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Sample records for cd133-positive cells derived

  1. Nestin expression in osteosarcomas and derivation of nestin/CD133 positive osteosarcoma cell lines

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    Nestin was originally identified as a class VI intermediate filament protein that is expressed in stem cells and progenitor cells in the mammalian CNS during development. This protein is replaced in the adult organism by other intermediate filament proteins; however, nestin may be re-expressed under certain pathological conditions such as ischemia, inflammation, brain injury, and neoplastic transformation. Nestin has been detected in many kinds of tumors, especially in tumors derived from the CNS. Co-expression of nestin and the CD133 surface molecule is considered to be a marker for cancer stem cells in neurogenic tumors. Our work was aimed at a detailed study of nestin expression in osteosarcomas and osteosarcoma-derived cell lines. Using immunodetection methods, we examined nestin in tumor tissue samples from 18 patients with osteosarcomas. We also successfully established permanent cell lines from the tumor tissue of 4 patients and immunodetection of nestin and CD133 was performed on these cell lines. Nestin-positive tumor cells were immunohistochemically detected in all of the examined osteosarcomas, but the proportion of these cells that were positively stained as well as the intensity of staining varied. Nestin-positive cells were rarely observed in 2 tumor samples, and the remaining 16 tumor samples showed various nestin expression patterns ranging from very sporadic occurrence to an overwhelming proportion of cells with strong positive staining. Three of the established osteosarcoma cell lines were demonstrated to be nestin-positive, and only one cell line showed no expression of nestin; this finding corresponds with the rare occurrence of nestin-positive cells in the respective tumor sample. Moreover, three of these osteosarcoma cell lines were undoubtedly proven to be Nes+/CD133+. Our results represent the first evidence of nestin expression in osteosarcomas and suggest the possible occurrence of cells with a stem-like phenotype in these tumors

  2. Oct-4 expression maintained cancer stem-like properties in lung cancer-derived CD133-positive cells.

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    Yu-Chih Chen

    Full Text Available CD133 (prominin-1, a 5-transmembrane glycoprotein, has recently been considered to be an important marker that represents the subset population of cancer stem-like cells. Herein we report the isolation of CD133-positive cells (LC-CD133(+ and CD133-negative cells (LC-CD133(- from tissue samples of ten patients with non-small cell lung cancer (LC and five LC cell lines. LC-CD133(+ displayed higher Oct-4 expressions with the ability to self-renew and may represent a reservoir with proliferative potential for generating lung cancer cells. Furthermore, LC-CD133(+, unlike LC-CD133(-, highly co-expressed the multiple drug-resistant marker ABCG2 and showed significant resistance to chemotherapy agents (i.e., cisplatin, etoposide, doxorubicin, and paclitaxel and radiotherapy. The treatment of Oct-4 siRNA with lentiviral vector can specifically block the capability of LC-CD133(+ to form spheres and can further facilitate LC-CD133(+ to differentiate into LC-CD133(-. In addition, knock-down of Oct-4 expression in LC-CD133(+ can significantly inhibit the abilities of tumor invasion and colony formation, and increase apoptotic activities of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Finally, in vitro and in vivo studies further confirm that the treatment effect of chemoradiotherapy for LC-CD133(+ can be improved by the treatment of Oct-4 siRNA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Oct-4 expression plays a crucial role in maintaining the self-renewing, cancer stem-like, and chemoradioresistant properties of LC-CD133(+. Future research is warranted regarding the up-regulated expression of Oct-4 in LC-CD133(+ and malignant lung cancer.

  3. Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity.

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    Zhou, Linli; Yang, Kun; Xu, Mingang; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E; Boyce, Steven; Zhang, Yuhang

    2016-08-01

    Bioengineering hair follicles using cells isolated from human tissue remains a difficult task. Dermal papilla (DP) cells are known to guide the growth and cycling activities of hair follicles by interacting with keratinocytes. However, DP cells quickly lose their inductivity during in vitro passaging. Rodent DP cell cultures need external addition of growth factors, including WNT and BMP molecules, to maintain the hair inductive property. CD133 is expressed by a subpopulation of DP cells that are capable of inducing hair follicle formation in vivo. We report here that expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin promoted clonal growth of CD133-positive (CD133+) DP cells in in vitro three-dimensional hydrogel culture while maintaining expression of DP markers, including alkaline phosphatase (AP), CD133, and integrin α8. After a 2-week in vitro culture, cultured CD133+ DP cells with up-regulated β-catenin activity led to an accelerated in vivo hair growth in reconstituted skin compared to control cells. Further analysis showed that matrix cell proliferation and differentiation were significantly promoted in hair follicles when β-catenin signaling was up-regulated in CD133+ DP cells. Our data highlight an important role for β-catenin signaling in promoting the inductive capability of CD133+ DP cells for in vitro expansion and in vivo hair follicle regeneration, which could potentially be applied to cultured human DP cells. PMID:27312243

  4. Gene expression profiling of CD133-positive cells in coronary artery disease.

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    Li, Jiayu; Zhou, Changyu; Li, Jiarui; Wan, Yingchun; Li, Tao; Ma, Piyong; Wang, Yingjian; Sang, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    Gene expression profiles of CD133-positive cells from patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) were analyzed to identify key genes associated with cardiac therapy. Furthermore, the effect of exercise on gene expression was also investigated. Gene expression data set (accession number: GSE18608) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, including blood samples from four healthy subjects (H), and from 10 patients with coronary artery disease at baseline (B) and after 3 months (3M) of exercise. Differential analysis was performed for H vs. B and H vs. 3M using limma package of R. Two‑way cluster analysis was performed using the expression levels of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by package pheatmap of R. Functional enrichment analysis was applied on the DEGs using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery. Relevant small molecules were predicted using the Connectivity map database (cMap). A total of 131 and 71 DEGs were identified in patients with CAD prior to and following 3 months of exercise. The two groups of DEGs were compared and 44 genes overlapped. In cluster analysis with the expression levels of the common DEGs, patients with CAD could be well separated from the healthy controls. Functional enrichment analysis showed that response to peptide hormone stimulus and anti‑apoptosis pathways were significantly enriched in the common DEGs. A total of 12 relevant small molecules were revealed by cMap based upon the expression levels of common DEGs, such as 5252917 and MG‑262. Three months of exercise in part normalized the gene expression in CAD patients. The genes not altered by exercise may be the targets of small molecules, such as 5252917 and MG-262. PMID:26458356

  5. A novel fixative for immunofluorescence staining of CD133-positive glioblastoma stem cells

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    Sherman, Jonathan H.; Redpath, Gerard T.; Redick, Jan A.; Purow, Benjamin W.; Laws, Edward R.; Jane, John A.; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Hussaini, Isa M.

    2011-01-01

    Isolation of glioblastoma stem cells requires incubation of tumor cells in a neural stem cell media. Neurospheres containing these glioblastoma stem cells are formed after approximately a five-day period. These cells can then be analyzed for the presence of stem cell markers. Immunofluorescence staining for these markers can serve as a valuable tool for analyzing the intact neurosphere directly in stem cell media. Here we present the use of a novel fixative (1,4-benzoquinone) for immunofloure...

  6. Activation of β-Catenin Signaling in CD133-Positive Dermal Papilla Cells Drives Postnatal Hair Growth

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    Zhou, Linli; Xu, Mingang; Yang, Yongguang; Yang, Kun; Wickett, Randall R.; Andl, Thomas; Millar, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle dermal papilla (DP) contains a unique prominin-1/CD133-positive (CD133+) cell subpopulation, which has been shown to possess hair follicle-inducing capability. By assaying for endogenous CD133 expression and performing lineage tracing using CD133-CreERT2; ZsGreen1 reporter mice, we find that CD133 is expressed in a subpopulation of DP cells during the growth phase of the murine hair cycle (anagen), but is absent at anagen onset. However, how CD133+ DP cells interact with keratinocytes to induce hair regenerative growth remains unclear. Wnt/β-catenin has long been recognized as a major signaling pathway required for hair follicle morphogenesis, development, and regeneration. Nuclear Wnt/β-catenin activity is observed in the DP during the hair growth phase. Here we show that induced expression of a stabilized form of β-catenin in CD133+ DP cells significantly accelerates spontaneous and depilation-induced hair growth. However, hair follicle regression is not affected in these mutants. Further analysis indicates that CD133+ DP-expressed β-catenin increases proliferation and differentiation of epithelial matrix keratinocytes. Upregulated Wnt/β-catenin activity in CD133+ DP cells also increases the number of proliferating DP cells in each anagen follicle. Our data demonstrate that β-catenin signaling potentiates the capability of CD133+ DP cells to promote postnatal hair growth. PMID:27472062

  7. Spatial distribution of prominin-1 (CD133-positive cells within germinative zones of the vertebrate brain.

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    József Jászai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, embryonic neural progenitors as well as adult neural stem cells can be prospectively isolated based on the cell surface expression of prominin-1 (CD133, a plasma membrane glycoprotein. In contrast, characterization of neural progenitors in non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with significant constitutive neurogenesis and inherent self-repair ability is hampered by the lack of suitable cell surface markers. Here, we have investigated whether prominin-1-orthologues of the major non-mammalian vertebrate model organisms show any degree of conservation as for their association with neurogenic geminative zones within the central nervous system (CNS as they do in mammals or associated with activated neural progenitors during provoked neurogenesis in the regenerating CNS. METHODS: We have recently identified prominin-1 orthologues from zebrafish, axolotl and chicken. The spatial distribution of prominin-1-positive cells--in comparison to those of mice--was mapped in the intact brain in these organisms by non-radioactive in situ hybridization combined with detection of proliferating neural progenitors, marked either by proliferating cell nuclear antigen or 5-bromo-deoxyuridine. Furthermore, distribution of prominin-1 transcripts was investigated in the regenerating spinal cord of injured axolotl. RESULTS: Remarkably, a conserved association of prominin-1 with germinative zones of the CNS was uncovered as manifested in a significant co-localization with cell proliferation markers during normal constitutive neurogenesis in all species investigated. Moreover, an enhanced expression of prominin-1 became evident associated with provoked, compensatory neurogenesis during the epimorphic regeneration of the axolotl spinal cord. Interestingly, significant prominin-1-expressing cell populations were also detected at distinct extraventricular (parenchymal locations in the CNS of all vertebrate species being suggestive of further, non

  8. Distinct and conserved prominin-1/CD133-positive retinal cell populations identified across species.

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    József Jászai

    Full Text Available Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133 plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts--except for the axolotl--were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells, but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL. In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b, a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6-positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1-positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1-positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1-expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies.

  9. Immunocapture of CD133-positive cells from human cancer cell lines by using monodisperse magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres containing amino groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic poly(glycidyl methacrylate)-based macroporous microspheres with an average particle size of 4.2 μm were prepared using a modified multi-step swelling polymerization method and by introducing amino functionality on their surfaces. Antibody molecules were oxidized on their carbohydrate moieties and bound to the amino-containing magnetic microspheres via a site-directed procedure. CD133-positive cells could be effectively captured from human cancer cell lines (HepG2, HCT116, MCF7, and IMR-32) by using magnetic microspheres conjugated to an anti-human CD133 antibody. After further culture, the immunocaptured CD133-expressing cells from IMR-32 proliferated and gradually detached from the magnetic microspheres. Flow-cytometric analysis confirmed the enrichment of CD133-expressing cells by using the antibody-bound magnetic microspheres. Such microspheres suitable for immunocapture are very promising for cancer diagnosis because the CD133-expressing cells in cancer cell lines have been suggested to be cancer stem cells. - Highlights: • Multi-step swelling polymerization produced poly(glycidyl methacrylate) microspheres. • Anti-human CD133 antibodies were bound to the amino-containing magnetic microspheres. • CD133-positive cells were effectively captured from human cancer cell lines. • Immunocaptured CD133-expressing cells proliferated and were detached from microspheres. • Enrichment of CD133-expressing cells was confirmed by flow-cytometric analysis

  10. Specific detection of CD133-positive tumor cells with iron oxide nanoparticles labeling using noninvasive molecular magnetic resonance imaging

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    Chen YW

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ya-Wen Chen,1,2 Gunn-Guang Liou,3 Huay-Ben Pan,4,5 Hui-Hwa Tseng,5,6 Yu-Ting Hung,4 Chen-Pin Chou4,5,7,8 1National Institute of Cancer Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 2Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 3Institute of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, 4Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, 5School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 6Department of Pathology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, 7Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, 8School of Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan Background: The use of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles to visualize cells has been applied clinically, showing the potential for monitoring cells in vivo with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. USPIO conjugated with anti-CD133 antibodies (USPIO-CD133 Ab that recognize the CD133 molecule, a cancer stem cell marker in a variety of cancers, was studied as a novel and potent agent for MRI contrast enhancement of tumor cells. Materials and methods: Anti-CD133 antibodies were used to conjugate with USPIO via interaction of streptavidin and biotin for in vivo labeling of CD133-positive cells in xenografted tumors and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced brain tumors. The specific binding of USPIO-CD133 Ab to CD133-positive tumor cells was subsequently detected by Prussian blue staining and MRI with T2-weighted, gradient echo and multiple echo recombined gradient echo images. In addition, the cellular toxicity of USPIO-CD133 Ab was determined by analyzing cell proliferation, apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species production. Results: USPIO-CD133 Ab specifically recognizes in vitro and labels CD133-positive cells, as validated using Prussian blue staining and MRI. The assays of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and

  11. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

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    Liu, Juntao; Mao, Zhangfan; Huang, Jie; Xie, Songping; Liu, Tianshu; Mao, Zhifu, E-mail: 48151660@qq.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were

  12. Blocking the NOTCH pathway can inhibit the growth of CD133-positive A549 cells and sensitize to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Notch signaling pathway members are expressed lower levels in CD133+ cells. • CD133+ cells are not as sensitive as CD133− cells to chemotherapy. • GSI could inhibit the growth of both CD133+ and CD133− cells. • Blockade of Notch signaling pathway enhanced the effect of chemotherapy with CDDP. • DAPT/CDDP co-therapy caused G2/M arrest and elimination in CD133+ cells. - Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to play an important role in tumor growth and recurrence. These cells exhibit self-renewal and proliferation properties. CSCs also exhibit significant drug resistance compared with normal tumor cells. Finding new treatments that target CSCs could significantly enhance the effect of chemotherapy and improve patient survival. Notch signaling is known to regulate the development of the lungs by controlling the cell-fate determination of normal stem cells. In this study, we isolated CSCs from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. CD133 was used as a stem cell marker for fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). We compared the expression of Notch signaling in both CD133+ and CD133− cells and blocked Notch signaling using the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT (GSI-IX). The effect of combining GSI and cisplatin (CDDP) was also examined in these two types of cells. We observed that both CD133+ and CD133− cells proliferated at similar rates, but the cells exhibited distinctive differences in cell cycle progression. Few CD133+ cells were observed in the G2/M phase, and there were half as many cells in S phase compared with the CD133− cells. Furthermore, CD133+ cells exhibited significant resistance to chemotherapy when treated with CDDP. The expression of Notch signaling pathway members, such as Notch1, Notch2 and Hes1, was lower in CD133+ cells. GSI slightly inhibited the proliferation of both cell types and exhibited little effect on the cell cycle. The inhibitory effects of DPP on these two types of cells were enhanced

  13. Activation of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway occurs in the CD133 positive cells of mouse liver cancer Hepa 1–6 cells

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    Jeng KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Shyang Jeng,1 I-Shyan Sheen,2 Wen-Juei Jeng,2 Ming-Che Yu,3 Hsin-I Hsiau,3 Fang-Yu Chang,3 Hsin-Hua Tsai31Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 2Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Chang Gung University, 3Department of Medical Research, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaBackground: The important role of cancer stem cells in carcinogenesis has been emphasized in research. CD133+ cells have been mentioned as liver cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Some researchers have proposed that the sonic hedgehog (Shh pathway contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis and that the pathway activation occurs mainly in cancer stem cells. We investigated whether the activation of the Shh pathway occurs in CD133+ cells from liver cancer.Materials and methods: We used magnetic sorting to isolate CD133+ cells from mouse cancer Hepa 1–6 cells. To examine the clonogenicity, cell culture and soft agar colony formation assay were performed between CD133+ and CD133- cells. To study the activation of the Shh pathway, we examined the mRNA expressions of Shh, patched homolog 1 (Ptch-1, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli-1, and smoothened homolog (Smoh by real-time polymerase chain reaction of both CD133+ and CD133- cells.Results: The number (mean ± standard deviation of colonies of CD133+ cells and CD133- cells was 1,031.0 ± 104.7 and 119.7 ± 17.6 respectively. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Their clonogenicity was 13.7% ± 1.4% and 1.6% ± 0.2% respectively with a statistically significant difference found (P < 0.001. CD133+ cells and CD133– cells were found to have statistically significant differences in Shh mRNA and Smoh mRNA (P = 0.005 and P = 0.043 respectively.Conclusion: CD133+ Hepa 1–6 cells have a significantly higher colony proliferation and clonogenicity. The Shh pathway is activated in these

  14. Sorting of CD133+ positive cells from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line%人鼻咽癌细胞株分选CD133+细胞实验研究

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    林国彪; 姚平; 张锡流

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察CD133在人鼻咽癌细胞株中的表达,探讨CD133+肿瘤细胞的体外增殖及分化能力从而确定鼻咽癌肿瘤干细胞的标志.方法 使用免疫细胞化学及流式细胞技术检测鼻咽癌CNE2Z细胞株中的表达,免疫磁珠分选技术纯化肿瘤细胞,体外培养,观察其增殖及分化能力.结果 鼻咽癌CNE2Z细胞株中有0.168%呈微量阳性表达,利用免疫磁珠分选技术纯化细胞的百分比为87.2%,免疫磁珠富集的CD133+肿瘤细胞在无血清培养基中1、3、5、7天的吸光度均高于相同条件下未分选细胞和CD133-细胞;CD133+在培养体系中的比例逐日下降,至培养的第12天,由第1天的87.2%下降至0.1%.结论 鼻咽癌CNE2Z细胞株中,CD133+癌细胞有比其他细胞亚群强的体外分化和增殖能力,具有自我更新、生成其他表型肿瘤细胞等干细胞样特性,CD133可能是肿瘤起始细胞的标志之一.%Purpose To detect the expression of CD133 in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line, CNE2Z cell line and to observe the proliferation and differentiation ability of CD133 + groups in vitro. Methods Immunocytochemical staining and flow cytometry were used to detect the expression of putative tumor initiating cell marker CD133 in CNE2Z cell line, and the selective technique of inmu-nomagnetic beads was applied to purify CD133 positive cells. CD133+ tumor cells were cultured and their ability of proliferation and differentiation were observed in vitro. Results Only 0. 168% of cells in CNE2Z cell line expressed CD133. In senun-free RPMI1640, on days 1,3,5 and 7, their UV absorption was higher in CD133 cells than control CNE2Z cells. CD133 + cells demonstrated increased proliferating capacity. The proportion of CD133 + cells decreased in culture as days passed. In twelve days of culture, the percentage of CD133 + cells decreased from 87. 2% to 0. 1%. Conclusions CD133 + cells process stronger motility than CD133 - , CNE2Z cells in vitro and CD133

  15. Isolation and Identification of CD133 Positive and Negative Cells from Human Lung Cancer and Screening of the Differential Genes between the Positive and Negative Cells%CD133阳性/阴性肺癌细胞的分选、鉴定及差异基因的筛选

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    郑少秋; 李书华; 王红艳; 谢晓斌; 张雅洁

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective It has been proven that cancer stem cell existed in variety of cancer, which an significant dierence of biological characteristics was observed between the cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells. And CD133 is considered to be cancer stem cell marker. So there may be significant dierences in CD133- positive cells and CD133-negative cells. e aim of this study is to isolate CD133+ cells and CD133- cells from lung cancer cell line A549, ex-plore their biological characteristics and screen the metastasis-related genes. Methods MACS was applied to isolate CD133+cells and CD133- cells from human lung cancer cell line A549. To observe the formation of sphere, CD133+ cells and CD133-cells were cultured in serum-free DMEM-F12 medium (containing EGF, bFGF) in vitro. e colony formaing eciency of CD133+ cells, CD133- cells and cells without sorting was tested by colony-forming assay. e dierentiation of sphere was in-duced by culturing in DMEM-F12 medium (containing serum). e metastasis-related genes (84 genes) of CD133+ cells and CD133- cells were detected by using DNA microarray. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expression of CD133 protein in Human lung cancer tissue. Results CD133+ cells formed sphere in serum-free DMEM-F12 medium,while the CD133- cells failed to form sphere. e rates of CD133+ cell colony formation (57.1%) was significantly higher than that of CD133- cells (3.3%). Sphere (CD133+/CK7-) was induced to dierentiate, and CK7 expression was found in dierentiated cells. e expression levels of 19 metastasis-related genes from CD133+ cells and CD133- cells were significant dierent. Lile CD133 positive cells which distributing around the cancer nests were found in lung cancer tissue. e expression of CD133 was not related to tumor types, cell dierentiation or TNM stage. Conclusion CD133+ cells exhibit the characteristics of can-cer stem cells. e dierence of metastasis

  16. Analysis of gene expression and chemoresistance of CD133+ cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

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    Lu Lizhi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a small population of cancer stem cells in adult and pediatric brain tumors has been identified. Some evidence has suggested that CD133 is a marker for a subset of leukemia and glioblastoma cancer stem cells. Especially, CD133 positive cells isolated from human glioblastoma may initiate tumors and represent novel targets for therapeutics. The gene expression and the drug resistance property of CD133 positive cancer stem cells, however, are still unknown. Results In this study, by FACS analysis we determined the percentage of CD133 positive cells in three primary cultured cell lines established from glioblastoma patients 10.2%, 69.7% and 27.5%, respectively. We also determined the average mRNA levels of markers associated with neural precursors. For example, CD90, CD44, CXCR4, Nestin, Msi1 and MELK mRNA on CD133 positive cells increased to 15.6, 5.7, 337.8, 21.4, 84 and 1351 times, respectively, compared to autologous CD133 negative cells derived from cell line No. 66. Additionally, CD133 positive cells express higher levels of BCRP1 and MGMT mRNA, as well as higher mRNA levels of genes that inhibit apoptosis. Furthermore, CD133 positive cells were significantly resistant to chemotherapeutic agents including temozolomide, carboplatin, paclitaxel (Taxol and etoposide (VP16 compared to autologous CD133 negative cells. Finally, CD133 expression was significantly higher in recurrent GBM tissue obtained from five patients as compared to their respective newly diagnosed tumors. Conclusion Our study for the first time provided evidence that CD133 positive cancer stem cells display strong capability on tumor's resistance to chemotherapy. This resistance is probably contributed by the CD133 positive cell with higher expression of on BCRP1 and MGMT, as well as the anti-apoptosis protein and inhibitors of apoptosis protein families. Future treatment should target this small population of CD133 positive cancer stem cells in

  17. CD133 is not present on neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone, but on embryonic neural stem cells, ependymal cells, and glioblastoma cells.

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    Pfenninger, Cosima V; Roschupkina, Teona; Hertwig, Falk; Kottwitz, Denise; Englund, Elisabet; Bengzon, Johan; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Nuber, Ulrike A

    2007-06-15

    Human brain tumor stem cells have been enriched using antibodies against the surface protein CD133. An antibody recognizing CD133 also served to isolate normal neural stem cells from fetal human brain, suggesting a possible lineage relationship between normal neural and brain tumor stem cells. Whether CD133-positive brain tumor stem cells can be derived from CD133-positive neural stem or progenitor cells still requires direct experimental evidence, and an important step toward such investigations is the identification and characterization of normal CD133-presenting cells in neurogenic regions of the embryonic and adult brain. Here, we present evidence that CD133 is a marker for embryonic neural stem cells, an intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type in the early postnatal stage, and for ependymal cells in the adult brain, but not for neurogenic astrocytes in the adult subventricular zone. Our findings suggest two principal possibilities for the origin of brain tumor stem cells: a derivation from CD133-expressing cells, which are normally not present in the adult brain (embryonic neural stem cells and an early postnatal intermediate radial glial/ependymal cell type), or from CD133-positive ependymal cells in the adult brain, which are, however, generally regarded as postmitotic. Alternatively, brain tumor stem cells could be derived from proliferative but CD133-negative neurogenic astrocytes in the adult brain. In the latter case, brain tumor development would involve the production of CD133. PMID:17575139

  18. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR). Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs) and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Our results suggest the importance of delayed apoptosis, associated mitotic catastrophe, and cellular proliferation for γIR-induced death of

  19. Delayed cell death associated with mitotic catastrophe in γ-irradiated stem-like glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esser Norbert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose Stem-like tumor cells are regarded as highly resistant to ionizing radiation (IR. Previous studies have focused on apoptosis early after irradiation, and the apoptosis resistance observed has been attributed to reduced DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair compared to non-stem tumor cells. Here, early and late radioresponse of patient-derived stem-like glioma cells (SLGCs and differentiated cells directly derived from them were examined for cell death mode and the influence of stem cell-specific growth factors. Materials and methods Primary SLGCs were propagated in serum-free medium with the stem-cell mitogens epidermal growth factor (EGF and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2. Differentiation was induced by serum-containing medium without EGF and FGF. Radiation sensitivity was evaluated by assessing proliferation, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, and mitotic catastrophe. DNA damage-associated γH2AX as well as p53 and p21 expression were determined by Western blots. Results SLGCs failed to apoptose in the first 4 days after irradiation even at high single doses up to 10 Gy, but we observed substantial cell death later than 4 days postirradiation in 3 of 6 SLGC lines treated with 5 or 10 Gy. This delayed cell death was observed in 3 of the 4 SLGC lines with nonfunctional p53, was associated with mitotic catastrophe and occurred via apoptosis. The early apoptosis resistance of the SLGCs was associated with lower γH2AX compared to differentiated cells, but we found that the stem-cell culture cytokines EGF plus FGF-2 strongly reduce γH2AX levels. Nonetheless, in two p53-deficient SLGC lines examined γIR-induced apoptosis even correlated with EGF/FGF-induced proliferation and mitotic catastrophe. In a line containing CD133-positive and -negative stem-like cells, the CD133-positive cells proliferated faster and underwent more γIR-induced mitotic catastrophe. Conclusions Our results suggest the importance of delayed

  20. Role of phosphoproteins involved in chemoresistance of colorectal cancer stem cells and immuno phenotypic comparative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent studies demonstrated that colon cancers contain a cellular subpopulation, with stem cell-like proprieties, able to initiate and sustain tumour growth. These cells, so-called Cancer Initiating Cells (CICs), express the transmembrane antigen CD133. CD133 positive cells show slow proliferation rate, high expression of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters and anti-apoptotic factors making them resistant to conventional therapies

  1. Cultivation and identification of colon cancer stem cell-derived spheres from the Colo205 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our group established a method to culture spheres under serum-free culture condition. However, the biological characteristics and the tumorigenicity of spheres are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that sphere cells expressed high levels of the putative colorectal cancer stem cell markers CD133 and CD44. The CD133-positive rates were 13.27 ± 5.62, 52.71 ± 16.97 and 16.47 ± 2.45% in sphere cells, regular Colo205 cells and differentiated sphere cells, respectively, while the CD44-positive rates were 62.92 ± 8.38, 79.06 ± 12.10 and 47.80 ± 2.5%, respectively, and the CD133/CD44-double-positive rates were 10.77 ± 4.96, 46.89 ± 19.17 and 12.41 ± 2.27%, respectively (P < 0.05). Cancer sphere cells formed crypt-like structures in 3-D culture. Moreover, cells from cancer spheres exhibited more tumorigenicity than regular Colo205 cells in a xenograft assay. The cancer sphere cells displayed much higher oncogenicity than regular Colo205 cells to initiate neoplasms, as assayed by H&E staining, Musashi-1 staining and electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that the sphere cells were enriched with cancer stem cells (CSCs), and exhibited more proliferation capacity, more differentiation potential and especially more tumorigenicity than regular Colo205 cells in vitro and in vivo. Further isolation and characterization of these CSCs may provide new insights for novel therapeutic targets and prognostic markers

  2. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Sabine; Ronchese, Franca

    2013-01-01

    The elicitation of efficient antitumor immune responses requires the optimal activation of tumor-associated dendritic cells (DCs). Our comparison of the effect of various immunostimulatory treatments on DCs revealed that the best predictor of the success of immunotherapy is not the activation of existing DC populations, but the appearance of a population of monocyte-derived DC in tumor-draining lymph nodes.

  3. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan;

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has shown that adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells. Many different therapies for chronic wounds exist with varying success rates. The capacity of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to promote angiogenesis, secrete growth factors......, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types makes them a potential ideal therapy for chronic wounds. The aim of this article was to review all preclinical trials using ASCs in problem wound models. A systematic search was performed and 12 studies were found where different...

  4. CD133 Immunohistochemisty in Glioblastoma – Identification of Tumor Stem Cells or a Matter of Coincidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Simon Kjær; Christensen, Karina Garnier; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    + niches in glioblastomas, often in close relation to blood vessels, using all four antibody clones. The distribution of identified niches did, however, rarely correspond among each antibody clone. Staining of glioblastoma single and niche cells was predominantly cytoplasmatic, although membranous staining...... was also observed in niches. Quantitative stereology revealed vast dissimilarities regarding fractions of CD133+ niches and single cells among the CD133 antibody clones. Generally, the fraction of CD133 positivity identified by clone W6B3C1 was significantly higher than CD133 fractions identified by...

  5. Isolation, cultivation and identification of brain glioma stem cells by magnetic bead sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiuping Zhou; Chao Zheng; Qiong Shi; Xiang Li; Zhigang Shen; Rutong Yu

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a detailed process for obtaining brain glioma stem cells from freshly dissected human brain glioma samples using an immunomagnetic bead technique combined with serum-free media pressure screening. Furthermore, the proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal biological features of brain glioma stem cells were identified. Results showed that a small number of CD133 positive tumor cells isolated from brain glioma samples survived as a cell suspension in serum-free media and proliferated. Subcultured CD133 positive cells maintained a potent self-renewal and proliferative ability, and expressed the stem cell-specific markers CD133 and nestin. After incubation with fetal bovine serum, the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein and microtubule associated protein 2 positive cells increased significantly, indicating that the cultured brain glioma stem cells can differentiate into astrocytes and neurons. Western blot analysis showed that tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog was highly expressed in tumor spheres compared with the differentiated tumor cells. These experimental findings indicate that the immunomagnetic beads technique is a useful method to obtain brain glioma stem cells from human brain tumors.

  6. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  7. Neural stem cell derived tumourigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Froldi; Milán Szuperák; Cheng, Louise Y.

    2015-01-01

    In the developing Drosophila CNS, two pools of neural stem cells, the symmetrically dividing progenitors in the neuroepithelium (NE) and the asymmetrically dividing neuroblasts (NBs) generate the majority of the neurons that make up the adult central nervous system (CNS). The generation of a correct sized brain depends on maintaining the fine balance between neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, which are regulated by cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic cues. In this review, we wil...

  8. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gathier, WA; Türktas, Z; Duckers, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Until recently bone marrow was perceived to be the only significant reservoir of stem cells in the body. However, it is now recognized that there are other and perhaps even more abundant sources, which include adipose tissue. Subcutaneous fat is readily available in most patients, and can easily be

  9. Characterization of colon cancer cells: a functional approach characterizing CD133 as a potential stem cell marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolation and characterization of tumourigenic colon cancer initiating cells may help to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. We characterized a panel of fourteen human colon carcinoma cell lines and their corresponding xenografts for the surface expression of potential stem cell markers CD133, CD24, CD44, CDCP1 and CXCR4. In five cell lines and nine xenografts, mRNA expression of these markers was determined. Tumour growth behaviour of CD133+, CD133- and unsorted SW620 cells was evaluated in vivo. All five putative stem cell markers showed distinct expression patterns in the tumours examined. Two patient-derived cell lines highly expressed CD133 (> 85% of positive cells) and three other cell lines had an expression level of about 50% whereas in long-term culture based models CD133 expression ranged only from 0 to 20%. In 8/14 cell lines, more than 80% of the cells were positive for CD24 and 11/14 were over 70% positive for CD44. 10/14 cell lines expressed CDCP1 on ≥ 83% of cells. CXCR4 expression was determined solely on 94 L and SW480. Analyses of the corresponding xenografts revealed a significant reduction of cell numbers expressing the investigated surface markers and showed single cell fractions expressing up to three markers simultaneously. Statistical analysis revealed that the CXCR4 mRNA level correlates negatively with the protein expression of CD133, CD44, CD24 and CDCP1 in cell lines and xenografts. A lower differentiation grade of donor material correlated with a higher CDCP1 mRNA expression level in the respective tumour model. In vivo growth behaviour studies of SW620 revealed significantly higher take rates and shorter doubling times in the tumour growth of CD133 positive subclones in comparison to the unsorted cell line or CD133 negative subclones. Our data revealed correlations in the expression of surface markers CD44 and CD24 as well as CD44 and CDCP1 and strongly suggest that CD133 is a stem cell marker within our colon

  10. Adipose-derived stem cells versus bone marrow-derived stem cells for vocal fold regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Hiwatashi, Nao; Hirano, Shigeru; Mizuta, Masanobu; Tateya, Ichiro; Kanemaru, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Ito, Juichi

    2014-01-01

    [Objectives/Hypothesis]Vocal fold scarring presents therapeutic challenges. Recently, cell therapy with mesenchymal stromal cells has become a promising approach. The aim of this study was to compare the therapeutic potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) with bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSC) for vocal fold regeneration. [Study Design]Prospective animal experiments with controls. [Methods]The vocal folds of Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally injured. Two months after injury, rat...

  11. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying, E-mail: ying.chen@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R. [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Knott, Jason G. [Developmental Epigenetics Laboratory, Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University (United States); Leach, Richard, E-mail: Richard.leach@hc.msu.edu [Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology, Michigan State University, 333 Bostwick NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503 (United States); Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health, Spectrum Health Medical Group (United States)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  12. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro

  13. Cytomegalovirus infection induces a stem cell phenotype in human primary glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornara, O; Rahbar, A; Odeberg, J;

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive surgical resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. Unfortunately, this standard therapy does not target glioma cancer stem cells (GCSCs), a subpopulation of GBM cells that can give rise to recurrent tumors. GBMs express...... human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) proteins, and previously we found that the level of expression of HCMV immediate-early (IE) protein in GBMs is a prognostic factor for poor patient survival. In this study, we investigated the relation between HCMV infection of GBM cells and the presence of GCSCs. Primary...... GBMs were characterized by their expression of HCMV-IE and GCSCs marker CD133 and by patient survival. The extent to which HCMV infection of primary GBM cells induced a GCSC phenotype was evaluated in vitro. In primary GBMs, a large fraction of CD133-positive cells expressed HCMV-IE, and higher co...

  14. Stemness is derived from thyroid cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risheng eMa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: One hypothesis for thyroid cancer development is its derivation from thyroid cancer stem cells (CSCs. Such cells could arise via different paths including from mutated resident stem cells within the thyroid gland or via epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT from malignant cells since EMT is known to confer stem-like characteristics. Methods: To examine the status of stemness in thyroid papillary cancer we employed a murine model of thyroid papillary carcinoma and examined the expression of stemness and EMT using qPCR and histochemistry in mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre. This construct is only activated at the time of thyroid peroxidase (TPO expression in differentiating thyroid cells and cannot be activated by undifferentiated stem cells which do not express TPO.Results: There was decreased expression of thyroid specific genes such as Tg and NIS and increased expression of stemness markers such as Oct4, Rex1, CD15 and Sox2 in the thyroid carcinoma tissue from 6 week old BRAFV600E mice. The decreased expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and increased EMT regulators including Snail, Slug, and TGF-β1 and TGF-β3, and the mesenchymal marker vimentin demonstrated the simultaneous progression of EMT and the CSC-like phenotype. Stemness was also found in a derived cancer thyroid cell line in which overexpression of Snail caused up-regulation of vimentin expression and up regulation of stemness markers Oct4, Rex1, CD15 with enhanced migration ability of the cells. Conclusions: Our findings support our earlier hypothesis that stemness in thyroid cancer is derived via EMT rather than from resident thyroid stem cells. In mice with a thyroid-specific knock-in of oncogenic Braf (LSL-Braf(V600E/TPO-Cre the neoplastic changes were dependent on thyroid cell differentiation and the onset of stemness must have been derived from differentiated thyroid epithelial cells.

  15. Adipose derived stem cells and nerve regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alessandro Faroni; Richard JP Smith; Adam J Reid

    2014-01-01

    Injuries to peripheral nerves are common and cause life-changing problems for patients along-side high social and health care costs for society. Current clinical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries predominantly relies on sacriifcing a section of nerve from elsewhere in the body to pro-vide a graft at the injury site. Much work has been done to develop a bioengineered nerve graft, precluding sacriifce of a functional nerve. Stem cells are prime candidates as accelerators of re-generation in these nerve grafts. This review examines the potential of adipose-derived stem cells to improve nerve repair assisted by bioengineered nerve grafts.

  16. Endothelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenberg, Shulamit; Golub, Justin S.; Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph; Langer, Robert

    2002-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have the potential to differentiate into various cell types and, thus, may be useful as a source of cells for transplantation or tissue engineering. We describe here the differentiation steps of human embryonic stem cells into endothelial cells forming vascular-like structures. The human embryonic-derived endothelial cells were isolated by using platelet endothelial cell-adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) antibodies, their behavior was characterized in vitro and in vivo, and their potential in tissue engineering was examined. We show that the isolated embryonic PECAM1+ cells, grown in culture, display characteristics similar to vessel endothelium. The cells express endothelial cell markers in a pattern similar to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, their junctions are correctly organized, and they have high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. In addition, the cells are able to differentiate and form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. In vivo, when transplanted into SCID mice, the cells appeared to form microvessels containing mouse blood cells. With further studies, these cells could provide a source of human endothelial cells that could be beneficial for potential applications such as engineering new blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation into the heart for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  17. Immunogenicity of umbilical cord tissue derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Patricia S; Messina, Darin J; Hirsh, Erica L; Chi, Nina; Goldman, Stephanie N; Lo, Diana P; Harris, Ian R; Popma, Sicco H; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A

    2008-01-01

    Umbilical cord tissue provides a unique source of cells with potential for tissue repair. Umbilical cord tissue-derived cells (UTCs) are MHC class I (MHCI) dull and negative for MHC class II (MHCII), but can be activated to increase MHCI and to express MHCII with IFN-gamma stimulation. Mesenchymal stem cells with similar characteristics have been inferred to be nonimmunogenic; however, in most cases, immunogenicity was not directly assessed. Using UTC from Massachusetts General Hospital MHC-defined miniature swine, we assessed immunogenicity across a full MHC barrier. Immunogenicity was assessed by in vitro assays including mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and flow cytometry to detect serum alloantibody. A single injection of MHC-mismatched unactivated UTCs did not induce a detectable immune response. When injected in an inflamed region, injected repeatedly in the same region or stimulated with IFN-gamma prior to injection, UTCs were immunogenic. As clinical cellular repair strategies may involve injection of allogeneic cells into inflamed regions of damaged tissue or repeated doses of cells to achieve the desired benefit, our results on the immunogenicity of these cells in these circumstances may have important implications for optimal success and functional improvement for this cellular treatment strategy for diseased tissues. PMID:17909081

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-3 in odontoblastic cells derived from ips cells: unique proliferation response as odontoblastic cells derived from ES cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiki Hiyama

    Full Text Available We previously reported that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-3 accelerates wound healing following dental pulp injury. In addition, we reported that a proinflammatory cytokine mixture (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1β and interferon-γ induced MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potential unique physiological role in wound healing and regeneration of dental pulp in odontoblast-like cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that upregulation of MMP-3 activity by IL-1β promotes proliferation and apoptosis of purified odontoblast-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS and ES cells. Each odontoblast-like cell was isolated and incubated with different concentrations of IL-1β. MMP-3 mRNA and protein expression were assessed using RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. MMP-3 activity was measured using immunoprecipitation and a fluorescence substrate. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using ELISA for BrdU and DNA fragmentation, respectively. siRNA was used to reduce MMP-3 transcripts in these cells. Treatment with IL-1β increased MMP-3 mRNA and protein levels, and MMP-3 activity in odontoblast-like cells. Cell proliferation was found to markedly increase with no changes in apoptosis. Endogenous tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were constitutively expressed during all experiments. The exocytosis inhibitor, Exo1, potently suppressed the appearance of MMP-3 in the conditioned medium. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 suppressed an IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity, and also suppressed cell proliferation, but unexpectedly increased apoptosis in these cells (P<0.05. Exogenous MMP-3 was found to induce cell proliferation in odontoblast-like cells derived from iPS cells and ES cells. This siRNA-mediated increase in apoptosis could be reversed with exogenous MMP-3 stimulation (P<0

  19. New naphthoquinone derivatives against glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redaelli, Marco; Mucignat-Caretta, Carla; Isse, Abdirisak Ahmed; Gennaro, Armando; Pezzani, Raffaele; Pasquale, Riccardo; Pavan, Valeria; Crisma, Marco; Ribaudo, Giovanni; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed to the development of a set of new naphtoquinone derivatives that can act against glioma. The compounds were tested in order to find out their ability to inhibit the growth of glioma cells, and the results of these assays were correlated with electrochemical analysis and NMR-based reoxidation kinetic studies, suggesting that a redox mechanism underlies and may explain the observed biological behavior. In addition to a full description of the synthetic pathways, electrochemistry, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction data are provided. PMID:25916907

  20. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker

  1. DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4) colocalizes with cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yun-Jeong; Jo, Jin-Ok; Ock, Mee Sun [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Soo Hyun; Suh, Dong Soo; Yoon, Man Soo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute and Pusan Cancer Center, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun-Sil [Vincent Center for Reproductive Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, MA (United States); Jeong, Namkung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Wan-Kyu [Department of Internal Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Heung Yeol, E-mail: hykyale@yahoo.com [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee-Jae, E-mail: hcha@kosin.ac.kr [Department of Parasitology and Genetics, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Medical Science, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Germ cell marker DDX4 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • Ovarian cancer stem cell marker CD133 was significantly increased in ovarian cancer. • DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. • CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4. • Germ cell marker DDX4 has the potential of ovarian cancer stem cell marker. - Abstract: DDX4 (DEAD box polypeptide 4), characterized by the conserved motif Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp (DEAD), is an RNA helicase which is implicated in various cellular processes involving the alteration of RNA secondary structure, such as translation initiation, nuclear and mitochondrial splicing, and ribosome and spliceosome assembly. DDX4 is known to be a germ cell-specific protein and is used as a sorting marker of germline stem cells for the production of oocytes. A recent report about DDX4 in ovarian cancer showed that DDX4 is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer and disrupts a DNA damage-induced G2 checkpoint. We investigated the relationship between DDX4 and ovarian cancer stem cells by analyzing the expression patterns of DDX4 and the cancer stem cell marker CD133 in ovarian cancers via tissue microarray. Both DDX4 and CD133 were significantly increased in ovarian cancer compared to benign tumors, and showed similar patterns of expression. In addition, DDX4 and CD133 were mostly colocalized in various types of ovarian cancer tissues. Furthermore, almost all CD133 positive ovarian cancer cells also express DDX4 whereas CD133-negative cells did not possess DDX4, suggesting a strong possibility that DDX4 plays an important role in cancer stem cells, and/or can be used as an ovarian cancer stem cell marker.

  2. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Katherine P; Hung, Sandy S C; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E; Nayagam, Bryony A; Cook, Anthony L; Hewitt, Alex W; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C B

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  3. Perlecan is required for FGF-2 signaling in the neural stem cell niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Kerever

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the adult subventricular zone (neurogenic niche, neural stem cells double-positive for two markers of subsets of neural stem cells in the adult central nervous system, glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD133, lie in proximity to fractones and to blood vessel basement membranes, which contain the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan. Here, we demonstrate that perlecan deficiency reduces the number of both GFAP/CD133-positive neural stem cells in the subventricular zone and new neurons integrating into the olfactory bulb. We also show that FGF-2 treatment induces the expression of cyclin D2 through the activation of the Akt and Erk1/2 pathways and promotes neurosphere formation in vitro. However, in the absence of perlecan, FGF-2 fails to promote neurosphere formation. These results suggest that perlecan is a component of the neurogenic niche that regulates FGF-2 signaling and acts by promoting neural stem cell self-renewal and neurogenesis.

  4. Derivation of epithelial-like cells from eyelid fat-derived stem cells in thermosensitive hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Keshel, Saeed; Rostampour, Maryam; Khosropour, Golbahar; Bandbon B, Atefehsadat; Baradaran-Rafii, Alireza; Biazar, Esmaeil

    2016-01-01

    Injectable hydrogel is one of the great interests for tissue engineering and cell encapsulation. In the study, the thermosensitive chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerol phosphate (C/G/GP) disodium salt hydrogels were designed and investigated by different analyses. The eye fat-derived stem cells were used to evaluate the biocompatibility of hydrogels based on their phenotypic profile, viability, proliferation, and attachment ability. The results show that the sol/gel transition temperature of the C/G/GP hydrogel was in the range of 31.1-33.8 °C at neutral pH value, the gelation time was shortened, and the gel strength also improved at body temperature when compared with the C/GP hydrogel. In vitro cell culture experiments with eyelid fat-derived stem cells in hydrogel showed beneficial effects on the cell phenotypic morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. Microscopic figures showed that the eyelid fat stem cell were firmly anchored to the substrates and were able to retain a normal stem cell phenotype. Immunocytochemistry (ICC) and real-time-PCR results revealed change in the expression profile of eyelid fat stem cells grown with hydrogels when compared to those grown on control in epithelial induction condition. This study indicates that using chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerol phosphate hydrogel for cell culture is feasible and may apply in minimal invasive surgery in the future.

  5. Nuclear expression of β-catenin and stem cell markers as potential prognostic indicators in medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Krishne Gowda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To study the prognostic role of β-catenin and stem cell markers in medulloblastoma (MB. Materials and Methods: Sixty cases of MB were retrospectively analyzed to study the expression of β-catenin, CD15, and CD133 by immunohistochemistry. Their expression was correlated with histological subtypes and event-free survival (EFS. Patients were divided into Group 1 and 2 based on non-occurrence and occurrence of events during the follow-up period. Results: Fifty of the 60 cases were of classic type of MB while nine were of desmoplastic subtype and one case showed chondroid and rhabdomyoblastic differentiation. Immunoreactivity for β-catenin was observed as nuclear and/or cytoplasmic positivity within the tumor cells. Forty-one (68.3% cases showed cytoplasmic positivity, while nuclear positivity was seen in 21 (35% cases. There was a significant correlation between nuclear expression of β-catenin and different histological subtypes by Chi-square test (P value<0.05. A statistically significant positive correlation of β-catenin nuclear positivity with EFS was observed. Among 60 cases, 37 cases (67.3% showed presence of CD15+ tumor cells with percentage of positivity varying between 0.1 to 17.1%. Overall, 42 of 60 (70% cases showed presence of CD133+ cells. The percentage of positivity varied between 0.1 to 16.5%. A statistically significant negative correlation of CD15 and CD133 positivity with EFS was observed. Conclusions: Nucleopositive β-catenin cases were associated with a favorable outcome on univariate analysis. Both CD15 and CD133 positivity were associated with a worse outcome on univariate analysis.

  6. Differentiation potential of the fetal rat liver-derived cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Zygmunt Pojda; Jerzy Moraczewski; Tomasz Oldak; Marzena Jastrzewska; Agnieszka Gajkowska; Iwona Grabowska; Eugeniusz K Machaj

    2005-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow or several fetal tissues can be expanded and differentiated into other cell lines. The fetal liver is the source of early hematopoietic cells and also, as a fetal tissue, may be considered as a source of pluripotent stem cells. The differentiation potential of fetal rat liver cells have been examined. Freshly isolated liver cells from 14-d fetuses were cultured in Dulbecco medium supplemented with 10% FCS. The plastic-adherent cells were then pa...

  7. COMPARISON OF HUMAN ADIPOSE-DERIVED STEM CELLS AND BONE MARROW-DERIVED STEM CELLS IN A MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION MODEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jeppe Grøndahl; Frøbert, Ole; Holst-Hansen, Claus;

    2012-01-01

    grown non-immunecompromised rat model. Methods: Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adipose tissue and bone marrow and compared with respect to surface markers and proliferative capability. To compare the regenerative potential of the two stem cell populations, male Sprague-Dawley rats were......Background: Treatment of myocardial infarction with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and recently also adipose-derived stem cells has shown promising results. In contrast to clinical trials and their use of autologous bone marrow-derived cells from the ischemic patient, the animal...... myocardial infarction models are often using young donors and young, often immune-compromised, recipient animals. Our objective was to compare bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells from an elderly ischemic patient in the treatment of myocardial infarction, using a fully...

  8. Natural Helper cells derive from lymphoid progenitors1

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Qi; Saenz, Steven A.; Zlotoff, Daniel A.; Artis, David; Bhandoola, Avinash

    2011-01-01

    Natural Helper (NH) cells are recently discovered innate immune cells that confer protective type 2 immunity during helminth infection and mediate influenza induced airway hypersensitivity. Little is known about the ontogeny of NH cells. We now report NH cells derive from bone marrow lymphoid progenitors. Using RAG-1Cre/ROSA26YFP mice, we show that the majority of NH cells are marked with a history of RAG-1 expression, implying lymphoid developmental origin. The development of NH cells depend...

  9. Multiple Effects of Berberine Derivatives on Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Guamán Ortiz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological use of the plant alkaloid berberine is based on its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; recently, anticancer activity has been attributed to this compound. To exploit this interesting feature, we synthesized three berberine derivatives, namely, NAX012, NAX014, and NAX018, and we tested their effects on two human colon carcinoma cell lines, that is, HCT116 and SW613-B3, which are characterized by wt and mutated p53, respectively. We observed that cell proliferation is more affected by cell treatment with the derivatives than with the lead compound; moreover, the derivatives proved to induce cell cycle arrest and cell death through apoptosis, thus suggesting that they could be promising anticancer drugs. Finally, we detected typical signs of autophagy in cells treated with berberine derivatives.

  10. Derivation of human embryonic stem cells in defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Tenneille E; Levenstein, Mark E; Jones, Jeffrey M; Berggren, W Travis; Mitchen, Erika R; Frane, Jennifer L; Crandall, Leann J; Daigh, Christine A; Conard, Kevin R; Piekarczyk, Marian S; Llanas, Rachel A; Thomson, James A

    2006-02-01

    We have previously reported that high concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) support feeder-independent growth of human embryonic stem (ES) cells, but those conditions included poorly defined serum and matrix components. Here we report feeder-independent human ES cell culture that includes protein components solely derived from recombinant sources or purified from human material. We describe the derivation of two new human ES cell lines in these defined culture conditions.

  11. Technical Challenges in the Derivation of Human Pluripotent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been discovered that human pluripotent cells could be isolated from the blastocyst state of embryos and called human embryonic stem cells (ESCs. These cells can be adapted and propagated indefinitely in culture in an undifferentiated manner as well as differentiated into cell representing the three major germ layers: endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. However, the derivation of human pluripotent cells from donated embryos is limited and restricted by ethical concerns. Therefore, various approaches have been explored and proved their success. Human pluripotent cells can also be derived experimentally by the nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells. These techniques include somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT, cell fusion and overexpression of pluripotent genes. In this paper, we discuss the technical challenges of these approaches for nuclear reprogramming, involving their advantages and limitations. We will also highlight the possible applications of these techniques in the study of stem cell biology.

  12. Cryopreservation of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kobayashi, Naoya; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Masami; Noguchi, Yasufumi; Matsushita,Masayuki; Noguchi,Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into cells of mesodermal origin such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, myocytes, and chondrocytes. They possess an immunosuppressive effect, which makes them a viable cell population for the cell-based therapy of treatment-resistant immune diseases. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) have been demonstrated to have the ability to acquire the properties of subcutaneous adipose tissue particularly easily, and cryopreservation...

  13. Adipose-derived regenerative cells in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perin, Emerson C; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Sánchez, Pedro L;

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Adipose-derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) can be isolated from liposuction aspirates and prepared as fresh cells for immediate administration in cell therapy. We performed the first randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial to examine the safety and feasibility of the transendocar...

  14. Differentiation and Molecular Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived on Gelatin or Collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Chizuka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Hazawa, Masaharu; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Gotoh, Takaya; Yasuda, Takeshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    The generation of induced-pluripotential stem cells- (iPSCs-) derived mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs) is an attractive and promising approach for preparing large, uniform batches of applicable MSCs that can serve as an alternative cell source of primary MSCs. Appropriate culture surfaces may influence their growth and differentiation potentials during iMSC derivation. The present study compared molecular properties and differentiation potential of derived mouse iPS-MSCs by deriving on gelatin or collagen-coated surfaces. The cells were derived by a one-step method and expressed CD73 and CD90, but CD105 was downregulated in iMSCs cultured only on gelatin-coated plates with increasing numbers of passages. A pairwise scatter analysis revealed similar expression of MSC-specific genes in iMSCs derived on gelatin and on collagen surfaces as well as in primary mouse bone marrow MSCs. Deriving iMSCs on gelatin and collagen dictated their osteogenic and adipose differentiation potentials, respectively. Derived iMSCs on gelatin upregulated Bmp2 and Lif prior to induction of osteogenic or adipose differentiation, while PPARγ was upregulated by deriving on collagen. Our results suggest that extracellular matrix components such as gelatin biases generated iMSC differentiation potential towards adipose or bone tissue in their derivation process via up- or downregulation of these master genes. PMID:27642306

  15. Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles and Immune-Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Jacopo; Monticone, Silvia; Gai, Chiara; Gomez, Yonathan; Kholia, Sharad; Camussi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Extra-cellular vesicles (EVs) are bilayer membrane structures enriched with proteins, nucleic acids, and other active molecules and have been implicated in many physiological and pathological processes over the past decade. Recently, evidence suggests EVs to play a more dichotomic role in the regulation of the immune system, whereby an immune response may be enhanced or supressed by EVs depending on their cell of origin and its functional state. EVs derived from antigen (Ag)-presenting cells for instance, have been involved in both innate and acquired (or adaptive) immune responses, as Ag carriers or presenters, or as vehicles for delivering active signaling molecules. On the other hand, tumor and stem cell derived EVs have been identified to exert an inhibitory effect on immune responses by carrying immuno-modulatory effectors, such as transcriptional factors, non-coding RNA (Species), and cytokines. In addition, stem cell-derived EVs have also been reported to impair dendritic cell maturation and to regulate the activation, differentiation, and proliferation of B cells. They have been shown to control natural killer cell activity and to suppress the innate immune response (IIR). Studies reporting the role of EVs on T lymphocyte modulation are controversial. Discrepancy in literature may be due to stem cell culture conditions, methods of EV purification, EV molecular content, and functional state of both parental and target cells. However, mesenchymal stem cell-derived EVs were shown to play a more suppressive role by shifting T cells from an activated to a T regulatory phenotype. In this review, we will discuss how stem cell-derived EVs may contribute toward the modulation of the immune response. Collectively, stem cell-derived EVs mainly exhibit an inhibitory effect on the immune system. PMID:27597941

  16. Modeling human liver biology using stem cell-derived hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Pingnan; Zhou, XiaoLing; Farnworth, Sarah; Arvind H Patel; Hay, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived hepatocytes represent promising models to study human liver biology and disease. This concise review discusses the recent progresses in the field, with a focus on human liver disease, drug metabolism and virus infection.

  17. Modeling Human Liver Biology Using Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Arvind H Patel; Hay, David C.; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Pingnan Sun; Xiaoling Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived hepatocytes represent promising models to study human liver biology and disease. This concise review discusses the recent progresses in the field, with a focus on human liver disease, drug metabolism and virus infection.

  18. 0Adipose-derived stem cells: Implications in tissue regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wakako; Tsuji; J; Peter; Rubin; Kacey; G; Marra

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells(ASCs) are mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) that are obtained from abundant adipose tissue, adherent on plastic culture flasks, can be expanded in vitro, and have the capacity to differ-entiate into multiple cell lineages. Unlike bone marrow-derived MSCs, ASCs can be obtained from abundant adipose tissue by a minimally invasive procedure, which results in a high number of cells. Therefore, ASCs are promising for regenerating tissues and organs dam-aged by injury and diseases. This article reviews the implications of ASCs in tissue regeneration.

  19. Schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived cells do not respond to extracellular reelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls. Automated high-throughput imaging and analysis were used to track motility of individual living cells on reelin-coated surfaces produced from reelin secreted into the medium by HEK293FT cells transfected with the full-length reelin plasmid pCrl. Automated assays were used to quantify intracellular cytoskeleton composition, cell morphology, and focal adhesions. Expression of reelin and components of the reelin signaling pathway were measured by western blot and flow cytometry. Reelin inhibited the motility of control cells but not patient cells, and increased the number and size of focal adhesions in control cells but not patient cells. Patient and control cells expressed similar levels of the reelin receptors and the reelin signaling protein, Dab1, but patient cells expressed less reelin. Patient cells were smaller than control cells and had less actin and acetylated α-tubulin, components of the cytoskeleton. These findings are the first direct evidence that cellular responses to reelin are impaired in schizophrenia and are consistent with the role of reelin in cytoarchitectural deficits observed in schizophrenia patient brains.

  20. Schizophrenia patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived cells do not respond to extracellular reelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Jing Yang; Sutharsan, Ratneswary; Fan, Yongjun; Mackay-Sim, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Reelin expression is reduced in various regions in the post-mortem brain of schizophrenia patients but the exact role of reelin function in the neurobiology of schizophrenia remains elusive. Absence of reelin in knockout mouse causes inverted lamination of the neocortex due to aberrant neuronal migration. The aim of this study was to utilize patient-derived olfactory neurosphere-derived (ONS) cells to investigate whether extracellular reelin alters cell motility in schizophrenia patient-derived cells. ONS cells from nine patients were compared with cells from nine matched healthy controls. Automated high-throughput imaging and analysis were used to track motility of individual living cells on reelin-coated surfaces produced from reelin secreted into the medium by HEK293FT cells transfected with the full-length reelin plasmid pCrl. Automated assays were used to quantify intracellular cytoskeleton composition, cell morphology, and focal adhesions. Expression of reelin and components of the reelin signaling pathway were measured by western blot and flow cytometry. Reelin inhibited the motility of control cells but not patient cells, and increased the number and size of focal adhesions in control cells but not patient cells. Patient and control cells expressed similar levels of the reelin receptors and the reelin signaling protein, Dab1, but patient cells expressed less reelin. Patient cells were smaller than control cells and had less actin and acetylated α-tubulin, components of the cytoskeleton. These findings are the first direct evidence that cellular responses to reelin are impaired in schizophrenia and are consistent with the role of reelin in cytoarchitectural deficits observed in schizophrenia patient brains. PMID:27602387

  1. Derivation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Immunosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Alice E.; Melton, Douglas A

    2007-01-01

    The ability of human embryonic stem cells to self-renew and differentiate into all cell types of the body suggests that they hold great promise for both medical applications and as a research tool for addressing fundamental questions in development and disease. Here, we provide a concise, step-by-step protocol for the derivation of human embryonic stem cells from embryos by immunosurgical isolation of the inner cell mass.

  2. Hospicells (ascites-derived stromal cells) promote tumorigenicity and angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Marlene; Golzio, Muriel; Mery, Eliane; Rafii, Arash; Benabbou, Nadia; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Allal, Ben; Teissie, Justin; Mirshahi, Massoud; Couderc, Bettina

    2010-05-01

    The microenvironment is known to play a dominant role in cancer progression. Cells closely associated with tumoral cells, named hospicells, have been recently isolated from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients. Whilst these cells present no specific markers from known cell lineages, they do share some homology with bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166, HLA-1). We studied the role of hospicells in ovarian carcinoma progression. In vitro, these cells had no effect on the growth of human ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3, SKOV-1 and IGROV-1. In vivo, their co-injection with adenocarcinoma cells enhanced tumor growth whatever the tumor model used (subcutaneous and intraperitoneally established xenografts in athymic mice). In addition, their injection increased the development of ascites in tumor-bearing mice. Fluorescent macroscopy revealed an association between hospicells and ovarian adenocarcinoma cells within the tumor mass. Tumors obtained by coinjection of hospicells and human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells presented an increased microvascularization indicating that the hospicells could promote tumorigenicity of ovarian tumor cells in vivovia their action on angiogenesis. This effect on angiogenesis could be attributed to the increased HIF1alpha and VEGF expression associated with the presence of the hospicells. Collectively, these data indicate a role for these ascite-derived stromal cells in promoting tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis.

  3. Challenges for the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem derived cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda eForsberg

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESC and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine. These cells can be expanded to vast numbers and can be differentiated to many cell types to generate pluripotent stem cells (PSC derived therapeutic cells. These cells are desired for cell transplantations. Cell replacement is promising, but it has many challenges. The challenge of introduction of exogenous cells in a recipient requires addressing several different topics; the immunological response and possible rejection, cleanliness, exclusion of tumor formation and functionality of the PSC derived therapeutic cells. Immunological rejection can be addressed with immunomodulation of the cells and the recipient. Cleanliness can be optimized using good manufacturing practice (GMP quality systems. Tumor formation requires the removal of any PSC remaining after differentiation. At last, the functionality of the cells must be tested in in-vitro and in animal models. After addressing these challenges, precise strategies are developed to monitor the status of the cells at different times and in case of undesired results, corresponding counteracting strategies must exist before any clinical attempt.

  4. Generation and characterization of functional cardiomyocytes derived from human T cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa Seki

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been proposed as novel cell sources for genetic disease models and revolutionary clinical therapies. Accordingly, human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes are potential cell sources for cardiomyocyte transplantation therapy. We previously developed a novel generation method for human peripheral T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs that uses a minimally invasive approach to obtain patient cells. However, it remained unknown whether TiPSCs with genomic rearrangements in the T cell receptor (TCR gene could differentiate into functional cardiomyocyte in vitro. To address this issue, we investigated the morphology, gene expression pattern, and electrophysiological properties of TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes differentiated by floating culture. RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes properly express cardiomyocyte markers and ion channels, and show the typical cardiomyocyte morphology. Multiple electrode arrays with application of ion channel inhibitors also revealed normal electrophysiological responses in the TiPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in terms of beating rate and the field potential waveform. In this report, we showed that TiPSCs successfully differentiated into cardiomyocytes with morphology, gene expression patterns, and electrophysiological features typical of native cardiomyocytes. TiPSCs-derived cardiomyocytes obtained from patients by a minimally invasive technique could therefore become disease models for understanding the mechanisms of cardiac disease and cell sources for revolutionary cardiomyocyte therapies.

  5. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  6. Towards the Maturation and Characterization of Smooth Muscle Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Vazão; Ricardo Pires das Neves; Mário Grãos; Lino Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate that CD34(+) cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have higher smooth muscle cell (SMC) potential than CD34(-) cells. We report that from all inductive signals tested, retinoic acid (RA) and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF(BB)) are the most effective agents in guiding the differentiation of CD34(+) cells into smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs) characterized by the expression of SMC genes and proteins, secretion of SMC-related cytokines, co...

  7. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  8. Stem cell-derived vascular endothelial cells and their potential application in regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although a 'vascular stem cell' population has not been identified or generated, vascular endothelial and mural cells (smooth muscle cells and pericytes) can be derived from currently known pluripotent stem cell sources, including human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. We rev...

  9. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.A. De Sousa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available.

  10. Derivation of the human embryonic stem cell line RCM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, P A; Tye, B J; Sneddon, S; Bruce, K; Dand, P; Russell, G; Collins, D M; Greenshields, A; McDonald, K; Bradburn, H; Gardner, J; Downie, J M; Courtney, A; Brison, D R

    2016-03-01

    The human embryonic stem cell line RCM-1 was derived from a failed to fertilise egg undergoing parthenogenetic stimulation. The cell line shows normal pluripotency marker expression and differentiation to three germ layers in vitro and in vivo. It has a normal 46XX female karyotype and microsatellite PCR identity, HLA and blood group typing data is available. PMID:27346018

  11. Maturation of Stem Cell-Derived Beta-cells Guided by the Expression of Urocortin 3

    OpenAIRE

    van der Meulen, Talitha; Huising, Mark O.

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a devastating disease precipitated by an autoimmune response directed at the insulin-producing beta-cells of the pancreas for which no cure exists. Stem cell-derived beta-cells show great promise for a cure as they have the potential to supply unlimited numbers of cells that could be derived from a patient's own cells, thus eliminating the need for immunosuppression. Current in vitro protocols for the differentiation of stem cell-derived beta-cells can successfully ge...

  12. Endothelial cell-derived interleukin-6 regulates tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endothelial cells play a complex role in the pathobiology of cancer. This role is not limited to the making of blood vessels to allow for influx of oxygen and nutrients required for the high metabolic demands of tumor cells. Indeed, it has been recently shown that tumor-associated endothelial cells secrete molecules that enhance tumor cell survival and cancer stem cell self-renewal. The hypothesis underlying this work is that specific disruption of endothelial cell-initiated signaling inhibits tumor growth. Conditioned medium from primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) stably transduced with silencing RNA for IL-6 (or controls) was used to evaluate the role of endothelial-derived IL-6 on the activation of key signaling pathways in tumor cells. In addition, these endothelial cells were co-transplanted with tumor cells into immunodefficient mice to determine the impact of endothelial cell-derived IL-6 on tumor growth and angiogenesis. We observed that tumor cells adjacent to blood vessels show strong phosphorylation of STAT3, a key mediator of tumor progression. In search for a possible mechanism for the activation of the STAT3 signaling pathway, we observed that silencing interleukin (IL)-6 in tumor-associated endothelial cells inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation in tumor cells. Notably, tumors vascularized with IL-6-silenced endothelial cells showed lower intratumoral microvessel density, lower tumor cell proliferation, and slower growth than tumors vascularized with control endothelial cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-6 secreted by endothelial cells enhance tumor growth, and suggest that cancer patients might benefit from targeted approaches that block signaling events initiated by endothelial cells

  13. Platelet-derived stromal cell-derived factor-1 is required for the transformation of circulating monocytes into multipotential cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Seta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14(+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs, which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s derived from circulating CD14(- cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. METHODS: We cultured CD14(+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14(- peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. RESULTS: The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1's critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14(+CXCR4(high cell population. CONCLUSION: The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs.

  14. Stromal cell-derived factors in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Salam, E.; Ehsan Abdel-Meguid, I.; Shatla, R.; Korraa, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by increased muscle damage and an abnormal blood flow after muscle contraction leading to a state of functional ischemia. Abundant evidence suggests that endothelial circulating progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in mediating vascular and muscle repair mechanisms and that the stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1 α chemokine is responsible for both progenitor cell mobilization from the bone marrow to peripheral blood and homing to t...

  15. Induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by tumor exosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiang, Xiaoyu; Poliakov, Anton; Liu, Cunren; Liu, Yuelong; Deng, Zhong-Bin; wang, Jianhua; Cheng, Ziqiang; Shah, Spandan V.; Wang, Gui-Jun; Zhang, Liming; Grizzle, William E.; Mobley, Jim; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) promote tumor progression. The mechanisms of MDSC development during tumor growth remain unknown. Tumor exosomes (T-exosomes) have been implicated to play a role in immune regulation, however the role of exosomes in the induction of MDSCs is unclear. Our previous work demonstrated that exosomes isolated from tumor cells are taken up by bone marrow myeloid cells. Here, we extend those findings showing that exosomes isolated from T-exosomes switch the di...

  16. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  17. Fullerene derivatives protect endothelial cells against NO-induced damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao Fang; Han Dong; Qu Ying; Liu Ying; Zhao Yuliang; Chen Chunying [CAS Key Laboratory for Biological Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), Beijing 100190 (China); Li Wei [CAS Key Laboratory for Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)], E-mail: chenchy@nanoctr.cn

    2009-06-03

    Functional fullerene derivatives have been demonstrated with potent antioxidation properties. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical that plays a part in leading to brain damage when it is accumulated to a high concentration. The possible scavenging activity of NO by the hydroxylated fullerene derivative C{sub 60}(OH){sub 22} and malonic acid derivative C{sub 60}(C(COOH){sub 2}){sub 2} was investigated using primary rat brain cerebral microvessel endothelial cells (CMECs). Results demonstrate that sodium nitroprusside (SNP), used as an NO donor, caused a marked decrease in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. However, fullerene derivatives can remarkably protect against the apoptosis induced by NO assault. In addition, fullerene derivatives can also prevent NO-induced depolymerization of cytoskeleton and damage of the nucleus and accelerate endothelial cell repair. Further investigation shows that the sudden increase of the intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by NO was significantly attenuated by post-treatment with fullerene derivatives. Our results suggest that functional fullerene derivatives are potential applications for NO-related disorders.

  18. OVCAR-3 spheroid-derived cells display distinct metabolic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Vermeersch

    Full Text Available Recently, multicellular spheroids were isolated from a well-established epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3, and were propagated in vitro. These spheroid-derived cells displayed numerous hallmarks of cancer stem cells, which are chemo- and radioresistant cells thought to be a significant cause of cancer recurrence and resultant mortality. Gene set enrichment analysis of expression data from the OVCAR-3 cells and the spheroid-derived putative cancer stem cells identified several metabolic pathways enriched in differentially expressed genes. Before this, there had been little previous knowledge or investigation of systems-scale metabolic differences between cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and no knowledge of such differences in ovarian cancer stem cells.To determine if there were substantial metabolic changes corresponding with these transcriptional differences, we used two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to measure the metabolite profiles of the two cell lines.These two cell lines exhibited significant metabolic differences in both intracellular and extracellular metabolite measurements. Principal components analysis, an unsupervised dimensional reduction technique, showed complete separation between the two cell types based on their metabolite profiles. Pathway analysis of intracellular metabolomics data revealed close overlap with metabolic pathways identified from gene expression data, with four out of six pathways found enriched in gene-level analysis also enriched in metabolite-level analysis. Some of those pathways contained multiple metabolites that were individually statistically significantly different between the two cell lines, with one of the most broadly and consistently different pathways, arginine and proline metabolism, suggesting an interesting hypothesis about cancerous and stem-like metabolic phenotypes in this pair of cell lines.Overall, we demonstrate for the first time that metabolism

  19. Dendritic Cell-Derived Exosomes Stimulate Stronger CD8+ CTL Responses and Antitumor Immunity than Tumor Cell-Derived Exosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siguo Hao; Ou Bai; Jinying Yuan; Mabood Qureshi; Jim Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Exosomes (EXO) derived from dendritic cells (DC) and tumor cells have been used to stimulate antitumor immune responses in animal models and in clinical trials. However, there has been no side-by-side comparison of the stimulatory efficiency of the antitumor immune responses induced by these two commonly used EXO vaccines. In this study, we selected to study the phenotype characteristics of EXO derived from a transfected EG7 tumor cells expressing ovalbumin (OVA) and OVA-pulsed DC by flow cytometry. We compared the stimulatory effect in induction of OVA-specific immune responses between these two types of EXO. We found that OVA protein-pulsed DCovA-derived EXO (EXODC) can more efficiently stimulate naive OVA-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and differentiation into cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo, and induce more efficient antitumor immunity than EG7 tumor cell-derived EXO (EXOEG7). In addition, we elucidated the important role of the host DC in EXO vaccines that the stimulatory effect of EXO is delivered to T cell responses by the host DC. Therefore, DC-derived EXO may represent a more effective EXO-based vaccine in induction of antitumor immunity.

  20. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Qiaobing Xu

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1...

  1. Differentiation potential of the fetal rat liver-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Pojda

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow or several fetal tissues can be expanded and differentiated into other cell lines. The fetal liver is the source of early hematopoietic cells and also, as a fetal tissue, may be considered as a source of pluripotent stem cells. The differentiation potential of fetal rat liver cells have been examined. Freshly isolated liver cells from 14-d fetuses were cultured in Dulbecco medium supplemented with 10% FCS. The plastic-adherent cells were then passaged up to 10 times. Freshly isolated cells and cells from every passage were cultured in hematopoiesis-promoting environment that consists of methylcelulose supplemented with FCS, rat IL-3, human IL-6 and Epo. Parallely these cells were incubated in co-culture with rat muscle satellite cells (Dulbecco medium with 10% FCS and 10% HS to examine their myogenic potential. Culture in methylcelulose resulted in a high number of GM and Mix colonies in case of freshly isolated liver cells and the number of colonies decreased according to the number of passages. In case of cells from 4th passage, there ware no hematopoietic colonies in culture. In contrast--freshly isolated cells were not able to fuse with rat satellite cells and form the myotubes. This ability appeared in plastic-adherent cells just from the second passage and increases to 5th passage. The cells from every next passage up to 10th when co-cultured with satellite cells participated in myotube formation at the same high level. This result may suggest that in the 14-d rat liver there exist at least two subpopulations of cells: the non-adherent hematopoietic cell population, and the population of plastic-adherent cells capable of differentiating into myotubes. Since the attempts to redifferentiate hematopoietic subpopulation into myopoiesis, or myopoietic subpopulation into hematopoiesis failed, it may be concluded that at least under our experimental conditions the fetal liver cells do not reveal the

  2. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Application Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujde Kivanc

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells derived from adipose tissue as an autologous and self-replenishing source for a variety of differentiated cell phenotypes, provides a great deal of promise for reconstructive surgery. The secret of the human body, stem cells are reserved. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells found in the human body placed in any body tissue characteristics that differentiate and win ever known to cross the tissue instead of more than 200 diseases and thus improve and, rejuvenates the tissues. So far, the cord blood of newborn babies are used as a source of stem cells, bone marrow, and twenty years after tooth stem cells in human adipose tissue, scientists studied more than other sources of stem cells in adipose tissue and discovered that. Increase in number of in vitro studies on adult stem cells, depending on many variables is that the stem cells directly to the desired soybean optimization can be performed.. We will conclude by assessing potential avenues for developing this incredibly promising field. The aim of this paper is to review the existing literature on applications of harvest, purification, characterization and cryopreservation of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(3.000: 399-408

  3. Large Scale Production of Stem Cells and Their Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigerdt, Robert

    Stem cells have been envisioned to become an unlimited cell source for regenerative medicine. Notably, the interest in stem cells lies beyond direct therapeutic applications. They might also provide a previously unavailable source of valuable human cell types for screening platforms, which might facilitate the development of more efficient and safer drugs. The heterogeneity of stem cell types as well as the numerous areas of application suggests that differential processes are mandatory for their in vitro culture. Many of the envisioned applications would require the production of a high number of stem cells and their derivatives in scalable, well-defined and potentially clinical compliant manner under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP). In this review we provide an overview on recent strategies to develop bioprocesses for the expansion, differentiation and enrichment of stem cells and their progenies, presenting examples for adult and embryonic stem cells alike.

  4. Reduced Immunogenicity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Sertoli Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoying Wang; Jie Qin; Robert Chunhua Zhao; Martin Zenke

    2014-01-01

    Sertoli cells constitute the structural framework in testis and provide an immune-privileged environment for germ cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) resemble embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and are generated from somatic cells by expression of specific reprogramming transcription factors. Here, we used C57BL/6 (B6) Sertoli cells to generate iPS cells (Ser-iPS cells) and compared the immunogenicity of Ser-iPS cells with iPS cells derived from mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF-iPS ...

  5. Cryopreservation of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi-Shiohira, Chika; Kurima, Kiyoto; Kobayashi, Naoya; Saitoh, Issei; Watanabe, Masami; Noguchi, Yasufumi; Matsushita, Masayuki; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2015-12-17

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to differentiate into cells of mesodermal origin such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, myocytes, and chondrocytes. They possess an immunosuppressive effect, which makes them a viable cell population for the cell-based therapy of treatment-resistant immune diseases. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) have been demonstrated to have the ability to acquire the properties of subcutaneous adipose tissue particularly easily, and cryopreservation is currently performed as a routine method for preserving ASCs to safely acquire large numbers of cells. However, many studies have reported that cellular activity after freezing and thawing may be affected by the solutions used for cryopreservation. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is commonly used as a cryopreservation medium as it diffuses into the cell through the plasma membrane and protects the cells from the damage caused by freezing. As substitutes for DMSO or animal-derived serum, cell banker series, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), sericin and maltose, and methyl cellulose (MC) have been investigated for their clinical applications. It is critical to develop a reliable cell cryopreservation protocol for regenerative medicine using MSCs. PMID:26858903

  6. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Laura; Dijkman, Petra E.; Hoerstrup, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    In regenerative medicine, adult stem cells are the most promising cell types for cell-based therapies. As a new source for multipotent stem cells, human adipose tissue has been introduced. These so called adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are considered to be ideal for application in regenerative therapies. Their main advantage over mesenchymal stem cells derived from other sources, e.g. from bone marrow, is that they can be easily and repeatable harvested using minimally invasive techniques with low morbidity. ADSCs are multipotent and can differentiate into various cell types of the tri-germ lineages, including e.g. osteocytes, adipocytes, neural cells, vascular endothelial cells, cardiomyocytes, pancreatic β-cells, and hepatocytes. Interestingly, ADSCs are characterized by immunosuppressive properties and low immunogenicity. Their secretion of trophic factors enforces the therapeutic and regenerative outcome in a wide range of applications. Taken together, these particular attributes of ADSCs make them highly relevant for clinical applications. Consequently, the therapeutic potential of ADSCs is enormous. Therefore, this review will provide a brief overview of the possible therapeutic applications of ADSCs with regard to their differentiation potential into the tri-germ lineages. Moreover, the relevant advancements made in the field, regulatory aspects as well as other challenges and obstacles will be highlighted.

  7. Adipose-derived stem cells: selecting for translational success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Kavan S; Lees, Vivien C; Reid, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    We have witnessed a rapid expansion of in vitro characterization and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells, with increasing translation to both in vivo models and a breadth of clinical specialties. However, an appreciation of the truly heterogeneous nature of this unique stem cell group has identified a need to more accurately delineate subpopulations by any of a host of methods, to include functional properties or surface marker expression. Cells selected for improved proliferative, differentiative, angiogenic or ischemia-resistant properties are but a few attributes that could prove beneficial for targeted treatments or therapies. Optimizing cell culture conditions to permit re-introduction to patients is critical for clinical translation.

  8. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea022

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea022 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea022 was demonstrated with 84% of cells expressed Nanog, 98% Oct4, 55% Tra1–60 and 97% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 42.95, Novelty of 1.23, demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination.

  9. Derivation of Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea052 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea052 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressing Nanog, 87% Oct4, 60% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 27.21, Novelty score of 1.2 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination.

  10. Derivation of Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea047 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea047 was demonstrated with 88% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 59% Tra1-60 and 99% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.86, Novelty score of 1.23 and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination.

  11. Derivation of Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea015 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male Allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea015 was demonstrated with 80% of cells expressing Nanog, 97% Oct4, 75% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 29.52, Novelty score of 1.3 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination.

  12. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea023

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea023 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XY karyotype and male allele pattern through CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea023 was demonstrated with 85% of cells expressed Nanog, 98% Oct4, 55% Tra1-60 and 98% SSEA4, gave a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 42.76, Novelty of 1.23, demonstrated Alkaline Phosphatase activity and tri-lineage teratoma formation. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and visible contamination.

  13. Derivation of Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea042 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated human feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype and female allele pattern through traditional karyotyping, CGH and STR analysis. Pluripotency of Genea042 was demonstrated with 81% of cells expressing Nanog, 95% Oct4, 53% Tra1-60 and 97% SSEA4, a PluriTest Pluripotency score of 30.06, Novelty score of 1.24 and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination.

  14. Adipose-derived stem cells and periodontal tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobita, Morikuni; Mizuno, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Innovative developments in the multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering have yielded various implementation strategies and the possibility of functional tissue regeneration. Technologic advances in the combination of stem cells, biomaterials, and growth factors have created unique opportunities to fabricate tissues in vivo and in vitro. The therapeutic potential of human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are harvested from bone marrow and adipose tissue, has generated increasing interest in a wide variety of biomedical disciplines. These cells can differentiate into a variety of tissue types, including bone, cartilage, fat, and nerve tissue. Adipose-derived stem cells have some advantages compared with other sources of stem cells, most notably that a large number of cells can be easily and quickly isolated from adipose tissue. In current clinical therapy for periodontal tissue regeneration, several methods have been developed and applied either alone or in combination, such as enamel matrix proteins, guided tissue regeneration, autologous/allogeneic/xenogeneic bone grafts, and growth factors. However, there are various limitations and shortcomings for periodontal tissue regeneration using current methods. Recently, periodontal tissue regeneration using MSCs has been examined in some animal models. This method has potential in the regeneration of functional periodontal tissues because the various secreted growth factors from MSCs might not only promote the regeneration of periodontal tissue but also encourage neovascularization of the damaged tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells are especially effective for neovascularization compared with other MSC sources. In this review, the possibility and potential of adipose-derived stem cells for regenerative medicine are introduced. Of particular interest, periodontal tissue regeneration with adipose-derived stem cells is discussed.

  15. Generation of Neurospheres from Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs to treat neurodegenerative disease shows promise; however, the clinical application of NSCs is limited by the invasive procurement and ethical concerns. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a source of multipotent stem cells that can self-renew and differentiate into various kinds of cells; this study intends to generate neurospheres from human ADSCs by culturing ADSCs on uncoated culture flasks in serum-free neurobasal medium supplemented with B27, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, and epidermal growth factor (EGF; the ADSCs-derived neurospheres were terminally differentiated after growth factor withdrawal. Expression of Nestin, NeuN, MAP2, and GFAP in ADSCs and terminally differentiated neurospheres was shown by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, western blotting, and immunocytochemistry; cell proliferation in neurospheres was evaluated by cell cycle analyses, immunostaining, and flow cytometry. These data strongly support the conclusion that human ADSCs can successfully differentiate into neurospheres efficiently on uncoated culture flasks, which present similar molecular marker pattern and proliferative ability with NSCs derived from embryonic and adult brain tissues. Therefore, human ADSCs may be an ideal alternative source of stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Tumorigenicity studies for human pluripotent stem cell-derived products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takuya; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sato, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), i.e. human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, are able to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types. Because of these abilities, numerous attempts have been made to utilize hPSCs in regenerative medicine/cell therapy. hPSCs are, however, also tumorigenic, that is, they can give rise to the progressive growth of tumor nodules in immunologically unresponsive animals. Therefore, assessing and managing the tumorigenicity of all final products is essential in order to prevent ectopic tissue formation, tumor development, and/or malignant transformation elicited by residual pluripotent stem cells after implantation. No detailed guideline for the tumorigenicity testing of hPSC-derived products has yet been issued for regenerative medicine/cell therapy, despite the urgent necessity. Here, we describe the current situations and issues related to the tumorigenicity testing of hPSC-derived products and we review the advantages and disadvantages of several types of tumorigenicity-associated tests. We also refer to important considerations in the execution and design of specific studies to monitor the tumorigenicity of hPSC-derived products. PMID:23370350

  17. Derivation of multipotent mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilineage differentiation into fat, cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings will help to elucidate the mechanism of mesoderm specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation and provide a platform to efficiently generate specialized human mesenchymal cell types for future clinical applications.

  18. Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediate viral entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sims B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Brian Sims,1,2,* Linlin Gu,3,* Alexandre Krendelchtchikov,3 Qiana L Matthews3,4 1Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, 2Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, 4Center for AIDS Research, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Viruses enter host cells through interactions of viral ligands with cellular receptors. Viruses can also enter cells in a receptor-independent fashion. Mechanisms regarding the receptor-independent viral entry into cells have not been fully elucidated. Exosomal trafficking between cells may offer a mechanism by which viruses can enter cells.Methods: To investigate the role of exosomes on cellular viral entry, we employed neural stem cell-derived exosomes and adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 for the proof-of-principle study. Results: Exosomes significantly enhanced Ad5 entry in Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR-deficient cells, in which Ad5 only had very limited entry. The exosomes were shown to contain T-cell immunoglobulin mucin protein 4 (TIM-4, which binds phosphatidylserine. Treatment with anti-TIM-4 antibody significantly blocked the exosome-mediated Ad5 entry.Conclusion: Neural stem cell-derived exosomes mediated significant cellular entry of Ad5 in a receptor-independent fashion. This mediation may be hampered by an antibody specifically targeting TIM-4 on exosomes. This set of results will benefit further elucidation of virus/exosome pathways, which would contribute to reducing natural viral infection by developing therapeutic agents or vaccines. Keywords: neural stem cell-derived exosomes, adenovirus type 5, TIM-4, viral entry, phospholipids

  19. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L.; Burns, Alan R.; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A.

    2007-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute ≈60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the ...

  20. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

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    Damaris Bausch-Fluck

    Full Text Available Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa. The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments.

  1. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  2. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  3. The similarity between human embryonic stem cell-derived epithelial cells and ameloblast-lineage cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Wei Zheng; Logan Linthicum; Pamela K DenBesten; Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to human ameloblast-lineage cells (ALCs), as a way to determine their potential use as a cell source for ameloblast regeneration. Induced by various concentrations of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), retinoic acid (RA) and lithium chloride (LiCI) for 7 days, hESCs adopted cobble-stone epithelial phenotype (hESC-derived epithelial cells (ES-ECs)) and expressed cytokeratin 14. Compared with ALCs and oral epithelial cells (OE), ES-ECs expressed amelogenesis-associated genes similar to ALCs. ES-ECs were compared with human fetal skin epithelium, human fetal oral buccal mucosal epithelial cells and human ALCs for their expression pattern of cytokeratins as well. ALCs had relatively high expression levels of cytokeratin 76, which ,vas also found to be upregulated in ES-ECs. Based on the present study, with the similarity of gene expression with ALCs, ES-ECs are a promising potential cell source for regeneration, which are not available in erupted human teeth for regeneration of enamel.

  4. Insulin Producing Cells Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells: Are We There Yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Raikwar, Sudhanshu P.; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    Derivation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) from embryonic stem (ES) cells provides a potentially innovative form of treatment for type 1 diabetes. Here, we discuss the current state of the art, unique challenges and future directions on generating IPCs.

  5. Equivalence of conventionally-derived and parthenote-derived human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie V Harness

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines can be derived via multiple means, it is important to determine particular characteristics of individual lines that may dictate the applications to which they are best suited. The objective of this work was to determine points of equivalence and differences between conventionally-derived hESC and parthenote-derived hESC lines (phESC in the undifferentiated state and during neural differentiation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: hESC and phESC were exposed to the same expansion conditions and subsequent neural and retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE differentiation protocols. Growth rates and gross morphology were recorded during expansion. RTPCR for developmentally relevant genes and global DNA methylation profiling were used to compare gene expression and epigenetic characteristics. Parthenote lines proliferated more slowly than conventional hESC lines and yielded lower quantities of less mature differentiated cells in a neural progenitor cell (NPC differentiation protocol. However, the cell lines performed similarly in a RPE differentiation protocol. The DNA methylation analysis showed similar general profiles, but the two cell types differed in methylation of imprinted genes. There were no major differences in gene expression between the lines before differentiation, but when differentiated into NPCs, the two cell types differed in expression of extracellular matrix (ECM genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data show that hESC and phESC are similar in the undifferentiated state, and both cell types are capable of differentiation along neural lineages. The differences between the cell types, in proliferation and extent of differentiation, may be linked, in part, to the observed differences in ECM synthesis and methylation of imprinted genes.

  6. Immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stromal cells-derived exosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wancheng; Huang, Yukai; Han, Jiaochan; Yu, Lili; Li, Yanli; Lu, Ziyuan; Li, Hongbo; Liu, Zenghui; Shi, Chenyan; Duan, Fengqi; Xiao, Yang

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying immunomodulatory ability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) remain unknown. Recently, studies suggested that the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs is largely mediated by paracrine factors. Among which, exosome is considered to play a major role in the communication between MSCs and target tissue. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect of MSCs-derived exosome on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), especially T cells. We find that the MSCs-derived exosome extracted from healthy donors' bone marrow suppressed the secretion of pro-inflammatory factor TNF-α and IL-1β, but increased the concentration of anti-inflammatory factor TGF-β during in vitro culture. In addition, exosome may induce conversion of T helper type 1 (Th1) into T helper type 2 (Th2) cells and reduced potential of T cells to differentiate into interleukin 17-producing effector T cells (Th17). Moreover, the level of regulatory T cells (Treg) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 were also increased. These results suggested that MSC-derived exosome possesses the immunomodulatory properties. However, it showed no effects on the proliferation of PBMCs or CD3+ T cells, but increases the apoptosis of them. In addition, indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) was previously shown to mediate the immunoregulation of MSCs, which was increased in PBMCs co-cultured with MSCs. In our study, IDO showed no significant changes in PBMCs exposed to MSCs-derived exosome. We conclude that exosome and MSCs might differ in their immune-modulating activities and mechanisms. PMID:27115513

  7. Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells express neuronal phenotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨立业; 刘相名; 孙兵; 惠国桢; 费俭; 郭礼和

    2004-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) can be greatly expanded in vitro, and induced to differentiate into multiple mesenchymal cell types, including osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and adipogenic cells. This study was designed to investigate the possibility of ADSCs differentiating into neurons.Methods Adipose tissue from rats was digested with collagenase, and adherent stromal cells were cultured. A medium containing a low concentration of fetal bovine serum was adopted to induce the cells to differentiate. ADSCs were identified by immunocytochemistry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR was applied to detect mRNA expression of neurofilament 1 (NF1), nestin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE).Results Nestin-positive cells were found occasionally among ADSCs. ADSCs were found to express NSE mRNA and nestin mRNA, but not NF1 mRNA. ADSCs could differentiate into neuron-like cells in a medium composed of a low concentration of fetal bovine serum, and these differentiated cells displayed complicated neuron-like morphologies.Conclusions The data support the hypothesis that adipose tissue contains stem cells capable of differentiating into neurons. These stem cells can overcome their mesenchymal commitment, and may represent an alternative autologous stem cell source for CNS cell transplantation.

  8. Bone marrow-derived pancreatic stellate cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparmann, Gisela; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Hofmeister-Mielke, Nicole; Koczan, Dirk; Jaster, Robert; Liebe, Stefan; Wolff, Daniel; Emmrich, Jörg

    2010-03-01

    Origin and fate of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) before, during and after pancreatic injury are a matter of debate. The crucial role of PSCs in the pathogenesis of pancreatic fibrosis is generally accepted. However, the turnover of the cells remains obscure. The present study addressed the issue of a potential bone marrow (BM) origin of PSCs. We used a model of stable hematopoietic chimerism by grafting enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-expressing BM cells after irradiation of acceptor rats. Chimerism was detected by FACS analysis of eGFP-positive cells in the peripheral blood. Dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) was used to induce acute pancreatic inflammation with subsequent recovery over 4 weeks. Investigations have been focused on isolated cells to detect the resting PSC population. The incidence of eGFP-positive PSC obtained from the pancreas of chimeric rats was approximately 7% in healthy pancreatic tissue and increased significantly to a mean of 18% in the restored pancreas 4 weeks after DBTC-induced acute inflammation. Our results suggest that BM-derived progenitor cells represent a source of renewable stellate cells in the pancreas. Increased numbers of resting PSCs after regeneration point toward enhanced recruitment of BM-derived cells to the pancreas and/or re-acquisition of a quiescent state after inflammation-induced activation. PMID:20101265

  9. Methods for derivation of multipotent neural crest cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide-range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly-efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well-suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration. PMID:25986498

  10. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  11. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, A.M.; A.L.M. Yamada; M.A. Golim; L.E.C. Álvarez; L.L. Jorge; M.L. Conceição; E. Deffune; C.A. Hussni; A.L.G. Alves

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs) in horses through (1) the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2) flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to...

  12. Derivation of hair-inducing cell from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedeva, Ksenia; Vorotelyak, Ekaterina; Cimadamore, Flavio; Cattarossi, Giulio; Giusto, Elena; Terskikh, Vasiliy V; Terskikh, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    Dermal Papillae (DP) is a unique population of mesenchymal cells that was shown to regulate hair follicle formation and growth cycle. During development most DP cells are derived from mesoderm, however, functionally equivalent DP cells of cephalic hairs originate from Neural Crest (NC). Here we directed human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to generate first NC cells and then hair-inducing DP-like cells in culture. We showed that hESC-derived DP-like cells (hESC-DPs) express markers typically found in adult human DP cells (e.g., p-75, nestin, versican, SMA, alkaline phosphatase) and are able to induce hair follicle formation when transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient NUDE mice. Engineered to express GFP, hESC-derived DP-like cells incorporate into DP of newly formed hair follicles and express appropriate markers. We demonstrated that BMP signaling is critical for hESC-DP derivation since BMP inhibitor dorsomorphin completely eliminated hair-inducing activity from hESC-DP cultures. DP cells were proposed as the cell-based treatment for hair loss diseases. Unfortunately human DP cells are not suitable for this purpose because they cannot be obtained in necessary amounts and rapidly loose their ability to induce hair follicle formation when cultured. In this context derivation of functional hESC-DP cells capable of inducing a robust hair growth for the first time shown here can become an important finding for the biomedical science. PMID:25607935

  13. Derivation of hair-inducing cell from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Gnedeva

    Full Text Available Dermal Papillae (DP is a unique population of mesenchymal cells that was shown to regulate hair follicle formation and growth cycle. During development most DP cells are derived from mesoderm, however, functionally equivalent DP cells of cephalic hairs originate from Neural Crest (NC. Here we directed human embryonic stem cells (hESCs to generate first NC cells and then hair-inducing DP-like cells in culture. We showed that hESC-derived DP-like cells (hESC-DPs express markers typically found in adult human DP cells (e.g., p-75, nestin, versican, SMA, alkaline phosphatase and are able to induce hair follicle formation when transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient NUDE mice. Engineered to express GFP, hESC-derived DP-like cells incorporate into DP of newly formed hair follicles and express appropriate markers. We demonstrated that BMP signaling is critical for hESC-DP derivation since BMP inhibitor dorsomorphin completely eliminated hair-inducing activity from hESC-DP cultures. DP cells were proposed as the cell-based treatment for hair loss diseases. Unfortunately human DP cells are not suitable for this purpose because they cannot be obtained in necessary amounts and rapidly loose their ability to induce hair follicle formation when cultured. In this context derivation of functional hESC-DP cells capable of inducing a robust hair growth for the first time shown here can become an important finding for the biomedical science.

  14. Derivation of Insulin-Producing Beta-Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Schiesser, Jacqueline V.; Micallef, Suzanne J.; Hawes, Susan; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Edouard G.

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells have been advanced as a source of insulin-producing cells that could potentially replace cadaveric-derived islets in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. To this end, protocols have been developed that promote the formation of pancreatic progenitors and endocrine cells from human pluripotent stem cells, encompassing both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. In this review, we examine these methods and place them in the context of the developmental a...

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solito, Samantha; Marigo, Ilaria; Pinton, Laura; Damuzzo, Vera; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    The dynamic interplay between cancer and host immune system often affects the process of myelopoiesis. As a consequence, tumor-derived factors sustain the accumulation and functional differentiation of myeloid cells, including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which can interfere with T cell-mediated responses. Since both the phenotype and mechanisms of action of MDSCs appear to be tumor-dependent, it is important not only to determine the presence of all MDSC subsets in each cancer patient, but also which MDSC subsets have clinical relevance in each tumor environment. In this review, we describe the differences between MDSC populations expanded within different tumor contexts and evaluate the prognostic significance of MDSC expansion in peripheral blood and within tumor masses of neoplastic patients.

  16. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for vascu

  17. Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Organ Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are prototypical adult stem cells with the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation with a broad tissue distribution. MSCs not only differentiate into types of cells of mesodermal lineage but also into endodermal and ectodermal lineages such as bone, fat, cartilage and cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, lung epithelial cells, hepatocytes, neurons, and pancreatic islets. MSCs have been identified as an adherent, fibroblast-like population and can be isolated from different adult tissues, including bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. MSCs secrete factors, including IL-6, M-CSF, IL-10, HGF, and PGE2, that promote tissue repair, stimulate proliferation and differentiation of endogenous tissue progenitors, and decrease inflammatory and immune reactions. In this paper, we focus on the role of BM-derived MSCs in organ repair.

  18. Efficient Isolation of Cardiac Stem Cells from Brown Adipose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Liu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac stem cells represent a logical cell type to exploit in cardiac regeneration. The efficient harvest of cardiac stem cells from a suitable source would turn promising in cardiac stem cell therapy. Brown adipose was recently found to be a new source of cardiac stem cells, instrumental to myocardial regeneration. Unfortunately, an efficient method for the cell isolation is unavailable so far. In our study we have developed a new method for the efficient isolation of cardiac stem cells from brown adipose by combining different enzymes. Results showed that the total cell yield dramatically increased (more than 10 times, P<.01 compared with that by previous method. The content of CD133-positive cells (reported to differentiate into cardiomyocytes with a high frequency was much higher than that in the previous report (22.43% versus 3.5%. Moreover, the isolated cells could be the efficiently differentiated into functional cardiomyocytes in optimized conditions. Thus, the new method we established would be of great use in further exploring cardiac stem cell therapy.

  19. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xiaowen, E-mail: baixw01@yahoo.com [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Alt, Eckhard, E-mail: ealt@mdanderson.org [Department of Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. {yields} For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. {yields} This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the

  20. Myocardial regeneration potential of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving tremendous attention from basic scientists and clinicians and hold great promise for myocardial regeneration. → For practical reasons, human adipose tissue-derived stem cells are attractive stem cells for future clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium. → This review summarizes the characteristics of cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential and the, underlying mechanisms, and safety issues. -- Abstract: Various tissue resident stem cells are receiving attention from basic scientists and clinicians as they hold promise for myocardial regeneration. For practical reasons, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) are attractive cells for clinical application in repairing damaged myocardium based on the following advantages: abundant adipose tissue in most patients and easy accessibility with minimally invasive lipoaspiration procedure. Several recent studies have demonstrated that both cultured and freshly isolated ASCs could improve cardiac function in animal model of myocardial infarction. The mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of ASCs on myocardial regeneration are not fully understood. Growing evidence indicates that transplantation of ASCs improve cardiac function via the differentiation into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, and through paracrine pathways. Paracrine factors secreted by injected ASCs enhance angiogenesis, reduce cell apoptosis rates, and promote neuron sprouts in damaged myocardium. In addition, Injection of ASCs increases electrical stability of the injured heart. Furthermore, there are no reported cases of arrhythmia or tumorigenesis in any studies regarding myocardial regeneration with ASCs. This review summarizes the characteristics of both cultured and freshly isolated stem cells obtained from adipose tissue, their myocardial regeneration potential, and the underlying

  1. Derivation and characterization of monkey embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Don P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Embryonic stem (ES cell based therapy carries great potential in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, before clinical application is realized, the safety, efficacy and feasibility of this therapeutic approach must be established in animal models. The rhesus macaque is physiologically and phylogenetically similar to the human, and therefore, is a clinically relevant animal model for biomedical research, especially that focused on neurodegenerative conditions. Undifferentiated monkey ES cells can be maintained in a pluripotent state for many passages, as characterized by a collective repertoire of markers representing embryonic cell surface molecules, enzymes and transcriptional factors. They can also be differentiated into lineage-specific phenotypes of all three embryonic germ layers by epigenetic protocols. For cell-based therapy, however, the quality of ES cells and their progeny must be ensured during the process of ES cell propagation and differentiation. While only a limited number of primate ES cell lines have been studied, it is likely that substantial inter-line variability exists. This implies that diverse ES cell lines may differ in developmental stages, lineage commitment, karyotypic normalcy, gene expression, or differentiation potential. These variables, inherited genetically and/or induced epigenetically, carry obvious complications to therapeutic applications. Our laboratory has characterized and isolated rhesus monkey ES cell lines from in vitro produced blastocysts. All tested cell lines carry the potential to form pluripotent embryoid bodies and nestin-positive progenitor cells. These ES cell progeny can be differentiated into phenotypes representing the endodermal, mesodermal and ectodermal lineages. This review article describes the derivation of monkey ES cell lines, characterization of the undifferentiated phenotype, and their differentiation into lineage-specific, particularly neural, phenotypes

  2. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells.

  3. Fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors for organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Dongbo; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Hee Un; Xu, Fei; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Energy is currently one of the most important problems humankind faces. Depletion of traditional energy sources such as coal and oil results in the need to develop new ways to create, transport, and store electricity. In this regard, the sun, which can be considered as a giant nuclear fusion reactor, represents the most powerful source of energy available in our solar system. For photovoltaic cells to gain widespread acceptance as a source of clean and renewable energy, the cost per watt of solar energy must be decreased. Organic photovoltaic cells, developed in the past two decades, have potential as alternatives to traditional inorganic semiconductor photovoltaic cells, which suffer from high environmental pollution and energy consumption during production. Organic photovoltaic cells are composed of a blended film of a conjugated-polymer donor and a soluble fullerene-derivative acceptor sandwiched between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate)-coated indium tin oxide positive electrode and a low-work-function metal negative electrode. Considerable research efforts aim at designing and synthesizing novel fullerene derivatives as electron acceptors with up-raised lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy, better light-harvesting properties, higher electron mobility, and better miscibility with the polymer donor for improving the power conversion efficiency of the organic photovoltaic cells. In this paper, we systematically review novel fullerene acceptors synthesized through chemical modification for enhancing the photovoltaic performance by increasing open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, and fill factor, which determine the performance of organic photovoltaic cells. PMID:24749413

  4. Identification of rabbit annulus fibrosus-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liu

    Full Text Available Annulus fibrosus (AF injuries can lead to substantial deterioration of intervertebral disc (IVD which characterizes degenerative disc disease (DDD. However, treatments for AF repair/regeneration remain challenging due to the intrinsic heterogeneity of AF tissue at cellular, biochemical, and biomechanical levels. In this study, we isolated and characterized a sub-population of cells from rabbit AF tissue which formed colonies in vitro and could self-renew. These cells showed gene expression of typical surface antigen molecules characterizing mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, including CD29, CD44, and CD166. Meanwhile, they did not express negative markers of MSCs such as CD4, CD8, and CD14. They also expressed Oct-4, nucleostemin, and SSEA-4 proteins. Upon induced differentiation they showed typical osteogenesis, chondrogenesis, and adipogenesis potential. Together, these AF-derived colony-forming cells possessed clonogenicity, self-renewal, and multi-potential differentiation capability, the three criteria characterizing MSCs. Such AF-derived stem cells may potentially be an ideal candidate for DDD treatments using cell therapies or tissue engineering approaches.

  5. Derivation, characterization and retinal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subba Rao Mekala; Vasundhara Vauhini; Usha Nagarajan; Savitri Maddileti; Subhash Gaddipati; Indumathi Mariappan

    2013-03-01

    Millions of people world over suffer visual disability due to retinal dystrophies which can be age-related or a genetic disorder resulting in gradual degeneration of the retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors. Therefore, cell replacement therapy offers a great promise in treating such diseases. Since the adult retina does not harbour any stem cells, alternative stem cell sources like the embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer a great promise for generating different cell types of the retina. Here, we report the derivation of four iPSC lines from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) using a cocktail of recombinant retroviruses carrying the genes for Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and cMyc. The iPS clone MEF-4F3 was further characterized for stemness marker expression and stable reprogramming by immunocytochemistry, FACS and RT-PCR analysis. Methylation analysis of the nanog promoter confirmed the reprogrammed epigenetic state. Pluripotency was confirmed by embryoid body (EB) formation and lineage-specific marker expression. Also, upon retinal differentiation, patches of pigmented cells with typical cobble-stone phenotype similar to RPE cells are generated within 6 weeks and they expressed ZO-1 (tight junction protein), RPE65 and bestrophin (mature RPE markers) and showed phagocytic activity by the uptake of fluorescent latex beads.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Support Ex Vivo Expansion of Cord Blood-Derived CD34+ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are known to support the characteristic properties of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs in the bone marrow hematopoietic microenvironment. MSCs are used in coculture systems as a feeder layer for the ex vivo expansion of umbilical cord blood (CB to increase the relatively low number of HSPCs in CB. Findings increasingly suggest that MSC-derived microvesicles (MSC-MVs play an important role in the biological functions of their parent cells. We speculate that MSC-MVs may recapitulate the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of their parent cells. In the current study, we found MSC-MVs containing microRNAs that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We also demonstrated that MSC-MVs could improve the expansion of CB-derived mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells and generate a greater number of primitive progenitor cells in vitro. Additionally, when MSC-MVs were added to the CB-MSC coculture system, they could improve the hematopoiesis-supporting effects of MSCs. These findings highlight the role of MSC-MVs in the ex vivo expansion of CB, which may offer a promising therapeutic approach in CB transplantation.

  7. Neuronal-like cell differentiation of non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yuxin; Zhang, Jinghan; Ben, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells from C57BL/6J mice were separated and cultured using the “pour-off” method. Non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells developed colony-forming unit-fibroblasts, and could be expanded by supplementation with epidermal growth factor. Immunocytochemistry showed that the non-adherent bone marrow cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells exposed to basic fibroblast growth factor/epidermal growth factor/nerve growth factor ex...

  8. Gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆柳; 朴英杰; 邹飞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells.Methods Total RNA extracted from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells underwent reverse transcription, and the products were labeled with α-32P dCTP. The cDNA probes of total RNA were hybridized to cDNA microarray with 1176 genes, and then the signals were analyzed by AtlasImage analysis software Version 1.01a.Results Fifteen genes associated with cell proliferation and signal transduction were up-regulated, and one gene that takes part in cell-to-cell adhesion was down-regulated in tendon cells.Conclusion The 15 up-regulated and one down-regulated genes may be beneficial to the orientational differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into tendon cells.

  9. Derivation and characterization of hepatic progenitor cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongxin Zhao

    Full Text Available The derivation of hepatic progenitor cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells is of value both in the study of early human liver organogenesis and in the creation of an unlimited source of donor cells for hepatocyte transplantation therapy. Here, we report for the first time the generation of hepatic progenitor cells derived from hES cells. Hepatic endoderm cells were generated by activating FGF and BMP pathways and were then purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting using a newly identified surface marker, N-cadherin. After co-culture with STO feeder cells, these purified hepatic endoderm cells yielded hepatic progenitor colonies, which possessed the proliferation potential to be cultured for an extended period of more than 100 days. With extensive expansion, they co-expressed the hepatic marker AFP and the biliary lineage marker KRT7 and maintained bipotential differentiation capacity. They were able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, which expressed ALB and AAT, and into cholangiocyte-like cells, which formed duct-like cyst structures, expressed KRT19 and KRT7, and acquired epithelial polarity. In conclusion, this is the first report of the generation of proliferative and bipotential hepatic progenitor cells from hES cells. These hES cell-derived hepatic progenitor cells could be effectively used as an in vitro model for studying the mechanisms of hepatic stem/progenitor cell origin, self-renewal and differentiation.

  10. Umbilical cord-derived stem cells (MODULATISTTM show strong immunomodulation capacity compared to adipose tissue-derived or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs show great promise in regenerative medicine. Clinical applications of MSCs have recently increased significantly, especially for immune diseases. Autologous transplantation is considered a safe therapy. However, its main disadvantages are poor stability and quality of MSCs from patient to patient, and labor-intensive and time-consuming culture procedures. Therefore, allogeneic MSC transplantation has recently emerged as a potential replacement for autologous transplantation. and ldquo;Off the shelf and rdquo; MSC products, or so-called and ldquo;stem cell drugs and rdquo;, have rapidly developed; these products have already been approved in various countries, including Canada, Korea and Japan. This study aims to evaluate a new stem cell product or and ldquo;drug and rdquo;, termed ModulatistTM, derived from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UCMSCs, which have strong immunomodulatory properties, compared to bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs or adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs. Methods: ModulatistTM was produced from MSCs derived from whole umbilical cord (UC tissue (which includes Wharton's jelly and UC, according to GMP compliant procedures. Bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived MSCs were isolated and proliferated in standard conditions, according to GMP compliant procedures. Immunomodulation mediated by MSCs was assessed by allogenic T cell suppression and cytokine release; role of prostaglandin E2 in the immunomodulation was also evaluated. Results: The results showed that ModulatistTM exhibited stronger immunomodulation than BMMSC and ADSC in vitro. ModulatistTM strongly suppressed allogeneic T cells proliferation and decreased cytokine production, compared to BMMSCs and ADSCs. Conclusion: ModulatistTM is a strong immunomodulator and promising MSC product. It may be useful to modulate or treat autoimmune diseases. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(6.000: 687-696

  11. Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Inhibit T Cell Activation by Depleting Cystine and Cysteine

    OpenAIRE

    Minu K Srivastava; Sinha, Pratima; Clements, Virginia K.; Rodriguez, Paulo; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are present in most cancer patients and are potent inhibitors of T-cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Their inhibitory activity is attributed to production of arginase, reactive oxygen species, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and IL-10. We now report that MDSC also block T cell activation by sequestering cystine and limiting the availability of cysteine. Cysteine is an essential amino acid for T cell activation because T cells lack cystathionase, which...

  12. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell line Genea019

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Dumevska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Genea019 human embryonic stem cell line was derived from a donated, fully commercially consented ART blastocyst, through ICM outgrowth on inactivated feeders. The line showed pluripotent cell morphology and genomic analysis verified a 46, XX karyotype, female Allele pattern and unaffected Htt CAG repeat length, compared to HD affected sibling Genea020. Pluripotency of Genea019 was demonstrated with 75% of cells expressing Nanog, 89% Oct4, 48% Tra1-60 and 85% SSEA4, a Pluritest Pluripotency score of 22.97, Novelty score of 1.42, tri-lineage teratoma formation and Alkaline Phosphatase activity. The cell line was negative for Mycoplasma and any visible contamination.

  13. iPS-cell derived dendritic cells and macrophages for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, Satoru

    2016-08-01

    Antibody-based anti-cancer immunotherapy was recently recognized as one of the truly effective therapies for cancer patients. Antibodies against cell surface cancer antigens, such as CD20, and also those against immune-inhibitory molecules called "immune checkpoint blockers", such as CTLA4 or PD1, have emerged. Large-scale clinical trials have confirmed that, in some cases, antibody-based drugs are superior to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. These antibody-based drugs are now being manufactured employing a mass-production system by pharmaceutical companies. Anti-cancer therapy by immune cells, i.e. cell-based immunotherapy, is expected to be more effective than antibody therapy, because immune cells can recognize, infiltrate, and act in cancer tissues more directly than antibodies. In order to achieve cell-based anti-cancer immunotherapy, it is necessary to develop manufacturing systems for mass-production of immune cells. Our group has been studying immunotherapy with myeloid cells derived from ES cells or iPS cells. These pluripotent stem cells can be readily propagated under constant culture conditions, with expansion into a large quantity. We consider these stem cells to be the most suitable cellular source for mass-production of immune cells. This review introduces our studies on anti-cancer therapy with iPS cell-derived dendritic cells and iPS cell-derived macrophages. PMID:27599426

  14. Molecular characterisation of stromal populations derived from human embryonic stem cells: Similarities to immortalised bone marrow derived stromal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Harkness

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human bone marrow-derived stromal (skeletal stem cells (BM-hMSC are being employed in an increasing number of clinical trials for tissue regeneration. A limiting factor for their clinical use is the inability to obtain sufficient cell numbers. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC can provide an unlimited source of clinical grade cells for therapy. We have generated MSC-like cells from hESC (called here hESC-stromal that exhibit surface markers and differentiate to osteoblasts and adipocytes, similar to BM-hMSC. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to compare the molecular phenotype of hESC-stromal and immortalised BM-hMSC cells (hMSC-TERT. Of the 7379 genes expressed above baseline, only 9.3% of genes were differentially expressed between undifferentiated hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC. Following ex vivo osteoblast induction, 665 and 695 genes exhibited ≥2-fold change (FC in hESC-stromal and BM-hMSC, respectively with 172 genes common to both cell types. Functional annotation of significantly changing genes revealed similarities in gene ontology between the two cell types. Interestingly, genes in categories of cell adhesion/motility and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT were highly enriched in hESC-stromal whereas genes associated with cell cycle processes were enriched in hMSC-TERT. This data suggests that while hESC-stromal cells exhibit a similar molecular phenotype to hMSC-TERT, differences exist that can be explained by ontological differences between these two cell types. hESC-stromal cells can thus be considered as a possible alternative candidate cells for hMSC, to be employed in regenerative medicine protocols.

  15. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  16. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  17. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 mediates human embryonic germ cell derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; Gearhart, John D; Kerr, Candace L

    2011-02-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recombinant human BMP4 could influence EGC derivation and/or human PGC survival. We found that the addition of recombinant BMP4 increased the number of human PGCs after 1 week of culture in a dose-responsive manner. The efficiency of EGC derivation and maintenance in culture was also enhanced by the presence of recombinant BMP4 based on alkaline phosphatase and OCT4 staining. In addition, an antagonist of the BMP4 pathway, Noggin, decreased PGC proliferation and led to an increase in cystic embryoid body formation. Quantitative real-time (qRT)-polymerase chain reaction analyses and immunostaining confirmed that the constituents of the BMP4 pathway were upregulated in EGCs versus PGCs. Downstream activators of the BMP4 pathway such as ID1 and phosphorylated SMADs 1 and 5 were also expressed, suggesting a role of this growth factor in EGC pluripotency. PMID:20486775

  18. Phenotypic characterizations and comparison of adult dental stem cells with adipose-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Alipour

    2010-01-01

    Conclusions: Both cell populations derived from adipose tissue and dental pulp showed common phenotypic markers of mesenchymal stem cells. In conclusion, mesenchymal stem cells could be isolated and cultured successfully from dental pulp of human exfo-liated deciduous teeth, they are very good candidates for treatment and prevention of human diseases.

  19. Therapeutic Lymphangiogenesis With Implantation of Adipose‐Derived Regenerative Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yuuki; Shibata, Rei; Shintani, Satoshi; Ishii, Masakazu; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2012-01-01

    Background Lymphedema is one of the serious clinical problems that can occur after surgical resection of malignant tumors such as breast cancer or intra‐pelvic cancers. However, no effective treatment options exist at present. Here, we report that implantation of adipose‐derived regenerative cells (ADRCs) can induce lymphangiogenesis in a mouse model of reparative lymphedema. Methods and Results ADRCs were isolated from C57BL/6J mice. To examine the therapeutic efficacy of ADRC implantation i...

  20. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells as a Trojan horse

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Ping-Ying; Chen, Hui-Ming; Chen, Shu-Hsia

    2013-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that oncolytic vesicular stomatitis viruses can be efficiently and selectively delivered to neoplastic lesions by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Importantly, the loading of viruses onto MDSCs inhibited their immunosuppressive properties and endowed them with immunostimulatory and tumoricidal functions. Our study demonstrates the potential use of MDSCs as a Trojan horse for the tumor-targeted delivery of various anticancer therapeutics.

  1. Endothelin-1 supports clonal derivation and expansion of cardiovascular progenitors derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Boon-Seng; Ng, Shi-Yan; Wu, Hao; Buac, Kristina; Park, Joo-Hye C; Lian, Xiaojun; Xu, Jiejia; Foo, Kylie S; Felldin, Ulrika; He, Xiaobing; Nichane, Massimo; Yang, Henry; Bu, Lei; Li, Ronald A; Lim, Bing; Chien, Kenneth R

    2016-03-08

    Coronary arteriogenesis is a central step in cardiogenesis, requiring coordinated generation and integration of endothelial cell and vascular smooth muscle cells. At present, it is unclear whether the cell fate programme of cardiac progenitors to generate complex muscular or vascular structures is entirely cell autonomous. Here we demonstrate the intrinsic ability of vascular progenitors to develop and self-organize into cardiac tissues by clonally isolating and expanding second heart field cardiovascular progenitors using WNT3A and endothelin-1 (EDN1) human recombinant proteins. Progenitor clones undergo long-term expansion and differentiate primarily into endothelial and smooth muscle cell lineages in vitro, and contribute extensively to coronary-like vessels in vivo, forming a functional human-mouse chimeric circulatory system. Our study identifies EDN1 as a key factor towards the generation and clonal derivation of ISL1(+) vascular intermediates, and demonstrates the intrinsic cell-autonomous nature of these progenitors to differentiate and self-organize into functional vasculatures in vivo.

  2. Drug Discovery via Human-Derived Stem Cell Organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangkun; Huang, Jing; Ning, Bo; Liu, Zhixiong; Chen, Shen; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived cell lines and animal models have proven invaluable for the understanding of human intestinal diseases and for drug development although both inherently comprise disadvantages and caveats. Many genetically determined intestinal diseases occur in specific tissue microenvironments that are not adequately modeled by monolayer cell culture. Likewise, animal models incompletely recapitulate the complex pathologies of intestinal diseases of humans and fall short in predicting the effects of candidate drugs. Patient-derived stem cell organoids are new and effective models for the development of novel targeted therapies. With the use of intestinal organoids from patients with inherited diseases, the potency and toxicity of drug candidates can be evaluated better. Moreover, owing to the novel clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein-9 genome-editing technologies, researchers can use organoids to precisely modulate human genetic status and identify pathogenesis-related genes of intestinal diseases. Therefore, here we discuss how patient-derived organoids should be grown and how advanced genome-editing tools may be applied to research on modeling of cancer and infectious diseases. We also highlight practical applications of organoids ranging from basic studies to drug screening and precision medicine. PMID:27713700

  3. A strategy to ensure safety of stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Parul; Whiting, Paul John

    2016-09-02

    Cell replacement and regenerative therapy using embryonic stem cell-derived material holds promise for the treatment of several pathologies. However, the safety of this approach is of prime importance given the teratogenic potential of residual stem cells, if present in the differentiated cell product. Using the example of embryonic stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, we present a novel strategy for ensuring the absence of stem cells in the RPE population. Based on an unbiased screening approach, we identify and validate the expression of CD59, a cell surface marker expressed on RPE but absent on stem cells. We further demonstrate that flow sorting on the basis of CD59 expression can effectively purify RPE and deplete stem cells, resulting in a population free from stem cell impurity. This purification helps to ensure removal of stem cells and hence increases the safety of cells that may be used for clinical transplantation. This strategy can potentially be applied to other pluripotent stem cell-derived material and help mitigate concerns of using such cells for therapy.

  4. Nanostructured Tendon-Derived Scaffolds for Enhanced Bone Regeneration by Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyung; Alberti, Kyle; Lee, Jong Seung; Yang, Kisuk; Jin, Yoonhee; Shin, Jisoo; Yang, Hee Seok; Xu, Qiaobing; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-09-01

    Decellularized matrix-based scaffolds can induce enhanced tissue regeneration due to their biochemical, biophysical, and mechanical similarity to native tissues. In this study, we report a nanostructured decellularized tendon scaffold with aligned, nanofibrous structures to enhance osteogenic differentiation and in vivo bone formation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hADSCs). Using a bioskiving method, we prepared decellularized tendon scaffolds from tissue slices of bovine Achilles and neck tendons with or without fixation, and investigated the effects on physical and mechanical properties of decellularized tendon scaffolds, based on the types and concentrations of cross-linking agents. In general, we found that decellularized tendon scaffolds without fixative treatments were more effective in inducing osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of hADSCs in vitro. When non-cross-linked decellularized tendon scaffolds were applied together with hydroxyapatite for hADSC transplantation in critical-sized bone defects, they promoted bone-specific collagen deposition and mineralized bone formation 4 and 8 weeks after hADSC transplantation, compared to conventional collagen type I scaffolds. Interestingly, stacking of decellularized tendon scaffolds cultured with osteogenically committed hADSCs and those containing human cord blood-derived endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) induced vascularized bone regeneration in the defects 8 weeks after transplantation. Our study suggests that biomimetic nanostructured scaffolds made of decellularized tissue matrices can serve as functional tissue-engineering scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis of stem cells. PMID:27502160

  5. Expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived stromal cells on hematopoietic stem cells from embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jin-rong; LIU Wen-li; ZHOU Yu-feng; ZHOU Jian-feng; SUN Han-ying; LUO Li; ZHANG Heng; XU Hui-zhen

    2005-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells and are used in clinical transplantation protocols to treat a wide variety of refractory diseases, but the amplification of HSCs has been difficult to achieve in vitro. In the present study, the expansive effects of aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region derived stromal cells on HSCs were explored, attempting to improve the efficiency of HSC transplantation in clinical practice.Methods The murine stromal cells were isolated from the AGM region of 12 days postcoitum (dpc) murine embryos and bone marrow(BM)of 6 weeks old mice, respectively. After identification with flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry, the stromal cells were co-cultured with ESCs-derived, cytokines-induced HSCs. The maintenance and expansion of ESCs-derived HSCs were evaluated by detecting the population of CD34+ and CD34+Sca-1+cells with flow cytometry and the blast colony-forming cells (BL-CFCs), high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFCs) by using semi-solid medium colonial culture. Finally, the homing and hematopoietic reconstruction abilities of HSCs were evaluated using a murine model of HSC transplantation in vivo.Results AGM and BM-derived stromal cells were morphologically and phenotypically similar, and had the features of stromal cells. When co-cultured with AGM or BM stromal cells, more primitive progenitor cells (HPP-CFCs ) could be detected in ESCs derived hematopoietic precursor cells, but BL-CFC's expansion could be detected only when co-cultured with AGM-derived stromal cells. The population of CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells were expanded 3 times,but no significant expansion in the population of CD34+Sca-1+ cells was noted when co-cultured with BM stromal cells. While both CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and CD34+Sca-1+ cells were expanded 4 to 5 times respectively when co-cultured with AGM stromal cells. AGM region-derived stromal cells, like BM-derived stromal

  6. Are human dental papilla-derived stem cell and human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantations suitable for treatment of Parkinson's disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung Ho Yoon; Joongkee Min; Nari Shin; Yong Hwan Kim; Jin-Mo Kim; Yu-Shik Hwang; Jun-Kyo Francis Suh; Onyou Hwang; Sang Ryong Jeon

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells has been reported as a possible approach for replacing impaired dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we tested the efficacy of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells and human brain-derived neural stem cells in rat models of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced Parkinson's disease. Rats received a unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine into right medial forebrain bundle, followed 3 weeks later by injections of PBS, early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells, or human brain-derived neural stem cells into the ipsilateral striatum. All of the rats in the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group died from tumor formation at around 2 weeks following cell transplantation. Postmortem examinations revealed homogeneous malignant tumors in the striatum of the human dental papilla-derived stem cell group. Stepping tests revealed that human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation did not improve motor dysfunction. In apomorphine-induced rotation tests, neither the human brain-derived neural stem cell group nor the control groups (PBS injection) demonstrated significant changes. Glucose metabolism in the lesioned side of striatum was reduced by human brain-derived neural stem cell transplantation. [18 F]-FP-CIT PET scans in the striatum did not demonstrate a significant increase in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. Tyrosine hydroxylase (dopaminergic neuronal marker) staining and G protein-activated inward rectifier potassium channel 2 (A9 dopaminergic neuronal marker) were positive in the lesioned side of striatum in the human brain-derived neural stem cell group. The use of early-stage human dental papilla-derived stem cells confirmed its tendency to form tumors. Human brain-derived neural stem cells could be partially differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, but they did not secrete dopamine.

  7. Research Advancements in Porcine Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Dinesh; Shivakumar, Sharath Belame; Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present era of stem cell biology, various animals such as Mouse, Bovine, Rabbit and Porcine have been tested for the efficiency of their mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs before their actual use for stem cell based application in humans. Among them pigs have many similarities to humans in the form of organ size, physiology and their functioning, therefore they have been considered as a valuable model system for in vitro studies and preclinical assessments. Easy assessability, few ethical issues, successful MSC isolation from different origins like bone marrow, skin, umbilical cord blood, Wharton's jelly, endometrium, amniotic fluid and peripheral blood make porcine a good model for stem cell therapy. Porcine derived MSCs (pMSCs have shown greater in vitro differentiation and transdifferention potential towards mesenchymal lineages and specialized lineages such as cardiomyocytes, neurons, hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. Immunomodulatory and low immunogenic profiles as shown by autologous and heterologous MSCs proves them safe and appropriate models for xenotransplantation purposes. Furthermore, tissue engineered stem cell constructs can be of immense importance in relation to various osteochondral defects which are difficult to treat otherwise. Using pMSCs successful treatment of various disorders like Parkinson's disease, cardiac ischemia, hepatic failure, has been reported by many studies. Here, in this review we highlight current research findings in the area of porcine mesenchymal stem cells dealing with their isolation methods, differentiation ability, transplantation applications and their therapeutic potential towards various diseases. PMID:26201864

  8. Human skeletal muscle-derived stem cells retain stem cell properties after expansion in myosphere culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Yan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Li, Yuan [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou (China); Chen, Chao; Stoelzel, Katharina [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Kaufmann, Andreas M. [Clinic for Gynecology CCM/CBF, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Albers, Andreas E., E-mail: andreas.albers@charite.de [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Human skeletal muscle contains an accessible adult stem-cell compartment in which differentiated myofibers are maintained and replaced by a self-renewing stem cell pool. Previously, studies using mouse models have established a critical role for resident stem cells in skeletal muscle, but little is known about this paradigm in human muscle. Here, we report the reproducible isolation of a population of cells from human skeletal muscle that is able to proliferate for extended periods of time as floating clusters of rounded cells, termed 'myospheres' or myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs). The phenotypic characteristics and functional properties of these cells were determined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. Our results showed that these cells are clonogenic, express skeletal progenitor cell markers Pax7, ALDH1, Myod, and Desmin and the stem cell markers Nanog, Sox2, and Oct3/4 significantly elevated over controls. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 20 weeks and passaged at least 18 times, despite an average donor-age of 63 years. Individual clones (4.2%) derived from single cells were successfully expanded showing clonogenic potential and sustained proliferation of a subpopulation in the myospheres. Myosphere-derived cells were capable of spontaneous differentiation into myotubes in differentiation media and into other mesodermal cell lineages in induction media. We demonstrate here that direct culture and expansion of stem cells from human skeletal muscle is straightforward and reproducible with the appropriate technique. These cells may provide a viable resource of adult stem cells for future therapies of disease affecting skeletal muscle or mesenchymal lineage derived cell types.

  9. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived Mast Cell Precursors from Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen K Meurer

    Full Text Available Mast cells (MCs are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC or mucosal (MMC type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM. The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC. These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research.

  10. Isolation of Mature (Peritoneum-Derived) Mast Cells and Immature (Bone Marrow-Derived) Mast Cell Precursors from Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurer, Steffen K.; Neß, Melanie; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Kim, Philipp; Tag, Carmen G.; Kauffmann, Marlies; Huber, Michael; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are a versatile cell type playing key roles in tissue morphogenesis and host defence against bacteria and parasites. Furthermore, they can enhance immunological danger signals and are implicated in inflammatory disorders like fibrosis. This granulated cell type originates from the myeloid lineage and has similarities to basophilic granulocytes, both containing large quantities of histamine and heparin. Immature murine mast cells mature in their destination tissue and adopt either the connective tissue (CTMC) or mucosal (MMC) type. Some effector functions are executed by activation/degranulation of MCs which lead to secretion of a typical set of MC proteases (MCPT) and of the preformed or newly synthesized mediators from its granules into the local microenvironment. Due to the potential accumulation of mutations in key signalling pathway components of corresponding MC cell-lines, primary cultured MCs are an attractive mean to study general features of MC biology and aspects of MC functions relevant to human disease. Here, we describe a simple protocol for the simultaneous isolation of mature CTMC-like murine MCs from the peritoneum (PMCs) and immature MC precursors from the bone marrow (BM). The latter are differentiated in vitro to yield BM-derived MCs (BMMC). These cells display the typical morphological and phenotypic features of MCs, express the typical MC surface markers, and can be propagated and kept in culture for several weeks. The provided protocol allows simple amplification of large quantities of homogenous, non-transformed MCs from the peritoneum and bone marrow-derived mast cells for cell- and tissue-based biomedical research. PMID:27337047

  11. Isolation and phenotypic characterization of cancer stem-like side population cells in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Long; Wu, Jian-Bing; Yi, Feng-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies in cancer biology suggest that chemotherapeutic drug resistance and tumor relapse are driven by cells within a tumor termed 'cancer stem cells'. In the present study, a Hoechst 33342 dye exclusion technique was used to identify cancer stem‑like side population (SP) cells in colon carcinoma, which accounted for 3.4% of the total cell population. Following treatment with verapamil, the population of SP cells was reduced to 0.6%. In addition, the sorted SP cells exhibited marked multidrug resistance and enhanced cell survival rates compared with non‑SP cells. The SP cells were able to generate more tumor spheres and were CD133 positive. Subsequent biochemical analysis revealed that the levels of the adenosine triphosphate‑binding cassette sub‑family G member 2 transporter protein, B‑cell lymphoma anti‑apoptotic factor and autocrine production of interleukin‑4 were significantly enhanced in the colon cancer SP cells, which contributed to drug resistance, protection of the cells from apoptosis and tumor recurrence. Therefore, the findings suggested that treatment failure and colon tumorigenesis is dictated by a small population of SP cells, which indicate a potential target in future therapies.

  12. Natural killer (NK cells for cancer immunotherapy: pluripotent stem cells-derived NK cells as an immunotherapeutic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eEguizabal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play an essential role in the fight against tumor development. Over the last years, the progress made in the NK cell biology field and in deciphering how NK cell function is regulated, is driving efforts to utilize NK cell-based immunotherapy as a promising approach for the treatment of malignant diseases. Therapies involving NK cells may be accomplished by activating and expanding endogenous NK cells by means of cytokine treatment or by transferring exogenous cells by adoptive cell therapy and/or by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. NK cells that are suitable for adoptive cell therapy can be derived from different sources, including ex vivo expansion of autologous NK cells, unstimulated or expanded allogeneic NK cells from peripheral blood, derived from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors from peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood, and NK cell lines. Besides, genetically modified NK cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs or cytokines genes may also have a relevant future as therapeutic tools. Recently, it has been described the derivation of large numbers of functional and mature NK cells from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, both embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which adds another tool to the expanding NK cell-based cancer immunotherapy arsenal.

  13. Use of RUNX2 Expression to Identify Osteogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li Zou; Fahad K. Kidwai; Ross A. Kopher; Jason Motl; Cory A. Kellum; Jennifer J. Westendorf; Dan S. Kaufman

    2015-01-01

    Summary We generated a RUNX2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter system to study osteogenic development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our studies demonstrate the fidelity of YFP expression with expression of RUNX2 and other osteogenic genes in hESC-derived osteoprogenitor cells, as well as the osteogenic specificity of YFP signal. In vitro studies confirm that the hESC-derived YFP+ cells have similar osteogenic phenotypes to osteoprogenitor cells generated from bone-marrow me...

  14. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell therapies for spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Corinne A Lee-Kubli; Paul Lu

    2015-01-01

    The greatest challenge to successful treatment of spinal cord injury is the limited regenerative capacity of the central nervous system and its inability to replace lost neurons and severed axons following injury. Neural stem cell grafts derived from fetal central nervous system tissue or embryonic stem cells have shown therapeutic promise by differentiation into neurons and glia that have the potential to form functional neuronal relays across injured spinal cord segments. However, implementation of fetal-derived or embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cell ther-apies for patients with spinal cord injury raises ethical concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells can be generated from adult somatic cells and differentiated into neural stem cells suitable for therapeutic use, thereby providing an ethical source of implantable cells that can be made in an autologous fashion to avoid problems of immune rejection. This review discusses the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury, as well as addressing potential mechanisms, future perspectives and challenges.

  15. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Renjun Zhu; Millrod, Michal A.; Zambidis, Elias T.; Leslie Tung

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to re...

  16. Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a New Host Cell in Latent Leishmaniasis

    OpenAIRE

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Baydar, Serap Yesilkir; Findikli, Necati; Oztel, Olga N.

    2011-01-01

    Some protozoan infections such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Plasmodium can be transmitted through stem cell transplantations. To our knowledge, so far, there is no study about transmission of Leishmania parasites in stem cell transplantation and interactions between parasites and stem cells in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between different species of Leishmania parasites and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). ADMSCs hav...

  17. Human Bone Marrow-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell: A Source for Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ayatollahi, M.; Geramizadeh, B; Zakerinia, M; M Ramzi; Yaghobi, R.; Hadadi, P.; Rezvani, A. R.; Aghdai, M.; N Azarpira; Karimi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to differentiate into many cell types, and modulate immune responses, makes them an attractive therapeutic tool for cell transplantation and tissue engineering. Objective: This project was designed for isolation, culture, and characterization of human marrow-derived MSCs based on the immunophenotypic markers and the differentiation potential. Methods: Bone marrow of healthy donors was aspirated from the iliac crest. Mononuclear cells we...

  18. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs

  19. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote cell proliferation and invasion of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yijing; Tang, Huijuan; Guo, Yan; Guo, Jing; Huang, Bangxing; Fang, Fang; Cai, Jing, E-mail: caijingmmm@hotmail.com; Wang, Zehua, E-mail: zehuawang@163.net

    2015-09-10

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) is an important component of tumor microenvironment. However, whether ADSCs have a hand in ovarian cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the impact of human ADSCs derived from the omentum of normal donors on human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells in vitro and in vivo. Direct and indirect co-culture models including ADSCs and human EOC cell lines were established and the effects of ADSCs on EOC cell proliferation were evaluated by EdU incorporation and flow cytometry. Transwell migration assays and detection of MMPs were performed to assess the invasion activity of EOC cells in vitro. Mouse models were established by intraperitoneal injection of EOC cells with or without concomitant ADSCs to investigate the role of ADSCs in tumor progression in vivo. We found that ADSCs significantly promoted proliferation and invasion of EOC cells in both direct and indirect co-culture assays. In addition, after co-culture with ADSCs, EOC cells secreted higher levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and inhibition of MMP2 and MMP9 partially relieved the tumor-promoting effects of ADSCs in vitro. In mouse xenograft models, we confirmed that ADSCs promoted EOC growth and metastasis and elevated the expression of MMP2 and MMP9. Our findings indicate that omental ADSCs play a promotive role during ovarian cancer progression. - Highlights: • Omental adipose derived stem cells enhanced growth and invasion properties of ovarian cancer cells. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted the growth and metastasis of ovarian cancer in mice models. • Adipose derived stem cells promoted MMPs expression and secretion of ovarian cancer cells. • Elevated MMPs mediated the tumor promoting effects of ADSCs.

  20. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunewardene, Niliksha; Crombie, Duncan; Dottori, Mirella; Nayagam, Bryony A.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days' coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients. PMID:26966437

  1. Low antigenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from human ES cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Mi Kim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Eun-Mi Kim1, Nicholas Zavazava1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa and Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City, Iowa, USA; 2Immunology Graduate Program, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USAAbstract: Human embryonic stem (hES cells are essential for improved understanding of diseases and our ability to probe new therapies for use in humans. Currently, bone marrow cells and cord blood cells are used for transplantation into patients with hematopoietic malignancies, immunodeficiencies and in some cases for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. However, due to the high immunogenicity of these hematopoietic cells, toxic regimens of drugs are required for preconditioning and prevention of rejection. Here, we investigated the efficiency of deriving hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs from the hES cell line H13, after co-culturing with the murine stromal cell line OP9. We show that HPCs derived from the H13 ES cells poorly express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and no detectable class II antigens (HLA-DR. These characteristics make hES cell-derived hematopoietic cells (HPCs ideal candidates for transplantation across MHC barriers under minimal immunosuppression.Keywords: human embryonic stem cells, H13, hematopoiesis, OP9 stromal cells, immunogenicity

  2. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  3. Derivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for DNA Methylomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubal, Ivan; Park, Sun Joo; Kim, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are self-renewing pluripotent cells with competency to differentiate into all three-germ lineages. Many studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic and epigenetic molecular mechanisms in the maintenance of self-renewal and pluripotency. Stem cells are under unique molecular and cellular regulations different from somatic cells. Proper regulation should be ensured to maintain their unique self-renewal and undifferentiated characteristics. Understanding key mechanisms in stem cell biology will be important for the successful application of stem cells for regenerative therapeutic medicine. More importantly practical use of stem cells will require our knowledge on how to properly direct and differentiate stem cells into the necessary type of cells. Embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells have been used as study models to unveil molecular and cellular mechanisms in various signaling pathways. They are especially beneficial to developmental studies where in vivo molecular/cellular study models are not available. We have derived neural stem cells from human embryonic stem cells as a model to study the effect of teratogen in neural development. We have tested commercial neural differentiation system and successfully derived neural precursor cells exhibiting key molecular features of neural stem cells, which will be useful for experimental application.

  4. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  5. Low immunogenicity of endothelial derivatives from rat embryonic stem cell-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juliane Ladhoff; Michael Bader; Sabine Br(o)sel; Elke Effenberger; Dirk Westermann; Hans-Dieter Volk; Martina Seifert

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESC) are suggested to be immune-privileged, but they carry the risk of uncontrolled expansion and malignancy. Upon differentiation they lose their tumor-forming capacity, but they become immunogenic by the expression of a normal set of MHC molecules. This immunogenicity might trigger rejection after application in regenerative therapies. In this study MHC expression of and immune responses to endothelial derivatives of rat embryonic stem cell-like cells (RESC) under inflammatory conditions were determined in comparison to primary rat aortic endothelial cells (ECs). Cellular as well as humoral allo-recognition was analyzed in vitro. In addition, immune reactions in vivo were assessed by allo-antibody production and determination of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting allo-reactive T cells. RESC derivatives expressed low but significant levels of MHC class I, and no MHC class II. In response to IFNγ MHC class I expression was enhanced, while class II transactivator induction failed completely in these cells; MHC class II expression remained consistently absent. Functionally, the RESC derivatives showed a reduced allo-stimulatory capacity, protection against humoral allo-recognition in vitro and a slightly diminished susceptibility to cytotoxic T cell lysis. Furthermore, in vivo experiments demonstrated that these cells do not trigger host immune reactions, characterized by no allo-antibody production and no induction of allo-reactive memory T cells. Our results show that endothelial derivatives of RESC have a distinctive reduced immunogenic potency even under inflammatory conditions.

  6. 5-Azacytidine Is Insufficient For Cardiogenesis In Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Safwani Wan Kamarul Zaman; Makpol Suzana; Sathapan Somasundaram; Chua Kien

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Adipose tissue is a source of multipotent adult stem cells and it has the ability to differentiate into several types of cell lineages such as neuron cells, osteogenic cells and adipogenic cells. Several reports have shown adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the ability to undergo cardiomyogenesis. Studies have shown 5-azacytidine can successfully drive stem cells such as bone marrow derived stem cells to differentiate into cardiomyogenic cells. Therefore, in this study...

  7. Drafting the proteome landscape of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, María; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Zudaire, Maribel; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Perez-Valderrama, Estela; Zabaleta, Aintzane; Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Fernandez-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of cells that are defined by their myeloid origin, immature state, and ability to potently suppress T-cell responses. They regulate immune responses and the population significantly increases in the tumor microenvironment of patients with glioma and other malignant tumors. For their study, MDSCs are usually isolated from the spleen or directly of tumors from a large number of tumor-bearing mice although promising ex vivo differentiated MDSC production systems have been recently developed. During the last years, proteomics has emerged as a powerful approach to analyze MDSCs proteomes using shotgun-based mass spectrometry (MS), providing functional information about cellular homeostasis and metabolic state at a global level. Here, we will revise recent proteome profiling studies performed in MDSCs from different origins. Moreover, we will perform an integrative functional analysis of the protein compilation derived from these large-scale proteomic studies in order to obtain a comprehensive view of MDSCs biology. Finally, we will also discuss the potential application of high-throughput proteomic approaches to study global proteome dynamics and post-translational modifications (PTMs) during the differentiation process of MDSCs that will greatly boost the identification of novel MDSC-specific therapeutic targets to apply in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26403437

  8. Derivation of human embryonic stem cell lines from parthenogenetic blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyun Mai; Yang Yu; Tao Li; Liu Wang; Mei-jue Chen; Shu-zhen Huang; Canquan Zhou; Qi Zhou

    2007-01-01

    Parthenogenesis is one of the main, and most useful, methods to derive embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which may be an important source of histocompatible cells and tissues for cell therapy. Here we describe the derivation and characterization of two ESC lines (hPES-1 and hPES-2) from in vitro developed blastocysts following parthenogenetic activation of human oocytes. Typical ESC morphology was seen, and the expression of ESC markers was as expected for alkaline phosphatase, octamer-binding transcription factor 4, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3, stage-specific embryonic antigen 4, TRA-1-60, and TRA-1-81, and there was absence of expression of negative markers such as stage-specific embryonic antigen 1. Expression of genes specific for different embryonic germ layers was detected from the embryoid bodies (EBs) of both hESC lines, suggesting their differentiation potential in vitro. However, in vivo, only hPES-1 formed teratoma consisting of all three embryonic germ layers (hPES-2 did not). Interestingly, after continuous proliferation for more than 100 passages, hPES-1 cells still maintained a normal 46 XX karyotype; hPES-2 displayed abnormalities such as chromosome translocation after long term passages. Short Tandem Repeat (STR) results demonstrated that the hPES lines were genetic matches with the egg donors, and gene imprinting data confirmed the parthenogenetic origin of these ES cells. Genome-wide SNP analysis showed a pattern typical of parthenogenesis. All of these results demonstrated the feasibility to isolate and establish human parthenogenetic ESC lines, which provides an important tool for studying epigenetic effects in ESCs as well as for future therapeutic interventions in a clinical setting.

  9. Stem cell-derived systems in toxicology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter-Dick, Laura; Alves, Paula M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bremm, Klaus-Dieter; Brito, Catarina; Coecke, Sandra; Flick, Burkhard; Fowler, Paul; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Jennings, Paul; Kelm, Jens M; Manou, Irene; Mistry, Pratibha; Moretto, Angelo; Roth, Adrian; Stedman, Donald; van de Water, Bob; Beilmann, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Industrial sectors perform toxicological assessments of their potential products to ensure human safety and to fulfill regulatory requirements. These assessments often involve animal testing, but ethical, cost, and time concerns, together with a ban on it in specific sectors, make appropriate in vitro systems indispensable in toxicology. In this study, we summarize the outcome of an EPAA (European Partnership of Alternatives to Animal Testing)-organized workshop on the use of stem cell-derived (SCD) systems in toxicology, with a focus on industrial applications. SCD systems, in particular, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived, provide physiological cell culture systems of easy access and amenable to a variety of assays. They also present the opportunity to apply the vast repository of existing nonclinical data for the understanding of in vitro to in vivo translation. SCD systems from several toxicologically relevant tissues exist; they generally recapitulate many aspects of physiology and respond to toxicological and pharmacological interventions. However, focused research is necessary to accelerate implementation of SCD systems in an industrial setting and subsequent use of such systems by regulatory authorities. Research is required into the phenotypic characterization of the systems, since methods and protocols for generating terminally differentiated SCD cells are still lacking. Organotypical 3D culture systems in bioreactors and microscale tissue engineering technologies should be fostered, as they promote and maintain differentiation and support coculture systems. They need further development and validation for their successful implementation in toxicity testing in industry. Analytical measures also need to be implemented to enable compound exposure and metabolism measurements for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. The future of SCD toxicological tests will combine advanced cell culture technologies and biokinetic measurements to support regulatory and

  10. A pure population of lung alveolar epithelial type II cells derived from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dachun; Haviland, David L; Burns, Alan R; Zsigmond, Eva; Wetsel, Rick A

    2007-03-13

    Alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cells are small, cuboidal cells that constitute approximately 60% of the pulmonary alveolar epithelium. These cells are crucial for repair of the injured alveolus by differentiating into alveolar epithelial type I cells. ATII cells derived from human ES (hES) cells are a promising source of cells that could be used therapeutically to treat distal lung diseases. We have developed a reliable transfection and culture procedure, which facilitates, via genetic selection, the differentiation of hES cells into an essentially pure (>99%) population of ATII cells (hES-ATII). Purity, as well as biological features and morphological characteristics of normal ATII cells, was demonstrated for the hES-ATII cells, including lamellar body formation, expression of surfactant proteins A, B, and C, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor, as well as the synthesis and secretion of complement proteins C3 and C5. Collectively, these data document the successful generation of a pure population of ATII cells derived from hES cells, providing a practical source of ATII cells to explore in disease models their potential in the regeneration and repair of the injured alveolus and in the therapeutic treatment of genetic diseases affecting the lung. PMID:17360544

  11. Generating a non-integrating human induced pluripotent stem cell bank from urine-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanting Xue

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell holds great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and disease modeling. We describe here a practical method to generate human iPS cells from urine-derived cells (UCs under feeder-free, virus-free, serum-free condition and without oncogene c-MYC. We showed that this approach could be applied in a large population with different genetic backgrounds. UCs are easily accessible and exhibit high reprogramming efficiency, offering advantages over other cell types used for the purpose of iPS generation. Using the approach described in this study, we have generated 93 iPS cell lines from 20 donors with diverse genetic backgrounds. The non-viral iPS cell bank with these cell lines provides a valuable resource for iPS cells research, facilitating future applications of human iPS cells.

  12. Photoresist Derived Carbon for Growth and Differentiation of Neuronal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tie Zou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or necrosis of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS is thehallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Theinability to regenerate in CNS offers little hope for naturally repairing the damagedneurons. However, with the rapid development of new technologies, regenerative medicineoffers great promises to patients with these disorders. Among many events for furtheradvancement of regenerative medicine, extracellular matrix (ECM plays a critical role forcellular migration and differentiation. To develop a biocompatible and electricallyconductive substrate that can be potentially used to promote growth and regeneration ofneurons and to record intracellular and multisite signals from brain as a probe, a polymericprecursor – SPR 220.7 was fabricated by pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 700 oC.Human Neuroblastoma cells - SK-N-MC, SY5Y, mouse teratocarcinoma cells P-19 and ratPC12 cells were found to attach and proliferate on photoresist derived carbon film.Significantly, neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells induced by NGF was demonstrated byobserving cell shape and size, and measuring the length of neurites under SEM. Our resultsindicated that fabricated carbon could potentially be explored in regenerative medicine forpromoting neuronal growth and differentiation in CNS with neurodegeneration.

  13. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in Chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesarina eGiallongo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The suppression of the immune system create a permissive environment for development and progression of cancer. One population of immunosuppressive cells that have become the focus of intense study is myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, immature myeloid cells able to induce immune-escape, angiogenesis and tumor progression. Two different subpopulations have been identified and studied: granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs, with a different immunophenotype and immunosuppressive properties. Recently, an accumulation of both Gr-MDSCs and Mo-MDSCs cells has been found in the peripheral blood of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients. They are part of the tumor clone showing BCR/ABL expression. Imatinib therapy decreases both MDSCs and arginase 1 levels to normal ones. This review will focus on actual knowledge for human MDSCs and their immunosuppressive activity in CML patients with a critical attention to comparison of Gr-MDSCs and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs. We will then suggest the monitoring of MDSCs in patients who have discontinued tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs therapy to evaluate if their increase could correlate with disease relapse.

  14. Large-scale generation of cell-derived nanovesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, W.; Kim, J.; Yoon, J.; Jeong, D.; Cho, S.; Jeong, H.; Yoon, Y. J.; Kim, S. C.; Gho, Y. S.; Park, J.

    2014-09-01

    Exosomes are enclosed compartments that are released from cells and that can transport biological contents for the purpose of intercellular communications. Research into exosomes is hindered by their rarity. In this article, we introduce a device that uses centrifugal force and a filter with micro-sized pores to generate a large quantity of cell-derived nanovesicles. The device has a simple polycarbonate structure to hold the filter, and operates in a common centrifuge. Nanovesicles are similar in size and membrane structure to exosomes. Nanovesicles contain intracellular RNAs ranging from microRNA to mRNA, intracellular proteins, and plasma membrane proteins. The quantity of nanovesicles produced using the device is 250 times the quantity of naturally secreted exosomes. Also, the quantity of intracellular contents in nanovesicles is twice that in exosomes. Nanovesicles generated from murine embryonic stem cells can transfer RNAs to target cells. Therefore, this novel device and the nanovesicles that it generates are expected to be used in exosome-related research, and can be applied in various applications such as drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

  15. Human adipose-derived stem cells stimulate neuroregeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masgutov, Ruslan F; Masgutova, Galina A; Zhuravleva, Margarita N; Salafutdinov, Ilnur I; Mukhametshina, Regina T; Mukhamedshina, Yana O; Lima, Luciana M; Reis, Helton J; Kiyasov, Andrey P; Palotás, András; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injuries and degenerative neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's dementia, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and many others are characterized by loss of brain cells and supporting structures. Restoring microanatomy and function using stem cells is a promising therapeutic approach. Among the many various sources, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) are one of the most easily harvested alternatives, they multiply rapidly, and they demonstrate low immunogenicity with an ability to differentiate into several cell types. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of xenotransplanted human ADSCs on post-traumatic regeneration of rat sciatic nerve. Peripheral reconstruction following complete sciatic transection and autonerve grafting was complemented by intra-operative injection of hADSCs into the proximal and distal stumps. The injury caused gliosis and apoptosis of sensory neurons in the lumbar 5 (L5) ganglia in the control rodents; however, animals treated with hADSCs demonstrated a smaller amount of cellular loss. Formation of amputation neuroma, which hinders axonal repair, was less prominent in the experimental group, and immunohistochemical analysis of myelin basic protein showed good myelination 65 days after surgery. At this point, control groups still exhibited high levels of microglia/macrophage-specific marker Iba-1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, the mark of an ongoing inflammation and incomplete axonal growth 2 months after the injury. This report demonstrates that hADSCs promote neuronal survival in the spinal ganglion, fuel axonal repair and stimulate the regeneration of peripheral nerves. PMID:26047869

  16. New perylene derivative dyes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafer, Ceylan; Turkmen, Gulsah; Demic, Serafettin; Icli, Siddik [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, TR-35040 Izmir (Turkey); Kus, Mahmut [Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, TR-35040 Izmir (Turkey); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Mugla University, TR-48000 Mugla (Turkey); Dincalp, Haluk [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Art and Science, Celal Bayar University, TR-45030 Manisa (Turkey); Kuban, Baha; Teoman, Yildirim [Tuerkiye Sise ve Cam Fabrikalari A.S. (SiSECAM), TR-80620 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2007-03-06

    We have studied the influence of the spacer alkyl chain length of perylenemonoimide (PMI) dyes on the device performance in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We observed that the dyes with longer and brunched alkyl chains exhibit higher efficiencies in DSSCs. In line with these statements we now report the highest efficiency obtained under standard conditions for a perylene imide derivative with PMI-DA1 that performs 300 mV open circuit voltage, 9.79 mA/cm{sup 2} short-circuit current and 1.61% overall conversion efficiency. (author)

  17. Induced Differentiation of Adipose-derived Stromal Cells into Myoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴桂珠; 郑秀; 江忠清; 王金华; 宋岩峰

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to induce the differentiation of isolated and purified adipose-derived stromal cells(ADSCs) into myoblasts,which may provide a new strategy for tissue engineering in patients with stress urinary incontinence(SUI).ADSCs,isolated and cultured ex vivo,were identified by flow cytometry and induced to differentiate into myoblasts in the presence of an induction solution consisting of DMEM supplemented with 5-azacytidine(5-aza),5% FBS,and 5% horse serum.Cellular morphology was observed under an i...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs induce immune modulatory profile in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Sá Silva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells have prominent immune modulatory properties, which may have clinical applications; however their major source, bone marrow, is of limited availability. On the other hand, mesenchymal stem cells derived from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs are readily accessible, but their immune regulatory properties have not been completely investigated. This study was designed, therefore, to evaluate the SHEDs influence on DCs differentiation, maturation, ability to activate T cells and to expand CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experiments were based in cellular co-culture during differentiation and maturation of monocyte derived-DCs (moDCs, with, or not, presence of SHEDs. After co-culture with SHEDs, (moDCs presented lower expression of BDCA-1 and CD11c, in comparison to DC cultivated without SHEDs. CD40, CD80, CD83 and CD86 levels were also decreased in mature DCs (mDCs after co-cultivation with SHEDs. To assess the ability of SHEDs-exposed moDCs to modulate T cell responses, the former were separated from SHEDs, and co-cultured with peripheral blood lymphocytes. After 5 days, the proliferation of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells was evaluated and found to be lower than that induced by moDCs cultivated without SHEDs. In addition, an increase in the proportion of CD4(+Foxp3(+IL-10(+ T cells was observed among cells stimulated by mature moDCs that were previously cultivated with SHEDs. Soluble factors released during co-cultures also showed a reduction in the pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ, and an increase in the anti-inflammatory molecule IL-10. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study shows that SHEDs induce an immune regulatory phenotype in moDCs cells, evidenced by changes in maturation and differentiation rates, inhibition of lymphocyte stimulation and ability to expand CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells. Further characterization and validation of this phenomenon could support the use of SHEDs

  19. Oct-4+/Tenascin C+ neuroblastoma cells serve as progenitors of tumor-derived endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annalisa Pezzolo; Silvia Deaglio; Fabio Malavasi; Vito Pistoia; Federica Parodi; Danilo Marimpietri; Lizzia Raffaghello; Claudia Cocco; Angela Pistorio; Manuela Mosconi; Claudio Gambini; Michele Cillj

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB)-associated endothelial microvessels (EMs) may be lined by tumor-derived endothelial cells (TECs),that are genetically unstable and chemoresistant.Here we have addressed the identification of TEC progenitors in NB by focusing on Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct-4) as a putative marker.Oct-4+ cells were detected in primary NB samples (n = 23),metastatic bone marrow aspirates (n = 10),NB cell lines (n = 4),and orthotopic tumors (n = 10) formed by the HTLA-230 NB cell line in immunodeficient mice.Most Oct-4+ cells showed a perivascular distribution,with 5% of them homing in perinecrotic areas.All Oct-4+ cells were tumor-derived since they shared amplification of MYCN oncogene with malignant cells.Perivascular Oct-4+ cells expressed stem cellrelated,neural progenitor-related and NB-related markers,including surface Tenascin C (TNC),that was absent from perinecrotic Oct-4+ cells and bulk tumor cells.TNC+ but not TNC- HTLA-230 cells differentiated in vitro into endothelial-like cells expressing vascular-endothellal-cadherin,prostate-specific membrane antigen and CD31 upon culture in medium containing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF).TNC+ but not TNC- HTLA-230 cells formed neurospheres when cultured in serum-free medium.Both cell fractions were tumorigenic,but only tumors formed by TNC+ cegs contained EMs fined by TECs.In conclusion,we have identified in NB tumors two putative niches containing Oct-4+ tumor cells.Oct-4+/TNC+ perivascular NB cells displayed a high degree of plasticity and served as progenitors of TECs.Therapeutic targeting of Oct4+/TNC+ progenitors may counteract the contribution of NB-derived ECs to tumor relapse and chemoresistance.

  20. Endothelial progenitor cell differentiation using cryopreserved, umbilical cord blood-derived mononuclear cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-ho JANG; Hugh C KIM; Sun-kyung KIM; Jeong-eun CHOI; Young-jin KIM; Hyun-woo LEE; Seok-yun KANG; Joon-seong PARK; Jin-hyuk CHOI; Ho-yeong LIM

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the endothelial differentiation potentiality of umbilical cord blood (UCB), we induced the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPC)from cryopreserved UCB-derived mononuclear cells (MNC). Methods: MNC from cryopreserved UCB and peripheral blood (PB) were cultured in M199 medium with endothelial cell growth supplements for 14 d. EPC were characterized by RT-PCR,flow cytometry, and immunocytochemistry analysis. The proliferation of differen-tiated EPC was studied by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTI') assay, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentra-tion was measured using an ELISA kit. Characteristics of UCB-derived EPC were compared with those of PB-derived EPC. Results: A number of round-shaped cells were loosely attached to the bottom after 24 h culture, and numerous spindle-shaped cells began to appear from the round-shaped ones on d 7. Those cells expressed endothelial markers such as, Fit-1/VEGFR-1, ecNOS, VE-cadherin, yon Willebrand factor, and secreted VEGF. The patterns of endothelial markers of EPC from PB and UCB did not show striking differences. The results of the prolifera-tion and secretion of VEGF were also similar. Conclusion: We successfully cul-tured UCB cells stored at -196 ℃ into cells with the quality of endothelial cells.Those EPC could be used for angiogenic therapeutics by activating adjacent endothelial cells and enhancing angiogenesis.

  1. Liver stem cell-derived β-cell surrogates for treatment of type 1 diabetes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the common embryonic origin of liver and pancreas as well the similar glucose-sensing systems in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, it should not be surprising that liver stem cells/hepatocytes can transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under high-glucose culture conditions or by genetic reprogramming. Persistent expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx1) transcription factor or its super-active form Pdx1-VP16 fusion protein in hepatic cells reprograms these cells into pancreatic β-cell precursors. In vitro culture at elevated glucose concentrations or in vivo exposure to a hyperglycemia are required for further differentiation and maturation of liver-derived pancreatic β-cell precursor into functional insulin-producing pancreatic β-like cells. Under appropriate conditions, multiple pancreatic transcription factors can work in concert to reprogram liver stem/adult liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. If such autologous liver-derived insulin-producing cells can be made to escape the type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity, they may serve as a valuable cell source for future cell replacement therapy without the need for life-long immunosuppression. PMID:16890895

  2. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on bisindolylmaleimide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiong ZHANG; Zhijun NING; Hongcui PEI; Wenjun WU

    2009-01-01

    Three organic dyes based on bisindolylmaleimide derivatives (11, 12 and 13) were synthesized and investigated as sensitizers for the application in nanocrystalline TiO2 solar cells. The indole group,maleimide group and carboxylic group functioned as electron donor, acceptor and anchoring group, respec-tively. Solar-to-electrical energy conversion efficiencies under simulated amplitude-modulated 1.5 irradiation based on 12 and of 1.87% and 1.50% for 13 and 11,respectively. The open circuit voltage Voc was demon-strated to be enhanced by the introduction of dodecyl or benzyl moieties on the indole groups. The nonplanar structure of bisindolylmaleimide was proven to be effective in aggregation resistance. This work suggests that organic sensitizers with maleimide as electron acceptor are promising candidates as organic sensiti-zers in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  3. Spine Fusion Using Cell Matrix Composites Enriched in Bone Marrow-Derived Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Muschler, George F.; Nitto, Hironori; Matsukura, Yoichi; Boehm, Cynthia; Valdevit, Antonio; Kambic, Helen; Davros, William; Powell, Kimerly; Easley, Kirk

    2003-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells including osteoblastic progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from bone marrow aspirates using the surface of selected implantable matrices for selective cell attachment. Concentration of cells in this way to produce an enriched cellular composite graft improves graft efficacy. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that the biologic milieu of a bone marrow clot will significantly improve the efficacy of such a graft. An established posterior spinal f...

  4. Pretreatment of Cardiac Stem Cells With Exosomes Derived From Mesenchymal Stem Cells Enhances Myocardial Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Yang, Junjie; Yan, Weiya; Li, Yangxin; Shen, Zhenya; Asahara, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Exosomes derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were proved to boost cell proliferation and angiogenic potency. We explored whether cardiac stem cells (CSCs) preconditioned with MSC exosomes could survive and function better in a myocardial infarction model. Methods and Results DiI‐labeled exosomes were internalized with CSCs. They stimulated proliferation, migration, and angiotube formation of CSCs in a dose‐dependent manner. In a rat myocardial infarction model, MSC exosome–p...

  5. Polymer photovoltaic cells by using manganese phthalocyanine derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel near-infrared absorbing manganese phthalocyanine bisphenol A epoxy derivative (MnPc-DGEBPA) was synthesized and characterized by infrared, UV–Vis and fluorescence spectra. The absorption spectrum of the derivative exhibited a Q-band in the near-infrared region and its fluorescence quantum yield reached 0.36 in N, N-dimethylformamide. MnPc-DGEBPA has high solubility and good film forming ability as well. The MnPc-DGEBPA films with a planar electrode were prepared by the dip-coating process using 2, 9, 16, 23-tetra-amino manganese phthalocyanine (TAMnPc) as a solidifying reagent. The current–voltage characteristics of the films were measured and photoconductivity was increased by an order of magnitude compared with dark conductivity, which indicates that MnPc-DGEBPA films have good photoelectric response. Schottky-type and pn-junction-type photovoltaic cells with ITO/MnPc-DGEBPA/Al and ITO/MnPc-DGEBPA/C60/Al structures were achieved by spin coating (using TAMnPc as a solidifying reagent) and vacuum evaporation. The open-circuit voltage (Voc) and short-circuit current density (Jsc) of the Schottky device were 0.6 V and 4.7 nA cm−2, while Voc and Jsc of the pn-junction device were 0.14 V and 0.45 µA cm−2, respectively. The photocurrent efficiency of the pn-junction cell was about 0.1%

  6. Fullerene derivatives as electron donor for organic photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated the performance of unconventional, all-fullerene-based, planar heterojunction (PHJ) organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells using fullerene derivatives indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA) and phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester as the electron donors with fullerene C70 as the electron acceptor. Two different charge generation processes, including charge generation in the fullerene bulk and exciton dissociation at the donor-acceptor interface, have been found to exist in such all-fullerene-based PHJ cells and the contribution to the total photocurrent from each process is strongly dependent on the thickness of fullerene donor. The optimized 5 nm ICBA/40 nm C70 PHJ cell gives clear external quantum efficiency responses for the long-wavelength photons corresponding to the dissociation of strongly bound Frenkel excitons, which is hardly observed in fullerene-based single layer reference devices. This approach using fullerene as a donor material provides further possibilities for developing high performance OPV cells

  7. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs in horses through (1 the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2 flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to collect adipose tissue from the base of the tail. After isolation and culture of AdMSCs, immunophenotypic characterization was performed through flow cytometry. There was a high expression of CD44, CD90 and CD105, and no expression of MHC Class II markers. The tri-lineage differentiation was confirmed by specific staining: adipogenic (Oil Red O, osteogenic (Alizarin Red, and chondrogenic (Alcian Blue. The equine AdMSCs are a promising type of adult progenitor cell for tissue engineering in veterinary medicine.

  8. Hypoxia promotes adipose-derived stem cell proliferation via VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a promising mesenchymal stem cell source with therapeutic applications. Recent studies have shown that ADSCs could be expanded in vitro without phenotype changes. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on ADSC proliferation in vitro and to determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in ADSC proliferation. ADSCs were selectively cultured from the stromal vascular fraction obtained from adipose tissue in DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic-antimycotic. ADSCs were cultured under two conditions: hypoxia (5% O2 and normal oxygen (21% O2. The effects of the oxygen concentration on cell proliferation were examined by cell cycle and doubling time. The expression of VEGF was evaluated by the ELISA assay. The role of VEGF in ADSC proliferation was studied by neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies. We found that the ADSC proliferation rate was significantly higher under hypoxia compared with normoxia. In hypoxia, ADSCs also triggered VEGF expression. However, neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation rate. These results suggest that hypoxia stimulated ADSC proliferation in association with VEGF production. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(1.000: 476-482

  9. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  10. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  11. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis

  12. Adipose tissue-derived stem cells promote pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, S.Q.; Cao, J. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Q.Y.; Li, Y.Y. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Yan, Y.Q. [Department of Liver Surgery I, Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai (China); Yu, F.X. [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China)

    2013-09-27

    To explore the effects of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and the possible mechanism involved, ADSCs were cocultured with pancreatic cancer cells, and a cell counting kit (CCK-8) was used to detect the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. ELISA was used to determine the concentration of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the supernatants. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in pancreatic cancer cells and ADSCs. An in vitro invasion assay was used to measure invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. SDF-1 was detected in the supernatants of ADSCs, but not in pancreatic cancer cells. Higher CXCR4 mRNA levels were detected in the pancreatic cancer cell lines compared with ADSCs (109.3±10.7 and 97.6±7.6 vs 18.3±1.7, respectively; P<0.01). In addition, conditioned medium from ADSCs promoted the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, and AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, significantly downregulated these growth-promoting effects. We conclude that ADSCs can promote the proliferation and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells, which may involve the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  13. Differentiation of dermis-derived multipotent cells into insulin-producing pancreatic cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Meng Shi; Tian-Min Cheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the plasticity of whether dermis-derived multipotent cells to differentiate into insulin-producing pancreatic cells in vitro.METHODS: A donal population of dermis-derived multipotent stem cells (DMCs) from newborn rat with the capacity to produce osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes and neurons was used. The gene expression of cultured DMCs was assessed by DNA microarray using rat RGU34A gene expression probe arrays. DMCs were further cultured in the presence of insulin complex components (Insulintransferrin-selenium, ITS) to observe whether DMCs could be induced into insulin-producing pancreatic cells in vitro.RESULTS: DNA microarray analysis showed that cultured DMCs simultaneously expressed several genes associated with pancreatic cell, neural cell, epithelial cell and hepatocyte,widening its transcriptomic repertoire. When cultured in the specific induction medium containing ITS for pancreatic cells, DMCs differentiated into epithelioid cells that were positive for insulin detected by immunohistochemistry.CONCLUSION: Our data indicate that dermal multipotent cells may serve as a source of stem/progenitor cells for insulin-producing pancreatic cells.

  14. Neuro-muscular differentiation of adult porcine skin derived stem cell-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Lermen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Due to the genetic relationship to humans, porcine stem cells are a very important model system to investigate cell differentiation, associated cell signaling pathways, and cell fate. Porcine skin derived stem cells have been isolated from mid-gestation porcine fetus recently. To our knowledge, stem cells from the skin of the adult porcine organism have not been isolated until now. Hence, to our knowledge, we here describe the isolation, expansion, characterization and differentiation of multipotent porcine skin derived stem cell-like cells (pSSCs from the adult porcine organism for the first time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: pSSCs had a spindle shaped morphology similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. They could be maintained proliferatively active in vitro for more than 120 days and were able to form colonies from single cells. pSSCs expressed Sox2 and Oct3/4, both transcription factors essential to the pluripotent and self-renewing phenotypes of embryonic stem cells, which recently gained attention due to their function in inducing pluripotent stem cells. Furthermore, the expression of the progenitor marker nestin, the somatic stem cell markers Bcrp1/ABCG2, Bmi1, and Stat3 was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in undifferentiated pSSCs. Flow cytometry revealed the expression of the MSC related proteins CD9, CD29, CD44 and CD105, but not CD90. After neuronal differentiation cells with a characteristic morphology of neuronal and smooth muscle-like cells were present in the cultures. Subsequent immunochemistry and flow cytometry revealed the down-regulation of nestin and the up-regulation of the neuron specific protein beta-III-tubulin and the astrocyte marker GFAP. Also, alpha-SMA expressing cells increased during differentiation suggesting the neuro-muscular differentiation of these skin derived cells. pSSCs could also be induced to differentiate into adipocyte-like cells when cultured under

  15. Transgene Reactivation in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivatives and Reversion to Pluripotency of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galat, Vasiliy; Galat, Yekaterina; Perepitchka, Mariana; Jennings, Lawrence J; Iannaccone, Philip M; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2016-07-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have enormous potential in regenerative medicine and disease modeling. It is now felt that clinical trials should be performed with iPSCs derived with nonintegrative constructs. Numerous studies, however, including those describing disease models, are still being published using cells derived from iPSCs generated with integrative constructs. Our experimental work presents the first evidence of spontaneous transgene reactivation in vitro in several cellular types. Our results show that the transgenes were predominantly silent in parent iPSCs, but in mesenchymal and endothelial iPSC derivatives, the transgenes experienced random upregulation of Nanog and c-Myc. Additionally, we provide evidence of spontaneous secondary reprogramming and reversion to pluripotency in mesenchymal stem cells derived from iPSCs. These findings strongly suggest that the studies, which use cellular products derived from iPSCs generated with retro- or lentiviruses, should be evaluated with consideration of the possibility of transgene reactivation. The in vitro model described here provides insight into the earliest events of culture transformation and suggests the hypothesis that reversion to pluripotency may be responsible for the development of tumors in cell replacement experiments. The main goal of this work, however, is to communicate the possibility of transgene reactivation in retro- or lenti-iPSC derivatives and the associated loss of cellular fidelity in vitro, which may impact the outcomes of disease modeling and related experimentation. PMID:27193052

  16. Pericytes derived from adipose-derived stem cells protect against retinal vasculopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Mendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal vasculopathies, including diabetic retinopathy (DR, threaten the vision of over 100 million people. Retinal pericytes are critical for microvascular control, supporting retinal endothelial cells via direct contact and paracrine mechanisms. With pericyte death or loss, endothelial dysfunction ensues, resulting in hypoxic insult, pathologic angiogenesis, and ultimately blindness. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs differentiate into pericytes, suggesting they may be useful as a protective and regenerative cellular therapy for retinal vascular disease. In this study, we examine the ability of ASCs to differentiate into pericytes that can stabilize retinal vessels in multiple pre-clinical models of retinal vasculopathy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that ASCs express pericyte-specific markers in vitro. When injected intravitreally into the murine eye subjected to oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR, ASCs were capable of migrating to and integrating with the retinal vasculature. Integrated ASCs maintained marker expression and pericyte-like morphology in vivo for at least 2 months. ASCs injected after OIR vessel destabilization and ablation enhanced vessel regrowth (16% reduction in avascular area. ASCs injected intravitreally before OIR vessel destabilization prevented retinal capillary dropout (53% reduction. Treatment of ASCs with transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 enhanced hASC pericyte function, in a manner similar to native retinal pericytes, with increased marker expression of smooth muscle actin, cellular contractility, endothelial stabilization, and microvascular protection in OIR. Finally, injected ASCs prevented capillary loss in the diabetic retinopathic Akimba mouse (79% reduction 2 months after injection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ASC-derived pericytes can integrate with retinal vasculature, adopting both pericyte morphology and marker expression, and provide functional vascular protection in multiple

  17. Analysis of G-banding in tumor cell lines derived from human neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua Zou; Yanhui Li

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The application of neural stem cell (NSC) is restricted because of its tumorigenesis, and the possible pathogenesis needs investigation.OBJECTIVE: To compare the differences of chromosomal G-banding between human NSCs (hNSCs) derived tumor cell line and hNSCs derived normal cell lines.DESIGN: A randomized controlled observation.SETTING: Building of Anatomy, Peking University Health Science Center.MATERIALS: The hNSC lines and hNSC-derived tumor cell lines were provided by the Research Center of Stem Cells, Peking University; DMEM/F12 (1:1) medium, N2 additive, B27 additive epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were produced by GIBCO BRL Company (USA); fetal bovine serum by HYCLONE Company (USA).METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Genetics, Peking University Health Science Center from February 2003 to July 2004. Human fetal striatal NSCs were inoculated hypodermically on the right scapular of nude mice; Normal human fetal striatal NSCs were cultured to 5-8 passages as controls. Karyotyping was performed on the 5th passage of hNSC-derived tumor cells at 6 weeks after hN-SC transplantation into nude mice (T1) and tumor cells at 15 weeks after transplantation (T2). Metaphase chromosomes were examined with microscope, G-banding cytogenetic analysis and karyotyping were performed according to the Cytoscan Karyotyping FISH and CGH software system (United biotechnology USA Corporation).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: G-banded analytical results of human fetal striatal nerve stem cells derived tumor cell lines (T1 and T2) of metaphase chromosomes were observed.RESULTS: ① Chromosome analysis of hNSC-derived tumor cell lines 1 (T1): Twenty-five well-spread metaphases were randomly selected for analysis. The karyotypes were 64, XX (8, 32%); 65, XX (1, 4%); 67,XX (5, 20%); 68, XX (11, 44%). The modal number of chromosomes in this cell lines was 68, which were all hypotriploid. The analysis of 8 G

  18. Cell surface and transcriptional characterization of human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Adam J; Tholpady, Ashok; Tholpady, Sunil S; Shang, Hulan; Ogle, Roy C

    2005-03-01

    Adult human subcutaneous adipose tissue contains cells with intriguing multilineage developmental plasticity, much like marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Putative stem or progenitor cells from fat have been given many different names in the literature, reflecting an early and evolving consensus regarding their phenotypic characterization. The study reported here used microarrays to evaluate over 170 genes relating to angiogenesis and extracellular matrix in undifferentiated, early-passage human adipose-derived adherent stromal (hADAS) cells isolated from three separate donors. The hADAS populations unanimously transcribed 66% of the screened genes, and 83% were transcribed by at least two of the three populations. The most highly transcribed genes relate to functional groupings such as cell adhesion, matrix proteins, growth factors and receptors, and proteases. The transcriptome of hADAS cells demonstrated by this work reveals many similarities to published profiles of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition, flow analysis of over 24 hADAS cell surface proteins (n = 7 donors) both confirms and expands on the existing literature and reveals strong intergroup correlation, despite an inconsistent nomenclature and the lack of standardized protocols for cell isolation and culture. Finally, based on flow analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction studies, our results suggest that hADAS cells do not express several proteins that are implicated as markers of "stemness" in other stem cell populations, including telomerase, CD133, and the membrane transporter ABCG2.

  19. Comprehensive characterization of genomic instability in pluripotent stem cells and their derived neuroprogenitor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Luis Lopez Corrales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The genomic integrity of two human pluripotent stem cells and their derived neuroprogenitor cell lines was studied, applying a combination of high-resolution genetic methodologies. The usefulness of combining array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH techniques should be delineated to exclude/detect a maximum of possible genomic structural aberrations. Interestingly, in parts different genomic imbalances at chromosomal and subchromosomal levels were detected in pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives. Some of the copy number variations were inherited from the original cell line, whereas other modifications were presumably acquired during the differentiation and manipulation procedures. These results underline the necessity to study both pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated progeny by as many approaches as possible in order to assess their genomic stability before using them in clinical therapies.

  20. Isolation and analysis of SSEA-4 positive cells derived from fetal marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Daqing; PEI Xuetao; YANG Yinxiang; GAO Yanhong; YUAN Hongfeng; QIN Lipeng; WANG Yunfang; NAN Xue; SHI Shuangshuang; YUE Wen

    2006-01-01

    A big issue in stem cell research is to derive prospective totipotential stem cells. In this study, fMSC-SSEA-4 cells expressing SSEA-4 antigen were isolated from fetal marrow masenchymal stem cells (fMSCs) using immunomagnetic bead sorting technique. The totipotent cells were identified and their biological characteristics were further studied. The expression of Oct-4 and SSEA-4, carcino- genicity, and the ability to differentiation of fMSC- SSEA-4 cells were evaluated to verify the totipotent potential. fMSC-SSEA-4 cells were isolated successfully from fMSCs (2.5% among fMSCs), while no obvious differences were seen in morphology, growth curve, cell cycle and immunophenotype, Oct-4 and SSEA-4 expression between fMSC-SSEA-4 cells and fMSCs. fMSC-SSEA-4 cells showed normal diploid chromosome karyotype and no carcinoma was induced after inoculation into nude mice. fMSC- SSEA-4 cells could be induced to fat cells, osteogenic cells and neuron-like cells in vitro with different induced factors. The results indicated that there may be a few totipotent cells among the fMSCs and it may offer the experimental basis for the further study and application of fMSCs.

  1. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  2. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen Chin; Kundra, Ajay; Andrei, Mirela; Baptiste, Stacey; Chen, Chi; Wong, Ching; Sindhu, Hemant

    2016-04-01

    Although BCR-ABL negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN)--and especially myelofibrosis (MF)--are recognized to be associated with autoimmune phenomena, immune derangements in MPN have been much less studied. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one type of important immune modulator cell. Therefore, we studied MDSCs in MPN disease. MDSCs were studied in two cohorts: the first cohort was 55 patients including 16 primary myelofibrosis (PMF), 7 post-polycythemia vera (PV)-MF, 2 post-essential thrombocythemia (ET)-MF, 11 ET, 17 PV, 2 undefined MPN disorder, and 23 normal controls; the second cohort included 38 patients: 17 ET, 7 PMF, 3 ET-MF, 2 PV-MF, 9 PV patients, and 20 normal volunteers. The second cohort was studied using freshly collected specimens and a comparable age group as controls. CD11b(+), CD14(-), and CD33(+) cells were defined as MDSCs in both cohorts by flow cytometry. Since there are no differences in MDSC levels among different MPN categories, they were grouped as MPNs. The results showed that MDSCs were significantly elevated in MPNs compared with controls in both cohorts. We also performed RT-PCR and found that MPN patients have significantly elevated arginase-1 mRNA compared with controls, and sorted MDSCs were found to have suppressor T cell activity in MPNs, substantiating the hypothesis that levels of MDSCs are, in fact, deranged in MPNs. MDSC levels were not correlated with JAK2 status, white blood cells, Hb levels, platelet counts, splenomegaly, or the degree of bone marrow fibrosis (in MF). Further studies in immune therapy involving MDSC inhibitors or differentiation may be developed to treat MPN disease. PMID:26943702

  3. Characterization of polyhormonal insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Bruin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs were used as a model system of human pancreas development to study characteristics of the polyhormonal cells that arise during fetal pancreas development. HESCs were differentiated into fetal-like pancreatic cells in vitro using a 33-day, 7-stage protocol. Cultures were ~90–95% PDX1-positive by day (d 11 and 70–75% NKX6.1-positive by d17. Polyhormonal cells were scattered at d17, but developed into islet-like clusters that expressed key transcription factors by d33. Human C-peptide and glucagon secretion were first detected at d17 and increased thereafter in parallel with INS and GCG transcript levels. HESC-derived cells were responsive to KCl and arginine, but not glucose in perifusion studies. Compared to adult human islets, hESC-derived cells expressed ~10-fold higher levels of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 mRNA, but similar levels of glucokinase (GCK. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of GLUT1 transcript within endocrine cells. However, GLUT1 protein was excluded from this population and was instead observed predominantly in non-endocrine cells, whereas GCK was co-expressed in insulin-positive cells. In rubidium efflux assays, hESC-derived cells displayed mild potassium channel activity, but no responsiveness to glucose, metabolic inhibitors or glibenclamide. Western blotting experiments revealed that the higher molecular weight SUR1 band was absent in hESC-derived cells, suggesting a lack of functional KATP channels at the cell surface. In addition, KATP channel subunit transcript levels were not at a 1:1 ratio, as would be expected (SUR1 levels were ~5-fold lower than KIR6.2. Various ratios of SUR1:KIR6.2 plasmids were transfected into COSM6 cells and rubidium efflux was found to be particularly sensitive to a reduction in SUR1. These data suggest that an impaired ratio of SUR1:KIR6.2 may contribute to the observed KATP channel defects in hESC-derived islet endocrine cells, and along with

  4. Adipose-derived stromal cells inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation inducing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kiyoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Ii, Masaaki, E-mail: masaii@art.osaka-med.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Inamoto, Teruo; Komura, Kazumasa; Ibuki, Naokazu; Minami, Koichiro; Uehara, Hirofumi; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kiyama, Satoshi [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Asahi, Michio [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan); Azuma, Haruhito [Department of Urology, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka Medical College, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • AdSC transplantation exhibits inhibitory effect on tumor progressions of PCa cells. • AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway. • High expression of the TGF-β1 gene in AdSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have generated a great deal of interest in the field of regenerative medicine. Adipose-derived stromal cells (AdSCs) are known to exhibit extensive proliferation potential and can undergo multilineage differentiation, sharing similar characteristics to bone marrow-derived MSCs. However, as the effect of AdSCs on tumor growth has not been studied sufficiently, we assessed the degree to which AdSCs affect the proliferation of prostate cancer (PCa) cell. Human AdSCs exerted an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of androgen-responsive (LNCaP) and androgen-nonresponsive (PC3) human PCa cells, while normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) did not, and in fact promoted PCa cell proliferation to a degree. Moreover, AdSCs induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells and PC3 cells, activating the caspase3/7 signaling pathway. cDNA microarray analysis suggested that AdSC-induced apoptosis in both LNCaP and PC3 cells was related to the TGF-β signaling pathway. Consistent with our in vitro observations, local transplantation of AdSCs delayed the growth of tumors derived from both LNCaP- and PC3-xenografts in immunodeficient mice. This is the first preclinical study to have directly demonstrated that AdSC-induced PCa cell apoptosis may occur via the TGF-β signaling pathway, irrespective of androgen-responsiveness. Since autologous AdSCs can be easily isolated from adipose tissue without any ethical concerns, we suggest that therapy with these cells could be a novel approach for patients with PCa.

  5. Transfection of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene promotes neuronal differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Du; Xiaoqing Gao; Li Deng; Nengbin Chang; Huailin Xiong; Yu Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor recombinant adenovirus vector-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells using inductive medium containing retinoic acid and epidermal growth factor. Cell viability, micro-tubule-associated protein 2-positive cell ratio, and the expression levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and growth-associated protein-43 protein in the su-pernatant were signiifcantly higher in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor/bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells compared with empty virus plasmid-transfected bone marrow mes-enchymal stem cells. Furthermore, microtubule-associated protein 2, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and growth-associated protein-43 mRNA levels in cell pellets were statistically higher in glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor/bone marrow mesen-chymal stem cells compared with empty virus plasmid-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These results suggest that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor/bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have a higher rate of induction into neuron-like cells, and this enhanced differentiation into neuron-like cells may be associated with up-regulated expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and growth-associated protein-43.

  6. Current Status of Human Adipose–Derived Stem Cells: Differentiation into Hepatocyte-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Al Battah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The shortage of human organ donors and the low cell quality of available liver tissues represent major obstacles for the clinical application of orthotropic liver transplantation and hepatocyte transplantation, respectively. Therefore, worldwide research groups are investigating alternative extrahepatic cell sources. Recent in vitro studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from various sources, including human bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord, can be differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells when appropriate conditions are used. In particular, interest exists for human adipose–derived stems cells (hASCs as an attractive cell source for generating hepatocyte-like cells. The hASCs are multipotent MSCs that reside in adipose tissue, with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineages. Moreover, these cells can secrete multiple growth factors and cytokines that exert beneficial effects on organ or tissue injury. In this review, we will not only present recent data regarding hASC biology, their isolation, and differentiation capability towards hepatocytes, but also the potential application of hASC-derived hepatocytes to study drug toxicity. Additionally, this review will discuss the therapeutic potential of hASCs as undifferentiated cells in liver regeneration.

  7. Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Useful in Insulin Production - Another Opportunity in Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarang, Shabari; Viswanathan, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is an autoimmune disorder resulting out of T cell mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Immunomodulatory properties of mesenchymal stem cells may help to regenerate beta cells and/or prevent further destruction of remnant, unaffected beta cells in diabetes. We have assessed the ability of umbilical cord derived MSCs (UCMSCs) to differentiate into functional islet cells in vitro. Methods and Results We have isolated UCMSCs and allowed sequential exposure of various inducing agents and growth factors. We characterized these cells for confirmation of the presence of islet cell markers and their functionality. The spindle shaped undifferentiated UCMSCs, change their morphology to become triangular in shape. These cells then come together to form the islet like structures which then grow in size and mature over time. These cells express pancreatic and duodenal homeobox −1 (PDX-1), neurogenin 3 (Ngn-3), glucose transporter 2 (Glut 2) and other pancreatic cell markers like glucagon, somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide and lose expression of MSC markers like CD73 and CD105. They were functionally active as demonstrated by release of physiological insulin and C-peptide in response to elevated glucose concentrations. Conclusions Pancreatic islet like cells with desired functionality can thus be obtained in reasonable numbers from undifferentiated UCMSCs invitro. This could help in establishing a “very definitive source” of islet like cells for cell therapy. UCMSCs could thus be a game changer in treatment of diabetes. PMID:27426087

  8. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  9. Use of RUNX2 Expression to Identify Osteogenic Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We generated a RUNX2-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP reporter system to study osteogenic development from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Our studies demonstrate the fidelity of YFP expression with expression of RUNX2 and other osteogenic genes in hESC-derived osteoprogenitor cells, as well as the osteogenic specificity of YFP signal. In vitro studies confirm that the hESC-derived YFP+ cells have similar osteogenic phenotypes to osteoprogenitor cells generated from bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In vivo studies demonstrate the hESC-derived YFP+ cells can repair a calvarial defect in immunodeficient mice. Using the engineered hESCs, we monitored the osteogenic development and explored the roles of osteogenic supplements BMP2 and FGF9 in osteogenic differentiation of these hESCs in vitro. Taken together, this reporter system provides a novel system to monitor the osteogenic differentiation of hESCs and becomes useful to identify soluble agents and cell signaling pathways that mediate early stages of human bone development.

  10. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into insulin, somatostatin, and glucagon expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from mouse bone marrow were shown to adopt a pancreatic endocrine phenotype in vitro and to reverse diabetes in an animal model. MSC from human bone marrow and adipose tissue represent very similar cell populations with comparable phenotypes. Adipose tissue is abundant and easily accessible and could thus also harbor cells with the potential to differentiate in insulin producing cells. We isolated human adipose tissue-derived MSC from four healthy donors. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed the stem cell markers nestin, ABCG2, SCF, Thy-1 as well as the pancreatic endocrine transcription factor Isl-1. The cells were induced to differentiate into a pancreatic endocrine phenotype by defined culture conditions within 3 days. Using quantitative PCR a down-regulation of ABCG2 and up-regulation of pancreatic developmental transcription factors Isl-1, Ipf-1, and Ngn3 were observed together with induction of the islet hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin

  11. Thrombin-specific inactivation of endothelial cell derived plasminogen activator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although thrombin (T) has diverse functions in the overall hemostatic mechanism, relatively little is known about its direct effect on components of the fibrinolytic enzyme system. The authors have investigated the interaction of T with plasminogen activators (PA) derived from bovine aortic endothelial cells (EC) in culture (2-5th passage, preconfluent monolayers). Varying concentrations of purified bovine or human thrombin were added to EC-conditioned media (CM). CM + T mixtures were assayed at various times for PA activity using purified plasminogen and a sensitive 125I-fibrinogenolytic or caseinolytic assay. T (5 nM), but not plasmin or trypsin at equivalent concentrations, resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of the PA activity in CM. T had no effect on the PA activity of urokinase, streptokinase or preformed plasmin. The ability of T to inactivate the EC-derived PA was abolished by prior treatment of T with active site-directed reagents. SDS-PAGE and zymography with copolymerized fibrinogen and plasminogen revealed further specificity in that only one of the multiple-molecular weight forms of PA present in EC-CM was inactivated by T. The authors conclude that in a highly specific fashion, T inactivates the predominant PA present in EC-CM by limited proteolysis. Thus, another potentially important function of T is suggested which may have particular significance in the temporal regulation of coagulation and fibrinolysis at the blood-endothelium interface

  12. Multifunctional Fullerene Derivative for Interface Engineering in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaowen; Zhao, Yue; Chen, Qi; Yang, Yang Michael; Liu, Yongsheng; Hong, Ziruo; Liu, Zonghao; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Meng, Lei; Li, Yongfang; Yang, Yang

    2015-12-16

    In perovskite based planar heterojunction solar cells, the interface between the TiO2 compact layer and the perovskite film is critical for high photovoltaic performance. The deep trap states on the TiO2 surface induce several challenging issues, such as charge recombination loss and poor stability etc. To solve the problems, we synthesized a triblock fullerene derivative (PCBB-2CN-2C8) via rational molecular design for interface engineering in the perovskite solar cells. Modifying the TiO2 surface with the compound significantly improves charge extraction from the perovskite layer. Together with its uplifted surface work function, open circuit voltage and fill factor are dramatically increased from 0.99 to 1.06 V, and from 72.2% to 79.1%, respectively, resulting in 20.7% improvement in power conversion efficiency for the best performing devices. Scrutinizing the electrical properties of this modified interfacial layer strongly suggests that PCBB-2CN-2C8 passivates the TiO2 surface and thus reduces charge recombination loss caused by the deep trap states of TiO2. The passivation effect is further proven by stability testing of the perovskite solar cells with shelf lifetime under ambient conditions improved by a factor of more than 4, from ∼40 h to ∼200 h, using PCBB-2CN-2C8 as the TiO2 modification layer. This work offers not only a promising material for cathode interface engineering, but also provides a viable approach to address the challenges of deep trap states on TiO2 surface in planar perovskite solar cells. PMID:26592525

  13. Differentiation of Human Cord Blood and Stromal Derived Stem Cells into Neuron Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Pamukçu Baran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The most basic properties of stem cells are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and to differentiate into multiple cell or tissue types. Umbilical cord blood has been utilized for human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as an alternative source to bone marrow.The experiments show that Wharton’s jelly cells are easily attainable and can be expanded in vitro, maintained in culture, and induced to differentiate into neural cells. Almost recent studies it has been discovered that the cord blood-derived cells can differantiate not only to blood cells but also to various somatic cells like neuron or muscle cell with the signals taken from the envoirenment.Interestingly, neural cells obtained from umbilical cord blood show a relatively high spontaneous differentiation into oligodendrocytes, Embryonic stem cells proliferate indefinitely and can differentiate spontaneously into all tissue types.It has been shown that embryonic stem cells can be induced to differentiate into neurons and glia by treatment with retinoic acid or basic fibroblast growth factor. It has been studied that the diseases as Motor Neuron Disease, Parkinson, Alzheimer and degeneration of medulla spinalis and also paralysises could be treated with transplantation of cord blood-dericed stem cells.

  14. Muse Cells, a New Type of Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived from Human Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Li, Di; Cheng, Sai; Yang, Yu-Hua; Tian, Ting; Pan, Xiao-Ru

    2016-04-01

    A new type of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that expresses stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3) and the mesenchymal cell marker CD105 are known as multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells. Studies have shown that stem cells in suspension cultures are more likely to generate embryoid body-like stem cell spheres and maintain an undifferentiated phenotype and pluripotency. We separated Muse cells derived from human dermal fibroblasts by long-term trypsin incubation (LTT) through suspension cultures in methylcellulose. The Muse cells obtained expressed several pluripotency markers, including Nanog, Oct4, Sox2, and SSEA-3, and could differentiate in vitro into cells of the three germ layers, such as hepatocytes (endodermal), neural cells (ectodermal) and adipocytes, and osteocytes (mesodermal cells). These cells showed a low level of DNA methylation and a high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio. Our study provides an innovative and exciting platform for exploring the potential cell-based therapy of various human diseases using Muse cells as well as their great possibility for regenerative medicine. PMID:27055628

  15. Isolation and characterization of cancer stem-like cells from MHCC97H Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanyong Yi; Kejun Nan; Aihua Yuan; Chuangxin Lu

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To identify and isolate CD133 positive cancer stem-like cells (CD133+ cells) from the highly invasive human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line(MHCC97H), and examine their potential for clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Methods: CD133+ and CD133- cells were isolated from MHCC97H cell line by magnetic bead cell sorting(MACS), and the potentials of CD133+ cells for colony formation and tumorigenicity were evaluated by soft agar cloning and tumor formation following nude mice inoculation. Results:CD133+ cells represent a minority(0.5-2.0%) of the tumor cell population with a greater colony-forming efficiency and greater tumor production ability. The colony-forming efficiency of CD133+ cells in soft agar was significantly higher than CD133- cells(36.8±1.4 vs 12.9±0.8, P<0.05).After 6 weeks, 3/5 mice inoculated with 1 × 103 CD133+ cells, 4/5 with 1 × 104 CD133+ cells and 5/5 with 1 × 105 CD133+ cells developed detectable tumors at the injection site, while only one tumor was found in mice treated with same numbers of CD133- cells. Conclusion: CD133 may be a hallmark of liver cancer stem cells (CSC) in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC), because the CD133+ cells identified and isolated with anti-CD133 labeled magnetic beads from MHCC97H cell line exhibit high potentials for clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. These CD133+ cells might contribute to hepatocarcinogenesis, as well as the growth and recurrence of human HCC, and therefore may be a useful target for anti-cancer therapy.

  16. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  17. Human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stem cells are superior to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cell therapy in regenerative medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Geetanjali B.; Srivastava, Rupesh K.; Gupta, Navita; Barhanpurkar, Amruta P.; Pote, Satish T. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Jhaveri, Hiral M. [Department of Periodontics and Oral Implantology, Dr. D.Y. Patil Dental College and Hospital, Pune (India); Mishra, Gyan C. [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India); Wani, Mohan R., E-mail: mohanwani@nccs.res.in [National Center for Cell Science, University of Pune Campus, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-03-12

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into multiple cell lineages. Presently, bone marrow is considered as a prime source of MSCs; however, there are some drawbacks and limitations in use of these MSCs for cell therapy. In this study, we demonstrate that human gingival tissue-derived MSCs have several advantages over bone marrow-derived MSCs. Gingival MSCs are easy to isolate, homogenous and proliferate faster than bone marrow MSCs without any growth factor. Importantly, gingival MSCs display stable morphology and do not loose MSC characteristic at higher passages. In addition, gingival MSCs maintain normal karyotype and telomerase activity in long-term cultures, and are not tumorigenic. Thus, we reveal that human gingiva is a better source of MSCs than bone marrow, and large number of functionally competent clinical grade MSCs can be generated in short duration for cell therapy in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  18. Placenta Mesenchymal Stem Cell Derived Exosomes Confer Plasticity on Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooi, Masayuki; Komaki, Motohiro; Morioka, Chikako; Honda, Izumi; Iwasaki, Kengo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conditioned medium (MSC-CM) has been reported to enhance wound healing. Exosomes contain nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids, and function as an intercellular communication vehicle for mediating some paracrine effects. However, the function of MSC-derived exosomes (MSC-exo) remains elusive. In this study, we isolated human placenta MSC (PlaMSC)-derived exosomes (PlaMSC-exo) and examined their function in vitro. PlaMSCs were isolated from human term placenta using enzymatic digestion. PlaMSC-exo were prepared from the conditioned medium of PlaMSC (PlaMSC-CM) by ultracentrifugation. The expression of stemness-related genes, such as OCT4 and NANOG, in normal adult human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) after incubation with PlaMSC-exo was measured by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR analysis (real-time PCR). The effect of PlaMSC-exo on OCT4 transcription activity was assessed using Oct4-EGFP reporter mice-derived dermal fibroblasts. The stimulating effects of PlaMSC-exo on osteoblastic and adipocyte-differentiation of NHDF were evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and Alizarin red S- and oil red O-staining, respectively. The expression of osteoblast- and adipocyte-related genes was also assessed by real-time PCR. The treatment of NHDF with PlaMSC-exo significantly upregulated OCT4 and NANOG mRNA expression. PlaMSC-exo also enhanced OCT4 transcription. The NHDF treated with PlaMSC-exo exhibited osteoblastic and adipocyte-differentiation in osteogenic and adipogenic induction media. PlaMSC-exo increase the expression of OCT4 and NANOG mRNA in fibroblasts. As a result, PlaMSC-exo influence the differentiation competence of fibroblasts to both osteoblastic and adipocyte-differentiation. It shows a new feature of MSCs and the possibility of clinical application of MSC-exo. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1658-1670, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26640165

  19. A protocol for embryonic stem cell derivation by somatic cell nuclear transfer into human oocytes

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Dieter Egli & Gloryn Chia ### Abstract Here we describe detailed methods that allowed us to derive embryonic stem cell lines by nuclear transfer of fibroblasts from a newborn and from a type 1 diabetic adult. The protocol is based on the insight that 1) agents for cell fusion can act as potent mediators of oocyte activation by compromising maintaining plasma membrane integrity; minimizing the concentration at which they are used, and at least transiently remove calcium f...

  20. Antioxidation of Decellularized Stem Cell Matrix Promotes Human Synovium-Derived Stem Cell-Based Chondrogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Pei, Ming; Zhang, Ying; Li, Jingting; Chen, Dongquan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical treatment of cartilage defects is challenging due to concomitant post-traumatic joint inflammation. This study was to demonstrate that the antioxidant ability of human adult synovium-derived stem cells (SDSCs) could be enhanced by ex vivo expansion on a decellularized stem cell matrix (DSCM). Microarray was used to evaluate oxidative, antioxidative, and chondrogenic status in SDSCs after expansion on the DSCM and induction in the chondrogenic medium. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was adde...

  1. Advances in pluripotent stem cell-derived endothelial cells: from biomaterials to organ regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Kathy O

    2014-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), by virtue of their capability to self-renew and differentiate into a variety of cell types, represent the first type of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to be used in clinical transplantation during recent phase-I trials; however, it is still unclear whether hESC-derived tissues can self-organize and form part of the vascularized, functional organ following transplantation. Recently, endothelial cells (ECs) or angiogenic factors such as VEGFA have been demonstrated to support development and regeneration of multiple organ systems, including the heart, pancreas, liver, lung and bone marrow. Therefore, co-transplantation of ECs derived from the same parental PSCs that differentiate into cell types of interest; or overexpression of the inductive angiogenic factors responsible for organ regeneration might be beneficial to support function of hPSC-derived tissues. In this special issue, we discuss how protein kinases (Ng and colleagues); DNA methylation and histone modification (Tsui and colleagues) regulate cellular pluripotency and cell-fate specification of PSCs. In addition, we discuss how ECs and angiogenic factors could contribute to repair and regeneration of organs such as the heart (Yuan and colleagues), the cardiovascular system (Tse and colleagues) and the pancreas (Lui). We also discuss the role of mesenchymal stem cells or paracrine factors secreted by them in tissue repair (Li and colleagues). Lastly, we discuss how to generate self-organized and vascularized tissues derived from PSCs in a 2- or 3-dimensional format by fusing tissue bioengineering approaches with stem cell technology (Chen).

  2. Suppression of Th1-mediated autoimmunity by embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokunori Ikeda

    Full Text Available We herein demonstrate the immune-regulatory effect of embryonic stem cell-derived dendritic cells (ES-DCs using two models of autoimmune disease, namely non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Treatment of pre-diabetic NOD mice with ES-DCs exerted almost complete suppression of diabetes development during the observation period for more than 40 weeks. The prevention of diabetes by ES-DCs was accompanied with significant reduction of insulitis and decreased number of Th1 and Th17 cells in the spleen. Development of EAE was also inhibited by the treatment with ES-DCs, and the therapeutic effect was obtained even if ES-DCs were administrated after the onset of clinical symptoms. Treatment of EAE-induced mice with ES-DCs reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the spinal cord and suppressed the T cell response to the myelin antigen. Importantly, the ES-DC treatment did not affect T cell response to an exogenous antigen. As the mechanisms underlying the reduction of the number of infiltrating Th1 cells, we observed the inhibition of differentiation and proliferation of Th1 cells by ES-DCs. Furthermore, the expression of VLA-4α on Th1 cells was significantly inhibited by ES-DCs. Considering the recent advances in human induced pluripotent stem cell-related technologies, these results suggest a clinical application for pluripotent stem cell-derived dendritic cells as a therapy for T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  3. Differentiation of mouse bone marrow derived stem cells toward microglia-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolzing Alexandra

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microglia, the macrophages of the brain, have been implicated in the causes of neurodegenerative diseases and display a loss of function during aging. Throughout life, microglia are replenished by limited proliferation of resident microglial cells. Replenishment by bone marrow-derived progenitor cells is still under debate. In this context, we investigated the differentiation of mouse microglia from bone marrow (BM stem cells. Furthermore, we looked at the effects of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L, astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM and GM-CSF on the differentiation to microglia-like cells. Methods We assessed in vitro-derived microglia differentiation by marker expression (CD11b/CD45, F4/80, but also for the first time for functional performance (phagocytosis, oxidative burst and in situ migration into living brain tissue. Integration, survival and migration were assessed in organotypic brain slices. Results The cells differentiated from mouse BM show function, markers and morphology of primary microglia and migrate into living brain tissue. Flt3L displays a negative effect on differentiation while GM-CSF enhances differentiation. Conclusion We conclude that in vitro-derived microglia are the phenotypic and functional equivalents to primary microglia and could be used in cell therapy.

  4. Reinnervation of hair cells by neural stem cell-derived neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Yasheng; Wang Yang; Chi Fanglu

    2014-01-01

    Background Replacement of spiral ganglion neurons would be one prioritized step in an attempt to restore sensory neuronal hearing loss.However,the possibility that transplanted neurons could regenerate new synaptic connections to hair cells has not been explored.The objective of this study was to test whether neural stem cell (NSC)-derived neurons can form synaptic connections with hair cells in vitro.Methods NSCs were mechanically separated from the hippocampus in SD rat embryos (E12-E14) and cultured in a serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor.Rat NSCs were co-cultured with explants of cochlea sensory epithelia obtained from postnatal Day 3 rats under transway filter membrane.Results At Day 3,the NSCs began to show chemotactic differentiation and grew toward cochlea sensory epithelia.After 9-day co-culture,neurites of NSC-derived neurons predominantly elongated toward hair cells.Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the fibers overlapped with synapsin and hair cells,indicating the formation of new synaptic connections.After 14-day culture,triple staining revealed the fibers overlapped with PSD95 (postsynaptic density) which is juxtaposed with CtBP2 (presynaptic vesicle),indicating the formation of new ribbon synapse.Conclusions NSC-derived neurons can make synaptic connections with hair cells and provide a model for studying synaptic plasticity and regeneration.Whether the newly forming synapse is functional merits further electrophysiological study.

  5. Norcantharidin, Derivative of Cantharidin, for Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsi Hsieh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs existing in human cancers have been demonstrated to be a major cause of cancer treatment resistance, invasion, metastasis, and relapse. Self-renewal pathways, Wnt/β-catenin, Sonic hedgehog (Shh, and the Notch signaling pathway play critical roles in developing CSCs and lead to angiogenesis, migration, invasion, and metastasis. Multidrug resistance (MDR is an unfavorable factor causing the failure of treatments against cancer cells. The most important and thoroughly studied mechanism involved in MDR is the active efflux of chemotherapeutic agents through membrane drug transporters. There is growing evidence that Norcantharidin (NCTD, a water-soluble synthetic small molecule derivative of naturally occurring cantharidin from the medicinal insect blister beetle (Mylabris phalerata Pallas, is capable of chemoprevention and tumor inhibition. We summarize investigations into the modulation of self-renewal pathways and MDR in CSCs by NCTD. This review may aid in further investigation of using NCTD to develop more effective strategies for cancer treatment to reduce resistance and recurrence.

  6. Reversal of diabetes with insulin-producing cells derived in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Alireza; Bruin, Jennifer E; Arora, Payal; Rubin, Allison; Batushansky, Irina; Asadi, Ali; O'Dwyer, Shannon; Quiskamp, Nina; Mojibian, Majid; Albrecht, Tobias; Yang, Yu Hsuan Carol; Johnson, James D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2014-11-01

    Transplantation of pancreatic progenitors or insulin-secreting cells derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has been proposed as a therapy for diabetes. We describe a seven-stage protocol that efficiently converts hESCs into insulin-producing cells. Stage (S) 7 cells expressed key markers of mature pancreatic beta cells, including MAFA, and displayed glucose-stimulated insulin secretion similar to that of human islets during static incubations in vitro. Additional characterization using single-cell imaging and dynamic glucose stimulation assays revealed similarities but also notable differences between S7 insulin-secreting cells and primary human beta cells. Nevertheless, S7 cells rapidly reversed diabetes in mice within 40 days, roughly four times faster than pancreatic progenitors. Therefore, although S7 cells are not fully equivalent to mature beta cells, their capacity for glucose-responsive insulin secretion and rapid reversal of diabetes in vivo makes them a promising alternative to pancreatic progenitor cells or cadaveric islets for the treatment of diabetes.

  7. In vitro differentiation of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into endothelial-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Lidong; SHI Shuangshuang; PEI Xuetao; LI Shaoqing; WANG Yunfang; YUE Huimin; LIU Daqing; HE Lijuan; BAI Cixian; YAN Fang; NAN Xue

    2006-01-01

    The neovascularization of ischemic tissue is a crucial initial step for the functional rehabilitation and wound healing. However, the short of seed cell candidate for the foundation of vascular network is still a big issue. Human adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADSCs), which possess multilineage potential, are capable of adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. We examined whether this kind of stem cells could differentiate into endothelial-like cells and participate in blood vessel formation, and whether they could be used as an ideal cell source for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic diseases or vascularization of tissue constructs. The results showed that hADSCs, grown under appropriately induced conditions, displayed characteristics similar to those of vessel endothelium. The differentiated cells expressed endothelial cell markers CD34 and vWF, and had high metabolism of acetylated low-density lipoprotein and prostacyclin. In addition, the induced cells were able to form tube-like structures when cultured on matrigel. Our data indicated that induced hADSCs could exhibit characteristics of endothelial cells. Therefore, these cells, as a source of human endothelial cells, may find many applications in such realms as engineering blood vessels, endothelial cell transplantation for myocardial regeneration, and induction of angiogenesis for treatment of regional ischemia.

  8. A robust method to derive functional neural crest cells from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Faith R; Salomonis, Nathan; Sheehan, Alice; Huang, Miller; Park, Jason S; Spindler, Matthew J; Lizarraga, Paweena; Weiss, William A; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells contribute to the development of many complex tissues of all three germ layers during embryogenesis, and its abnormal development accounts for several congenital birth defects. Generating NC cells-including specific subpopulations such as cranial, cardiac, and trunk NC cells-from human pluripotent stem cells will provide a valuable model system to study human development and disease. Here, we describe a rapid and robust NC differentiation method called "LSB-short" that is based on dual SMAD pathway inhibition. This protocol yields high percentages of NC cell populations from multiple human induced pluripotent stem and human embryonic stem cell lines in 8 days. The resulting cells can be propagated easily, retain NC marker expression over multiple passages, and can spontaneously differentiate into several NC-derived cell lineages, including smooth muscle cells, peripheral neurons, and Schwann cells. NC cells generated by this method represent cranial, cardiac and trunk NC subpopulations based on global gene expression analyses, are similar to in vivo analogues, and express a common set of NC alternative isoforms. Functionally, they are also able to migrate appropriately in response to chemoattractants such as SDF-1, FGF8b, and Wnt3a. By yielding NC cells that likely represent all NC subpopulations in a shorter time frame than other published methods, our LSB-short method provides an ideal model system for further studies of human NC development and disease. PMID:23862100

  9. Transfection of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor gene promotes neuronal differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Jie; Gao, Xiaoqing; Deng, Li; Chang, Nengbin; Xiong, Huailin; Zheng, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor recombinant adenovirus vector-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells using inductive medium containing retinoic acid and epidermal growth factor. Cell viability, microtubule-associated protein 2-positive cell ratio, and the expression levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and growth-associated protein-43 protein in the supernatant were significantly hig...

  10. Effects of everolimus on macrophage-derived foam cell behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of everolimus on foam cell (FC) viability, mRNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production to better understand its potential inhibitory effects on atheroma progression. Methods and materials: Human THP1 macrophage-derived FC were formed using acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 μg/mL) for 72 hours, followed by everolimus treatment (10-5–10-11 M) for 24 hours. FC viability was quantified using fluorescent calcein AM/DAPI staining. FC lysates and media supernatants were analyzed for apoptosis and necrosis using a Cell Death ELISAPLUS assay. FC lysates and media supernatants were also analyzed for inflammatory cytokine (IL1β, IL8, MCP1, TNFα) mRNA levels and protein expression using quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and a Procarta® immunoassay, respectively. mRNA levels of autophagy (MAP1LC3), apoptosis (survivin, clusterin), and matrix degradation (MMP1, MMP9) markers were evaluated by Quantigene® Plex assay and verified with QPCR. Additionally, hypercholesterolemic rabbits received everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for 28 or 60 days. RAM-11 immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare %RAM-11 positive area between stented sections and unstented proximal sections. Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Calcein AM/DAPI staining showed that FC exposed to everolimus (10-5 M) had significantly decreased viability compared to control. FC apoptosis was significantly increased at a high dose of everolimus (10-5 M), with no necrotic effects at any dose tested. Everolimus did not affect endothelial (HUVEC) and smooth muscle (HCASMC) cell apoptosis or necrosis. Everolimus (10-5 M) significantly increased MAP1LC3, caused an increased trend in clusterin (p = 0.10), and significantly decreased survivin and MMP1 mRNA levels in FC. MCP1 cytokine mRNA levels and secreted protein expression was significantly decreased by

  11. Effects of everolimus on macrophage-derived foam cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Steven, E-mail: steven.hsu@av.abbott.com [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Koren, Eugen; Chan, Yen; Koscec, Mirna; Sheehy, Alexander [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Kolodgie, Frank; Virmani, Renu [CVPath Institute, Inc., 19 Firstfield Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); Feder, Debra [Abbott Vascular, 3200 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of everolimus on foam cell (FC) viability, mRNA levels, and inflammatory cytokine production to better understand its potential inhibitory effects on atheroma progression. Methods and materials: Human THP1 macrophage-derived FC were formed using acetylated LDL (acLDL, 100 μg/mL) for 72 hours, followed by everolimus treatment (10{sup -5}–10{sup -11} M) for 24 hours. FC viability was quantified using fluorescent calcein AM/DAPI staining. FC lysates and media supernatants were analyzed for apoptosis and necrosis using a Cell Death ELISA{sup PLUS} assay. FC lysates and media supernatants were also analyzed for inflammatory cytokine (IL1β, IL8, MCP1, TNFα) mRNA levels and protein expression using quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) and a Procarta® immunoassay, respectively. mRNA levels of autophagy (MAP1LC3), apoptosis (survivin, clusterin), and matrix degradation (MMP1, MMP9) markers were evaluated by Quantigene® Plex assay and verified with QPCR. Additionally, hypercholesterolemic rabbits received everolimus-eluting stents (EES) for 28 or 60 days. RAM-11 immunohistochemical staining was performed to compare %RAM-11 positive area between stented sections and unstented proximal sections. Statistical significance was calculated using one-way ANOVA (p ≤ 0.05). Results: Calcein AM/DAPI staining showed that FC exposed to everolimus (10{sup -5} M) had significantly decreased viability compared to control. FC apoptosis was significantly increased at a high dose of everolimus (10{sup -5} M), with no necrotic effects at any dose tested. Everolimus did not affect endothelial (HUVEC) and smooth muscle (HCASMC) cell apoptosis or necrosis. Everolimus (10{sup -5} M) significantly increased MAP1LC3, caused an increased trend in clusterin (p = 0.10), and significantly decreased survivin and MMP1 mRNA levels in FC. MCP1 cytokine mRNA levels and secreted protein

  12. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem;

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...... bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106 and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of h...

  13. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  14. Generation of insulin-producing cells from gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ji Hoon; Lee, Sung Ho; Heo, Young Tae [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Sang Jun [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hoon Taek, E-mail: htl3675@konkuk.ac.kr [Department of Animal Biotechnology, Bio-Organ Research Center, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    A major problem in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus is the limited availability of alternative sources of insulin-producing cells for islet transplantation. In this study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) treatments of gnotobiotic porcine skin-derived stem cells (gSDSCs) on their reprogramming and subsequent differentiation into insulin-producing cells (IPCs). We isolated SDSCs from the ear skin of a gnotobiotic pig. During the proliferation period, the cells expressed stem-cell markers Oct-4, Sox-2, and CD90; nestin expression also increased significantly. The cells could differentiate into IPCs after treatments with activin-A, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), and nicotinamide. After 15 days in the differentiation medium, controlled gSDSCs began expressing endocrine progenitor genes and proteins (Ngn3, Neuro-D, PDX-1, NKX2.2, NKX6.1, and insulin). The IPCs showed increased insulin synthesis after glucose stimulation. The results indicate that stem cells derived from the skin of gnotobiotic pigs can differentiate into IPCs under the appropriate conditions in vitro. Our three-stage induction protocol could be applied without genetic modification to source IPCs from stem cells in the skin of patients with diabetes for autologous transplantation.

  15. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor influences proliferation of osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Zoe; Cooper, Paul R; Scheven, Ben A

    2012-02-01

    Little is known about the role of neurotrophic growth factors in bone metabolism. This study investigated the short-term effects of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on calvarial-derived MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. MC3T3-E1 expressed GDNF as well as its canonical receptors, GFRα1 and RET. Addition of recombinant GDNF to cultures in serum-containing medium modestly inhibited cell growth at high concentrations; however, under serum-free culture conditions GDNF dose-dependently increased cell proliferation. GDNF effects on cell growth were inversely correlated with its effect on alkaline phosphatase (AlP) activity showing a significant dose-dependent inhibition of relative AlP activity with increasing concentrations of GDNF in serum-free culture medium. Live/dead and lactate dehydrogenase assays demonstrated that GDNF did not significantly affect cell death or survival under serum-containing and serum-free conditions. The effect of GDNF on cell growth was abolished in the presence of inhibitors to GFRα1 and RET indicating that GDNF stimulated calvarial osteoblasts via its canonical receptors. Finally, this study found that GDNF synergistically increased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated MC3T3-E1 cell growth suggesting that GDNF interacted with TNF-α-induced signaling in osteoblastic cells. In conclusion, this study provides evidence for a direct, receptor-mediated effect of GDNF on osteoblasts highlighting a novel role for GDNF in bone physiology.

  16. Derivation of Corneal Keratocyte-Like Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Richard W.; McGhee, Charles N. J.; Cowan, Chad A.; Davidson, Alan J.; Holm, Teresa M.; Sherwin, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Corneal diseases such as keratoconus represent a relatively common disorder in the human population. However, treatment is restricted to corneal transplantation, which only occurs in the most advanced cases. Cell based therapies may offer an alternative approach given that the eye is amenable to such treatments and corneal diseases like keratoconus have been associated specifically with the death of corneal keratocytes. The ability to generate corneal keratocytes in vitro may enable a cell-based therapy to treat patients with keratoconus. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) offer an abundant supply of cells from which any cell in the body can be derived. In the present study, hiPSCs were successfully differentiated into neural crest cells (NCCs), the embryonic precursor to keratocytes, and then cultured on cadaveric corneal tissue to promote keratocyte differentiation. The hiPSC-derived NCCs were found to migrate into the corneal stroma where they acquired a keratocyte-like morphology and an expression profile similar to corneal keratocytes in vivo. These results indicate that hiPSCs can be used to generate corneal keratocytes in vitro and lay the foundation for using these cells in cornea cell-based therapies. PMID:27792791

  17. Telomere shortening and cell senescence induced by perylene derivatives in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taka, Thanachai; Huang, Liming; Wongnoppavich, Ariyaphong; Tam-Chang, Suk-Wah; Lee, T Randall; Tuntiwechapikul, Wirote

    2013-02-15

    Cancer cells evade replicative senescence by re-expressing telomerase, which maintains telomere length and hence chromosomal integrity. Telomerase inhibition would lead cancer cells to senesce and therefore prevent cancer cells from growing indefinitely. G-quadruplex ligands can attenuate telomerase activity by inducing G-quadruplex formation at the 3'-overhang of telomere and at the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter; the former prevents telomerase from accessing the telomere, and the latter acts as a transcriptional silencer. The present investigation found that perylene derivatives PM2 and PIPER induced G-quadruplex formation from both telomeric DNA and the hTERT promoter region in vitro. Further, TRAP assay showed that these compounds inhibited telomerase in a dose-dependent manner. When A549 human lung cancer cells were treated with these compounds, hTERT expression was down-regulated. Moreover, the crude protein extract from these treated cells exhibited less telomerase activity. In the long-term treatment of A549 lung cancer cells with sub-cytotoxic dose of these perylenes, telomere shortening, reduction of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and cell senescence were observed. The results of this study indicate that perylene derivatives warrant further consideration as effective agents for cancer therapy.

  18. Colloidal Properties of Nanoerythrosomes Derived from Bovine Red Blood Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Hoang, Dao; Bentley, William E; D'Souza, Warren D; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-12

    Liposomes are nanoscale containers that are typically synthesized from lipids using a high-shear process such as extrusion or sonication. While liposomes are extensively used in drug delivery, they do suffer from certain problems including limited colloidal stability and short circulation times in the body. As an alternative to liposomes, we explore a class of container structures derived from erythrocytes (red blood cells). The procedure involves emptying the inner contents of these cells (specifically hemoglobin) and resuspending the empty structures in buffer, followed by sonication. The resulting structures are termed nanoerythrosomes (NERs), i.e., they are membrane-covered nanoscale containers, much like liposomes. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are employed for the first time to study these NERs. The results reveal that the NERs are discrete spheres (∼110 nm diameter) with a unilamellar membrane of thickness ∼4.5 nm. Remarkably, the biconcave disc-like shape of erythrocytes is also exhibited by the NERs under hypertonic conditions. Moreover, unlike typical liposomes, NERs show excellent colloidal stability in both buffer as well as in serum at room temperature, and are also able to withstand freeze-thaw cycling. We have explored the potential for using NERs as colloidal vehicles for targeted delivery. Much like conventional liposomes, NER membranes can be decorated with fluorescent or other markers, solutes can be encapsulated in the cores of the NERs, and NERs can be targeted to specifically bind to mammalian cells. Our study shows that NERs are a promising and versatile class of nanostructures. NERs that are harvested from a patient's own blood and reconfigured for nanomedicine can potentially offer several benefits including biocompatibility, minimization of immune response, and extended circulation time in the body. PMID:26684218

  19. Procedures for Derivation and Characterisation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells from Odense, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harkness, Linda; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    In 1998, a development occurred in stem cell biology with the fi rst report of the derivation of a human embryonic stem cell (hESC) line. Since then a number of techniques have been used to derive and characterise hESCs. Here, we describe the derivation methods used by our laboratory for isolation...

  20. Donor lung derived myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells differentially regulate T cell proliferation and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benson Heather L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct allorecognition, i.e., donor lung-derived dendritic cells (DCs stimulating recipient-derived T lymphocytes, is believed to be the key mechanism of lung allograft rejection. Myeloid (cDCs and plasmacytoid (pDCs are believed to have differential effects on T cell activation. However, the roles of each DC type on T cell activation and rejection pathology post lung transplantation are unknown. Methods Using transgenic mice and antibody depletion techniques, either or both cell types were depleted in lungs of donor BALB/c mice (H-2d prior to transplanting into C57BL/6 mice (H-2b, followed by an assessment of rejection pathology, and pDC or cDC-induced proliferation and cytokine production in C57BL/6-derived mediastinal lymph node T cells (CD3+. Results Depleting either DC type had modest effect on rejection pathology and T cell proliferation. In contrast, T cells from mice that received grafts depleted of both DCs did not proliferate and this was associated with significantly reduced acute rejection scores compared to all other groups. cDCs were potent inducers of IFNγ, whereas both cDCs and pDCs induced IL-10. Both cell types had variable effects on IL-17A production. Conclusion Collectively, the data show that direct allorecognition by donor lung pDCs and cDCs have differential effects on T cell proliferation and cytokine production. Depletion of both donor lung cDC and pDC could prevent the severity of acute rejection episodes.

  1. 胶质瘤干细胞对替莫唑胺敏感性的研究%Analysis of the sensitivity of glioma stem cells to temozolomide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赛克; WANG Shu-zhen; Popoff S; Yung WK; Colman H; 陈忠平

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the sensitivity of glioma stem cells (GSC) to temozolomide (TMZ).MethodsFive GSC lines were successfully established from fresh glioma tissues.Immunofluoresence was employed to detect the expression of CD133 in undifferentiated GSC and glial fibriUary acid protein (GFAP) in differentiated GSC.The sensitivity of GSC was determined by using MTS.The percentage of CD133-positive cells was measured with flow cytometry.The methylation of MGMT promoter region in GSC was determined by using fluorescent methylation specific PCR (F-MSP).Western blotting was used to determine the protein level of PTEN in GSC.Results (1) The 5 established GSC lines demonstrated characteristics of cancer stem cells.(2) GSC lines were generally resistant to TMZ.The IC50 of TMZ was 22.3 μmol/L for T509,286.3 μmol/L for T411,and more than 1000 μmol/L for T402,T405 and T511,respectively.(3) GSC lines with more than 10% CD133-positive cells were more resistant to TMZ.(4) GSC lines with unmethylated MGMT promoter region were resistant or intermediately sensitive to TMZ.(5) The protein level of PTEN was different in the 5 GSC lines.No relationship between PTEN level and TMZ sensitivity was found.Conclusion A majority of GSC is resistant to TMZ,which is associated with the methylation status of MGMT promoter and CD133-positive cell population.%目的 探讨胶质瘤干细胞(GSC)对替莫唑胺(TMZ)的敏感性及耐药机制.方法 新鲜多形性胶质母细胞瘤(GBM)标本培养后获得GSC.免疫荧光技术榆测未分化GSC的CD133及分化生长GSC的GFAP的表达,MTS法检测对替莫唑胺的敏感性,流式细胞技术对CD133阳性细胞的比例进行定量,荧光标记的甲基化特异性PCR分析MGMT启动子区域的甲基化状态,Western blot检测抑癌基因PTEN的表达.结果 (1)5例GBM标本中成功获得GSC,符合肿瘤下细胞定义.(2)5个GSC细胞株多数对TMZ不敏感.其中,T509的半数抑制浓度(IC50)为22.3 μmol/L(敏感),T411的IC50

  2. A modified method of insulin producing cells' generation from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czubak, Paweł; Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek; Putowski, Lechosław

    2014-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a result of autoimmune destruction of pancreatic insulin producing β-cells and so far it can be cured only by insulin injection, by pancreas transplantation, or by pancreatic islet cells' transplantation. The methods are, however, imperfect and have a lot of disadvantages. Therefore new solutions are needed. The best one would be the use of differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we investigated the potential of the bone marrow-derived MSCs line for in vitro differentiation into insulin producing cells (IPSs). We applied an 18-day protocol to differentiate MSCs. Differentiating cells formed cell clusters some of which resembled pancreatic islet-like cells. Using dithizone we confirmed the presence of insulin in the cells. What is more, the expression of proinsulin C-peptide in differentiated IPCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. For the first time, we investigated the influence of growth factors' concentration on IPCs differentiation efficiency. We have found that an increase in the concentration of growth factors up to 60 ng/mL of β-FGF/EGF and 30 ng/mL of activin A/β-cellulin increases the percentage of IPCs. Further increase of growth factors does not show any increase of the percentage of differentiated cells. Our findings suggest that the presented protocol can be adapted for differentiation of insulin producing cells from stem cells. PMID:25405207

  3. Tiliroside-derivatives enhance GLUT4 translocation via AMPK in muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lihuan; Qin, Nan; Hu, Lijuan; Liu, Linjuan; Duan, Hongquan; Niu, Wenyan

    2011-05-01

    Tiliroside isolated from Chinese herb Potentilla chinensis showed therapeutic activities in diabetes. We synthesized 7 tiliroside-derivatives and examined their effects on surface GLUT4myc levels in muscle cells. Derivatives 2a and 3 increased surface GLUT4myc levels, and derivative 3 has the greatest potential. AMPK may be involved in tiliroside-derivatives-regulated GLUT4myc traffic.

  4. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells for chronic myocardial ischemia (MyStromalCell Trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas Ali; Haack-Sørensen, Mandana; Mathiasen, Anders Bruun;

    2012-01-01

    for regenerative therapy to replace injured tissue by creating new blood vessels and cardiomyocytes in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease. The aim of this special report is to review the present preclinical data leading to clinical stem cell therapy using ADSCs in patients with ischemic heart disease....... In addition, we give an introduction to the first-in-man clinical trial, MyStromalCell Trial, which is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using culture-expanded ADSCs obtained from adipose-derived cells from abdominal adipose tissue and stimulated with VEGF-A(165) the week...

  5. Analysis of cell growth and gene expression of porcine adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as nuclear donor cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Ju; Park, Jung Eun; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Min Jung; Kim, Geon A; Rhee, Sang Ho; Lim, Sang Hyun; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2014-12-01

    In several laboratory animals and humans, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASC) are of considerable interest because they are easy to harvest and can generate a huge proliferation of cells from a small quantity of fat. In this study, we investigated: (i) the expression patterns of reprogramming-related genes in porcine ASC; and (ii) whether ASC can be a suitable donor cell type for generating cloned pigs. For these experiments, ASC, adult skin fibroblasts (AF) and fetal fibroblasts (FF) were derived from a 4-year-old female miniature pig. The ASC expressed cell-surface markers characteristic of stem cells, and underwent in vitro differentiation when exposed to specific differentiation-inducing conditions. Expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)1 in ASC was similar to that in AF, but the highest expression of the DNMT3B gene was observed in ASC. The expression of OCT4 was significantly higher in FF and ASC than in AF (P development rate of cloned embryos derived from ASC was comparable to the development of those derived using FF. Total cell numbers of blastocysts derived using ASC and FF were significantly higher than in embryos made with AF. The results demonstrated that ASC used for SCNT have a potential comparable to those of AF and FF in terms of embryo in vitro development and blastocyst formation.

  6. Human Intestinal Tissue with Adult Stem Cell Properties Derived from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Forster

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have been proposed as a source for transplantation therapies and are rapidly becoming valuable tools for human disease modeling. However, many applications are limited due to the lack of robust differentiation paradigms that allow for the isolation of defined functional tissues. Here, using an endogenous LGR5-GFP reporter, we derived adult stem cells from hPSCs that gave rise to functional human intestinal tissue comprising all major cell types of the intestine. Histological and functional analyses revealed that such human organoid cultures could be derived with high purity and with a composition and morphology similar to those of cultures obtained from human biopsies. Importantly, hPSC-derived organoids responded to the canonical signaling pathways that control self-renewal and differentiation in the adult human intestinal stem cell compartment. This adult stem cell system provides a platform for studying human intestinal disease in vitro using genetically engineered hPSCs.

  7. Variability of Action Potentials Within and Among Cardiac Cell Clusters Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Renjun; Millrod, Michal A; Zambidis, Elias T; Tung, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological variability in cardiomyocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells continues to be an impediment for their scientific and translational applications. We studied the variability of action potentials (APs) recorded from clusters of human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) using high-resolution optical mapping. Over 23,000 APs were analyzed through four parameters: APD30, APD80, triangulation and fractional repolarization. Although measures were taken to reduce variability due to cell culture conditions and rate-dependency of APs, we still observed significant variability in APs among and within the clusters. However, similar APs were found in spatial locations with close proximity, and in some clusters formed distinct regions having different AP characteristics that were reflected as separate peaks in the AP parameter distributions, suggesting multiple electrophysiological phenotypes. Using a recently developed automated method to group cells based on their entire AP shape, we identified distinct regions of different phenotypes within single clusters and common phenotypes across different clusters when separating APs into 2 or 3 subpopulations. The systematic analysis of the heterogeneity and potential phenotypes of large populations of hESC-CMs can be used to evaluate strategies to improve the quality of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications and in drug screening. PMID:26729331

  8. Flk1+ and VE-cadherin+ endothelial cells derived from iPSCs recapitulates vascular development during differentiation and display similar angiogenic potential as ESC-derived cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Kohler

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have emerged as a source of potentially unlimited supply of autologous endothelial cells (ECs for vascularization. However, the regenerative function of these cells relative to adult ECs and ECs derived from embryonic stem (ES cells is unknown. The objective was to define the differentiation characteristics and vascularization potential of Fetal liver kinase (Flk1(+ and Vascular Endothelial (VE-cadherin(+ ECs derived identically from mouse (mES and miPS cells. METHODS AND RESULTS: Naive mES and miPS cells cultured in type IV collagen (IV Col in defined media for 5 days induced the formation of adherent cell populations, which demonstrated similar expression of Flk1 and VE-cadherin and the emergence of EC progenies. FACS purification resulted in 100% Flk1(+ VE-cadherin(+ cells from both mES and miPS cells. Emergence of Flk1(+VE-cadherin(+ cells entailed expression of the vascular developmental transcription factor Er71, which bound identically to Flk1, VE-cadherin, and CD31 promoters in both populations. Immunostaining with anti-VE-cadherin and anti-CD31 antibodies and microscopy demonstrated the endothelial nature of these cells. Each cell population (unlike mature ECs organized into well-developed vascular structures in vitro and incorporated into CD31(+ neovessels in matrigel plugs implanted in nude mice in vivo. CONCLUSION: Thus, iPS cell-derived Flk1(+VE-cadherin(+ cells expressing the Er71 are as angiogenic as mES cell-derived cells and incorporate into CD31(+ neovessels. Their vessel forming capacity highlights the potential of autologous iPS cells-derived EC progeny for therapeutic angiogenesis.

  9. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-[2-3H]mannose or L-[5,6-3H]fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with [2-3H]mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with [2-3H]mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-[1,6-3H]glucosamine and L-[1-14C]fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced 3H-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine

  10. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy.

  11. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. PMID:22683799

  12. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Li; Wei Zhao; Wei Liu; Ye Zhou; Jingqiao Jia; Lifeng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the ifeld of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the resto-ration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury.

  13. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  14. Elements of a neural stem cell niche derived from embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierret, Chris; Spears, Kathleen; Morrison, Jason A; Maruniak, Joel A; Katz, Martin L; Kirk, Mark D

    2007-12-01

    Recent studies show that adult neural tissues can harbor stem cells within unique niches. In the mammalian central nervous system, neural stem cell (NSC) niches have been identified in the dentate gyrus and the subventricular zone (SVZ). Stem cells in the well-characterized SVZ exist in a microenvironment established by surrounding cells and tissue components, including transit-amplifying cells, neuroblasts, ependymal cells, blood vessels, and a basal lamina. Within this microenvironment, stem cell properties, including proliferation and differentiation, are maintained. Current NSC culture techniques often include the addition of molecular components found within the in vivo niche, such as mitogenic growth factors. Some protocols use bio-scaffolds to mimic the physical growth environment of living tissue. We describe a novel NSC culture system, derived from embryonic stem (ES) cells, that displays elements of an NSC niche in the absence of exogenously applied mitogens or complex physical scaffolding. Mouse ES cells were neuralized with retinoic acid and plated on an entactin-collagen-laminin-coated glass surface at high density (250,000 cells/cm(2)). Six to eight days after plating, complex multicellular structures consisting of heterogeneous cell types developed spontaneously. NSC and progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation continued within these structures. The identity of cellular and molecular components within the cultures was documented using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and neurosphere-forming assays. We show that ES cells can be induced to form structures that exhibit key properties of a developing NSC niche. We believe this system can serve as a useful model for studies of neurogenesis and stem cell maintenance in the NSC niche as well as for applications in stem cell transplantation.

  15. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yingbin [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Cai, Shaoxi, E-mail: sxcai@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Li [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Yu, Shuhui [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Library of Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Jiang, Jiahuan; Yan, Xiaoqing [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhang, Haoxing [School of Life Science, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Liu, Lan [Department of Laboratory of Medicine, Children' s Hospital of Chongqin Medical University, Chongqing 400014 (China); Liu, Qun [College of Life Science and Technology, Southwest University for Nationalities, Chengdu 610041 (China); Du, Jun [Center of Microbiology, Biochemistry, and Pharmacology, School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Cai, Shaohui [College of Pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Sung, K.L. Paul [Key Laboratory of Biorheological Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery and Bioengineering, University of California, SD 0412 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  16. Targeting eradication of malignant cells derived from human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (hBMSC) have been shown to participate in malignant transformation. However, hampered by the low frequency of malignant transformation of hBMSC, we do not yet know how to prevent malignant transformation of implanted hBMSC. In this study, in order to establish a model for the eradication of hBMSC-derived malignant cells, a gene fusion consisting of a human telomerase (hTERT) promoter modified with both c-Myc and myeloid zinc finger protein2 (MZF-2) binding elements and followed by the E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD) and luciferase genes was stably transferred into hBMSC via lentiviral transduction; n-phosphonacelyl-L-aspartic acid (PALA) selection was used to generate malignant cell colonies derived from transduced hBMSC after treatment with the carcinogenic reagent BPDE. Cells that were amplified after PALA selection were used for transplantation and 5-FC pro-drug cytotoxicity tests. The results showed that PALA-resistant malignant cells could be generated from hBMSC co-induced with lentiviral transduction and treatment with Benzo(a)pyrene Diol Epoxide (BPDE); the modification of c-Myc and MZF-2 binding elements could remarkably enhance the transcriptional activities of the hTERT promoter in malignant cells, whereas transcriptional activity was depressed in normal hBMSC; malignant cells stably expressing CD under the control of the modified hTERT promoter could be eliminated by 5-FC administration. This study has provided a method for targeted eradication of malignant cells derived from hBMSC.

  17. Human Adipose Derived Stem Cells Induced Cell Apoptosis and S Phase Arrest in Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of human adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs on the viability and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells. EJ and T24 cells were cocultured with ADSCs or cultured with conditioned medium of ADSCs (ADSC-CM, respectively. The cell counting and colony formation assay showed ADSCs inhibited the proliferation of EJ and T24 cells. Cell viability assessment revealed that the secretions of ADSCs, in the form of conditioned medium, were able to decrease cancer cell viability. Wound-healing assay suggested ADSC-CM suppressed migration of T24 and EJ cells. Moreover, the results of the flow cytometry indicated that ADSC-CM was capable of inducing apoptosis of T24 cells and inducing S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot revealed ADSC-CM increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP, indicating that ADSC-CM induced apoptosis in a caspase-dependent way. PTEN/PI3K/Akt pathway and Bcl-2 family proteins were involved in the mechanism of this reaction. Our study indicated that ADSCs may provide a promising and practicable manner for bladder tumor therapy.

  18. In vitro formation of β cell pseudoislets using islet-derived endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Spelios

    Full Text Available β cell pseudoislets (PIs are used for the in vitro study of β-cells in a three-dimensional (3-D configuration. Current methods of PI induction require unique culture conditions and extensive mechanical manipulations. Here we report a novel co-culture system consisting of high passage β-cells and islet-derived endothelial cells (iECs that results in a rapid and spontaneous formation of free-floating PIs. PI structures were formed as early as 72 h following co-culture setup and were preserved for more than 14 d. These PIs, composed solely of β-cells, were similar in size to that of native islets and showed an increased percentage of proinsulin-positive cells, increased insulin gene expression in response to glucose stimulation, and restored glucose-stimulated insulin secretion when compared to β-cells cultured as monolayers. Key extracellular matrix proteins that were absent in β-cells cultured alone were deposited by iECs on PIs and were found in and around the PIs. iEC-induced PIs are a readily available tool for examining β cell function in a native 3-D configuration and can be used for examining β-cell/iEC interactions in vitro.

  19. Tip cell-derived RTK signaling initiates cell movements in the Drosophila stomatogastric nervous system anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaitán, M; Jäckle, H

    2000-10-01

    The stomatogastric nervous system (SNS) of Drosophila is a simply organized neural circuitry that innervates the anterior enteric system. Unlike the central and the peripheral nervous systems, the SNS derives from a compact epithelial anlage in which three invagination centers, each giving rise to an invagination fold headed by a tip cell, are generated. Tip cell selection involves lateral inhibition, a process in which Wingless (Wg) activity adjusts the range of Notch signaling. Here we show that RTK signaling mediated by the Drosophila homolog of the epidermal growth factor receptor, DER, plays a key role in two consecutive steps during early SNS development. Like Wg, DER signaling participates in adjusting the range of Notch-dependent lateral inhibition during tip cell selection. Subsequently, tip cells secrete the DER ligand Spitz and trigger local RTK signaling, which initiates morphogenetic movements resulting in the tip cell-directed invaginations within the SNS anlage.

  20. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new host cell in latent leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdiyev, Adil M; Bagirova, Melahat; Elcicek, Serhat; Koc, Rabia Cakir; Baydar, Serap Yesilkir; Findikli, Necati; Oztel, Olga N

    2011-09-01

    Some protozoan infections such as Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Plasmodium can be transmitted through stem cell transplantations. To our knowledge, so far, there is no study about transmission of Leishmania parasites in stem cell transplantation and interactions between parasites and stem cells in vitro. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between different species of Leishmania parasites and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs). ADMSCs have been isolated, cultured, characterized, and infected with different species of Leishmania parasites (L. donovani, L. major, L. tropica, and L. infantum). Infectivity was examined by Giemsa staining, microculture, and polymerase chain reaction methods. As a result, infectivity of ADMSCs by Leishmania parasites has been determined for the first time in this study. According to our findings, it is very important that donors are screened for Leishmania parasites before stem cell transplantations in regions where leishmaniasis is endemic. PMID:21896818

  1. All-trans retinoic acid promotes smooth muscle cell differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells*

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Zhong-yuan; Ying LI; Zhao, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells are multipotent stem cells, an attractive resource for regenerative medicine. Accumulating evidence suggests that all-trans retinoic acid plays a key role in the development and differentiation of smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we demonstrate, for the first time, that rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into smooth muscle cells upon the treatment with all-trans retinoic acid. All-trans retinoic acid increased t...

  2. Functional Differences in Engineered Myocardium from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived versus Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feinberg, Adam W.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; van der Meer, Peter; Sheehy, Sean P.; Domian, Ibrahim; Chien, Kenneth R.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes represent unique tools for cell-and tissue-based regenerative therapies, drug discovery and safety, and studies of fundamental heart-failure mechanisms. However, the degree to which stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes compare to mature cardiomyocytes is often debated. W

  3. ES cells derived from cloned embryos in monkey - a jump toward human therapeutic cloning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangzhong Yang; Sadie L Smith

    2007-01-01

    @@ Therapeutic cloning refers to the derivation of embryonic stem cells (ntESC) from embryos derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) also known as cloning. Cloning involves transplanting a differentiated cell into an oocyte that has had its nucleus (DNA) removed.

  4. Sphingosylphosphorylcholine stimulates human monocyte-derived dendritic cell chemotaxis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ha-young LEE; Eun-ha SHIN; Yoe-sik BAE

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) on human monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) chemotaxis. Methods: Human DC were generated from peripheral blood monocytes by culturing them with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and interleukin-4. The effect of SPC on the DC chemotactic migration was measured by chemotaxis assay. Intracellular signaling event involved in the SPC-induced DC chemotaxis was investigated with several inhibitors for specific kinase. The expression of the SPC receptors was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results: We found that SPC induced chemotactic migration in immature DC (iDC) and mature DC (mDC). In terms of SPC-induced signaling events, mitogen activated protein kinase activation and Akt activation in iDC and mDC were stimulated. SPC-induced chemotaxis was mediated by extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and phosphoino-sitide-3-kinase, but not by calcium in both iDC and mDC. Although mDC express ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1, but not G protein-coupled receptor 4, iDC do not express any of these receptors. To examine the involvement of sphin-gosine-1-phosphate (SIP) receptors, we checked the effect of an SIP receptor antagonist (VPC23019) on SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. VPC23019 did not affect SPC-induced DC chemotaxis. Conclusion: The results suggest that SPC may play a role in regulating DC trafficking during phagocytosis and the T cell-stimulating phase, and the unique SPC receptor, which is different from SIP receptors, is involved in SPC-induced chemotaxis.

  5. Blastema from rabbit ear contains progenitor cells comparable to marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadreza Baghaban Eslaminejad

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits have the capacity to regenerate holes in their ears by forming a blastema, a tissue that is made up of a group of undifferentiated cells. The purpose of the present study was to isolate and characterize blastema progenitor cells and compare them with marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. Five New Zealand white male rabbits were used in the present study. A 2-mm hole was created in the animal ears. After 4 days, the blastema ring formed in the periphery of the hole was removed and cultivated. The cells were expanded through several subcultures and compared with the MSCs derived from the marrow of same animal in terms of in vitro differentiation capacity, growth kinetics and culture requirements for optimal proliferation. The primary cultures from both cells tended to be heterogeneous. Fibroblastic cells became progressively dominant with advancing passages. Similar to MSCs blastema passaged-3 cells succeeded to differentiate into bone, cartilage and adipose cell lineages. Even lineage specific genes tended to express in higher level in blastema cells compared to MSCs (p < 0.05. Moreover blastema cells appeared more proliferative; producing more colonies (p < 0.05. While blastema cells showed extensive proliferation in 15% fetal bovine serum (FBS, MSCs displayed higher expansion rate at 10% FBS. In conclusion, blastema from rabbit ear contains a population of fibroblastic cells much similar in characteristic to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the two cells were different in the level of lineage-specific gene expression, the growth curve characteristics and the culture requirements.

  6. Derivation and characterization of human embryonic stem cells on human amnion epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Dongmei; Wang, Yongwei; Sun, Jian; Chen, Yifei; Li, Ting; Wu, Yi; Guo, Lihe; Wei, Chunsheng

    2015-05-07

    Culture conditions that support the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have already been established using primary human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs) as an alternative to traditional mitotically inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In the present work, inner cell masses (ICM) were isolated from frozen embryos obtained as donations from couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and four new hESC lines were derived using hAECs as feeder cells. This feeder system was able to support continuous growth of what were, according to their domed shape and markers, undifferentiated naïve-like hESCs. Their pluripotent potential were also demonstrated by embryoid bodies developing to the expected three germ layers in vitro and the productions of teratoma in vivo. The cell lines retained their karyotypic integrity for over 35 passages. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that these newly derived hESCs consisted mostly of undifferentiated cells with large nuclei and scanty cytoplasm. The new hESCs cultured on hAECs showed distinct undifferentiated characteristics in comparison to hESCs of the same passage maintained on MEFs. This type of optimized culture system may provide a useful platform for establishing clinical-grade hESCs and assessing the undifferentiated potential of hESCs.

  7. Comparative evaluation of cancer stem cell markers in normal pancreas and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizio, Barbara; Mauri, Francesco A; Prati, Adriana; Trivedi, Pritesh; Giacobino, Alice; Novarino, Anna; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Ciuffreda, Libero; Camandona, Michele; Gasparri, Guido; Bellone, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Chemoresistance and self-renewal of cancer stem cells (CSC), found in many tumors including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), are believed to underlie tumor mass regrowth. The distribution of cells carrying the putative stem-cell markers CD133, Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1 and 2, ABCG2 and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH1) was assessed immunohistochemically using PDAC and normal pancreas tissue microarrays. The immunoreactivity was semi-quantitatively graded against the normal pancreas and was correlated with the differentiation grade and disease stage. No statistical significant differences were found between normal pancreas and PDAC in the expression of Nestin, Notch1, 3 and 4, ABCG2 or ALDH1. Notch2 and Jagged1 and 2 expression were increased in PDAC. CD133-positive cells were above-normal in PDAC, but the difference was not statistically significant. Nestin, Notch1-4, Jagged1, ABCG2 and ALDH1 immunostaining scores were not correlated with tumor grade or disease stage. CD133 and Notch2 expression was significantly inversely correlated with tumor grade, but not disease stage. Notch3 immunostaining positively correlated with tumor stage, but not with differentiation grade. Jagged2 protein expression correlated inversely with disease stage, but not with tumor grade. From the clinical standpoint, improved delineation of the tumor CSC signature, putatively responsible for tumor initiation and recurrence after initial response to chemotherapy, may offer novel therapeutic targets for this highly lethal cancer.

  8. DNA Damage in Inflammation-Related Carcinogenesis and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiho Ohnishi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection and chronic inflammation have been recognized as important factors for carcinogenesis. Under inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS are generated from inflammatory and epithelial cells and result in oxidative and nitrative DNA damage, such as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG and 8-nitroguanine. The DNA damage can cause mutations and has been implicated in the initiation and/or promotion of inflammation-mediated carcinogenesis. It has been estimated that various infectious agents are carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 1, including parasites (Schistosoma haematobium (SH and Opisthorchis viverrini (OV, viruses (hepatitis C virus (HCV, human papillomavirus (HPV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, and bacterium Helicobacter pylori (HP. SH, OV, HCV, HPV, EBV, and HP are important risk factors for bladder cancer, cholangiocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, cervical cancer, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and gastric cancer, respectively. We demonstrated that 8-nitroguanine was strongly formed via inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression at these cancer sites of patients. Moreover, 8-nitroguanine was formed in Oct3/4-positive stem cells in SH-associated bladder cancer tissues and in Oct3/4- and CD133-positive stem cells in OV-associated cholangiocarcinoma tissues. Therefore, it is considered that oxidative and nitrative DNA damage in stem cells may play a key role in inflammation-related carcinogenesis.

  9. Neural differentiation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells following neural cell co-culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nailong Yang; Hongyan Zhang; Xiaojuan Sun; Lili Xu

    2011-01-01

    We induced human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hPMSCs) to differentiate into neural cells by adding chemical reagents,despite the fact that toxic chemicals induce cell shrinkage or cytoskeletal formation,which does not represent a proper cell differentiation process.The present study established a co-culture system with hPMSCs and neural cells and analyzed the influence of neural cells on hPMSC differentiation in a co-culture system.hPMSCs were isolated and purified from human full-term placenta using collagenase digestion.Fetal neural cells were co-cultured with hPMSCs for 48 hours using the Transwell co-culture system.hPMSCs co-cultured with neural cells exhibited a slender morphology with a filament.After 96 hours,hPMSCs expressed neuron-specific enolase,which suggested that co-culture of hPMSCs and neural cells induced neural differentiation of hPMSCs.

  10. Ultrastructure of neuronal-like cells differentiated from adult adipose-derived stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changqing Ye; Xiaodong Yuan; Hui Liu; Yanan Cai; Ya Ou

    2010-01-01

    β-mercaptoethanol induces in vitro adult adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) to differentiate into neurons. However, the ultrastructural features of the differentiated neuronal-like cells remain unknown. In the present study, inverted phase contrast microscopy was utilized to observe β-mercaptcethanol-induced differentiation of neuronal-like cells from human ADSCs, and immunocytochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction were employed to detect expression of a neural stem cells marker (nestin), a neuronal marker (neuron-specific enolase), and a glial marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein). In addition, ultrastructure of neuronal-like cells was observed by transmission election microscopy. Results revealed highest expression rate of nestin and neuron-specific enolase at 3 and 5 hours following induced differentiation; cells in the 5-hour induction group exhibited a neuronal-specific structure, i.e., Nissl bodies. However, when induction solution was replaced by complete culture medium after 8-hour induction, the differentiated cells reverted to the fibroblast-like morphology from day 1. These results demonstrate that β-mercaptoethanol-induced ADSCs induced differentiation into neural stem cells, followed by morphology of neuronal-like cells. However, this differentiation state was not stable.

  11. Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ru Dai; Zongjie Wang; Roya Samanipour; Kyo-in Koo; Keekyoung Kim

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a mesenchymal stem cell source with properties of self-renewal and multipotential differentiation. Compared to bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), ASCs can be derived from more sources and are harvested more easily. Three-dimensional (3D) tissue engineering scaffolds are better able to mimic the in vivo cellular microenvironment, which benefits the localization, attachment, proliferation, and differentiation of ASCs. Therefore, tissue-engineered ASCs ...

  12. Meet the inlaws: Embryonic stem cell derivatives meet the immune system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William B Tabayoyong; Nicholas Zavazava

    2009-01-01

    @@ Since the derivation of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines from human blasto-cysts in 1998 [1], ES cells have emerged as a potential source of cells and tissues that could be used for cell replacement therapy of incurable degenerative diseases. This is due to their remarkable pluripotency, which enables them to differentiate into any adult cell type of the three embryonal germ layers.

  13. Derivation of Lung Epithelium from Human Cord Blood–derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sueblinvong, Viranuj; Loi, Roberto; Eisenhauer, Philip L.; Bernstein, Ira M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Recent studies have suggested that both embryonic stem cells and adult bone marrow stem cells can participate in the regeneration and repair of diseased adult organs, including the lungs. However, the extent of airway epithelial remodeling with adult marrow stem cells is low, and there are no available in vivo data with embryonic stem cells. Human umbilical cord blood contains both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stem cells, which have been used clinically as an alternative to b...

  14. Extravillous trophoblast cells-derived exosomes promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

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    Carlos eSalomon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs migration is a critical process during human uterine spiral artery (SpA remodeling and a successful pregnancy. Extravillous trophoblast cells (EVT interact with VSMC and enhance their migration, however, the mechanisms by which EVT remodel SpA remain to be fully elucidated. We hypothesize that exosomes released from EVT promote VSMC migration.Methods: JEG-3 and HTR-8/SVneo cell lines were used as models for EVT. Cells were cultured at 37 0C and humidified under an atmosphere of 5% CO2-balanced N2 to obtain 8% O2. Cell-conditioned media were collected and exosomes (exo-JEG-3 and exo- HTR-8/SVneo isolated by differential and buoyant density centrifugation. The effects of exo-EVT on VSMC migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte™. Exosomal proteins where identified by mass spectrometry and submitted to bioinformatic pathway analysis (Ingenuity software .Results: HTR-8/SVneo cells were significantly more (~30% invasive than JEG-3 cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells released 2.6-fold more exosomes (6.39 x 108 ± 2.5 x108 particles/106 cells compared to JEG-3 (2.86 x 108 ± 0.78 x108 particles/106 cells. VSMC migration was significantly increased in the presence of exo-JEG-3 and exo-HTR-8/SVneo compared to control (-exosomes (21.83 ± 0.49 h and 15.57 ± 0.32, respectively, versus control 25.09 ± 0.58 h, p<0.05. Sonication completely abolished the effect of exosomes on VSMC migration. Finally, mass spectrometry analysis identified unique exosomal proteins for each EVT cell line-derived exosomes.Conclusion: The data obtained in this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the release, content and bioactivity of exosomes derived from EVT-like cell lines is cell origin-dependent and differentially regulates VSMC migration. Thus, an EVT exosomal signaling pathway may contribute to SpA remodeling by promoting the migration of VSMC out of the vessel walls.

  15. Human primordial germ cell-derived progenitors give rise to neurons and glia in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yincheng [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The 6th People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Chen, Bin [Center for Developmental Biology, Xinhua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 1665 Kong Jiang Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Tao, Minfang, E-mail: Taomf@126.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The 6th People' s Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 600 Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2009-12-18

    We derived a cell population from cultured human primordial germ cells from early human embryos. The derivates, termed embryoid body-derived (EBD) cells, displayed an extensive capacity for proliferation and expressed a panel of markers in all three germ layers. Interestingly, EBD cells were also positive for markers of neural stem/progenitor cells, such as nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein. When these cells were transplanted into the brain cavities of fetal sheep and postnatal NOD-SCID mice or nerve-degenerated tibialis anterior muscles, they readily gave rise to neurons or glial cells. To our knowledge, our data are the first to demonstrate that EBD cells can undergo further neurogenesis under suitable environments in vivo. Hence, with the abilities of extensive expansion, self-renewal, and differentiation, EBD cells may provide a useful donor source for neural stem/progenitor cells to be used in cell-replacement therapies for diseases of the nervous system.

  16. Appearance of differentiated cells derived from polar body nuclei in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eSakai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn Bombyx mori, polar body nuclei are observed until 9h after egg lying, however, the fate of polar body nuclei remains unclear. To examine the fate of polar body nuclei, we employed a mutation of serosal cell pigmentation, pink-eyed white egg (pe. The heterozygous pe/+pe females produced black serosal cells in white eggs, while pe/pe females did not produce black serosal cells in white eggs. These results suggest that the appearance of black serosal cells in white eggs depends on the genotype (pe/ +pe of the mother. Because the polar body nuclei had +pe genes in the white eggs laid by a pe/ +pe female, polar body nuclei participate in development and differentiate into functional cell (serosal cells. Analyses of serosal cells pigmentation indicated that approximately 30% of the eggs contained polar-body-nucleus-derived cells. These results demonstrate that polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared at a high frequency under natural conditions. Approximately 80% of polar-body-nucleus-derived cells appeared near the anterior pole and the dorsal side, which is opposite to where embryogenesis occurs. The number of cells derived from the polar body nuclei was very low. Approximately 26 % of these eggs contained only one black serosal cell. PCR-based analysis revealed that the polar-body-nucleus-derived cells disappeared in late embryonic stages (stage 25. Overall, polar-body-nuclei-derived cells were unlikely to contribute to embryos.

  17. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the "Yamanaka method." However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning.

  18. Neurospheres from rat adipose-derived stem cells could be induced into functional Schwann cell-like cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Yanchang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schwann cells (SC which are myelin-forming cells in peripheral nervous system are very useful for the treatment of diseases of peripheral nervous system and central nervous system. However, it is difficult to obtain sufficient large number of SC for clinical use, so alternative cell systems are desired. Results Using a procedure similar to the one used for propagation of neural stem cells, we could induce rat adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC into floating neurospheres. In addition to being able to differentiate into neuronal- and glial-like cells, neurospheres could be induced to differentiate into SC-like cells. SC-like cells were bi- or tri-polar in shape and immunopositive for nestin and SC markers p75, GFAP and S-100, identical to genuine SC. We also found that SC-like cells could induce the differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells efficiently, perhaps through secretion of soluble substances. We showed further that SC-like cells could form myelin structures with PC12 cell neurites in vitro. Conclusion These findings indicated that ADSC could differentiate into SC-like cells in terms of morphology, phenotype and functional capacities. SC-like cells induced from ADSC may be useful for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  19. Mast Cell-Derived Exosomes Promote Th2 Cell Differentiation via OX40L-OX40 Ligation

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Li; Yuping Wang; Lihui Lin; Juan Wang; Hui Xiao; Jia Li; Xia Peng; Huirong Dai; Li Li

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles released by different cell types, such as dendritic cells (DCs), mast cells (MCs), and tumor cells. Exosomes of different origin play a role in antigen presentation and modulation of immune response to infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that mast cells and CD4+ T cells colocated in peritoneal lymph nodes from BALB/c mouse. Further, bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) constitutively release exosomes, which express CD63 and OX40L. BMMC-exosomes partia...

  20. Biocompatibility of magnesium implants in primary human reaming debris-derived cells stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Charyeva, Olga; Dakischew, Olga; Sommer, Ursula; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of magnesium for resorbable metal implants is a new concept in orthopaedic and dental medicine. The majority of studies on magnesium’s biocompatibility in vitro have assessed the short-term effect of magnesium extract on cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of direct exposure to magnesium alloys on the bioactivity of primary human reaming debris-derived (HRD) cells. Materials and methods Pure Mg, Mg2Ag, WE43 and Mg10Gd were tested for biocompatibility. The...

  1. Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Hagiwara, Keitaro; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2010-06-01

    Severe hepatic dysfunctions including hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma are life-threatening conditions for which effective medical treatments are needed. With the only effective treatment to date being orthotropic liver transplantation, alternative approaches are needed because of the limited number of donors and the possibility of immune-rejection. One alternative is regenerative medicine, which holds promise for the development of a cell-based therapy enabling hepatic regeneration through transplantation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) or hepatocyte-like cells generated from AT-MSCs. When compared with embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, the use of AT-MSCs as regenerative cells would be advantageous in regard to ethical and safety issues since AT-MSCs are somatic cells and have the potential to be used without in vitro culture. These autologous cells are immuno-compatible and exhibit controlled differentiation and multi-functional abilities and do not undergo post-transplantation rejection or unwanted differentiation such as formation of teratomas. AT-MSC-based therapies may provide a novel approach for hepatic regeneration and hepatocyte differentiation and thereby support hepatic function in diseased individuals.

  2. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression.

  3. The Comparison of Biologic Characteristics between Mice Embryonic Stem Cells and Bone Marrow Derived Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junfeng Liu; Zhixu He; Dong Shen; Jin Huang; Haowen Wang

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This research was to induce dendritic cells (DCs)from mice embryonic stem cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells in vitro, and then compare the biologic characteristics of them.METHODS Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) suspending cultured in petri dishes were induced to generate embryonic bodies (EBs).Fourteen-day well-developed EBs were transferred to histological culture with the same medium and supplemented 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-3. In the next 2 weeks, there were numerous immature DCs outgrown. Meantime, mononuclear cells isolated from mice bone marrow were induced to derive dendritic cells by supplementing 25 ng/ml GM-CSF and 25 ng/ml IL-4, and then the morphology, phenotype and function of both dendritic cells from different origins were examined.RESULTS Growing mature through exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), both ESC-DCs and BM-DCs exhibited dramatic veils of cytoplasm and extensive dendrites on their surfaces, highly expressed CD11c, MHC-Ⅱ and CD86 with strong capacity to stimulate primary T cell responses in mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR).CONCLUSION ESC-DC has the same biologic characteristics as BM-DC, and it provides a new, reliable source for the functional research of DC and next produce corresponding anti-tumor vaccine.

  4. Techniques of Human Embryonic Stem Cell and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Derivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Jarosław; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-10-01

    Developing procedures for the derivation of human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) gave rise to novel pathways into regenerative medicine research. For many years, stem cells have attracted attention as a potentially unlimited cell source for cellular therapy in neurodegenerative disorders, cardiovascular diseases, and spinal cord injuries, for example. In these studies, adult stem cells were insufficient; therefore, many attempts were made to obtain PSCs by other means. This review discusses key issues concerning the techniques of pluripotent cell acquisition. Technical and ethical issues hindered the medical use of somatic cell nuclear transfer and embryonic stem cells. Therefore, induced PSCs (iPSCs) emerged as a powerful technique with great potential for clinical applications, patient-specific disease modelling and pharmaceutical studies. The replacement of viral vectors or the administration of analogous proteins or chemical compounds during cell reprogramming are modifications designed to reduce tumorigenesis risk and to augment the procedure efficiency. Intensified analysis of new PSC lines revealed other barriers to overcome, such as epigenetic memory, disparity between human and mouse pluripotency, and variable response to differentiation of some iPSC lines. Thus, multidimensional verification must be conducted to fulfil strict clinical-grade requirements. Nevertheless, the first clinical trials in patients with spinal cord injury and macular dystrophy were recently carried out with differentiated iPSCs, encouraging alternative strategies for potential autologous cellular therapies.

  5. Modeling chemotherapeutic neurotoxicity with human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuronal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather E Wheeler

    Full Text Available There are no effective agents to prevent or treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN, the most common non-hematologic toxicity of chemotherapy. Therefore, we sought to evaluate the utility of human neuron-like cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs as a means to study CIPN. We used high content imaging measurements of neurite outgrowth phenotypes to compare the changes that occur to iPSC-derived neuronal cells among drugs and among individuals in response to several classes of chemotherapeutics. Upon treatment of these neuronal cells with the neurotoxic drug paclitaxel, vincristine or cisplatin, we identified significant differences in five morphological phenotypes among drugs, including total outgrowth, mean/median/maximum process length, and mean outgrowth intensity (P < 0.05. The differences in damage among drugs reflect differences in their mechanisms of action and clinical CIPN manifestations. We show the potential of the model for gene perturbation studies by demonstrating decreased expression of TUBB2A results in significantly increased sensitivity of neurons to paclitaxel (0.23 ± 0.06 decrease in total neurite outgrowth, P = 0.011. The variance in several neurite outgrowth and apoptotic phenotypes upon treatment with one of the neurotoxic drugs is significantly greater between than within neurons derived from four different individuals (P < 0.05, demonstrating the potential of iPSC-derived neurons as a genetically diverse model for CIPN. The human neuron model will allow both for mechanistic studies of specific genes and genetic variants discovered in clinical studies and for screening of new drugs to prevent or treat CIPN.

  6. Efflux protein expression in human stem cell-derived retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Juuti-Uusitalo

    Full Text Available Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells in the back of the eye nourish photoreceptor cells and form a selective barrier that influences drug transport from the blood to the photoreceptor cells. At the molecular level, ATP-dependent efflux transporters have a major role in drug delivery in human RPE. In this study, we assessed the relative expression of several ATP-dependent efflux transporter genes (MRP1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, p-gp, and BCRP, the protein expression and localization of MRP1, MRP4, and MRP5, and the functionality of MRP1 efflux pumps at different maturation stages of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC and RPE derived from the hESC (hESC-RPE. Our findings revealed that the gene expression of ATP-dependent efflux transporters MRP1, -3, -4, -5, and p-gp fluctuated during hESC-RPE maturation from undifferentiated hESC to fusiform, epithelioid, and finally to cobblestone hESC-RPE. Epithelioid hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP1, -3, -4, and P-gp, whereas the most mature cobblestone hESC-RPE had the highest expression of MRP5 and MRP6. These findings indicate that a similar efflux protein profile is shared between hESC-RPE and the human RPE cell line, ARPE-19, and suggest that hESC-RPE cells are suitable in vitro RPE models for drug transport studies. Embryonic stem cell model might provide a novel tool to study retinal cell differentiation, mechanisms of RPE-derived diseases, drug testing and targeted drug therapy.

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells impair the quality of dendritic cell vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poschke, I; Mao, Y; Adamson, L; Salazar-Onfray, F; Masucci, G; Kiessling, R

    2012-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are important regulators of the immune system and key players in tumor-induced suppression of T-cell responses. CD14+HLA-DR-/low MDSC have been detected in a great number of malignancies, including melanoma. MDSC are known to be impaired in their ability to differentiate along the myeloid lineage, e.g., into dendritic cells (DC). This is a concern for utilization of monocyte-derived DC for vaccination of patients with melanoma or other cancers exhibiting accumulation of CD14+ MDSC. When producing DC according to standard operating procedures of two currently ongoing clinical trials, we found that MDSC co-purified with monocytes isolated by elutriation. MDSC frequencies did not affect yield or viability of the produced DC, but induced a dose-dependent decrease in DC maturation, ability to take up antigen, migrate and induce T-cell IFNγ production. Changes in DC characteristics were most notable when 'pathological' frequencies of >50% CD14+HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture. The impaired DC quality could not be explained by altered cytokine production or increased oxidative stress in the cultures. Tracking of HLA-DR- cells throughout the culture period revealed that the observed changes were partially due to the impaired maturation and functionality of the originally HLA-DR- population, but also to their negative effects on HLA-DR+ cells. In conclusion, MDSC could be induced to differentiate into DC but, due to the impairment of overall DC vaccine quality when >50% HLA-DR- cells were present in the starting culture, their removal could be advisable.

  8. Chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF enhances the malignant phenotype of colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vascular endothelial growth factor-a (VEGF)-targeted therapies have become an important treatment for a number of human malignancies. The VEGF inhibitors are actually effective in several types of cancers, however, the benefits are transiently, and the vast majority of patients who initially respond to the therapies will develop resistance. One of possible mechanisms for the acquired resistance may be the direct effect(s) of VEGF inhibitors on tumor cells expressing VEGF receptors (VEGFR). Thus, we investigated here the direct effect of chronic VEGF inhibition on phenotype changes in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. To chronically inhibit cancer cell-derived VEGF, human CRC cell lines (HCT116 and RKO) were chronically exposed (2 months) to an anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb) or were disrupted the Vegf gene (VEGF-KO). Effects of VEGF family members were blocked by treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (VEGFR-TKI). Hypoxia-induced apoptosis under VEGF inhibited conditions was measured by TUNEL assay. Spheroid formation ability was assessed using a 3-D spheroid cell culture system. Chronic inhibition of secreted/extracellular VEGF by an anti-VEGF mAb redundantly increased VEGF family member (PlGF, VEGFR1 and VEGFR2), induced a resistance to hypoxia-induced apoptosis, and increased spheroid formation ability. This apoptotic resistance was partially abrogated by a VEGFR-TKI, which blocked the compensate pathway consisted of VEGF family members, or by knockdown of Vegf mRNA, which inhibited intracellular function(s) of all Vegf gene products. Interestingly, chronic and complete depletion of all Vegf gene products by Vegf gene knockout further augmented these phenotypes in the compensate pathway-independent manner. These accelerated phenotypes were significantly suppressed by knockdown of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α that was up-regulated in the VEGF-KO cell lines. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of tumor cell-derived VEGF

  9. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pmass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined AEC exosome

  10. Mass Production of Stem Cell-Derived Progeny in Bioreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yan; Sart, Sébastien; Agathos, Spiros N.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), have shown great potential for various biomedical applications including drug discovery, disease modeling, and tissue engineering. Especially, the discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) with similar characteristics to embryonic stem cells (ESCs) opens a new era for stem cell research and transplantations. Bioprocess engineering provides a platform to generate a controlled microenvironment that ...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes facilitate nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Si; Zhang, Qicheng; Xia, Yunfei; You, Bo; Shan, Ying; Bao, Lili; Li, Li; You, Yiwen; Gu, Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types, are reported to exert multiple effects on tumor development. However, the relationship between MSCs and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells remains unclear. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles that can be released by several cell types, including MSCs. Exosomes, which can carry membrane and cytoplasmic constituents, have been described as participants in a novel mechanism of cell-to-cell communicat...

  12. Human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into nerve-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Lian; FENG Xue-yong; CUI Bing-lin; Frieda Law; JIANG Xue-wu; YANG Li-ye; XIE Qing-dong; HUANG Tian-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background The two most basic properties of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the capacities to self-renew indefinitely and differentiate into multiple cells and tissue types. The cells from human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly have properties of MSCs and represent a rich source of primitive cells. This study was conducted to explore the possibility of inducing human umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly-derived MSCs to differentiate into nerve-like cells.Methods MSCs were cultured from the Wharton's Jelly taken from human umbilical cord of babies delivered after full-term normal labor. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol were used to induce the human umbilical cord-derived MSCs to differentiate. The expression of neural protein markers was shown by immunocytochemistry. The induction process was monitored by phase contrast microscopy, electron microscopy (EM), and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) .The pleiotrophin and nestin genes were measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results MSCs in the Wharton's Jelly were easily attainable and could be maintained and expanded in culture. They were positive for markers of MSCs, but negative for markers of hematopoietic cells and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related cells. Treatment with Salvia miltiorrhiza caused Wharton's Jelly cells to undergo profound morphological changes. The induced MSCs developed rounded cell bodies with multiple neurite-like extensions. Eventually they developed processes that formed networks reminiscent of primary cultures of neurons. Salvia miltiorrhiza and β-mercaptoethanol also induced MSCs to express nestin, β-tubulinⅢ, neurofilament (NF) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). It was confirmed by RT-PCR that MSCs could express pleiotrophin both before and after induction by Salvia miltiorrhiza. The expression was markedly enhanced after induction and the nestin gene was also expressed.Conclusions MSCs could be isolated from human umbilical

  13. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Kelly

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  14. Sox17-Mediated XEN Cell Conversion Identifies Dynamic Networks Controlling Cell-Fate Decisions in Embryo-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela C.H. McDonald

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the gene regulatory networks (GRNs distinguishing extraembryonic endoderm (ExEn stem (XEN cells from those that maintain the extensively characterized embryonic stem cell (ESC. An intriguing network candidate is Sox17, an essential transcription factor for XEN derivation and self-renewal. Here, we show that forced Sox17 expression drives ESCs toward ExEn, generating XEN cells that contribute to ExEn when placed back into early mouse embryos. Transient Sox17 expression is sufficient to drive this fate change during which time cells transit through distinct intermediate states prior to the generation of functional XEN-like cells. To orchestrate this conversion process, Sox17 acts in autoregulatory and feedforward network motifs, regulating dynamic GRNs directing cell fate. Sox17-mediated XEN conversion helps to explain the regulation of cell-fate changes and reveals GRNs regulating lineage decisions in the mouse embryo.

  15. The Phenotypic Fate of Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Acute Kidney Injury

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    Guowei Feng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite increasing attention on the role of bone marrow derived stem cells in repair or rejuvenation of tissues and organs, cellular mechanisms of such cell-based therapy remain poorly understood. Methods: We reconstituted hematopoiesis in recipient C57BL/6J mice by transplanting syngeneic GFP+ bone marrow (BM cells. Subsequently, the recipients received subcutaneous injection of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF and were subjected to acute renal ischemic injury. Flow cytometry and immunostaining were performed at various time points to assess engraftment and phenotype of BM derived stem cells. Results: Administration of G-CSF increased the release of BM derived stem cells into circulation and enhanced the ensuing recruitment of BM derived stem cells into injured kidney. During the second month post injury, migrated BM derived stem cells lost hematopoietic phenotype (CD45 but maintained the expression of other markers (Sca-1, CD133 and CD44, suggesting their potential of transdifferentiation into renal stem cells. Moreover, G-CSF treatment enhanced the phenotypic conversion. Conclusion: Our work depicted a time-course dependent transition of phenotypic characteristics of BM derived stem cells, demonstrated the existence of BM derived stem cells in damaged kidney and revealed the effects of G-CSF on cell transdifferentiation.

  16. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization.

  17. {gamma}-irradiation deregulates cell cycle control and apoptosis in nevoid basal cell carcinomas syndrome-derived cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Katsunori; Miyashita, Toshiyuki; Yamada, Masao [National Children' s Medical Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Sugita, Katsuo; Kohno, Yoichi; Nishie, Haruko; Yasumoto, Shin-ichiro; Furue, Masutaka

    1999-12-01

    The nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by nevi, palmar and plantar pits, falx calcification, vertebrate anomalies and basal cell carcinomas. It is well known in NBCCS that {gamma}-irradiation to the skin induces basal cell carcinomas or causes an enlargement of the tumor size, although the details of the mechanism remain unknown. We have established lymphoblastoid cell lines from three NBCCS patients, and we present here the first evidence of abnormal cell cycle and apoptosis regulations. A novel mutation (single nucleotide deletion) in the coding region of the human patched gene, PTCH, was identified in two sibling patients, but no apparent abnormalities were detected in the gene of the remaining patient. Nevertheless, the three established cell lines showed similar features in the following analyses. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that the NBCCS-derived cells were accumulated in the G{sub 2}M phase after {gamma}-irradiation, whereas normal cells showed cell cycle arrest both in the G{sub 0}G{sub 1} and G{sub 2}M phases. The fraction of apoptotic cells after {gamma}-irradiation was smaller in the NBCCS cells. The level of p27 expression markedly decreased after {gamma}-irradiation in the NBCCS cells, although the effects of the irradiation on the expression profiles for p53, p21 and Rb did not differ in normal and NBCCS cells. These findings may provide a clue to the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis in NBCCS. (author)

  18. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell-derived microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Luigi; Bruno, Stefania; Deregibus, Maria Chiara; Tetta, Ciro; Camussi, Giovanni

    2012-08-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to reverse acute and chronic kidney injury in different experimental models by paracrine mechanisms. This paracrine action may be accounted for, at least in part, by microvesicles (MVs) released from mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in a horizontal transfer of mRNA, microRNA and proteins. MVs, released as exosomes from the endosomal compartment, or as shedding vesicles from the cell surface, are now recognized as being an integral component of the intercellular microenvironment. By acting as vehicles for information transfer, MVs play a pivotal role in cell-to-cell communication. This exchange of information between the injured cells and stem cells has the potential to be bi-directional. Thus, MVs may either transfer transcripts from injured cells to stem cells, resulting in reprogramming of their phenotype to acquire specific features of the tissue, or conversely, transcripts could be transferred from stem cells to injured cells, restraining tissue injury and inducing cell cycle re-entry of resident cells, leading to tissue self-repair. Upon administration with a therapeutic regimen, MVs mimic the effect of mesenchymal stem cells in various experimental models by inhibiting apoptosis and stimulating cell proliferation. In this review, we discuss whether MVs released from mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to be exploited in novel therapeutic approaches in regenerative medicine to repair damaged tissues, as an alternative to stem cell-based therapy. PMID:22851627

  19. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jindou Jiang; Xingyao Bu; Meng Liu; Peixun Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Results from the present study demonstrated that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the lesion site in rat brain significantly ameliorated brain tissue pathological changes and brain edema, attenuated glial cell proliferation, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, the number of cells double-labeled for 5-bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein and cells expressing nestin increased. Finally, blood vessels were newly generated, and the rats exhibited improved motor and cognitive functions. These results suggested that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promoted brain remodeling and improved neurological functions following traumatic brain injury.

  20. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harvested immediately after irradiation, and at 1 and 5 days after irradiation. Cell cycle analysis, colony forming ability (CFU-F), differentiation ability, and expression of osteogenic-specific runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), oxidative stress-specific dismutase-1 (SOD1) and Glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) were analyzed. Irradiation arrested cell cycle progression in BMMSCs and hESMSCs. Colony formation ability of irradiated MSCs decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Irradiated hESMSCs showed higher adipogenic differentiation compared with BMMSCs, together with an increase in the adipogenic PPARγ expression. PPARγ expression was upregulated as early as 4 h after irradiation, along with the expression of SOD1. More than 70% downregulation was found in Wnt3A, Wnt4, Wnt7A, Wnt10A and Wnt11 in BMMSCs, but not in hESMSCs. hESMSCs are highly proliferative but radiosensitive compared with BMMSCs. Increased PPARγ expression relative to RUNX2 and downregulation of Wnt ligands in irradiated MSCs suggest Wnt mediated the fate determination of irradiated MSCs. (author)

  1. Detection of embryonic stem cell markers in adult human adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarasa Bharati Arumugam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bone marrow transplantation is already an established therapy, which is now widely used in medicine to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and several inherited blood disorders. The culture of multilineage cells from easily available adipose tissue is another source of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells, and is referred to as adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs. While ADSCs are being used to treat various conditions, some lacuna exists regarding the specific proteins in these. It was therefore decided to analyze the specific proteins of embryonic cells in ADSCs. Aims: To analyze the specific protein of embryonic stem cells (ESCs in ADSCs. Materials and Methods: Adult human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs were harvested from 13 patients after obtaining patients′ consent. The specific markers of ESCs included surface proteins CD10, CD13, CD44, CD59, CD105, and CD166, and further nucleostemin,(NS NANOG, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gγ, collagen type 1 (Coll1, alkaline phosphate, (ALP osteocalcin (OC, and core binding factor 1 (Cbfa1 were analyzed using by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, (RT-PCR immunofluorescence (IF, and western blot. Results: All the proteins were expressed distinctly, except CD13 and OC. CD13 was found individually with different expressions, and OC expression was discernable. Conclusions: Although the ESC with its proven self-renewal capacity and pluripotency seems appropriate for clinical use, the recent work on ADSCs suggests that these adult stem cells would be a valuable source for future biotechnology, especially since there is a relative ease of procurement.

  2. Differentiation of Bone Marrow: Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Hepatocyte-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghrbawy, Nesrien M; Afify, Reham Abdel Aleem Mohamed; Dyaa, Nehal; El Sayed, Asmaa A

    2016-09-01

    Cirrhosis is the end-stage liver fibrosis, whereby normal liver architecture is disrupted by fibrotic bands, parenchymal nodules and vascular distortion. Portal hypertension and hepatocyte dysfunction are the end results and give rise to major systemic complications and premature death. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have the capacity of self-renew and to give rise to cells of various lineages, so MSC can be isolated from bone marrow (BM) and induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells. MSC were induced to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells by hepatotic growth factor (HGF) and fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4). Differentiated cells were examined for the expression of hepatocyte-specific markers and hepatocyte functions. MSC were isolated. Flow cytometry analysis showed that they expressed the MSC-specific markers, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that MSC expressed the hepatocyte-specific marker cytokeratin 18 (CK-18) following hepatocyte induction. This study demonstrates that BM-derived-MSC can differentiate into functional hepatocyte-like cells following the induction of HGF and FGF-4. MSC can serve as a favorable cell source for tissue engineering in the treatment of liver disease. PMID:27429519

  3. On the Origin of Cells and Derivation of Thyroid Cancer: C Cell Story Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Mikael; Williams, Dillwyn

    2016-07-01

    We will highlight and put into perspective new lineage tracing data from genetic studies in mice indicating that the genuine progenitors to C cells arise in the endoderm germ layer. This overturns the current concept of a neural crest origin of thyroid C cells referred to in every textbook and dedicated paper to this very day. As will become apparent, except for a single experiment, the neural crest theory has little or no support when the evolution and development of calcitonin-producing cells in the entire chordate family are considered. Instead, a unifying origin of all cells of the ultimobranchial bodies reopens questions on the histogenesis of certain thyroid pathologies previously difficult to explain. On this aspect, medullary thyroid cancer shows a stronger connection to gut neuroendocrine tumours than previously recognized. It is envisaged that novel factors implicated in C cell-derived tumour growth and progression will be discovered as the mechanisms that regulate lineage expansion of embryonic C cell precursors from pharyngeal endoderm are uncovered. We will not discuss why C cells go to the bother of burying themselves in the thyroid - this remains a mystery. PMID:27493881

  4. In vitro isolation, culture and identification of adipose-derived stem cells*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Du Guo-jia; Chen Xiao-hong; Zhu Guo-hua; Fan Yan-dong; Wang Yun; Dang Mu-ren

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Adipose-derived stem cells are easily col ected and abundantly cultured, which can proliferate rapidly when being cultured in vitro. With multi-directional differentiation potential, adipose-derived stem cells are expected as seed cells for tissue engineering. OBJECTIVE:To isolate, culture and identify of adipose-derived stem cells from Sprague-Dawley rats in vitro. METHODS:The subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from the iliac region of rats under the aseptic condition, and then was digested with 0.075%type Ⅰ col agenase and cultured in vitro. The morphology and proliferation characteristics of the cells were observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope. The third passage was put into gauge for growth curve by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and the cells were also identified by CD44, a stem cellmarker, with immunofluorescence staining. Adipose-derived stem cells were induced and differentiated into adipocytes in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium/Ham’s nutrient mixture F-12 containing 10%fetal bovine serum, dexamethasone and insulin, and then the cells were identified with oil red“O”staining. Adipose-derived stem cells were induced and differentiated into neural cells, and then the cells were identified with immunohistochemical staining. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:The growth curve of adipose-derived stem cells was opposite-like“S”shape, and it strongly expressed CD44 that can designate a stem cell. The passage cells were exposed to a defined medium for adipocyte differentiation, and then could be stained with oil red. After being induced and differentiated into nerve cells, the cells expressed neuron-specific enolase. The adipose-derived stem cells of Sprague-Dawley rats are characterized by easy isolation, culture and proliferation in vitro, expressing related phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cells, as wel as induction and differentiation under certain conditions.

  5. Immunomodulatory effects of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on differentiation, maturation and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidi, Mohsen; Masoud, Ahmad; Shakiba, Yadollah; Hadjati, Jamshid; Mohyeddin Bonab, Mandana; Nicknam, Mohammad Hossein; Latifpour, Mostafa; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2013-03-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is believed to be a source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) which can be therapeutically applied in degenerative diseases.In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of umbilical cord derived-mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) and bone marrow-derived-mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on differentiation, maturation, and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in a transwell culture system under laboratory conditions. Monocytes were differentiated into immature dendritic cells (iDCs) in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days and then differentiated into mature dendritic cells (mDCs) in the presence of TNF-α for 2 days. In every stage of differentiation, immature and mature dendritic cells were separately co-cultured with UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs. The findings showed that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs inhibited strongly differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells at higher dilution ratios (1:1). The BM-MSCs and UC-MSCs showed more inhibitory effect on CD1a, CD83, CD86 expression, and dendritic cell endocytic activity, respectively. On the other hand, these cells severely up-regulated CD14 marker expression. We concluded that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs could inhibit differentiation, maturation and endocytosis in monocyte-derived DCs through the secreted factors and free of any cell-cell contacts under laboratory conditions. As DCs are believed to be the main antigen presenting cells for naïve T cells in triggering immune responses, it would be logical that their inhibitory effect on differentiation, maturation and function can decrease or modulate immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:23454777

  6. Immunomodulatory effects of human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells on differentiation, maturation and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Saeidi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Wharton’s jelly of the umbilical cord is believed to be a source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs which can be therapeutically applied in degenerative diseases.In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of umbilical cord derived- mesenchymal stem  cells (UC-MSCs and  bone  marrow-derived-mesenchymal stem  cells (BM-MSCs on differentiation, maturation, and endocytosis of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in a transwell culture system under laboratory conditions. Monocytes were differentiated into immature dendritic cells (iDCs in the presence of GM-CSF and IL-4 for 6 days and then differentiated into mature dendritic cells (mDCs in the presence of TNF-α for 2 days. In every stage of differentiation, immature and mature dendritic cells were separately co- cultured with UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs.The findings showed that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs inhibited strongly differentiation and maturation of dendritic cells at higher dilution ratios (1:1. The BM-MSCs and UC-MSCs showed more inhibitory effect on CD1a, CD83, CD86 expression, and dendritic cell endocytic activity, respectively. On the other hand, these cells severely up-regulated CD14 marker expression. We concluded that UC-MSCs and BM-MSCs could inhibit differentiation, maturation and endocytosis in monocyte-derived DCs through the secreted factors and free of any cell- cell contacts  under  laboratory conditions. As DCs  are believed to  be the  main antigen presenting cells for naïve T cells in triggering immune responses, it would be logical that their inhibitory effect on differentiation, maturation and function can decrease or modulate immune and inflammatory responses.

  7. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 Mediates Human Embryonic Germ Cell Derivation

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Marc; Liu, Cyndi; Blumenthal, Paul D; John D Gearhart; Kerr, Candace L.

    2010-01-01

    Human primordial germ cells (PGCs) have proven to be a source of pluripotent stem cells called embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Unlike embryonic stem cells, virtually little is known regarding the factors that regulate EGC survival and maintenance. In mice, the growth factor bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has been shown to be required for maintaining mouse embryonic stem cells, and disruptions in this gene lead to defects in mouse PGC specification. Here, we sought to determine whether recom...

  8. Establishment of induced pluripotent stem cells from aged mice using bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Cheng; Sachiko Ito; Naomi Nishio; Hengyi Xiao; Rong Zhang; Haruhiko Suzuki; Yayoi Okawa; Toyoaki Murohara; Ken-ichi Isobe

    2011-01-01

    If induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are to be used to treat damaged tissues or repair organs in elderly patients, it will be necessaryto establish iPS cells from their tissues. To determine the feasibility of using this technology with elderly patients, we asked if itwas indeed possible to establish iPS cells from the bone marrow (BM) of aged mice. BM cells from aged C57BL/6 mice carrying thegreen fluorescence protein (GFP) gene were cultured with granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) for 4 days.Four factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc) were introduced into the BM-derived myeloid (BM-M) cells. The efficiency of generating iPS cells from aged BM cultured in GM-CSF was low. However, we succeeded in obtaining BM-M-iPS cells from aged C57BL/6 mice,which carried GFP. Our BM-M-iPS cells expressed SSEA-1 and Pou5f1 and were positive for alkaline phosphatase staining. The iPScells did make teratoma with three germ layers following injection into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, and can be differentiated to threegerm layers in vitro. By co-culturing with OP9, the BM-M-iPS cells can be differentiated to the myeloid lineage. The differentiated BM-M-iPS cells proliferated well in the presence of GM-CSF, and lost expression of Nanog and Pou5f1, at least in part, due to methylation of their promoters. On the contrary, Tnf and Il1b gene expression was upregulated and their promoters were hypornethylated.

  9. Autophagy activator promotes neuronal differentiation of adult adipose-derived stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhui Lu; Xiaodong Yuan; Qiaoyu Sun; Ya Ou

    2013-01-01

    Preliminary research from our group found altered autophagy intensity during adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells, and that this change was associated with morphological changes in differentiated cells. This study aimed to verify the role of rapamycin, an autophagy activator, in the process of adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that expression of neuron-specific enolase and neurofilament-200 were gradually upregulated in adipose-derived stromal cells after 5 mM β-mercaptoethanol induction, and the differentiation rate gradually increased with induction time. Using transmission electron microscopy, induced cells were shown to exhibit cytoplasmic autophagosomes, with bilayer membranes, and autolysosomes. After rapamycin (200μg/L) induction for 1 hour, adipose-derived stromal cells began to extend long processes, similar to the morphology of neuronal-like cells, while untreated cells did not exhibit similar morphologies until 3 hours after induction. Moreover, the differentiation rate was significantly increased after rapamycin treatment. Compared with untreated cells, expression of LC3, an autophagy protein, was also significantly upregulated. Positive LC3 expression tended to concentrate at cell nuclei with increasing induction times. Our experimental findings indicate that autophagy can significantly increase the speed of adipose-derived stromal cell differentiation into neuronal-like cells.

  10. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pexosome characteristics and their cargo reflected the physiologic status of the cell of origin and suggests that AEC-derived exosomal p38 MAPK plays a major role in determining the fate of pregnancy

  11. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) interact depending on breast cancer cell type through secreted molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hee; Bang, So Hee; Kang, So Yeong; Park, Ki Dae; Eom, Jun Ho; Oh, Il Ung; Yoo, Si Hyung; Kim, Chan-Wha; Baek, Sun Young

    2015-02-01

    Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells (hAMSC) are candidates for cell-based therapies. We examined the characteristics of hAMSC including the interaction between hAMSC and breast cancer cells, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells showed typical MSC properties, including fibroblast-like morphology, surface antigen expression, and mesodermal differentiation. To investigate cell-cell interaction via secreted molecules, we cultured breast cancer cells in hAMSC-conditioned medium (hAMSC-CM) and analyzed their proliferation, migration, and secretome profiles. MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to hAMSC-CM showed increased proliferation and migration. However, in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells proliferated significantly faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. When cultured in hAMSC-CM, MCF-7 cells migrated faster than MDA-MB-231 cells. Two cell types showed different profiles of secreted factors. MCF-7 cells expressed much amounts of IL-8, GRO, and MCP-1 in hAMSC-CM. Human amniotic membrane-derived stromal cells interact with breast cancer cells through secreted molecules. Factors secreted by hAMSCs promote the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. For much safe cell-based therapies using hAMSC, it is necessary to study carefully about interaction between hAMSC and cancer cells.

  12. Bone marrow-derived stem cells and respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carla P; Rankin, Sara M

    2011-07-01

    Adult bone marrow contains a number of discrete populations of progenitor cells, including endothelial, mesenchymal, and epithelial progenitor cells and fibrocytes. In the context of a range of diseases, endothelial progenitor cells have been reported to promote angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells are potent immunosuppressors but can also contribute directly to tissue regeneration, and fibrocytes have been shown to induce tissue fibrosis. This article provides an overview of the basic biology of these different subsets of progenitor cells, reporting their distinct phenotypes and functional activities. The differences in their secretomes are highlighted, and the relative role of cellular differentiation vs paracrine effects of progenitor cells is considered. The article reviews the literature examining the contribution of progenitor cells to the pathogenesis of respiratory disease, and discusses recent studies using bone marrow progenitor cells as stem cell therapies in the context of pulmonary hypertension, COPD, and asthma. PMID:21729891

  13. Can muscle-derived stem cells serve as seed cells to repair spinal cord injury?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifan Mei; Chang Liu; Gang Lü; Yansong Wang; Quanshuang Li; Zhanpeng Guo; Shiqiong Liu; He Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) can come from a number of different sources, which are easy to isolate and culture, and are also useful in the transformation and expression of exogenous genes. Therefore, MDSCs could possibly be used for gene therapy in the treatment of neurological diseases. However, research on MDSCs has focused on identifying phenotypes and induced differentiation, with few in vivo animal experiments conducted. In this study, MDSCs were selected as seed cells and implanted into the rat spinal cord injury area. Results demonstrated that the MDSCs survived, migrated, and were distributed along the spinal nerves. Moreover, the motor function of rat lower limbs improved significantly, suggesting that MDSCs could be used as seed cells to repair spinal cord injury.

  14. Tubular engraftment and myofibroblast differentiation of recipient-derived cells after experimental kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Martine; Harmsen, Martin C.; Koerts, Jasper A.; Van Kooten, Theo G.; Navis, Gerjan; Van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Popa, Eliane R.

    2007-01-01

    Background. In human renal allografts, recipient-derived cells engrafted in various kidney substructures, have been detected in the long term after transplantation. Here we investigated tubular engraftment and myofibroblast differentiation of recipient-derived cells at short term after experimental

  15. An experimental platform for studying growth and invasiveness of tumor cells within teratomas derived from human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Tzukerman, Maty; Rosenberg, Tzur; Ravel, Yael; Reiter, Irena; Coleman, Raymond; Skorecki, Karl

    2003-01-01

    There is currently no available experimental system wherein human cancer cells can be grown in the context of a mixed population of normal differentiated human cells for testing biological aspects of cancer cell growth (e.g., tumor cell invasion and angiogenesis) or response to anti-cancer therapies. When implanted into immunocompromised mice, human embryonic stem cells develop teratomas containing complex structures comprising differentiated cell types representing the major germ line-derive...

  16. Increased stromal-cell-derived factor 1 enhances the homing of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells in dilated cardiomyopathy in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan-li; Michael Fu; ZHANG Hai-feng; LI Xin-li; DI Ruo-min; YAO Wen-ming; LI Dian-fu; FENG Jian-lin; HUANG Jun; CAO Ke-jiang

    2010-01-01

    Background Stem cell transplantation has been shown to have beneficial effects on dilated cardiomyopathy. However,mechanism for stem cell homing to cardiac tissue in dilated cardiomyopathy has not yet been elucidated.Methods Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from rat bone marrow, expanded in vitro, and labeled with 99mTc.Cardiomyopathy model was induced by doxorubicin in rats. 99mTc labeled cells were infused into the left ventricles in cardiomyopathy and control rats. Sixteen hours after injection, animals were sacrificed and different tissues were harvested to measure specific radioactivity. By use of real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry,Mrna and protein expressions for stromal-cell-derived factor 1 in cardiac tissue were measured.Results Labeling efficiency of mesenchymal stem cells was (70.0±11.2)%. Sixteen hours after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the heart-to-muscle radioactivity ratio was increased significantly in cardiomyopathy hearts as compared to control hearts. Both Mrna and rotein expressions of stromal-cell-derived factor 1 were up-regulated in cardiomyopathy hearts as compared with control hearts.Conclusion In dilated cardiomyopathy induced by doxorubicin up-regulated expression of stromal-cell-derived factor 1in heart may induce mesenchymal stem cells home to the heart.

  17. Human hepatocytes derived from pluripotent stem cells: a promising cell model for drug hepatotoxicity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Lechón, María José; Tolosa, Laia

    2016-09-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a frequent cause of failure in both clinical and post-approval stages of drug development, and poses a key challenge to the pharmaceutical industry. Current animal models offer poor prediction of human DILI. Although several human cell-based models have been proposed for the detection of human DILI, human primary hepatocytes remain the gold standard for preclinical toxicological screening. However, their use is hindered by their limited availability, variability and phenotypic instability. In contrast, pluripotent stem cells, which include embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), proliferate extensively in vitro and can be differentiated into hepatocytes by the addition of soluble factors. This provides a stable source of hepatocytes for multiple applications, including early preclinical hepatotoxicity screening. In addition, iPSCs also have the potential to establish genotype-specific cells from different individuals, which would increase the predictivity of toxicity assays allowing more successful clinical trials. Therefore, the generation of human hepatocyte-like cells derived from pluripotent stem cells seems to be promising for overcoming limitations of hepatocyte preparations, and it is expected to have a substantial repercussion in preclinical hepatotoxicity risk assessment in early drug development stages. PMID:27325232

  18. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  19. Characterization of pancreatic stem cells derived from adult human pancreas ducts by fluorescence activated cell sorting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Tso Lin; Shih-Hwa Chiou; Chung-Lan Kao; Yi-Ming Shyr; Chien-Jen Hsu; Yih-Wen Tarng; Larry L-T Ho; Ching-Fai Kwok; Hung-Hai Ku

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To isolate putative pancreatic stem cells (PSCs)from human adult tissues of pancreas duct using serumfree, conditioned medium. The characterization of surface phenotype of these PSCs was analyzed by flow cytometry. The potential for pancreatic lineage and the capability of β-cell differentiation in these PSCs were evaluated as well.METHODS: By using serum-free medium supplemented with essential growth factors, we attempted to isolate the putative PSCs which has been reported to express nestin and pdx-1. The MatrigelTM was employed to evaluate the differential capacity of isolated cells. Dithizone staining, insulin content/secretion measurement, and immunohistochemistry staining were used to monitor the differentiation. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS)was used to detect the phenotypic markers of putative PSCs.RESULTS: A monolayer of spindle-like cells was cultivated. The putative PSCs expressed pdx-1 and nestin.They were also able to differentiate into insulin-, glucagon-, and somatostatin-positive cells. The spectrum of phenotypic markers in PSCs was investigated; a similarity was revealed when using human bone marrow-derived stem cells as the comparative experiment, such as CD29,CD44, CD49, CD50, CD51, CD62E, PDGFR-α, CD73 (SH2),CD81, CD105(SH3).CONCLUSION: In this study, we successfully isolated PSCs from adult human pancreatic duct by using serumfree medium. These PSCs not only expressed nestin and pdx-1 but also exhibited markers attributable to mesenchymal stem cells. Although work is needed to elucidate the role of these cells, the application of these PSCs might be therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus.

  20. Potential antitumor therapeutic strategies of human amniotic membrane and amniotic fluid-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, N-H; Hwang, K-A; Kim, S U; Kim, Y-B; Hyun, S-H; Jeung, E-B; Choi, K-C

    2012-08-01

    As stem cells are capable of self-renewal and can generate differentiated progenies for organ development, they are considered as potential source for regenerative medicine and tissue replacement after injury or disease. Along with this capacity, stem cells have the therapeutic potential for treating human diseases including cancers. According to the origins, stem cells are broadly classified into two types: embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells. In terms of differentiation potential, ESCs are pluripotent and adult stem cells are multipotent. Amnion, which is a membranous sac that contains the fetus and amniotic fluid and functions in protecting the developing embryo during gestation, is another stem cell source. Amnion-derived stem cells are classified as human amniotic membrane-derived epithelial stem cells, human amniotic membrane-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells. They are in an intermediate stage between pluripotent ESCs and lineage-restricted adult stem cells, non-tumorigenic, and contribute to low immunogenicity and anti-inflammation. Furthermore, they are easily available and do not cause any controversial issues in their recovery and applications. Not only are amnion-derived stem cells applicable in regenerative medicine, they have anticancer capacity. In non-engineered stem cells transplantation strategies, amnion-derived stem cells effectively target the tumor and suppressed the tumor growth by expressing cytotoxic cytokines. Additionally, they also have a potential as novel delivery vehicles transferring therapeutic genes to the cancer formation sites in gene-directed enzyme/prodrug combination therapy. Owing to their own advantageous properties, amnion-derived stem cells are emerging as a new candidate in anticancer therapy.

  1. Regenerative Applications Using Tooth Derived Stem Cells in Other Than Tooth Regeneration: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Yun-Jong Park; Seunghee Cha; Young-Seok Park

    2016-01-01

    Tooth derived stem cells or dental stem cells are categorized according to the location from which they are isolated and represent a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine. Originally, as one kind of mesenchymal stem cells, they are considered an alternative of bone marrow stromal cells. They share many commonalties but maintain differences. Considering their original function in development and the homeostasis of tooth structures, many applications of these cells in dentistry ha...

  2. Bone marrow-derived cells can acquire renal stem cells properties and ameliorate ischemia-reperfusion induced acute renal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Xiaohua

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow (BM stem cells have been reported to contribute to tissue repair after kidney injury model. However, there is no direct evidence so far that BM cells can trans-differentiate into renal stem cells. Methods To investigate whether BM stem cells contribute to repopulate the renal stem cell pool, we transplanted BM cells from transgenic mice, expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP into wild-type irradiated recipients. Following hematological reconstitution and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, Sca-1 and c-Kit positive renal stem cells in kidney were evaluated by immunostaining and flow cytometry analysis. Moreover, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF was administrated to further explore if G-CSF can mobilize BM cells and enhance trans-differentiation efficiency of BM cells into renal stem cells. Results BM-derived cells can contribute to the Sca-1+ or c-Kit+ renal progenitor cells population, although most renal stem cells came from indigenous cells. Furthermore, G-CSF administration nearly doubled the frequency of Sca-1+ BM-derived renal stem cells and increased capillary density of I/R injured kidneys. Conclusions These findings indicate that BM derived stem cells can give rise to cells that share properties of renal resident stem cell. Moreover, G-CSF mobilization can enhance this effect.

  3. Urocortin 3 marks mature human primary and embryonic stem cell-derived pancreatic alpha and beta cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha van der Meulen

    Full Text Available The peptide hormone Urocortin 3 (Ucn 3 is abundantly and exclusively expressed in mouse pancreatic beta cells where it regulates insulin secretion. Here we demonstrate that Ucn 3 first appears at embryonic day (E 17.5 and, from approximately postnatal day (p 7 and onwards throughout adult life, becomes a unifying and exclusive feature of mouse beta cells. These observations identify Ucn 3 as a potential beta cell maturation marker. To determine whether Ucn 3 is similarly restricted to beta cells in humans, we conducted comprehensive immunohistochemistry and gene expression experiments on macaque and human pancreas and sorted primary human islet cells. This revealed that Ucn 3 is not restricted to the beta cell lineage in primates, but is also expressed in alpha cells. To substantiate these findings, we analyzed human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived pancreatic endoderm that differentiates into mature endocrine cells upon engraftment in mice. Ucn 3 expression in hESC-derived grafts increased robustly upon differentiation into mature endocrine cells and localized to both alpha and beta cells. Collectively, these observations confirm that Ucn 3 is expressed in adult beta cells in both mouse and human and appears late in beta cell differentiation. Expression of Pdx1, Nkx6.1 and PC1/3 in hESC-derived Ucn 3(+ beta cells supports this. However, the expression of Ucn 3 in primary and hESC-derived alpha cells demonstrates that human Ucn 3 is not exclusive to the beta cell lineage but is a general marker for both the alpha and beta cell lineages. Ucn 3(+ hESC-derived alpha cells do not express Nkx6.1, Pdx1 or PC1/3 in agreement with the presence of a separate population of Ucn 3(+ alpha cells. Our study highlights important species differences in Ucn 3 expression, which have implications for its utility as a marker to identify mature beta cells in (reprogramming strategies.

  4. Modulation of dendritic cell function by Trichomonas vaginalis-derived secretory products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min-Ji; Lee, Jong-Joo; Nam, Young Hee; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Chung, Youn Wook; Kim, Mikyoung; Choi, Ye-Eun; Shin, Myeong Heon; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2015-02-01

    Trichomoniasis caused by the parasitic protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the world. Dendritic cells are antigen presenting cells that initiate immune responses by directing the activation and differentiation of naïve T cells. In this study, we analyzed the effect of Trichomonas vaginalis-derived Secretory Products on the differentiation and function of dendritic cells. Differentiation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in the presence of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced maturation of dendritic cells, down-regulation of IL-12, and up-regulation of IL-10. The protein components of T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Products were shown to be responsible for altered function of bone marrow- derived dendritic cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that IL-12 expression was regulated at the chromatin level in T. vaginalis-derived Secretory Productstreated dendritic cells. Our results demonstrated that T. vaginalis- derived Secretory Products modulate the maturation and cytokine production of dendritic cells leading to immune tolerance.

  5. Effect of hyperthermic CO2-treated dendritic cell-derived exosomes on the human gastric cancer AGS cell line

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jinlin; Wang, Zhiyong; MO, YANXIA; Zeng, Zhaohui; Wei, Pei; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antitumor effects of hyperthermic CO2 (HT-CO2)-treated dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dex) on human gastric cancer AGS cells. Mouse-derived DCs were incubated in HT-CO2 at 43°C for 4 h. The exosomes in the cell culture supernatant were then isolated. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Cell apoptosis was observed using flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining and the analysis of caspase-3 activity....

  6. Derivation and differentiation of haploid human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagi, Ido; Chia, Gloryn; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Peretz, Mordecai; Weissbein, Uri; Sui, Lina; Sauer, Mark V; Yanuka, Ofra; Egli, Dieter; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2016-04-01

    Diploidy is a fundamental genetic feature in mammals, in which haploid cells normally arise only as post-meiotic germ cells that serve to ensure a diploid genome upon fertilization. Gamete manipulation has yielded haploid embryonic stem (ES) cells from several mammalian species, but haploid human ES cells have yet to be reported. Here we generated and analysed a collection of human parthenogenetic ES cell lines originating from haploid oocytes, leading to the successful isolation and maintenance of human ES cell lines with a normal haploid karyotype. Haploid human ES cells exhibited typical pluripotent stem cell characteristics, such as self-renewal capacity and a pluripotency-specific molecular signature. Moreover, we demonstrated the utility of these cells as a platform for loss-of-function genetic screening. Although haploid human ES cells resembled their diploid counterparts, they also displayed distinct properties including differential regulation of X chromosome inactivation and of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, alongside reduction in absolute gene expression levels and cell size. Surprisingly, we found that a haploid human genome is compatible not only with the undifferentiated pluripotent state, but also with differentiated somatic fates representing all three embryonic germ layers both in vitro and in vivo, despite a persistent dosage imbalance between the autosomes and X chromosome. We expect that haploid human ES cells will provide novel means for studying human functional genomics and development.

  7. Characterization of adipose-derived stem cells from subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues and their function in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Andreas; Friemel, Alexandra; Fornoff, Friderike; Adjan, Mouhib; Solbach, Christine; Yuan, Juping; Louwen, Frank

    2015-10-27

    Adipose-derived stem cells are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types and thus considered useful for regenerative medicine. However, this differentiation feature seems to be associated with tumor initiation and metastasis raising safety concerns, which requires further investigation. In this study, we isolated adipose-derived stem cells from subcutaneous as well as from visceral adipose tissues of the same donor and systematically compared their features. Although being characteristic of mesenchymal stem cells, subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells tend to be spindle form-like and are more able to home to cancer cells, whereas visceral adipose-derived stem cells incline to be "epithelial"-like and more competent to differentiate. Moreover, compared to subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells, visceral adipose-derived stem cells are more capable of promoting proliferation, inducing the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing migration and invasion of breast cancer cells by cell-cell contact and by secreting interleukins such as IL-6 and IL-8. Importantly, ASCs affect the low malignant breast cancer cells MCF-7 more than the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. Induction of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is mediated by the activation of multiple pathways especially the PI3K/AKT signaling in breast cancer cells. BCL6, an important player in B-cell lymphoma and breast cancer progression, is crucial for this transition. Finally, this transition fuels malignant properties of breast cancer cells and render them resistant to ATP competitive Polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors BI 2535 and BI 6727.

  8. The niche-derived glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF induces migration of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Dovere

    Full Text Available In mammals, the biological activity of the stem/progenitor compartment sustains production of mature gametes through spermatogenesis. Spermatogonial stem cells and their progeny belong to the class of undifferentiated spermatogonia, a germ cell population found on the basal membrane of the seminiferous tubules. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, a Sertoli-derived factor, is essential for in vivo and in vitro stem cell self-renewal. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are not completely understood. In this study, we show that GDNF induces dose-dependent directional migration of freshly selected undifferentiated spermatogonia, as well as germline stem cells in culture, using a Boyden chamber assay. GDNF-induced migration is dependent on the expression of the GDNF co-receptor GFRA1, as shown by migration assays performed on parental and GFRA1-transduced GC-1 spermatogonial cell lines. We found that the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP is specifically expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. VASP belongs to the ENA/VASP family of proteins implicated in actin-dependent processes, such as fibroblast migration, axon guidance, and cell adhesion. In intact seminiferous tubules and germline stem cell cultures, GDNF treatment up-regulates VASP in a dose-dependent fashion. These data identify a novel role for the niche-derived factor GDNF, and they suggest that GDNF may impinge on the stem/progenitor compartment, affecting the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  9. The niche-derived glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) induces migration of mouse spermatogonial stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovere, Lisa; Fera, Stefania; Grasso, Margherita; Lamberti, Dante; Gargioli, Cesare; Muciaccia, Barbara; Lustri, Anna Maria; Stefanini, Mario; Vicini, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, the biological activity of the stem/progenitor compartment sustains production of mature gametes through spermatogenesis. Spermatogonial stem cells and their progeny belong to the class of undifferentiated spermatogonia, a germ cell population found on the basal membrane of the seminiferous tubules. A large body of evidence has demonstrated that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a Sertoli-derived factor, is essential for in vivo and in vitro stem cell self-renewal. However, the mechanisms underlying this activity are not completely understood. In this study, we show that GDNF induces dose-dependent directional migration of freshly selected undifferentiated spermatogonia, as well as germline stem cells in culture, using a Boyden chamber assay. GDNF-induced migration is dependent on the expression of the GDNF co-receptor GFRA1, as shown by migration assays performed on parental and GFRA1-transduced GC-1 spermatogonial cell lines. We found that the actin regulatory protein vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) is specifically expressed in undifferentiated spermatogonia. VASP belongs to the ENA/VASP family of proteins implicated in actin-dependent processes, such as fibroblast migration, axon guidance, and cell adhesion. In intact seminiferous tubules and germline stem cell cultures, GDNF treatment up-regulates VASP in a dose-dependent fashion. These data identify a novel role for the niche-derived factor GDNF, and they suggest that GDNF may impinge on the stem/progenitor compartment, affecting the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration.

  10. Derivation of a Homozygous Human Androgenetic Embryonic Stem Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chenhui; Huang, Sunxing; Qi, Quan; Fu, Rui; Zhu, Wanwan; Cai, Bing; Hong, Pingping; Liu, Zhengxin; Gu, Tiantian; Zeng, Yanhong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Yanwen; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Zhou, Qi; Zhou, Canquan

    2015-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have long been considered as a promising source for cell replacement therapy. However, one major obstacle for the use of these cells is immune compatibility. Histocompatible human parthenogenetic ESCs have been reported as a new method for generating human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched hESCs. To further investigate the possibility of obtaining histocompatible stem cells from uniparental embryos, we tried to produce androgenetic haploid human embryos by injecting a single spermatozoon into enucleated human oocyte, and establish human androgenetic embryonic stem (hAGES) cell lines from androgenetic embryos. In the present study, a diploid hAGES cell line has been established, which exhibits typical features of human ESCs, including the expression of pluripotency markers, having differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo, and stable propagation in an undifferentiated state (>P40). Bisulfite sequencing of the H19, Snrpn, Meg3, and Kv imprinting control regions suggested that hAGES cells maintained to a certain extent a sperm methylation pattern. Genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism, short tandem repeat, and HLA analyses revealed that the hAGES cell genome was highly homozygous. These results suggest that hAGES cells from spermatozoon could serve as a useful tool for studying the mechanisms underlying genomic imprinting in humans. It might also be used as a potential resource for cell replacement therapy as parthenogenetic stem cells.

  11. Human embryonic stem cell lines derived from the Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Fu FANG; Fan JIN; Hui GAI; Ying CHEN; Li WU; Ai Lian LIU; Bin CHEN; Hui Zhen SHENG

    2005-01-01

    Six human embryonic stem cell lines were established from surplus blastocysts. The cell lines expressed alkaline phosphatase and molecules typical of primate embryonic stem cells, including Oct-4, Nanog, TDGF1, Sox2, EBAF,Thy-1, FGF4, Rex-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. Five of the six lines formed embryoid bodies that expressed markers of a variety of cell types; four of them formed teratomas with tissue types representative of all three embryonic germ layers. These human embryonic stem cells are capable of producing clones of undifferentiated morphology, and one of them was propagated to become a subline. Human embryonic stem cell lines from the Chinese population should facilitate stem cell research and may be valuable in studies of population genetics and ecology.

  12. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induces cell proliferation in the mouse urogenital sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun-Jung; Bolton, Eric C

    2015-02-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a TGFβ family member, and GDNF signals through a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-linked cell surface receptor (GFRα1) and RET receptor tyrosine kinase. GDNF signaling plays crucial roles in urogenital processes, ranging from cell fate decisions in germline progenitors to ureteric bud outgrowth and renal branching morphogenesis. Gene ablation studies in mice have revealed essential roles for GDNF signaling in urogenital development, although its role in prostate development is unclear. We investigated the functional role of GDNF signaling in the urogenital sinus (UGS) and the developing prostate of mice. GDNF, GFRα1, and RET show time-specific and cell-specific expression during prostate development in vivo. In the UGS, GDNF and GFRα1 are expressed in the urethral mesenchyme (UrM) and epithelium (UrE), whereas RET is restricted to the UrM. In each lobe of the developing prostate, GDNF and GFRα1 expression declines in the epithelium and becomes restricted to the stroma. Using a well-established organ culture system, we determined that exogenous GDNF increases proliferation of UrM and UrE cells, altering UGS morphology. With regard to mechanism, GDNF signaling in the UrM increased RET expression and phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, inhibition of RET kinase activity or ERK kinases suppressed GDNF-induced proliferation of UrM cells but not UrE cells. We therefore propose that GDNF signaling in the UGS increases proliferation of UrM and UrE cells by different mechanisms, which are distinguished by the role of RET receptor tyrosine kinase and ERK kinase signaling, thus implicating GDNF signaling in prostate development and growth.

  13. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Seeding on Biofunctionalized Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WahWah TheinHan; Jun Liu; Minghui Tang; Wenchuan Chen; Linzhao Cheng; Hockin H. K. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have great potential due to their proliferation and differentiation capability. The objectives of this study were to generate iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs), and investigate iPSC-MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on calcium phosphate cement (CPC) containing biofunctional agents for the first time. Human iPSCs were derived from marrow CD34+ cells which were reprogrammed by a single episomal vector. iPSCs were cultured to form embryoid bodies (EBs), and MSCs migrated out of EBs. Five biofunctional agents were incorporated into CPC:RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptides, fibronectin (Fn), fibronectin-like engineered polymer protein (FEPP), extracellular matrix Geltrex, and platelet concentrate. iPSC-MSCs were seeded on five biofunctionalized CPCs:CPC-RGD, CPC-Fn, CPC-FEPP, CPC-Geltrex, and CPC-Platelets. iPSC-MSCs on biofunctional CPCs had enhanced proliferation, actin fiber expression, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, compared to control. Cell proliferation was greatly increased on biofunctional CPCs. iPSC-MSCs underwent osteogenic differentiation with increased alkaline phosphatase, Runx2 and collagen-I expressions. Mineral synthesis by iPSC-MSCs on CPC-Platelets was 3-fold that of CPC control. In conclusion, iPSCs showed high potential for bone engineering. iPSC-MSCs on biofunctionalized CPCs had cell proliferation and bone mineralization that were much better than traditional CPC. iPSC-MSC-CPC constructs are promising to promote bone regeneration in craniofacial/orthopedic repairs.

  14. Neuronal differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells and their transplantation for cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping Tian; Xiaoguang Luo; Jin Zhou; Jinge Wang; Bing Xu; Li Li; Feng Zhu; Jian Han; Jianping Li; Siyang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review published data on the biological characteristics, differentiation and applications of adipose-derived stem cells in ischemic diseases.DATA RETRIEVAL: A computer-based online search of reports published from January 2005 to June 2012 related to the development of adipose-derived stem cells and their transplantation for treatment of cerebral ischemia was performed in Web of Science using the key words"adipose-derived stem cells", "neural-like cells", "transplantation", "stroke", and "cerebral ischemia". SELECTION CRITERIA: The documents associated with the development of adipose-derived stem cells and their transplantation for treatment of cerebral ischemia were selected, and those published in the last 3-5 years or in authoritative journals were preferred in the same field. Totally 89 articles were obtained in the initial retrieval, of which 53 were chosen based on the inclusion criteria. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Biological characteristics and induced differentiation ofadipose-derived stem cells and cell transplantation for disease treatment as well as the underlying mechanism of clinical application. RESULTS: The advantages of adipose-derived stem cells include their ease of procurement, wide availability, rapid expansion, low tumorigenesis, low immunogenicity, and absence of ethical constraints. Preclinical experiments have demonstrated that transplanted adipose-derived stem cells can improve neurological functions, reduce small regions of cerebral infarction, promote angiogenesis, and express neuron-specific markers. The improvement of neurological functions was demonstrated in experiments using different methods and time courses of adipose-derived stem cell transplantation, but the mechanisms remain unclear.CONCLUSION: Further research into the treatment of ischemic disease by adipose-derived stem cell transplantation is needed to determine their mechanism of action.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes: New Opportunity in Cell-Free Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashoutan Sarvar, Davod; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are involved in tissue homeostasis through direct cell-to-cell interaction, as well as secretion of soluble factors. Exosomes are the sort of soluble biological mediators that obtained from MSCs cultured media in vitro. MSC-derived exosomes (MSC-DEs) which produced under physiological or pathological conditions are central mediators of intercellular communications by conveying proteins, lipids, mRNAs, siRNA, ribosomal RNAs and miRNAs to the neighbor or distant cells. MSC-DEs have been tested in various disease models, and the results have revealed that their functions are similar to those of MSCs. They have the supportive functions in organisms such as repairing tissue damages, suppressing inflammatory responses, and modulating the immune system. MSC-DEs are of great interest in the scope of regenerative medicine because of their unique capacity to the regeneration of the damaged tissues, and the present paper aims to introduce MSC-DEs as a novel hope in cell-free therapy.

  16. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals. PMID:27409807

  17. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  18. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human cancer-derived cell lines (HeLa, Si

  19. Neural precursors derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Hongmei; Chen Gui'an

    2005-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells provide a promising supply of specific cell types for transplantation therapy. We presented here the method to induce differentiation of purified neural precursors from hES cells, hES cells (Line PKU-1 and Line PKU-2) were cultured in suspension in bacteriological Petri dishes, which differentiated into cystic embryoid bodies (EBs).The EBs were then cultured in N2 medium containing bFGF in poly- L-lysine-coated tissue culture dishes for two weeks. The central, small cells with 2-3 short processes of the spreading outgrowth were isolated mechanically and replated. The resulting neurospheres were cultured in suspension for 10 days, then dissociated into single cell suspension with a Pasteur pipette and plated. Cells grew vigorously in an attached way and were passed every 4-5 days. Almost all the cells were proved nestin positive by immunostaining. Following withdrawal of bFGF, they differentiated into neurons expressing β-tubulin isotypeⅢ, GABA, serotonin and synaptophysin.Through induction of PDGF-AA, they differentiated into astrocytes expressing GFAP and oligodendrocytes expressing O4. The results showed that hES cells can differentiate into typical neural precursors expressing the specific marker nestin and capable of generating all three cell types of the central nervous system (CNS) in vitro.

  20. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The s...

  1. Multipotent properties of myofibroblast cells derived from human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Strakova, Zuzana; Livak, Mark; Krezalek, Monika; Ihnatovych, Ivanna

    2008-01-01

    Human uterine fibroblasts (HuF) isolated from the maternal part (decidua parietalis) of a term placenta provide a useful model of in vitro cell differentiation into decidual cells (decidualization), critical for successful pregnancy. After isolation, the cells adhere to plastic and have either a small round or spindle-shaped morphology which later changes into a flattened pattern in culture. HuF robustly proliferate in culture until passage 20 and form colonies when plated at low densities. T...

  2. Cutaneous postirradiation sarcoma. Ultrastructural evidence of pluripotential mesenchymal cell derivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 75-year-old man developed synchronous multicentric cutaneous sarcomas and basal cell carcinoma of the face 57 years after receiving irradiation for acne. During the previous 30 years he had been treated many times for actinic keratoses and basal cell carcinomas. Surgical treatment had included total nasectomy, excision, and replacement of the skin of the upper and lower lips and the chin. Due to the multiplicity of morphologic patterns, it was difficult to subtype the sarcomas. Ultrastructural studies showed histiocyte-like, fibroblast-like and vasoformative cells suggesting an origin from a pluripotential mesenchymal stem cells

  3. Modeling Dengue Virus-Hepatic Cell Interactions Using Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jianshe; Vera, Daniel; Cheng, Yichen; Tang, Hengli

    2016-09-13

    The development of dengue antivirals and vaccine has been hampered by the incomplete understanding of molecular mechanisms of dengue virus (DENV) infection and pathology, partly due to the limited suitable cell culture or animal models that can capture the comprehensive cellular changes induced by DENV. In this study, we differentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into hepatocytes, one of the target cells of DENV, to investigate various aspects of DENV-hepatocyte interaction. hPSC-derived hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) supported persistent and productive DENV infection. The activation of interferon pathways by DENV protected bystander cells from infection and protected the infected cells from massive apoptosis. Furthermore, DENV infection activated the NF-κB pathway, which led to production of proinflammatory cytokines and downregulated many liver-specific genes such as albumin and coagulation factor V. Our study demonstrates the utility of hPSC-derived hepatocytes as an in vitro model for DENV infection and reveals important aspects of DENV-host interactions. PMID:27546535

  4. Gastroprotective Mechanisms of Action of Semisynthetic Carnosic Acid Derivatives in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carnosic acid (CA and its semisynthetic derivatives display relevant gastroprotective effects on HCl/ethanol induced gastric lesions in mice. However, little is known on the mechanisms of action of the new compounds. The aim of the present work was to assess the gastroprotective action mechanisms of CA and its derivatives using human cell culture models. A human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line (AGS and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 were used to reveal the possible mechanisms involved. The ability of the compounds to protect cells against sodium taurocholate (NaT-induced damage, and to increase the cellular reduced glutathione (GSH and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 content was determined using AGS cells. Stimulation of cell proliferation was studied employing MRC-5 fibroblasts. Carnosic acid and its derivatives 10–18 raised GSH levels in AGS cells. While CA did not increase the PGE2 content in AGS cells, all derivatives significantly stimulated PGE2 synthesis, the best effect being found for the 12-O-indolebutyrylmethylcarnosate 13. A significant increase in MRC-5 fibroblast proliferation was observed for the derivatives 7 and 16–18. The antioxidant effect of the compounds was assessed by the inhibition of lipid peroxidation in human erythrocyte membranes, scavenging of superoxide anion and DPPH discoloration assay. The new CA derivatives showed gastroprotective effects by different mechanisms, including protection against cell damage induced by NaT, increase in GSH content, stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and cell proliferation.

  5. Reprogramming of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into functional insulin-producing cells by chemical regimen

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qiwei; Ye, Lingling; Liu, Hong; Liu, Xingmao; Li, Shichong; Chen, Zhaolie

    2012-01-01

    Beta-cell transplantation is considered to be the most effective approach to cure type 1 diabetes (T1D). Unfortunately, the scarce availability of donor tissue limits the applicability of this therapy. Recent stem cell research progress shows stem cell therapy may be a potential means to solve this problem. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are self-renewable and multipotent adult stem cells which can differentiate into the three germ layers. Here we aimed to investigate wheth...

  6. Glucose responsive insulin production from human embryonic germ (EG) cell derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus subjects millions to a daily burden of disease management, life threatening hypoglycemia and long-term complications such as retinopathy, nephropathy, heart disease, and stroke. Cell transplantation therapies providing a glucose-regulated supply of insulin have been implemented clinically, but are limited by safety, efficacy and supply considerations. Stem cells promise a plentiful and flexible source of cells for transplantation therapies. Here, we show that cells derived from human embryonic germ (EG) cells express markers of definitive endoderm, pancreatic and β-cell development, glucose sensing, and production of mature insulin. These cells integrate functions necessary for glucose responsive regulation of preproinsulin mRNA and expression of insulin C-peptide in vitro. Following transplantation into mice, cells become insulin and C-peptide immunoreactive and produce plasma C-peptide in response to glucose. These findings suggest that EG cell derivatives may eventually serve as a source of insulin producing cells for the treatment of diabetes

  7. Transplantation of bone marrow derived cells promotes pancreatic islet repair in diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transplantation of bone marrow (BM) derived cells to initiate pancreatic regeneration is an attractive but as-yet unrealized strategy. Presently, BM derived cells from green fluorescent protein transgenic mice were transplanted into diabetic mice. Repair of diabetic islets was evidenced by reduction of hyperglycemia, increase in number of islets, and altered pancreatic histology. Cells in the pancreata of recipient mice co-expressed BrdU and insulin. Double staining revealed β cells were in the process of proliferation. BrdU+ insulin- PDX-1+ cells, Ngn3+ cells and insulin+ glucagon+ cells, which showed stem cells, were also found during β-cell regeneration. The majority of transplanted cells were mobilized to the islet and ductal regions. In recipient pancreas, transplanted cells simultaneously expressed CD34 but did not express insulin, PDX-1, Ngn3, Nkx2.2, Nkx6.1, Pax4, Pax6, and CD45. It is concluded that BM derived cells especially CD34+ cells can promote repair of pancreatic islets. Moreover, both proliferation of β cells and differentiation of pancreatic stem cells contribute to the regeneration of β cells

  8. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes are Cell Line-Dependent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Hannes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modelling of cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology by differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs requires comparability of cardiac differentiation between different ESC lines. To investigate whether the outcome of cardiac differentiation is consistent between different ESC lines, we compared electrophysiological properties of ESC-derived cardiomyocytes (ESC-CMs of different murine ESC lines. Methods: Two wild-type (D3 and R1 and two transgenic ESC lines (D3/aPIG44 and CGR8/AMPIGX-7 were differentiated under identical culture conditions. The transgenic cell lines expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP and puromycin-N-acetyltransferase under control of the cardiac specific α-myosin heavy chain (αMHC promoter. Action potentials (APs were recorded using sharp electrodes and multielectrode arrays in beating clusters of ESC-CMs. Results: Spontaneous AP frequency and AP duration (APD as well as maximal upstroke velocity differed markedly between unpurified CMs of the four ESC lines. APD heterogeneity was negligible in D3/aPIG44, moderate in D3 and R1 and extensive in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Interspike intervals calculated from long-term recordings showed a high degree of variability within and between recordings in CGR8/AMPIGX-7, but not in D3/aPIG44. Purification of the αMHC+ population by puromycin treatment posed only minor changes to APD in D3/aPIG44, but significantly shortened APD in CGR8/AMPIGX-7. Conclusion: Electrophysiological properties of ESC-CMs are strongly cell line-dependent and can be influenced by purification of cardiomyocytes by antibiotic selection. Thus, conclusions on cardiac development, physiology and pharmacology derived from single stem cell lines have to be interpreted carefully.

  9. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells prevent allergic airway inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue-Qi; Deng, Meng-Xia; He, Jia; Zeng, Qing-Xiang; Wen, Weiping; Wong, David S H; Tse, Hung-Fat; Xu, Geng; Lian, Qizhou; Shi, Jianbo; Fu, Qing-Ling

    2012-12-01

    We previously found that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exerted immunomodulatory effects on Th2-mediated allergic rhinitis in vitro. However, their contribution to the asthma and allergic rhinitis in animal models remains unclear. In this study, we developed a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic inflammation in both the upper and lower airways and evaluated the effects of the systemic administration of human iPSC-MSCs and bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on allergic inflammation. Our results showed that treatments with both the iPSC-MSCs and BM-MSCs before the challenge phase protected the animals from the majority of allergy-specific pathological changes. This protection included an inhibition of inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus production in the lung, a reduction in eosinophil infiltration in the nose, and a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration in both the bronchoalveolar and nasal lavage fluids. In addition, treatment with iPSC-MSCs or BM-MSCs before the challenge phase resulted in reduced serum levels of Th2 immunoglobulins (e.g., IgE) and decreased levels of Th2 cytokines including interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, or IL-13 in the bronchoalveolar and/or nasal lavage fluids. Similar therapeutic effects were observed when the animals were pretreated with human iPSC-MSCs before the sensitization phase. These data suggest that iPSC-MSCs may be used as an alternative strategy to adult MSCs in the treatment of asthma and allergic rhinitis. PMID:22987325

  10. Cardiac Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Exhibit High Differentiation Potential to Cardiovascular Cells in C57BL/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hiroki; Ii, Masaaki; Kohbayashi, Eiko; Hoshiga, Masaaki; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Asahi, Michio

    2016-02-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (AdSCs) have recently been shown to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells. However, little is known about the fat tissue origin-dependent differences in AdSC function and differentiation potential. AdSC-rich cells were isolated from subcutaneous, visceral, cardiac (CA), and subscapular adipose tissue from mice and their characteristics analyzed. After four different AdSC types were cultured with specific differentiation medium, immunocytochemical analysis was performed for the assessment of differentiation into cardiovascular cells. We then examined the in vitro differentiation capacity and therapeutic potential of AdSCs in ischemic myocardium using a mouse myocardial infarction model. The cell density and proliferation activity of CA-derived AdSCs were significantly increased compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Immunocytochemistry showed that CA-derived AdSCs had the highest appearance rates of markers for endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes among the AdSCs. Systemic transfusion of CA-derived AdSCs exhibited the highest cardiac functional recovery after myocardial infarction and the high frequency of the recruitment to ischemic myocardium. Moreover, long-term follow-up of the recruited CA-derived AdSCs frequently expressed cardiovascular cell markers compared with the other adipose tissue-derived AdSCs. Cardiac adipose tissue could be an ideal source for isolation of therapeutically effective AdSCs for cardiac regeneration in ischemic heart diseases. Significance: The present study found that cardiac adipose-derived stem cells have a high potential to differentiate into cardiovascular lineage cells (i.e., cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells) compared with stem cells derived from other adipose tissue such as subcutaneous, visceral, and subscapular adipose tissue. Notably, only a small number of supracardiac adipose-derived stem cells that were

  11. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light

    OpenAIRE

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm2). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxyg...

  12. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_mesendodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... ectodermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... ectodermal cells SRX702062 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... pancreatic cells SRX146010,SRX146009 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... ectodermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... endoodermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... ectodermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... pancreatic cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural cells SRX378284 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... cardiac cells SRX305934,SRX305933,SRX305932,SRX305935 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... cardiac cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells SRX121240,SRX121254,SRX134724 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... pancreatic cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... pancreatic cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells SRX305933,SRX305932,SRX305935,SRX305934 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells SRX685643,SRX685645,SRX685642,SRX685644 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells SRX305933,SRX305932,SRX305935,SRX305934 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells SRX685645,SRX685643,SRX685642,SRX685644 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells SRX685645,SRX685643,SRX685642,SRX685644 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived cardia...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_cardiac_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreat...ic cells SRX146010,SRX146009 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX404487 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreat...ic cells SRX146010,SRX146009 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancrea...tic cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreati...c cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived pancreatic... cells SRX146012,SRX146011 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_pancreatic_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem c...ell mESC derived endoodermal cells SRX501738 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem ...cell hESC derived ectodermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem c...ell mESC derived endoodermal cells SRX501738 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082043,SRX1082042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082042,SRX1082043 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082041 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082043,SRX1082042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082041 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082041 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082043,SRX1082042 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells SRX1082041 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived epib...last-like cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_epiblast-like_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... trophoblast cells SRX378285 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_trophoblast_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells SRX702062 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived ecto...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_ectodermal_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440736,SRX440731 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440731,SRX440736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived end...oodermal cells SRX390400,SRX390398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived end...oodermal cells SRX404485,SRX404486 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived end...oodermal cells SRX501738 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived end...oodermal cells SRX501738 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells mm9 Input control Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived end...oodermal cells SRX390400,SRX390398 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_endoodermal_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells SRX404483,SRX404484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells SRX305931,SRX305930 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells SRX404483,SRX404484 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived meso...dermal cells SRX305930,SRX305931 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  11. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_mesodermal_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. Biogenesis and function of T cell-derived exosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Alonso

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins and nucleic acids confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes.

  14. Biogenesis and Function of T Cell-Derived Exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Alonso, Miguel A

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a particular type of extracellular vesicle, characterized by their endosomal origin as intraluminal vesicles present in large endosomes with a multivesicular structure. After these endosomes fuse with the plasma membrane, exosomes are secreted into the extracellular space. The ability of exosomes to carry and selectively deliver bioactive molecules (e.g., lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids) confers on them the capacity to modulate the activity of receptor cells, even if these cells are located in distant tissues or organs. Since exosomal cargo depends on cell type, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the biochemical composition of exosomes is fundamental to a comprehensive view of exosome function. Here, we review the latest advances concerning exosome function and biogenesis in T cells, with particular focus on the mechanism of protein sorting at multivesicular endosomes. Exosomes secreted by specific T-cell subsets can modulate the activity of immune cells, including other T-cell subsets. Ceramide, tetraspanins and MAL have been revealed to be important in exosome biogenesis by T cells. These molecules, therefore, constitute potential molecular targets for artificially modulating exosome production and, hence, the immune response for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27583248

  15. Ovine carotid artery-derived cells as an optimized supportive cell layer in 2-D capillary network assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Weinandy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial cell co-culture assays are differentiation assays which simulate the formation of capillary-like tubules with the aid of a supportive cell layer. Different cell types have been employed as a supportive cell layer, including human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and human mammary fibroblasts. However, these sources of human tissue-derived cells are limited, and more readily accessible human or animal tissue-derived cell sources would simplify the endothelial cell co-culture assay. In the present study, we investigated the potential use of alternative, accessible supportive cells for endothelial cell co-culture assay, including human umbilical cord and ovine carotid artery. METHODS AND RESULTS: Human umbilical artery SMCs (HUASMCs and ovine carotid artery-derived cells were seeded into 96-well plates, followed by addition of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Nine days after co-culture, cells were fixed, immunostained and analysed using an in vitro angiogenesis quantification tool. Capillary-like structures were detected on ovine carotid artery-derived supportive cell layers. The initial cell number, as well as pro- and anti-angiogenic factors (VEGF, PDGF-BB and Bevacizumab, had a positive or negative influence on the number of capillary-like structures. Furthermore, HUVECs from different donors showed distinct levels of VEGF receptor-2, which correlated with the amount of capillary-like structures. In the case of HUASMC supportive cell layers, HUVECs detached almost completely from the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Cells of different origin have a varying applicability regarding the endothelial cell co-culture assay: under the conditions described here, ovine carotid artery-derived cells seem to be more suitable than HUASMCs for an endothelial co-culture assay. Furthermore, the ovine carotid artery-derived cells are easier to obtain and are in more abundant supply than the currently used dermal or breast

  16. Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Fotino, Carmen; Ricordi, Camillo; Lauriola, Vincenzo; Alejandro, Rodolfo; Pileggi, Antonello

    2010-01-01

    The bone marrow is an invaluable source of adult pluripotent stem cells, as it gives rise to hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and mesenchymal cells, amongst others. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMC) transplantation (BMT) may be of assistance in achieving tissue repair and regeneration, as well as in modulating immune responses in the context of autoimmunity and transplantation. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effects of BMC to preserve functiona...

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Adipose-Derived SSEA-3-Positive Muse Cells for Treating Diabetic Skin Ulcers

    OpenAIRE

    Kinoshita, Kahori; Kuno, Shinichiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Aoi, Noriyuki; Mineda, Kazuhide; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Mashiko, Takanobu; Kurisaki, Akira; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2015-01-01

    Refractory skin ulcers were generated in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with type 1 diabetes and delayed wound healing compared with nondiabetic SCID mice. Treatment with a multilineage differentiating stress-enduring (Muse)-rich cell population significantly accelerated wound healing compared with the Muse-poor cell population, and these cells be achieved in large amounts with minimal morbidity. Adipose-derived Muse cells could be a practical tool for a variety of stem cell-dep...

  18. Keratocytes Derived from Spheroid Culture of Corneal Stromal Cells Resemble Tissue Resident Keratocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Yong-Soo; Tibrewal, Sapna; Kim, Eunjae; Yco, Lisette; Sarkar, Joy; Ivanir, Yair; Liu, Chia-Yang; Sano, Cecile M.; Jain, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Corneal stromal cells transform to precursor cells in spheroid culture. We determined whether keratocytes derived from spheroid culture of murine corneal stromal cells resemble tissue resident keratocytes. Methods Spheroid culture was performed by seeding dissociated stromal cells onto ultra-low attachment plates containing serum-free mesenchymal stem cell culture medium. Spheroids were characterized with phenotype specific markers and stemness transcription factor genes. Spheroids an...

  19. GATA2 regulates differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kamata, Mayumi; Okitsu, Yoko; Fujiwara, Tohru; Kanehira, Masahiko; Nakajima, Shinji; Takahashi, Taro; Inoue, Ai; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment comprises multiple cell niches derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. However, the molecular mechanism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation is poorly understood. The transcription factor GATA2 is indispensable for hematopoietic stem cell function as well as other hematopoietic lineages, suggesting that it may maintain bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in an immature state and also contribute to their differentiation. To explore this ...

  20. Derivation of Myogenic Progenitors Directly From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Sphere-Based Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hosoyama, Tohru; McGivern, Jered V.; Van Dyke, Jonathan M.; Allison D Ebert; Suzuki, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    The authors present a novel protocol for deriving myogenic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells using free-floating spherical culture. Results show that sphere-based cultures of human pluripotent stem cells, expanded in medium containing high concentrations of fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor, can propagate myogenic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells and healthy and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells.