles (Mark); P.G. Genever (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also called bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells) provide hematopoietic support and immunoregulation and contain a stem cell fraction capable of skeletogenic differentiation. We used immortalized human BMSC clonal lines for multi-level analysis

  11. Intrapelvic dissemination of early low-grade endometrioid stromal sarcoma due to electronic morcellation

    OpenAIRE

    Choo, Kyoung-Ja; Lee, Hyun Joo; Lee, Tae Sung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Koh, Suk Bong; Choi, Youn Seok

    2015-01-01

    Endometrioid stromal sarcoma is a rare malignancy that originates from mesenchymal cells. It is classified into low-grade endometrioid stromal sarcoma (LGESS) and high-grade endometrioid stromal sarcoma. Ultrasonographic findings of LGESS resemble those of submucosal myomas, leading to the possible preoperative misdiagnosis of LGESS as uterine leiomyoma. Electronic morcellation during laparoscopic surgery in women with LGESS can result in iatrogenic intraabdominal dissemination and a poorer p...

  12. Keratocytes Derived from Spheroid Culture of Corneal Stromal Cells Resemble Tissue Resident Keratocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Yong-Soo; Tibrewal, Sapna; Kim, Eunjae; Yco, Lisette; Sarkar, Joy; Ivanir, Yair; Liu, Chia-Yang; Sano, Cecile M.; Jain, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Corneal stromal cells transform to precursor cells in spheroid culture. We determined whether keratocytes derived from spheroid culture of murine corneal stromal cells resemble tissue resident keratocytes. Methods Spheroid culture was performed by seeding dissociated stromal cells onto ultra-low attachment plates containing serum-free mesenchymal stem cell culture medium. Spheroids were characterized with phenotype specific markers and stemness transcription factor genes. Spheroids an...

  13. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56+ cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15+ cells emerged, partly from CD56+ cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56+ and CD15+ cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56+ cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15+ cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  14. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells fo

  15. Cryopreservation and revival of mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Kastrup, Jens

    2011-01-01

    Over the past few years, the pace of preclinical stem cell research is astonishing and adult stem cells have become the subject of intense research. Due to the presence of promising supporting preclinical data, human clinical trials for stem cell regenerative treatment of various diseases have be...... better cryoprotective agents, maintaining appropriate storage temperatures, and controlling the cell thawing rate. As is described in this chapter, human MSCs can either be frozen in cryovials or in freezing bags together with cryopreserve solutions containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)....

  16. Biological Characteristics of Exosomes Secreted by Human Umbilical Cord-derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells%人脐带间充质干细胞来源外泌体的生物学特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨正常人脐带间充质干细胞(human umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells,hUC-MSCs)分泌的外泌体(exosomes)的免疫调节功能及对恶性肿瘤细胞体外增殖的影响.方法 采用组织贴壁法分离培养hUC-MSCs,收集第3~6代hUC-MSCs上清液,使用超速离心法分离纯化exosomes;通过电子显微镜观察exosomes形态并分析其直径和直径分布范围等特征;采用流式细胞仪检测其表面hUC-MSCs来源的CD44、CD73标志物.将exosomes与正常人外周血单个核细胞共培养,采用MTT检测exosomes对淋巴细胞增殖的影响,ELISA法检测上清液中IL-4和INF-γ的分泌量.选择慢性粒细胞白血病(CML)K562细胞株,加入exosomes共培养,应用MTT法、PI/AnnexinⅤ双染流式法检测exosomes对癌细胞体外生长增殖、凋亡的影响.结果 组织贴壁法成功分离hUC-MSCs,传代后呈长梭状生长.电镜观察分离得到的exosomes为椭圆形膜性小囊泡,经统计得出其直径在6.8~78.1 nm之间,且分布比较集中.流式细胞术测得exosomes高表达黏附分子CD44(54.1%)与干细胞标志物CD73 (31.5%),MTT和ELISA检测结果表明,不同浓度的exosomes均抑制外周血单个核细胞增殖且抑制细胞因子IL-4和INF-γ的分泌,呈现剂量依赖性.体外实验表明exosomes对K562细胞株具有抑制增殖、促进凋亡的作用.结论 hUC-MSCs来源的exosomes具有免疫调节作用及抑制K562细胞增殖的作用.

  17. Optimal Seeding Densities for In Vitro Chondrogenesis of Two- and Three-Dimensional-Isolated and -Expanded Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells Within a Porous Collagen Scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornes, Troy D; Jomha, Nadr M; Mulet-Sierra, Aillette; Adesida, Adetola B

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (BMSCs) are a promising cell source for treating articular cartilage defects. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of cell seeding density within a collagen I scaffold on in vitro BMSC chondrogenesis following isolation and expansion in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) environments. It was hypothesized that both expansion protocols would produce BMSCs capable of hyaline-like chondrogenesis with an optimal seeding density of 10 × 10(6) cells/cm(3). Ovine BMSCs were isolated in a 2D environment by plastic adherence, expanded to passage two in flasks containing an expansion medium, and seeded within collagen I scaffolds at densities of 50, 10, 5, 1, and 0.5 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3). For 3D isolation and expansion, aspirates containing known quantities of mononucleated cells (bone marrow-derived mononucleated cells [BMNCs]) were seeded on scaffolds at 50, 10, 5, 1, and 0.5 × 10(6) BMNCs/cm(3) and cultured in the expansion medium for an equivalent duration to 2D expansion. Constructs were differentiated in vitro in the chondrogenic medium for 21 days and assessed with reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, safranin O staining, histological scoring using the Bern Score, collagen immunofluorescence, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification. Two-dimensional-expanded BMSCs seeded at all densities were capable of proteoglycan production and displayed increased expressions of aggrecan and collagen II messenger RNA (mRNA) relative to predifferentiation controls. Collagen II deposition was apparent in scaffolds seeded at 0.5-10 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3). Chondrogenesis of 2D-expanded BMSCs was most pronounced in scaffolds seeded at 5-10 × 10(6) BMSCs/cm(3) based on aggrecan and collagen II mRNA, safranin O staining, Bern Score, total GAG, and GAG/deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). For 3D-expanded BMSC-seeded scaffolds, increased aggrecan and collagen II m

  18. Bone marrow stromal cell : mediated neuroprotection for spinal cord repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritfeld, Gaby Jane

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is no treatment available that restores anatomy and function after spinal cord injury. This thesis explores transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bone marrow stromal cells; BMSCs) as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. BMSCs secrete neurotrophic f

  19. An optimized protocol for isolating lymphoid stromal cells from the intestinal lamina propria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stzepourginski, Igor; Eberl, Gérard; Peduto, Lucie

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells in lymphoid organs, also called lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs), play a pivotal role in immunity by forming specialized microenvironments that provide signals for leukocyte migration, positioning, and survival. Best characterized in lymphoid organs, LSCs are also abundant in the intestinal mucosa, which harbors a rich repertoire of immune cells. However, the lack of efficient procedures for isolation and purification of LSCs from the intestine has been a major limitation to their characterization. Here we report a new method to efficiently isolate, in addition to immune cells, viable lymphoid stromal cells and other stromal subsets from the intestinal lamina propria for subsequent phenotypic and functional analysis.

  20. Dental pulp-derived stromal cells exhibit a higher osteogenic potency than bone marrow-derived stromal cells in vitro and in a porcine critical-size bone defect model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas; Tvedesøe, Claus; Rölfing, Jan Hendrik Duedal;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) was compared with that of dental pulp-derived stromal cells (DPSCs) in vitro and in a pig calvaria critical-size bone defect model. METHODS: BMSCs and DPSCs were extracted from the tibia bone mar...

  1. Enhanced differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to mesenchymal progenitors by inhibition of TGF-beta/Activin/Nodal signaling using SB-431542

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Schrøder, Henrik Daa;

    2010-01-01

    Directing differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) into specific cell types using an easy and reproducible protocol is a prerequisite for the clinical use of hESC in regenerative medicine procedures. Here, we report a protocol for directing the differentiation of hESC into mesenchymal...... in vivo. Interestingly, SB-OG cells cultured in 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) developed into a homogeneous population of mesenchymal progenitors that expressed CD markers characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC): CD44(+) (100%), CD73(+) (98%), CD146(+) (96%) and CD166(+) (88%) with the ability...... progenitor cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of TGF-beta/Activin/Nodal signaling during embryoid bodies (EB) formation using SB-431542 (SB) in serum free medium, markedly up-regulated paraxial mesodermal markers (TBX6, TBX5), and several myogenic developmental markers including early myogenic...

  2. Novel daidzein analogs enhance osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stromal/stem cells through estrogen receptor dependent and independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and increased risk of fractures. Studies have demonstrated the use of phytoestrogens, or plant-derived estrogens, such as genistein anddaidzein, to effectively increase osteogenic activity of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal s...

  3. Imaging of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, S. E-mail: laushunhk@yahoo.com.hk; Tam, K.F.; Kam, C.K.; Lui, C.Y.; Siu, C.W.; Lam, H.S.; Mak, K.L

    2004-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) represents the most common kind of mesenchymal tumour that arises from the alimentary tract. GIST is currently defined as a gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal tumour containing spindle cells (or less commonly epithelioid cells or rarely both) and showing CD117 (c-kit protein) positivity. Targeted molecular therapy of non-resectable GIST using imatinib, a specific tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, represents a real milestone in the management of solid malignancy. Imaging studies, both anatomical and functional, are playing an increasingly important role in management of patients with GIST. This review illustrates the radiological appearance of GISTs and the site-specific roles of each imaging tool. Clinical features and radiological differential diagnosis of GIST are also discussed.

  4. Small bowel Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors can physiologically alter gut motility before causing mechanical obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Kothari, Manish S; Kosmoliaptsis, Vasilis; Meyrick-Thomas, John

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastro Intestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) are rare stromal neoplasms that represent the most common mesenchymal tumor of the G.I. tract, accounting for 5% of all sarcomas [1,2]. Originating from interstitial cells of Cajal, which are regulators of gut peristalsis, they are preferentially located in the stomach and the small intestine [3] and clinical presentation is variable, ranging from vague complaints to major G.I. bleeding. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment for pa...

  5. Synchronous Acromegaly and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüsniye Başer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly is a rare endocrine disorder characterized by the manifestations of sustained hypersecretion of growth hormone and concomitant elevations in circulating concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1. It has been reported that patients with acromegaly are at the increased risk of developing malignant tumors, particularly colorectal cancer. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. An association between gastrointestinal stromal tumors and insulin-like growth factor system has been reported. Here, we report a patient diagnosed with synchronous acromegaly and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. A 59-year-old man with iron deficiency anemia presented with enlarged hands, coarse facial feature and several skin tags. Thyroid function tests were within normal range. Growth hormone was 5.14 ng/mL, insulin-like growth factor-1 was 820 ng/mL, and no growth hormone suppression was observed on 75g oral glucose tolerance test. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging revealed microadenoma, and the patient was diagnosed with acromegaly. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy revealed an ulcerovegetan mass in the duodenum and the results of the histopathologcal analysis was consistent with gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The association of synchronous and asynchronous gastrointestinal stromal tumors with other malignancies have been reported. The most common accompanying neoplasms are colorectal and gastric adenocarcinomas, as well as pancreatic tumors. However, in the literature, the number of reported cases of synchronous acromegaly and gastrointestinal stromal tumor are limited, and there are no sufficient data on this association. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 52-55

  6. Context dependent development of lymphoid organ mesenchymal subsets fromBP3-Gp38+ PDGFRβ++CD34+ vascular adventitial precursors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitnik, Katarzyna Maria; Wendland, Kerstin; Weishaupt, Holger;

    Lymphoid associated mesenchymal stromal cells are believed to play essential roles in immune and organ homeostasis however our knowledge regarding the functional heterogenity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited.......Lymphoid associated mesenchymal stromal cells are believed to play essential roles in immune and organ homeostasis however our knowledge regarding the functional heterogenity and ontogeny of these cells remains limited....

  7. Stromal microcalcification in prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muezzinoglu, B; Gurbuz, Y

    2001-06-01

    Prostatic calcification is most commonly encountered as calculus or intraluminal calcifications within atypical small glandular proliferations. This study was undertaken to detect stromal microcalcifications in prostate tissue. All slides from 194 needle biopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases (3.1%) had stromal microcalcifications constantly associated with mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate around the each focus. Association with prostatic glands was not seen in any of the microcalcification foci. Three cases had simultaneous adenocarcinoma and one had high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, all of which were apart from the microcalcification foci. In conclusion, stromal microcalcification is a dystrophic, inflammation-mediated, benign process.

  8. Colonic gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A diagnostic dilemma on cytology

    OpenAIRE

    Shailja Puri Wahal; Reetika Sharma; Neelam Gupta; Anchana Gulati

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) is mesenchymal tumors arising from the interstitial cells of Cajal (pace maker cells) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Stomach is the most common site (60-65%) of these tumors. Large intestine and rectum constitute only 5-10% of GIT tumors. Pre-operative diagnosis helps in the management of this tumor as it responds well to c-kit inhibitors. The cytological diagnosis of GIST is characteristic, however, associated with many pitfalls leading to erroneo...

  9. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Grażyna R. Wiraszka; Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyros...

  10. Equine Metabolic Syndrome Affects Viability, Senescence, and Stress Factors of Equine Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells: New Insight into EqASCs Isolated from EMS Horses in the Context of Their Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, equine metabolic syndrome (EMS, an endocrine disease linked to insulin resistance, affects an increasing number of horses. However, little is known about the effect of EMS on mesenchymal stem cells that reside in adipose tissue (ASC. Thus it is crucial to evaluate the viability and growth kinetics of these cells, particularly in terms of their application in regenerative medicine. In this study, we investigated the proliferative capacity, morphological features, and accumulation of oxidative stress factors in mesenchymal stem cells isolated from healthy animals (ASCN and horses suffering from EMS (ASCEMS. ASCEMS displayed senescent phenotype associated with β-galactosidase accumulation, enlarged cell bodies and nuclei, increased apoptosis, and reduced heterochromatin architecture. Moreover, we observed increased amounts of nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS in these cells, accompanied by reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD activity. We also found in ASCEMS an elevated number of impaired mitochondria, characterized by membrane raptures, disarrayed cristae, and vacuole formation. Our results suggest that the toxic compounds, accumulating in the mitochondria under oxidative stress, lead to alternations in their morphology and may be partially responsible for the senescent phenotype and decreased proliferation potential of ASCEMS.

  11. Molecular characterisation of stromal populations derived from human embryonic stem cells: Similarities to immortalised bone marrow derived stromal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Harkness

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow-derived stromal (skeletal stem cells (BM-hMSC are being employed in an increasing number of clinical trials for tissue regeneration. A limiting factor for their clinical use is the inability to obtain sufficient cell numbers. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC can provide an unlimited source of clinical grade cells for therapy. We have generated MSC-like cells from hESC (called here hESC-stromal that exhibit surface markers and differentiate to osteoblasts and adipocytes, similar to BM-hMSC. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to compare the molecular phenotype of hESC-stromal and immortalised BM-hMSC cells (hMSC-TERT. Of the 7379 genes expressed above baseline, only 9.3% of genes were differentially expressed between undifferentiated hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC. Following ex vivo osteoblast induction, 665 and 695 genes exhibited ≥2-fold change (FC in hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC, respectively with 172 genes common to both cell types. Functional annotation of significantly changing genes revealed similarities in gene ontology between the two cell types. Interestingly, genes in categories of cell adhesion/motility and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT were highly enriched in hESC-stromal whereas genes associated with cell cycle processes were enriched in hMSC-TERT. This data suggests that while hESC-stromal cells exhibit a similar molecular phenotype to hMSC-TERT, differences exist that can be explained by ontological differences between these two cell types. hESC-stromal cells can thus be considered as a possible alternative candidate cells for hMSC, to be employed in regenerative medicine protocols.

  12. Characterization of distinct mesenchymal-like cell populations from human skeletal muscle in situ and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecourt, Severine, E-mail: severine.lecourt@sls.aphp.fr [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Marolleau, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: Marolleau.Jean-Pierre@chu-amiens.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); CHU Amiens Hopital Sud, Service d' Hematologie Clinique, UPJV, Amiens (France); Fromigue, Olivia, E-mail: olivia.fromigue@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vauchez, Karine, E-mail: k.vauchez@institut-myologie.org [UPMC/AIM UMR S 974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); INSERM U974, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); CNRS UMR 7215, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France); Genzyme S.A.S., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Andriamanalijaona, Rina, E-mail: rinandria@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Ternaux, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.ternaux@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Lacassagne, Marie-Noelle, E-mail: mnlacassagne@free.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Robert, Isabelle, E-mail: isa-robert@hotmail.fr [Laboratoire de Therapie Cellulaire, Hopital Saint Louis, Paris (France); Boumediene, Karim, E-mail: karim.boumediene@unicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie des Tissus Conjonctifs, Faculte de Medecine, Caen (France); Chereau, Frederic, E-mail: fchereau@pervasistx.com [Myosix S.A., Saint-Germain en Laye (France); Marie, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.marie@larib.inserm.fr [INSERM U606, Universite Paris 07, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); and others

    2010-09-10

    Human skeletal muscle is an essential source of various cellular progenitors with potential therapeutic perspectives. We first used extracellular markers to identify in situ the main cell types located in a satellite position or in the endomysium of the skeletal muscle. Immunohistology revealed labeling of cells by markers of mesenchymal (CD13, CD29, CD44, CD47, CD49, CD62, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD146, and CD15 in this study), myogenic (CD56), angiogenic (CD31, CD34, CD106, CD146), hematopoietic (CD10, CD15, CD34) lineages. We then analysed cell phenotypes and fates in short- and long-term cultures of dissociated muscle biopsies in a proliferation medium favouring the expansion of myogenic cells. While CD56{sup +} cells grew rapidly, a population of CD15{sup +} cells emerged, partly from CD56{sup +} cells, and became individualized. Both populations expressed mesenchymal markers similar to that harboured by human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In differentiation media, both CD56{sup +} and CD15{sup +} cells shared osteogenic and chondrogenic abilities, while CD56{sup +} cells presented a myogenic capacity and CD15{sup +} cells presented an adipogenic capacity. An important proportion of cells expressed the CD34 antigen in situ and immediately after muscle dissociation. However, CD34 antigen did not persist in culture and this initial population gave rise to adipogenic cells. These results underline the diversity of human muscle cells, and the shared or restricted commitment abilities of the main lineages under defined conditions.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells have two features: the ability to differentiate along different lineages and the ability of self-renewal. Two major types of stem cells have been described, namely, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are obtained from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst and are associated with tumorigenesis, and the use of human ESCs involves ethical and legal considerations. The use of adult mesenchymal stem cells is less problematic with regard to these issues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation. MSCs can be isolated from a variety of tissues, such as umbilical cord, endometrial polyps, menses blood, bone marrow, adipose tissue, etc. This is because the ease of harvest and quantity obtained make these sources most practical for experimental and possible clinical applications. Recently, MSCs have been found in new sources, such as menstrual blood and endometrium. There are likely more sources of MSCs waiting to be discovered, and MSCs may be a good candidate for future experimental or clinical applications. One of the major challenges is to elucidate the mechanisms of differentiation, mobilization, and homing of MSCs, which are highly complex. The multipotent properties of MSCs make them an attractive choice for possible development of clinical applications. Future studies should explore the role of MSCs in differentiation, transplantation, and immune response in various diseases. PMID:21396235

  14. Polyurethane/Polylactide-Blend Films Doped with Zinc Ions for the Growth and Expansion of Human Olfactory Ensheathing Cells (OECs and Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells (ASCs for Regenerative Medicine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Polymeric biomaterials based on polyurethane and polylactide blends are promising candidates for regenerative medicine applications as biocompatible, bioresorbable carriers. In current research we showed that 80/20 polyurethane/polylactide blends (PU/PLDL with confirmed biological properties in vitro may be further improved by the addition of ZnO nanoparticles for the delivery of bioactive zinc oxide for cells. The PU/PLDL blends were doped with different concentrations of ZnO (0.001%, 0.01%, 0.05% and undertaken for in vitro biological evaluation using human adipose stromal stem cells (ASCs and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. The addition of 0.001% of ZnO to the biomaterials positively influenced the morphology, proliferation, and phenotype of cells cultured on the scaffolds. Moreover, the analysis of oxidative stress markers revealed that 0.001% of ZnO added to the material decreased the stress level in both cell lines. In addition, the levels of neural-specific genes were upregulated in OECs when cultured on sample 0.001 ZnO, while the apoptosis-related genes were downregulated in OECs and ASCs in the same group. Therefore, we showed that PU/PLDL blends doped with 0.001% of ZnO exert beneficial influence on ASCs and OECs in vitro and they may be considered for future applications in the field of regenerative medicine.

  15. Imaging of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors before and after Imatinib Mesylate Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, S.; Dundamadappa, S.K.; Karam, A.R. (Radiology Dept., Univ. of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States)); Stay, R.M. (Radiology Dept., Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)); Sonnenberg, E. van (Radiology Dept., Dana Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA (United States))

    2009-10-15

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) account for the majority of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. Recent advances in treatment using the molecular targeting agent imatinib mesylate have shown startling response rates and variegated imaging findings. We present the various imaging appearances of GIST on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both before and after treatment.

  16. Multilineage differentiation of porcine bone marrow stromal cells associated with specific gene expression pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, Lijin; Zou, Xuenong; Chen, Li;

    2007-01-01

    There are increasing reports regarding differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) from human and various species of animals including pigs. The phenotype and function of BMSC along a mesenchymal lineage differentiation are well characterized by specific transcription factors and marker g...

  17. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and pro...

  18. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Fernandes Vianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells. Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics.

  19. Late Adherent Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Form Bone and Restore the Hematopoietic Microenvironment In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Verônica Fernandes; Bonfim, Danielle Cabral; Cavalcanti, Amanda dos Santos; Fernandes, Marco Cury; Kahn, Suzana Assad; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Lima, Inayá Correa; Murray, Samuel S.; Murray, Elsa J. Brochmann; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are a valuable resource for skeletal regenerative medicine because of their osteogenic potential. In spite of the very general term “stem cell,” this population of cells is far from homogeneous, and different BMSCs clones have greatly different phenotypic properties and, therefore, potentially different therapeutic potential. Adherence to a culture flask surface is a primary defining characteristic of BMSCs. We hypothesized that based on the adherence time we could obtain an enriched population of cells with a greater therapeutic potential. We characterized two populations of bone marrow-derived cells, those that adhered by three days (R-cells) and those that did not adhere by three days but did by six days (L-cells). Clones derived from L-cells could be induced into adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. L-cells appeared to have greater proliferative capacity, as manifested by larger colony diameter and clones with higher CD146 expression. Only clones from L-cells developed bone marrow stroma in vivo. We conclude that the use of late adherence of BMSCs is one parameter that can be used to enrich for cells that will constitute a superior final product for cell therapy in orthopedics. PMID:23710460

  20. Identification of appropriate reference genes for human mesenchymal cells during expansion and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Romina Amable

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR is an extremely powerful technique for monitoring gene expression. The quantity of the messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNA of interest should be normalized using a reference gene, in order to avoid unreliable results originated by the obtained RNA quality and quantity, manipulation errors and inhibitory contaminants. A reference gene is any gene that is stably and consistently expressed under the conditions being studied. Completely false data can be generated if a reference gene is not chosen adequately. RESULTS: In the present study, we compared expression levels of five putative reference genes (HPRT1, ACTB, GAPDH, RPL13A and B2M in primary cultures of four different human cells: mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from bone marrow, adipose tissue or umbilical cord Whartońs Jelly, and dermal fibroblasts, under different expansion and differentiation conditions. We observed that reference genes are not the same for different cells under the same culture conditions. CONCLUSION: Most stable reference genes under our experimental conditions were: RPL13A for adipose tissue- and Whartońs Jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, and HPRT1 for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts. ACTB was the most unstable gene when evaluating adipose tissue- and Whartońs Jelly-derived mesenchymal stromal cells, whilst GAPDH and B2M were the most unstable genes for bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts, respectively.

  1. Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantation in Myocardial Ischemia (HUC-HEART Trial). A Study Protocol of a Phase 1/2, Controlled and Randomized Trial in Combination with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Alp; Ulus, Ahmet Tulga; Cinar, Ozgur; Topal Celikkan, Ferda; Simsek, Erdal; Akyol, Mesut; Canpolat, Ugur; Erturk, Murat; Kara, Fadil; Ilhan, Osman

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which may be obtained from the bone marrow, have been studied for more than a decade in the setting of coronary artery disease (CAD). Adipose tissue-derived MSCs have recently come into focus and are being tested in a series of clinical trials. MSC-like cells have also been derived from a variety of sources, including umbilical cord stroma, or HUC-MSCs. The HUC-HEART trail (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02323477) is a phase 1/2, controlled, multicenter, randomized clinical study of the intramyocardial delivery of allogeneic HUC-MSCs in patients with chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy. A total of 79 patients (ages 30-80) with left ventricle ejection fractions ranging between 25 and 45% will be randomized in a 2:1:1 pattern in order to receive an intramyocardial injection of either HUC-MSCs or autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) in combination with coronary arterial bypass grafting (CABG) surgery. The control group of patients will receive no cells and undergo CABG alone. Human HUC-MSCs will be isolated, propagated and banked in accordance with a cGMP protocol, whereas the autologous BM-MNCs will be isolated via aspiration from the iliac crest and subsequently process in a closed-circuit cell purification system shortly before cell transplantation. The cell injections will be implemented in 10 peri-infarct areas. Baseline and post-transplantation outcome measures will be primarily utilized to test both the safety and the efficacy of the administered cells for up to 12 months.

  2. A Stromal Cell Niche for Human and Mouse Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation, and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized stromal niche for ILC3 has not been identified. A novel lineage-tracing approach now identifies a subset of murine fetal lymphoid tissue organizer cells that gives rise exclusively to adult marginal reticular cells. Moreover, both cell types are conserved from mice to humans and colocalize with ILC3 in secondary lymphoid tissues throughout life. In sum, we provide evidence that fetal stromal organizers give rise to adult marginal reticular cells and form a dedicated stromal niche for innate ILC3 in adaptive lymphoid organs.

  3. Gastric carcinoid tumor in a patient with a past history of gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chien-Yuan Hung; Ming-Jen Chen; Shou-Chuan Shih; Tsang-Pai Liu; Yu-Jan Chan; Tsang-En Wang; Wen-Hsiung Chang

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract. It may coexist with other type of cancers, and if so, the tumors usually involve the stomach. The most common associated cancers are gastrointestinal carcinomas. We report a 65-year-old woman with a history of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor who had undergone subtotal segmental gastrectomy. New polypoid lesions were detected on a follow-up gastroscopy one year later. The lesions were biopsied and found to be carcinoid tumors. There was serum hypergastrinemia, and type 1 gastric carcinoid tumor was diagnosed. A total gastrectomy was performed. Pathologic examination revealed both carcinoid tumors and a recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

  4. Comparative characterization of stromal vascular cells derived from three types of vascular wall and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Santsun; Eto, Hitomi; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kuno, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Kahori; Ma, Hsu; Tsai, Chi-Han; Chou, Wan-Ting; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2013-12-01

    Multipotent stem/progenitor cells localize perivascularly in many organs and vessel walls. These tissue-resident stem/progenitor cells differentiate into vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, and other mesenchymal lineages, and participate in physiological maintenance and repair of vasculatures. In this study, we characterized stromal vascular cells obtained through the explant culture method from three different vessel walls in humans: arterial wall (ART; >500 μm in diameter), venous wall (VN; >500 μm in diameter), and small vessels in adipose tissue (SV; arterioles and venules, adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs). All stromal vascular cells of different origins presented fibroblast-like morphology and we could not visually discriminate one population from another. Flow cytometry showed that the cultured population heterogeneously expressed a variety of surface antigens associated with stem/progenitor cells, but CD105 was expressed by most cells in all groups, suggesting that the cells generally shared the characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Our histological and flow cytometric data suggested that the main population of vessel wall-derived stromal vascular cells were CD34(+)/CD31(-) and came from the tunica adventitia and areola tissue surrounding the adventitia. CD271 (p75NTR) was expressed by the vasa vasorum in the VN adventitia and by a limited population in the adventitia of SV. All three populations differentiated into multiple lineages as did ASCs. ART cells induced the largest quantity of calcium formation in the osteogenic medium, whereas ASCs showed the greatest adipogenic differentiation. SV and VN stromal cells had greater potency for network formation than did ART stromal cells. In conclusion, the three stromal vascular populations exhibited differential functional properties. Our results have clinical implications for vascular diseases such as arterial wall calcification and possible applications to regenerative therapies

  5. Current management and prognostic features for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamba Gurpreet

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stromal or mesenchymal neoplasms affecting the gastrointestinal (GI tract have undergone a remarkable evolution in how they are perceived, classified, approached, diagnosed and managed over the last 30 years. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST account for approximately 1% to 3% of all malignant GI tumors. The clinical features can vary depending on the anatomic location, size and aggressiveness of the tumor. Metastatic GIST represents a successful example of molecular targeted therapy. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology, clinical features and diagnostic modalities for GIST. We also describe treatment options for early stage, locally advanced and metastatic GIST. Indications for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapy along with duration of therapy are also explained. A brief discussion of latest biomarkers and updates from recent meetings is also provided.

  6. Skeletal (stromal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Zaher, Walid;

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal (marrow stromal) stem cells (BMSCs) are a group of multipotent cells that reside in the bone marrow stroma and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Studying signaling pathways that regulate BMSC differentiation into osteoblastic cells is a strategy....../preadipocyte factor 1 (Dlk1/Pref-1), the Wnt co-receptor Lrp5 and intracellular kinases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stem Cells and Bone....

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Maria-Christina Kastrinaki; Konstantia Pavlaki; Batsali, Aristea K.; Elisavet Kouvidi; Irene Mavroudi; Charalampos Pontikoglou; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Immune-mediated bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS) are characterized by ineffective marrow haemopoiesis and subsequent peripheral cytopenias. Ineffective haemopoiesis is the result of a complex marrow deregulation including genetic, epigenetic, and immune-mediated alterations in haemopoietic stem/progenitor cells, as well as abnormal haemopoietic-to-stromal cell interactions, with abnormal release of haemopoietic growth factors, chemokines, and inhibitors. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MS...

  8. Effects of Osteogenic Induction on Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Ability to Repair Grade Ⅱ Root Furcation Lesions%矿化诱导对骨髓基质细胞修复Ⅱ度根分叉病变的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁芳; 金峰; 李厚轩; 雷浪; 闫福华

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究价矿化诱导对骨髓基质细胞(bone marrow mesenchymal cells,BMSCs)体内形成牙周支持组织,治疗根分叉病变的影响.方法:2只beagle犬双侧下颌第3、4前磨牙和第1磨牙制备根分叉病变,分别植入胶原膜(空白对照组)、胶原膜—矿化诱导的BMSCs复合物(矿化诱导组)和胶原膜—非矿化诱导的BMSCs复合物(非矿化诱导组),术后12周组织学观察牙周组织再生情况.结果:新生牙槽骨面积和新生牙骨质长度的百分比,矿化诱导组(62.31±15.45和72.34±17.42)和非矿化诱导组(48.24±12.34和52.25±15.45)显著高于空白组(24.65±10.35和25.34±9.45)(P<0.05),但矿化诱导组和非矿化诱导组之间没有统计学差异.结论:BMSCs移植可以促进Ⅱ度根分叉病变牙周组织再生,矿化诱导不能提高BMSCs体内修复Ⅲ度根分叉病变的能力.%Objective: To evaluate the effects of osteogenic induction on bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs)' ability to regenerate periodontal tissue and repair grade Ⅱ root furcation lesions. Methods: Grade Ⅱ furcation lesions were established at bilateral 3rd premolar,4th premolar and 1st molar in two beagle dogs, and were treated by implantation of blank collagen membrane (blank control group), collagen membrane-osteogenically inducted BMSCs complex (Osteogenic induction group) or collagen membrane-non-osteogenically inducted BMSCs complex (Non-osteogenical induction group). Periodontal regeneration was evaluated histologically 12 weeks after implantion. Results: The percentage of newly formed alveolar bone and cementum was significantly higher in osteogenic (62. 31 + 15. 45 and 72. 34±17. 42 respectively) and non-osteogenic induction group(48. 24± 12. 34 and 52. 25±15.45) than in blank control group (24.65 + 10.35 and 25. 34 + 9. 45) (P<0.05), but no statistical difference was observed between osteogenic and non - osteogenic induction group. Conclusion: Implantation of BMSCs enhanced

  9. Gastric schwannoma: a benign tumor often misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva S. Shah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastric schwannomas are rare mesenchymal tumors that arise from the nerve plexus of gut wall. They present with nonspecific symptoms and are often detected incidentally. Preoperative investigation is not pathognomic and many are therefore misdiagnosed as gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We report a rare case of a 37-year old woman who underwent laparotomy for complex bilateral ovarian cyst with resection of gastric-gastrointestinal stromal tumor preoperatively, but confirmed to have a gastric schwannomas postoperatively. This case underscores the differential diagnosis of submucosal, exophytic gastric mass as schwannoma.

  10. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekwueme, E.C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, M.; Ghebes, C.A.; Crispim, J.F.; Saris, D.B.F.; Fernandez, A.F.; Freeman, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great p

  11. Selenium supplementation restores the antioxidative capacity and prevents cell damage in bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, Regina; Ulmer, Matthias; Zeck, Sabine;

    2006-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) and other cell populations derived from mesenchymal precursors are developed for cell-based therapeutic strategies and undergo cellular stress during ex vivo procedures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) of cellular and environmental origin are involved in redox...... and transplantation procedures....

  12. Mesenchymal Cells of the Intestinal Lamina Propria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D.W.; Pinchuk, I.V.; Saada, J.I.; Chen, Xin; Mifflin, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The mesenchymal elements of the intestinal lamina propria reviewed here are the myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, mural cells (pericytes) of the vasculature, bone marrow–derived stromal stem cells, smooth muscle of the muscularis mucosae, and smooth muscle surrounding the lymphatic lacteals. These cells share similar marker molecules, origins, and coordinated biological functions previously ascribed solely to subepithelial myofibroblasts. We review the functional anatomy of intestinal mesenchymal cells and describe what is known about their origin in the embryo and their replacement in adults. As part of their putative role in intestinal mucosal morphogenesis, we consider the intestinal stem cell niche. Lastly, we review emerging information about myofibroblasts as nonprofessional immune cells that may be important as an alarm system for the gut and as a participant in peripheral immune tolerance. PMID:21054163

  13. Octacalcium phosphate ceramics combined with gingiva-derived stromal cells for engineered functional bone grafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biocompatible ceramic fillers are capable of sustaining bone formation in the proper environment. The major drawback of these scaffolding materials is the absence of osteoinductivity. To overcome this limitation, bioengineered scaffolds combine osteoconductive components (biomaterials) with osteogenic features such as cells and growth factors. The bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BMMSCs) and the β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) are well-known and characterized in this regard. The present study was conducted to compare the properties of novel octacalcium phosphate ceramic (OCP) granules with β-TCP (Cerasorb®), gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (GMSCs) properties with the BMMSCs and osteogenic and angiogenic properties of a bioengineered composite based on OCP granules and the GMSCs. This study demonstrates that GMSCs and BMMSCs have a similar osteogenic capacity. The usage of OCP ceramic granules in combination with BMMSCs/GMSCs significantly affects the osteo- and angiogenesis in bone grafts of ectopic models. (paper)

  14. Could cancer and infection be adverse effects ofmesenchymal stromal cell therapy?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martha L Arango-Rodriguez; Fernando Ezquer; Marcelo Ezquer; Paulette Conget

    2015-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells [also referred toas mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)] are a heterogeneoussubset of stromal cells. They can be isolated from bonemarrow and many other types of tissue. MSCs arecurrently being tested for therapeutic purposes (i.e.,improving hematopoietic stem cell engraftment, managinginflammatory diseases and regenerating damagedorgans). Their tropism for tumors and inflamed sites andtheir context-dependent potential for producing trophicand immunomodulatory factors raises the question asto whether MSCs promote cancer and/or infection. Thisarticle reviews the effect of MSCs on tumor establishment,growth and metastasis and also susceptibility to infectionand its progression. Data published to date shows aparadoxical effect regarding MSCs, which seems todepend on isolation and expansion, cells source anddose and the route and timing of administration. Cancerand infection may thus be adverse or therapeutic effectsarising form MSC administration.

  15. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells express neuronal phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 刘相名; 孙兵; 惠国桢; 费俭; 郭礼和

    2004-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) can be greatly expanded in vitro, and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types, including osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic cells. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of ADSCs differentiating into neurons.Methods Adipose tissue from rats was digested with collagenase, and adherent stromal cells were cultured. A medium containing a low concentration of fetal bovine serum was adopted to induce the cells to differentiate. ADSCs were identified by immunocytochemistry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of neurofilament 1 (NF1), nestin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).Results Nestin-positive cells were found occasionally among ADSCs. ADSCs were found to express NSE mRNA and nestin mRNA, but not NF1 mRNA. ADSCs could differentiate into neuron-like cells in a medium composed of a low concentration of fetal bovine serum, and these differentiated cells displayed complicated neuron-like morphologies.Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons. These stem cells can overcome their mesenchymal commitment, and may represent an alternative autologous stem cell source for CNS cell transplantation.

  16. Low Reactive Level Laser Therapy for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Kushibiki; Takeshi Hirasawa; Shinpei Okawa; Miya Ishihara

    2015-01-01

    Low reactive level laser therapy (LLLT) is mainly focused on the activation of intracellular or extracellular chromophore and the initiation of cellular signaling by using low power lasers. Over the past forty years, it was realized that the laser therapy had the potential to improve wound healing and reduce pain and inflammation. In recent years, the term LLLT has become widely recognized in the field of regenerative medicine. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms of action of LLLT...

  17. Nephron Progenitor But Not Stromal Progenitor Cells Give Rise to Wilms Tumors in Mouse Models with β-Catenin Activation or Wt1 Ablation and Igf2 Upregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wilms tumor, a common childhood tumor of the kidney, is thought to arise from undifferentiated renal mesenchyme. Variable tumor histology and the identification of tumor subsets displaying different gene expression profiles suggest that tumors may arise at different stages of mesenchyme differentiation and that this ontogenic variability impacts tumor pathology, biology, and clinical outcome. To test the tumorigenic potential of different cell types in the developing kidney, we used kidney progenitor-specific Cre recombinase alleles to introduce Wt1 and Ctnnb1 mutations, two alterations observed in Wilms tumor, into embryonic mouse kidney, with and without biallelic Igf2 expression, another alteration that is observed in a majority of tumors. Use of a Cre allele that targets nephron progenitors to introduce a Ctnnb1 mutation that stabilizes β-catenin resulted in the development of tumors with a predominant epithelial histology and a gene expression profile in which genes characteristic of early renal mesenchyme were not expressed. Nephron progenitors with Wt1 ablation and Igf2 biallelic expression were also tumorigenic but displayed a more triphasic histology and expressed early metanephric mesenchyme genes. In contrast, the targeting of these genetic alterations to stromal progenitors did not result in tumors. These data demonstrate that committed nephron progenitors can give rise to Wilms tumors and that committed stromal progenitors are less tumorigenic, suggesting that human Wilms tumors that display a predominantly stromal histology arise from mesenchyme before commitment to a stromal lineage.

  18. Heterologous mesenchymal stem cells successfully treat femoral pseudarthrosis in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira Manoel; Silva Paulo; Alvarez Silva Lucas; Bonfim Danielle; Conilho Macedo Müller Lucas; Espósito Christiano; Schanaider Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background This study evaluated the effectiveness of treating pseudarthrosis in rats by using bone marrow cell suspensions or cultures of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells Methods Thirty-eight specific pathogen-free (SPF) animals were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1, Control, without surgical intervention; Group 2 (Placebo), experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated only with saline solution; Group 3, experimental model of femoral pseudarthrosis treated with ...

  19. Recruitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Prostate Tumors Promotes Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; SHIOZAWA, YUSUKE; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E.; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Paul H Krebsbach

    2013-01-01

    Tumors recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that the CXCR6 ligand CXCL16 facilitates MSC or Very Small Embryonic-Like (VSEL) cells recruitment into prostate tumors. CXCR6 signaling stimulates the conversion of MSCs into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also kno...

  20. Long-term survival after enucleation of a giant esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Zhi-Min; Xie, Yuan-Cai; Peng, Xu-Xing; Zhang, Hai; Hui, Gang; Wu, Hao; Liu, Ji-Xian; Chen, Bao-Kun; WU, DA; Ye, Yi-Wang

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Less than 1% occurs in the esophagus. Surgery is the primary treatment for patients with GISTs. We report a 29-year-old male was admitted after the detection of a posterior mediastinal mass during work-up with routine examination. He did not have any disease-related symptoms. The physical examination was unremarkable. Chest computed tomographic scan, the barium esophagogram and endoscopic eso...

  1. Reactive Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Attenuate Systemic Inflammation via sTNFR1

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Hiroshi; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Nahmias, Yaakov; Goldwasser, Yoni; Kitagawa, Yuko; Tilles, Arno W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Parekkadan, Biju; Yarmush, Martin L

    2010-01-01

    Excessive systemic inflammation following trauma, sepsis, or burn could lead to distant organ damage. The transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been reported to be an effective treatment for several immune disorders by modulating the inflammatory response to injury. We hypothesized that MSCs can dynamically secrete systemic factors that can neutralize the activity of inflammatory cytokines. In this study, we showed that cocultured MSCs are able to d...

  2. A stromal cell niche for human and mouse type 3 innate lymphoid cells ¶

    OpenAIRE

    Hoorweg, Kerim; Narang, Priyanka; Li, Zhi; Thuery, Anne; Papazian, Natalie; Withers, David R; Coles, Mark C.; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity critically depends on the functional compartmentalization of secondary lymphoid organs. Mesenchymal stromal cells create and maintain specialized niches that support survival, activation and expansion of T and B cells, and integrated analysis of lymphocytes and their niche has been instrumental in understanding adaptive immunity. Lymphoid organs are also home to type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3), innate effector cells essential for barrier immunity. However, a specialized ...

  3. Non-expanded adipose stromal vascular fraction cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Jorge; Alfaro Miguel; Lara Fabian; Solano Fabio; Wang Hao; Min Wei-Ping; Ichim Thomas E; Riordan Neil H; Harman Robert J; Patel Amit N; Murphy Michael P; Lee Roland R; Minev Boris

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is known to contain mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), T regulatory cells, endothelial precursor cells, preadipocytes, as well as anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. Safety of autologous adipose tissue implantation is supported by extensive use of this procedure in cosmetic surgery, as well as by ongoing studies using in vitro expanded adipose derived MSC. Equine and canine studies demonstrating anti-inflammatory and regenerative effects...

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of large size, extragastrointestinal localization and different morphological features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpon’ka I.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The problems of accurate verification of the gastro¬intestinal stromal tumor are relevant today for many reasons. Thus, the histological diagnosis is complicated by the morphological similarity of other gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal neoplasms and by histologicaly different zones within the same investigation. We present the situation with the above issues: the differential diagnosis includes an analysis of morphological criteria and received immunohisto-chemical reactions. Between immunophenotypes of histologicaly different zones principal difference is not revealed.

  5. Pseudoangiomatous Stromal Hyperplasia (PASH) of the Breast: A Series of 24 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Erin; Oprea, Gabriela; Okoli, Joel; Gundry, Kathleen; Rizzo, Monica; Gabram-Mendola, Sheryl; Manne, Upender; Smith, Geoffrey; Pambuccian, Stefan; Bumpers, Harvey L.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign mesenchymal proliferative lesion of the breast. In 2005, only 109 cases had been reported since its initial description in 1986 by Vuitch et al. Our 24 cases represent one of the largest series to be reported from a single institution. We retrospectively reviewed data from 2004 to 2010 of patients diagnosed with PASH by surgical excision or image-guided biopsy. All pathological specimens were reviewed by a single pathologist. The sample...

  6. Cerebellar hemangioblastomas: A study of the immunoprofile of neoplastic stromal component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasić Desanka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Central nervous system hemangioblastomas (HBs are uncommon highly vascularized tumors that are predominantly found in the cerebellum. They occur sporadically or in association with von Hippel-Lindau (VHL disease. HBs are of unknown histogenesis, and the origin of stromal cells is still a subject of debate. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunoprofile of neoplastic stromal component, and to determine whether the profile of the expression of immunomarkers used can contribute to the elucidation of the histogenesis of HBs. Methods. A series of eight cerebellar HBs were histochemically examined for the detection of mast cells and immunohistochemically for the expression of factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAg, CD34, vimentin, factor XIIIa (FXIIIa, S-100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, neuron-specific enolase (NSE neurofilaments (NF, synaptophysin, chromogranin, and somatostatin. Results. Mast cells were present in all hemangioblastomas, and were particularly abundant in one tumor. Immunohistochemically, intense reactivity for vimentin and NSE in the stromal cells was constantly seen. Immunoreactivity with S-100 protein and FXIIIa was variable, but generally many HBs stromal cells were negative for these markers. However, stromal cells were uniformly negative for FVIII-RAg in all HBs investigated. They were negative for CD34 GFAP, NF, synaptophysin, chromogranin, as well as somatostatin. GFAP-positivity of the occasional stromal type cells, located only peripherally, was interpreted as "pseudopositivity". Conclusion. The immunoprofile of neoplastic stromal component in this study suggested a possible origin from undifferentiated multipotential mesenchymal cells. High expression of NSE (glycolytic and hypoxia-inducible enzyme in the HBs stromal cells might be related to the loss of the VHL protein function.

  7. Sclerosing stromal tumour of ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitrawati B. Gargade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing stromal tumor is rare benign ovarian sex cord stromal tumour which occurs predominantly in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life. We report a case of a 32-year-old woman who presented with irregular menstruation and pelvic pain. She underwent panhysterectomy as USG revealed a solid and cystic 15 cm right ovarian tumour with increased vascularity with raised CA125. Hysterectomy specimen revealed a benign sclerosing stromal tumour of right ovary. We present this rare case to emphasis the awareness of benign sclerosing stromal tumour of ovary in young female to avoid unnecessary extensive surgery. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(6.000: 2037-2040

  8. Tumor suppression by stromal TIMPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Jackson, Hartland W; Khokha, Rama

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma has the capacity to drive cancer progression, although the mechanisms governing these effects are incompletely understood. Recently, we reported that deletion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (Timps) in fibroblasts unleashes the function of cancer-associated fibroblasts and identifies a novel mode of stromal-tumor communication that activates key oncogenic pathways invoving Notch and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) via stromal exosomes. PMID:27314104

  9. Sclerosing Stromal Tumor of Ovary

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiu-Huei Peng; Ting-Chang Chang; Swei Hsueh

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary is a rare ovarian disease with prevalence of 1.5%to 6% of ovarian stromal tumors. We present a 24-year-old woman with irregular menstruationfor 6 months and a self-palpable lower abdominal mass. Enucleation of the left ovariantumor was undertaken. Gross examination showed a soft elastic tumor with a smooth outersurface and diffusely white edematous stroma with scattered yellowish nodular areas on thecut surface. Histologic study showed that the cellular n...

  10. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  11. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Sever; Barbu, Emil; Ionescu, Călin; Costache, Adrian; Bălăşoiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the digestive tract. Gastric localization is the most frequent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance of immunohistochemical factors (CD117, CD34, α-SMA, vimentin, p53, Ki67) in diagnostic and size tumor and mitotic activity as prognostic factors for these tumors. We present the case of a 66-year-old male patient with a giant gastric GIST. Like in the vast majority, the symptomatology in this patient has long been faint, despite the large tumor size, and when it became manifest, it was nonspecific. Imagery wise, the computer tomography (CT) scan was the most efficient, showing the origin of the tumor from the greater curvature of the stomach, its dimensions, as well as the relations with the other abdominal viscera. Surgery in this patient was en-bloc, according to the principles of GIST. The histological aspect is characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells positive for CD117 and CD34. Despite complete microscopic resection, the size of the tumor (25×20×27 cm) and the mitotic activity (21÷5 mm2) remains important relapse factor.

  12. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Tumor Compartments Exhibit In Vivo Complementary Patterns of Vascular Perfusion and Glucose Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Galiè

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transport and consumption are increased in tumors, and this is considered a diagnostic index of malignancy. However, there is recent evidence that carcinoma-associated stromal cells are capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption, at least partly because of their efficient vascular supply. In the present study, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET, we mapped in vivo the vascular supply and glucose metabolism in syngeneic experimental models of carcinoma and mesenchymal tumor. We found that in both tumor histotypes, regions with high vascular perfusion exhibited a significantly lower FDG uptake. This reciprocity was more conspicuous in carcinomas than in mesenchymal tumors, and regions with a high-vascular/low-FDG uptake pattern roughly overlapped with a stromal capsule and intratumoral large connectival septa. Accordingly, mesenchymal tumors exhibited a higher vascular perfusion and a lower FDG uptake than carcinomas. Thus, we provide in vivo evidence of vascular/metabolic reciprocity between epithelial and mesenchymal histotypes in tumors, suggesting a new intriguing aspect of epithelial-stromal interaction. Our results suggests that FDG-PET-based clinical analysis can underestimate the malignity or tumor extension of carcinomas exhibiting any trait of “mesenchymalization” such as desmoplasia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  13. Analysis of CD117-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chin-Yuan Tzen; Bey-Liing Mau

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GISTs) that are negative for CD117 expression by immunohistochemistry and to characterize their malignant potential.METHODS: A total of 108 primary mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract were screened to select CD117-negative tumors, from which KIT(exons 9, 11, 13, and 17)and PDGFRA (exons 10, 12, 14, and 18) were sequenced to identify GISTs. Tumor recurrence and distant metastasis were used as the criteria of malignancy.RESULTS: The result showed that approximately 25%(29/108) of the gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors were negative for CD117 and approximately 6% (7/108)of the tumors were CD117-negative GISTs. All these CD117-negative tumors had a mutated KITand a wildtype PDGFRA. All CD117-negative GISTs with mutations at codons 557/558 of KIThad mitotic counts >10/50 high power field, and 75% (3/4) of them showed multiple recurrence or distant metastasis.CONCLUSION: CD1 17-negative KITmutated GISTs account for approximately 6% of the gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors. Tumor recurrence or distant metastasis correlates to both theKITmutations at codons 557/558 and the mitotic counts, but not to the tumor size.

  14. Molecular characterisation of stromal populations derived from human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, L.; Twine, N. A.; Abu Dawud, R.;

    2015-01-01

    of hESC-stromal and immortalised BM-hMSC cells (hMSC-TERT). Of the 7379 genes expressed above baseline, only 9.3% of genes were differentially expressed between undifferentiated hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC. Following ex vivo osteoblast induction, 665 and 695 genes exhibited >. 2-fold change (FC) in h......ESC-stromal and BM-hMSC, respectively with 172 genes common to both cell types. Functional annotation of significantly changing genes revealed similarities in gene ontology between the two cell types. Interestingly, genes in categories of cell adhesion/motility and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were highly...... enriched in hESC-stromal whereas genes associated with cell cycle processes were enriched in hMSC-TERT. This data suggests that while hESC-stromal cells exhibit a similar molecular phenotype to hMSC-TERT, differences exist that can be explained by ontological differences between these two cell types. h...

  15. Rapid attachment of adipose stromal cells on resorbable polymeric scaffolds facilitates the one-step surgical procedure for cartilage and bone tissue engineering purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J. Jurgens; R.J. Kroeze; R.A. Bank; M.J.P.F. Ritt; M.N. Helder

    2011-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue provides an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells. For clinical application, it would be beneficial to establish treatments in which SVF is obtained, seeded onto a scaffold, and returned into the patient within a single surgical procedure. In

  16. Rapid Attachment of Adipose Stromal Cells on Resorbable Polymeric Scaffolds Facilitates the One-Step Surgical Procedure for Cartilage and Bone Tissue Engineering Purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurgens, Wouter J.; Kroeze, Robert Jan; Bank, Ruud A.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; Helder, Marco N.

    2011-01-01

    The stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue provides an abundant source of mesenchymal stem cells. For clinical application, it would be beneficial to establish treatments in which SVF is obtained, seeded onto a scaffold, and returned into the patient within a single surgical procedure. In

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as palpableabdominal mass: A rare entity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are the mostcommon mesenchymal tumour of gastro-intestinaltract. Annual incidence of GIST in United States isapproximately 3000-4000. Clinical presentation ofGIST varies with location and size of tumour but GISTpresenting with palpable abdominal mass is rare. Wereport a case of 38 years old male who presented withlarge abdominal lump. Computed tomography (CT)scan showed a large solid-cystic lesion encasing secondpart of duodenum and distal common bile duct. On CTdifferential diagnosis of Leiomyoma, Leiomyosarcomaand GIST were made. The diagnosis of GIST wasconfirmed by immune-histochemical study of the biopsymaterial. Patient underwent pancreaticodudenectomy.Post-operative course was uneventful. Patient wasstarted on Imatinib therapy post-operatively. Norecurrence noted at six months follow up.

  18. Colonic gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A diagnostic dilemma on cytology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailja Puri Wahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST is mesenchymal tumors arising from the interstitial cells of Cajal (pace maker cells of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Stomach is the most common site (60-65% of these tumors. Large intestine and rectum constitute only 5-10% of GIT tumors. Pre-operative diagnosis helps in the management of this tumor as it responds well to c-kit inhibitors. The cytological diagnosis of GIST is characteristic, however, associated with many pitfalls leading to erroneous diagnosis. Morphological resemblance is seen with other spindle cell and epithelioid cell tumors. The differentiation between high grade and low grade GISTs is described but not reliable. Cytology combined with cell block and Immunocytochemistry helps in making a confident diagnosis. Here we present colonic GIST diagnosed as GIST on cytology and confirmed on histopathology. We report this case to describe the cytological features of GIST and pitfalls in the cytology.

  19. A subset of chondrogenic cells provides early mesenchymal progenitors in growing bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Ono, Wanida; Nagasawa, Takashi; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2014-12-01

    The hallmark of endochondral bone development is the presence of cartilaginous templates, in which osteoblasts and stromal cells are generated to form mineralized matrix and support bone marrow haematopoiesis. However, the ultimate source of these mesenchymal cells and the relationship between bone progenitors in fetal life and those in later life are unknown. Fate-mapping studies revealed that cells expressing cre-recombinases driven by the collagen II (Col2) promoter/enhancer and their descendants contributed to, in addition to chondrocytes, early perichondrial precursors before Runx2 expression and, subsequently, to a majority of osteoblasts, Cxcl12 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 12)-abundant stromal cells and bone marrow stromal/mesenchymal progenitor cells in postnatal life. Lineage-tracing experiments using a tamoxifen-inducible creER system further revealed that early postnatal cells marked by Col2-creER, as well as Sox9-creER and aggrecan (Acan)-creER, progressively contributed to multiple mesenchymal lineages and continued to provide descendants for over a year. These cells are distinct from adult mesenchymal progenitors and thus provide opportunities for regulating the explosive growth that occurs uniquely in growing mammals. PMID:25419849

  20. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abdelkader Salama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive system. They originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal and are characterized by the over expression of KIT protein (Tyrosine Kinase, and they pose a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Objective: A challenge in diagnosis and treatment of GIST Patients & Methods: This is a retrospective study of GIST cases that diagnosed and treated in our center during the past 5 years. These studies include clinical characteristics, imaging techniques, neoadjuvant therapy, surgical techniques, immunohistochemistry, and prognosis of such cases. Results: Sixteen patients were diagnosed as having GIST (12 males/4 females with a mean age 62 years (31-83 years. Diagnosis was made preoperatively in 11 patients (69% and intraoperatively with histopatholgical confirmation in five patients (31%. The site of the tumor was detected in the stomach in 6 cases (37.5%, one in duodenum (6.25%, five in small intestine (31.25%, one in mesentery (6.25%, two in colon (12.5% and one rectal GIST (6.25%. The main presentation of the disease was anemia, GIT bleeding and abdominal mass. Fourteen patients considered resectable and they were operated upon (87.5% and in two patients (12.5% neadjuvant therapy was started with favorable response in one case and poor response in other one with advanced GIST. All patients received Imatinib as adjuvant therapy. Mean follow up period was 33 months (4-54 months. Conclusion: GIST is a complex and challenging disease that requires a multidisciplinary approach in specililized center for better prognosis of such disease.

  1. Myogenic differentiation and reparative activity of stromal cells derived from pericardial adipose in comparison to subcutaneous origin

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hui; Nie, Liangming; Xu, Linhai; Chen, Min; Ding, Zhaoping

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are abundant and easy to obtain, but the diversity of differentiation potential from different locations may vary with the developmental origin of their mesenchymal compartment. We therefore aim to compare the myogenic differentiation and reparative activity of ADSCs derived from the pericardial tissue to ADSCs of subcutaneous origin. Methods Pericardial and inguinal adipose tissues from Wistar rats were surgically obtained, and the st...

  2. EGFR and gastrointestinal stromal tumor: an immunohistochemical and FISH study of 82 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutually exclusive KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha mutations are key events in gastrointestinal stromal tumor pathogenesis, and specific treatment targeting KIT/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha activation is available. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays an important role in cancer biology and also constitutes a promising molecular target of therapy. Very few reports have been published in the literature about the relationship between gastrointestinal stromal tumor and epidermal growth factor receptor. The aim of this study was to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor immunohistochemical expression and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification in 82 consecutive gastrointestinal stromal tumor cases using tissue microarray technique. Hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections and clinical information were reviewed, and expression of CD117 (KIT), CD34 and epidermal growth factor receptor was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CD117 and CD34 were expressed in 96 and 57% of tumors, respectively. Variable epidermal growth factor receptor protein immunohistochemical overexpression was detected in 96% of gastrointestinal stromal tumor cases, but none of the 75 cases with represented tumor tissue cores and countable fluorescence signals exhibited epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization. These results show that there is no correlation between epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Considering that the mechanisms of epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression are not well understood and

  3. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  4. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1+/+ MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1−/− MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1+/+ and Med1−/− MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells

  5. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Tumor Compartments Exhibit In Vivo Complementary Patterns of Vascular Perfusion and Glucose Metabolism1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galie, Mirco; Farace, Paolo; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Magnani, Paolo; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Glucose transport and consumption are increased in tumors, and this is considered a diagnostic index of malignancy. However, there is recent evidence that carcinoma-associated stromal cells are capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption, at least partly because of their efficient vascular supply. In the present study, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), we mapped in vivo the vascular supply and glucose metabolism in syngeneic experimental models of carcinoma and mesenchymal tumor. We found that in both tumor histotypes, regions with high vascular perfusion exhibited a significantly lower FDG uptake. This reciprocity was more conspicuous in carcinomas than in mesenchymal tumors, and regions with a high-vascular/low-FDG uptake pattern roughly overlapped with a stromal capsule and intratumoral large connectival septa. Accordingly, mesenchymal tumors exhibited a higher vascular perfusion and a lower FDG uptake than carcinomas. Thus, we provide in vivo evidence of vascular/metabolic reciprocity between epithelial and mesenchymal histotypes in tumors, suggesting a new intriguing aspect of epithelial-stromal interaction. Our results suggests that FDG-PET-based clinical analysis can underestimate the malignity or tumor extension of carcinomas exhibiting any trait of “mesenchymalization” such as desmoplasia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:18030358

  6. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn;

    2001-01-01

    that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently....... It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells......, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer...

  7. Mechanical regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Andrew J; Kelly, Daniel J

    2015-12-01

    Biophysical cues play a key role in directing the lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent stromal cells (MSCs), but the mechanotransductive mechanisms at play are still not fully understood. This review article first describes the roles of both substrate mechanics (e.g. stiffness and topography) and extrinsic mechanical cues (e.g. fluid flow, compression, hydrostatic pressure, tension) on the differentiation of MSCs. A specific focus is placed on the role of such factors in regulating the osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Next, the article focuses on the cellular components, specifically integrins, ion channels, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton, hypothesized to be involved in MSC mechanotransduction. This review aims to illustrate the strides that have been made in elucidating how MSCs sense and respond to their mechanical environment, and also to identify areas where further research is needed.

  8. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH RARE PRESENTATION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS IN A RURAL MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar Vipul

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST - are one of the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract [1 - 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies]. Their behaviour is driven by mutations in the kit gene or PDGFRA gene and may or may not positively stain for kit. We report fo ur additional cases of a GIST presenting as an abdominal mass along with a pertinent review of the literature. All four patients received surgical resection. The mean tumor size was 10.5 with an average mitotic index of 6.25 per 50 high power fields. Three patients were disease free and one patient came with recurrence. In conclusion, symptomatic patents have an increased incidence of high - risk tumors and metastases at presentation. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib improves disease - free survival in patients w ith large abdominal GIST tumors, but no change in overall survival was noted. KEY WORD: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors; Imatinib; mitotic index;Meckel’s Diverticulum

  9. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  10. The Bone Marrow-Derived Stromal Cells: Commitment and Regulation of Adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tencerova, Michaela; Kassem, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) microenvironment represents an important compartment of bone that regulates bone homeostasis and the balance between bone formation and bone resorption depending on the physiological needs of the organism. Abnormalities of BM microenvironmental dynamics can lead to metabolic bone diseases. BM stromal cells (also known as skeletal or mesenchymal stem cells) [bone marrow stromal stem cell (BMSC)] are multipotent stem cells located within BM stroma and give rise to osteoblasts and adipocytes. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms of BMSC lineage commitment to adipocytic lineage and regulation of BM adipocyte formation are not fully understood. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pertaining to identification and characterization of adipocyte progenitor cells in BM and the regulation of differentiation into mature adipocytes. We have also emphasized the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27708616

  11. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Hutchinson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and review the literature on this rare pathologic finding.

  12. Prostatic Stromal Hyperplasia with Atypia

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, Ryan C.; Wu, Kevin J.; Cheville, John C.; Thiel, David D

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic stromal hyperplasia with atypia (PSHA) is a rare histologic finding diagnosed incidentally on prostate biopsies, transurethral resection specimens, and radical prostatectomy specimens. PSHA has a bizarre histologic appearance and these lesions often raise concern for sarcoma; however, their clinical course is indolent and does not include extraprostatic progression. We discuss a case of PHSA discovered on prostate biopsy performed for an abnormal digital rectal examination and revie...

  13. Bone marrow stromal cell transplantation mitigates radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhrajit Saha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nuclear accidents and terrorism presents a serious threat for mass casualty. While bone-marrow transplantation might mitigate hematopoietic syndrome, currently there are no approved medical countermeasures to alleviate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS, resulting from direct cytocidal effects on intestinal stem cells (ISC and crypt stromal cells. We examined whether bone marrow-derived adherent stromal cell transplantation (BMSCT could restitute irradiated intestinal stem cells niche and mitigate radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Autologous bone marrow was cultured in mesenchymal basal medium and adherent cells were harvested for transplantation to C57Bl6 mice, 24 and 72 hours after lethal whole body irradiation (10.4 Gy or abdominal irradiation (16-20 Gy in a single fraction. Mesenchymal, endothelial and myeloid population were characterized by flow cytometry. Intestinal crypt regeneration and absorptive function was assessed by histopathology and xylose absorption assay, respectively. In contrast to 100% mortality in irradiated controls, BMSCT mitigated RIGS and rescued mice from radiation lethality after 18 Gy of abdominal irradiation or 10.4 Gy whole body irradiation with 100% survival (p<0.0007 and p<0.0009 respectively beyond 25 days. Transplantation of enriched myeloid and non-myeloid fractions failed to improve survival. BMASCT induced ISC regeneration, restitution of the ISC niche and xylose absorption. Serum levels of intestinal radioprotective factors, such as, R-Spondin1, KGF, PDGF and FGF2, and anti-inflammatory cytokines were elevated, while inflammatory cytokines were down regulated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitigation of lethal intestinal injury, following high doses of irradiation, can be achieved by intravenous transplantation of marrow-derived stromal cells, including mesenchymal, endothelial and macrophage cell population. BMASCT increases blood levels of

  14. CD34 defines an osteoprogenitor cell population in mouse bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem M; Al-Shammary, Asma; Skagen, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells) and their progenitors have been identified based on retrospective functional criteria. CD markers are employed to define cell populations with distinct functional characteristics. However, defining and...... prospective isolation of mouse bone marrow osteoprogenitors....... prospective isolation of BMSCs and committed progenitors are lacking. Here, we compared the transcriptome profile of CD markers expressed at baseline and during the course of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation of two well-characterized osteogenic-committed murine BMSCs (mBMSC(Bone)) and adipogenic...

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of stomach with inguinal lymph nodes metastasis: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the alimentary tract. To the best of our knowledge, few cases have been reported in the literature about the peripheral lymph node metastasis of GIST. Here we report an unusual case of gastric GIST with inguinal lymph nodes metastasis. After the metastatic lymph nodes were resected, the. patient started to take imatinib 400 mg/d for 12 mo. There were no signs of tumor recurrence at follow-up after 29 mo. This case suggests that th...

  16. Image-based RNA interference screening reveals an individual dependence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia on stromal cysteine support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutter, Jeannette; Huang, Yun; Marovca, Blerim; Vonderheit, Andreas; Grotzer, Michael A; Eckert, Cornelia; Cario, Gunnar; Wollscheid, Bernd; Horvath, Peter; Bornhauser, Beat C; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-30

    Interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment are essential for leukemia survival and disease progression. We developed an imaging-based RNAi platform to identify protective cues from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) that promote survival of primary acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Using a candidate gene approach, we detected distinct responses of individual ALL cases to RNA interference with stromal targets. The strongest effects were observed when interfering with solute carrier family 3 member 2 (SLC3A2) expression, which forms the cystine transporter xc- when associated with SLC7A11. Import of cystine and metabolism to cysteine by stromal cells provides the limiting substrate to generate and maintain glutathione in ALL. This metabolic interaction reduces oxidative stress in ALL cells that depend on stromal xc-. Indeed, cysteine depletion using cysteine dioxygenase resulted in leukemia cell death. Thus, functional evaluation of intercellular interactions between leukemia cells and their microenvironment identifies a selective dependency of ALL cells on stromal metabolism for a relevant subgroup of cases, providing new opportunities to develop more personalized approaches to leukemia treatment. PMID:25415224

  17. Recruitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Prostate Tumors Promotes Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E.; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keller, Evan T.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumors recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that the CXCR6 ligand CXCL16 facilitates MSC or Very Small Embryonic-Like (VSEL) cells recruitment into prostate tumors. CXCR6 signaling stimulates the conversion of MSCs into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumor cells and induces an epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumor sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for MSC recruitment into tumors and how this process leads to tumor metastasis. PMID:23653207

  18. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the duodenum masquerading as a pancreatic head tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Ho Kwon; Jung Woo Shin; Neung Hwa Park; Do Ha Kim; Hee Jeong Cha; Seok Won Jung; Byung Chul Kim; Jae Serk Park; In Du Jeong; Jong Hwa Lee; Yang Won Nah; Sung Jo Bang

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) represents the most common kind of mesenchymal tumor that arises from the alimentary tract. GIST is currently defined as a gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal tumor showing CD117 (c-kit protein) positivity at immunohistochemistry.Throughout the whole length of the gastrointestinal tract, GIST arises most commonly from the stomach followed by the small intestine, the colorectum, and the esophagus. Only 3%-5% of GISTs occur in the duodenum, and especially, if GIST arises from the C loop of the duodenum, it can be difficult to differentiate from the pancreas head mass because of its anatomical proximity. Here, we report a case of duodenal GIST,which was assessed as a pancreatic head tumor preoperatively.

  19. Cell therapy of congenital corneal diseases with umbilical mesenchymal stem cells: lumican null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratoplasty is the most effective treatment for corneal blindness, but suboptimal medical conditions and lack of qualified medical personnel and donated cornea often prevent the performance of corneal transplantation in developing countries. Our study aims to develop alternative treatment regimens for congenital corneal diseases of genetic mutation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from neonatal umbilical cords were transplanted to treat thin and cloudy corneas of lumican null mice. Transplantation of umbilical mesenchymal stem cells significantly improved corneal transparency and increased stromal thickness of lumican null mice, but human umbilical hematopoietic stem cells failed to do the same. Further studies revealed that collagen lamellae were re-organized in corneal stroma of lumican null mice after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Transplanted umbilical mesenchymal stem cells survived in the mouse corneal stroma for more than 3 months with little or no graft rejection. In addition, these cells assumed a keratocyte phenotype, e.g., dendritic morphology, quiescence, expression of keratocyte unique keratan sulfated keratocan and lumican, and CD34. Moreover, umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improved host keratocyte functions, which was verified by enhanced expression of keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 3A1 in lumican null mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is a promising treatment for congenital corneal diseases involving keratocyte dysfunction. Unlike donated corneas, umbilical mesenchymal stem cells are easily isolated, expanded, stored, and can be quickly recovered from liquid nitrogen when a patient is in urgent need.

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Treatment for Microvascular and Secondary Complications of Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    GraceCDavey; TimothyO'Brien

    2014-01-01

    The worldwide increase in the prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus has highlighted the need for increased research efforts into treatment options for both the disease itself and its associated complications. In recent years, Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been highlighted as a new emerging regenerative therapy due to their multipotency but also due to their paracrine secretion of angiogenic factors, cytokines and immunomodulatory substances. This review focuses on the potential use of MSCs...

  1. Adipose Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated after Manual or Water-jet-Assisted Liposuction Display Similar Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Bony, Claire; Cren, Mailys; Domergue, Sophie; Toupet, Karine; Jorgensen, Christian; Noël, Danièle

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) are under investigation in many clinical trials for their therapeutic potential in a variety of diseases, including autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. One of the main sources of MSCs is the adipose tissue, which is mainly obtained by manual liposuction using a cannula linked to a syringe. However, in the past years, a number of devices for fat liposuction intended for clinical use have been commercialized but few papers have compared these procedure...

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells: paracrine signaling and differentiation during cutaneous wound repair

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, Anne M.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous wounds persist as a health care crisis in spite of increased understanding of the cellular and molecular responses to injury. Contributing significantly to this crisis is the lack of reliable therapies for treatment of wounds that are slow to heal including chronic wounds and deep dermal wounds that develop hypertrophic scars. This article will review the growing evidence demonstrating the promise of multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal (MSCs) for the treatment of impaired wound hea...

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Peter J Nelson; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  4. Selective activation of the versican promoter by epithelial– mesenchymal interactions during hair follicle development

    OpenAIRE

    Kishimoto, Jiro; Ehama, Ritsuko; Wu, Lin; Jiang, Shuwei; Jiang, Nanyan; Burgeson, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    Interaction between the epithelium and the mesenchyme is an essential feature of organogenesis, including hair follicle formation. The dermal papilla (DP), a dense aggregate of specialized dermis-derived stromal cells located at the bottom of the follicle, is a major component of hair that signals the follicular epithelial cells to prolong the hair growth process. However, little is known about DP-specific gene activation with regard to hair induction. In this study we demonstrate that a shor...

  5. Stromal cells promote anti-estrogen resistance of breast cancer cells through an insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5)/B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 3 (Bcl-3) axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Leyh (Benjamin); A. Dittmer (Angela); T. Lange (Theresia); J.W.M. Martens (John W. M.); A. Dittmer (Angela)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThere is strong evidence that stromal cells promote drug resistance of cancer. Here, we show that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) desensitize ERa-positive breast cancer cells to the anti-estrogen fulvestrant. In search for the mechanism, we found

  6. Loss of mesenchymal bone morphogenetic protein signaling leads to development of reactive stroma and initiation of the gastric neoplastic cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sébastien A. B.; Allaire, Joannie M.; Ouellet, Camille; Maloum-Rami, Faiza; Pomerleau, Véronique; Lemieux, Étienne; Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Rousseau, Jasmin; Paquet, Marilène; Garde-Granger, Perrine; Boudreau, François; Perreault, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    Bmps are morphogens involved in various gastric cellular functions. Studies in genetically-modified mice have shown that Bmp disruption in gastric epithelial and stromal cell compartments leads to the development of tumorigenesis. Our studies have demonstrated that abrogation of gastric epithelial Bmp signaling alone was not sufficient to recapitulate the neoplastic features associated with total gastric loss of Bmp signaling. Thus, epithelial Bmp signaling does not appear to be a key player in gastric tumorigenesis initiation. These observations suggest a greater role for stromal Bmp signaling in gastric polyposis initiation. In order to identify the specific roles played by mesenchymal Bmp signaling in gastric homeostasis, we generated a mouse model with abrogation of Bmp signaling exclusively in the gastro-intestinal mesenchyme (Bmpr1aΔMES). We were able to expose an unsuspected role for Bmp loss of signaling in leading normal gastric mesenchyme to adapt into reactive mesenchyme. An increase in the population of activated-fibroblasts, suggesting mesenchymal transdifferentiation, was observed in mutant stomach. Bmpr1aΔMES stomachs exhibited spontaneous benign polyps with presence of both intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic-polypeptide-expressing metaplasia as early as 90 days postnatal. These results support the novel concept that loss of mesenchymal Bmp signaling cascade acts as a trigger in gastric polyposis initiation.

  7. Endometrial Stromal Nodule: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Z. Fdili Alaoui

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis.

  8. Endometrial stromal nodule: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fdili Alaoui, F Z; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Melhouf, M A; Fatemi, H; Belmlih, A; Amarti, A

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  9. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Shukla Shailaja; Singh Sanjeet; Pujani Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within th...

  10. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Abrogate Plasmablast Formation and Induce Regulatory B Cells Independently of T Helper Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franquesa, M.; Mensah, F. K.; Huizinga, R.; Strini, T.; Boon, L.; Lombardo, E.; DelaRosa, O.; Laman, J. D.; Grinyo, J. M.; Weimar, W.; Betjes, M. G. H.; Baan, C. C.; Hoogduijn, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal or stromal stem cells (MSC) interact with cells of the immune system in multiple ways. Modulation of the immune system by MSC is believed to be a therapeutic option for autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. In recent years, B cells have moved into the focus of the attention as tar

  11. Effects of stromal derived factor-1 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 in rats with white matter damage treated with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells%基质细胞衍生因子-1及CXC家族趋化因子-4在人脐带间充质干细胞干预新生大鼠脑白质损伤中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王诗雨; 朱丽华; 摆翔; 蒋犁; 李伟

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects and the migration mechanisms of stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR-4) in rats with white matter damage treated with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSCs).Methods A total of 108 three-day old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the experimental group,control group and sham group.The left common carotid artery was ligated and then exposed to hypoxia of 6% O2 and 94% N2 in rats in the experimental and control groups.Rats in sham group were neither ligation nor hypoxia.After 24 hours,rats in the experimental group were administered 0.5 ml hUC-MSCs (1 × 106/ml) intraperitoneally,and rats in control and sham groups were administered 0.5 ml saline by the same way.Immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to determine the expression of SDF-1 and CXCR-4 protein and mRNA in 5-,7-and 14-day-old rats.Analysis of variance and the LSD test were used for statistical analysis of the data.Results HE staining showed that,in 14 day-old rats of the experimental group,bilateral cerebral ventricles were similar with no cellular edema or necrocytosis.In the sham group,bilateral cerebral ventricles were also normal.However,in the control group,ventriculomegaly,cellular degeneration and necrocytosis were observed on the left side.On the 5th,7th and 14th day,SDF-1 protein levels were 0.15±0.06,0.24±0.01 and 0.12±0.01,and CXCR-4 protein levels were 0.35±0.16,0.60±0.21 and 0.72±0.25,respectively,in the experimental group; SDF-1 protein levels were 0.13 ± 0.01,0.16± 0.01 and 0.08± 0.01,and CXCR-4 protein levels were 0.18 ± 0.04,0.17 ± 0.09 and 0.25 ± 0.06,respectively,in the control group,and all were higher than those in the sham group (SDF-1 protein levels were 0.03 ± 0.01,0.04± 0.01 and 0.02±0.01; and CXCR-4 protein levels were 0.04±0.02,0.05±0.03 and 0.05±0.03,respectively) (LSD test,all P<0.05).SDF-1 protein increased to a peak

  12. Characterization of the osteogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells from human periodontal ligament based on cell surface markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruth Alvarez; Hye-Lim Lee; Cun-Yu Wang; Christine Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-mediated therapy has been shown to be clinically effective in regenerating tissue defects. For improved regenerative therapy, it is critical to isolate homogenous populations of MSCs with high capacity to differentiate into appropriate tissues. The utilization of stem cell surface antigens provides a means to identify MSCs from various tissues. However, few surface markers that consistently isolate highly regenerative MSCs have been validated, making it challenging for routine clinical applications and making it all the more imperative to identify reliable surface markers. In this study, we used three surface marker combinations:CD51/CD140a, CD271, and STRO-1/CD146 for the isolation of homogenous populations of dental mesenchymal stem cells (DMSCs) from heterogeneous periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis revealed that 24%of PDLCs were CD511/CD140a1, 0.8%were CD2711, and 2.4%were STRO-11/CD1461. Sorted cell populations were further assessed for their multipotent properties by inducing osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. All three subsets of isolated DMSCs exhibited differentiation capacity into osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages but with varying degrees. CD2711 DMSCs demonstrated the greatest osteogenic potential with strong induction of osteogenic markers such as DLX5, RUNX2, and BGLAP. Our study provides evidence that surface marker combinations used in this study are sufficient markers for the isolation of DMSCs from PDLCs. These results provide important insight into using specific surface markers for identifying homogenous populations of DMSCs for their improved utilization in regenerative medicine.

  13. Human epicardium-derived cells fuse with high efficiency with skeletal myotubes and differentiate toward the skeletal muscle phenotype: a comparison study with stromal and endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    A. Gentile; G. Toietta; V. Pazzano; V. Tsiopoulos; A. Giglio; F. Crea; Pompilio, G; Capogrossi, M.; G. Di Rocco

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have underscored a role for the epicardium as a source of multipotent cells. Here, we investigate the myogenic potential of adult human epicardium-derived cells (EPDCs) and analyze their ability to undergo skeletal myogenesis when cultured with differentiating primary myoblasts. Results are compared to those obtained with mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and with endothelial cells, another mesodermal derivative. We demonstrate that EPDCs spontaneously fuse with pre-existing myo...

  14. Adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improves early tendon healing: an experimental study in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behfar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Tendon never restores the complete biological and mechanical properties after healing. Bone marrow and recently adipose tissue have been used as the sources of mesenchymal stem cells, which have been proven to enhance tendon healing. Stromal vascular fraction (SVF, derived from adipose tissue by an enzymatic digestion, represents an alternative source of multipotent cells, which undergo differentiation into multiple lineages to be used in regenerative medicine. In the present study, we investigated potentials of this source on tendon healing. Twenty rabbits were divided into control and treatment groups. Five rabbits were used as donors of adipose tissue. The injury model was unilateral complete transection through the middle one third of deep digital flexor tendon. Immediately after suture repair, either fresh stromal vascular fraction from enzymatic digestion of adipose tissue or placebo was intratendinously injected into the suture site in treatments and controls, respectively. Cast immobilization was continued for two weeks after surgery. Animals were sacrificed at the third week and tendons underwent histological, immunohistochemical, and mechanical evaluations. By histology, improved fibrillar organization and remodeling of neotendon were observed in treatment group. Immunohistochemistry revealed an insignificant increase in collagen type III and I expression in treatments over controls. Mechanical testing showed significant increase in maximum load and energy absorption in SVF treated tendons. The present study showed that intratendinous injection of uncultured adipose derived stromal vascular fraction improved structural and mechanical properties of repaired tendon and it could be an effective modality for treating tendon laceration.

  15. Cytokeratin expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 687 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common clinically significant mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of the intermediate filament cytokeratin in gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not frequently reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of several types of cytokeratin in a large number of cases (n=687), including a pan-cytokeratin marker (AE1/AE3 cocktail antibodies), high-molecular weight cytokeratins (34ßE12 antibody), and individual cytokeratins 8 (35ßH11 and CAM5.2 antibodies), 7, 14, and 20. Ki-67 antigen was used for the determination of cell proliferation index, and the correlation between Ki-67 and cytokeratin expression was evaluated. Cytokeratin expression was also correlated with several clinicopathologic parameters. The expression of pan-cytokeratin was observed in 24 (3.5%) cases, with variable intensity. Only 1 of 687 (0.1%) cases showed cytokeratin 14 expression. All 687 cases revealed no expression of high-molecular weight cytokeratins, cytokeratins 7, 8, and 20. No significant statistical association was found between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and several clinicopathologic parameters, including sex, tumor location and size, cell morphology, mitotic count, risk of aggressive behavior, and Ki-67 antigen cell proliferation index. However, statistical correlation between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and a higher age at diagnosis was detected. These results show that cytokeratin expression is not frequent in gastrointestinal stromal tumor, but caution is necessary to avoid erroneous diagnoses.

  16. Human adipose-derived stromal cells efficiently support hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo: a key step for therapeutic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni, Fabienne; Poglio, Sandrine; Youcef, Aissa Ben; Cousin, Béatrice; Pflumio, Françoise; Bourin, Philippe; Casteilla, Louis; Laharrague, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) are close relatives of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). The ease of access to subcutaneous fat pad and the abundance of stromal precursors make fat tissue an attractive source of stromal cells for clinicians. However, their ability to support hematopoietic stem cells in vitro and in vivo has not been established definitively. Thus, their usefulness in supporting hematopoietic stem cell engraftment is not as clear as with BM-MSCs. In this article, we show that human ADSCs, cultured with a good manufacturing practice medium, maintain in vitro human early and committed hematopoietic progenitors and support their complete differentiation toward myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Compared with BM-MSCs, ADSCs elicit a more precocious early progenitor formation and faster proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. Further, in vivo, when co-injected in NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2(rgtm1Wjl)/SzJ (NSG) mice with a low number of human CD34(+) cells, ADSCs enabled the higher production of immature human hematopoietic progenitors and CD45(+) cells when compared with BM-MSCs. As a whole, our results indicate that human ADSCs, isolated and expanded under clinical-grade conditions, support hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo and thus provide the rationale for their use in supporting hematopoietic reconstitution in clinical settings.

  17. Localized intra-abdominal fibromatosis of the small bowel mimicking a gastrointestinal stromal tumor:A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Piergiuseppe Colombo; Daoud Rahal; Fabio Grizzi; Vittorio Quagliuolo; Massimo Roncalli

    2005-01-01

    Intra-abdominal fibromatosis (IAF) is a benign mesenchymal lesion that can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Although rare, it is the most common primary tumor of the mesentery and can develop at any age. We describe a rare case of primary IAF involving the mesentery and small bowel which clinically, macroscopically and histologically mimicked malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). This report highlights the fact that benign IAF can be misdiagnosed as a malignant GIST localized in the mesentery or arising from the intestinal wall. Their diagnostic discrimination is essential because of their very different biological behaviors and the fact that the introduction of effective therapies involving tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 (imatinib mesylate) has greatly changed the clinical approach to intra-abdominal stromal spindle cell tumors.

  18. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML. PMID:26967055

  19. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  20. Stromal fibrosis reaction in rat prostates induced by alpha 1 adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig-Bublil, Nurit; Abramovici, Armand

    2006-01-01

    Most of the publications dealing with the experimental induction of prostatic neoplasia have focused on the description of epithelial lesions, but little attention has been paid to the involvement of their stromal alterations. The present study is a first attempt to assess the stromal changes in both collagen and elastic fibrils as well as in its cellular constituents, which accompany prostatic intraepithelial neoplastic (PIN)-like lesions induced by phenylephrine (PE) in rats. Adolescent rats received subcutaneous injections of PE daily (10 mg/kg/d) for 1 month. At the end of the experimental period the rats were sacrificed; the dissected ventral prostates were fixed in Stieve solution and paraffin-embedded; and sections were cut and stained accordingly. Most of the stromal cells were identified by immunohistochemistry techniques using primary antibodies to ED2 (resident macrophages), actin (fibrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells), vimentin (mesenchymal cells), and 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (S-phase proliferating cells). Collagen stromal mass was visualized by Gomori trichrome and individual collagen fibers by picrosirius red staining under polarized light, whereas the fine fibrils were stained according to the Pinkus method. The untreated rat prostates are characterized by a delicate interacinar stroma with scanty cells and fibrils. The PE-treated prostates showed a significant increase in both cellular and fibrillar elements as well as an increase in arteriolar density, in addition to the typical PIN lesions. The presence of such an interstitial fibrosis, which also includes inflammatory cells, neoangiogenesis, and synthesis de novo of collagen and fibers, might be regarded as a desmoplastic reaction. It is suggested that these changes could be related to a tissue repair process occurring subsequent to the inflammatory exudate that takes place during the incipient phases of the PE treatment. PMID:16304211

  1. Markers for Characterization of Bone Marrow Multipotential Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally A. Boxall

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the observed efficacy of culture-expanded multipotential stromal cells, also termed mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, in the treatment of graft-versus host and cardiac disease, it remains surprising that purity and potency characterization of manufactured cell batches remains rather basic. In this paper, we will initially discuss surface and molecular markers that were proposed to serve as the indicators of the MSC potency, in terms of their proliferative potential or the ability to differentiate into desired lineages. The second part of this paper will be dedicated to a critical discussion of surface markers of uncultured (i.e., native bone marrow (BM MSCs. Although no formal consensus has yet been reached on which markers may be best suited for prospective BM MSC isolation, markers that cross-react with MSCs of animal models (such as CD271 and W8-B2/MSCA-1 may have the strongest translational value. Whereas small animal models are needed to discover the in vivo function on these markers, large animal models are required for safety and efficacy testing of isolated MSCs, particularly in the field of bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

  2. Hedgehog pathway responsiveness correlates with the presence of primary cilia on prostate stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Aubie K

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hedgehog (Hh signaling from the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium to the surrounding mesenchyme plays a critical role in regulating ductal formation and growth during prostate development. The primary cilium, a feature of most interphase vertebrate cell types, serves as a required localization domain for Hh signaling transducing proteins. Results Immunostaining revealed the presence of primary cilia in mesenchymal cells of the developing prostate. Cell-based assays of a urongenital sinus mesenchymal cell line (UGSM-2 revealed that proliferation-limiting (serum starvation and/or confluence growth conditions promoted cilia formation and correlated with pathway activation associated with accumulation of Smoothened in primary cilia. The prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, LNCaP, and 22RV1, previously shown to lack demonstrable autocrine Hh signaling capacity, did not exhibit primary cilia even under proliferation-limiting growth conditions. Conclusion We conclude that paracrine Hedgehog signaling activity in the prostate is associated with the presence of primary cilia on stromal cells but that a role in autocrine Hh signaling remains speculative.

  3. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. (author)

  4. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Shailaja; Singh, Sanjeet K; Pujani, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST.We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS). Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence. PMID:19568556

  5. Multicentric malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shukla Shailaja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST is a rare type of sarcoma that is found in the digestive system, most often in the wall of the stomach. Multiple GISTs are extremely rare and usually associated with type 1 neurofibromatosis and familial GIST. We report here a case of a 70-year-old woman who reported pain in the abdomen, loss of appetite, and weight loss for six months. Ultrasound examination showed a small bowel mass along with multiple peritoneal deposits and a mass within the liver. Barium studies were suggestive of a neoplastic pathology of the distal ileum. A differential diagnosis of adenocarcinoma/lymphoma with metastases was entertained. Perioperative findings showed two large growths arising from the jejunum and the distal ileum, along with multiple smaller nodules on the serosal surface and adjoining mesentery of the involved bowel segments. Segmental resection of the involved portions of the intestine was performed. Histopathological features were consistent with those of multicentric malignant GIST-not otherwise specified (GIST-NOS. Follow-up examination three months after surgery showed no evidence of recurrence.

  6. Use of adipose tissue as a source of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jezierska-Woźniak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Enormous expectations are associated with stem cells with regard to cell therapy and tissue engineering. Stem cells have unlimited potential for self-renewal and develop into various cell types. For the mesodermal tissue engineering such a source of cells is the bone marrow stroma. However, isolation of the bone marrow requires general or spinal anesthesia and yields low number of mesodermal stem cells (MSCs upon processing (1 MSC per 105 adherent stromal cells. An alternative source of autologous stem cells seems to be, apart from bone marrow: periosteum, muscular tissue or synovial membrane and adipose tissue. The adipose tissue is derived from the embryonic mesenchyme, contains a large number of stromal stem cells and is relatively easy to obtain in large quantities. It covers a widespread area of human body, and can be classified as white and brown adipose tissue in terms of location and function. Specimens of the adipose tissue are usually obtained from elective, laparoscopic or liposuction surgeries. Stromal stem cells, isolated from this tissue, exhibit characteristics common to mesodermal tissues, including: adherence to plastic, formation of fibroblastic- like colonies, extensive proliferative capacity, ability to differentiate into several mesodermal lineages (including bone, cartilage, muscle and fat, and expression of several common cell surface antigens. Recent evidence suggest that these cells can also form non-mesodermal tissues – neuron-like cells. The aim of this publication is to describe the application of the adipose tissue as a source of mesenchymal stem cells based on current literature data.