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Sample records for cd-free cigs based

  1. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  2. Survey of CIG Data Base Generation from Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    200, February 1980. McGrath, J., "The Use of Wide-Angle Cinematic Simulators in Pilot Training", Technical Report NAVTRAEQUIPCEN 70-C-0306-1, March 1973... March 1974. 5 NAVTRAEQUIPCEN IH-318 algorithms which utilize data bases in which the inf)rmation is stored as planar polygons. In currint, real-time CIG...Vision Simulation and Motion Conference, April 1976. 42McGrath, J., "The Use of Wide-Angle Cinematic Simulators in Pilot Training", Technical Report

  3. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Cost and Throughput Improvements for Thin Film CIGS-Based Modules: Final Technical Report, July 1998 -- September 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, J.

    2002-04-01

    This report describes the marked improvements made of the production line under the PVMaT program: successfully developed a high-speed, all-laser, monolithic integration process for CIGS-based modules on polyimide substrates; exceeded PVMaT goals for scribing rate and total interconnect width; developed robust, well-controlled techniques for selective scribing; improved CIGS evaporation sources to allow uniform, controllable delivery; completed foundation required to integrate higher CIGS deposition rates into the production line; developed well-controlled Se delivery system to minimize Se consumption; successfully integrated the parallel-detector spectroscope ellipsometer (PDSE) into a production CIGS deposition chamber; collected useful, in-situ data with PDSE; validated the performance of the X-ray fluorescometry (XRF) sensor in the production CIGS deposition chamber; and successfully incorporated the XRF sensor into the control architecture of the production CIGS deposition chamber .

  4. Hydrazine-based deposition route for device-quality CIGS films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitzi, David B.; Yuan, Min; Liu, Wei; Kellock, Andrew J.; Chey, S. Jay; Gignac, Lynne; Schrott, Alex G.

    2009-01-01

    A simple solution-based approach for depositing CIGS (Cu-In-Ga-Se/S) absorber layers is discussed, with an emphasis on film characterization, interfacial properties and integration into photovoltaic devices. The process involves incorporating all metal and chalcogenide components into a single hydrazine-based solution, spin coating a precursor film, and heat treating in an inert atmosphere, to form the desired CIGS film with up to micron-scaled film thickness and grain size. PV devices (glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/i-ZnO/ITO) employing the spin-coated CIGS and using processing temperatures below 500 deg. C have yielded power conversion efficiencies of up to 10% (AM 1.5 illumination), without the need for a post-CIGS-deposition treatment in a gaseous Se source or a cyanide-based bath etch. Short-duration low-temperature (T < 200 deg. C ) oxygen treatment of completed devices is shown to have a positive impact on the performance of initially underperforming cells, thereby enabling better performance in devices prepared at temperatures below 500 deg. C

  5. Hydrazine-based deposition route for device-quality CIGS films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitzi, David B. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)], E-mail: dmitzi@us.ibm.com; Yuan, Min; Liu, Wei [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kellock, Andrew J [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Rd, San Jose, CA 95120 (United States); Chey, S Jay; Gignac, Lynne; Schrott, Alex G [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2009-02-02

    A simple solution-based approach for depositing CIGS (Cu-In-Ga-Se/S) absorber layers is discussed, with an emphasis on film characterization, interfacial properties and integration into photovoltaic devices. The process involves incorporating all metal and chalcogenide components into a single hydrazine-based solution, spin coating a precursor film, and heat treating in an inert atmosphere, to form the desired CIGS film with up to micron-scaled film thickness and grain size. PV devices (glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/i-ZnO/ITO) employing the spin-coated CIGS and using processing temperatures below 500 deg. C have yielded power conversion efficiencies of up to 10% (AM 1.5 illumination), without the need for a post-CIGS-deposition treatment in a gaseous Se source or a cyanide-based bath etch. Short-duration low-temperature (T < 200 deg. C ) oxygen treatment of completed devices is shown to have a positive impact on the performance of initially underperforming cells, thereby enabling better performance in devices prepared at temperatures below 500 deg. C.

  6. Raster Scan Computer Image Generation (CIG) System Based On Refresh Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, W.; Doris, K.; Conkling, C.

    1982-06-01

    A full color, Computer Image Generation (CIG) raster visual system has been developed which provides a high level of training sophistication by utilizing advanced semiconductor technology and innovative hardware and firmware techniques. Double buffered refresh memory and efficient algorithms eliminate the problem of conventional raster line ordering by allowing the generated image to be stored in a random fashion. Modular design techniques and simplified architecture provide significant advantages in reduced system cost, standardization of parts, and high reliability. The major system components are a general purpose computer to perform interfacing and data base functions; a geometric processor to define the instantaneous scene image; a display generator to convert the image to a video signal; an illumination control unit which provides final image processing; and a CRT monitor for display of the completed image. Additional optional enhancements include texture generators, increased edge and occultation capability, curved surface shading, and data base extensions.

  7. All-Nonvacuum-Processed CIGS Solar Cells Using Scalable Ag NWs/AZO-Based Transparent Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingqing; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2016-07-06

    With record cell efficiency of 21.7%, CIGS solar cells have demonstrated to be a very promising photovoltaic (PV) technology. However, their market penetration has been limited due to the inherent high cost of the cells. In this work, to lower the cost of CIGS solar cells, all nonvacuum-processed CIGS solar cells were designed and developed. CIGS absorber was prepared by the annealing of electrodeposited metallic layers in a chalcogen atmosphere. Nonvacuum-deposited Ag nanowires (NWs)/AZO transparent electrodes (TEs) with good transmittance (92.0% at 550 nm) and high conductivity (sheet resistance of 20 Ω/□) were used to replace the vacuum-sputtered window layer. Additional thermal treatment after device preparation was conducted at 220 °C for a few of minutes to improve both the value and the uniformity of the efficiency of CIGS pixel cell on 5 × 5 cm substrate. The best performance of the all-nonvacuum-fabricated CIGS solar cells showed an efficiency of 14.05% with Jsc of 34.82 mA/cm(2), Voc of 0.58 V, and FF of 69.60%, respectively, which is comparable with the efficiency of 14.45% of a reference cell using a sputtered window layer.

  8. Photovoltaic manufacturing cost and throughput improvements for thin-film CIGS-based modules: Phase 1 technical report, July 1998--July 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeman, S.; Wendt, R.G.

    2000-03-01

    The primary objectives of the Global Solar Energy (GSE) Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract are directed toward reducing cost and expanding the production rate of thin-film CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS)-based PV modules on flexible substrates. Improvements will be implemented in monolithic integration, CIGS deposition, contact deposition, and in-situ CIGS control and monitoring. In Phase 1, GSE has successfully attacked many of the highest risk aspects of each task. All-laser, selective scribing processes for CIGS have been developed, and many end-of-contract goals for scribing speed have been exceeded in the first year. High-speed ink-jet deposition of insulating material in the scribes now appears to be a viable technique, again exceeding some end-of-contract goals in the first year. Absorber deposition of CIGS was reduced corresponding to throughput speeds of up to 24-in/min, also exceeding an end-of-contract goal. Alternate back-contact materials have been identified that show potential as candidates for replacement of higher-cost molybdenum, and a novel, real-time monitoring technique (parallel-detector spectroscopic ellipsometry) has shown remarkable sensitivity to relevant properties of the CIGS absorber layer for use as a diagnostic tool. Currently, one of the bilayers has been baselined by GSE for flexible CIGS on polymeric substrates. Resultant back-contacts meet sheet-resistance goals and exhibit much less intrinsic stress than Mo. CIGS has been deposited, and resultant devices are comparable in performance to pure Mo back-contacts. Debris in the chamber has been substantially reduced, allowing longer roll-length between system cleaning.

  9. Nanosecond laser scribing of CIGS thin film solar cell based on ITO bottom contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Seungkuk; Wang, Zhen; Fu, Shi; Zhang, Tao; Yu, Yi Yin; Choi, JaeMyung; Jeong, Jeung-hyun; Hwang, David J.

    2018-03-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films, a promising photovoltaic architecture, have mainly relied on Molybdenum for the bottom contact. However, the opaque nature of Molybdenum (Mo) poses limitations in module level fabrication by laser scribing as a preferred method for interconnect. We examined the P1, P2, and P3 laser scribing processes on CIGS photovoltaic architecture on the indium tin oxide (ITO) bottom contact with a cost-effective nanosecond pulsed laser of 532 nm wavelength. Laser illuminated from the substrate side, enabled by the transparent bottom contact, facilitated selective laser energy deposition onto relevant interfaces towards high-quality scribing. Parametric tuning procedures are described in conjunction with experimental and numerical investigation of relevant mechanisms, and preliminary mini-module fabrication results are also presented.

  10. Analysis on the Performance of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Based Photovoltaic Thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulkepli Afzam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the efficiency improvement of Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS Photovoltaic (PV and also solar thermal collector. Photovoltaic thermal (PV/T can improve overall efficiency for PV and also solve the problem of limited roof space at urban area. Objective of this study is to clarify the effect of mass flow rate on the efficiency of the PV/T system. A CIGS solar cell is used with rated output power 65 W and 1.18 m2 of area. 4 set of experiments were carried out, which were: thermal collector with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate, PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate and PV. It was found that PV/T with 0.12 kg/s flow rate had the highest electrical efficiency, 2.92 %. PV/T with 0.09 kg/s flow rate had the lowest electrical efficiency, 2.68 %. It also had 2 % higher overall efficiency. The efficiency gained is low due to several factors. The rated output power of the PV is low for the area of 1.18 m2. The packing factor of the PV also need to be considered as it may not be operated at the optimal packing factor. Furthermore, aluminium sheet of the PV may affect the PV temperature due to high thermal conductivity. Further study on more values of mass flow rate and also other parameters that affect the efficiency of the PV/T is necessary.

  11. Noise properties of Pb/Cd-free thick film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, Adam Witold; Kolek, Andrzej; Zawislak, Zbigniew; Mleczko, Krzysztof; Jakubowska, Malgorzata; Kielbasinski, Konrad Rafal; Mlozniak, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Low-frequency noise spectroscopy has been used to examine noise properties of Pb/Cd-free RuO 2 - and CaRuO 3 -based thick films screen printed on alumina substrates. Experiments were performed in the temperature range 77-300 K and the frequency range 0.5-5000 Hz with multiterminal devices. The measured noise has been recognized as resistance noise that consists of background 1/f noise and components generated by several thermally activated noise sources (TANSs) of different activation energies. The total noise has been composed of the contributions generated in the resistive layer and in the resistive/conductive layers interface. These noise sources are non-uniformly distributed in the resistor volume. Noise intensity of new-resistive layers has been described by the noise parameter C bulk . Pb/Cd-free layers turned out to be noisier than their Pb-containing counterparts; however, the removal of Pb and Cd from resistive composition is hardly responsible for the increase in the noise. In the case of RuO 2 layers noise increases most likely due to larger grain size of RuO 2 powder used to prepare resistive pastes. Information on the quality of the resistive-to-conductive layers interface occurred to be stored in the values of noise parameter C int . Pb/Cd-free RuO 2 -based resistive pastes form well-behaved interfaces with various Ag-based conductive pastes. In contrast, CaRuO 3 -based paste forms bad contacts with AgPd terminations because the density of TANSs increases in the interface area.

  12. 7 CFR 1466.27 - Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., evaluation, and implementation of: (i) Conservation adoption incentive systems, including market-based... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG). 1466.27 Section... PROGRAM Contracts and Payments § 1466.27 Conservation Innovation Grants (CIG). (a) Definitions. In...

  13. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale commercial introduction of CIGS photovoltaics (PV) requires modules with low costs, high efficiencies and long and predictable lifetimes. Unfortunately,knowledge about the lifetime of CIGS PV is limited, which is reflected in the results of field studies: degradation rates varying from

  14. Commercialization of High Efficiency Low Cost CIGS Technology Based on Electroplating: Final Technical Progress Report, 28 September 2007 - 30 June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basol, B.

    2010-08-01

    This report describes SoloPower's work as a Photovoltaic Technology Incubator awardee within the U.S. Department of Energy's Solar Energy Technologies Program. The term of this subcontract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory was two years. The project focused on SoloPower's electrodeposition-based copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) technology. Under this subcontract, SoloPower improved the quality of its flexible metal substrates, increased the size of its solar cells from 0.5 cm2 to 120 cm2, increased the small-area cell efficiencies from near 11% to near 14%, demonstrated large-area cells, and developed a module manufacturing process.

  15. E-Cigs, Menthol & Dip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are many types of tobacco products. Learn how e-cigarettes, menthol cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and other products are ... your health. What We Know About Electronic Cigarettes (E-cigarettes) Some people use e-cigs to quit smoking. ...

  16. E-Cigs, Menthol & Dip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Close Search × MENU BACK CLOSE SMOKEFREE.GOV HOME E-Cigs, Menthol & Dip There are many types of tobacco products. Learn how e-cigarettes, menthol cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, and other products ...

  17. Semi-transparent photovoltaic glazing based on electrodeposited CIGS solar cells on patterned molybdenum/glass substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidali Tarik

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new way of preparing semi-transparent solar cells using Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS chalcopyrite semiconductors as absorbers for BIPV applications is presented. The key to the elaboration process consists in the co-electrodeposition of Cu-In-Ga mixed oxides on submillimetric hole-patterned molybdenum substrate, followed by thermal reduction to metallic alloys and selenisation. This method has the advantage of being a selective deposition technique where the thin film growth is carried out only on Mo covered areas. Thus, after annealing, the transparency of the sample is always preserved, allowing light to pass through the device. A complete device (5 × 5 cm2 with 535 μm diameter holes and total glass aperture of around 35% shows an open circuit voltage (VOC of 400 mV. Locally, the I-V curves reveal a maximum efficiency of 7.7%, VOC of 460 mV, JSC of 24 mA.cm−2 in an area of 0.1 cm2 with 35% aperture. This efficiency on the semi-transparent area is equivalent to a record efficiency of 11.9% by taking into account only the effective area.

  18. Semi-transparent photovoltaic glazing based on electrodeposited CIGS solar cells on patterned molybdenum/glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidali, Tarik; Bou, Adrien; Coutancier, Damien; Chassaing, Elisabeth; Theys, Bertrand; Barakel, Damien; Garuz, Richard; Thoulon, Pierre-Yves; Lincot, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a new way of preparing semi-transparent solar cells using Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) chalcopyrite semiconductors as absorbers for BIPV applications is presented. The key to the elaboration process consists in the co-electrodeposition of Cu-In-Ga mixed oxides on submillimetric hole-patterned molybdenum substrate, followed by thermal reduction to metallic alloys and selenisation. This method has the advantage of being a selective deposition technique where the thin film growth is carried out only on Mo covered areas. Thus, after annealing, the transparency of the sample is always preserved, allowing light to pass through the device. A complete device (5 × 5 cm2) with 535 μm diameter holes and total glass aperture of around 35% shows an open circuit voltage (VOC) of 400 mV. Locally, the I-V curves reveal a maximum efficiency of 7.7%, VOC of 460 mV, JSC of 24 mA.cm-2 in an area of 0.1 cm2 with 35% aperture. This efficiency on the semi-transparent area is equivalent to a record efficiency of 11.9% by taking into account only the effective area.

  19. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film CIGS solar cells and individual layers within these solar cells have been tested in order to assess their long term stability. Alongside with the execution of standard tests, in which elevated temperatures and humidity levels are used, the solar cells have also been exposed to a

  20. CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 2 Uppsala University Final report 2006-01-01 - 2007-06-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edoff, Marika (Thin Film Solar Cell group, Dep. Technical Sciences, Uppsala Univ., P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)) (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The project CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 2 has been going on for 18,5 months and was interrupted in advance on the 14th of June, 2007. The decision to shorten the period was taken by the board of the Swedish Energy Agency the 14th of February. It was decided to reevaluate and re-direct the financial support to the group. A new project, CIGS Thin Film Solar Cells, phase 3, superseded this project and will go on for the initially planned project period (until 2009-12-31). During the project much of the focus has been on research on Cd-free buffer layers, with an emphasis on the interface properties between the CIGS and the buffer layer. (CIGS is a commonly used acronym for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}, which is the active absorption layer in this type of solar cells) The combination of high quality CIGS and the new buffer layers has been another field of interest. CIGS solar cell module development and computer modelling of solar cells and modules has been the third major research area. The results show that the group still holds a position as one of the leaders in the world in this field. The 18.5 % efficient Cd-free solar cell, which was obtained and independently confirmed is only one percent away from the world record and in addition it is Cd-free using a Zn(O,S) buffer layer (the world record from NREL contains Cd). By alloying ZnO with MgO instead of ZnS almost equally good results can be achieved. During the last half year an 18.1 % cell has been measured with a (Zn,Mg)O buffer layer. Solar cell module technology includes several research issues, both fundamental as e.g. modelling of cell voltage and losses as a function of distance from interconnect to interconnect, but also more development as e.g. encapsulation routines. The harsh environment test (damp heat test) run at 85 deg C and 85 % relative humidity for 1000 hours was passed for both a small (12.5x12.5 cm2) and a large (27.5x30 cm2) module within the degradation limits stated by the IEC standards, using

  1. Alternative bufferlayers for CIGS solarcells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beleanu, A.; Gruhn, T.; Blum, C.G.F.; Balke, B.; Felser, C. [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg - University, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide is a highly efficient buffer layer material in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se2)[CIGS] solar devices, but for environmental reasons and possible gains in efficiency there is a great interest in replacing CdS by a cadmium-free alternative buffer layer. Using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods possible candidates like LiZnP and LiCuS have been proposed as alternative buffer layers. The experimental verification of the DFT results was quite challenging due to the fact that LiCuS was an unknow and completely new material. In a first step, we tried to synthesize LiCuS through solid state reactions in a corund crucible. After optimizing the parameters and successfully synthesizing the material its properties were investigated. In a second step, huge amounts of LiCuS and LiZnP were synthesized and pressed using Spark Plasma Sintering as 3 inch targets. LiCuS and LiZnP films were grown by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from these target and their properties as an alternative buffer layer in CIGS solar cells were investigated. The 1:1:1 stoichiometry of the films was delivered from in-situ XPS measurements. Absorption measurements show a band gap of {approx}2.0 eV which is in good agreement with the theoretical estimates.

  2. CIGS thin film solar cell prepared by reactive co-sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeha; Lee, Ho-Sub; Park, Nae-Man

    2013-09-01

    The reactive co-sputtering was developed as a new way of preparing high quality CuInGaSe2(CIGS) films from two sets of targets; Cu0.6Ga 0.4 and Cu0.4In0.6 alloy and Cu and (In0.7Ga0.3)2Se3 compound targets. During sputtering, Cu, In, Ga metallic elements as well as the compound materials were reacted to form CIGS simultaneously in highly reactive elemental Se atmosphere generated by a thermal cracker. CIGS layer had been grown on Mo/soda-lime glass(SLG) at 500°C. For both sets of targets, we controlled the composition of CIGS thin film by changing the RF power for target components. All the films showed a preferential (112) orientation as observed from X-ray diffraction analysis. The composition ratios of CIGS were easily set to 0.71-0.95, 0.10-0.30 for [Cu]/[III] and [Ga]/[III], respectively. The grain size and the surface roughness of a CIGS film increased as the [Cu]/[III] ratios increased. The solar cells were fabricated using a standard base line process in the device structure of grid/ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/ SLG. The best performance was obtained the performance of Voc = 0.45 V, Jsc =35.6, FF = 0.535, η = 8.6% with a 0.9 μm-CIGS solar cell from alloy targets while Voc = 0.54 V, Jsc =30.8, FF = 0.509, η = 8.5% with a 0.8 μm-CIGS solar cell from Cu and (In0.7Ga0.3)2Se3.

  3. Thin-Film CIGS Photovoltaic Technology: Annual Technical Report-Phase II, 16 April 1999-15 April 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Bruns, J.; Ruppert, A.; Akhtar, M.; Chen, L.; Kiss, Z.J.

    2000-08-24

    A summary of Energy Photovoltaics' Phase II work includes the following: (1) EPV has demonstrated that it can sputter a Mo back-contact capable of supporting very high efficiency cell processing. Using EPV Mo, NREL has deposited a 17.1% CIGS cell (no AR coating). EPV believes it can identify the signature of ``good'' Mo. The Mo was produced on EPV's 0.43 m{sup 2} pilot-line equipment; (2) EPV has performed compound synthesis for several classes of materials, namely non-Cu precursor materials, Cu-containing materials, and ternary buffer materials. Using a ternary compound synthesized at EPV (ZIS) as an evaporation source material for the buffer layer, a Cd-free CIGS device has been produced having an efficiency of 11.5% (560 mV, 32.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF 64.3%). The ZIS films are photoconductive, and the devices exhibit no dark-light crossover or light soaking effects; (3) EPV initiated the interest of the University of Oregon in capacitance spectroscopy of CIGS devices. An Urbach tail with characteristic energy E0 < 20meV was identified by transient photocapacitance spectroscopy; (4) Small-area CIGS devices were produced in the pilot-line system with an efficiency of 12.0% (581 mV, 30.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF 68.7%), and in an R and D-scale system with 13.3% efficiency (569 mV, 34.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF 68.1%); (5) An improved linear evaporation source for Cu delivery has been developed and was used for CIGS formation in the pilot-line system. The deposition width is 45 cm. This technological ``tour de force'' allows EPV to build large-area CIGS systems possessing considerable flexibility. In particular, both EPV's FORNAX process and NREL's 3-stage process have been implemented on the pilot line. A CIGS thickness uniformity of 7% over a 40 cm width has been achieved; (6) A 4-head linear source assembly was designed, constructed, and is in use. Flux monitoring is practiced; (7) Large-area CIGS modules were produced with Voc's up to 36

  4. Thin-Film CIGS Photovoltaic Technology: Annual Technical Report-Phase II, 16 April 1999-15 April 2000; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delahoy, A.E.; Bruns, J.; Ruppert, A.; Akhtar, M.; Chen, L.; Kiss, Z.J.

    2000-01-01

    A summary of Energy Photovoltaics' Phase II work includes the following: (1) EPV has demonstrated that it can sputter a Mo back-contact capable of supporting very high efficiency cell processing. Using EPV Mo, NREL has deposited a 17.1% CIGS cell (no AR coating). EPV believes it can identify the signature of''good'' Mo. The Mo was produced on EPV's 0.43 m(sup 2) pilot-line equipment; (2) EPV has performed compound synthesis for several classes of materials, namely non-Cu precursor materials, Cu-containing materials, and ternary buffer materials. Using a ternary compound synthesized at EPV (ZIS) as an evaporation source material for the buffer layer, a Cd-free CIGS device has been produced having an efficiency of 11.5% (560 mV, 32.1 mA/cm(sup 2), FF 64.3%). The ZIS films are photoconductive, and the devices exhibit no dark-light crossover or light soaking effects; (3) EPV initiated the interest of the University of Oregon in capacitance spectroscopy of CIGS devices. An Urbach tail with characteristic energy E0 and lt; 20meV was identified by transient photocapacitance spectroscopy; (4) Small-area CIGS devices were produced in the pilot-line system with an efficiency of 12.0% (581 mV, 30.1 mA/cm(sup 2), FF 68.7%), and in an R and D-scale system with 13.3% efficiency (569 mV, 34.1 mA/cm(sup 2), FF 68.1%); (5) An improved linear evaporation source for Cu delivery has been developed and was used for CIGS formation in the pilot-line system. The deposition width is 45 cm. This technological''tour de force'' allows EPV to build large-area CIGS systems possessing considerable flexibility. In particular, both EPV's FORNAX process and NREL's 3-stage process have been implemented on the pilot line. A CIGS thickness uniformity of 7% over a 40 cm width has been achieved; (6) A 4-head linear source assembly was designed, constructed, and is in use. Flux monitoring is practiced; (7) Large-area CIGS modules were produced with Voc's up to 36.3 V; (8) EPV has started to construct an

  5. Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnis, M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Bloxham, J.; Hager, B. H.; Spiegelman, M.; Willett, S.; Wysession, M. E.; Aivazis, M.

    2004-12-01

    Solid earth geophysicists have a long tradition of writing scientific software to address a wide range of problems. In particular, computer simulations came into wide use in geophysics during the decade after the plate tectonic revolution. Solution schemes and numerical algorithms that developed in other areas of science, most notably engineering, fluid mechanics, and physics, were adapted with considerable success to geophysics. This software has largely been the product of individual efforts and although this approach has proven successful, its strength for solving problems of interest is now starting to show its limitations as we try to share codes and algorithms or when we want to recombine codes in novel ways to produce new science. With funding from the NSF, the US community has embarked on a Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) that will develop, support, and disseminate community-accessible software for the greater geodynamics community from model developers to end-users. The software is being developed for problems involving mantle and core dynamics, crustal and earthquake dynamics, magma migration, seismology, and other related topics. With a high level of community participation, CIG is leveraging state-of-the-art scientific computing into a suite of open-source tools and codes. The infrastructure that we are now starting to develop will consist of: (a) a coordinated effort to develop reusable, well-documented and open-source geodynamics software; (b) the basic building blocks - an infrastructure layer - of software by which state-of-the-art modeling codes can be quickly assembled; (c) extension of existing software frameworks to interlink multiple codes and data through a superstructure layer; (d) strategic partnerships with the larger world of computational science and geoinformatics; and (e) specialized training and workshops for both the geodynamics and broader Earth science communities. The CIG initiative has already started to

  6. Development of CIGS2 solar cells with lower absorber thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasekar, Parag S.; Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Rd., Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States); Moutinho, Helio [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    The availability and cost of materials, especially of indium can be a limiting factor as chalcopyrite based thin-film solar cells advance in their commercialization. The required amounts of metals can be lowered by using thinner films. When the thickness of the film decreases, there is possibility of remaining only in the small grain region because the coalescence of grains does not have an opportunity to enhance the grain size to the maximum. Solar cell performance in smaller grain chalcopyrite absorber deteriorates due to larger fraction of grain boundaries. Efforts are being made to reduce the thickness while maintaining the comparable performance. This work presents a study of preparation, morphology and other material properties of CIGS2 absorber layers with decreasing thicknesses up to 1.2 {mu}m and its correlation with the device performance. Encouraging results were obtained demonstrating that reasonable solar cell efficiencies (>10%) can be achieved even for thinner CIGS2 thin-film solar cells. (author)

  7. Use of different Zn precursors for the deposition of Zn(S,O) buffer layers by chemical bath for chalcopyrite based Cd-free thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saez-Araoz, R.; Lux-Steiner, M.C. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany); Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Ennaoui, A.; Kropp, T.; Veryaeva, E. [Hahn Meitner Institut, Berlin (Germany); Niesen, T.P. [AVANCIS GmbH and Co. KG, Munich (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Progress in fabricating Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGSSe) solar cells with Zn(S,O) buffer layers prepared by chemical bath deposition (CBD) is discussed. The effect of different Zn salt precursors on solar cell device performance is investigated using production scale CIGSSe absorbers provided by AVANCIS GmbH and Co. KG. The CBD process has been developed at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut (HMI) using zinc nitrate, zinc sulphate or zinc chloride as zinc precursor. An average efficiency of 14.2{+-}0.8% is obtained by using one-layer CBD Zn(S,O) The dominant recombination path for well performing solar cells is discussed based on the results obtained from temperature dependent J(V) analysis. The structure and morphology of buffer layers deposited using zinc nitrate and zinc sulphate has been studied by means of transmission electron micrographs of glass/Mo/CIGSSe/Zn(S,O) structures. Results show a conformal coverage of the absorber by a Zn(S,O) layer of 15-25 nm consisting of nanocrystals with radii of {proportional_to}5 nm. XAES analysis of the buffer layer reveals a similar surface composition for buffer layers deposited with zinc nitrate and zinc sulphate. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. High efficiency copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajanikant, Ray Jayminkumar

    The generation of electrical current from the solar radiation is known as the photovoltaic effect. Solar cell, also known as photovoltaic (PV) cell, is a device that works on the principle of photovoltaic effect, and is widely used for the generation of electricity. Thin film polycrystalline solar cells based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) are admirable candidates for clean energy production with competitive prices in the near future. CIGS based polycrystalline thin film solar cells with efficiencies of 20.3 % and excellent temperature stability have already been reported at the laboratory level. The present study discusses about the fabrication of CIGS solar cell. Before the fabrication part of CIGS solar cell, a numerical simulation is carried out using One-Dimensional Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS-ID) for understanding the physics of a solar cell device, so that an optimal structure is analyzed. In the fabrication part of CIGS solar cell, Molybdenum (Mo) thin film, which acts as a 'low' resistance metallic back contact, is deposited by RF magnetron sputtering on organically cleaned soda lime glass substrate. The major advantages for using Mo are high temperature, (greater than 600 °C), stability and inertness to CIGS layer (i.e., no diffusion of CIGS into Mo). Mo thin film is deposited at room temperature (RT) by varying the RF power and the working pressure. The Mo thin films deposited with 100 W RF power and 1 mTorr working pressure show a reflectivity of above average 50 % and the low sheet resistance of about 1 O/□. The p-type CIGS layer is deposited on Mo. Before making thin films of CIGS, a powder of CIGS material is synthesized using melt-quenching method. Thin films of CIGS are prepared by a single-stage flash evaporation process on glass substrates, initially, for optimization of deposition parameters and than on Mo coated glass substrates for device fabrication. CIGS thin film is deposited at 250 °C at a

  9. Low temperature deposition of bifacial CIGS solar cells on Al-doped Zinc Oxide back contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallari, Nicholas, E-mail: nicholas.cavallari@imem.cnr.it [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Pattini, Francesco; Rampino, Stefano; Annoni, Filippo [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Barozzi, Mario [FBK—CMM—Micro Nano Facility, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Bronzoni, Matteo; Gilioli, Edmondo; Gombia, Enos [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Maragliano, Carlo [Solar Bankers LLC, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Mazzer, Massimo [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Pepponi, Giancarlo [FBK—CMM—Micro Nano Facility, Via Sommarive 18, 38123 Trento (Italy); Spaggiari, Giulia; Fornari, Roberto [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/a, 43124 Parma (Italy); Department of Mathematical, Physical and Computer Sciences, University of Parma, Parco Area delle Scienze 7/a, 43124 Parma (Italy)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • AZO and CIGS were deposited by Low-Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition (LT-PED). • CIGS/AZO contacts with ohmic behavior and resistance of 1.07 Ω cm{sup 2} were fabricated. • LT-PED deposition of AZO and CIGS prevents formation of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} interlayer. • CIGS-based bifacial solar cells with AZO back contact were realized. • Front PV efficiency of 9.3% and equivalent bifacial efficiency of 11.6% were achieved. - Abstract: We report on the fabrication and characterization of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS)-based thin film bifacial solar cells using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) as cost-effective and non-toxic transparent back contact. We show that, by depositing both CIGS and AZO by Low Temperature Pulsed Electron Deposition at a maximum temperature of 250 °C, a good ohmic contact is formed between the two layers and good quality solar cells can be fabricated as a result. Photovoltaic efficiencies as high as 9.3% (front illumination), 5.1% (backside illumination) and 11.6% (bifacial illumination) have been obtained so far. These values are remarkably higher than those previously reported in the literature. We demonstrate that this improvement is ascribed to the low-temperature deposition process that avoids the formation of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the CIGS/AZO interface and favours the formation of a low-resistivity contact in agreement with device simulations.

  10. TEMPERATURE EFFECT OF ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF CIGS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-30

    Jun 30, 2011 ... Key words: Thin film solar cells, SCAPS, CIGS, temperature, effiency energetic. 1. INTRODUCTION ... technology are the low material consumption and the high efficiency that has been demonstrated, which .... [2] S. Wenham, M. Green, M. Watt, Applied Photovoltaics, The University of New. South Wales ...

  11. Numerical modelling of CIGS/CdS solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Nisha; Aziz, Anver; Datta, Shouvik

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we design and analyze the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cell using simulation software "Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in One Dimension (SCAPS-1D)". The conventional CIGS solar cell uses various layers, like intrinsic ZnO/Aluminium doped ZnO as transparent oxide, antireflection layer MgF2, and electron back reflection (EBR) layer at CIGS/Mo interface for good power conversion efficiency. We replace this conventional model by a simple model which is easy to fabricate and also reduces the cost of this cell because of use of lesser materials. The new designed model of CIGS solar cell is ITO/CIGS/OVC/CdS/Metal contact, where OVC is ordered vacancy compound. From this simple structure, even at very low illumination we are getting good results. We simulate this CIGS solar cell model by varying various physical parameters of CIGS like thickness, carrier density, band gap and temperature.

  12. The Theory of Planned Behavior and E-cig Use: Impulsive Personality, E-cig Attitudes, and E-cig Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Alexandra; Connors, Miranda; Um, Miji; Cyders, Melissa A

    2018-04-01

    The current paper applied the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB; Ajzen & Fishbein, 1988) to understand how impulsive personality traits and attitudes concerning e-cig use relate to the likelihood of electronic cigarette (e-cig) use. Seven hundred and fourteen participants (Mean age = 34.04, SD = 10.89, 48.6% female) completed cross-sectional measures of e-cig use attitudes (CEAC) and the Short UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale. A structural path analysis suggested that urgency and deficits in conscientiousness were significantly related to e-cig attitudes (CFI = 0.99, TLI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.02; urgency: β = 0.32, p = .001; deficits in conscientiousness: β = -0.48, p E-cig attitude scores were significantly higher for e-cig users than non-users, β = 0.85, p e-cig use. Findings provide initial support for a model in which impulsive traits are related to e-cig use through positive e-cig attitudes.

  13. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, M.; Wachters, A.J.H.; Van Deelen, J.; Mourad, M.C.D.; Buskens, P.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the

  14. Thin-Film CIGS Photovoltaic Technology; Annual Technical Report, Phase I; 16 April 1998 - 15 April 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorobski, D.; Delahoy, A.E.; Kiss, Z.J.; Ziobro, F.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes work performed by Energy Photovoltaics, Inc. (EPV) under Phase I of this subcontract. EPV's new FORNAX process for CIGS formation is capable of producing devices with high Voc ( and gt;600 mV) and no dark aging effects. Parameters of the best device so far are Voc= 611 mV, Jsc= 27.5 mA/cm2, FF= 74.5%, and efficiency= 12.5%. A 34-cm2 16-cell minimodule was produced using FORNAX CIGS with Voc= 9.58 V, Isc= 52.0 mA, FF69.8%, and efficiency= 10.2%. A new version of EPV's linear evaporation source was developed with improved rate and uniformity for Cu deposition over a width of 45 cm. Using the new linear source, the FORNAX process was implemented on 0.43-m2 substrates in EPV's CIGS pilot line, with Voc= 537 mV and FF= 70.3% being achieved on a device. The EPV Subteam of the National CIS R and D Team has produced Cd-free ZnO/CIGS devices on NREL CIGS using the ROMEAO process (reaction of metal and atomic oxygen) for ZnO deposition. After soaking, the best device exhibited a Voc of 565 mV and an efficiency of 12.3%. Novel bias drive methods were devised for field soaking/anti-soaking experiments as a function of time and temperature. Scaling laws and an activation energy of 0.51 eV were found. Thermally stimulated capacitance reveals the existence of three distinct contributions to ZnO/CIGS device capacitance, two appearing to be gap-state effects and one related to net doping concentration. The coating time of the sputtered pilot-line ZnO:Al has been reduced by a factor of 3 while maintaining film quality. The deposition rate is 48 A s-1. Plans are under way to increase the substrate size from 0.43 m2 to 0.79 m2

  15. TEMPERATUREEFFECT OFELECTRICALPROPERTIES OF CIGS SOLAR CELL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ferouani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we are interested in studying the copper–indium–gallium–selenium (CIGS solar cells sandwiched between cadmium sulfide (CdS and ZnO as buffer layers, and Molybdenum (Mo. Thus, we report our simulation results using the capacitance simulator (SCAPS in terms of layer thickness, absorber layer band gap and operating temperature to find out the optimum choice. An efficiency of 20.61% (with Voc of 635.2mV, Jsc of 44.08 mA/cm2 and fill factor of 0.73 has been achieved with CdS used as buffer layer as the reference case. It is also found that the high efficiency CIGS cells with the low temperature were a very high efficiency conversion.

  16. A study on the optics of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells with ultra-thin absorber layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Wachters, Arthur J H; van Deelen, Joop; Mourad, Maurice C D; Buskens, Pascal J P

    2014-03-10

    We present a systematic study of the effect of variation of the zinc oxide (ZnO) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) layer thickness on the absorption characteristics of CIGS solar cells using a simulation program based on finite element method (FEM). We show that the absorption in the CIGS layer does not decrease monotonically with its layer thickness due to interference effects. Ergo, high precision is required in the CIGS production process, especially when using ultra-thin absorber layers, to accurately realize the required thickness of the ZnO, cadmium sulfide (CdS) and CIGS layer. We show that patterning the ZnO window layer can strongly suppress these interference effects allowing a higher tolerance in the production process.

  17. Optical characteristics of thin CIGS cells on TCO back contact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Kniknie, B.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Wuerz, R.; Kessler, F.

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of CIGS layer thickness could translate in significant cost reduction. CIGS was made on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) to allow for optical characterization. This data was compared with external quantum efficiency (EQE) data. The results suggest that changes in surface morphology are

  18. Thin film CIGS solar cells with a novel low cost process - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, A. N.; Romanyuk, Y.

    2010-01-15

    Novel manufacturing routes for efficient and low-cost Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (called CIGS) thin film solar cells are explored and patented. CIGS has proven its suitability for highly efficient and extremely stable solar cells. The low-cost methods allow impurity free material synthesis, fast large-area deposition, high material utilization and a very short energy payback time with drastically lower manufacturing costs. Two non-vacuum, solution-based approaches are investigated to deposit thin layers of CIGS. The first approach considers incorporation of copper into indium gallium selenide precursor layers by ion-exchange from aqueous or organic solutions. Organic solutions provide faster copper incorporation and do not corrode the metal back contact. Solar cells processed from selenized precursor films exhibit efficiencies of up to 4.1%. The second approach with paste coating of inorganic salt solution results in a solar cell efficiency of 4% (record 6.7%), where further improvements are hindered by the presence of the residual carbon layer. Using alternative organic binders, pre-deposited selenium layers, non-binder recipes helps to avoid the carbon layer although the obtained layers are inhomogeneous and contain impurity phases. A patent for the ion-exchange approach is pending, and the obtained research results on the paste coating approach will be scrutinized during new European FP7 project 'NOVA-CIGS'. (authors)

  19. Solution-deposited CIGS thin films for ultra-low-cost photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Hersh, Peter; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2010-09-01

    We describe the production of photovoltaic modules with high-quality large-grain copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) thin films obtained with the unique combination of low-cost ink-based precursors and a reactive transfer printing method. The proprietary metal-organic inks contain a variety of soluble Cu-, In- and Ga- multinary selenide materials; they are called metal-organic decomposition (MOD) precursors, as they are designed to decompose into the desired precursors. Reactive transfer is a two-stage process that produces CIGS through the chemical reaction between two separate precursor films, one deposited on the substrate and the other on a printing plate in the first stage. In the second stage, these precursors are rapidly reacted together under pressure in the presence of heat. The use of two independent thin films provides the benefits of independent composition and flexible deposition technique optimization, and eliminates pre-reaction prior to the synthesis of CIGS. In a few minutes, the process produces high quality CIGS films, with large grains on the order of several microns, and preferred crystallographic orientation, as confirmed by compositional and structural analysis by XRF, SIMS, SEM and XRD. Cell efficiencies of 14% and module efficiencies of 12% were achieved using this method. The atmospheric deposition processes include slot die extrusion coating, ultrasonic atomization spraying, pneumatic atomization spraying, inkjet printing, direct writing, and screen printing, and provide low capital equipment cost, low thermal budget, and high throughput.

  20. Novel in situ resistance measurement for the investigation of CIGS growth in a selenization process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; He Qing; Li Fengyan; Li Changjian; Sun Yun; Tian Jianguo; Li Zubin

    2009-01-01

    During the selenization process of CIGS thin films, the relation between the element loss rate and the precursor depositions are analyzed. The growth of the CIGS thin films during the selenization process is investigated by the novel in situ resistance measurement, by which the formation of compound semiconductors can be observed directly and simultaneously. Their structures, phase evolutions and element losses are analyzed by XRD and XRF. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that the phase transforms have nothing to do with the deposition sequences of precursors, while the element loss rates are related to the deposition sequences in this process. In addition, element loss mechanisms of CIGS thin films prepared by the selenization process are analyzed by the phase evolutions and chemical combined path in the In, Ga–Se reaction processes. Moreover it is verified that the element losses are depressed by increasing the ramping-up rate finally. The results provide effective methods to fabricate high-quality CIGS thin films with low element losses

  1. Novel in situ resistance measurement for the investigation of CIGS growth in a selenization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tian, Jian-Guo; Li, Zu-Bin; He, Qing; Li, Feng-Yan; Li, Chang-Jian; Sun, Yun

    2009-03-01

    During the selenization process of CIGS thin films, the relation between the element loss rate and the precursor depositions are analyzed. The growth of the CIGS thin films during the selenization process is investigated by the novel in situ resistance measurement, by which the formation of compound semiconductors can be observed directly and simultaneously. Their structures, phase evolutions and element losses are analyzed by XRD and XRF. Based on the experimental results, it can be concluded that the phase transforms have nothing to do with the deposition sequences of precursors, while the element loss rates are related to the deposition sequences in this process. In addition, element loss mechanisms of CIGS thin films prepared by the selenization process are analyzed by the phase evolutions and chemical combined path in the In, Ga-Se reaction processes. Moreover it is verified that the element losses are depressed by increasing the ramping-up rate finally. The results provide effective methods to fabricate high-quality CIGS thin films with low element losses.

  2. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenberg, Daniel A.; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W.; Ogunseitan, Oladele A.; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparative alternatives assessment of thin film manufacturing technologies. • Development of chemical alternatives assessment in a life cycle context. • Screening of manufacturing and solar cell hazardous substances simultaneously. -- Abstract: Copper–indium–gallium–selenium–sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals™ and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS 2 p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane

  3. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Daniel A; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-09-15

    Copper-indium-gallium-selenium-sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS₂ p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, Daniel A.; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W. [University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ogunseitan, Oladele A. [University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [University of California, Davis, 1 Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Comparative alternatives assessment of thin film manufacturing technologies. • Development of chemical alternatives assessment in a life cycle context. • Screening of manufacturing and solar cell hazardous substances simultaneously. -- Abstract: Copper–indium–gallium–selenium–sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals™ and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS{sub 2} p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane.

  5. Improvements in CdTe- and CIGS-based thin-film solar cells and investigation on new materials for photovoltaic applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Greta

    2018-01-01

    Currently, thin-film solar cells are one of the most promising technologies for low-cost renewable energy production. CdTe- and CuInGaSe2-based cells, which achieved record efficiencies of 22.1% and 22.6% respectively, are the most attractive among thin-film solar cells. These high efficiencies have had a huge influence in making them highly competitive in the photovoltaic market, with an estimated final cost per module lower than US $ 0.50 per peak-watt. At the Thin Film Laboratory of the...

  6. 2D Finite Element Model of a CIGS Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O.Box 1, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    The performance of thin-film CIGS (Copper indium gallium selenide) modules is often limited due to inhomogeneities in CIGS layers. A 2-dimensional Finite Element Model for CIGS modules is presented that predicts the impact of such inhomogeneities on the module performance. Results are presented of a module with a region of poor diode characteristics. It is concluded that according to this model the effects of poor diodes depend strongly on their location in the module and on their dispersion over the module surface. Due to its generic character the model can also be applied to other series connections of photovoltaic cells.

  7. 2D - Finite element model of a CIGS module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    The performance of thin-film CIGS modules is often limited due to inhomogeneities in CIGS layers. A 2-dimensional Finite Element Model for CIGS modules is demonstrated that predicts the impact of such inhomogeneities on the module performance. Results are presented of a module with a region of poor diode characteristics. It is concluded that according to this model the effects of poor diodes depend strongly on their location in the module and on their dispersion over the module surface. Due to its generic character the model can also be applied to other series connections of photovoltaic cells.

  8. Optical Metrology for CIGS Solar Cell Manufacturing and its Cost Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkoju, Sravan Kumar

    Solar energy is a promising source of renewable energy which can meet the demand for clean energy in near future with advances in research in the field of photovoltaics and cost reduction by commercialization. Availability of a non-contact, in-line, real time robust process control strategies can greatly aid in reducing the gap between cell and module efficiencies, thereby leading to cost-effective large-scale manufacturing of high efficiency CIGS solar cells. In order to achieve proper process monitoring and control for the deposition of the functional layers of CuIn1-xGaxSe 2 (CIGS) based thin film solar cell, optical techniques such as spectroscopic reflectometry and polarimetry are advantageous because they can be set up in an unobtrusive manner in the manufacturing line, and collect data in-line and in-situ. The use of these techniques requires accurate optical models that correctly represent the properties of the layers being deposited. In this study, Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) has been applied for the characterization of each individual stage of CIGS layers deposited using the 3-stage co-evaporation process along with the other functional layers. Dielectric functions have been determined for the energy range from 0.7 eV to 5.1 eV. Critical-point line-shape analysis was used in this study to determine the critical point energies of the CIGS based layers. To control the compositional and thickness uniformity of all the functional layers during the fabrication of CIGS solar cells over large areas, multilayer photovoltaics (PV) stack optical models were developed with the help of extracted dielectric functions. In this study, mapping capability of RC2 spectroscopic ellipsometer was used to map all the functional layer thicknesses of a CIGS solar cell in order to probe the spatial non-uniformities that can affect the performance of a cell. The optical functions for each of the stages of CIGS 3-stage deposition process along with buffer layer and transparent

  9. Development of Enhanced Window layers for CIGS Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, J. Nicholas

    , had an alternative deposition chemistry investigated. This new chemistry replacing thiourea with N-methylthiourea was used in a chemical bath deposition (CBD). This new chemistry yielded more controlled growth kinetics with a wider processing window. The films grown using this chemistry were more uniform than those grown with the standard process using thiourea. These uniform films were shown to have more complete surface coverage at very thin layers ( 20-30 nm). The second study investigated commercial modules of crystalline silicon, CIGS, and CdTe based technologies with a total system capacity of approximately 100 kW. The system is fitted with current, voltage, temperature, irradiance, and a complete weather station. The purpose of the system is to investigate different panel technologies and monitoring challenges in northeast climates and to track their degradation over time. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  10. Electrodeposition route to synthesize cigs films – an economical way ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Unlike binary conductors CIGS film preparation needs highly ... This argument also holds well in forming a hetero-junction partner CdS ..... successfully electrodeposited onto indium tin oxide substrate and it is recently reported (Li et al., 2010).

  11. Vaping cannabis (marijuana): parallel concerns to e-cigs?

    OpenAIRE

    Budney, Alan J.; Sargent, James D.; Lee, Dustin C.

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation of vaporization (‘vaping’) as a method for administering cannabis raises many of the same public health issues being debated and investigated in relation to e-cigarettes (e-cigs). Good epidemiological data on the prevalence of vaping cannabis are not yet available, but with current trends towards societal approval of medicinal and recreational use of cannabis, the pros and cons of vaping cannabis warrant study. As with e-cigs, vaping cannabis portends putative health benefit...

  12. Se interlayer in CIGS absorption layer for solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung-Kyu; Sim, Jae-Kwan [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kissinger, N.J. Suthan [Department of General Studies, Physics Group, Jubail University College, Royal Commission for Jubail, Jubail 10074 (Saudi Arabia); Song, Il-Seok; Kim, Jin-Soo; Baek, Byung-Joon [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr [Semiconductor Materials Process Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development, Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-Dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Highlights: • Se interlayer is deposited between the CuGa and CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacked layer. • Both CIG precursor layers were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. • SIMS depth profile shows that Ga distribution is uniform by Se interlayer. • The efficiency was improved for the CIGS solar cell by Se interlayer. - Abstract: A CIGS absorber layer with high gallium contents in the space-charge region can reduce the carrier recombination and improve the open circuit voltage V{sub oc}. Therefore, controlling Ga grading on top of CIGS thin film solar cells is the main objective of this experiment. To reduce Selenium (Se) vacancy, it is important that the diffusion of Ga elements into Se vacancy between Mo back contact and CIGS absorption layer would be controlled. In order to reduce Se vacancy and confirm Ga inter-diffusion, two CIGS solar cells were fabricated by converting CIG precursor with and without Se interlayer. The copper-indium metallic precursors were fabricated corresponding to the sequence CuIn/In/Mo/STS on stainless steel (STS) substrates by sequential direct current magnetron sputtering while Se layer was evaporated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system to obtain a Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. CuGa precursor layer was also fabricated on the Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. Finally, both CuGa/Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS and CuGa/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacks were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. It was clearly observed from the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) that there was a change between the fabricated CIGS absorption layers and the amount of Ga elements. Furthermore, the Ga elements gradually decreased from the top to the bottom layer of the CIGS absorption layer. We also discussed the effect of Se interlayer in the CIGS absorption layer and its influence on the solar cell’s performance.

  13. Se interlayer in CIGS absorption layer for solar cell devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung-Kyu; Sim, Jae-Kwan; Kissinger, N.J. Suthan; Song, Il-Seok; Kim, Jin-Soo; Baek, Byung-Joon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Se interlayer is deposited between the CuGa and CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacked layer. • Both CIG precursor layers were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. • SIMS depth profile shows that Ga distribution is uniform by Se interlayer. • The efficiency was improved for the CIGS solar cell by Se interlayer. - Abstract: A CIGS absorber layer with high gallium contents in the space-charge region can reduce the carrier recombination and improve the open circuit voltage V oc . Therefore, controlling Ga grading on top of CIGS thin film solar cells is the main objective of this experiment. To reduce Selenium (Se) vacancy, it is important that the diffusion of Ga elements into Se vacancy between Mo back contact and CIGS absorption layer would be controlled. In order to reduce Se vacancy and confirm Ga inter-diffusion, two CIGS solar cells were fabricated by converting CIG precursor with and without Se interlayer. The copper-indium metallic precursors were fabricated corresponding to the sequence CuIn/In/Mo/STS on stainless steel (STS) substrates by sequential direct current magnetron sputtering while Se layer was evaporated by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) system to obtain a Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. CuGa precursor layer was also fabricated on the Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stack. Finally, both CuGa/Se/CuIn/In/Mo/STS and CuGa/CuIn/In/Mo/STS stacks were selenized at 500 °C for 1 h. It was clearly observed from the secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) that there was a change between the fabricated CIGS absorption layers and the amount of Ga elements. Furthermore, the Ga elements gradually decreased from the top to the bottom layer of the CIGS absorption layer. We also discussed the effect of Se interlayer in the CIGS absorption layer and its influence on the solar cell’s performance

  14. Surface Passivation of CIGS Solar Cells Using Gallium Oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Garud, Siddhartha

    2018-02-27

    This work proposes gallium oxide grown by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition, as a surface passivation material at the CdS buffer interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. In preliminary experiments, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is used to compare aluminium oxide, gallium oxide, and hafnium oxide as passivation layers at the CIGS-CdS interface. The findings suggest that gallium oxide on CIGS may show a density of positive charges and qualitatively, the least interface trap density. Subsequent solar cell results with an estimated 0.5 nm passivation layer show an substantial absolute improvement of 56 mV in open-circuit voltage (VOC), 1 mA cm−2 in short-circuit current density (JSC), and 2.6% in overall efficiency as compared to a reference (with the reference showing 8.5% under AM 1.5G).

  15. Scale-up issues of CIGS thin film PV modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Photovoltaics cost has been declining following a 70% learning curve. Now the challenge is to bring down the cost of solar electricity to make it competitive with conventional sources within the next decade. In the long run, the module efficiencies tend to reach 80% of the champion cell efficiencies. Using a semiempirical methodology, it has been shown earlier that while the triple junction a-Si:H thin film technology is competitive, CIGS and CdTe thin film module technologies are highly competitive and presently offer the best approach for significantly exceeding the cost/performance levels of standard and non-standard crystalline Si PV technologies. Since 2006, the production of thin film solar cell in the U.S. has surpassed that of c-Si. At present, the production of CIGS PV modules lags considerably behind that of CdTe PV modules. This is mainly because of its complexity. Scale-up issues related to various CIGS preparation technologies such as co-evaporation, metallic precursor deposition by magnetron sputtering and non-vacuum techniques such as ink-jet printing, electroplating or doctor-blade technology followed by their selenization/sulfurization are discussed so as to assist the CIGS technology to attain its full potential. Besides the welcome announcements of large volume production, it is essential to achieve the production cost below $1/Wp in the near term and attain production speeds comparable to CdTe production speeds. Comparable production speeds are expected to be achieved within the next decade. This will enable reduction of CIGS module production costs to {proportional_to}65 cents /Wp that would be comparable to the CdTe module projected production cost. Additionally CIGS will have a higher efficiency premium. (author)

  16. Thermal Effect on a CIGS Thin-Film Solar Cell P2 Layer by Using a UV Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyi-Cheng Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study used ANSYS simulation software for analyzing an ultraviolet (UV (355 nm laser processing system. The laser apparatus was used in a stainless steel CIGS solar cell P2 layer for simulation analysis. CIGS films process order according to SiO2 layer, molybdenum electrode, CIGS absorbed layer, CdS buffered layer, i-ZnO penetrate light layer, TCO front electrode, MgF resist reflected materials, andelectrode materials. The simulation and experimental results were compared to obtain a laser-delineated P2 laser with a low melting and vaporization temperature. According to the simulation results, the laser function time was 135 μs, the UV laser was 0.5 W, and the P2 layer thin films were removed. The experimental results indicated that the electrode pattern of the experiment was similar to that of the simulation result, and the laser process did not damage the base plate. The analysis results confirm that the laser apparatus is effective when applied to a stainless steel CIGS solar cell P2 layer.

  17. Biosensing of matrix metalloproteinase activity with Cd-free quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumley, John Bryan

    Quantum dots (QDs) have become attractive in the biomedical field on account of their superior optical properties and stability, in comparison to traditional fluorophores. QDs also have properties which make them ideal for complex in vivo conditions. However, toxicity has been a chief concern in the eventual implementation of QDs for in vivo applications such as biosensing and tumor imaging. Commercially available QDs contain a notoriously noxious Cd component and therefore continuous research has gone into developing QDs without toxic heavy metals, generally Cd, that would still yield comparable performance in terms of their optical properties. Nonetheless, even in the case of Cd-free QDs, toxicity should be evaluated on a case by case basis, as other properties such as size, coating, stability, and charge can affect toxicity of nanomaterials as well, making it a very complex issue. With the high promise of QDs in the field of biomedical development as a motivation, this work strives to develop the efficient and repeatable synthesis of Cd-free QDs with high stability and luminescence, with proven low toxicity, and the ability to detect active matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) in a biosensing system, designed to identify direct biomarkers for pathological conditions, which in turn would enable early disease diagnosis and better treatment development. In this work, highly luminescent ZnSe:Mn/ZnS QDs have been synthesized, characterized, and modified with peptides with a bioconjugation procedure that utilized thiol-metal affinity. Experiments aiming at MMP detection were conducted using the peptide/QD conjugates. In addition, the ApoTox-Glo(TM) Triplex assay was utilized to evaluate cytotoxicity, and a safe concentration below 0.125 microM was identified for peptide-coated ZnSe:Mn/ZnS QDs in water. Finally, in contribution to developing an in vivo fiberoptic system for sensing MMP activity, the QDs were successfully tethered to silica and MMP detection was demonstrated

  18. Electrochemical behavior of CIGS electrodeposition for applications to photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyunju; Ji, Changwook; Kim, Yangdo; Hwang, Yoonhwae [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaeho [Hongik University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Ilguk [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Kim, Hyoungchan [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The electrodeposition mechanism of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films on ITO substrates was examined by using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The CV study was performed in unitary In, binary In-Se, ternary Cu-In-Se, and quaternary Cu-In-Ga-Se systems. CV of the Cu-In-Ga-Se system revealed a reduction peak at -0.6 V with the addition of GaCl{sub 3} and showed that the current density was affected significantly by the concentrations of GaCl{sub 3} and InCl{sub 3}. This is probably due to the adsorption-site competition between In{sup 3+} and Ga{sup 3+} on the electrode surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the CV results. The composition of Ga in the CIGS films increased with increasing concentration of GaCl{sub 3} in the electrolyte whereas the composition of In decreased sharply. The as-deposited films were annealed at 500 .deg. C in a N{sub 2} atmosphere for crystallization. XRD revealed three major peaks corresponding to the (112), (220) and (312) planes of CIGS chalcopyrite respectively. On the other hand, a secondary phase, such as In{sub 4}Se{sub 3}, was observed in the CIGS films containing a high In composition.

  19. An investigation on preparation of CIGS targets by sintering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ning, E-mail: zhn98@126.co [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhuang Daming; Zhang Gong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Pressureless sintering process was used to fabricate CIGS targets with Cu{sub 2}Se, In{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, and Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} as raw powders mixed according to the stoichiometry of CuIn{sub 0.72}Ga{sub 0.28}Se{sub 2} (CIGS). The results showed that only CuIn{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}Se{sub 2} phase can be detected in the sintered targets. The pores in sintered specimen become smaller and distribute more homogeneously under the conditions of finer powders and higher cold pressure. Both mass loss caused by the formation of volatile phase relating to Ga and volume expansion occur during the sintering process, which result in the decrease of density. The tendency of anti-densification becomes stronger under the conditions of coarser powders and higher cold pressure. The sintering process and causes for anti-densification were discussed. Finally, a hot pressing process was carried out, which was proved to be fairly effective to increase the density of CIGS target. The fabricated target can be used for magnetron-sputtering deposition of CIGS absorbers.

  20. Lessons learned from NMSG-085 CIG Land Operation demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gautreau, B.; Remmersmann, T.; Henderson, H.C.; Reus, N.M. de; Khimeche, L.; Pedersen, E.; Lillesoe, J.; Liberg, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the experience gained during demonstrations carried out between Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain under the umbrella of the NMSG-085 / CIG Land Operation group. The demonstration, also presented in this paper, focuses on command post exercise training. It

  1. Electrodeposition route to synthesize cigs films – an economical way ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Electrodeposition route to synthesize cigs films – an economical way to harness solar energy. ... for solar cells, how the charge separation in this nano scale photovoltaic (PV) materials occurs which help in absorption of radiation, and the electro-deposition route, a low cost one, produces thin film solar cells are analyzed.

  2. Metal-assisted chemical etching of CIGS thin films for grain size analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chaowei [Research and Development Centre, Hanergy Thin Film Power Group Limited, Chengdu (China); Loi, Huu-Ha; Duong, Anh; Parker, Magdalena [Failure Analysis Department, MiaSole Hi-Tech Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Grain size of the CIGS absorber is an important monitoring factor in the CIGS solar cell manufacturing. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis is commonly used to perform CIGS grain size analysis in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Although direct quantification on SEM image using the average grain intercept (AGI) method is faster and simpler than EBSD, it is hardly applicable on CIGS thin films. The challenge is that, not like polycrystalline silicon, to define grain boundaries by selective chemical etching is not easily realizable for the multi-component CIGS alloy. In this Letter, we present direct quantification of CIGS thin film grain size using the AGI method by developing metal-assisted wet chemical etching process to define CIGS grain boundaries. The calculated value is similar to EBSD result. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Erratum: Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-29

    A correction was made to: Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications. There was an error with an author's given name. The author's name was corrected to: Katye M. Fichter from: Kathryn M. Fichter.

  4. Vaping cannabis (marijuana): parallel concerns to e-cigs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budney, Alan J; Sargent, James D; Lee, Dustin C

    2015-11-01

    The proliferation of vaporization ('vaping') as a method for administering cannabis raises many of the same public health issues being debated and investigated in relation to e-cigarettes (e-cigs). Good epidemiological data on the prevalence of vaping cannabis are not yet available, but with current trends towards societal approval of medicinal and recreational use of cannabis, the pros and cons of vaping cannabis warrant study. As with e-cigs, vaping cannabis portends putative health benefits by reducing harm from ingesting toxic smoke. Indeed, vaping is perceived and being sold as a safer way to use cannabis, despite the lack of data on the health effects of chronic vaping. Other perceived benefits include better taste, more efficient and intense effects and greater discretion which allows for use in more places. Unfortunately, these aspects of vaping could prompt an increased likelihood of trying cannabis, earlier age of onset, more positive initial experiences, and more frequent use, thereby increasing the probability of problematic use or addiction. Sales and marketing of vaping devices with no regulatory guidelines, especially related to advertising or product development targeting youth, parallels concerns under debate related to e-cigs and youth. Thus, the quandary of whether or not to promote vaping as a safer method of cannabis administration for those wishing to use cannabis, and how to regulate vaping and vaping devices, necessitates substantial investigation and discussion. Addressing these issues in concert with efforts directed towards e-cigs may save time and energy and result in a more comprehensive and effective public health policy on vaping. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  5. Band gap engineering of tandem structured CIGS compound absorption layer fabricated by sputtering and selenization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, San; Sharma, Rahul; Sim, Jae-Kwan [Semiconductor Materials Processing Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development (RCAMD), Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr [Semiconductor Materials Processing Laboratory, School of Advanced Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, Research Center for Advanced Materials Development (RCAMD), Chonbuk National University, Deokjin-dong 664-14, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-25

    Highlights: ► Systematic band gap engineering to fabricate tandem Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} absorption layers. ► XRD shows prominent (1 1 2) reflection shift for attributed CIS, CIGS, and CGS phases. ► Optical transmittance and reflectance spectrum are improved towards infrared region. ► The Cu/In + Ga and Ga/In + Ga effect is matched with highest efficient solar cell. ► Tandem CIS/CIGS/CGS layer, the band gap is increased from 1.15 to 2.06 eV. -- Abstract: Band gap engineering was executed to fabricate a multi-junction stacked i.e. tandem Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) absorption layer. The CIGS absorption layers consist of multi-junction stacked CIS/CIGS/CGS thin films from bottom to top with increasing band gap. Tandem CIGS layers were fabricated by using three precursor of CuIn, In/CuGa/In, and CuGa onto the Mo coated soda-lime glass (SLG) by the sequential sputtering of CuIn, CuGa, and In targets. The CIG precursors were converted into CIGS absorption thin film by selenization process. From the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of CIS/CIGS/CGS tandem layer, with the prominent peak shift for (1 1 2) reflections was attributed to the individual CIS, CIGS, and CGS phases at 26.76°, 27.15°, and 27.65° diffraction angles, respectively. The morphologies and atomic (at%) composition uniformity onto the surface and along the depth were extensively analyzed with field effect scanning electron microscope (FESEM) attached energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The optical properties such as transmittance, reflectance and absorbance were found to improve in the infrared region for all the tandem CIGS layers. Near the fundamental absorption edge, the absorption coefficient was approached to 10{sup 5} cm{sup −1} for CIS/CIGS/CGS tandem layer. The straight-line behavior indicates that the films have a direct band gap. The band gap was found to increase from 1.15 to 1.74 eV with the Ga-grading along the depth of individual CIS, CIGS

  6. Band gap engineering of tandem structured CIGS compound absorption layer fabricated by sputtering and selenization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, San; Sharma, Rahul; Sim, Jae-Kwan; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Systematic band gap engineering to fabricate tandem Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 absorption layers. ► XRD shows prominent (1 1 2) reflection shift for attributed CIS, CIGS, and CGS phases. ► Optical transmittance and reflectance spectrum are improved towards infrared region. ► The Cu/In + Ga and Ga/In + Ga effect is matched with highest efficient solar cell. ► Tandem CIS/CIGS/CGS layer, the band gap is increased from 1.15 to 2.06 eV. -- Abstract: Band gap engineering was executed to fabricate a multi-junction stacked i.e. tandem Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) absorption layer. The CIGS absorption layers consist of multi-junction stacked CIS/CIGS/CGS thin films from bottom to top with increasing band gap. Tandem CIGS layers were fabricated by using three precursor of CuIn, In/CuGa/In, and CuGa onto the Mo coated soda-lime glass (SLG) by the sequential sputtering of CuIn, CuGa, and In targets. The CIG precursors were converted into CIGS absorption thin film by selenization process. From the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of CIS/CIGS/CGS tandem layer, with the prominent peak shift for (1 1 2) reflections was attributed to the individual CIS, CIGS, and CGS phases at 26.76°, 27.15°, and 27.65° diffraction angles, respectively. The morphologies and atomic (at%) composition uniformity onto the surface and along the depth were extensively analyzed with field effect scanning electron microscope (FESEM) attached energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). The optical properties such as transmittance, reflectance and absorbance were found to improve in the infrared region for all the tandem CIGS layers. Near the fundamental absorption edge, the absorption coefficient was approached to 10 5 cm −1 for CIS/CIGS/CGS tandem layer. The straight-line behavior indicates that the films have a direct band gap. The band gap was found to increase from 1.15 to 1.74 eV with the Ga-grading along the depth of individual CIS, CIGS, and CGS thin films

  7. Design and long-term monitoring of DSC/CIGS tandem solar module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vildanova, M F; Nikolskaia, A B; Kozlov, S S; Shevaleevskiy, O I

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of tandem dye-sensitized/Cu(In, Ga)Se (DSC/CIGS) PV modules. The tandem PV module comprised of the top DSC module and a bottom commercial 0,8 m 2 CIGS module. The top DSC module was made of 10 DSC mini-modules with the field size of 20 × 20 cm 2 each. Tandem DSC/CIGS PV modules were used for providing the long-term monitoring of energy yield and electrical parameters in comparison with standalone CIGS modules under outdoor conditions. The outdoor test facility, containing solar modules of both types and a measurement unit, was located on the roof of the Institute of Biochemical Physics in Moscow. The data obtained during monitoring within the 2014 year period has shown the advantages of the designed tandem DSC/CIGS PV-modules over the conventional CIGS modules, especially for cloudy weather and low-intensity irradiation conditions. (paper)

  8. Modelling Defects Acceptors And Determination Of Electric Model From The Nyquist Plot And Bode In Thin Film CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demba Diallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The performance of the chalcopyrite material CuInGaSe2 CIGS used as an absorber layer in thin-film photovoltaic devices is significantly affected by the presence of native defects. Multivalent defects e.g. double acceptors or simple acceptor are important immaterial used in solar cell production in general and in chalcopyrite materials in particular. We used the thin film solar cell simulation software SCAPS to enable the simulation of multivalent defects with up to five different charge states.Algorithms enabled us to simulate an arbitrary number of possible states of load. The presented solution method avoids numerical inaccuracies caused by the subtraction of two almost equal numbers. This new modelling facility is afterwards used to investigate the consequences of the multivalent character of defects for the simulation of chalcopyrite based CIGS. The capacitance increase with the evolution of the number of defects C- f curves have found to have defect dependence.

  9. Modeling and simulation of a dual-junction CIGS solar cell using Silvaco ATLAS

    OpenAIRE

    Fotis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The potential of designing a dual-junction Copper Indium Gallium Selenide (CIGS) photovoltaic cell is investigated in this thesis. Research into implementing a dual-junction solar cell, using a CIGS bottom cell and different thin-film designs as a top cell, was conducted in order to increase the current record efficiency of 20.3% for a single CIGS cell. This was accomplished through modeling and simulation using Silvaco ATLASTM, an ad...

  10. A Novel Semiconductor CIGS Photovoltaic Material and Thin-Film ED Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to achieve low-cost high-efficiency thin-film solar cells, a novel Semiconductor Photovoltaic (PV) active material CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) and thin-film Electro-Deposition (ED) technology is explored. Firstly,the PV materials and technologies is investigated, then the detailed experimental processes of CIGS/Mo/glass structure by using the novel ED technology and the results are reported. These results shows that high quality CIGS polycrystalline thin-films can be obtained by the ED method, in which the polycrystalline CIGS is definitely identified by the (112), (204, 220) characteristic peaks of the tetragonal structure, the continuous CIGS thin-film layers with particle average size of about 2μm of length and around 1.6μm of thickness. The thickness and solargrade quality of CIGS thin-films can be produced with good repeatability. Discussion and analysis on the ED technique, CIGS energy band and sodium (Na) impurity properties, were also performed. The alloy CIGS exhibits not only increasing band-gap with increasing x, but also a change in material properties that is relevant to the device operation. The beneficial impurity Na originating from the low-cost soda-lime glass substrate becomes one prerequisite for high quality CIGS films. These novel material and technology are very useful for low-cost high-efficiency thin-film solar cells and other devices.

  11. Process parameter impact on properties of sputtered large-area Mo bilayers for CIGS thin film solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badgujar, Amol C.; Dhage, Sanjay R., E-mail: dhage@arci.res.in; Joshi, Shrikant V.

    2015-08-31

    Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) has emerged as a promising candidate for thin film solar cells, with efficiencies approaching those of silicon-based solar cells. To achieve optimum performance in CIGS solar cells, uniform, conductive, stress-free, well-adherent, reflective, crystalline molybdenum (Mo) thin films with preferred orientation (110) are desirable as a back contact on large area glass substrates. The present study focuses on cylindrical rotating DC magnetron sputtered bilayer Mo thin films on 300 mm × 300 mm soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. Key sputtering variables, namely power and Ar gas flow rates, were optimized to achieve best structural, electrical and optical properties. The Mo films were comprehensively characterized and found to possess high degree of thickness uniformity over large area. Best crystallinity, reflectance and sheet resistance was obtained at high sputtering powers and low argon gas flow rates, while mechanical properties like adhesion and residual stress were found to be best at low sputtering power and high argon gas flow rate, thereby indicating a need to arrive at a suitable trade-off during processing. - Highlights: • Sputtering of bilayer molybdenum thin films on soda lime glass • Large area deposition using rotating cylindrical direct current magnetron • Trade of sputter process parameters power and pressure • High uniformity of thickness and best electrical properties obtained • Suitable mechanical and optical properties of molybdenum are achieved for CIGS application.

  12. Reusing a declarative specification to check the conformance of different CIGs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grando, M.A.; Aalst, van der W.M.P.; Mans, R.S.; Daniel, F.; Barkaoui, K.; Dustdar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Several Computer Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) languages have been proposed by the health community. Even though these CIG languages share common ideas each language has to be provided with his own mechanism of verification. In an earlier work we have shown that a DECLARE model can be used for

  13. Thin Film CIGS Solar Cells, Photovoltaic Modules, and the Problems of Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the results regarding a nonvacuum technique to fabricate CIGS thin films for solar cells by means of single-step electrodeposition, we focus on the methodological problems of modeling at cell structure and photovoltaic module levels. As a matter of fact, electrodeposition is known as a practical alternative to costly vacuum-based technologies for semiconductor processing in the photovoltaic device sector, but it can lead to quite different structural and electrical properties. For this reason, a greater effort is required to ensure that the perspectives of the electrical engineer and the material scientist are given an opportunity for a closer comparison and a common language. Derived parameters from ongoing experiments have been used for simulation with the different approaches, in order to develop a set of tools which can be used to put together modeling both at single cell structure and complete module levels.

  14. Cost and Potential of Monolithic CIGS Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Kelsey; Woodhouse, Michael

    2015-06-17

    A bottom-up cost analysis of monolithic, glass-glass Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS) modules is presented, illuminating current cost drivers for this technology and possible pathways to reduced cost. At 14% module efficiency, for the case of U.S. manufacturing, a manufacturing cost of $0.56/WDC and a minimum sustainable price of $0.72/WDC were calculated. Potential for reduction in manufacturing costs to below $0.40/WDC in the long-term may be possible if module efficiency can be increased without significant increase in $/m2 costs. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) in Phoenix, AZ under different conditions is assessed and compared to standard c-Si.

  15. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  16. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    KAUST Repository

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grä tzel, Michael; Noufi, Rommel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS

  17. Controlling the physical parameters of crystalline CIGS nanowires for use in superstrate configuration using vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jeon, H. C.; Kang, T. W.; Kumar, Sunil

    2018-03-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a suitable candidate for smart windows and bifacial semi-transparent solar cell applications. In this study, highly crystalline CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) nanowires were successfully grown by horizontal-type vapor phase epitaxy on an ITO substrate. Length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were studied by varying the growth temperature (500, 520, and 560 °C), time (3.5, 6.5, and 9.5 h), and type of catalyst (In, Au, and Ga). Length, diameter, and density of the nanowires were found to be highly dependent on the growth conditions. At an optimized growth period and temperature of 3.5 h and 520 °C, respectively, the length and diameter of the nanowires were found to increase when grown in a catalyst-free environment. However, the density of the nanowires was found to be higher while using a catalyst during growth. Even in a catalyst-free environment, an Indium cluster formed at the bottom of the nanowires. The source of these nanowires is believed to be Indium from the ITO substrate which was observed in the EDS measurement. TEM-based EDS and line EDS indicated that the nanowires are made up of CIGS material with a very low Gallium content. XRD measurements also show the appearance of wurtzite CIS nanowires grown on ITO in addition to the chalcopyrite phase. PL spectroscopy was done to see the near-band-edge emission for finding band-to-band optical transition in this material. Optical response of the CIGS nanowire network was also studied to see the photovoltaic effect. This work creates opportunities for making real solar cell devices in superstrate configuration.

  18. Modeling and Simulation of a Dual-Junction CIGS Solar Cell Using Silvaco ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    stage process, thermal evaporation, electrodeposition , deposition temperatures, content, stoichiometry and composition range on CIGS, inducing in...mesh. This location can be any specific region, and for the purposes of this thesis, a pair of cathode , and anode electrodes was assigned in the two...ATLASTM structure file for the dual-junction CIGS cell. In order to extract an overall I–V curve, two sets of anodes and cathodes were placed on the

  19. One-pot Synthesis of Soluble Nanoscale CIGS Photoactive Functional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Aixia

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Promising alternatives for solar energy utilization are thin film technologies involving various new materials. This contribution describes an easy and inexpensive synthetic method that can be used to prepare soluble nanoscale triphenyl phosphine-coordinated CIGS (TPP-CIGS photoactive functional materials. This complex is stable in the solid state under the irradiation of the ambient light, but its solution becomes a little bit unstable under the illumination of the low intensity laser.

  20. An optimized efficient dual junction InGaN/CIGS solar cell: A numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Bita; Naseri, Mosayeb

    2016-08-01

    The photovoltaic performance of an efficient double junction InGaN/CIGS solar cell including a CdS antireflector top cover layer is studied using Silvaco ATLAS software. In this study, to gain a desired structure, the different design parameters, including the CIGS various band gaps, the doping concentration and the thickness of CdS layer are optimized. The simulation indicates that under current matching condition, an optimum efficiency of 40.42% is achieved.

  1. Expanding Thermal Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition of ZnO:Al Layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing ZnO:Al on CIGS solar cell stacks, one should be aware that high substrate temperature processing (i.e., >200°C can damage the crucial underlying layers/interfaces (such as CIGS/CdS and CdS/i-ZnO. In this paper, the potential of adopting ETP-CVD ZnO:Al in CIGS solar cells is assessed: the effect of substrate temperature during film deposition on both the electrical properties of the ZnO:Al and the eventual performance of the CIGS solar cells was investigated. For ZnO:Al films grown using the high thermal budget (HTB condition, lower resistivities, ρ, were achievable (~5 × 10−4 Ω·cm than those grown using the low thermal budget (LTB conditions (~2 × 10−3 Ω·cm, whereas higher CIGS conversion efficiencies were obtained for the LTB condition (up to 10.9% than for the HTB condition (up to 9.0%. Whereas such temperature-dependence of CIGS device parameters has previously been linked with chemical migration between individual layers, we demonstrate that in this case it is primarily attributed to the prevalence of shunt currents.

  2. Selenization of CIS and CIGS layers deposited by chemical spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, B. J.; Egaas, B.; Velumani, S.

    2018-03-21

    Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) thin films with x=0 (CIS) and x=0.3 (CIGS) were prepared on Mo-coated glass substrate by using chemical spray pyrolysis at a substrate temperature of 350 degrees C, followed by selenization treatment at 550 degrees C in selenium environment under N2 gas flow. X-ray diffraction patterns of as-deposited CIGS layers on Mo showed polycrystalline chalcopyrite phase with an intense (112) plane. Splitting of (204)/(220) and (116)/(312) planes for the film with x=0.3 reveals deviation of tetragonal nature. Field emission scanning electron microscopy cross-sectional images of selenized films showed clear re-crystallization of grains. During the selenization process of the CIGS absorber, a thin interface layer of MoSe2 is formed. Line mapping of Mo/CIGS layer showed more gallium segregation at the interface of back contact resulting in band gap grading. Chemical composition and mapping of the as-deposited and selenized samples were determined by energy dispersive analysis of X-rays. This work leads to fabrication of low cost and large scale Mo/CIGS/CdS/ZnO/ZnO:Al device structure.

  3. Effect of yoghurt or yoghurt serum on microbial quality of cig kofte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mahmut; Cankurt, Hasan; Toker, Omer Said; Yetim, Hasan; Sagdic, Osman

    2014-07-01

    Cig kofte, raw meatball is a traditionally produced meat product in Turkey and some other Middle East countries. It is prepared from mixtures of finely minced raw beef, bulgur, onions, various spices and tap water. Cig kofte is an uncooked product and popularly consumed with lettuce and lemon juice. In this study, yoghurt or yoghurt serum (YS) were added to the mixtures of cig kofte instead of tap water to reduce microbial risks of the raw meatball. Additionally, the effects of yoghurt and YS on some physicochemical characteristics of cig kofte were investigated. Cig kofte is generally consumed within a few hours after the preparation because of its raw nature. Also, it is generally sold under unhygienic conditions in restaurants and restaurant-like places. For this purpose, reducing of the microbial load of cig kofte is important. In the results, Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes were not detected in any samples. While lactic acid bacteria count increased by addition of yoghurt and YS, the number of other microorganisms except for total aerobic mesophilic bacteria (TAMB) were decreased. The aw values and% moisture contents of the samples were varied between 0.88-0.94 and 46.25-49.72, respectively. The pH values of the samples were slightly changed during the storage of 24 h while no changes detected in the control samples during the storage. In conclusion, it can be suggested that using the yoghurt or YS instead of tap water in the preparation of cig kofte might ensure the microbial safety, increase the nutritional value and its flavour or aroma.

  4. Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew A.; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Fichter, Katye M.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots, have been a useful tool for many biomedical applications. For successful use in biological systems, quantum dots should be highly fluorescent and small/monodisperse in size. While commonly used cadmium-based quantum dots possess these qualities, they are potentially toxic due to the possible release of Cd2+ ions through nanoparticle degradation. Indium-based quantum dots, specifically InP/ZnS, have recently been explored as a viable alternative to cadmium-based quantum dots due to their relatively similar fluorescence characteristics and size. The synthesis presented here uses standard hot-injection techniques for effective nanoparticle growth; however, nanoparticle properties such as size, emission wavelength, and emission intensity can drastically change due to small changes in the reaction conditions. Therefore, reaction conditions such temperature, reaction duration, and precursor concentration should be maintained precisely to yield reproducible products. Because quantum dots are not inherently soluble in aqueous solutions, they must also undergo surface modification to impart solubility in water. In this protocol, an amphiphilic polymer is used to interact with both hydrophobic ligands on the quantum dot surface and bulk solvent water molecules. Here, a detailed protocol is provided for the synthesis of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS quantum dots that are suitable for use in biomedical applications. PMID:26891282

  5. Synthesis of Cd-free InP/ZnS Quantum Dots Suitable for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Matthew A; Grandinetti, Giovanna; Fichter, Katye M; Fichter, Kathryn M

    2016-02-06

    Fluorescent nanocrystals, specifically quantum dots, have been a useful tool for many biomedical applications. For successful use in biological systems, quantum dots should be highly fluorescent and small/monodisperse in size. While commonly used cadmium-based quantum dots possess these qualities, they are potentially toxic due to the possible release of Cd(2+) ions through nanoparticle degradation. Indium-based quantum dots, specifically InP/ZnS, have recently been explored as a viable alternative to cadmium-based quantum dots due to their relatively similar fluorescence characteristics and size. The synthesis presented here uses standard hot-injection techniques for effective nanoparticle growth; however, nanoparticle properties such as size, emission wavelength, and emission intensity can drastically change due to small changes in the reaction conditions. Therefore, reaction conditions such temperature, reaction duration, and precursor concentration should be maintained precisely to yield reproducible products. Because quantum dots are not inherently soluble in aqueous solutions, they must also undergo surface modification to impart solubility in water. In this protocol, an amphiphilic polymer is used to interact with both hydrophobic ligands on the quantum dot surface and bulk solvent water molecules. Here, a detailed protocol is provided for the synthesis of highly fluorescent InP/ZnS quantum dots that are suitable for use in biomedical applications.

  6. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  7. Parameters optimization of CIGS solar cell using 2D physical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Dabbabi

    Full Text Available In this study, the CIGS thin film solar cell has been investigated using the two-dimensional device simulator Silvaco-Atlas. Thickness and carrier concentration effects of the cell structure were studied to optimize the solar cell performances. Our results revealed high efficiency for a cell structure of 0.15 µm ZnO:Al, 0.06 µm i-ZnO, 0.04 µm CdS and 3 µm CIGS. The carrier concentration effects of the different layers were also studied revealing a better performance for CIGS doping concentration of 1018 cm−3. The optimized CIGS solar cell characteristics were a current density of short circuit Jsc = 38.75 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage V0C = 804.03 mV, a fill factor FF = 74.48% and an efficiency η = 23.20%. This result is in good agreement with experimental efficiencies found in literature. Keywords: CIGS solar cell, Electrical characteristics, Silvaco-Atlas software

  8. The influence of Na on metastable defect kinetics in CIGS materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erslev, Peter T.; Lee, Jin Woo; Shafarman, William N.; Cohen, J. David

    2009-01-01

    The electronic properties of matched pairs of Cu(In x Ga 1-x )Se 2 (CIGS) solar cells, with and without normal sodium levels, were studied by junction capacitance methods including admittance spectroscopy, drive level capacitance profiling (DLCP) and transient photocapacitance spectroscopy (TPC). The capacitance profiling measurements revealed a large deep defect density in the vicinity of the barrier interface that was likely responsible for the lower performance of the reduced Na samples. The metastable properties of CIGS solar cells were also examined, and these revealed marked differences between the two types of samples. These results directly address the predictions of theoretical microscopic models that have been proposed to account for metastable effects in CIGS

  9. Modeling and performance analysis dataset of a CIGS solar cell with ZnS buffer layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Billal Hosen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article represents the baseline data of the several semiconductor materials used in the model of a CIGS thin film solar cell with an inclusion of ZnS buffer layer. As well, input parameters, contact layer data and operating conditions for CIGS solar cell simulation with ZnS buffer layer have been described. The schematic diagram of photovoltaic solar cell has been depicted. Moreover, the most important performance measurement graph, J-V characteristic curve, resulting from CIGS solar cell simulation has been analyzed to estimate the optimum values of fill factor and cell efficiency. These optimum results have been obtained from the open circuit voltage, short circuit current density, and the maximum points of voltage and current density generated from the cell.

  10. Recycling of high purity selenium from CIGS solar cell waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Anna M.K., E-mail: anna.gustafsson@chalmers.se; Foreman, Mark R.StJ.; Ekberg, Christian

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new method for recycling of selenium from CIGS solar cell materials is presented. • Separation of selenium as selenium dioxide after heating in oxygen atmosphere. • Complete selenium separation after oxidation of <63 μm particles at 800 °C for 1 h. • After reduction of selenium dioxide the selenium purity was higher than 99.999 wt%. - Abstract: Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a promising material in thin film solar cell production. To make CIGS solar cells more competitive, both economically and environmentally, in comparison to other energy sources, methods for recycling are needed. In addition to the generally high price of the material, significant amounts of the metals are lost in the manufacturing process. The feasibility of recycling selenium from CIGS through oxidation at elevated temperatures was therefore examined. During oxidation gaseous selenium dioxide was formed and could be separated from the other elements, which remained in solid state. Upon cooling, the selenium dioxide sublimes and can be collected as crystals. After oxidation for 1 h at 800 °C all of the selenium was separated from the CIGS material. Two different reduction methods for reduction of the selenium dioxide to selenium were tested. In the first reduction method an organic molecule was used as the reducing agent in a Riley reaction. In the second reduction method sulphur dioxide gas was used. Both methods resulted in high purity selenium. This proves that the studied selenium separation method could be the first step in a recycling process aimed at the complete separation and recovery of high purity elements from CIGS.

  11. Development of CIGS2 thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Gade, Vivek S.; Kadam, Ankur A.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Kulkarni, Sachin S.; Bet, Sachin M.

    2005-01-01

    Research and development of CuIn 1-x Ga x Se 2-y S y (CIGSS) thin-film solar cells on ultralightweight flexible metallic foil substrates is being carried out at FSEC PV Materials Lab for space applications. Earlier, the substrate size was limited to 3 cm x 2.5 cm. Large-area sputtering systems and scrubber for hydrogen selenide and sulfide have been designed and constructed for preparation of CIGSS thin-films on large (15 cm x 10 cm) substrates. A selenization/sulfurization furnace donated by Shell (formerly Siemens) Solar has also been refurbished and upgraded. The sputtering target assembly design was modified for proper clamping of targets and effective cooling. A new design of the magnetic assembly for large-area magnetron sputtering sources was implemented so as to achieve uniform deposition on large area. Lightweight stainless steel foil and ultralightweight titanium foil substrates were utilized to increase the specific power of solar cells. Sol-gel derived SiO 2 layers were coated on titanium foil by dip coating method. Deposition parameters for the preparation of molybdenum back contact layers were optimized so as to minimize the residual stress as well as reaction with H 2 S. Presently large (15 cm x 10 cm) CuIn 1-x Ga x S 2 (CIGS2) thin film solar cells are being prepared on Mo-coated titanium and stainless steel foil by sulfurization of CuGa/In metallic precursors in diluted Ar:H 2 S(4%). Heterojunction partner CdS layers are deposited by chemical bath deposition. The regeneration sequence of ZnO/ZnO:Al targets was optimized for obtaining consistently good-quality, transparent and conducting ZnO/ZnO:Al bilayer by RF magnetron-sputter deposition. Excellent facilities at FSEC PV Materials Lab are one of its kinds and could serve as a nucleus of a small pilot plant for CIGSS thin film solar cell fabrication

  12. CIG-DB: the database for human or mouse immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes available for cancer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furue Motoki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunoglobulin (IG or antibody and the T-cell receptor (TR are pivotal proteins in the immune system of higher organisms. In cancer immunotherapy, the immune responses mediated by tumor-epitope-binding IG or TR play important roles in anticancer effects. Although there are public databases specific for immunological genes, their contents have not been associated with clinical studies. Therefore, we developed an integrated database of IG/TR data reported in cancer studies (the Cancer-related Immunological Gene Database [CIG-DB]. Description This database is designed as a platform to explore public human and murine IG/TR genes sequenced in cancer studies. A total of 38,308 annotation entries for IG/TR proteins were collected from GenBank/DDBJ/EMBL and the Protein Data Bank, and 2,740 non-redundant corresponding MEDLINE references were appended. Next, we filtered the MEDLINE texts by MeSH terms, titles, and abstracts containing keywords related to cancer. After we performed a manual check, we classified the protein entries into two groups: 611 on cancer therapy (Group I and 1,470 on hematological tumors (Group II. Thus, a total of 2,081 cancer-related IG and TR entries were tabularized. To effectively classify future entries, we developed a computational method based on text mining and canonical discriminant analysis by parsing MeSH/title/abstract words. We performed a leave-one-out cross validation for the method, which showed high accuracy rates: 94.6% for IG references and 94.7% for TR references. We also collected 920 epitope sequences bound with IG/TR. The CIG-DB is equipped with search engines for amino acid sequences and MEDLINE references, sequence analysis tools, and a 3D viewer. This database is accessible without charge or registration at http://www.scchr-cigdb.jp/, and the search results are freely downloadable. Conclusions The CIG-DB serves as a bridge between immunological gene data and cancer studies, presenting

  13. Above-CMOS a-Si and CIGS Solar Cells for Powering Autonomous Microsystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, W.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Kovalgin, A.Y.; Sun, Y.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Schmitz, J.

    2010-01-01

    Two types of solar cells are successfully grown on chips from two CMOS generations. The efficiency of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) solar cells reaches 5.2%, copperindium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) cells 7.1%. CMOS functionality is unaffected. The main integration issues: adhesion, surface topography, metal

  14. Materials Characterization of CIGS solar cells on Top of CMOS chips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Liu, W.; Kovalgin, A.Y.; Sun, Y.; Schmitz, J.; Venkatasubramanian, R.; Radousky, H.; Liang, H.

    2011-01-01

    In the current work, we present a detailed study on the material properties of the CIGS layers, fabricated on top of the CMOS chips, and compare the results with the fabrication on standard glass substrates. Almost identical elemental composition on both glass and CMOS chips (within measurement

  15. Characterization and Analysis of Ultrathin CIGS Films and Solar Cells Deposited by 3-Stage Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Rajan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the large-scale utilization of Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS solar cells for photovoltaic application, it is of interest not only to enhance the conversion efficiency but also to reduce the thickness of the CIGS absorber layer in order to reduce the cost and improve the solar cell manufacturing throughput. In situ and real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (RTSE has been used conjointly with ex situ characterizations to understand the properties of ultrathin CIGS films. This enables monitoring the growth process, analyzing the optical properties of the CIGS films during deposition, and extracting composition, film thickness, grain size, and surface roughness which can be corroborated with ex situ measurements. The fabricated devices were characterized using current voltage and quantum efficiency measurements and modeled using a 1-dimensional solar cell device simulator. An analysis of the diode parameters indicates that the efficiency of the thinnest cells was restricted not only by limited light absorption, as expected, but also by a low fill factor and open-circuit voltage, explained by an increased series resistance, reverse saturation current, and diode quality factor, associated with an increased trap density.

  16. CIGS cells with metallized front contact: Longer cells and higher efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Frijters, C.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the benefit of a patterned metallization on top of a transparent conductive oxide in CIGS thin-film solar panels. It was found that cells with a grid have a higher efficiency compared to cells with only a TCO. This was observed for all cell lengths used. Furthermore, metallic

  17. Identifying parasitic current pathways in CIGS solar cells by modelling dark J-V response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, B.L.; Smit, S.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, K.J.; Keuning, W.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2015-01-01

    An equivalent circuit model, which allows for the presence of three types of shunting pathways, has been developed to describe the dark J-V characteristics in CIGS solar cells. Excellent agreement between the model and experimental data was apparent throughout a temperature range of 183-323K.

  18. Parameters optimization of CIGS solar cell using 2D physical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbabi, Samar; Nasr, Tarek Ben; Kamoun-Turki, Najoua

    In this study, the CIGS thin film solar cell has been investigated using the two-dimensional device simulator Silvaco-Atlas. Thickness and carrier concentration effects of the cell structure were studied to optimize the solar cell performances. Our results revealed high efficiency for a cell structure of 0.15 μm ZnO:Al, 0.06 μm i-ZnO, 0.04 μm CdS and 3 μm CIGS. The carrier concentration effects of the different layers were also studied revealing a better performance for CIGS doping concentration of 1018 cm-3. The optimized CIGS solar cell characteristics were a current density of short circuit Jsc = 38.75 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage V0C = 804.03 mV, a fill factor FF = 74.48% and an efficiency η = 23.20%. This result is in good agreement with experimental efficiencies found in literature.

  19. Monolithic two-terminal hybrid a-Si:H/CIGS tandem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanker, J.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.

    2016-01-01

    Copper-indium-gallium-di-selenide (CIGS) is the present record holder in lab-scale thin-film photovoltaics (TFPV). One of the problems of this PV technology is the scarcity of indium. Multi-junction solar cells allow better spectral utilization of the light spectrum, while the required current

  20. Microstructural evolution of all-wet-processed CIGS films using Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hee Soo; Choi, Eunmi; Kim, Areum; Pyo, Sung Gyu [School of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Seoul, 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sung Pil [Fuel Cell Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We report a wet process deposition in order to identify a cost-effective processing scheme for CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers on molybdenum/soda lime glass substrates from a Cu-In-Ga precursor solution. We employed a spin coater at various settings to evaluate the uniformity of the resulting CIGS solar cell layer. After the CIGS precursor film was deposited, we applied a selenization process. In the selenization process, we used a controlled temperature RTA system and compared it to a noncontrolled temperature system. We investigated the morphological properties for different selenization temperature treatments. We used Raman mapping to detect binary compounds and found the binary compound effect on the film. Raman mapping results show that the density of the binary compound in the CIGS layer increased with selenization temperature, and at 600 C, the density of the binary compounds was highest. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Growth and structural properties of reactively co-sputtered CIGS films and their solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeha [Cheongju University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Nae-Man [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    Using reactive sputtering, we fabricated stoichiometric CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films. Both Cu{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} (CuGa) and Cu{sub 0.4}In{sub 0.6} (CuIn) alloy targets were simultaneously sputtered under the delivery of elemental Se produced from a thermal cracker. By changing the sputtering rates of the CuGa and the CuIn, we were able to obtain the composition ratios of Cu/(Ga+In) and Ga/(Ga+In) in the range of 0.71-0.95 and 0.10-0.30, respectively. Both the grain size and the surface roughness of the CIGS film increased as the Cu/(Ga+In) ratio increased. In the X-ray diffraction analysis on CIGS films of 0.9 m, preferential growth with a [112] orientation was found, and reflections from the (211), (220)/(204), (301), (312)/(116), (400)/(008), and (332)/(316) planes were observed. The CIGS films showed the existence of Cu{sub 2-x}Se phases in the Cu-rich samples and ordered defect compound (ODC) phases in the Cu-poor films, as confirmed in the Raman measurements. A best device performance of η = 8.1%, V{sub oc} = 0.442 V, J{sub sc} = 34.3 mA/cm{sup 2}, and FF = 53.4% was obtained from a cell fabricated with a CIGS layer (t = 0.9 μm) with the Cu/(Ga+In) ratio = 0.71 and the Ga/(Ga+In) ratio = 0.10.

  2. Significant effect of substrate temperature on the phase structure, optical and electrical properties of RF sputtered CIGS films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Zhou; Yan Yong; Li Shasha; Zhang Yanxia; Yan Chuanpeng; Liu Lian; Zhang Yong [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity and New energy R and D Center (SNERDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhao Yong, E-mail: yzhao@swjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Magnetic Suspension Technology and Maglev Vehicle, Ministry of Education, Superconductivity and New energy R and D Center (SNERDC), Mail Stop 165, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary phase exist in the RF sputtered CIGS films as it deposited at 150 Degree-Sign C and 500 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CIGS films deposited beyond 350 Degree-Sign C show (1 1 2) prefer orientation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E{sub g} of the CIGS films increased with the increase of substrate temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductivity of the films is affected by 'variable range hopping' mechanism. - Abstract: This work studied the effect of substrate temperature on the phase structure, optical and electrical properties of the one-step radio frequency sputtered Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that all the deposited CIGS films are chalcopyrite phase with polycrystalline structure. The films deposited beyond the substrate temperature of 350 Degree-Sign C show (1 1 2) prefer orientation. Raman spectra reveal that the 150 Degree-Sign C deposited CIGS film coexists with Cu{sub 2-x}Se phase and the 500 Degree-Sign C deposited film contains ordered defect compound (ODC) phase. With the increase of substrate temperature, energy band gap of the CIGS film increase from 0.99 to 1.27 eV. Films deposited at higher temperature exhibit larger electrical conductivity. Conductivity of the CIGS films is dominated by 'variable range hopping' mechanism. The disorder in our CIGS the films is associated with the formation of intrinsic defects such as V{sub Se} and In{sub Cu} for their low formation energy.

  3. Effect of annealing on the structural properties of electron beam deposited CIGS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, M. [Department of Electronics, Erode Arts College, Erode (India)], E-mail: prabhu7737@yahoo.com; Kannan, M.D.; Jayakumar, S.; Balasundaraprabhu, R. [Thin Film Center, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Muthukumarasamy, N. [Department of Physics, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore (India)

    2008-08-30

    CIGS bulk compound of three different compositions CuIn{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}Se{sub 2}, CuIn{sub 0.80}Ga{sub 0.20}Se{sub 2} and CuIn{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}Se{sub 2} have been prepared by direct reaction of elemental copper, indium, gallium and selenium. CIGS thin films of the three compositions have been deposited onto glass and silicon substrates using the prepared bulk by electron beam deposition method. The structural properties of the deposited films have been studied using X-ray diffraction technique. The as-deposited CIGS films have been found to be amorphous in nature. To study the effect of annealing on the structural properties, the films have been annealed in vacuum of the order of 10{sup -5} Torr. The X-ray diffractograms of the annealed CIGS films exhibited peaks revealing that the annealed films are crystalline in nature with tetragonal chalcopyrite structure. The (112) peak corresponding to the chalcopyrite structure has been observed to be the dominating peak in all the annealed films. The position of the (112) peak and other peaks in the X-ray diffraction pattern has been observed to shift to higher values of 2{theta} with the increase of gallium concentration. The lattice parameter values 'a' and 'c' have been calculated and they are found to be dependent on the concentration of gallium in the films. The FWHM in the X-ray diffraction pattern is found to decrease with an increase in annealing temperature indicating that the crystalline nature of the CIGS improves with increase in annealing temperature. The films grown on silicon substrates have been found to be of better crystalline quality than those deposited on glass substrates. The micro structural parameters like grain size, dislocation density and strain have been evaluated. The chemical constituents present in the deposited CIGS films have been identified using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The surface topographical study on the films has been performed by AFM. The

  4. Identification and Validation of Novel Hedgehog-Responsive Enhancers Predicted by Computational Analysis of Ci/Gli Binding Site Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Neil; Parker, David S.; Johnson, Lisa A.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Barolo, Scott; Gumucio, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway directs a multitude of cellular responses during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Stimulation of the pathway results in activation of Hh target genes by the transcription factor Ci/Gli, which binds to specific motifs in genomic enhancers. In Drosophila, only a few enhancers (patched, decapentaplegic, wingless, stripe, knot, hairy, orthodenticle) have been shown by in vivo functional assays to depend on direct Ci/Gli regulation. All but one (orthodenticle) contain more than one Ci/Gli site, prompting us to directly test whether homotypic clustering of Ci/Gli binding sites is sufficient to define a Hh-regulated enhancer. We therefore developed a computational algorithm to identify Ci/Gli clusters that are enriched over random expectation, within a given region of the genome. Candidate genomic regions containing Ci/Gli clusters were functionally tested in chicken neural tube electroporation assays and in transgenic flies. Of the 22 Ci/Gli clusters tested, seven novel enhancers (and the previously known patched enhancer) were identified as Hh-responsive and Ci/Gli-dependent in one or both of these assays, including: Cuticular protein 100A (Cpr100A); invected (inv), which encodes an engrailed-related transcription factor expressed at the anterior/posterior wing disc boundary; roadkill (rdx), the fly homolog of vertebrate Spop; the segment polarity gene gooseberry (gsb); and two previously untested regions of the Hh receptor-encoding patched (ptc) gene. We conclude that homotypic Ci/Gli clustering is not sufficient information to ensure Hh-responsiveness; however, it can provide a clue for enhancer recognition within putative Hedgehog target gene loci. PMID:26710299

  5. CIGS thin films, solar cells, and submodules fabricated using a rf-plasma cracked Se-radical beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, Shogo; Yamada, Akimasa; Shibata, Hajime; Fons, Paul; Niki, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    Coevaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) film growth using a rf-plasma cracked Se-radical beam (R-Se) source leads to a significant reduction in the amount of raw Se source material wasted during growth and exhibits unique film properties such as highly dense, smooth surfaces and large grain size. R-Se grown CIGS solar cells also show concomitant unique properties different from conventional evaporative Se (E-Se) source grown CIGS cells. In the present work, the impact of modified surfaces, interfaces, and bulk crystal properties of R-Se grown CIGS films on the solar cell performance was studied. When a R-Se source was used, Na diffusion into CIGS layers was enhanced while a remarkable diffusion of elemental Ga and Se into Mo back contact layers was observed. Improvements in the bulk crystal quality as manifested by large grain size and increased Na concentration with the use of a R-Se source is expected to be effective to improve photovoltaic performance. Using a R-Se source for the growth of CIGS absorber layers at a relatively low growth temperature, we have successfully demonstrated a monolithically integrated submodule efficiency of 15.0% (17 cells, aperture area of 76.5 cm 2 ) on 0.25-mm thick soda-lime glass substrates.

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigations of structural and optical properties of CIGS thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandramohan, M., E-mail: chandramohan59@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Park college of Engineering and Tecknology, Coimbatore-641 659 (India); Velumani, S., E-mail: vels64@yahoo.com [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N.(CINVESTAV), Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508 Col. San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Venkatachalam, T., E-mail: atvenkatachalam@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore-14. India (India)

    2010-10-25

    Experimental and theoretical studies of the structural and optical properties of Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide thin films have been performed. Thin films of CIGS were deposited on glass substrates by chemical bath deposition. From the XRD results of the films, it is found that the films are of chalcopyrite type structure. The lattice parameter were determined as a = 5.72 A and c = 11.462 A. The optical properties of the thin films were carried out with the help of spectrophotometer. First principles density functional theory calculations of the band structure, density of states and effective masses of electrons and holes of the CIGS crystals have been done by computer simulations. The experimental data and theoretically calculated data have demonstrated good agreement.

  7. Preparation of CIGS thin films by HiPIMS or DC sputtering and various selenization processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejníček, Jiří; Hubička, Zdeněk; Kšírová, Petra; Kment, Štěpán; Brunclíková, Michaela; Kohout, Michal; Čada, Martin; Darveau, S.A.; Exstrom, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2013), s. 314-319 ISSN 1203-8407 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12045 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : CIGS * HIPIMS * selenization * nanocrystals * solar energy * sputtering * thin films Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.106, year: 2013 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/stn/jaots/2013/00000016/00000002/art00015

  8. Toward GW/year of CIGS production within the next decade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2007-09-22

    A detailed study carried out in 1996-1997 showed that manufacturing cost of crystalline silicon PV modules could be lowered to 1 ECU/Wp when the c-Si annual module production level reaches 500 MWp while an annual production of only 60 MWp would lower production cost of thin-film PV modules to 0.6 ECU/Wp. During 1976-2003, the PV module price has followed the 80% learning curve with cumulative production volume. However, the price reduction has slowed since because of the polysilicon supply problem. Because of their high potential for improvement, thin-film PV and especially copper (Cu)-indium (In)-gallium (Ga)-selenide (Se)-sulfide (CIGS) technology have the potential for growing at the fastest rate and consequently not only to complement the lagging c-Si PV production but also to assist in following the 80% learning curve. This paper reviews the CIGS PV manufacturing processes in comparison to those of other PV technologies and predicts that annual production volume of CIGS thin-film PV modules will exceed 1 GW/year within the next 10 years. (author)

  9. Experimental studies of thin films deposition by magnetron sputtering method for CIGS solar cell fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gułkowski Sławomir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Among a variety of the thin film solar cell technologies of second generation, copper-indium-gallium-diselenide device (CIGS with the latest highest lab cell efficiency record of 22.4 % seems to be the most promising for the power generation. This is partly due to the advantages of using low cost films of few microns thick not only as a metallic contacts but also as a main structure of the solar cell consisted of high quality semiconductor layers. This paper reports the experimental studies of the CIGS absorber formation on Soda Lime Glass substrate covered by thin molybdenum film as a back contact layer. All structures were deposited with the use of magnetron sputtering method only. Technological parameters of the deposition process such as deposition power, pressure and deposition time were optimized for each layer of the structure. Mo back contact was examined in terms of resistivity. EDS measurements were carried out to verify stoichiometric composition of CIGS absorber. Thin film of Al was used as a top contact in order to examine the quality of p-n junction. The I-V electrical characteristic of the p-n junction was analysed in terms of solar cell application.

  10. Sputtered molybdenum thin films and the application in CIGS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, D.; Zhu, H., E-mail: hongbing1982@hotmail.com; Liang, X.; Zhang, C.; Li, Z.; Xu, Y.; Chen, J.; Zhang, L.; Mai, Y., E-mail: yaohuamai@hbu.edu.cn

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mo thin films are prepared by magnetron sputtering. • The dynamic deposition rate increases with the increasing discharge power. • The surface structure of Mo films varies with discharge power and working pressure. • High efficiency CIGS thin film solar cell of 15.2% has been obtained. - Abstract: Molybdenum (Mo) thin films are prepared by magnetron sputtering with different discharge powers and working pressures for the application in Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin film solar cells as back electrodes. Properties of these Mo thin films are systematically investigated. It is found that the dynamic deposition rate increases with the increasing discharge power while decreases with the increasing working pressure. The highest dynamic deposition rate of 15.1 nm m/min is achieved for the Mo thin film deposited at the discharge power of 1200 W and at the working pressure of 0.15 Pa. The achieved lowest resistivity of 3.7 × 10{sup −5} Ω cm is attributed to the large grains in the compact thin film. The discharge power and working pressure have great influence on the sputtered Mo thin films. High efficiency of 12.5% was achieved for the Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin film solar cells with Mo electrodes prepared at 1200 W and low working pressures. By further optimizing material and device properties, the conversion efficiency has reached to 15.2%.

  11. Experimental studies of thin films deposition by magnetron sputtering method for CIGS solar cell fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gułkowski, Sławomir; Krawczak, Ewelina

    2017-10-01

    Among a variety of the thin film solar cell technologies of second generation, copper-indium-gallium-diselenide device (CIGS) with the latest highest lab cell efficiency record of 22.4 % seems to be the most promising for the power generation. This is partly due to the advantages of using low cost films of few microns thick not only as a metallic contacts but also as a main structure of the solar cell consisted of high quality semiconductor layers. This paper reports the experimental studies of the CIGS absorber formation on Soda Lime Glass substrate covered by thin molybdenum film as a back contact layer. All structures were deposited with the use of magnetron sputtering method only. Technological parameters of the deposition process such as deposition power, pressure and deposition time were optimized for each layer of the structure. Mo back contact was examined in terms of resistivity. EDS measurements were carried out to verify stoichiometric composition of CIGS absorber. Thin film of Al was used as a top contact in order to examine the quality of p-n junction. The I-V electrical characteristic of the p-n junction was analysed in terms of solar cell application.

  12. Improving Efficiency of Multicrystalline Silicon and CIGS Solar Cells by Incorporating Metal Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jer Jeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work studies the use of gold (Au and silver (Ag nanoparticles in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS solar cells. Au and Ag nanoparticles are deposited by spin-coating method, which is a simple and low cost process. The random distribution of nanoparticles by spin coating broadens the resonance wavelength of the transmittance. This broadening favors solar cell applications. Metal shadowing competes with light scattering in a manner that varies with nanoparticle concentration. Experimental results reveal that the mc-Si solar cells that incorporate Au nanoparticles outperform those with Ag nanoparticles. The incorporation of suitable concentration of Au and Ag nanoparticles into mc-Si solar cells increases their efficiency enhancement by 5.6% and 4.8%, respectively. Incorporating Au and Ag nanoparticles into CIGS solar cells improve their efficiency enhancement by 1.2% and 1.4%, respectively. The enhancement of the photocurrent in mc-Si solar cells is lower than that in CIGS solar cells, owing to their different light scattering behaviors and material absorption coefficients.

  13. Toward GW/year of CIGS production within the next decade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed study carried out in 1996-1997 showed that manufacturing cost of crystalline silicon PV modules could be lowered to 1 ECU/Wp when the c-Si annual module production level reaches 500 MWp while an annual production of only 60 MWp would lower production cost of thin-film PV modules to 0.6 ECU/Wp. During 1976-2003, the PV module price has followed the 80% learning curve with cumulative production volume. However, the price reduction has slowed since because of the polysilicon supply problem. Because of their high potential for improvement, thin-film PV and especially copper (Cu)-indium (In)-gallium (Ga)-selenide (Se)-sulfide (CIGS) technology have the potential for growing at the fastest rate and consequently not only to complement the lagging c-Si PV production but also to assist in following the 80% learning curve. This paper reviews the CIGS PV manufacturing processes in comparison to those of other PV technologies and predicts that annual production volume of CIGS thin-film PV modules will exceed 1 GW/year within the next 10 years. (author)

  14. Advances in Cost-Efficient Thin-Film Photovoltaics Based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Powalla; Stefan Paetel; Dimitrios Hariskos; Roland Wuerz; Friedrich Kessler; Peter Lechner; Wiltraud Wischmann; Theresa Magorian Friedlmeier

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the leading thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology based on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) compound semiconductor. This contribution includes a general comparison with the conventional Si-wafer-based PV technology and discusses the basics of the CIGS technology as well as advances in world-record-level conversion efficiency, production, applications, stability, and future developments with respect to a flexible product. Once in large-scale mass production, the CIGS techno...

  15. BADANIA NAD TECHNOLOGIĄ OTRZYMYWANIA CIENKICH WARSTW EMITERA METODĄ ROZPYLANIA MAGNETRONOWEGO DLA ZASTOSOWAŃ W OGNIWACH CIGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna PIETRASZEK

    Full Text Available Cienkowarstwowe ogniwa fotowoltaiczne wykonane na bazie struktury CIGS (mieszaniny pierwiastków miedzi, indu, galu oraz selenu należą do II generacji ogniw fotowoltaicznych. Wykazują one efektywność na poziomie zbliżonym do ogniw I generacji, lecz ze względu na niższe zużycie materiału, coraz częściej wypierają z rynku ogniwa krzemowe Artykuł przedstawia rezultaty badań dotyczących sposobu otrzymywania warstwy buforowej CdS (siarczku kadmu, zastosowanej w cienkowarstwowych ogniwach fotowoltaicznych typu CIGS. Przyjęto dwa rozwiązania technologii nanoszenia: warstwa okna CdS uzyskana metodą rozpylenia magnetronowego oraz warstwa okna CdS uzyskana metodą kąpieli chemicznej (CBD– Chemical Bath Deposition. Struktura ta powinna posiadać odpowiednią wielkość przerwy energetycznej, która pozwali na większą absorpcję fotonów, a także wymaga się, aby była cienka (mniej niż 100 nm i jednolita. Warstwy CdS zostały nałożone przez osadzanie w kąpieli chemicznej CBD na szklanych podłożach pokrytych Mo/CIGS (naniesione warstwy metodą sputteringu magnetronowego. Uzyskano dzięki temu warstwę emitera o grubości 80 nm po czasie osadzania 35 minut. Dla porównania warstwy CdS zostały nałożone poprzez sputtering magnetronowy na podłożu Mo/CIGS, uzyskanym tą samą metodą. Następnie oba rozwiązania zostały przebadane pod względem morfologii powierzchni na elektronowym mikroskopie skaningowym, jak również przeprowadzono analizy składu pierwiastkowego warstw. Zarówno jedna, jak i druga metoda prowadzi do otrzymania warstwy emitera CdS dla zastosowań w ogniwach CIGS.

  16. OTRZYMYWANIE CIENKICH WARSTW ABSORBERA CIGS METODĄ ROZPYLANIA MAGNETRONOWEGO DLA ZASTOSOWAŃ FOTOWOLTAICZNYCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir GUŁKOWSKI

    w cienkowarstwowych ogniwach słonecznych. Metoda rozpylania magnetronowego jest efektywną metodą produkcji cienkich warstw CIGS. Proces nanoszenia warstw można podzielić na dwie zasadnicze części: pierwsza to tworzenie prekursora CIG, tj. nanoszenie warstw metalicznych miedzi, galu i indu w odpowiednich proporcjach. Etap drugi to krystalizacja absorbera CIGS w wyniku procesu wygrzewania prekursora w obecności selenu. W artykule skupiono się na opracowaniu odpowiednich proporcji poszczególnych pierwiastków wchodzących w skład prekursora. Przebadano następujące konfiguracje nanoszenia poszczególnych warstw absorbera: CuGa/In oraz CuGa/In/Cu. Poszczególne warstwy naniesione zostały na podłoże molibdenowe, stanowiące tylny kontakt ogniwa budowanego na bazie absorbera CIGS. Warstwa molibdenu została przebadana metodą czteroostrzową w celu znalezienia zależności rezystywności od grubości warstwy. Przeprowadzono analizę składu pierwiastkowego warstwy za pomocą skaningowego mikroskopu elektronowego wyposażonego w system EDS. Dla każdej z otrzymanych warstw określono atomowe współczynniki proporcji występowania miedzi oraz galu w składzie warstwy. Na podstawie otrzymanych wyników badań dokonano optymalizacji parametrów technologicznych procesu takich jak: moc katody, ciśnienie oraz czas procesu, a także temperatura. Znaleziono zależności grubości warstw w funkcji czasu nanoszenia dla ustalonych warunków ciśnienia i mocy. Grubości poszczególnych warstw określono na podstawie badań profilometrycznych. W oparciu o opracowane parametry wykonane warstwy prekursora poddawane są obróbce termicznej w celu uzyskania absorbera CIGS.

  17. Supply risks associated with CdTe and CIGS thin-film photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, Christoph; Bradshaw, Alex M.; Kolotzek, Christoph; Thorenz, Andrea; Tuma, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Supply risks associated with thin film photovoltaic technologies are considered. • Eleven supply risk indicators are used to evaluate Cd, Te, Cu, In, Ga, Se and Mo. • Indicator weighting based on peer assessment and an Analytic Hierarchy Process. • Various possibilities for the aggregation of elemental supply risks discussed. • Aggregated results show a marginally lower supply risk for CdTe than for CIGS. - Abstract: As a result of the global warming potential of fossil fuels there has been a rapid growth in the installation of photovoltaic generating capacity in the last decade. While this market is dominated by crystalline silicon, thin-film photovoltaics are still expected to make a substantial contribution to global electricity supply in future, due both to lower production costs and to recent increases in conversion efficiency. At present, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper-indium-gallium diselenide (CuIn_xGa_1_−_xSe_2) seem to be the most promising materials and currently have a share of ≈9% of the photovoltaic market. An expected stronger market penetration by these thin-film technologies raises the question as to the supply risks associated with the constituent elements. Against this background, we report here a semi-quantitative, relative assessment of mid- to long-term supply risk associated with the elements Cd, Te, Cu, In, Ga, Se and Mo. In this approach, the supply risk is measured using 11 indicators in the four categories “Risk of Supply Reduction”, “Risk of Demand Increase”, “Concentration Risk” and “Political Risk”. In a second step, the single indicator values, which are derived from publicly accessible databases, are weighted relative to each other specifically for the case of thin film photovoltaics. For this purpose, a survey among colleagues and an Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) approach are used, in order to obtain a relative, element-specific value for the supply risk. The aggregation of these

  18. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Wehrli, Bernhard [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zurich, Universitätsstrasse 16, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L{sup −1} molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L{sup −1}. From OPV, copper (14 μg L{sup −1}), zinc (87 μg L{sup −1}) and silver (78 μg L{sup −1}) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. - Highlights: • Photovoltaics may be disposed in the environment after usage. • Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic (OPV) cells were compared. • Morphological and molecular effects were assessed in zebrafish embryos. • Environmental condition affected metal leaching and ecotoxicological activity. • Damaged CIGS cells pose higher risk to the environment than OPV cells.

  19. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burghoorn, M.; Kniknie, B.; Deelen, J. van; Ee, R. van [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Xu, M. [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Delft University of Technology, Optics Group, Van der Waalsweg 8, 2628 CH, Delft (Netherlands); Vroon, Z. [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Zuyd Hogeschool, Nieuw Eyckholt 300, 6419 DJ, Heerlen (Netherlands); Belt, R. van de [Kriya Materials BV, Urmonderbaan 22, 6167 RD, Geleen (Netherlands); Buskens, P., E-mail: pascal.buskens@tno.nl, E-mail: buskens@dwi.rwth-aachen.de [The Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), De Rondom 1, 5612 AP, Eindhoven (Netherlands); DWI – Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials, Forckenbeckstrasse 50, 52056, Aachen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the J{sub sc} and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (d{sub CIGS}) of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (n{sub resist} = 1.792 vs. n{sub AZO} = 1.913 at 633 nm) to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, J{sub sc} increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%). No trend towards a larger relative increase in J{sub sc} with decreasing d{sub CIGS} was observed. Ergo, the increase in J{sub sc} can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in J{sub sc} based on an increased photon path length.

  20. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-selenide (CIGS solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burghoorn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed photons and, consequently, an increase in short-circuit current density (Jsc and cell efficiency. Through optical simulations, we recently obtained strong indications that texturing of the transparent conductor in copper indium gallium (di-selenide (CIGS solar cells is also optically advantageous. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the Jsc and efficiency of CIGS solar cells with an absorber layer thickness (dCIGS of 0.85 μm, 1.00 μm and 2.00 μm increase through application of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index that is sufficiently similar to AZO (nresist = 1.792 vs. nAZO = 1.913 at 633 nm to avoid large optical losses at the resist-AZO interface. On average, Jsc increases by 7.2%, which matches the average reduction in reflection of 7.0%. The average relative increase in efficiency is slightly lower (6.0%. No trend towards a larger relative increase in Jsc with decreasing dCIGS was observed. Ergo, the increase in Jsc can be fully explained by the reduction in reflection, and we did not observe any increase in Jsc based on an increased photon path length.

  1. Ecotoxicological assessment of solar cell leachates: Copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) cells show higher activity than organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Wehrli, Bernhard; Fent, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of photovoltaics their potential environmental risks are poorly understood. Here, we compared ecotoxicological effects of two thin-film photovoltaics: established copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. Leachates were produced by exposing photovoltaics to UV light, physical damage, and exposure to environmentally relevant model waters, representing mesotrophic lake water, acidic rain, and seawater. CIGS cell leachates contained 583 μg L(-1) molybdenum at lake water, whereas at acidic rain and seawater conditions, iron, copper, zinc, molybdenum, cadmium, silver, and tin were present up to 7219 μg L(-1). From OPV, copper (14 μg L(-1)), zinc (87 μg L(-1)) and silver (78 μg L(-1)) leached. Zebrafish embryos were exposed until 120 h post-fertilization to these extracts. CIGS leachates produced under acidic rain, as well as CIGS and OPV leachates produced under seawater conditions resulted in a marked hatching delay and increase in heart edema. Depending on model water and solar cell, transcriptional alterations occurred in genes involved in oxidative stress (cat), hormonal activity (vtg1, ar), metallothionein (mt2), ER stress (bip, chop), and apoptosis (casp9). The effects were dependent on the concentrations of cationic metals in leachates. Addition of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid protected zebrafish embryos from morphological and molecular effects. Our study suggests that metals leaching from damaged CIGS cells, may pose a potential environmental risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparative study of the role of Ga in CIGS solar cells with different thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Anjun, E-mail: haj211@mail.sim.ac.cn [Institute of Photo Electronics Thin Film Devices and Technique of Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Research Center for New Energy Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 235 Chengbei Road, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China); Sun, Yun; Zhang, Yi [Institute of Photo Electronics Thin Film Devices and Technique of Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xiaohui; Meng, Fanying; Liu, Zhengxin [Research Center for New Energy Technology, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology (SIMIT), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 235 Chengbei Road, Jiading, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films with thickness of 1 μm and 2 μm are prepared by co-evaporation process, and the different Ga/(Ga + In) are achieved by varying the temperature of Ga source. The morphology, structure, minimum band gap, and performance of solar cells are comparatively studied. As Ga/(Ga + In) increases, little changes can be observed in the crystal quality of 1 μm CIGS films, while the grain size of 2 μm films decreases significantly. (112) diffraction peak intensities of the 1 μm and 2 μm films decrease and increase, respectively. In the case of the same Ga/(Ga + In), the minimum band gap values of 1 μm films are larger than that of 2 μm films, and the difference becomes large with Ga/(Ga + In) increasing. The minimum band gap values of 1 μm films are more sensitive to variation of the Ga/(Ga + In). As Ga/(Ga + In) increases, a more improvement of the efficiency of solar cells with thickness of 1 μm is obtained due to the large enhancement of the open-circuit voltage, and the efficiency reaches the maximum value when Ga/(Ga + In) is about 0.37. - Highlights: • The role of Ga in CIGS solar cells with different thickness is comparatively studied. • Effect of Ga on the material properties of 1 μm and 2 μm films is totally different. • The minimum band gap of thinned films is more sensitive to variation of Ga/(Ga + In). • Efficiency of thinned solar cells increases more significantly with Ga increasing.

  3. Quenching Mo optical losses in CIGS solar cells by a point contacted dual-layer dielectric spacer: a 3-D optical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei, N.; Isabella, O.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.

    2018-01-01

    A 3-D optical modelling was calibrated to calculate the light absorption and the total reflection of fabricated CIGS solar cells. Absorption losses at molybdenum (Mo) / CIGS interface were explained in terms of plasmonic waves. To quench these losses, we assumed the insertion of a lossless

  4. Quenching Mo optical losses in CIGS solar cells by a point contacted dual-layer dielectric spacer : A 3-D optical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaei, N.; Isabella, O.; Vroon, Zeger; Zeman, M.

    2018-01-01

    A 3-D optical modelling was calibrated to calculate the light absorption and the total reflection of fabricated CIGS solar cells. Absorption losses at molybdenum (Mo) / CIGS interface were explained in terms of plasmonic waves. To quench these losses, we assumed the insertion of a lossless

  5. Nd:YAG laser annealing investigation of screen-printed CIGS layer on PET: Layer annealing method for photovoltaic cell fabrication process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed; Alarousu, Erkki; Boulfrad, Samir; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    by heat treatment using a Nd:YAG laser. The structure and morphology of the heated thin films were studied. The characterization of the CIGS powder, ink, and film was done using TGA, SEM, FIB, EDS, and XRD. TGA analysis shows that the CIGS ink is drying

  6. The Effect of Sputtering Parameters on the Film Properties of Molybdenum Back Contact for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-cheng Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo thin films are widely used as a back contact for CIGS-based solar cells. This paper determines the optimal settings for the sputtering parameters for an Mo thin film prepared on soda lime glass substrates, using direct current (dc magnetron sputtering, with a metal Mo target, in an argon gas environment. A Taguchi method with an L9 orthogonal array, the signal-to-noise ratio, and an analysis of variances is used to determine the performance characteristics of the coating operation. The main sputtering parameters, such as working pressure (mTorr, dc power (W, and substrate temperature (°C, are optimized with respect to the structural features, surface morphology, and electrical properties of the Mo films. An adhesive tape test is performed on each film to determine the adhesion strength of the films. The experimental results show that the working pressure has the dominant effect on electrical resistivity and reflectance. The intensity of the main peak (110 for the Mo film increases and the full width at half maximum decreases gradually as the sputtering power is increased. Additionally, the application of an Mo bilayer demonstrates good adherence and low resistivity.

  7. Photovoltaic characterization of Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) solar cells for lower absorber thicknesses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasekar, Parag S., E-mail: psvasekar@yahoo.co [Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Rd., Cocoa FL, 32922 (United States); Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G. [Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Rd., Cocoa FL, 32922 (United States)

    2010-01-31

    Chalcopyrites are important contenders among thin-film solar cells due to their direct band gap and higher absorption coefficient. Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) is a chalcopyrite material with a near-optimum band gap of {approx} 1.5 eV. Record efficiency of 11.99% has been achieved on a 2.7 {mu}m CIGS2 film prepared by sulfurization at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) PV Materials Lab. In this work, photovoltaic performance analysis has been carried out for a 1.5 {mu}m absorber prepared under similar conditions as that of a 2.7 {mu}m thick absorber sample. It was observed that there is an increase in diode factor and reverse saturation current density when the absorber thickness was decreased. The diode factor increased from 1.69 to 2.18 and reverse saturation current density increased from 1.04 x 10{sup -10} mA/cm{sup 2} to 1.78 x 10{sup -8} mA/cm{sup 2}. This can be attributed to a decrease in the grain size when the absorber thickness is decreased. It was also observed that there is an improvement in the shunt resistance. Improvement in shunt resistance can be attributed to optimized value of i:ZnO for lower absorber thickness and less shunting paths due to a smoother absorber.

  8. Photovoltaic characterization of Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) solar cells for lower absorber thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasekar, Parag S.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2010-01-01

    Chalcopyrites are important contenders among thin-film solar cells due to their direct band gap and higher absorption coefficient. Copper-Indium-Gallium Sulfide (CIGS2) is a chalcopyrite material with a near-optimum band gap of ∼ 1.5 eV. Record efficiency of 11.99% has been achieved on a 2.7 μm CIGS2 film prepared by sulfurization at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) PV Materials Lab. In this work, photovoltaic performance analysis has been carried out for a 1.5 μm absorber prepared under similar conditions as that of a 2.7 μm thick absorber sample. It was observed that there is an increase in diode factor and reverse saturation current density when the absorber thickness was decreased. The diode factor increased from 1.69 to 2.18 and reverse saturation current density increased from 1.04 x 10 -10 mA/cm 2 to 1.78 x 10 -8 mA/cm 2 . This can be attributed to a decrease in the grain size when the absorber thickness is decreased. It was also observed that there is an improvement in the shunt resistance. Improvement in shunt resistance can be attributed to optimized value of i:ZnO for lower absorber thickness and less shunting paths due to a smoother absorber.

  9. CIGS J-V distortion in the absence of blue photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudov, A.O.; Sites, J.R.; Contreras, M.A.; Nakada, T.; Schock, H.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Common buffer materials used with CuInGaSe 2 (CIGS) absorbers produce conduction-band barriers that may significantly distort the current-voltage (J-V) curves, especially when short-wavelength photons are excluded from the illumination spectrum. Earlier work documented this effect for CuInSe 2 (CIS) absorbers (band gap near 1.0 eV) with CdS buffers. Higher band-gap (no. approxno. 1.15 eV) CIGS absorbers show little or no distortion with CdS buffer layers. However, wider band gap (lower electron affinity) ZnS(O,OH) or InS(O,OH) buffers, prepared by chemical-bath deposition (CBD), clearly show the J-V distortion. The distortions have a turn-on time constant the order of a minute and turn-off time constant the order of a day, and they correlate with major variations in apparent quantum efficiency (QE) measured with varying intensity and spectral content of bias light. The results are consistent with a conduction-band spike barrier that increases with buffer band gap and is larger when the electron concentration in the buffer is small

  10. The exposure of CIGS solar cells to different electrical biases in a damp-heat illumination environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Steijvers, H.; Bakker, K.; Vink, J.; Mortazavi, S.; Mulder, A.; Barreau, N.; Roosen, D.; Haverkamp, E.

    2016-01-01

    Two hybrid degradation setups, allowing exposure of solar cells and modules to elevated temperatures and humidity as well as illumination have been built. CIGS solar cells were placed in the degradation setups, allowing real time monitoring of their electrical properties. Under open circuit

  11. Enhancement of the CIGS solar cell's efficiency by anti-reflection coating with teflon AF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Hong-Sub; Kim, Chan; Rhee, Il-Su [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Dae-Hwan [Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung-Wook [Daegu University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    An anti-reflection (AR) layer of Teflon AF was deposited on the front surface of a Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cell with a structure of grid/TCO/ZnO/CdS/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}/Mo/glass by using the spin coating method. This AR layer reduced the front-surface reflection, which resulted in high efficiency for the CIGS solar cell. The thickness of the Teflon AF layer was varied to determine the thickness that gave the highest transmittance of incident light into the active absorber of the CIGS solar cell. The optimum thickness of the Teflon AF layer was found to be 105 nm. CIGS solar cells with a Teflon AF layer of 105 nm were constructed, and their efficiencies were compared with those of solar cells without a Teflon AF layer. The average increase in the relative efficiency of the solar cells was 2.63% due to the inclusion of an anti-reflection layer of Teflon AF.

  12. The effect of damp heat-illumination exposure on CIGS solar cells: A combined XRD and electrical characterization study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Hendrikx, R.; Barreau, N.; Steijvers, H.; Böttger, A.

    2016-01-01

    Unencapsulated CIGS solar cells were simultaneously exposed to damp heat and illumination. In-situ monitoring of their electrical parameters demonstrated a rapid decrease of the efficiency, mainly driven by changes in the series and shunt resistances. The non-degraded and degraded solar cells were

  13. Quenching Mo optical losses in CIGS solar cells by a point contacted dual-layer dielectric spacer: a 3-D optical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Nasim; Isabella, Olindo; Vroon, Zeger; Zeman, Miro

    2018-01-22

    A 3-D optical modelling was calibrated to calculate the light absorption and the total reflection of fabricated CIGS solar cells. Absorption losses at molybdenum (Mo) / CIGS interface were explained in terms of plasmonic waves. To quench these losses, we assumed the insertion of a lossless dielectric spacer between Mo and CIGS, whose optical properties were varied. We show that such a spacer with low refractive index and proper thickness can significantly reduce absorption in Mo in the long wavelength regime and improve the device's rear reflectance, thus leading to enhanced light absorption in the CIGS layer. Therefore, we optimized a realistic two-layer MgF 2 / Al 2 O 3 dielectric spacer to exploit (i) the passivation properties of ultra-thin Al 2 O 3 on the CIGS side for potential high open-circuit voltage and (ii) the low refractive index of MgF 2 on the Mo side to reduce its optical losses. Combining our realistic spacer with optically-optimized point contacts increases the implied photocurrent density of a 750 nm-thick CIGS layer by 10% for the wavelengths between 700 and 1150 nm with respect to the reference cell. The elimination of plasmonic resonances in the new structure leads to a higher electric field magnitude at the bottom of CIGS layer and justifies the improved optical performance.

  14. Nd:YAG laser annealing investigation of screen-printed CIGS layer on PET: Layer annealing method for photovoltaic cell fabrication process

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2014-06-01

    Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) ink was formulated from CIGS powder, polyvinyl butyral PVB, terpineol and polyester/polyamine co-polymeric dispersant KD-1. Thin films with different thicknesses were deposited on PET substrate using screen-printing followed by heat treatment using a Nd:YAG laser. The structure and morphology of the heated thin films were studied. The characterization of the CIGS powder, ink, and film was done using TGA, SEM, FIB, EDS, and XRD. TGA analysis shows that the CIGS ink is drying at 200 °C, which is well below the decomposition temperature of the PET substrate. It was observed by SEM that 20 pulses of 532nm and 60 mJ/cm2 Nd:YAG laser annealing causes atomic diffusion on the near surface area. Furthermore, FIB cross section images were utilized to monitor the effect of laser annealing in the depth of the layer. Laser annealing effects were compared to as deposited layer using XRD in reference to CIGS powder. The measurement shows that crystallinity of deposited CIGS is retained while EDS quantification and atomic ratio result in gradual loss of selenium as laser energy increases. The laser parameters were tuned in an effort to utilize laser annealing of screen-printed CIGS layer as a layer annealing method for solar cell fabrication process.

  15. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    KAUST Repository

    Bailie, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. This work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  16. Notas sobre Feral y las cigüeñas, de Fernando Alonso, y la "Historia del califa cigüeña" (Wilhelm Hauff, Sara Cone Bryant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Hagedorn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En el presente estudio se analizan las fuentes de la versión de la "Historia del califa cigüeña", incluida en la narración Feral y las cigüeñas (1971, de Fernando Alonso. Para ello se tienen en cuenta el cuento original del autor postromántico alemán Wilhelm Hauff ("Die Geschichte von Kalif Storch", 1825, y la adaptación de este cuento que Sara Cone Bryant realizó para su libro How to tell stories to children (1905, traducción española: El arte de contar cuentos, 1965.

  17. Cd-free buffer layer materials on Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4: Band alignments with ZnO, ZnS, and In2S3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.; Haight, Richard; Sakai, Noriyuki; Hiroi, Homare; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Mitzi, David B.

    2012-05-01

    The heterojunctions formed between Cu2ZnSn(SxSe1-x)4 (CZTSSe) and three Cd-free n-type buffers, ZnS, ZnO, and In2S3, were studied using femtosecond ultraviolet photoemission and photovoltage spectroscopy. The electronic properties including the Fermi level location at the interface, band bending in the CZTSSe substrate, and valence and conduction band offsets were determined and correlated with device properties. We also describe a method for determining the band bending in the buffer layer and demonstrate this for the In2S3/CZTSSe system. The chemical bath deposited In2S3 buffer is found to have near optimal conduction band offset (0.15 eV), enabling the demonstration of Cd-free In2S3/CZTSSe solar cells with 7.6% power conversion efficiency.

  18. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of

  19. Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, David S.; Noufi, Rommel

    2015-06-09

    Systems and methods for solar cells with CIS and CIGS films made by reacting evaporated copper chlorides with selenium are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating a thin film device comprises: providing a semiconductor film comprising indium (In) and selenium (Se) upon a substrate; heating the substrate and the semiconductor film to a desired temperature; and performing a mass transport through vapor transport of a copper chloride vapor and se vapor to the semiconductor film within a reaction chamber.

  20. Improving Performance of CIGS Solar Cells by Annealing ITO Thin Films Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Lung Chuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indium tin oxide (ITO thin films were grown on glass substrates by direct current (DC reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature. Annealing at the optimal temperature can considerably improve the composition, structure, optical properties, and electrical properties of the ITO film. An ITO sample with a favorable crystalline structure was obtained by annealing in fixed oxygen/argon ratio of 0.03 at 400°C for 30 min. The carrier concentration, mobility, resistivity, band gap, transmission in the visible-light region, and transmission in the near-IR regions of the ITO sample were -1.6E+20 cm−3, 2.7E+01 cm2/Vs, 1.4E-03 Ohm-cm, 3.2 eV, 89.1%, and 94.7%, respectively. Thus, annealing improved the average transmissions (400–1200 nm of the ITO film by 16.36%. Moreover, annealing a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS solar cell at 400°C for 30 min in air improved its efficiency by 18.75%. The characteristics of annealing ITO films importantly affect the structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties of ITO films that are used in solar cells.

  1. Efficiency enhancement of CIGS compound solar cell fabricated using homomorphic thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffusion barrier formed on stainless steel substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jae-Kwan; Lee, Seung-Kyu; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeong, Kwang-Un; Ahn, Haeng-Keun; Lee, Cheul-Ro, E-mail: crlee7@jbnu.ac.kr

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A chromium oxide layer is formed as diffusion barrier by thermal oxidation process on STS substrate. • A Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer effectively reduces impurities diffusion into the CIGS absorber layer. • The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer plays an important role in increasing the efficiency by reduction of impurity diffusion. - Abstract: It is known that the efficiency of flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells fabricated on stainless-steel (STS) substrates deteriorates due to iron (Fe) and Cr impurities diffusing into the CIGS absorber layer. To overcome this problem, a nanoscale homomorphic chromium oxide layer was formed as a diffusion barrier by thermal oxidation on the surface of STS substrates for 1 min at 600 °C in oxygen atmosphere. By TEM and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), it was confirmed that the formed oxide layer on surface of STS substrates was a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. It was found that the formed homomorphic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin layer of about 15 nm thickness was an effective diffusion barrier to reduce impurity diffusion into the CIGS layer by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). In contrast to the efficiency of CIGS solar cell without homomorphic Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} diffusion layer is 8.6%, whereas with diffusion barrier it increases to 10.6% because of impurities such as Fe and Cr from the STS substrate into the CIGS layer. It reveals that the layer formed on the surface of STS substrate by thermal oxidation process plays an important role in increasing the performance of CIGS solar cells.

  2. EffiCiency and Safety of an eLectronic cigAreTte (ECLAT as tobacco cigarettes substitute: a prospective 12-month randomized control design study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Caponnetto

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular with smokers worldwide. Users report buying them to help quit smoking, to reduce cigarette consumption, to relieve tobacco withdrawal symptoms, and to continue having a 'smoking' experience, but with reduced health risks. Research on e-cigarettes is urgently needed in order to ensure that the decisions of regulators, healthcare providers and consumers are based on science. Methods ECLAT is a prospective 12-month randomized, controlled trial that evaluates smoking reduction/abstinence in 300 smokers not intending to quit experimenting two different nicotine strengths of a popular e-cigarette model ('Categoria'; Arbi Group Srl, Italy compared to its non-nicotine choice. GroupA (n = 100 received 7.2 mg nicotine cartridges for 12 weeks; GroupB (n = 100, a 6-week 7.2 mg nicotine cartridges followed by a further 6-week 5.4 mg nicotine cartridges; GroupC (n = 100 received no-nicotine cartridges for 12 weeks. The study consisted of nine visits during which cig/day use and exhaled carbon monoxide (eCO levels were measured. Smoking reduction and abstinence rates were calculated. Adverse events and product preferences were also reviewed.Declines in cig/day use and eCO levels were observed at each study visits in all three study groups (p<0.001 vs baseline, with no consistent differences among study groups. Smoking reduction was documented in 22.3% and 10.3% at week-12 and week-52 respectively. Complete abstinence from tobacco smoking was documented in 10.7% and 8.7% at week-12 and week-52 respectively. A substantial decrease in adverse events from baseline was observed and withdrawal symptoms were infrequently reported during the study. Participants' perception and acceptance of the product under investigation was satisfactory.In smokers not intending to quit, the use of e-cigarettes, with or without nicotine, decreased cigarette consumption and elicited enduring tobacco

  3. Preparation and optimization of a molybdenum electrode for CIGS solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jingxue

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo films were deposited by radio frequency (RF, direct current (DC and mixed magnetron sputtering, respectively. With changing the deposition parameters including deposition pressure and power, the films show different surface morphology and crystallinity. Lower resistivity of the films is obtained in the DC mode and better reflectivity of the films is obtained in the RF mode. It is shown that the crystallinity increases when the deposition pressure decreases. The crystallinity and the grain size both increase as the deposition power increasing. The lowest resistivity of the single Mo film is 34×10-6 Ω·cm when the deposition pressure is 0.1 Pa and the deposition power is 300 W in the DC mode. In order to obtain lower resistivity, better adhesion and better reflectivity, bilayer films and tri-layer films were both deposited in different mode. They all show good adhesion and low resistivity. The Mo films deposited in mixed mode show better reflectivity. It is demonstrated that the resistivity of about 65×10-6 Ω·cm is achieved in DC/RF mode and the resistivity of about 61×10-6 Ω·cm is achieved in RF/DC/RF mode. And the tri-layer films achieved in RF/DC/RF mode have better reflectivity than bilayer films achieved in DC/RF mode. The tri-layer films achieved in RF/DC/RF mode is appropriate for using as the electrode of CIGS solar cells.

  4. Indium tin oxide with titanium doping for transparent conductive film application on CIGS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei-Sheng; Cheng, Huai-Ming; Hu, Hung-Chun; Li, Ying-Tse; Huang, Shi-Da; Yu, Hau-Wei [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Pu, Nen-Wen, E-mail: nwpuccit@gmail.com [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Liang, Shih-Chang [Materials & Electro-Optics Research Division, National Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Lung Tan 32599, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Ti-doped indium tin oxide (ITO) films were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. • Optimal optoelectronic properties were achieved at a sputtering power of 100 W. • Resistivity = 3.2 × 10{sup −4} Ω-cm without substrate heating or post growth annealing. • Mean visible and NIR transmittances of 83 and 80%, respectively, were achieved. • Efficient batteries (11.3%) were fabricated by applying ITO:Ti to CIGS solar cells. - Abstract: In this study, Ti-doped indium tin oxide (ITO:Ti) thin films were fabricated using a DC-magnetron sputtering deposition method. The thin films were grown without introducing oxygen or heating the substrate, and no post-growth annealing was performed after fabrication. The thickness of the ITO:Ti thin films (350 nm) was controlled while increasing the sputtering power from 50 to 150 W. According to the results, the optimal optoelectronic properties were observed in ITO:Ti thin films grown at a sputtering power of 100 W, yielding a reduced resistivity of 3.2 × 10{sup −4} Ω-cm and a mean high transmittance of 83% at wavelengths ranging from 400 to 800 nm. The optimal ITO:Ti thin films were used to fabricate a Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell that exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 11.3%, a short-circuit current density of 33.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, an open-circuit voltage of 0.54 V, and a fill factor of 0.64.

  5. Adhesion, resistivity and structural, optical properties of molybdenum on steel sheet coated with barrier layer done by sol–gel for CIGS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amouzou, Dodji, E-mail: dodji.amouzou@fundp.ac.be [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Dumont, Jacques [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Fourdrinier, Lionel; Richir, Jean-Baptiste; Maseri, Fabrizio [CRM-Group, Boulevard de Colonster, B 57, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Sporken, Robert [Research Centre in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), Rue de Bruxelles 61, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2013-03-01

    Molybdenum films are investigated on stainless steel substrates coated with polysilazane based sol–gel and SiO{sub x} layers for flexible CIGS solar cell applications. Thermal stability of the multilayer has been studied. The thickness of polysilazane films are significantly reduced (17%) after heat treatment suggesting a thermal degradation. Four different microstructures were found for Mo films by varying argon total pressure from 2.6 × 10{sup −1} Pa to 2.6 Pa. It was shown that continuous films, low sheet resistance (0.5 Ω/□) and well facetted grains can be achieved when Mo films are deposited on heated substrates at homologous temperature, T of 0.2. - Highlights: ► Steel sheet is functionalized for Cu[Inx,Ga(1 − x)Se2] solar cells. ► Varying deposition pressure impacts the microstructure of Mo films. ► High thermal stability of the sol gel based barrier layer has been investigated. ► Low sheet resistance and continuous Mo films have been obtained at 550°C. ► Thermal stability of functionalized steel sheets at 550°C has been investigated.

  6. Flexible CIGS solar cells on large area polymer foils with in-line deposition methods and application of alternative back contacts - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, A. N.

    2009-08-15

    This illustrated report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the work performed within this project and also reports on synergies with other projects that helped to make a significant contribution to the development of CIGS thin film solar cells on flexible substrates such as polymer foils. The project's aims were to learn more about up-scaling issues and to demonstrate the abilities required for the processing of layers on large area polyimide foils for flexible CIGS solar cells. Custom-built evaporators that were designed and constructed in-house are described. A CIGS system for in-line deposition was also modified for roll-to-roll deposition and alternative electrical back contacts to conventional ones were evaluated on flexible polyimide foils. The objectives of the project and the results obtained are looked at and commented on in detail.

  7. Advances in Cost-Efficient Thin-Film Photovoltaics Based on Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Powalla; Stefan Paetel; Dimitrios Hariskos; Roland Wuerz; Friedrich Kessler; Peter Lechner; Wiltraud Wischmann; Theresa Magorian Friedlmeier

    2017-01-01

    In this article,we discuss the leading thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology based on the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)compound semiconductor.This contribution includes a general comparison with the conventional Si-wafer-based PV technology and discusses the basics of the CIGS technology as well as advances in worldrecord-level conversion efficiency,production,applications,stability,and future developments with respect to a flexible product.Once in large-scale mass production,the CIGS technology has the highest potential of all PV technologies for cost-efficient clean energy generation.

  8. Advances in Cost-Efficient Thin-Film Photovoltaics Based on Cu(In,GaSe2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Powalla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we discuss the leading thin-film photovoltaic (PV technology based on the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS compound semiconductor. This contribution includes a general comparison with the conventional Si-wafer-based PV technology and discusses the basics of the CIGS technology as well as advances in world-record-level conversion efficiency, production, applications, stability, and future developments with respect to a flexible product. Once in large-scale mass production, the CIGS technology has the highest potential of all PV technologies for cost-efficient clean energy generation.

  9. Hydrogen effects on deep level defects in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} based thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.W.; Seol, M.S.; Kwak, D.W.; Oh, J.S. [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, J.H. [Photo-electronic Hybrids Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, H.Y., E-mail: hycho@dongguk.edu [Department of Physics, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-01

    Hydrogen effects on deep level defects and a defect generation in proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) based thin films for solar cell were investigated. CIGS films with a thickness of 3 {mu}m were grown on a soda-lime glass substrate by a co-evaporation method, and then were implanted with protons. To study deep level defects in the proton implanted CIGS films, deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on the CIGS-based solar cells were carried out, these measurements found 6 traps (including 3 hole traps and 3 electron traps). In the proton implanted CIGS films, the deep level defects, which are attributed to the recombination centers of the CIGS solar cell, were significantly reduced in intensity, while a deep level defect was generated around 0.28 eV above the valence band maximum. Therefore, we suggest that most deep level defects in CIGS films can be controlled by hydrogen effects. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton implanted Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep level defects of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film and solar cell are investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation using proton implantation and H{sub 2} annealing reduces deep level defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogenation could enhance electrical properties and efficiency of solar cells.

  10. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M. K. Gustafsson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode, respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective.

  11. Optical Design of Textured Thin-Film CIGS Solar Cells with Nearly-Invisible Nanowire Assisted Front Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop van Deelen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The conductivity of transparent front contacts can be improved by patterned metallic nanowires, albeit at the cost of optical loss. The associated optical penalty can be strongly reduced by texturization of the cell stack. Remarkably, the nanowires themselves are not textured and not covered in our design. This was shown by optical modeling where the width of the nanowire, the texture height and the texture period were varied in order to obtain a good insight into the general trends. The optical performance can be improved dramatically as the reflection, which is the largest optical loss, can be reduced by 95% of the original value. The spectra reveal absorption in the Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS layer of 95% and reflection below 2% over a large part of the spectrum. In essence, a virtually black CIGS cell stack can be achieved for textured cells with a metal nanogrid. Moreover, it turned out that the ratio between the width of the nanowire and the height of the texture is a critical parameter for optical losses.

  12. Photoelectrochemical water splitting for hydrogen production using combination of CIGS2 solar cell and RuO2 photocatalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Jahagirdar, Anant H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the development of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell for water splitting setup using multiple band gap combination of CuIn 1-x Ga x S 2 (CIGS2) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cell and ruthenium oxide (RuO 2 ) photocatalyst. FSEC PV Materials Lab has developed a PEC setup consisting of two illuminated CIGS2 cells, a ruthenium oxide (RuO 2 ) anode deposited on titanium sheet for oxygen evolution and a platinum foil cathode for hydrogen evolution. With this combination, a PEC efficiency of 4.29% has been achieved. This paper also presents the research aimed at further improvements in the PEC efficiency by employing highly efficient photoanode that can be illuminated by photons not absorbed at the PV cell and by increasing the concentration of electrolyte solution (pH 10). The former will be achieved by employing a p-type transparent and conducting layer at the back of PV cell to transmit the unabsorbed photons, and the latter will reduce the resistance offered by the electrolyte. Concentration of the electrolyte was increased by five times, and the I-V characteristics of both RuO 2 and RuS 2 were measured with and without illumination. The results indicate that PEC efficiencies of over 9% can be achieved using RuS 2 with illumination and five times concentrated pH 10 solution instead of pH 10 with normal concentration

  13. Photoelectrochemical water splitting for hydrogen production using combination of CIGS2 solar cell and RuO{sub 2} photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G. [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)]. E-mail: dhere@fsec.ucf.edu; Jahagirdar, Anant H. [University of Central Florida, Florida Solar Energy Center, 1679 Clearlake Road Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents the development of photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell for water splitting setup using multiple band gap combination of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga {sub x}S{sub 2} (CIGS2) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) cell and ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}) photocatalyst. FSEC PV Materials Lab has developed a PEC setup consisting of two illuminated CIGS2 cells, a ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub 2}) anode deposited on titanium sheet for oxygen evolution and a platinum foil cathode for hydrogen evolution. With this combination, a PEC efficiency of 4.29% has been achieved. This paper also presents the research aimed at further improvements in the PEC efficiency by employing highly efficient photoanode that can be illuminated by photons not absorbed at the PV cell and by increasing the concentration of electrolyte solution (pH 10). The former will be achieved by employing a p-type transparent and conducting layer at the back of PV cell to transmit the unabsorbed photons, and the latter will reduce the resistance offered by the electrolyte. Concentration of the electrolyte was increased by five times, and the I-V characteristics of both RuO{sub 2} and RuS{sub 2} were measured with and without illumination. The results indicate that PEC efficiencies of over 9% can be achieved using RuS{sub 2} with illumination and five times concentrated pH 10 solution instead of pH 10 with normal concentration.

  14. Confinement - assisted shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) on a flexible substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Pierre; Zagoranskiy, Igor; Ehrhardt, Martin; Han, Bing; Bayer, Lukas; Zimmer, Klaus

    2017-12-01

    The laser structuring of CIGS (copper indium gallium (di)selenide) solar cell material without influence and damaging the functionality of the active layer is a challenge for laser methods The shock-wave-induced thin-film delamination (SWIFD) process allows structuring without thermal modifications due to a spatial separation of the laser absorption from the functional layer removal process. In the present study, SWIFD structuring of CIGS solar cell stacks was investigated. The rear side of the polyimide was irradiated with a KrF-Excimer laser. The laser-induced ablation process generates a traverse shock wave, and the interaction of the shock wave with the layer-substrate interface results in a delamination process. The effect of a water confinement on the SWIFD process was studied where the rear side of the substrate was covered with a ∼2 mm thick water layer. The resultant surface morphology was analysed and discussed. At a sufficient number of laser pulses N and laser fluences Φ, the CIGS layer can be selectively removed from the Mo back contact. The water confinement, as well as the increasing laser beam size A0 and N, results in the reduction of the necessary minimal laser fluence Φth. Further, the delaminated CIGS area increased with increasing Φ, N, and A0.

  15. High throughput CIGS solar cell fabrication via ultra-thin absorber layer with optical confinement and (Cd, CBD)-free heterojunction partner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsillac, Sylvain [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-11-30

    The main objective of this proposal was to use several pathways to reduce the production cost of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) PV modules and therefore the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) associated with this technology. Three high cost drivers were identified, nominally: 1) Materials cost and availability; 2) Large scale uniformity; 3) Improved throughput These three cost drivers were targeted using the following pathways: 1) Reducing the thickness of the CIGS layer while enhancing materials quality; 2) Developing and applying enhanced in-situ metrology via real time spectroscopic ellipsometry; 3) Looking into alternative heterojunction partner, back contact and anti-reflection (AR) coating Eleven main Tasks were then defined to achieve these goals (5 in Phase 1 and 6 in Phase 2), with 11 Milestones and 2 Go/No-go decision points at the end of Phase 1. The key results are summarized below

  16. CIGS Solar Cells for Space Applications: Numerical Simulation of the Effect of Traps Created by High-Energy Electron and Proton Irradiation on the Performance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbabi, Samar; Ben Nasr, Tarek; Turki Kamoun, Najoua

    2018-02-01

    Numerical simulation is carried out using the Silvaco ATLAS software to predict the effect of 1-MeV electron and 4-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cell that operates under the air mass zero spectrum (AM0). As a consequence of irradiation, two types of traps are induced including the donor- and acceptor-type traps. Only one of them (the donor-type trap) is found responsible for the degradation of the open-circuit voltage (V OC), fill factor (FF) and efficiency (η), while the short circuit current (J SC) remains essentially unaffected. The modelling simulation validity is verified by comparison with the experimental data. This article shows that CIGS solar cells are suited for space applications.

  17. Lung Toxicity of Condensed Aerosol from E-CIG Liquids: Influence of the Flavor and the In Vitro Model Used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bengalli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion of e-cigarette (e-CIG opens a great scientific and regulatory debate about its safety. The huge number of commercialized devices, e-liquids with almost infinite chemical formulations and the growing market demand for a rapid and efficient toxicity screen system that is able to test all of these references and related aerosols. A consensus on the best protocols for the e-CIG safety assessment is still far to be achieved, since the huge number of variables characterizing these products (e.g., flavoring type and concentration, nicotine concentration, type of the device, including the battery and the atomizer. This suggests that more experimental evidences are needed to support the regulatory frameworks. The present study aims to contribute in this field by testing the effects of condensed aerosols (CAs from three main e-liquid categories (tobacco, mint, and cinnamon as food-related flavor, with (18 mg/mL or without nicotine. Two in vitro models, represented by a monoculture of human epithelial alveolar cells and a three-dimensional (3D co-culture of alveolar and lung microvascular endothelial cells were used. Cell viability, pro-inflammatory cytokines release and alveolar-blood barrier (ABB integrity were investigated as inhalation toxicity endpoints. Results showed that nicotine itself had almost no influence on the modulation of the toxicity response, while flavor composition did have. The cell viability was significantly decreased in monoculture and ABB after exposure to the mints and cinnamon CAs. The barrier integrity was significantly affected in the ABB after exposure to cytotoxic CAs. With the exception of the significant IL-8 release in the monoculture after Cinnamon exposure, no increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and MCP-1 release was observed. These findings point out that multiple assays with different in vitro models are able to discriminate the acute inhalation toxicity of CAs from liquids with different flavors

  18. Competitive-IgY- Enzyme Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay (CIgY-ELISA to detect the cytokinins in Gerbera jamesonii plantlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleiton Mateus Sousa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A competitive hyper-immune yolk Immunoglobulin Y - Enzyme Linked Immune Sorbent Assay (CIgY-ELISA, was developed as an alternative method to detect zeatin and 2ip in plantlets of gerbera. The endogenous level of hormones in the plantlets in vitro of gerbera with one or six weeks after replication was determined with competitive IgY-ELISA set to detect between 1 and 100 pmoles of plant hormone for each 1.0 g tissue. The plantlets of six weeks presented sprouts and root, while the plantlets of one week presented only sprouts. The CIgY-ELISA was set with high independent variables values of sensitivity/specificity of 96/89 % for zeatin and 94/78 % for 2ip, with high values of reproducibility (up to 90 % for both the cytokinins. Zeatin content varied from 2.2 to 2.8 pmoles.g-1 and from 2.7 to 3.3 pmoles.g-1 on the plantlet with one and six weeks, respectively. The 2ip content did not vary and was detected near the detection limit in all the assays. It was concluded that the observed capabilities of CIgY-ELISA were putative and the competitive assay was a highly robust and stable method, which could be used for the studies on plant physiology for endogenous cytokinins.

  19. Effector Protein Cig2 Decreases Host Tolerance of Infection by Directing Constitutive Fusion of Autophagosomes with the Coxiella-Containing Vacuole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara J. Kohler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii replicates in an acidified lysosome-derived vacuole. Biogenesis of the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV requires bacterial effector proteins delivered into host cells by the Dot/Icm secretion system. Genetic and cell biological analysis revealed that an effector protein called Cig2 promotes constitutive fusion of autophagosomes with the CCV to maintain this compartment in an autolysosomal stage of maturation. This distinguishes the CCV from other pathogen-containing vacuoles that are targeted by the host autophagy pathway, which typically confers host resistance to infection by delivering the pathogen to a toxic lysosomal environment. By maintaining the CCV in an autolysosomal stage of maturation, Cig2 enabled CCV homotypic fusion and enhanced bacterial virulence in the Galleria mellonella (wax moth model of infection by a mechanism that decreases host tolerance. Thus, C. burnetii residence in an autolysosomal organelle alters host tolerance of infection, which indicates that Cig2-dependent manipulation of a lysosome-derived vacuole influences the host response to infection.

  20. Adhesion Improvement and Characterization of Magnetron Sputter Deposited Bilayer Molybdenum Thin Films for Rear Contact Application in CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum (Mo thin films are widely used as rear electrodes in copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS solar cells. The challenge in Mo deposition by magnetron sputtering lies in simultaneously achieving good adhesion to the substrates while retaining the electrical and optical properties. Bilayer Mo films, comprising five different thickness ratios of a high pressure (HP deposited bottom layer and a low pressure (LP deposited top layer, were deposited on 40 cm × 30 cm soda-lime glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering. We focus on understanding the effects of the individual layer properties on the resulting bilayer Mo films, such as microstructure, surface morphology, and surface oxidation. We show that the thickness of the bottom HP Mo layer plays a major role in determining the micromechanical and physical properties of the bilayer Mo stack. Our studies reveal that a thicker HP Mo bottom layer not only improves the adhesion of the bilayer Mo, but also helps to improve the film crystallinity along the preferred [110] direction. However, the surface roughness and the porosity of the bilayer Mo films are found to increase with increasing bottom layer thickness, which leads to lower optical reflectance and a higher probability for oxidation at the Mo surface.

  1. Daily users compared to less frequent users find vape as or more satisfying and less dangerous than cigarettes, and are likelier to use non-cig-alike vaping products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn T. Kozlowski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the roles of perceived satisfaction and perceived danger and vaping-product-type as correlates of more frequent use of vaping products. In a baseline assessment of a longitudinal study of US Army Reserve/National Guard Soldiers and their partners (New York State, USA, 2014–2016, participants were asked about current use of vaping products (e-cigarettes and perceived satisfaction and danger in comparison to cigarettes as well as type of product used. Fisher-exact tests and multiple ordinal logistic regressions were used. In multivariable and univariate models, more perceived satisfaction, less perceived danger, and use of non-cig-alike products were associated with more frequent use of vaping products (ps < 0.05, two-tailed. For self-selected, more frequent adult users, e-cigs can be at least as satisfying as cigarettes and often more satisfying and are perceived as less dangerous than cigarettes. Non-cig-alike products were more likely in daily users. Some concern that e-cigs are a gateway to cigarettes arises from assuming that e-cigs may not be as reinforcing and pleasurable as cigarettes. These results indicate that accurate perception of comparative risk and use of more effective-nicotine delivery product can produce for some users a highly-satisfying alternative to cigarettes.

  2. Daily users compared to less frequent users find vape as or more satisfying and less dangerous than cigarettes, and are likelier to use non-cig-alike vaping products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Lynn T; Homish, D Lynn; Homish, Gregory G

    2017-06-01

    We assessed the roles of perceived satisfaction and perceived danger and vaping-product-type as correlates of more frequent use of vaping products. In a baseline assessment of a longitudinal study of US Army Reserve/National Guard Soldiers and their partners (New York State, USA, 2014-2016), participants were asked about current use of vaping products (e-cigarettes) and perceived satisfaction and danger in comparison to cigarettes as well as type of product used. Fisher-exact tests and multiple ordinal logistic regressions were used. In multivariable and univariate models, more perceived satisfaction, less perceived danger, and use of non-cig-alike products were associated with more frequent use of vaping products ( p s < 0.05, two-tailed). For self-selected, more frequent adult users, e-cigs can be at least as satisfying as cigarettes and often more satisfying and are perceived as less dangerous than cigarettes. Non-cig-alike products were more likely in daily users. Some concern that e-cigs are a gateway to cigarettes arises from assuming that e-cigs may not be as reinforcing and pleasurable as cigarettes. These results indicate that accurate perception of comparative risk and use of more effective-nicotine delivery product can produce for some users a highly-satisfying alternative to cigarettes.

  3. Single-graded CIGS with narrow bandgap for tandem solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feurer, Thomas; Bissig, Benjamin; Weiss, Thomas P; Carron, Romain; Avancini, Enrico; Löckinger, Johannes; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2018-01-01

    Multi-junction solar cells show the highest photovoltaic energy conversion efficiencies, but the current technologies based on wafers and epitaxial growth of multiple layers are very costly. Therefore, there is a high interest in realizing multi-junction tandem devices based on cost-effective thin film technologies. While the efficiency of such devices has been limited so far because of the rather low efficiency of semitransparent wide bandgap top cells, the recent rise of wide bandgap perovskite solar cells has inspired the development of new thin film tandem solar devices. In order to realize monolithic, and therefore current-matched thin film tandem solar cells, a bottom cell with narrow bandgap (~1 eV) and high efficiency is necessary. In this work, we present Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 with a bandgap of 1.00 eV and a maximum power conversion efficiency of 16.1%. This is achieved by implementing a gallium grading towards the back contact into a CuInSe 2 base material. We show that this modification significantly improves the open circuit voltage but does not reduce the spectral response range of these devices. Therefore, efficient cells with narrow bandgap absorbers are obtained, yielding the high current density necessary for thin film multi-junction solar cells.

  4. Zinc Sulfide Buffer Layer for CIGS Solar Cells Prepared by Chemical Bath Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Wei You

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ZnS thin films were successfully synthesized by chemical bath deposition (CBD with starting materials of NH2-NH2, SC(NH22, and ZnSO4‧7H2O. ZnS thin films were deposited with different time on glass substrates by CBD at 80oC and pH=9. Based on X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns, it is found that the ZnS thin films exhibit cubic polycrystalline phase. It was found that the optimum deposition time is 90 min for preparing ZnS thin film that is suitable as buffer layer for CuIn1-xGaxSe2 solar cells. The thin film deposited for 90 min has high transmittance up to 80% in the spectra range from 350 nm to 800 nm, and the optical band gap is about 3.59 eV.

  5. Research on fabrication technology for thin film solar cells for practical use. Technological development for qualitative improvement (CuInSe2 based PV cell); Usumaku taiyo denchi seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kenkyu. Kohinshitsuka gijutsu (CuInSe2 taiyo denchi seizo no gijutsu kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuta, M [New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reports the study results on the fabrication technology of CuInSe2 based PV cell in fiscal 1994. (1) On formation of high-quality CIGS thin films by bilayer method, Mo film was deposited on a glass substrate by sputtering, and CIGS film with different Ga/In ratios was next formed on the substrate by quaternary simultaneous deposition at different In and Ga deposition speeds. In addition, CdS film was deposited on the CIGS film, and ZnO and ITO films were finally deposited on it by sputtering to complete solar cell. This solar cell offered the maximum conversion efficiency among cells using CIGS film. (2) On formation of high-quality CIGS thin films by three-stage method, a certain correlation was found between substrate temperature and CIGS film composition by monitoring substrate temperature in film forming process. This phenomenon allowed rigorous control of CIS film compositions important for CIS thin film solar cells. (3) On low-cost process technology for thin film formation, Cu(In,Ga)S2 solid solution film was fabricated by expanded selenic process. 3 figs.

  6. Primeros datos sobre movimientos de cigüeñas blancas Ciconia ciconia L., 1758 anilladas como pollos en nido en Navarra: 2012-2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Resano-Mayor, Juan M. Barbarín, Daniel Alonso, Blanca Fernández-Eslava, Diego Villanua, Jesús Mari Lekuona, Ricardo Rodríguez,

    2016-01-01

    (i.e., avistamientos como muertos (i.e., recuperaciones, en su mayoría por electrocución. Todos los avistamientos, excepto tres, se realizaron en vertederos (n = 64, en donde el esfuerzo de muestreo fue considerablemente mayor. Dos avistamientos correspondieron a cigüeñas observadas en humedales, así como otro ejemplar que se observó dos años después en la colonia donde nació (i.e., reclutamiento. La distancia promedio de avistamiento en relación a la colonia de anillamiento fue de 48 km (distancia máxima, 410 km. La mayoría de avistamientos/recuperaciones se realizó durante la primavera y verano, con independencia de la edad. Todas las aves que se hallaron muertas (n = 7 fueron jóvenes encontrados en la proximidad de sus colonias de nacimiento.

  7. Understanding the Effect of Na in Improving the Performance of CuInSe2 Based Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Kevin D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-11-17

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film photovoltaic technology is in the early stages of commercialization with an annual manufacturing capacity over 1 GW and has demonstrated the highest module efficiency of any of the thin film technologies. However there still is a lack of fundamental understanding of the relationship between the material properties and solar cell device operation. It is well known that the incorporation of a small amount of Na into the CIGS film during processing is essential for high efficiency devices. However, there are conflicting explanations for how Na behaves at the atomic scale. This report investigates how Na is incorporated into the CIGS device structure and evaluates the diffusion of Na into CIGS grain boundaries (GBs) and bulk crystallites. Participants: This project was carried out at the Institute of Energy Conversion at the University of Delaware, collaborating with the Rockett group at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champagne. Significant Findings: The significant outcomes of this project for each task include; Task 1.0: Effect of Na in Devices Fabricated on PVD Deposited CIGS; Na diffusion occurs through the Mo back contact via GBs driven by the presence of oxygen; Na reversibly compensates donor defects in CIGS GBs,Task 2.0: Na Incorporation in Single Crystal CIGS; and bulk Na diffusion proceeds rapidly such that grains are Na-saturated immediately following CIGS thin film manufacture. Industry Guidance: The presented results offer interesting concepts for modification of manufacturing processes of CIGS-based PV modules. Possible approaches to improve control of Na uptake and uniformly increase levels in CIGS films are highlighted for processes that employ either soda-lime glass or NaF as the Na source. Concepts include the potential of O2 or oxidative based treatments of Mo back contacts to improve Na diffusion through the metal film and increase Na uptake into the growing CIGS. This project has also offered

  8. Shunt resistance and saturation current determination in CdTe and CIGS solar cells. Part 2: application to experimental IV measurements and comparison with other methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Albor-Aguilera, María-de-Lourdes; Hérnandez-Vásquez, César; Flores-Márquez, José-Manuel; Jiménez-Olarte, Daniel; Sastré-Hernández, Jorge; González-Trujillo, Miguel-Ángel; Contreras-Puente, Gerardo-Silverio

    2018-04-01

    In this Part 2 of this series of articles, the procedure proposed in Part 1, namely a new parameter extraction technique of the shunt resistance (R sh ) and saturation current (I sat ) of a current-voltage (I-V) measurement of a solar cell, within the one-diode model, is applied to CdS-CdTe and CIGS-CdS solar cells. First, the Cheung method is used to obtain the series resistance (R s ) and the ideality factor n. Afterwards, procedures A and B proposed in Part 1 are used to obtain R sh and I sat . The procedure is compared with two other commonly used procedures. Better accuracy on the simulated I-V curves used with the parameters extracted by our method is obtained. Also, the integral percentage errors from the simulated I-V curves using the method proposed in this study are one order of magnitude smaller compared with the integral percentage errors using the other two methods.

  9. Shunt resistance and saturation current determination in CdTe and CIGS solar cells. Part 1: a new theoretical procedure and comparison with other methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Kuoppa, Victor-Tapio; Albor-Aguilera, María-de-Lourdes; Hérnandez-Vásquez, César; Flores-Márquez, José-Manuel; González-Trujillo, Miguel-Ángel; Contreras-Puente, Gerardo-Silverio

    2018-04-01

    A new proposal for the extraction of the shunt resistance (R sh ) and saturation current (I sat ) of a current-voltage (I-V) measurement of a solar cell, within the one-diode model, is given. First, the Cheung method is extended to obtain the series resistance (R s ), the ideality factor (n) and an upper limit for I sat . In this article which is Part 1 of two parts, two procedures are proposed to obtain fitting values for R sh and I sat within some voltage range. These two procedures are used in two simulated I-V curves (one in darkness and the other one under illumination) to recover the known solar cell parameters R sh , R s , n, I sat and the light current I lig and test its accuracy. The method is compared with two different common parameter extraction methods. These three procedures are used and compared in Part 2 in the I-V curves of CdS-CdTe and CIGS-CdS solar cells.

  10. In Situ and Ex Situ Studies of Molybdenum Thin Films Deposited by rf and dc Magnetron Sputtering as a Back Contact for CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Aryal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum thin films were deposited by rf and dc magnetron sputtering and their properties analyzed with regards to their potential application as a back contact for CIGS solar cells. It is shown that both types of films tend to transition from tensile to compressive strain when the deposition pressure increases, while the conductivity and the grain size decreas. The nucleation of the films characterized by in situ and real time spectroscopic ellipsometry shows that both films follow a Volmer-Weber growth, with a higher surface roughness and lower deposition rate for the rf deposited films. The electronic relaxation time was then extracted as a function of bulk layer thickness for rf and dc films by fitting each dielectric function to a Drude free-electron model combined with a broad Lorentz oscillator. The values were fitted to a conical growth mode and demonstrated that the rf-deposited films have already smaller grains than the dc films when the bulk layer thickness is 30 nm.

  11. Mg-doped ZnO thin films deposited by the atomic layer chemical vapor deposition for the buffer layer of CIGS solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhao-Hui [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Center for Photovoltaic and Solar Energy, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen city 518055 (China); Cho, Eou-Sik [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Sang Jik, E-mail: sjkwon@gachon.ac.kr [Department of Electronics Engineering, Gachon University, Soojung-gu, Seongnam city 461-701, Gyunggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Mg-doped ZnO film as CIGS buffer was prepared by ALD process. • The grain size of ZnO-like hexagonal phase decreased with Mg content. • The transmittance and crystallinity increased but the band gap decreased with temperature. - Abstract: Mg-doped ZnO [(Zn, Mg)O] thin films were prepared by atomic layer chemical vapor deposition (ALCVD) process with different Mg content, using diethyl zinc, biscyclopentadienyl magnesium, and water as the metal and oxygen sources, respectively. The ratio of Mg to Zn was varied by changing the pulse ratio of MgCp{sub 2} to DEZn precursor to study its effect on the properties of (Zn, Mg)O thin films. From the experimental results, it was shown that the grain size of the ZnO-like hexagonal phase (Zn, Mg)O decreased as the Mg content increased. But the transmittance and optical band gap of (Zn, Mg)O films increased with the increase of the Mg content. In addition, the effect of the substrate temperature on the properties of (Zn, Mg)O films was also investigated. The deposition rate, transmittance, and crystallinity of (Zn, Mg)O films increased as the substrate temperature increased. But its band gap decreased slightly with the increase of substrate temperature.

  12. Surface microstructure evolution of highly transparent and conductive Al-doped ZnO thin films and its application in CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ke; Liu, Jingjing; Jin, Ranran; Liu, Jingling; Liu, Xinsheng; Lu, Zhangbo; Liu, Ya; Liu, Xiaolan; Du, Zuliang

    2017-07-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) has attained intensive attention as being a very good transparent conducting oxide for photovoltaic applications. In this work, AZO films have been deposited on glass substrate by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The influences of substrate temperatures on morphological, structural, optical and electrical properties of AZO films were systematically investigated. The results indicate that all AZO films have the hexagonal structure with c-axis preferred orientation. Morphological and electrical measurements have revealed that the substrate temperatures have strong influence on the microstructure, optical and electrical properties of AZO films. The AZO film is highly transparent from ultraviolet up to near infrared range with highest average transparency exceeding 83%. The minimum resistivity is as low as 6.1 × 10-4 Ω cm. The carrier concentration and mobility are as high as 3.357 × 1020 cm-3 and 30.48 cm2/Vs, respectively. Finally, the performances of the AZO film are evaluated by its practical application in Cu(In1-xGax)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic device as a transparent electrode. Benefited from its highly transparent and conductive feature, the most efficient device reveals an efficiency of 7.8% with a short-circuit current density of 28.99 mA/cm2, an open-circuit voltage of 430 mV, and a fill factor of 62.44 under standard conditions.

  13. NIR emitting K2SrCl4:Eu2+, Nd3+ phosphor as a spectral converter for CIGS solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawalare, P. K.; Bhatkar, V. B.; Omanwar, S. K.; Moharil, S. V.

    2018-05-01

    Intense near-infrared emitting phosphor K2SrCl4:Eu2+,Nd3+ with various concentrations of Nd3+ were synthesized. These are characterized with X-ray diffraction, reflectance, photoluminescence emission and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, PL lifetime measurements. The emission can be excited by a broad band in near ultra violet region as a consequence of Eu2+→Nd3+ energy transfer. The efficiency of Eu2+→Nd3+ energy transfer is as high as 95%. Fluorescence decay curves for Eu2+ doped samples are almost exponential and described by τ = 500 ns. Eu2+ lifetimes are shortened after Nd3+ doping. Near infrared Emission intensity is limited by Nd3+→Nd3+ energy transfer and the consequent concentration quenching. Nd3+ emission matches well with the spectral response of CIGS and CIS solar cells. Absorption of near ultra violet radiations followed by conversion to near infrared indicates the potential application in solar photovoltaics.

  14. Development of Electrodeposited CIGS Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-357

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neale, Nathan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    At present, most PV materials are fabricated by vacuum technologies. Some of the many disadvantages of vacuum technology are complicated instrumentation, material waste, high cost of deposition per surface area, and instability of some compounds at the deposition temperature. Solution-based approaches for thin-film deposition on large areas are particularly desirable because of the low capital cost of the deposition equipment, relative simplicity of the processes, ease of doping, uniform deposition on a variety of substrates (including interior and exterior of tubes and various nonplanar devices), and potential compatibility with high-throughput (e.g., roll-to-roll) processing. Of the nonsilicon solar photovoltaic device modules that have been deployed to date, those based on the n-CdS/p-CdTe is a leading candidate. Two features in the optical characteristics of CdTe absorber are particularly attractive for photovoltaic conversion of sunlight; (a) its energy bandgap of 1.5 eV, which provides an optimal match with the solar spectrum and thus facilitates its efficient utilization and (b) the direct mode of the main optical transition which results in a large absorption coefficient and turn permits the use of thin layer (1-2 um) of active material. Thin films of CdTe required for these devices have been fabricated by a variety of methods (e.g., vapor transport deposition, vacuum deposition, screen printing and close-spaced sublimation). Electrodeposition is another candidate deserves more attention. This project will focus on delivering low-cost, high efficiency electrodeposited CdTe-based device.

  15. Funcionamiento hidrológico de un humedal ribereño, el Masegar, en el conjunto de los humedales de La Mancha Húmeda de la cuenca alta del rió Cigüela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llamas, M. R.

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Fifteen years ago «La Mancha Húmeda» was deelared Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, at the request of the Spanish Government. According to a recent deelaration by UNESCO in 1995, such title could be lost if the degradation processes of the wetlands of «La Mancha Húmeda» continue. «La Mancha Húmeda» was formed by a hundred of small lakes or wetlands that in area totalled about 200-300 km2 and they were distributed over an area of about 25.000 km2. These are different types of wetlands (saltwater and freshwater, permanent and ephimeral, riparian and closed basins, etc.. It is estimated that the actual surface of all the wetlands is about 20-30% of that occupied 20 or 30 years ago. The most famous degradation case is that of the «Tablas de Daimiel National Park» that has shrinked fram an area of about 15-20km2 to less than 1 km2 This article presents the general situation of the riverine wetlands of the Cigüela river and the results of the hydrological functioning of a wetland of modest dimensions, less than 1 km2, El Masegar. It is a riparian wetland located in the Cigüela River basin which has been severely affected by man actions. El Masegar can be considered as an artificial wetland. From an ecological point of view, this wetland seems to have been functioning in a proper way until 1988, when the so called «Plan de Regeneración Hídrica del Parque Nacional de las Tablas de Daimiel» began. This Plan has not regenerated the Natural Park but has degradated or destroyed the riparian wetlands that existed along the Cigüela River valley which is about ISO km long. The surface of these wetlands all together was larger than that of Tablas de Daimiel National Park. The study shows that it could be feasible to restore or maintain most of the riparian wetlands of the «La Mancha Húmeda» without a great economic investment and without social conflicts with the farmers.En 1981, a petición del Gobierno español, la

  16. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  17. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure

  18. An International Peer Review of the Safety Options Dossier of the Project for Disposal of Radioactive Waste in Deep Geological Formations (Cigéo). Final Report of the IAEA International Review Team November 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorité de sûreté nucléaire, ASN) is preparing the evaluation of a licence application for the creation of a deep geological disposal facility in 2018, called Cigéo, for intermediate level, high level and long lived radioactive waste. This licence is preceded by the submission of a Safety Options Dossier to ASN, which provides the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, Andra) the possibility to receive advice from ASN on the preparation of the licence application on the safety principles and approach. The Safety Options Dossier sets out the chosen objectives, concepts and principles for ensuring the safety of the facility. ASN requested the IAEA to organize an international peer review of the Safety Options Dossier. This publication presents the consensus view of the international group of experts convened by the IAEA to conduct the review against the relevant IAEA safety standards and proven international practice and experience. The experts acted in a personal capacity and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the IAEA, the governments of the nominating Member States or the nominating organizations. The basis of this peer review is the set of documents provided by Andra, as the agency responsible for the development of the Cigéo project and for its safety. Consequently, the findings of the reviews are addressed directly to Andra. This publication, however, is primarily submitted to ASN to review the outcomes of the Andra project.

  19. Evaluación de la fractura por fatiga del cigüeñal de un motor Diesel. // Evaluation of the crank shaft fatigue failure of a boat diesel engine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Goytisolo Espinosa

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el Trabajo se presentan los resultados de una investigación realizada por el colectivo de Mecánica Aplicada de laFacultad de Ingeniería Mecánica de La Universidad de Cienfuegos, con vistas a esclarecer la causa de la fractura delcigüeñal de uno de los motores de la Moto Nave “Mar del Sur” de le Empresa EQUITALL.La investigación del material del cigüeñal arrojó que se trata de acero 30. Los cálculos realizados demostraron, que lacapacidad resistente de este acero es insuficiente para soportar las tensiones que se desarrollan en el codo de salida delcigüeñal y los factores de seguridad a la fatiga en algunos de los puntos mas críticos del cachete, por donde se produjo lafractura, dan inferiores a la unidad y la aplicación de la Mecánica de la Fractura Subcrítica, confirmó que la Vida Útil delárbol con dicho material, es muy limitada.Palabras claves: Cigüeñal diesel, fractura por fatiga, mecánica de la fractura subcrítica.__________________________________________________________________________Abstract.This research paper shows the results of an investigation carried out by the Applied Mechanics staff of the MechanicalEngineering faculty of the Cienfuegos University. It was developed in order to determine the crankshaft failure causes ofengines of a boat diesel engine.The crankshaft material investigation showed that it was steel grade 30. The calculations showed that the steel resistancecapacity is not enough to support the stresses produced in the crankshaft output elbow. The fatigue security factors in someof the most critical areas of the cheek, where the failure took place, are lower than unity. The subcritical fracture mechanicsapplication confirmed that the shaft working life is quite limited with this steel.Key words: Diesel crankshaft, fatigue fracture, subcritical fracture mechanics.

  20. Investigations into alterntive substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}-based solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuttle, J.R.; Berens, T.A.; Keane, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    High-performance Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}(CIGS)-based solar cells are presently fabricated within a narrow range of processing options. In this contribution, alternative substrate, absorber, and buffer layer processing is considered. Cell performance varies considerably when alternative substrates are employed. These variations are narrowed with the addition of Na via a Na{sub 2}S compound. Sputtered and electrodeposited CIGS precursors and completed absorbers show promise as alternatives to evaporation. A recrystallization process is required to improve their quality. (In,Ga){sub y}Se buffer layers contribute to cell performance above 10. Further improvements in these alternatives will lead to combined cell performance greater than 10% in the near term.

  1. Dataset demonstrating the modeling of a high performance Cu(In,GaSe2 absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The physical data of the semiconductor materials used in the design of a CIGS absorber based thin film photovoltaic cell have been presented in this data article. Besides, the values of the contact parameter and operating conditions of the cell have been reported. Furthermore, by conducting the simulation with data corresponding to the device structure: soda-lime glass (SLG substrate/Mo back-contact/CIGS absorber/CdS buffer/intrinsic ZnO/Al-doped ZnO window/Al-grid front-contact, the solar cell performance parameters such as open circuit voltage (Voc, short circuit current density Jsc, fill factor (FF, efficiency (η, and collection efficiency ηc have been analyzed.

  2. Modeling and simulation of CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} based thin film solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, S., E-mail: sarita.kumari132@gmail.com; Verma, A. S. [Department of Physics, Banasthali University, Rajasthan-304022 (India); Singh, P.; Gautam, R. [Department of Electronics and Communication, Krishna Institute of Engg. and Tech., Ghaziabad-201206 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In this work, CIGS (Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide) based solar cell structure has been simulated. We have been calculated short circuit current, open circuit voltage and efficiency of the cell. The thickness of the absorption layer is varied from 400 to 3000 nm, keeping the thickness of other layers unchanged. The effect of absorption layer thickness over cell performance has been analyzed and found that the efficiency increases upto 22% until the thickness of the absorption layer reaches around 2000 nm.

  3. Fundamental Materials Research and Advanced Process Development for Thin-Film CIS-Based Photovoltaics: Final Technical Report, 2 October 2001 - 30 September 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T. J.; Li, S. S.; Crisalle, O. D.; Craciun, V.

    2006-09-01

    The objectives for this thin-film copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cell project cover the following areas: Develop and characterize buffer layers for CIS-based solar cell; grow and characterize chemical-bath deposition of Znx Cd1-xS buffer layers grown on CIGS absorbers; study effects of buffer-layer processing on CIGS thin films characterized by the dual-beam optical modulation technique; grow epitaxial CuInSe2 at high temperature; study the defect structure of CGS by photoluminescence spectroscopy; investigate deep-level defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells by deep-level transient spectroscopy; conduct thermodynamic modeling of the isothermal 500 C section of the Cu-In-Se system using a defect model; form alpha-CuInSe2 by rapid thermal processing of a stacked binary compound bilayer; investigate pulsed non-melt laser annealing on the film properties and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells; and conduct device modeling and simulation of CIGS solar cells.

  4. Controlled formation of MoSe{sub 2} by MoN{sub x} thin film as a diffusion barrier against Se during selenization annealing for CIGS solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Chan-Wook [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Taehoon [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Core Research Facilities, DaeguGyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hangil [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Min-Su [School of Chemical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Soo-Hyun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsangbuk-do 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Mo/MoN{sub x}/Mo multilayer was investigated as a back contact for CIGS solar cell. • The MoN{sub x} protected the underlying Mo layer during high temperature selenization. • The formation of MoSe{sub 2} layer was precisely controlled. • The diffusion barrier performance of MoN{sub x} against Se was evaluated using TEM analysis. - Abstract: This study investigated the interfacial reactions and electrical properties of a Mo single layer and Mo/MoN{sub x}/Mo multilayer during high temperature selenization annealing. The Mo single layer was converted easily to MoSe{sub 2}, which was 7 times thicker than the Mo layer consumed ∼900 nm, by selenization at 460 °C for 10 min and the sheet resistance increased 8 fold compared to that of the as-deposited Mo film. On the other hand, in the Mo/MoN{sub x}/Mo structure, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the MoSe{sub 2} transformation was localized only in the top Mo layer and the bottom Mo layer was completely unaffected, even after selenization at 560 °C. The sheet resistance of the multilayer was relatively unchanged by selenization. This suggests that the MoN{sub x} layer performed well as a diffusion barrier against Se and the thickness of MoSe{sub 2} can be controlled precisely by adjusting the top Mo layer thickness. Furthermore, TEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis showed that the selenized multilayer consisted of MoSe{sub 2}/Mo/MoN{sub x}/Mo, in which the top Mo layer of 60 nm was not fully converted to MoSe{sub 2} and 20 nm was left unreacted. The residual Mo interlayer located at the interface of MoSe{sub 2} and MoN{sub x} is believed to be beneficial for the ohmic contact of the selenized multilayer.

  5. Encapsulated Somatic Embryos and Zygotic Embryos for Obtaining Artificial Seeds of Rauli-Beech (Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst. Encapsulado de Embriones Somáticos y Embriones Cigóticos para Obtención de Semillas Artificiales de Raulí (Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Cartes R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Somatic and zygotic embryos from mature seeds of rauli-beech, Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst., were encapsulated in different artificial endosperms in order to generate a cover that fulfills the function of nourishment and protection of the embryos, facilitating their later germination. The content of sodium alginate varied by 4%, 3%, and 2%, as did the immersion time in calcium chloride (CaCl2, which acts as complexing agent. The artificial endosperm components of the Murashige and Skoog medium (MS were added, supplemented with 0.5 mg L-1 indolacetic acid (IAA, 0.5 mg L-1 naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA, 2 mg L-1 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP and 30 g L-1 sucrose. The germinative behaviors of encapsulated somatic and zygotic embryos were evaluated after 4 wk. Comparing the percentages of germination reached by encapsulated somatic and zygotic embryos it was observed that they had similar germinative behavior according to the type of encapsulation applied. However, zygotic embryos substantially exceeded the germination levels reached by somatic embryos, 100% vs. 45% respectively.Embriones somáticos y cigóticos provenientes de semillas maduras de raulí, Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst., se encapsularon en diferentes endospermas sintéticos con el fin de generar una cubierta que cumpla la función de nutrir y proteger al embrión para facilitar su posterior germinación. Se varió el contenido de alginato de sodio al 4%, 3% y 2% y el tiempo de inmersión en cloruro de calcio (CaCl2, el que actúa como agente acomplejante. Además, a la matriz artificial se adicionaron componentes del medio Murashige y Skoog (MS suplementado con: 0,5 mg L-1 de indolacetic acid (IAA, 0,5 mg L-1 de ácido naftalenacético (NAA, 2 mg L-1 de 6-bencilaminopurina (BAP y 30 gL-1 de sacarosa. Al cabo de 4 semanas el porcentaje de germinación de los embriones somáticos y cigóticos encapsulados tuvieron similar comportamiento germinativo según el tipo de

  6. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-05-01

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion.

  7. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS2/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardelis, Spiros; Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS 2 /ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion

  8. 13.7%-efficient Zn(Se,OH){sub x}/Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} thin-film solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ennaoui, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Bereich Physikalische Chemie, Berlin (Germany); Blieske, U.; Lux-Steiner, M.Ch. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Bereich Festkoerperphysik, Berlin (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) and related semiconducting compounds have demonstrated their high potential for high-efficiency thin-film solar cells. The highest efficiency for CIGS based thin-film solar cells has been achieved with CdS buffer layers prepared by a solution growth method known as chemical based deposition (CBD). With the aim of developing Cd-free chalcopyrite-based thin-film solar cells, Zn(Se,OH){sub x} buffer layers were deposited by CBD on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGSS). A total-area conversion efficiency of 13.7% was certified by the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems. The CIGSS absorber was fabricated by Siemens Solar Industries (California). For device optimisation, the thickness and good surface coverage were controlled by XPS-UPS photoemission spectroscopy. A Zn(Se,OH){sub x} thickness below 7 nm has been found to be optimum for achieving a homogeneous and compact buffer film on CIGSS, with open-circuit photovoltage V{sub oc} = 535 mV, fill factor FF = 70.76% and a high short-circuit photocurrent density J{sub sc} 36.1 mA cm{sup -2}. (Author)

  9. Chemical synthesis of Cd-free wide band gap materials for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sankapal, B.R.; Sartale, S.D.; Ennaoui, A. [Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Berlin (Germany). Department of Solar Energy Research; Lokhande, C.D. [Shivaji University, Kolhapur (India). Department of Physics

    2004-07-01

    Chemical methods are nowadays very attractive, since they are relatively simple, low cost and convenient for larger area deposition of thin films. In this paper, we outline our work related to the synthesis and characterization of some wide band gap semiconducting material thin films prepared by using solution methods, namely, chemical bath deposition and successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). The optimum preparative parameters are given and respective structural, surface morphological, compositional, optical, and electrical properties are described. Some materials we used in solar cells as buffer layers and achieved remarkable results, which are summarized. (author)

  10. Numerical Analysis of Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide-Based Solar Cells by SCAPS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ouédraogo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a one-dimensional simulation program Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator in 1 Dimension (SCAPS-1D to investigate Copper-Indium-Gallium-Diselenide- (CIGS- based solar cells properties. Starting with a conventional ZnO-B/i-ZnO/CdS/CIGS structure, we simulated the parameters of current-voltage characteristics and showed how the absorber layer thickness, hole density, and band gap influence the short-circuit current density (Jsc, open-circuit voltage (Voc, fill factor (FF, and efficiency of solar cell. Our simulation results showed that all electrical parameters are greatly affected by the absorber thickness (w below 1000 nm, due to the increase of back-contact recombination and very poor absorption. Increasing hole density (p or absorber band gap (Eg improves Voc and leads to high efficiency, which equals value of 16.1% when p = 1016 cm−3 and Eg=1.2 eV. In order to reduce back-contact recombination, the effect of a very thin layer with high band gap inserted near the back contact and acting as electrons reflector, the so-called back-electron reflector (EBR, has been investigated. The performances of the solar cells are significantly improved, when ultrathin absorbers (w < 500 nm are used; the corresponding gain of Jsc due to the EBR is 3 mA/cm2. Our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature from experiments.

  11. Electrical aging effect of ZnS based quantum dots for white light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohan; Ippen, Christian; Greco, Tonino; Jang, Ilwan; Park, Sungkyu; Oh, Min Suk; Han, Chul Jong; Lee, Jeongno; Wedel, Armin; Kim, Jiwan

    2014-03-01

    The present work reports cadmium-free colloidal ZnS:Al quantum dot (QD) based white quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs). The device was fabricated with a structure of ITO/PEDOT:PSS/PVK/QDs/TPBi/LiF/Al using synthesized ZnS:Al QDs which has 393 nm of peak wavelength and sub peaks in visible wavelength. White emission with high color rending index (CRI) was achieved by the combination of blue emission from PVK and ZnS:Al QDs, electroplex emission at the interface between PVK and ZnS:Al QDs, and Al traps/defects emission, which are controlled by electrical aging effect. The characteristic of our device shows the potential for spectrum tunable and Cd-free white QD-LEDs in the near future.

  12. THM large spatial-temporal model to simulate the past 2 Ma hydrogeological evolution of Paris Basin including natural tracer transport as part of site characterization for radwaste repository project Cigéo - France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabderrahmane, A., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrogeological site characterization for deep geological high level and intermediate level long lived radioactive waste repository cover a large time scale needed for safety analysis and calculation. Hydrogeological performance of a site relies also on the effects of geodynamic evolution as tectonic uplift, erosion/sedimentation and climate including glaciation on the groundwater flow and solute and heat transfer. Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical model of multilayered aquifer system of Paris Basin is developed to reproduce the present time flow and the natural tracer (Helium) concentration profiles based on the last 2 Ma of geodynamic evolution. Present time geological conceptual model consist of 27 layers at Paris Basin (Triassic-Tertiary) with refinement at project site scale (29 layers from Triassic to Portlandian). Target layers are the clay host formation of Callovo-Oxfrodian age (160 Ma) and the surrounding aquifer layers of Oxfordian and Dogger. Modelled processes are: groundwater flow, heat and solutes (natural tracers) transport, freezing and thawing of groundwater (expansion and retreat of permafrost), deformation of the multilayered aquifer system induced by differential tectonic uplift and the hydro-mechanical stress effect as caused by erosion of the outcropping layers. Numerical simulation considers a period from 2 Ma BP and up to the present. Transient boundary conditions are governed by geodynamic processes: (i) modification of the geometry of the basin and (ii) temperatures along the topography will change according to a series of 15 identical climate cycles with multiple permafrost (glaciation) periods. Numerical model contains 71 layers and 18 million cells. The solution procedure solves three coupled systems of equations, head, temperature and concentrations, by the use of a finite difference method, and by applying extensive parallel processing. The major modelling results related to the processes of importance for site characterization as hydraulic

  13. Improving efficiency (optimization) of CIGS thin film solar cell using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jsc ,Voc , FF and Quantum efficiency (QE) decrease due to absorption of electrons of electrons to the surface of back connection and their participation in recomposition. Efficiency increases from 20.3399% to 21.3721% by increasing impurity density of absorbent layer and efficiency increases to 28.9266% and the quantum ...

  14. Spatial atmospheric ALD of functional layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Frijters, C.; Balder, J. E.; Poodt, P.; Roozeboom, F.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial Atmospheric Atomic Layer Deposition combines the advantages of temporal ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and uniformity over large area substrates, with high growth rates (up to nm/s). In this paper we present a short overview of our research activity carried out on S-ALD of

  15. Spatial atmospheric ALD of functional layers for CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Frijters, C.; Balder, J.E.; Poodt, P.W.G.; Roozeboom, F.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial Atmosperic Atomic Layer Depositon combines the advantages of temporal ALD, i.e. excellent control of film composition and uniformity over large area substrates, with high growth rages (up tot nm/s). In this paper we present a short overview of our research acctivity carried out on S-ALD of

  16. Endogenous Quantification of Abscisic Acid and Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Somatic and Zigotic Embryos of Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst Cuantificación Endógena de Ácido Abscísico y Ácido Indol-3 Acético en Embriones Somáticos y Cigóticos de Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pricila Cartes Riquelme

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abscisic acid (ABA and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA participate in the propagation of plants by somatic embryogenesis, causing polar structural differentiation of the embryo. The goal of the assay was to compare endogenous levels of ABA and IAA between somatic embryos (SE and zygotic embryos (ZE of Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst. In this study, a somatic embryo maturation assay involving the addition of varying concentrations of exogenous ABA was performed on cotyledonary-stage of N. alpina. Furthermore, the endogenous levels of ABA and IAA were quantified in the immature ZE, the mature ZE, and the embryonic axis of a mature embryo of N. alpina. The current study utilized high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for quantification. The maturation treatments performed did not present significant differences in the endogenous ABA levels in SE. However, significant differences did exist in levels of ABA and IAA between SE submitted to the different maturation treatments and mature ZE of N. alpina. The application of exogenous ABA to the culture medium increased endogenous ABA levels, therefore, increasing the number of germinated somatic embryos. Thus, the plant conversion process was also successfully completed in somatic embryos of N. alpina.El ácido abscísico (ABA y el ácido indol 3 acético (IAA participan en el proceso de propagación de plantas mediante embriogénesis somática, ya que permiten la diferenciación de la estructura polar del embrión, órganos y regiones meristemáticas de éste. En este estudio se llevó a cabo un ensayo de maduración de embriones somáticos en estado cotiledonar con la adición de diferentes concentraciones de ABA exógeno, además se determinaron niveles endógenos entre ZE inmaduro, ZE maduro, y eje embrionario aislado desde el embrión maduro para luego comparar niveles endógenos de ABA e IAA en embriones somáticos (SE y cigóticos (ZE de raulí, Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl. Oerst. La

  17. Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte; Johansson, Christer

    2004-01-01

    BASE - Engelsk basisgrammatik er resultatet af Lise-Lotte Hjulmands grundige bearbejdning og omfattende revidering af Christer Johanssons Engelska basgrammatik. Grammatikken adskiller sig fra det svenske forlæg på en lang række punkter. Den er bl.a. tilpasset til et dansk publikum og det danske...

  18. Oxide nanoparticle-based fabrication and optical properties of Cu(In1−xGax)S2 absorber layer for solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yo-Min; Lee, Young-In; Kim, Bum-Sung; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The compound Cu(In 1−x Ga x )S 2 (CIGS) was synthesized using copper oxide, indium oxide and gallium oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles using salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (SAUSP). Under this method, CIGS can be produced without the complicated restrictions of a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired stoichiometric quantities of starting materials. In order to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles, various NaCl/precursor ratios were used to accomplish the SAUSP process and ultimately monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles with average particle size of 9 nm without hard agglomeration were obtained. Subsequently, the CIGO nanoparticles were sulfurized to form the CIGS in H 2 S/Ar atmosphere at 500 °C. The CIGS obtained in the present study has the various band gap ranging from 1.67 to 2.34 eV depending on the Ga / (In + Ga) ratio, and those band gap correspond to the respective bulk materials. - Highlights: • CIGS is obtained using Cu, In and Ga oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles. • Salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is used to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles. • Nine nanometers of monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles without hard agglomeration is obtained. • The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired ratio of precursor

  19. Oxide nanoparticle-based fabrication and optical properties of Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})S{sub 2} absorber layer for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yo-Min [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young-In [Institute of Nanosensor Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bum-Sung [Production Technology R and D Division, Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Fusion Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Nanosensor Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The compound Cu(In{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x})S{sub 2} (CIGS) was synthesized using copper oxide, indium oxide and gallium oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles using salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (SAUSP). Under this method, CIGS can be produced without the complicated restrictions of a vacuum and an inert atmosphere. The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired stoichiometric quantities of starting materials. In order to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles, various NaCl/precursor ratios were used to accomplish the SAUSP process and ultimately monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles with average particle size of 9 nm without hard agglomeration were obtained. Subsequently, the CIGO nanoparticles were sulfurized to form the CIGS in H{sub 2}S/Ar atmosphere at 500 °C. The CIGS obtained in the present study has the various band gap ranging from 1.67 to 2.34 eV depending on the Ga / (In + Ga) ratio, and those band gap correspond to the respective bulk materials. - Highlights: • CIGS is obtained using Cu, In and Ga oxide mixture (CIGO) nanoparticles. • Salt-assisted ultrasonic spray pyrolysis is used to synthesize CIGO nanoparticles. • Nine nanometers of monodisperse CIGO nanoparticles without hard agglomeration is obtained. • The band gap of CIGS can be controlled by introducing the desired ratio of precursor.

  20. Impedance-Based Stability Analysis in Grid Interconnection Impact Study Owing to the Increased Adoption of Converter-Interfaced Generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngho Cho

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the emerging harmonic stability concerns to be addressed by grid planners in generation interconnection studies, owing to the increased adoption of renewable energy resources connected to the grid via power electronic converters. The wideband and high-frequency electromagnetic transient (EMT characteristics of these converter-interfaced generators (CIGs and their interaction with the grid impedance are not accurately captured in the typical dynamic studies conducted by grid planners. This paper thus identifies the desired components to be studied and subsequently develops a practical process for integrating a new CIG into a grid with the existing CIGs. The steps of this process are as follows: the impedance equation of a CIG using its control dynamics and an interface filter to the grid, for example, an LCL filter (inductor-capacitor-inductor type, is developed; an equivalent impedance model including the existing CIGs nearby and the grid observed from the point of common coupling are derived; the system stability for credible operating scenarios is assessed. Detailed EMT simulations validate the accuracy of the impedance models and stability assessment for various connection scenarios. By complementing the conventional EMT simulation studies, the proposed analytical approach enables grid planners to identify critical design parameters for seamlessly integrating a new CIG and ensuring the reliability of the grid.

  1. Using droplet-on-demand based printing to guide self-assembly in a peptide-protein based bioink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Clara; Collin, Estelle; Redondo-Gomez, Carlos; Nguyen, Luong T. H.; Ng, Kee Woei; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. Rafael; Mata, Alvaro

    2017-11-01

    Tissue engineering aims to capture details of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that stimulate tissue regeneration. Advanced biofabrication techniques have enabled structural complexity, however they are restricted by the choice of material due to stringent printing requirements, leading to a lack of nanoscale control and molecular versatility. In this project, we exploit the dynamics of droplet fluid interactions combined with the co-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) with biomolecules/proteins to develop a new approach to droplet-based biofabrication. A custom-made droplet generator was developed and used to controllably dispense droplets of PA into a protein solution resulting in gel formation within milliseconds. Taking advantage of the interfacial and inertial forces during the droplet/liquid interaction, it is possible to control the co-assembly kinetics, to give rise to aligned or disordered nanofibers, hydrogel structures of different geometries and sizes, surface topographies, and higher-ordered structures made from multiple hydrogels. The process allows multiple cell types to be spatially distributed on the outside or embedded within the ECM mimetic scaffolds, whilst exhibiting high cell viability (>88%). ERC Starting Grant (STROFUNSCAFF), FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG Biomorph and the Royal Society.

  2. Copper zinc tin sulfide-based thin film solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Beginning with an overview and historical background of Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) technology, subsequent chapters cover properties of CZTS thin films, different preparation methods of CZTS thin films, a comparative study of CZTS and CIGS solar cell, computational approach, and future applications of CZTS thin film solar modules to both ground-mount and rooftop installation. The semiconducting compound (CZTS) is made up earth-abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements, which make it an ideal candidate to replace Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe solar cells which face material scarcity and tox

  3. Investigation of Non-Vacuum Deposition Techniques in Fabrication of Chalcogenide-Based Solar Cell Absorbers

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaggaf, Ahmed

    2015-07-01

    The environmental challenges are increasing, and so is the need for renewable energy. For photovoltaic applications, thin film Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) and CuIn(S,Se)2 (CIS) solar cells are attractive with conversion efficiencies of more than 20%. However, the high-efficiency cells are fabricated using vacuum technologies such as sputtering or thermal co-evaporation, which are very costly and unfeasible at industrial level. The fabrication involves the uses of highly toxic gases such as H2Se, adding complexity to the fabrication process. The work described here focused on non-vacuum deposition methods such as printing. Special attention has been given to printing designed in a moving Roll-to-Roll (R2R) fashion. The results show potential of such technology to replace the vacuum processes. Conversion efficiencies for such non-vacuum deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 solar cells have exceeded 15% using hazardous chemicals such as hydrazine, which is unsuitable for industrial scale up. In an effort to simplify the process, non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)S2 molecular-based precursors achieved efficiencies of ~7-15%. Attempts to further simplify the selenization step, deposition of CuIn(S,Se)2 particulate solutions without the Ga doping and non-toxic suspensions of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 quaternary precursors achieved efficiencies (~1-8%). The contribution of this research was to provide a new method to monitor printed structures through spectral-domain optical coherence tomography SD-OCT in a moving fashion simulating R2R process design at speeds up to 1.05 m/min. The research clarified morphological and compositional impacts of Nd:YAG laser heat-treatment on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layer to simplify the annealing step in non-vacuum environment compatible to R2R. Finally, the research further simplified development methods for CIGS solar cells based on suspensions of quaternary Cu(In,Ga)Se2 precursors and ternary CuInS2 precursors. The methods consisted of post deposition reactive

  4. Electron accelerator-based production of molybdenum-99: Bremsstrahlung and photoneutron generation from molybdenum vs. tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsechanski, A. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Bielajew, A.F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Archambault, J.P.; Mainegra-Hing, E. [National Research Council of Canada, Ionizing Radiation Standards Laboratory, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    A new “one-stage” approach for production of {sup 99}Mo and other radioisotopes by means of an electron linear accelerator is described. It is based on using a molybdenum target both as a bremsstrahlung converter and as a radioisotope producing target for the production of {sup 99}Mo via the photoneutron reaction {sup 100}Mo(γ,n){sup 99}Mo. Bremsstrahlung characteristics, such as bremsstrahlung efficiency, angular distribution, and energy deposition for molybdenum targets were obtained by means of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation code system. As a result of our simulations, it is concluded that a 60 MeV electron beam incident on a thick Mo target will have greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness (in units of r{sub 0}) W target, for target thickness z > 1.84r{sub 0}, where r{sub 0} is the electron range. A 50 MeV electron beam incident on a Mo target will result in greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness W target (in units of r{sub 0}) for target thickness case: z ⩾ 2.0r{sub 0}. It is shown for the one-stage approach with thicknesses of (1.84–2.0)r{sub 0}, that the {sup 99}Mo-production bremsstrahlung efficiency of a molybdenum target is greater by ∼100% at 30 MeV and by ∼70% at 60 MeV compared to the values for tungsten of the same thickness (in units of the appropriate r{sub 0}) in the traditional two-stage approach (W converter and separate {sup 99}Mo producing target). This advantage of the one-stage approach arises from the fact that the bremsstrahlung produced is attenuated only once from attenuation in the molybdenum converter/target. In the traditional, two-stage approach, the bremsstrahlung generated in the W-converter/target is attenuated both in the converter in the {sup 99}Mo-producing molybdenum target. The photoneutron production yield of molybdenum and tantalum (as a substitute for tungsten) target was calculated by means of the MCNP5 transport code. On the basis of these data, the specific activity

  5. Towards a Conceptual Model for Enhancing Reasoning about Clinical Guidelines: A case-study on Comorbidity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carretta Zamborlini, Veruska; Da Silveira, Marcos; Pruski, Cedric; ten Teije, Annette; van Harmelen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Computer-Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) are representations of Clinical Guidelines (CGs) in computer interpretable languages. CIGs have been pointed as an alternative to deal with the various limitations of paper based CGs to support healthcare activities. Although the improvements offered by

  6. Inkjet printed Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} nanoparticles for low-cost solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbé, Jérémy, E-mail: jeremy.barbe@kaust.edu.sa; Eid, Jessica [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Solar and Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering (Saudi Arabia); Ahlswede, Erik; Spiering, Stefanie; Powalla, Michael [Zentrum fur Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) (Germany); Agrawal, Rakesh [Purdue University, School of Chemical Engineering (United States); Del Gobbo, Silvano, E-mail: silvano.delgobbo@gmail.com [King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Solar and Photovoltaics Engineering Research Center (SPERC), Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-12-15

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) thin film solar cells were fabricated by direct inkjet printing of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} (CIGS) nanoparticles followed by rapid thermal annealing under selenium vapor. Inkjet printing is a low-cost, low-waste, and flexible patterning method which can be used for deposition of solution-based or nanoparticle-based CIGS films with high throughput. XRD and Raman spectra indicate that no secondary phase is formed in the as-deposited CIGS film since quaternary chalcopyrite nanoparticles are used as the base solution for printing. Besides, CIGSe films with various Cu/(In + Ga) ratios could be obtained by finely tuning the composition of CIGS nanoparticles contained in the ink, which was found to strongly influence the devices performance and film morphology. To date, this is the first successful fabrication of a solar device by inkjet printing of CIGS nanoparticles.

  7. Inkjet printed Cu(In,Ga)S2 nanoparticles for low-cost solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Barbe, Jeremy

    2016-12-13

    Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) thin film solar cells were fabricated by direct inkjet printing of Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) nanoparticles followed by rapid thermal annealing under selenium vapor. Inkjet printing is a low-cost, low-waste, and flexible patterning method which can be used for deposition of solution-based or nanoparticle-based CIGS films with high throughput. XRD and Raman spectra indicate that no secondary phase is formed in the as-deposited CIGS film since quaternary chalcopyrite nanoparticles are used as the base solution for printing. Besides, CIGSe films with various Cu/(In + Ga) ratios could be obtained by finely tuning the composition of CIGS nanoparticles contained in the ink, which was found to strongly influence the devices performance and film morphology. To date, this is the first successful fabrication of a solar device by inkjet printing of CIGS nanoparticles.

  8. Progress in Thin Film Solar Cells Based on Cu2ZnSnS4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The research in thin film solar cells has been dominated by light absorber materials based on CdTe and Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS in the last several decades. The concerns of environment impact of cadmium and the limited availability of indium in those materials have driven the research towards developing new substitute light absorbers made from earth abundant, environment benign materials. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS semiconductor material has emerged as one of the most promising candidates for this aim and has attracted considerable interest recently. Significant progress in this relatively new research area has been achieved in the last three years. Over 130 papers on CZTS have been published since 2007, and the majority of them are on the preparation of CZTS thin films by different methods. This paper, will review the wide range of techniques that have been used to deposit CZTS semiconductor thin films. The performance of the thin film solar cells using the CZTS material will also be discussed.

  9. Na effect on flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} photovoltaic cell depending on diffusion barriers (SiOx, i-ZnO) on stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo-Jung; Cho, Dae-Hyung; Wi, Jae-Hyung; Han, Won Seok [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeha [Insitute of Photovoltaics, Cheongju University, Cheongju 360-764 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong-Duck, E-mail: ydchung@etri.re.kr [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Advanced Device Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) based-photovoltaic (PV) cells with different diffusion barriers of SiOx and i-ZnO were fabricated on stainless steel (STS) substrate and their electrical characteristics were investigated by measuring J–V curves under illuminated and dark conditions. The physical properties of the CIGS film depending on type of diffusion barrier were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The efficiency of the CIGS-PV cell with i-ZnO barrier was approximately 2% higher than that with the SiOx barrier. Through the analysis of dark J–V curves, we discovered that distinctive defects were formed in the band gap of CIGS based on which diffusion barrier contacted the STS. The diffraction pattern showed a slightly different tendency of the peak intensity ratio of (220/204)/(112) in the PV cell with the i-ZnO barrier, which was slightly higher than that in the PV cell with SiOx barrier. In elemental depth profile, a deficient Ga profile was observed near the surface of the CIGS film with the SiOx barrier, and an abundant Na profile within the CIGS film with the i-ZnO barrier was detected. This is attributed to a difference in thermal conduction through the diffusion barriers during CIGS film growth, originating from the larger thermal conductivity of ZnO compared with SiOx. - Highlights: • We fabricated CIGS-PV cells with diffusion barriers of SiOx and i-ZnO on STS. • The efficiency of CIGS-PV cell with i-ZnO was ∼2% higher than that with SiOx. • Distinctive defects were formed into CIGS absorber depending on diffusion barrier.

  10. Knowledge engineering for adverse drug event prevention: on the design and development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutkias, Vassilis; Kilintzis, Vassilis; Stalidis, George; Lazou, Katerina; Niès, Julie; Durand-Texte, Ludovic; McNair, Peter; Beuscart, Régis; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2012-06-01

    The primary aim of this work was the development of a uniform, contextualized and sustainable knowledge-based framework to support adverse drug event (ADE) prevention via Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSSs). In this regard, the employed methodology involved first the systematic analysis and formalization of the knowledge sources elaborated in the scope of this work, through which an application-specific knowledge model has been defined. The entire framework architecture has been then specified and implemented by adopting Computer Interpretable Guidelines (CIGs) as the knowledge engineering formalism for its construction. The framework integrates diverse and dynamic knowledge sources in the form of rule-based ADE signals, all under a uniform Knowledge Base (KB) structure, according to the defined knowledge model. Equally important, it employs the means to contextualize the encapsulated knowledge, in order to provide appropriate support considering the specific local environment (hospital, medical department, language, etc.), as well as the mechanisms for knowledge querying, inference, sharing, and management. In this paper, we present thoroughly the establishment of the proposed knowledge framework by presenting the employed methodology and the results obtained as regards implementation, performance and validation aspects that highlight its applicability and virtue in medication safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-cost ZnO:Al transparent contact by reactive rotatable magnetron sputtering for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menner, R.; Hariskos, D.; Linss, V.; Powalla, M.

    2011-01-01

    Sputtering ZnO as transparent front contact (TCO) is standard in today's industrial scale Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) module manufacturing. Although innovative concepts like rotatable magnetron sputtering from ceramic targets have been realised, costs are still high due to expensive ceramic targets. Significant cost reductions are expected by using reactive sputtering of metallic targets. Therefore, ZSW and industrial partners investigated the reactive sputtering of Al-doped zinc oxide (ZAO) as TCO on CIGS absorbers of high quality and industrial relevance. The reactive DC sputtering from rotatable magnetron targets is controlled in the transition mode by adjusting oxygen flow and discharge voltage. Optimisation leads to ZAO films with a TCO quality nearly comparable to standard films deposited by DC ceramic sputtering. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Hall analyses of the ZAO films are performed. Medium-size CIGS modules are coated with reactively sputtered ZAO, resulting in 12.8% module efficiency and surpassing the efficiency of the ceramic witness device. Cd-free buffered devices are also successfully coated with reactive TCO. Damp heat stability according to IEC61646 is met by all reactively sputtered devices.

  12. Immunological and toxicological risk assessment of e-cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagandeep Kaur

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the long-term toxicological and immunological effects of e-cigarette (e-cig aerosols remains elusive due to the relatively short existence of vaping. Therefore, we performed a systematic search of articles published in public databases and analysed the research evidence in order to provide critical information regarding e-cig safety. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (or e-cigs are an alternative to traditional cigarettes for the delivery of nicotine and are typically filled with glycerol or propylene glycol-based solutions known as e-liquids. Though present in lower quantities, e-cig aerosols are known to contain many of the harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke. However, due to the paucity of experimental data and contradictory evidence, it is difficult to draw conclusive outcomes regarding toxicological, immunological and clinical impacts of e-cig aerosols. Excessive vaping has been reported to induce inflammatory responses including mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription and nuclear factor-κB signalling, similar to that induced by tobacco smoke. Based on recent evidence, prolonged exposure to some constituents of e-cig aerosols might result in respiratory complications such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inflammation. Future studies are warranted that focus on establishing correlations between e-cig types, generations and e-liquid flavours and immunological and toxicological profiles to broaden our understanding about the effects of vaping.

  13. Immunological and toxicological risk assessment of e-cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Pinkston, Rakeysha; Mclemore, Benathel; Dorsey, Waneene C; Batra, Sanjay

    2018-03-31

    Knowledge of the long-term toxicological and immunological effects of e-cigarette (e-cig) aerosols remains elusive due to the relatively short existence of vaping. Therefore, we performed a systematic search of articles published in public databases and analysed the research evidence in order to provide critical information regarding e-cig safety. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (or e-cigs) are an alternative to traditional cigarettes for the delivery of nicotine and are typically filled with glycerol or propylene glycol-based solutions known as e-liquids. Though present in lower quantities, e-cig aerosols are known to contain many of the harmful chemicals found in tobacco smoke. However, due to the paucity of experimental data and contradictory evidence, it is difficult to draw conclusive outcomes regarding toxicological, immunological and clinical impacts of e-cig aerosols. Excessive vaping has been reported to induce inflammatory responses including mitogen-activated protein kinase, Janus tyrosine kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription and nuclear factor-κB signalling, similar to that induced by tobacco smoke. Based on recent evidence, prolonged exposure to some constituents of e-cig aerosols might result in respiratory complications such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inflammation. Future studies are warranted that focus on establishing correlations between e-cig types, generations and e-liquid flavours and immunological and toxicological profiles to broaden our understanding about the effects of vaping. Copyright ©ERS 2018.

  14. Evaluating effectiveness and safety toward electronic cigarette among Malaysian vapers: One-month observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Azizur Rahman; Mohamad Haniki Nik Mohamad; Shazia Jamshed

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Electronic cigarette (e-cig) is recently growing substitute for smoking. The attention and practice of e-cig among consumers is expanded globally, and Malaysia is not an exception to this, but the paucity of local data motivates us to do the current research. Methods: A total of 220 e-cig vapers recruited for the study and divided into two categories based on smoking status as a single user and dual user. Both users observed for 1 month period to assess smoking cessation rate, a...

  15. Analysis of performance and device parameters of CIGS PV modules deployed outdoors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radue, C. [Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa)], E-mail: chantelle.radue@nmmu.ac.za; Dyk, E.E. van; Macabebe, E.Q. [Physics Department, P.O. Box 77000, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2009-02-02

    Two 20 W copper indium gallium diselenide photovoltaic modules were subjected to a thorough indoor assessment procedure, followed by outdoor deployment at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University as part of an ongoing study. The initial indoor measurement of maximum power output (P{sub MAX}) of one of the modules was considerably higher than the manufacturer's rating (E.E. van Dyk, C. Radue and A.R. Gxasheka, Thin Solid Films 515 (2007) 6196). The modules were deployed on a dual-axis solar tracker and current-voltage characteristics were obtained weekly. In addition to the normal PV parameters of short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, P{sub MAX}, fill factor and efficiency, shunt and series resistances were also monitored. The performances of the two modules are compared and analyzed and the results presented in this paper.

  16. Multipathing Via Three Parameter Common Image Gathers (CIGs) From Reverse Time Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhassan, M.; Zhang, X.

    2015-12-01

    A noteworthy problem for seismic exploration is effects of multipathing (both wanted or unwanted) caused by subsurface complex structures. We show that reverse time migration (RTM) combined with a unified, systematic three parameter framework that flexibly handles multipathing can be accomplished by adding one more dimension (image time) to the angle domain common image gather (ADCIG) data. RTM is widely used to generate prestack depth migration images. When using the cross-correlation image condition in 2D prestack migration in RTM, the usual practice is to sum over all the migration time steps. Thus all possible wave types and paths automatically contribute to the resulting image, including destructive wave interferences, phase shifts, and other distortions. One reason is that multipath (prismatic wave) contributions are not properly sorted and mapped in the ADCIGs. Also, multipath arrivals usually have different instantaneous attributes (amplitude, phase and frequency), and if not separated, the amplitudes and phases in the final prestack image will not stack coherently across sources. A prismatic path satisfies an image time for it's unique path; Cavalca and Lailly (2005) show that RTM images with multipaths can provide more complete target information in complex geology, as multipaths usually have different incident angles and amplitudes compared to primary reflections. If the image time slices within a cross-correlation common-source migration are saved for each image time, this three-parameter (incident angle, depth, image time) volume can be post-processed to generate separate, or composite, images of any desired subset of the migrated data. Images can by displayed for primary contributions, any combination of primary and multipath contributions (with or without artifacts), or various projections, including the conventional ADCIG (angle vs depth) plane. Examples show that signal from the true structure can be separated from artifacts caused by multiple arrivals when they have different image times. This improves the quality of images and benefits migration velocity analysis (MVA) and amplitude variation with angle (AVA) inversion.

  17. Functional layers for CIGS solar cell on-chip fabrication during post-processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, J.; Kovalgin, Alexeij Y.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous deploying of wireless electronic devices due to pervasive computing results in the idea of Energy Scavenging, i.e., harvesting ambient energy from surroundings of the electronic devices [1]. As an approach to the most practical realization of such an energy scavenger, copper indium

  18. Expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition of ZnO:Al layers for CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharma, K.; Williams, B.L.; Mittal, A.; Knoops, H.C.M.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, N.J.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) grown by expanding thermal plasma chemical vapour deposition (ETP-CVD) has demonstrated excellent electrical and optical properties, which make it an attractive candidate as a transparent conductive oxide for photovoltaic applications. However, when depositing

  19. Identifying parasitic current pathways in CIGS solar cells by modelling dark J-V response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, B.L.; Smit, S.; Kniknie, B.J.; Bakker, K.; Keuning, W.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Creatore, M.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    The non-uniform presence of shunting defects is a significant cause of poor reproducibility across large-area solar cells, or from batch-to-batch for small area cells, but the most commonly used value for shunt parameterisation (the shunt resistance) fails to identify the cause for shunting. Here,

  20. Optical Simulation of Light Management in CIGS Thin-Film Solar Cells Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Bednar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present an optical simulation of light management in Cu(In,GaSe2 thin-film solar cells with reduced absorber layer thickness, with the goal of absorption enhancement in the absorber layer. The light management was achieved by texturing of the substrate layer, and the conformal growth of all the following layers was assumed. Two texturing shapes have been explored: triangular and convex, with different periods and height aspect ratios. The simulations have shown that significant enhancement of absorption within the absorber layer can be achieved using the proposed geometry. The results showed that the triangular textures with small periods (100–200 nm and high aspect ratios have the most prominent effect on the enhancement of absorption within the absorber layer, although they are difficult to achieve experimentally.

  1. E-cigs . . . Are They Cool? Talking to Teens About E-Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modesto-Lowe, Vania; Alvarado, Camille

    2017-09-01

    Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes as they are commonly called, have gained wide acceptance among adolescents, especially those with sweet flavors such as bubble gum and cheesecake. Although health effects of e-cigarettes have not been well characterized, their use increases a teen's exposure to nicotine and may serve as a gateway to traditional cigarettes. This article outlines the basics of e-cigarettes and potential health hazards, followed by selected literature on teens' perceptions of e-cigarettes, as well as motivational interviewing strategies that can be used in talking to teens about using electronic cigarettes.

  2. Analysis of performance and device parameters of CIGS PV modules deployed outdoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radue, C.; Dyk, E.E. van; Macabebe, E.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Two 20 W copper indium gallium diselenide photovoltaic modules were subjected to a thorough indoor assessment procedure, followed by outdoor deployment at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University as part of an ongoing study. The initial indoor measurement of maximum power output (P MAX ) of one of the modules was considerably higher than the manufacturer's rating (E.E. van Dyk, C. Radue and A.R. Gxasheka, Thin Solid Films 515 (2007) 6196). The modules were deployed on a dual-axis solar tracker and current-voltage characteristics were obtained weekly. In addition to the normal PV parameters of short-circuit current, open-circuit voltage, P MAX , fill factor and efficiency, shunt and series resistances were also monitored. The performances of the two modules are compared and analyzed and the results presented in this paper

  3. Thinning of CIGS solar cells: Part I: Chemical processing in acidic bromine solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouttemy, M.; Tran-Van, P. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Gerard, I., E-mail: gerard@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Hildebrandt, T.; Causier, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Pelouard, J.L.; Dagher, G. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), route de Nozay 91460 Marcoussis (France); Jehl, Z.; Naghavi, N. [Institut de Recherche et Developpement sur l' Energie Photovoltaique (IRDEP -UMR 7174 CNRS/EDF/Chimie-ParisTech), 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Voorwinden, G.; Dimmler, B. [Wuerth Elektronik Research GmbH, Industriestr. 4, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Powalla, M. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW), Industriestr. 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Guillemoles, J.F. [Institut de Recherche et Developpement sur l' Energie Photovoltaique (IRDEP -UMR 7174 CNRS/EDF/Chimie-ParisTech), 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Lincot, D. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), route de Nozay 91460 Marcoussis (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2011-08-31

    CIGSe absorber was etched in HBr/Br{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O to prepare defined thicknesses of CIGSe between 2.7 and 0.5 {mu}m. We established a reproducible method of reducing the absorber thickness via chemical etching. We determine the dissolution kinetics rate of CIGSe using trace analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry of Ga and Cu. The roughness of the etching surface decreases during the first 500 nm of the etching to a steady state value of the root-mean-square roughness near 50 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrate an etching process occurring with a constant chemical composition of the treated surface acidic bromine solutions provide a controlled chemical thinning process resulting in an almost flat surface and a very low superficial Se{sup 0} enrichment.

  4. Photoelectric properties of variably RTP processed CIGS{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riediger, Julia; Ohland, Joerg; Knipper, Martin; Parisi, Juergen; Riedel, Ingo [Energy and Semiconductor Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Mainz, Roland; Merdes, Saoussen; Klaer, Joachim [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The open circuit voltage V{sub oc} of CuInS{sub 2} solar cells was found to improve via incorporation of gallium. The Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2} absorber of the samples studied in this work was prepared by sputtering (Cu,Ga) and In precursors subsequently sulfurized via rapid thermal processing (RTP) in sulfur vapor. Distinctive top/bottom CuInS{sub 2}/CuGaS{sub 2} segregation has been observed which extent depends on the substrate temperature and holding time of the temperature during RTP-process. The insufficient gallium accumulation at the surface impedes high values of V{sub oc}.We studied the consequences of RTP-process parameter variation in regard of the interdiffusion of CuInS{sub 2} and CuGaS{sub 2}. Quantum efficiency (QE) and temperature-/illumination-dependent current-voltage (IV) profiling have been carried out for differently processed samples. These measurements provide the minimum band gap E{sub g} of the graded absorber layer, the temperature dependent V{sub oc} and the activation energy E{sub a} for carrier recombination. Drive level capacitance (DLCP) profiling reveals the spatially resolved in-depth variation of the doping/defect concentration close to the space charge region.

  5. Thermodynamic Simulation of the Endpoint Characteristics in a CIGS Deposition Process

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Uwe; Schöldström, Jens; Edoff, Marika; Stolt, Lars

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to model the thermodynamic behavior of a Cu(In,Ga)Se2 sample during the growth process and especially during the conversion from copper-rich to copper-poor material in a two-step  process.  Starting  from  a  very  simple  model  of  a  directly  heated  substrate  the  model  was  refined  until  it qualitatively and quantitatively explained the features observed in the real experiment. The results can be used todetermine more accurate criteria for the e...

  6. Recovery of galium and indium from liquid crystal displays and CIGS photovailtaic modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisselink, R.; Steeghs, W.; Brouwer, J.G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: The increasing amount of electronics, such as consumer products and green technologies (e.g. solar PV cells) increases the demand of metals such as indium and gallium. This increasing demand together with the dependency on import of these metals drive research on recycling of waste

  7. Application of Thin Film Photovoltaic CIGS Cells to Extend the Endurance of Small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Source: [10]. ............................................................10  Figure 4.  IV Curve Example at Different Solar Intensity . Adapted from [2...research will show the growing capability and efficiency of using TFPV cells. Figure 4. IV Curve Example at Different Solar Intensity . Adapted from [2...tests were conducted to determine the power output. To determine the power output, we measured the electrical characteristics and solar efficiency

  8. Knowledge on Irradiation, Medical Imaging Prescriptions, and Clinical Imaging Referral Guidelines among Physicians in a Sub-Saharan African Country (Cameroon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moifo, Boniface; Tene, Ulrich; Moulion Tapouh, Jean Roger; Samba Ngano, Odette; Tchemtchoua Youta, Justine; Simo, Augustin; Gonsu Fotsin, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) are suitable tools to enhance justification of imaging procedures. To assess physicians' knowledge on irradiation, their self-perception of imaging prescriptions, and the use of CIGs. A questionnaire of 21 items was self-administered between July and August 2016 to 155 referring physicians working in seven university-affiliated hospitals in Yaoundé and Douala (Cameroon). This pretested questionnaire based on imaging referral practices, the use and the need of CIGs, knowledge on radiation doses of 11 specific radiologic procedures, and knowledge of injurious effects of radiation was completed in the presence of the investigator. Scores were allocated for each question. 155 questionnaires were completed out of 180 administered (86.1%). Participants were 90 (58%) females, 63 (40.64%) specialists, 53 (34.20%) residents/interns, and 39 (25.16%) general practitioners. The average professional experience was 7.4 years (1-25 years). The mean knowledge score was 11.5/59 with no influence of sex, years of experience, and professional category. CIGs users' score was better than nonusers (means 14.2 versus 10.6; p imaging exams. Seventy-eight (50.3%) participants have knowledge on CIGs and half of them made use of them. "Impact on diagnosis" was the highest justification criteria follow by "impact on treatment decision." Unjustified requests were mainly for "patient expectation or will" or for "research motivations." 96% of interviewees believed that making available national CIGs will improve justification. Most physicians did not have appropriate awareness about radiation doses for routine imaging procedures. A small number of physicians have knowledge on CIGs but they believe that making available CIGs will improve justification of imaging procedures. Continuous trainings on radiation protection and implementation of national CIGs are therefore recommended.

  9. Wave-equation Migration Velocity Analysis Using Plane-wave Common Image Gathers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2017-01-01

    Wave-equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) based on subsurface-offset, angle domain or time-lag common image gathers (CIGs) requires significant computational and memory resources because it computes higher dimensional migration images

  10. Transport, Interfaces, and Modeling in Amorphous Silicon Based Solar Cells: Final Technical Report, 11 February 2002 - 30 September 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, E. A.

    2008-10-01

    Results for a-Si characteristics/modeling; photocarrier drift mobilities in a-Si;H, ..mu..c-Si:H, CIGS; hole-conducting polymers as p-layer for a-Si and c-Si; IR spectra of p/i and n/i interfaces in a-Si.

  11. A high-efficiency solution-deposited thin-film photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitzi, David B; Yuan, Min; Liu, Wei; Chey, S Jay; Schrott, Alex G [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY (United States); Kellock, Andrew J; Deline, Vaughn [IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA (United States)

    2008-10-02

    High-quality Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) films are deposited from hydrazine-based solutions and are employed as absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaic devices. The CIGS films exhibit tunable stoichiometry and well-formed grain structure without requiring post-deposition high-temperature selenium treatment. Devices based on these films offer power conversion efficiencies of 10% (AM1.5 illumination). (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Large magnetoresistance in Heusler-alloy-based epitaxial magnetic junctions with semiconducting Cu(In{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2})Se{sub 2} spacer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasai, S. [Research Center for Magnetic and Spintronic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Takahashi, Y. K.; Ohkubo, T. [Research Center for Magnetic and Spintronic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Cheng, P.-H.; Ikhtiar,; Mitani, S.; Hono, K. [Research Center for Magnetic and Spintronic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8577 (Japan); Kondou, K. [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Otani, Y. [Center for Emergent Matter Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8581 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    We investigated the structure and magneto-transport properties of magnetic junctions using a Co{sub 2}Fe(Ga{sub 0.5}Ge{sub 0.5}) Heusler alloy as ferromagnetic electrodes and a Cu(In{sub 0.8}Ga{sub 0.2})Se{sub 2} (CIGS) semiconductor as spacers. Owing to the semiconducting nature of the CIGS spacer, large magnetoresistance (MR) ratios of 40% at room temperature and 100% at 8 K were obtained for low resistance-area product (RA) values between 0.3 and 3 Ω μm{sup 2}. Transmission electron microscopy observations confirmed the fully epitaxial growth of the chalcopyrite CIGS layer, and the temperature dependence of RA indicated that the large MR was due to spin dependent tunneling.

  13. New Sunshine Project FY 1996 report on the results of development of photovoltaic power generation system commercialization technologies. Research on commercialization of the technologies for production of thin-film photovoltaic cells (Development of fabrication technologies of high-quality CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film solar cells); 1996 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Usumaku taiyo denchi seizo gijutsu no jitsuyoka kenkyu (kohinshitsuka gijutsu (CuInSe{sub 2} taiyo denchi seizo no gijutsu kaihatsu))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Described herein are the FY 1996 results of development of fabrication technologies for high-quality CuInSe{sub 2}-based photovoltaic cells. The Cu-Ga alloy/In-stacked precursor film is prepared for production of the high-quality thin-film absorber applicable to large-area module fabrication, and selenized by the vapor-phase selenization in a H{sub 2}Se gas atmosphere to produce the thin light-absorbing film in which In and Ga are present at graded concentrations. Increasing Ga alloy content in the CIGS-based thin-film photovoltaic cell fails to widen the forbidden band and improve V{sub oc}, and further optimization works are needed. The method is developed for production of thin-film buffer layer of sulfur-containing Zn compound which can give the cell characteristics equivalent to those of CdS generally used for CIS-based thin-film photovoltaic cell. It is clarified that the photovoltaic cell characteristics can be improved by use of a transparent electroconductive ZnO film of stacked structure, produced by a combination of RF sputtering and DC sputtering. For the patterning technologies necessary for forming series connection on a mini-module, the laser scribing method is applicable to the metal base-electrode, and the mechanical scribing method to the light absorber and window layer. (NEDO)

  14. Wave-equation Migration Velocity Analysis Using Plane-wave Common Image Gathers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-06-01

    Wave-equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) based on subsurface-offset, angle domain or time-lag common image gathers (CIGs) requires significant computational and memory resources because it computes higher dimensional migration images in the extended image domain. To mitigate this problem, a WEMVA method using plane-wave CIGs is presented. Plane-wave CIGs reduce the computational cost and memory storage because they are directly calculated from prestack plane-wave migration, and the number of plane waves is often much smaller than the number of shots. In the case of an inaccurate migration velocity, the moveout of plane-wave CIGs is automatically picked by a semblance analysis method, which is then linked to the migration velocity update by a connective function. Numerical tests on two synthetic datasets and a field dataset validate the efficiency and effectiveness of this method.

  15. Theoretical Analysis of Two Novel Hybrid Thermoelectric-Photovoltaic Systems Based on Cu₂ZnSnS₄ Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzi, Bruno; Contento, Gaetano; Sabatelli, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Antonella; Narducci, Dario

    2017-03-01

    The development and commercialization of Photovoltaic (PV) cells with good cost-efficiency trade-off not using critical raw materials (CRMs) is one of the strategies chosen by the European Community (EC) to address the Energy Roadmap 2050. In this context Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) solar cells are attracting a major interest since they have the potential to combine low price with relatively high conversion efficiencies. Although a ≈9% lab scale efficiency has already been reported for CZTS this technology is still far from being competitive in terms of cost per peak-power (€/Wp) with other common materials. One possible near-future solution to increase the CZTS competiveness comes from thermoelectrics. Actually it has already been shown that Hybrid Thermoelectric-Photovoltaic Systems (HTEPVs) based on CIGS, another kesterite very similar to CZTS, can lead to a significant efficiency improvement. However it has been also clarified how the optimal hybridization strategy cannot come from the simple coupling of solar cells with commercial TEGs, but special layouts have to be implemented. Furthermore, since solar cell performances are well known to decrease with temperature, thermal decoupling strategies of the PV and TEG sections have to be taken. To address these issues, we developed a model for two different HTEPV solutions, both coupled with CZTS solar cells. In the first case we considered a Thermally-Coupled HTEPV device (TC-HTEPV) in which the TEG is placed underneath the solar cell and in thermal contact with it. The second system consists instead of an Optically-Coupled but thermally decoupled device (OC-HTEPV) in which part of the solar spectrum is focused by a non-imaging optical concentrator on the TEG hot side. For both solutions the model returns conversion efficiencies higher than that of the CZTS solar cell alone. Specifically, increases of ≈30% are predicted for both kind of systems considered.

  16. Factors associated with experimentation of electronic cigarettes among Parisian teenagers in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautzenberg, Bertrand; Berlin, Ivan; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Rieu, Nicole; Birkui, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cig.) became widely used among adults. Data are insufficient about e-cig. experimentation among youth. To assess prevalence of e-cig. experimentation and associated factors among the 12 to 19 years old we analyse a cross sectional school based survey in the city of Paris, France in 2013 on a randomly selected sample of 2 % of schoolchildren (n = 3 279). Self-report questionnaire include demographic, individual and family smoking characteristics and questions about e-cig: "Have you ever used an e-cigarette?"- "Did you use e-cigarette in the last 30 days?"-"Did you try e-cigarette as a first tobacco product?". In 2013, 17.9 % (564) schoolchildren reported having experienced the e-cig (boys: 19.0 %, girls: 16.8 %) compared to 9.8 % in 2012. Experimentation rate increases from 5 % among the 12 to 30 % among the 16-year-old. E-cig. experimentation was significantly associated with 11 parameters including : age >15 years (OR: 0.66 (IC95 % = 0.46-0.94)); smoking 10 cigarettes or more (OR = 5.67 (IC95 % = 3.11-10.34)), best friends and siblings smoker (OR = 1.54 (IC95 % = 1.11-2.14)) and (OR = 1.88 (IC95 % = 1.41-2.52)); experimentation of shisha (OR = 2.60 (IC95 % = 1.75-3.86)), cannabis use (OR = 1.90 (IC95 % = 1.32-2.72)); having two parents who forbid smoking (OR = 2.32 (IC95 % = 1.63-3.30)). Only 5.6 % of the study population (and 32.5 % of e-cig. experimenters (183/564)) have used it in the last 30 days; 1.7 % of the study population and 10.0 % of e-cig. experimenters were non-smokers (56/564). Rate of e-cig. experimentation among schoolchildren increased by 8.1 % in 1 year. Non-smoking youth may use e-cig. Prospective studies are urgently needed to assess the evolution of e-cig. use both among smoking and non-smoking youth.

  17. Electronic Cigarettes: Their Constituents and Potential Links to Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Phillip W; Jaspers, Ilona

    2017-10-05

    Vaping is gaining popularity in the USA, particularly among teens and young adults. While e-cigs are commonly represented as safer alternatives to tobacco cigarettes, little is known regarding the health effects of their short- or long-term use, especially in individuals with pre-existing respiratory diseases such as asthma. Flavored e-cig liquids (e-liquids) and e-cig aerosols contain airway irritants and toxicants that have been implicated in the pathogenesis and worsening of lung diseases. In this review, we will summarize existing data on potential health effects of components present in e-cig aerosols, such as propylene glycol, vegetable glycerin, nicotine, and flavorings, and discuss their relevance in the context of asthma. Recent survey data indicate that adolescents with asthma had a higher prevalence of current e-cig use (12.4%) compared to their non-asthmatics peers (10.2%) and conveyed positive beliefs about tobacco products, especially e-cigs. Similarly, a study conducted among high school students from Ontario, Canada, indicated a greater likelihood of e-cig use in asthmatics as compared to their non-asthmatic peers. Availability of different flavorings is often cited as the main reason among youth/adolescents for trying e-cigs or switching from cigarettes to e-cigs. Occupational inhalation of some common food-safe flavoring agents is reported to cause occupational asthma and worsen asthmatic symptoms. Moreover, workplace inhalation exposures to the flavoring agent diacetyl have caused irreversible obstructive airway disease in healthy workers. Additionally, recent studies report that thermal decomposition of propylene glycol (PG) and vegetable glycerin (VG), the base constituents of e-liquids, produces reactive carbonyls, including acrolein, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde, which have known respiratory toxicities. Furthermore, recent nicotine studies in rodents reveal that prenatal nicotine exposures lead to epigenetic reprogramming in the offspring

  18. Barrier effect of AlN film in flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells on stainless steel foil and solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Boyan; Li, Jianjun [Institute of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology, Key Laboratory of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology of Tianjin, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wu, Li [The MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Wei; Sun, Yun [Institute of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology, Key Laboratory of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology of Tianjin, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Yi, E-mail: yizhang@nankai.edu.cn [Institute of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology, Key Laboratory of Photo-electronic Thin Film Devices and Technology of Tianjin, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • The adhension between AlN film and Mo are verygood. • AlN film can be effectively used as the barrier of flexible CIGS solar cell on SS substrate. • AlN film is suitable as the insulation barrier of flexible CIGS solar cell on SS substrate. - Abstract: The AlN film deposited by DC magnetron sputtering on stainless steel (SS) foils was used as the barrier in flexible Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells on stainless steel foil and characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), I–V, and QE measurements study. The study of AlN as insulation barrier in the flexible CIGS solar cell showed that the adhesion strength between the SS foil and the deposited AlN film was very strong even after annealing at high temperature at 530 °C. More importantly, a high resistance of over 10 MΩ was remained with the film with thickness of around 200 nm after annealing. This indicates that the AlN film is suitable as an effective insulation barrier in flexible CIGS solar cells based on SS foil. In addition, the XRD and SEM results showed that the AlN film did not influence the crystal structure of the Mo film which was deposited upon the AlN layer and used as the electrical contact in CIGS solar cells. It was found that the AlN film contributed to an improved crystallinity of the Mo contact layer compared to the bare SS foil. The combined results of secondary ion mass spectrometry, I–V and EQE measurements of the corresponding flexible CIGS solar cells confirmed that 1 μm-thick AlN film could be used as an efficient barrier layer in CIGS solar cells on SS foil.

  19. The influence of different locations of sputter guns on the morphological and structural properties of Cu–In–Ga precursors and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, J., E-mail: jiezhu@ustb.edu.cn; He, Y.X.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of two different locations of sputter guns on the morphological and structural properties of Cu–In–Ga precursors and Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films was investigated. All the precursors contained cauliflower-like nodules, whereas smaller subnodules were observed on the background. All the precursors revealed apparent three-layered structures, and voids were observed at the CIGS/SLG interface of Sets 1 and 2 films rather than Set 3 film. EDS results indicated that all CIGS thin films were Cu-deficient. Based on the grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) patterns, as-selenized films showed peaks corresponding to the chalcopyrite-type CIGS structure. Depth-resolved Raman spectra showed the formation of a dominant CIGS phase inside the films for all the as-selenized samples investigated, and of an ordered vacancy compound (OVC) phase like Cu(In,Ga){sub 3}Se{sub 5} or Cu(In,Ga){sub 2}Se{sub 3.5} at the surface and/or CIGS/SLG interface region of Sets 2 and 3 films. No evidence was obtained on the presence of an OVC phase in Set 1 CIGS film, which may be speculated that long-time annealing is contributed to suppress the growth of OVC phases. The results of the present work suggest that the metallic precursors deposited with the upright-location sputter gun might be more appropriate to prepare CIGS thin films than those sputtered with the titled-location gun.

  20. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N [Littleton, CO

    2009-11-03

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  1. Interplay between Clinical Guidelines and Organizational Workflow Systems. Experience from the MobiGuide Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabo, Amnon; Peleg, Mor; Parimbelli, Enea; Quaglini, Silvana; Napolitano, Carlo

    2016-12-07

    Implementing a decision-support system within a healthcare organization requires integration of clinical domain knowledge with resource constraints. Computer-interpretable guidelines (CIG) are excellent instruments for addressing clinical aspects while business process management (BPM) languages and Workflow (Wf) engines manage the logistic organizational constraints. Our objective is the orchestration of all the relevant factors needed for a successful execution of patient's care pathways, especially when spanning the continuum of care, from acute to community or home care. We considered three strategies for integrating CIGs with organizational workflows: extending the CIG or BPM languages and their engines, or creating an interplay between them. We used the interplay approach to implement a set of use cases arising from a CIG implementation in the domain of Atrial Fibrillation. To provide a more scalable and standards-based solution, we explored the use of Cross-Enterprise Document Workflow Integration Profile. We describe our proof-of-concept implementation of five use cases. We utilized the Personal Health Record of the MobiGuide project to implement a loosely-coupled approach between the Activiti BPM engine and the Picard CIG engine. Changes in the PHR were detected by polling. IHE profiles were used to develop workflow documents that orchestrate cross-enterprise execution of cardioversion. Interplay between CIG and BPM engines can support orchestration of care flows within organizational settings.

  2. Site selective doping of Zn for the p-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin film for solar cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Sho [Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Tokyo University of Science, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Selective doping of a Zn impurity at the group III site in a Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) film was performed by the doping of Zn at the first stage of the three-stage method. The p-type CIGS:Zn film was obtained, which is in contrast to the n-type CIGS:Zn film obtained by the Zn impurity doping at the second and third-stages. Based on excitation intensity dependence of photoluminescence (PL) at low-temperature, the change in the acceptor level was observed. The enhancement of carrier concentration as a result of Zn-doping in the p-type CIGS:Zn film was observed. The CIGS:Zn solar cells exhibited η of 14.5% and V{sub oc} of 0.658 V, which are higher than that of the corresponding solar cells using the undoped CIGS films. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Fabrication of selenization-free superstrate-type CuInS{sub 2} solar cells based on all-spin-coated layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheshme khavar, Amir Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box. 14155-4383, Gisha Bridge, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahjoub, Alireza, E-mail: mahjouba@modares.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box. 14155-4383, Gisha Bridge, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samghabadi, Farnaz Safi [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, 14588 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taghavinia, Nima, E-mail: taghavinia@sharif.edu [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, 14588 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, 14588 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Today manufacturing of high efficiency chalcogenide thin film solar cells is based on high cost vacuum-based deposition processes at high temperature (>500 °C) and in chalcogen -containing atmosphere. In this paper, we introduce a simple vacuum-free and selenization-free, solution processing for fabricating a superstrate-type CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) solar cell. The absorber, buffer and blocking layers were all deposited by spin coating of molecular precursor inks. We demonstrate the deposition of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} buffer layer by sol-gel spin casting for the first time. The rapid sintering process of CIS layer was carried out at 250 °C that is considered a very low temperature in CIGS thin-film technologies. A novel molecular-ink route to deposit In{sub 2}S{sub 3} type buffer layer is presented. For the back contact we employed carbon, deposited by simple knife coating method. Different parameters including type of buffer, thickness of absorber layer, CIS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3} annealing temperature and morphology were optimized. Our air stable simple device structure consisting of showed promising power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.67%. - Highlights: • This work is an effort on the fabrication of all spin-coated CIS solar cells. • A novel molecular-ink route to deposit In{sub 2}S{sub 3} type buffer layer is presented. • The best devices showed power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.67%.

  4. Impact of the deposition conditions of buffer and windows layers on lowering the metastability effects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2/Zn(S,O)-based solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghavi, Negar; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Bouttemy, Muriel; Etcheberry, Arnaud; Lincot, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The highest and most reproducible (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) based solar-cell efficiencies are obtained by use of a very thin n-type CdS layer deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD). However because of both Cadmium's adverse environmental impact and the narrow bandgap of CdS (2.4-2.5 eV) one of the major objectives in the field of CIGSe technology remains the development and implementation in the production line of Cd-free buffer layers. The CBDZn( S,O) remains one the most studied buffer layer for replacing the CdS in Cu(In,Ga)Se2-based solar cells and has already demonstrated its potential to lead to high-efficiency solar cells up to 22.3%. However one of the key issue to implement a CBD-Zn(S,O) process in a CIGSe production line is the cells stability, which depends both on the deposition conditions of CBD-Zn(S,O) and on a good band alignment between CIGSe/Zn(S,O)/windows layers. The most common window layers applied in CIGSe solar cells consist of two layers : a thin (50-100 nm) and highly resistive i-ZnO layer deposited by magnetron sputtering and a transparent conducting 300-500 nm ZnO:Al layer. In the case of CBD-Zn(S,O) buffer layer, the nature and deposition conditions of both Zn(S,O) and the undoped window layer can strongly influence the performance and stability of cells. The present contribution will be specially focused on the effect of condition growth of CBD-Zn(S,O) buffer layers and the impact of the composition and deposition conditions of the undoped window layers such as ZnxMgyO or ZnxSnyO on the stability and performance of these solar cells.

  5. Optical constants of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} for arbitrary Cu and Ga compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minoura, Shota; Kodera, Keita; Nakane, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fujiwara@gifu-u.ac.jp [Center of Innovative Photovoltaic Systems (CIPS), Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Maekawa, Takuji [Research and Development Headquarters, ROHM Co., Ltd., 21 Saiin Mizosaki-cho, Ukyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8585 (Japan); Niki, Shigeru [Research Center for Photovoltaic Technologies, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Central2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2015-05-21

    The optical constants of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS)-based polycrystalline layers with different Cu and Ga compositions are parameterized completely up to a photon energy of 6.5 eV assuming several Tauc-Lorentz transition peaks. Based on the modeled optical constants, we establish the calculation procedure for the CIGS optical constants in a two-dimensional compositional space of (Cu, Ga) by taking the composition-induced shift of the critical point energies into account. In particular, we find that the variation of the CIGS optical constants with the Cu composition can be modeled quite simply by a spectral-averaging method in which the dielectric function of the target Cu composition is estimated as a weighted average of the dielectric functions with higher and lower Cu compositions. To express the effect of the Ga composition, on the other hand, an energy shift model reported earlier is adopted. Our model is appropriate for a wide variety of CIGS-based materials having different Cu and Ga compositions, although the modeling error increases slightly at lower Cu compositions [Cu/(In + Ga) < 0.69]. From our model, the dielectric function, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and absorption coefficient for the arbitrary CIGS composition can readily be obtained. The optical database developed in this study is applied further for spectroscopic ellipsometry analyses of CIGS layers fabricated by single and multi-stage coevaporation processes. We demonstrate that the compositional and structural characterizations of the CIGS-based layers can be performed from established analysis methods.

  6. TGF-alpha genotypes, oral clefts, and environmental risk factors: A population-based California study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G.M.; Wasserman, C.R. [CA Birth Defects Monitoring Program, Emeryville, CA (United States); Lammer, E.J. [Stanford Univ., Palo Alto, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several studies have shown a relation between genetic variation at the TGF-alpha locus and oral clefts. These studies had limited sample sizes and also lacked data on additional factors potentially related to clefting. We investigated the influence on clefting from risk factors, such as maternal smoking, dependent on TFG-alpha genotype. This was accomplished using a large population-bases case-control study of fetuses and liveborn infants with oral clefts among a 1987-89 cohort of California births (N=548,844). To obtain data on potential risk factors, telephone interviews were conducted with mothers of 731 (84.5% of eligible) cleft cases, and 734 (78.2%) nonmalformed controls. DNA was obtained from newborn screening bloodspots and genotyped by using SSCP designed to detect the Taq1 RFLP. Among mothers who completed an interview, genotyping results were available for 571 (78.1%) cases and 640 (87.2%) controls. Compared to controls, the risk estimate for TGF-alpha polymorphism as measured by the odds ratio was: 0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.64, 1.5) for isolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 0.88 (0.33, 2.2) for nonisolated cleft lip {plus_minus}palate; 1.6 (0.94, 2.8) for isolated cleft palate; 1.9 (0.82, 4.3) for nonisolated cleft palate; and 2.2 (0.99, 5.0) for clefts with known etiology. This dataset also revealed 1.4 to 2-fold increased risks for maternal cigarette smoking > 19 cigs/day in early pregnancy. Among these heavy smokers, risk of clefting was even more increased for infants with the TGF-alpha polymorphism. Our data suggest an association between the TGF-alpha uncommon allele and some phenotypic subgroups as well as provide evidence for a genetic-environment interaction between maternal smoking and the variant in the etiology of clefting. The fraction of cases possibly attributed to this interaction, however, was small.

  7. Exploratory Analysis of Marketing and Non-marketing E-cigarette Themes on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sifei; Kavuluru, Ramakanth

    2016-11-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) have been gaining popularity and have emerged as a controversial tobacco product since their introduction in 2007 in the U.S. The smoke-free aspect of e-cigs renders them less harmful than conventional cigarettes and is one of the main reasons for their use by people who plan to quit smoking. The US food and drug administration (FDA) has introduced new regulations early May 2016 that went into effect on August 8, 2016. Given this important context, in this paper, we report results of a project to identify current themes in e-cig tweets in terms of semantic interpretations of topics generated with topic modeling. Given marketing/advertising tweets constitute almost half of all e-cig tweets, we first build a classifier that identifies marketing and non-marketing tweets based on a hand-built dataset of 1000 tweets. After applying the classifier to a dataset of over a million tweets (collected during 4/2015 - 6/2016), we conduct a preliminary content analysis and run topic models on the two sets of tweets separately after identifying the appropriate numbers of topics using topic coherence. We interpret the results of the topic modeling process by relating topics generated to specific e-cig themes. We also report on themes identified from e-cig tweets generated at particular places (such as schools and churches) for geo-tagged tweets found in our dataset using the GeoNames API. To our knowledge, this is the first effort that employs topic modeling to identify e-cig themes in general and in the context of geo-tagged tweets tied to specific places of interest.

  8. Antimony assisted low-temperature processing of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2-y}S{sub y} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Yuan [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Mitzi, David B., E-mail: dmitzi@us.ibm.co [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Gunawan, Oki [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kellock, Andrew J [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Rd, San Jose, CA 95120 (United States); Chey, S Jay [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P. O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Deline, Vaughn R [IBM Almaden Research Center, 650 Harry Rd, San Jose, CA 95120 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Application of the Sb-doping method to low-temperature ({<=} 400 {sup o}C) processing of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2-y}S{sub y} (CIGS) solar cells is explored, using a hydrazine-based approach to deposit the absorber films. Power conversion efficiencies of 10.5% and 8.4% have been achieved for CIGS devices (0.45 cm{sup 2} device area) processed at 400 {sup o}C and 360 {sup o}C, respectively, with an Sb-incorporation level at 1.2 mol % (relative to the moles of CIGS). Significant Sb-induced grain size enhancement was confirmed for these low processing temperatures using cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, and an average 2-3% absolute efficiency improvement was achieved in Sb-doped samples compared to their Sb-free sister samples. With Sb inclusion, the CIGS film grain growth temperature is lowered to well below 450 {sup o}C, a range compatible with flexible polymer substrate materials such as polyimide. This method opens up access to opportunities in low-temperature processing of CIGS solar cells, an area that is being actively pursued using both traditional vacuum-based as well as other solution-based deposition techniques.

  9. Antimony assisted low-temperature processing of CuIn1-xGaxSe2-ySy solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Min; Mitzi, David B.; Gunawan, Oki; Kellock, Andrew J.; Chey, S. Jay; Deline, Vaughn R.

    2010-01-01

    Application of the Sb-doping method to low-temperature (≤ 400 o C) processing of CuIn 1-x Ga x Se 2-y S y (CIGS) solar cells is explored, using a hydrazine-based approach to deposit the absorber films. Power conversion efficiencies of 10.5% and 8.4% have been achieved for CIGS devices (0.45 cm 2 device area) processed at 400 o C and 360 o C, respectively, with an Sb-incorporation level at 1.2 mol % (relative to the moles of CIGS). Significant Sb-induced grain size enhancement was confirmed for these low processing temperatures using cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, and an average 2-3% absolute efficiency improvement was achieved in Sb-doped samples compared to their Sb-free sister samples. With Sb inclusion, the CIGS film grain growth temperature is lowered to well below 450 o C, a range compatible with flexible polymer substrate materials such as polyimide. This method opens up access to opportunities in low-temperature processing of CIGS solar cells, an area that is being actively pursued using both traditional vacuum-based as well as other solution-based deposition techniques.

  10. Role of the buffer solution in the chemical deposition of CdS films for CIGS solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sooho; Kim, Donguk; Baek, Dohyun; Hong, Byoungyou; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yongseob [Chosun College of Science and and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Wonseok [Hanbat National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this work, the effects of NH{sub 4}Ac on the structural and the electro-optical properties of CdS films were investigated. CdS thin films were deposited on soda-lime glass and indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass from a chemical bath containing 0.025 M cadmium acetate, 0 M ∼ 0.2 M ammonium acetate, 0.5 M thiourea, and ammonia. Cadmium acetate was the cadmium source, ammonium acetate served as a buffer, ammonia was the complexing agent, and thiourea was the source of sulfur. A commonly- available chemical bath deposition system was successfully modified to obtain precise control over the pH of the solution at 75 .deg. C during the deposition. Chemically deposited CdS films were studied by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical transmittance, and electrical resistivity measurements.

  11. Examination of the Relationship between Urban Air Pollution and Urban Planning Decisions in Cigli Case, Izmir (Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Sinem Ozcan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The air pollution problem remains, although significant improvements have been seen in urban air quality over the last years. Despite the size and variety of studies on urban air pollution, the usage of spatial statistics has been extremely limited. This study aims to show that the spatial statistic techniques can well be used to examine and explain the air pollution levels in urban areas. The data for the sulphur dioxide (SO2 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations are measures using passive diffusion tubes at the 67 monitoring sites in the district of Çiğli (Izmir, which are selected through a spatial systematic sampling process. The tubes were exposed for a 2-week period in August 2015. For the determination of the level of clustering for high values and low values of SO2 and NO2 concentrations, Getis-Ord G* local statistics are calculated. There are five points with high values of SO2 surrounded by low values, three points of NO2, where the results are statistically significant at the 0.10 level. The findings indicate that the presence of the industrial zone, the form of fossil fuels (coal or natural gas used in heating, and topography are the strong determinants urban air pollution.

  12. Optical Design of Textured Thin-Film CIGS Solar Cells with Nearly-Invisible Nanowire Assisted Front Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Omar, A.; Barink, M.

    2017-01-01

    The conductivity of transparent front contacts can be improved by patterned metallic nanowires, albeit at the cost of optical loss. The associated optical penalty can be strongly reduced by texturization of the cell stack. Remarkably, the nanowires themselves are not textured and not covered in our

  13. Recycling of Indium From CIGS Photovoltaic Cells: Potential of Combining Acid-Resistant Nanofiltration with Liquid-Liquid Extraction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, Y.S.; Niewersch, C.; Lenz, M.; Corvini, P.F.X.; Schäffer, A.; Wintgens, T.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called “urban mining” considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than

  14. Intercomparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and Ground-Based Narrow Band Spectrometers Applied to Crop Trait Monitoring in Organic Potato Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marston Héracles Domingues Franceschini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation properties can be estimated using optical sensors, acquiring data on board of different platforms. For instance, ground-based and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV-borne spectrometers can measure reflectance in narrow spectral bands, while different modelling approaches, like regressions fitted to vegetation indices, can relate spectra with crop traits. Although monitoring frameworks using multiple sensors can be more flexible, they may result in higher inaccuracy due to differences related to the sensors characteristics, which can affect information sampling. Also organic production systems can benefit from continuous monitoring focusing on crop management and stress detection, but few studies have evaluated applications with this objective. In this study, ground-based and UAV spectrometers were compared in the context of organic potato cultivation. Relatively accurate estimates were obtained for leaf chlorophyll (RMSE = 6.07 µg·cm−2, leaf area index (RMSE = 0.67 m2·m−2, canopy chlorophyll (RMSE = 0.24 g·m−2 and ground cover (RMSE = 5.5% using five UAV-based data acquisitions, from 43 to 99 days after planting. These retrievals are slightly better than those derived from ground-based measurements (RMSE = 7.25 µg·cm−2, 0.85 m2·m−2, 0.28 g·m−2 and 6.8%, respectively, for the same period. Excluding observations corresponding to the first acquisition increased retrieval accuracy and made outputs more comparable between sensors, due to relatively low vegetation cover on this date. Intercomparison of vegetation indices indicated that indices based on the contrast between spectral bands in the visible and near-infrared, like OSAVI, MCARI2 and CIg provided, at certain extent, robust outputs that could be transferred between sensors. Information sampling at plot level by both sensing solutions resulted in comparable discriminative potential concerning advanced stages of late blight incidence. These results indicate that optical

  15. Physics of grain boundaries in polycrystalline photovoltaic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yanfa, E-mail: yanfa.yan@utoledo.edu; Yin, Wan-Jian; Wu, Yelong; Shi, Tingting; Paudel, Naba R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Li, Chen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Poplawsky, Jonathan [The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wang, Zhiwei [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization, The University of Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Moseley, John; Guthrey, Harvey; Moutinho, Helio; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Pennycook, Stephen J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2015-03-21

    Thin-film solar cells based on polycrystalline Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) and CdTe photovoltaic semiconductors have reached remarkable laboratory efficiencies. It is surprising that these thin-film polycrystalline solar cells can reach such high efficiencies despite containing a high density of grain boundaries (GBs), which would seem likely to be nonradiative recombination centers for photo-generated carriers. In this paper, we review our atomistic theoretical understanding of the physics of grain boundaries in CIGS and CdTe absorbers. We show that intrinsic GBs with dislocation cores exhibit deep gap states in both CIGS and CdTe. However, in each solar cell device, the GBs can be chemically modified to improve their photovoltaic properties. In CIGS cells, GBs are found to be Cu-rich and contain O impurities. Density-functional theory calculations reveal that such chemical changes within GBs can remove most of the unwanted gap states. In CdTe cells, GBs are found to contain a high concentration of Cl atoms. Cl atoms donate electrons, creating n-type GBs between p-type CdTe grains, forming local p-n-p junctions along GBs. This leads to enhanced current collections. Therefore, chemical modification of GBs allows for high efficiency polycrystalline CIGS and CdTe thin-film solar cells.

  16. Investigation of the diffusion behavior of sodium in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laemmle, Anke, E-mail: anke.laemmle@zsw-bw.de; Wuerz, Roland; Powalla, Michael [Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden Württemberg, Industriestraße 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Schwarz, Torsten; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Choi, Pyuck-Pa [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-04-21

    Sodium diffusion in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers was investigated over a temperature range from 157 °C to 400 °C. The diffusion profiles were measured by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Sodium ions diffused from a sodium fluoride (NaF) layer on the CIGS surface into the CIGS layer. From Na diffusion profiles, the diffusion along grain boundaries could be distinguished from the diffusion into the grain interior. Atom-probe tomography measurements reveal that even at a low temperature of 157 °C bulk diffusion of sodium into CIGS occurs. Based on this data, the slower diffusion coefficient in the volume can be described by the Arrhenius equation D{sub Na}{sup V} = 9.7 × 10{sup −9} exp(−0.36 eV/k{sub B}T) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1} and the fast diffusion along the grain boundaries by D{sub Na}{sup GB} = 6.5 × 10{sup −9} exp(−0.21 eV/k{sub B}T) cm{sup 2} s{sup −1}. Hence, we propose that sodium ions do not only passivate grain boundaries, but also act as dopants in the CIGS bulk.

  17. Investigations on electron beam evaporated Cu(In{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15})Se{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatachalam, M.; Kannan, M.D.; Prasanna, S.; Jayakumar, S.; Balasundaraprabhu, R. [Thin Film Center, Department of Physics, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Muthukumarasamy, N. [Department of Physics, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore (India); Saroja, M. [Department of Electronics, Erode Arts College, Erode (India)

    2009-09-15

    CIGS bulk with composition of CuIn{sub 0.85}Ga{sub 0.15}Se{sub 2} was synthesized by direct reaction of elemental copper, indium, gallium and selenium. CIGS thin films were then deposited onto well-cleaned glass substrates using the prepared bulk alloy by electron beam deposition method. The structural properties of the deposited films were studied using X-ray diffraction technique. The as-deposited CIGS films were found to be amorphous. On annealing, the films crystallized with a tetragonal chalcopyrite structure. An intermediate Cu-rich phase precipitated at 200 C and dissociated at higher annealing temperatures. Average grain size calculated from the XRD spectra indicated that the films had a nano-crystalline structure and was further corroborated by AFM analysis of the sample surface. The chemical constituents present in the deposited CIGS films were identified using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. CIGS based solar cells were then fabricated on molybdenum and ITO coated glass substrates and the efficiencies have been evaluated. (author)

  18. Potassium-induced surface modification of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin films for high-efficiency solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirilă, Adrian; Reinhard, Patrick; Pianezzi, Fabian; Bloesch, Patrick; Uhl, Alexander R; Fella, Carolin; Kranz, Lukas; Keller, Debora; Gretener, Christina; Hagendorfer, Harald; Jaeger, Dominik; Erni, Rolf; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Buecheler, Stephan; Tiwari, Ayodhya N

    2013-12-01

    Thin-film photovoltaic devices based on chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorber layers show excellent light-to-power conversion efficiencies exceeding 20%. This high performance level requires a small amount of alkaline metals incorporated into the CIGS layer, naturally provided by soda lime glass substrates used for processing of champion devices. The use of flexible substrates requires distinct incorporation of the alkaline metals, and so far mainly Na was believed to be the most favourable element, whereas other alkaline metals have resulted in significantly inferior device performance. Here we present a new sequential post-deposition treatment of the CIGS layer with sodium and potassium fluoride that enables fabrication of flexible photovoltaic devices with a remarkable conversion efficiency due to modified interface properties and mitigation of optical losses in the CdS buffer layer. The described treatment leads to a significant depletion of Cu and Ga concentrations in the CIGS near-surface region and enables a significant thickness reduction of the CdS buffer layer without the commonly observed losses in photovoltaic parameters. Ion exchange processes, well known in other research areas, are proposed as underlying mechanisms responsible for the changes in chemical composition of the deposited CIGS layer and interface properties of the heterojunction.

  19. Development of practical application technology for photovoltaic power generation systems in fiscal 1997. Development of technologies to manufacture next-generation thin film solar cells, development of technologies to manufacture CIS solar cell modules, development of technologies to increase high-quality film area; 1997 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu. Jisedai usumaku taiyo denchi module no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, CIS taiyo denchi module no seizo gijutsu kaihatsu, kohinshitsumaku no daimensekika gijutsu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    With an objective to improve efficiency and reduce cost of CIS-based thin film solar cells, research and development has been made on technologies to increase high-quality CIS film area and technologies to increase speed in the manufacturing process. This paper describes the achievements attained during fiscal 1997. The research covered development of technologies to form high-grade Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) film by using the multi-dimensional deposition process, component technologies for forming a rear electrode, a buffer layer and a transparent electrode, and patterning technologies. As a result of the research, thickness of the CIGS film was reduced to half as much as that of the conventional films, having achieved conversion efficiency of 13.1%, which corresponds to about 90% of the conventional CIGS solar cells. In addition, elucidation was made on the effect of an MoSe{sub 2} layer existing on interface with CIGS/Mo in a CIGS solar cell imposed on solar cell characteristics. In developing an Mo film laser scribing technology, intensity dependence of laser energy was made clear, the energy being required for scribing according to surface condition of the Mo film. (NEDO)

  20. Ionization effects on Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou; Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0031 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime [Institute of National Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuenmachi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan)

    2017-06-15

    Cu (In, Ga) Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 60, 100, and 250 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of radiation induced defects. Electrons with less than 200 keV energy cannot generate any displacement defects in CIGS materials. In addition, a low amount of the electrons can improve the roll-over behavior in current-voltage characteristics of CIGS solar cells. However, the deterioration of the electrical performance in CIGS solar cells irradiated with a high amount of electrons was observed. The deterioration rate on the cells irradiated with lower-energy electrons was higher than that induced by electrons with higher-energy. The degradation curve of J{sub SC} based on the ionizing dose estimated from the ionizing energy loss model does not depend on the energy of electrons. Therefore, it implies that the electrons can degrade CIGS solar cells due to the ionization effect. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Quantitative Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs Cited by the United States Food and Drug Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guthery W

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The yields of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were determined from cigarette mainstream smoke condensate extracts using Gas Chromatography- Tandem Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS/MS. The method has been validated for ISO and Health Canada Intense (HCI smoking protocols. Quantifiable levels (ISO means 0.16 to 365 ng/cig; HCI means 0.33 to 1595 ng/cig; n = 30 of 15 PAHs were found in the Kentucky reference cigarette K3R4F. The coefficient of variance (CV was derived from ten determinations each run in triplicate. The CV range was 8.7% to 24.8% (ISO and 6.6% to 24.3% (HCI. The limit of detection (LOD based on empirical precision was ≤ 0.06 ng/cig (ISO and ≤ 0.20 ng/cig (HCI for all components except naphthalene (2.89 and 9.62 ng/cig, respectively. The yields from 5 unspecified branded cigarettes (Samples A-E and 2 other reference cigarettes, K1R5F and the CORESTA monitor CM7, were determined under ISO smoking conditions. The same 15 PAHs were detected as in the K3R4F; however, cigarettes with lower yields of total particulate matter (TPM were found to contain significantly less PAHs. One component was measured below the limit of quantification (LOQ in Sample E and 2 components were < LOQ in the K1R5F.

  2. Characterization of grain boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Torsten; Cojocaru-Miredin, Oana; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Raabe, Dierk [Max-Planck Institute for Iron Research GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany); Wuerz, Roland [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Solar cells based on the compound semiconductor Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) as absorber material exhibit the highest efficiency among all thin-film solar cells. This is surprising high in view of the polycrystalline defect-rich structure of the CIGS absorber films. The high efficiency has been commonly ascribed to the diffusion of alkali metal atoms from the soda-lime glass substrate into the CIGS layer, which can render the grain boundaries (GB) electrically inactive. However, the exact mechanisms of how these impurities enhance the cell efficiency are yet to be clarified. As a step towards a better understanding of CIGS solar cells, we have analyzed the composition of solar-grade CIGS layers at the atomic-scale by using pulsed laser Atom Probe Tomography (APT). To perform APT analyses on selected GBs site-specific sample preparation was carried out using the Focused Ion Beam lift-out technique. In addition, Electron Back Scattered Diffraction was performed to characterize the structure and misorientation of selected GBs. Using APT, segregation of impurities at the GBs was directly observed. APT data of various types of GBs are presented and discussed with respect to the possible effects on the cell efficiency.

  3. Knowledge on Irradiation, Medical Imaging Prescriptions, and Clinical Imaging Referral Guidelines among Physicians in a Sub-Saharan African Country (Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface Moifo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs are suitable tools to enhance justification of imaging procedures. Objective. To assess physicians’ knowledge on irradiation, their self-perception of imaging prescriptions, and the use of CIGs. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire of 21 items was self-administered between July and August 2016 to 155 referring physicians working in seven university-affiliated hospitals in Yaoundé and Douala (Cameroon. This pretested questionnaire based on imaging referral practices, the use and the need of CIGs, knowledge on radiation doses of 11 specific radiologic procedures, and knowledge of injurious effects of radiation was completed in the presence of the investigator. Scores were allocated for each question. Results. 155 questionnaires were completed out of 180 administered (86.1%. Participants were 90 (58% females, 63 (40.64% specialists, 53 (34.20% residents/interns, and 39 (25.16% general practitioners. The average professional experience was 7.4 years (1–25 years. The mean knowledge score was 11.5/59 with no influence of sex, years of experience, and professional category. CIGs users’ score was better than nonusers (means 14.2 versus 10.6; p<0.01. 80% of physicians (124/155 underrated radiation doses of routine imaging exams. Seventy-eight (50.3% participants have knowledge on CIGs and half of them made use of them. “Impact on diagnosis” was the highest justification criteria follow by “impact on treatment decision.” Unjustified requests were mainly for “patient expectation or will” or for “research motivations.” 96% of interviewees believed that making available national CIGs will improve justification. Conclusion. Most physicians did not have appropriate awareness about radiation doses for routine imaging procedures. A small number of physicians have knowledge on CIGs but they believe that making available CIGs will improve justification of imaging procedures. Continuous

  4. Band gap grading and photovoltaic performance of solution-processed Cu(In,Ga)S2 thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Yong Jin; Park, Seung Min; An, Hee Sang; Kim, Dong-Wook; Min, Byoung Koun; Song, Jae Kyu

    2014-12-28

    The photophysical properties of CuInxGa1-xS2 (CIGS) thin films, prepared by solution-based coating methods, are investigated to understand the correlation between the optical properties of these films and the electrical characteristics of solar cells fabricated using these films. Photophysical properties, such as the depth-dependent band gap and carrier lifetime, turn out to be at play in determining the energy conversion efficiency of solar cells. A double grading of the band gap in CIGS films enhances solar cell efficiency, even when defect states disturb carrier collection by non-radiative decay. The combinational stacking of different density films leads to improved solar cell performance as well as efficient fabrication because a graded band gap and reduced shunt current increase carrier collection efficiency. The photodynamics of minority-carriers suggests that the suppression of defect states is a primary area of improvement in CIGS thin films prepared by solution-based methods.

  5. Device Modeling of the Performance of Cu(In,GaSe2 Solar Cells with V-Shaped Bandgap Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Yi Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cu(In,GaSe2 (CIGS with V-shaped bandgap on device performance is investigated in detail. A series of Ga/(In+Ga ratio are set to study the influence of V-shaped bandgap profile on the electricity of CIGS thin film solar cells. The modeling of device current density-voltage (J-V curve and bandgap grading profile corresponded well to measurement results. Detailed characteristic and modeling results show that an increased gradient of bandgap from valley to the buffer layer CdS will result in a barrier and lead to an enhanced recombination in the valley. This phenomenon can be modified by the back electric field resulting from a gradient bandgap from valley (bandgap minimum to the Mo back contact. These results indicate CIGS-based solar cells can achieve higher performance by optimizing the V-shaped bandgap profile.

  6. The Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics: An Example of Software Curation and Citation in the Geodynamics Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, L.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2017-12-01

    Curation of software promotes discoverability and accessibility and works hand in hand with scholarly citation to ascribe value to, and provide recognition for software development. To meet this challenge, the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) maintains a community repository built on custom and open tools to promote discovery, access, identification, credit, and provenance of research software for the geodynamics community. CIG (geodynamics.org) originated from recognition of the tremendous effort required to develop sound software and the need to reduce duplication of effort and to sustain community codes. CIG curates software across 6 domains and has developed and follows software best practices that include establishing test cases, documentation, and a citable publication for each software package. CIG software landing web pages provide access to current and past releases; many are also accessible through the CIG community repository on github. CIG has now developed abc - attribution builder for citation to enable software users to give credit to software developers. abc uses zenodo as an archive and as the mechanism to obtain a unique identifier (DOI) for scientific software. To assemble the metadata, we searched the software's documentation and research publications and then requested the primary developers to verify. In this process, we have learned that each development community approaches software attribution differently. The metadata gathered is based on guidelines established by groups such as FORCE11 and OntoSoft. The rollout of abc is gradual as developers are forward-looking, rarely willing to go back and archive prior releases in zenodo. Going forward all actively developed packages will utilize the zenodo and github integration to automate the archival process when a new release is issued. How to handle legacy software, multi-authored libraries, and assigning roles to software remain open issues.

  7. Lotus Base

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mun, Terry; Bachmann, Asger; Gupta, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    exploration of Lotus genomic and transcriptomic data. Equally important are user-friendly in-browser tools designed for data visualization and interpretation. Here, we present Lotus Base, which opens to the research community a large, established LORE1 insertion mutant population containing an excess of 120...... such data, allowing users to construct, visualize, and annotate co-expression gene networks. Lotus Base takes advantage of modern advances in browser technology to deliver powerful data interpretation for biologists. Its modular construction and publicly available application programming interface enable...... developers to tap into the wealth of integrated Lotus data. Lotus Base is freely accessible at: https://lotus.au.dk....

  8. Touch BASE

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    In a recent Nature article (see here), the BASE collaboration reported the most precise comparison of the charge-to-mass ratio of the proton to its antimatter equivalent, the antiproton. This result is just the beginning and many more challenges lie ahead.   CERN's AD Hall, where the BASE experiment is set-up. The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) was approved in June 2013 and was ready to take data in August 2014. During these 14 months, the BASE collaboration worked hard to set up its four cryogenic Penning traps, which are the heart of the whole experiment. As their name indicates, these magnetic devices are used to trap antiparticles – antiprotons coming from the Antiproton Decelerator – and particles of matter – negative hydrogen ions produced in the system by interaction with a degrader that slows the antiprotons down, allowing scientists to perform their measurements. “We had very little time to set up the wh...

  9. Degradation of Cu(In, Ga)Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells due to the ionization effect of low-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Shirou, E-mail: kawakita.shirou@jaxa.jp [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Imaizumi, Mitsuru [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Okuda, Shuichi [Osaka Prefecture University (OPU), Sakai, Osaka 599-8570 (Japan); Kusawake, Hiroaki [Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Cu (In, Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells were irradiated with 100 keV electrons to reveal the characteristics of created radiation defects. 100 keV electrons cannot produce any displacement defects in CIGS. Low-fluence electrons improve the electrical performance of the CIGS solar cells due to the change in the conductive type of donor to acceptor in a metastable defect, which is equivalent to the light-soaking effect. However, high fluence electrons cause the cell performance to decline. From analysis based on changes in carrier density and electroluminescence, defects causing the decline in performance include donor- and non-radiative types. In addition, red-on-bias experiments showed an increase in III{sub Cu} defects due to electron irradiation. Based on these results, the degradation in the electrical performance of the CIGS solar cells irradiated with high electron fluence would be attributable to a change in the conductive type of III{sub Cu} defects. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar cells were irradiated with 100 and 250 keV electrons at low temperature. • These electrons degraded the electrical performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 sola cells. • The electrons induced ⅢCu defects in Cu(In,Ga)Se2.

  10. A formal approach to the analysis of clinical computer-interpretable guideline modeling languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grando, M Adela; Glasspool, David; Fox, John

    2012-01-01

    To develop proof strategies to formally study the expressiveness of workflow-based languages, and to investigate their applicability to clinical computer-interpretable guideline (CIG) modeling languages. We propose two strategies for studying the expressiveness of workflow-based languages based on a standard set of workflow patterns expressed as Petri nets (PNs) and notions of congruence and bisimilarity from process calculus. Proof that a PN-based pattern P can be expressed in a language L can be carried out semi-automatically. Proof that a language L cannot provide the behavior specified by a PNP requires proof by exhaustion based on analysis of cases and cannot be performed automatically. The proof strategies are generic but we exemplify their use with a particular CIG modeling language, PROforma. To illustrate the method we evaluate the expressiveness of PROforma against three standard workflow patterns and compare our results with a previous similar but informal comparison. We show that the two proof strategies are effective in evaluating a CIG modeling language against standard workflow patterns. We find that using the proposed formal techniques we obtain different results to a comparable previously published but less formal study. We discuss the utility of these analyses as the basis for principled extensions to CIG modeling languages. Additionally we explain how the same proof strategies can be reused to prove the satisfaction of patterns expressed in the declarative language CIGDec. The proof strategies we propose are useful tools for analysing the expressiveness of CIG modeling languages. This study provides good evidence of the benefits of applying formal methods of proof over semi-formal ones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Beneficial effect of post-deposition treatment in high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells through reduced potential fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, S. A., E-mail: Soren.Jensen@nrel.gov, E-mail: Darius.Kuciauskas@nrel.gov; Glynn, S.; Kanevce, A.; Dippo, P.; Li, J. V.; Levi, D. H.; Kuciauskas, D., E-mail: Soren.Jensen@nrel.gov, E-mail: Darius.Kuciauskas@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2016-08-14

    World-record power conversion efficiencies for Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells have been achieved via a post-deposition treatment with alkaline metals, which increases the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. We explore the role of the potassium fluoride (KF) post-deposition treatment in CIGS by employing energy- and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy and electrical characterization combined with numerical modeling. The bulk carrier lifetime is found to increase with post-deposition treatment from 255 ns to 388 ns, which is the longest charge carrier lifetime reported for CIGS, and within ∼40% of the radiative limit. We find evidence that the post-deposition treatment causes a decrease in the electronic potential fluctuations. These potential fluctuations have previously been shown to reduce the open-circuit voltage and the device efficiency in CIGS. Additionally, numerical simulations based on the measured carrier lifetimes and mobilities show a diffusion length of ∼10 μm, which is ∼4 times larger than the film thickness. Thus, carrier collection in the bulk is not a limiting factor for device efficiency. By considering differences in doping, bandgap, and potential fluctuations, we present a possible explanation for the voltage difference between KF-treated and untreated samples.

  12. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V. [Ångström Solar Center, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lischner, J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Louie, Steven G. [Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Guo, J.-H. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Himpsel, F. J., E-mail: fhimpsel@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se₂ (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO=VBM{sub CIGS} – VBM{sub diamond}=0.3 eV±0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV±0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  13. Photoluminescence study of high energy proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Bonhyeong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, June Hyuk [Neutron Science Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), 989-111 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Donghyeop [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Ahn, Byung Tae, E-mail: btahn@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byungha, E-mail: byungha@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-31

    We have studied the effect of proton irradiation on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) thin films using photoluminescence (PL). We used a 10 MeV proton beam with varying doses from 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2}. Intensity-dependent low temperature PL measurements suggest that the proton irradiation does not create a new defect level but instead changes the number of preexisting defects in the detection range of the PL system. By comparing PL spectra after the proton irradiation with those obtained after thermal annealing under inert gas as well as under hydrogen gas ambient, we find that the irradiation-induced change in the defect structure does not originate from the incorporation of hydrogen but from energetics of the irradiating particles. Electrical resistivity of the proton irradiated CIGS thin films is shown to decrease after the proton irradiation, and this is explained by the reduction of the concentration of compensating donor-like defects, specifically selenium vacancies, based on the PL results. - Highlights: • Photoluminescence study of 10 MeV proton irradiation on CIGS at 10 K. • Irradiation modified population of existing defects without introducing new levels. • Changes in CIGS by 10 MeV irradiation are due to energetics of irradiating protons.

  14. Influence of encapsulated electron active molecules of single walled-carbon nanotubes on superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jungwoo [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); CRD Laboratory, LG Chem. Research Park, Daejeon 305-738 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Wonjoo [Department of Defense Ammunitions, Daeduk College, Daejeon 305-715 (Korea, Republic of); Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Deok Yeon; Lim, Iseul [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Hyung [Department of Chemistry Education, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Nah, Yoon-Chae [School of Energy, Materials, and Chemical Engineering, Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan 330-708 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Hyoung, E-mail: shlee66@jbnu.ac.kr [School of Semiconductor and Chemical Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Whikun, E-mail: wkyi@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sung-Hwan, E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells due to change of three factors viz. electronic energy structures, interfacial resistance, and electrical field. Therefore, it is worthwhile to investigate the influence of these three factors on the solar cells based on the functionalization of various active molecules in CNTs. In the present study, we investigate the influence of the three factors in the efficiency of superstrate-type Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells [i.e. F-doped SnO{sub 2}/CNTs/CdS/CIGS/Au] by encapsulation of electron withdrawing and donating organic molecules inside CNTs. The CIGS solar cell was characterized using the electronic diagram, electrochemical impendence spectroscopy, reverse field emission currents, and currents–voltages curves. - Highlights: • We investigated the three effects of CNTs in superstrate-type CIGS solar cells. • Chemical functionalization of CNTs strongly affect the efficiency of solar cells. • The electrical field of solar cell was characterized using the reverse FE-currents.

  15. Progress in Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cu(In,GaSe2 Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udai P. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For some time, the chalcopyrite semiconductor CuInSe2 and its alloy with Ga and/or S [Cu(InGaSe2 or Cu(InGa(Se,S2], commonly referred as CIGS, have been leading thin-film material candidates for incorporation in high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. CuInSe2-based solar cells have shown long-term stability and the highest conversion efficiencies among all thin-film solar cells, reaching 20%. A variety of methods have been reported to prepare CIGS thin film. Efficiency of solar cells depends upon the various deposition methods as they control optoelectronic properties of the layers and interfaces. CIGS thin film grown on glass or flexible (metal foil, polyimide substrates require p-type absorber layers of optimum optoelectronic properties and n-type wideband gap partner layers to form the p-n junction. Transparent conducting oxide and specific metal layers are used for front and back contacts. Progress made in the field of CIGS solar cell in recent years has been reviewed.

  16. Self-assembled synthesis of 3D Cu(In1 − xGax)Se2 nanoarrays by one-step electroless deposition into ordered AAO template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bin; Zheng, Maojun; Xiong, Zuzhou; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Hong; Wang, Faze; Shen, Wenzhong; Zhou, Tao; Ma, Li

    2014-01-01

    Quaternary nanostructured Cu(In 1 − x Ga x )Se 2 (CIGS) arrays were successfully fabricated via a novel and simple solution-based protocol on the electroless deposition method, using a flexible, highly ordered anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) substrate. This method does not require electric power, complicated sensitization processes, or complexing agents, but provides nearly 100% pore fill factor to AAO templates. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that we obtained uniformly three-dimensional nanostructured CIGS arrays, and we can tailor the diameter and wall thicknesses of the nanostructure by adjusting the pore diameter of the AAO and metal Mo layer. Their chemical composition was determined by energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis, which is very close to the stoichiometric value. The Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further confirm the formation of nanostructured CIGS with prominent chalcopyrite structure. The nanostructured CIGS arrays can support the design of low-cost, highlight-trapping, and enhanced carrier collection nanostructured solar cells. (paper)

  17. In-Situ Probing Plasmonic Energy Transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Solar Cells by Ultrabroadband Femtosecond Pump-Probe Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chen; Wu, Kaung-Hsiung; Li, Jia-Xing; Yabushita, Atsushi; Tang, Shih-Han; Luo, Chih Wei; Juang, Jenh-Yih; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-12-18

    In this work, we demonstrated a viable experimental scheme for in-situ probing the effects of Au nanoparticles (NPs) incorporation on plasmonic energy transfer in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells by elaborately analyzing the lifetimes and zero moment for hot carrier relaxation with ultrabroadband femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The signals of enhanced photobleach (PB) and waned photoinduced absorption (PIA) attributable to surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of Au NPs were in-situ probed in transient differential absorption spectra. The results suggested that substantial carriers can be excited from ground state to lower excitation energy levels, which can reach thermalization much faster with the existence of SPR. Thus, direct electron transfer (DET) could be implemented to enhance the photocurrent of CIGS solar cells. Furthermore, based on the extracted hot carrier lifetimes, it was confirmed that the improved electrical transport might have been resulted primarily from the reduction in the surface recombination of photoinduced carriers through enhanced local electromagnetic field (LEMF). Finally, theoretical calculation for resonant energy transfer (RET)-induced enhancement in the probability of exciting electron-hole pairs was conducted and the results agreed well with the enhanced PB peak of transient differential absorption in plasmonic CIGS film. These results indicate that plasmonic energy transfer is a viable approach to boost high-efficiency CIGS solar cells.

  18. Charge-carrier dynamics in polycrystalline thin-film CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} photovoltaic devices after pulsed laser excitation: Interface and space-charge region analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuciauskas, Darius; Li, Jian V.; Kanevce, Ana; Guthrey, Harvey; Contreras, Miguel; Pankow, Joel; Dippo, Pat; Ramanathan, Kannan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 (United States)

    2015-05-14

    We used time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy to analyze time-domain and spectral-domain charge-carrier dynamics in CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) devices. This new approach allowed detailed characterization for the CIGS/CdS buffer interface and for the space-charge region. We find that dynamics at the interface is dominated by diffusion, where the diffusion rate is several times greater than the thermionic emission or interface recombination rate. In the space-charge region, the electric field of the pn junction has the largest effect on the carrier dynamics. Based on the minority-carrier (electron) drift-rate dependence on the electric field strength, we estimated drift mobility in compensated CuIn{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (with x ≈ 0.3) as 22 ± 2 cm{sup 2}(Vs){sup −1}. Analysis developed in this study could be applied to evaluate interface and junction properties of PV and other electronic devices. For CIGS PV devices, TRPL spectroscopy could contribute to understanding effects due to absorber compositional grading, which is one of the focus areas in developing record-efficiency CIGS solar cells.

  19. High-throughput combinatorial chemical bath deposition: The case of doping Cu (In, Ga) Se film with antimony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zongkai; Zhang, Xiaokun; Li, Guang; Cui, Yuxing; Jiang, Zhaolian; Liu, Wen; Peng, Zhi; Xiang, Yong

    2018-01-01

    The conventional methods for designing and preparing thin film based on wet process remain a challenge due to disadvantages such as time-consuming and ineffective, which hinders the development of novel materials. Herein, we present a high-throughput combinatorial technique for continuous thin film preparation relied on chemical bath deposition (CBD). The method is ideally used to prepare high-throughput combinatorial material library with low decomposition temperatures and high water- or oxygen-sensitivity at relatively high-temperature. To check this system, a Cu(In, Ga)Se (CIGS) thin films library doped with 0-19.04 at.% of antimony (Sb) was taken as an example to evaluate the regulation of varying Sb doping concentration on the grain growth, structure, morphology and electrical properties of CIGS thin film systemically. Combined with the Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), automated X-ray Diffraction (XRD) for rapid screening and Localized Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (LEIS), it was confirmed that this combinatorial high-throughput system could be used to identify the composition with the optimal grain orientation growth, microstructure and electrical properties systematically, through accurately monitoring the doping content and material composition. According to the characterization results, a Sb2Se3 quasi-liquid phase promoted CIGS film-growth model has been put forward. In addition to CIGS thin film reported here, the combinatorial CBD also could be applied to the high-throughput screening of other sulfide thin film material systems.

  20. Cytotoxicity of semiconductor nanoparticles in A549 cells is attributable to their intrinsic oxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escamilla-Rivera, Vicente; Uribe-Ramirez, Marisela [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV-IPN), Departamento de Toxicología (Mexico); Gonzalez-Pozos, Sirenia [CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad de Microscopia Electrónica (LaNSE) (Mexico); Velumani, Subramaniam [CINVESTAV-IPN, Departamento de Ingeniería Eléctrica (Mexico); Arreola-Mendoza, Laura [Centro Interdisciplinario de Investigaciones y Estudios sobre Medio Ambiente y Desarrollo del Instituto Politécnico Nacional (CIIEMAD-IPN), Departamento de Biociencias e Ingeniería (Mexico); Vizcaya-Ruiz, Andrea De, E-mail: avizcaya@cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV-IPN), Departamento de Toxicología (Mexico)

    2016-04-15

    Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanoparticles (NP) are next generation semiconductors used in photovoltaic cells (PV). They possess high quantum efficiency, absorption coefficient, and cheaper manufacturing costs compared to silicon. Due to their potential for an industrial development and the lack of information about the risk associated in their use, we investigated the influence of the physicochemical characteristics of CIGS (9 nm) and CdS (20 nm) in relation to the induction of cytotoxicity in human alveolar A549 cells through ROS generation and mitochondrial dysfunction. CIGS induced cytotoxicity in a dose dependent manner in lower concentrations than CdS; both NP were able to induce ROS in A549. Moreover, CIGS interact directly with mitochondria inducing depolarization that leads to the induction of apoptosis compared to CdS. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytotoxicity, suggesting ROS generation as the main cytotoxic mechanism. These results demonstrate that semiconductor characteristics of NP are crucial for the type and intensity of the cytotoxic effects. Our work provides relevant information that may help guide the production of a safer NP-based PV technologies, and would be a valuable resource on future risk assessment for a safer use of nanotechnology in the development of clean sources of renewable energy.

  1. Boron Doped diamond films as electron donors in photovoltaics: An X-ray absorption and hard X-ray photoemission study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapilashrami, M.; Zegkinoglou, I.; Conti, G.; Nemšák, S.; Conlon, C. S.; Fadley, C. S.; Törndahl, T.; Fjällström, V.; Lischner, J.; Louie, Steven G.; Hamers, R. J.; Zhang, L.; Guo, J.-H.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films are investigated for their potential as transparent electron donors in solar cells. Specifically, the valence band offset between a diamond film (as electron donor) and Cu(In,Ga)Se 2 (CIGS) as light absorber is determined by a combination of soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which is more depth-penetrating than standard soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, a theoretical analysis of the valence band is performed, based on GW quasiparticle band calculations. The valence band offset is found to be small: VBO = VBM CIGS – VBM diamond  = 0.3 eV ± 0.1 eV at the CIGS/Diamond interface and 0.0 eV ± 0.1 eV from CIGS to bulk diamond. These results provide a promising starting point for optimizing the band offset by choosing absorber materials with a slightly lower valence band maximum.

  2. Fragmentation based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Gaining the understanding of mobile agent architecture and the security concerns, in this paper, we proposed a security protocol which addresses security with mitigated computational cost. The protocol is a combination of self decryption, co-operation and obfuscation technique. To circumvent the risk of malicious code execution in attacking environment, we have proposed fragmentation based encryption technique. Our encryption technique suits the general mobile agent size and provides hard and thorny obfuscation increasing attacker’s challenge on the same plane providing better performance with respect to computational cost as compared to existing AES encryption.

  3. 20% Efficient Zn0.9Mg0.1O:Al/Zn0.8Mg0.2O/Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 Solar Cell Prepared by All-Dry Process through a Combination of Heat-Light-Soaking and Light-Soaking Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantana, Jakapan; Kato, Takuya; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Minemoto, Takashi

    2018-04-04

    Development of Cd-free Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se) 2 (CIGSSe)-based thin-film solar cells fabricated by an all-dry process is intriguing to minimize optical loss at a wavelength shorter than 520 nm owing to absorption of the CdS buffer layer and to be easily integrated into an in-line process for cost reduction. Cd-free CIGSSe solar cells are therefore prepared by the all-dry process with a structure of Zn 0.9 Mg 0.1 O:Al/Zn 0.8 Mg 0.2 O/CIGSSe/Mo/glass. It is demonstrated that Zn 0.8 Mg 0.2 O and Zn 0.9 Mg 0.1 O:Al are appropriate as buffer and transparent conductive oxide layers with large optical band gap energy values of 3.75 and 3.80 eV, respectively. The conversion efficiency (η) of the Cd-free CIGSSe solar cell without K-treatment is consequently increased to 18.1%. To further increase the η, the Cd-free CIGSSe solar cell with K-treatment is next fabricated and followed by posttreatment called the heat-light-soaking (HLS) + light-soaking (LS) process, including HLS at 110 °C followed by LS under AM 1.5G illumination. It is disclosed that the HLS + LS process gives rise to not only the enhancement of carrier density but also the decrease in the carrier recombination rate at the buffer/absorber interface. Ultimately, the η of the Cd-free CIGSSe solar cell with K-treatment prepared by the all-dry process is enhanced to the level of 20.0%.

  4. Nanosolar: Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sager, Brian [Nanosolar, Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)

    2012-05-31

    Nanosolar has developed proprietary technology based on Copper-Indium-Gallium-diSelenide (CIGS) absorber technology that allows the printing of this semiconductor material using a high-speed, high-throughput roll-to-roll manufacturing process. A central challenge in cost-effectively constructing a large-area CIGS-based solar cell or module is that the elements of the CIGS layer must be within a narrow stoichiometric ratio on nano-, meso-, and macroscopic length scale in all three dimensions in order for the resulting cell or module to be highly efficient. Achieving precise stoichiometric composition over relatively large substrate areas is however difficult using traditional vacuum-based deposition processes. For example, it is difficult to uniformly deposit compounds and/or alloys containing more than one element by sputtering or evaporation. Both techniques rely on deposition approaches that are limited to line-of-sight and limited-area sources, tending to result in poor surface coverage. Line-of-sight trajectories and limited-area sources can result in non-uniform three-dimensional distribution of the elements in all three dimensions and/or poor film-thickness uniformity over large areas. These non-uniformities can occur over the nano-, meso-, and/or macroscopic scales. Such non-uniformity also alters the local stoichiometric ratios of the absorber layer, decreasing the potential power conversion efficiency of the complete cell or module. Nanosolar has overcome these challenges by printing nanoparticulate CIGS precursor materials onto low-cost metal foil substrates, and performing a rapid thermal processing to convert the nanoparticulate coating into a CIGS absorber layer By locking in the appropriate stochiometry into the nanoparticulate precursor material, spatial uniformity is ensured in the coated layers, while printing at high speed and throughput minimizes solar cell cost.

  5. Intermixing at the absorber-buffer layer interface in thin-film solar cells: The electronic effects of point defects in Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(Se,S){sub 4} devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, J. B.; Lordi, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-08-14

    We investigate point defects in the buffer layers CdS and ZnS that may arise from intermixing with Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGS) or Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} (CZTS) absorber layers in thin-film photovoltaics. Using hybrid functional calculations, we characterize the electrical and optical behavior of Cu, In, Ga, Se, Sn, Zn, Na, and K impurities in the buffer. We find that In and Ga substituted on the cation site act as shallow donors in CdS and tend to enhance the prevailing n-type conductivity at the interface facilitated by Cd incorporation in CIGS, whereas they are deep donors in ZnS and will be less effective dopants. Substitutional In and Ga can favorably form complexes with cation vacancies (A-centers) which may contribute to the “red kink” effect observed in some CIGS-based devices. For CZTS absorbers, we find that Zn and Sn defects substituting on the buffer cation site are electrically inactive in n-type buffers and will not supplement the donor doping at the interface as in CIGS/CdS or ZnS devices. Sn may also preferentially incorporate on the S site as a deep acceptor in n-type ZnS, which suggests possible concerns with absorber-related interfacial compensation in CZTS devices with ZnS-derived buffers. Cu, Na, and K impurities are found to all have the same qualitative behavior, most favorably acting as compensating acceptors when substituting on the cation site. Our results suggest one beneficial role of K and Na incorporation in CIGS or CZTS devices is the partial passivation of vacancy-related centers in CdS and ZnS buffers, rendering them less effective interfacial hole traps and recombination centers.

  6. Analysis of the process of representing clinical statements for decision-support applications: a comparison of openEHR archetypes and HL7 virtual medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ferrer, A; Peleg, M; Marcos, M; Maldonado, J A

    2016-07-01

    Delivering patient-specific decision-support based on computer-interpretable guidelines (CIGs) requires mapping CIG clinical statements (data items, clinical recommendations) into patients' data. This is most effectively done via intermediate data schemas, which enable querying the data according to the semantics of a shared standard intermediate schema. This study aims to evaluate the use of HL7 virtual medical record (vMR) and openEHR archetypes as intermediate schemas for capturing clinical statements from CIGs that are mappable to electronic health records (EHRs) containing patient data and patient-specific recommendations. Using qualitative research methods, we analyzed the encoding of ten representative clinical statements taken from two CIGs used in real decision-support systems into two health information models (openEHR archetypes and HL7 vMR instances) by four experienced informaticians. Discussion among the modelers about each case study example greatly increased our understanding of the capabilities of these standards, which we share in this educational paper. Differing in content and structure, the openEHR archetypes were found to contain a greater level of representational detail and structure while the vMR representations took fewer steps to complete. The use of openEHR in the encoding of CIG clinical statements could potentially facilitate applications other than decision-support, including intelligent data analysis and integration of additional properties of data items from existing EHRs. On the other hand, due to their smaller size and fewer details, the use of vMR potentially supports quicker mapping of EHR data into clinical statements.

  7. Fuzzy knowledge bases integration based on ontology

    OpenAIRE

    Ternovoy, Maksym; Shtogrina, Olena

    2012-01-01

    the paper describes the approach for fuzzy knowledge bases integration with the usage of ontology. This approach is based on metadata-base usage for integration of different knowledge bases with common ontology. The design process of metadata-base is described.

  8. Foundation: Transforming data bases into knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, R. B.; Carnes, James R.; Cutts, Dannie E.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to transforming information stored in relational data bases into knowledge based representations and back again is described. This system, called Foundation, allows knowledge bases to take advantage of vast amounts of pre-existing data. A benefit of this approach is inspection, and even population, of data bases through an intelligent knowledge-based front-end.

  9. First principles based multiparadigm modeling of electronic structures and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai

    Electronic structures and dynamics are the key to linking the material composition and structure to functionality and performance. An essential issue in developing semiconductor devices for photovoltaics is to design materials with optimal band gaps and relative positioning of band levels. Approximate DFT methods have been justified to predict band gaps from KS/GKS eigenvalues, but the accuracy is decisively dependent on the choice of XC functionals. We show here for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2, the parent compounds of the promising CIGS solar cells, conventional LDA and GGA obtain gaps of 0.0-0.01 and 0.02-0.24 eV (versus experimental values of 1.04 and 1.67 eV), while the historically first global hybrid functional, B3PW91, is surprisingly the best, with band gaps of 1.07 and 1.58 eV. Furthermore, we show that for 27 related binary and ternary semiconductors, B3PW91 predicts gaps with a MAD of only 0.09 eV, which is substantially better than all modern hybrid functionals, including B3LYP (MAD of 0.19 eV) and screened hybrid functional HSE06 (MAD of 0.18 eV). The laboratory performance of CIGS solar cells (> 20% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic devices. However, there remains little understanding of how defects at the CIGS/CdS interface affect the band offsets and interfacial energies, and hence the performance of manufactured devices. To determine these relationships, we use the B3PW91 hybrid functional of DFT with the AEP method that we validate to provide very accurate descriptions of both band gaps and band offsets. This confirms the weak dependence of band offsets on surface orientation observed experimentally. We predict that the CBO of perfect CuInSe2/CdS interface is large, 0.79 eV, which would dramatically degrade performance. Moreover we show that band gap widening induced by Ga adjusts only the VBO, and we find that Cd impurities do not significantly affect the CBO. Thus we show that Cu vacancies at the interface play the key role in

  10. Paper based electronics platform

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna Mohammad; Sevilla, Galo Andres Torres; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    A flexible and non-functionalized low cost paper-based electronic system platform fabricated from common paper, such as paper based sensors, and methods of producing paper based sensors, and methods of sensing using the paper based sensors

  11. Solution-processed In2S3 buffer layer for chalcopyrite thin film solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Lan; Lin Xianzhong; Ennaoui Ahmed; Wolf Christian; Lux-Steiner Martha Ch.; Klenk Reiner

    2016-01-01

    We report a route to deposit In2S3 thin films from air-stable, low-cost molecular precursor inks for Cd-free buffer layers in chalcopyrite-based thin film solar cells. Different precursor compositions and processing conditions were studied to define a reproducible and robust process. By adjusting the ink properties, this method can be applied in different printing and coating techniques. Here we report on two techniques, namely spin-coating ...

  12. High efficiency thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (Germany). Solar Energy

    2012-11-01

    Production of photovoltaics is growing worldwide on a gigawatt scale. Among the thin film technologies, Cu(In,Ga)S,Se{sub 2} (CIS or CIGS) based solar cells have been the focus of more and more attention. This paper aims to analyze the success of CIGS based solar cells and the potential of this technology for future photovoltaics large-scale production. Specific material properties make CIS unique and allow the preparation of the material with a wide range of processing options. The huge potential lies in the possibility to take advantage of modern thin film processing equipment and combine it with very high efficiencies beyond 20% already achieved on the laboratory scale. A sustainable development of this technology could be realized by modifying the materials and replacing indium by abundant elements. (orig.)

  13. Regulation in the face of uncertainty: the evidence on electronic nicotine delivery systems (e-cigarettes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsalinos, Konstantinos E; Le Houezec, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is the largest single preventable cause of many chronic diseases and death. Effective treatments exist; however, few smokers use them and most try to quit by themselves. Most of the tobacco cigarette's toxicity is related to the combustion process. Models of harm reduction applied to tobacco suggest that switching from inhalation of combustible products to a noncombustible nicotine delivery product would likely result in a vast reduction in tobacco-related death and illness. Currently available evidence raises no doubt that electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) are by far less harmful than smoking (although probably not absolutely safe) and have the potential to be the most effective tobacco harm reduction products due to their unique property of resembling smoking and providing satisfaction to the user. A lot of controversy is surrounding e-cigs and their regulation, much of which is based on the precautionary principle. Although monitoring and further research is definitely needed, the arguments used to implement severe restrictions or bans are mostly hypothetical, weakly supported by evidence, and, in some cases, derived from mispresentation or misinterpretation of the study findings. Regulators should keep in mind that the target population is smokers who want to reduce or quit their deadly tobacco consumption. To achieve this goal, smokers should be honestly informed on the relative harmfulness of the different products. E-cigs are not tobacco products and are not used as medications. For this reason, a specific regulatory scheme is needed, separate from tobacco or medicinal products regulation. Regulation should implement specific quality criteria for products, rules for the exclusion of chemicals of reasonable concern, and appropriate testing for possible contaminants. Additionally, manufacturing standards derived from the food industry should be implemented and adjusted for specific conditions related to e-cigs. Finding the appropriate balance

  14. Thin-film photovoltaic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, R.N. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The high material and processing costs associated with single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon wafers that are commonly used in photovoltaic cells render these modules expensive. This presentation described thin-film solar cell technology as a promising alternative to silicon solar cell technology. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films along with copper, indium, gallium, and selenium (CIGS) thin films have become the leaders in this field. Their large optical absorption coefficient can be attributed to a direct energy gap that allows the use of thin layers (1-2 {mu}m) of active material. The efficiency of thin-film solar cell devices based on CIGS is 20 per cent, compared to 16.7 per cent for thin-film solar cell devices based on CdTe. IBM recently reported an efficiency of 9.7 per cent for a new type of inorganic thin-film solar cell based on a Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S, Se){sub 4} compound. The efficiency of an organic thin-film solar cell is 7.9 per cent. This presentation included a graph of PV device efficiencies and discussed technological advances in non-vacuum deposited, CIGS-based thin-film solar cells. 1 fig.

  15. E-Cigarette Awareness, Perceptions and Use among Community-Recruited Smokers in Hong Kong

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Man Ping; Li, William Ho Cheung; Jiang, Nan; Chu, Lai Yan; Kwong, Antonio; Lai, Vienna; Lam, Tai Hing

    2015-01-01

    Background Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are being increasingly used. We examined the correlates associated with e-cigarette awareness, use and perceived effectiveness in smoking cessation among Chinese daily smokers in Hong Kong. Methods Daily smokers (N = 1,307) were recruited to a community-based randomised controlled trial (?Quit to Win?) in 2014. Socio-demographic characteristics, conventional cigarette smoking status, nicotine addiction level, quit attempts, quit intention, e-cig...

  16. The physics data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gault, F.D.

    1984-01-01

    The physics data base is introduced along with its associated data base management system. The emphasis is on data and their use and a classification of data and of data bases is developed to distinguish compilation organizations. The characteristics of these organizations are examined briefly and the long term consequences of the physics data base discussed. (orig.)

  17. Solid Base Catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    The importance of solid base catalysts has come to be recognized for their environmentally benign qualities, and much significant progress has been made over the past two decades in catalytic materials and solid base-catalyzed reactions. The book is focused on the solid base. Because of the advantages over liquid bases, the use of solid base catalysts in organic synthesis is expanding. Solid bases are easier to dispose than liquid bases, separation and recovery of products, catalysts and solvents are less difficult, and they are non-corrosive. Furthermore, base-catalyzed reactions can be performed without using solvents and even in the gas phase, opening up more possibilities for discovering novel reaction systems. Using numerous examples, the present volume describes the remarkable role solid base catalysis can play, given the ever increasing worldwide importance of "green" chemistry. The reader will obtain an overall view of solid base catalysis and gain insight into the versatility of the reactions to whic...

  18. The development of hydrazine-processed Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bob, Brion; Lei, Bao; Chung, Choong-Heui; Yang, Wenbing; Hsu, Wan-Ching; Duan, Hsin-Sheng; Hou, William Wei-Jen; Li, Sheng-Han; Yang, Yang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    The hydrazine-based deposition of Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se){sub 2} (CIGS) thin films has attracted considerable attention in recent years due to its potential for the high-throughput production of photovoltaic devices based on this absorber material. This article provides an introduction as well as presenting a complete picture of the current status of hydrazine-based CIGS solar-cell fabrication, including the three major steps of this deposition process: dissolution of the precursor materials in hydrazine, deposition of a film from the resulting precursor solution, and the completion and characterization of a photovoltaic device following absorber deposition. Recent discoveries are then discussed, regarding the dissolution chemistry of the relevant precursor complexes in hydrazine, which together represent the true foundation of this processing method. Recent studies on CIGS film formation are then summarized, including the control and analysis of the crystalline phase, electronic bandgap, and film morphology. Finally, the latest progress in high-performance device fabrication is highlighted, with a focus on optoelectronic characterization including current-voltage, junction capacitance, and minority carrier lifetime measurements. Finally, a discussion and future outlook is provided. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Understanding the cell-to-module efficiency gap in Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 photovoltaics scale-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Veronica; Perez-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    2018-06-01

    Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) solar cells show record efficiencies comparable to those of crystalline Si-based technologies. Their industrial module production costs are also comparable to those of Si photovoltaics in spite of their much lower production volume. However, the competitiveness of CIGS is compromised by the difference in performance between cell and module scales, known as the cell-to-module efficiency gap, which is significantly higher than in competing industrial photovoltaic technologies. In this Review, we quantify the main cell-to-module efficiency loss mechanisms and discuss the various strategies explored in academia and industry to reduce the efficiency gap: new transparent conductive oxides, hybrid modularization approaches and the use of wide-bandgap solar absorbers in the 1.4-1.5 eV range. To implement these strategies, research gaps relating to various device layers need to be filled.

  20. Multilayer Transparent Top Electrode for Solution Processed Perovskite/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 Four Terminal Tandem Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang Michael; Chen, Qi; Hsieh, Yao-Tsung; Song, Tze-Bin; Marco, Nicholas De; Zhou, Huanping; Yang, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Halide perovskites (PVSK) have attracted much attention in recent years due to their high potential as a next generation solar cell material. To further improve perovskites progress toward a state-of-the-art technology, it is desirable to create a tandem structure in which perovskite may be stacked with a current prevailing solar cell such as silicon (Si) or Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIGS). The transparent top electrode is one of the key components as well as challenges to realize such tandem structure. Herein, we develop a multilayer transparent top electrode for perovskite photovoltaic devices delivering an 11.5% efficiency in top illumination mode. The transparent electrode is based on a dielectric/metal/dielectric structure, featuring an ultrathin gold seeded silver layer. A four terminal tandem solar cell employing solution processed CIGS and perovskite cells is also demonstrated with over 15% efficiency.

  1. Coherence measures in automatic time-migration velocity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Jonathas S; Costa, Jessé C; Schleicher, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Time-migration velocity analysis can be carried out automatically by evaluating the coherence of migrated seismic events in common-image gathers (CIGs). The performance of gradient methods for automatic time-migration velocity analysis depends on the coherence measures used as the objective function. We compare the results of four different coherence measures, being conventional semblance, differential semblance, an extended differential semblance using differences of more distant image traces and the product of the latter with conventional semblance. In our numerical experiments, the objective functions based on conventional semblance and on the product of conventional semblance with extended differential semblance provided the best velocity models, as evaluated by the flatness of the resulting CIGs. The method can be easily extended to anisotropic media. (paper)

  2. Materials availability for large-scale thin-film photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Bjoern A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss to what extent materials availability could restrain the expansion of PV systems based on CdTe, CIGS, aSiGe and nanocrystalline dye-sensitised cells. The investigated elements are cadmium, tellurium, indium, gallium, selenium, germanium and ruthenium. Materials requirement, annual availability and available stock of resources are assessed. The material constrained growth of installed capacity in the year 2020 is estimated at about 20 GWp/year for CdTe and dye-sensitise cells, 70 GWp/year for CIGS and 200 GWp/year for aSiGe. These potentials are reached through decreased materials requirement and increased materials availability. Metal prices are assumed to rise. With pessimistic assumptions, the potential decrease by one or two orders of magnitude. Implications for public policy and firm strategy are briefly discussed. (Author)

  3. Hybrid density functional theory study of Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 band structure for solar cell application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Dong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS alloy based thin film photovoltaic solar cells have attracted more and more attention due to its large optical absorption coefficient, long term stability, low cost and high efficiency. However, the previous theoretical investigation of this material with first principle calculation cannot fulfill the requirement of experimental development, especially the accurate description of band structure and density of states. In this work, we use first principle calculation based on hybrid density functional theory to investigate the feature of CIGS, with B3LYP applied in the CuIn1−xGaxSe2 stimulation of the band structure and density of states. We report the simulation of the lattice parameter, band gap and chemical composition. The band gaps of CuGaSe2, CuIn0.25Ga0.75Se2, CuIn0.5Ga0.5Se2, CuIn0.75Ga0.25Se2 and CuInSe2 are obtained as 1.568 eV, 1.445 eV, 1.416 eV, 1.275 eV and 1.205 eV according to our calculation, which agree well with the available experimental values. The band structure of CIGS is also in accordance with the current theory.

  4. Development of process technology for large-area thin-film solar modules based on compound semiconductors. Final report; Entwicklung der technologischen Grundlagen fuer grosse Photovoltaikmodule auf Basis von Duennschicht-Verbindungshalbleitern. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, H.; Lechner, P.; Geyer, R.; Ruebel, H.; Schade, H.; Psyk, W.; Frammelsberger, W.; Berthold, W.; Eichner, C.; Heckel, E.; Huber, R.; Labudde-Eibl, H.; Raith, S.; Schenk, B.; Ullrich, H.

    1998-06-01

    A cooperative effort of the Center for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research (ZSW) and Phototronics Solartechnik GmbH (PST) aimed at the transfer of highly efficient solar cells developed on a laboratory scale, to large-area thin-film solar modules suitable for production. This work was based on research and development at the Institute for Physical Electronics (IPE) of Stuttgart University and ZSW on one hand, and on the know-how of PST in regard to large-area module fabrication on the other hand. The various thin-film layers of the cells and modules comprize molybdenum as rear contact, copper-indium(gallium)-diselenide (CIGS) as absorber material, the combination of cadmium sulphide (CdS) and ZnO as window layer. To produce these layers on large areas (30x30 cm{sup 2}), equipment was constructed and procedures were developed. Monolithic series connection of cells, used in other thin-film technologies, was studied and optimized by suitable patterning procedures, such as laser-scribing, mechanical scribing or lift-off techniques. Central to the PST efforts was the large-area deposition of Mo followed by patterning for the monolithic series connection, and furthermore important contributions in regard to the ZnO window layer as well as aspects of the module technology. The latter include film removal along the module edges, contacting and cable attachment, lamination, module measurements and temperature/humidity tests. The main goal, namely the basic development of equipment and procedures to fabricate large-area (30x30 cm{sup 2}) modules with an efficiency of 10-12%, was reached (best module with 11.7% efficiency referenced to the aperature area). (orig.) [Deutsch] Um die im Labormassstab entwickelten hocheffizienten Solarzellen in industriell relevante grossflaechige Duennschichtmodule umzusetzen, arbeiteten das Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW) Baden-Wuerttemberg und die Phototronics Solartechnik GmbH (PST) zusammen. Ausgangsbasis waren

  5. Beyond Zero Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Daniel M., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Suggests that the most practical budgeting system for most managers is a formalized combination of incremental and zero-based analysis because little can be learned about most programs from an annual zero-based budget. (Author/IRT)

  6. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  7. Mobile Inquiry Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Specht, M. (2012, 8 November). Mobile Inquiry Based Learning. Presentation given at the Workshop "Mobile inquiry-based learning" at the Mobile Learning Day 2012 at the Fernuniversität Hagen, Hagen, Germany.

  8. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas; Castro, David; Foulds, Ian G.; Parameswaran, Ash M.; Sumanpreet, K. Chhina

    2013-01-01

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling

  9. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  10. The ground based plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents a report of ''The Ground Based Plan'' of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The ground based plan is a plan for research in astronomy and planetary science by ground based techniques. The contents of the report contains a description of:- the scientific objectives and technical requirements (the basis for the Plan), the present organisation and funding for the ground based programme, the Plan, the main scientific features and the further objectives of the Plan. (U.K.)

  11. Stolen Base Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting, the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The…

  12. Convergent Filter Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We are inspired by the work of Henri Cartan [16], Bourbaki [10] (TG. I Filtres and Claude Wagschal [34]. We define the base of filter, image filter, convergent filter bases, limit filter and the filter base of tails (fr: filtre des sections.

  13. Cholinesterase-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štěpánková, Šárka; Vorčáková, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Recently, cholinesterase-based biosensors are widely used for assaying anticholinergic compounds. Primarily biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening of inhibitors, such as organophosphates and carbamates. The present review is aimed at compilation of the most important facts about cholinesterase based biosensors, types of physico-chemical transduction, immobilization strategies and practical applications.

  14. Systematic ab initio study of half-Heusler materials for optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruhn, Thomas; Felser, Claudia [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The development of new, optimized optoelectronic devices depends crucially on the availability of semiconductors with taylored electronic and structural properties. At the moment, the majority of applications is based on a rather small set of semiconducting materials, while many more semiconductors exist in the huge class of ternary compounds. Especially, the class of 8-electron half-Heusler materials comprises a large number semiconducters with various properties. With the help of ab initio density functional theory we have studied essentially all 8-electron half-Heusler compounds that are of technological relevance. For more than 650 compounds we have determined the optimum configuration by varying the lattice constant and permuting the elements over the sublattices. Within this exceptionally large data set we have studied the band structure and the lattice constants as a function of the electronegativities of the elements, the arrangement of the atoms, and the atomic radii. The results are used to select suitable materials for the buffer layer in thin-film solar cells with a Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) absorber layer. Considering the bandgap and the geometrical matching with the CIGS film, we have obtained a set of 29 compounds that are promissing materials for cadmium-free CIGS buffer layer.

  15. Depth Profile of Impurity Phase in Wide-Bandgap Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2 Film Fabricated by Three-Stage Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenghao; Nazuka, Takehiro; Hagiya, Hideki; Takabayashi, Yutaro; Ishizuka, Shogo; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru; Islam, Muhammad M.; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Sakurai, Takeaki

    2018-02-01

    For copper indium gallium selenide [Cu(In1-x ,Ga x )Se2, CIGS]-based solar cells, defect states or impurity phase always form due to both the multinary compositions of CIGS film and the difficulty of controlling the growth process, especially for high Ga concentration. To further improve device performance, it is important to understand such formation of impurity phase or defect states during fabrication. In the work presented herein, the formation mechanism of impurity phase Cu2-δ Se and its depth profile in CIGS film with high Ga content, in particular CuGaSe2 (i.e., CGS), were investigated by applying different growth conditions (i.e., normal three-stage process and two-cycle three-stage process). The results suggest that impurity phase Cu2-δ Se is distributed nonuniformly in the film because of lack of Ga diffusion. The formed Cu2-δ Se can be removed by etching the as-deposited CGS film with bromine-methanol solution, resulting in improved device performance.

  16. Automated Testing Infrastructure and Result Comparison for Geodynamics Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heien, E. M.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    The geodynamics community uses a wide variety of codes on a wide variety of both software and hardware platforms to simulate geophysical phenomenon. These codes are generally variants of finite difference or finite element calculations involving Stokes flow or wave propagation. A significant problem is that codes of even low complexity will return different results depending on the platform due to slight differences in hardware, software, compiler, and libraries. Furthermore, changes to the codes during development may affect solutions in unexpected ways such that previously validated results are altered. The Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics (CIG) is funded by the NSF to enhance the capabilities of the geodynamics community through software development. CIG has recently done extensive work in setting up an automated testing and result validation system based on the BaTLab system developed at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. This system uses 16 variants of Linux and Mac platforms on both 32 and 64-bit processors to test several CIG codes, and has also recently been extended to support testing on the XSEDE TACC (Texas Advanced Computing Center) Stampede cluster. In this work we overview the system design and demonstrate how automated testing and validation occurs and results are reported. We also examine several results from the system from different codes and discuss how changes in compilers and libraries affect the results. Finally we detail some result comparison tools for different types of output (scalar fields, velocity fields, seismogram data), and discuss within what margins different results can be considered equivalent.

  17. ARAC terrain data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1982-11-01

    A terrain data base covering the continental United States at 500-meter resolution has been generated. Its function is to provide terrain data for input to mesoscale atmospheric models that are used as part of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL). The structure of the data base as it exists on the LLNL computer system is described. The data base has been written to tapes for transfer to other systems and the format of these tapes is also described

  18. Base Station Performance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Barbara; Farrell, Ronan

    2005-01-01

    At present the testing of power amplifiers within base station transmitters is limited to testing at component level as opposed to testing at the system level. While the detection of catastrophic failure is possible, that of performance degradation is not. This paper proposes a base station model with respect to transmitter output power with the aim of introducing system level monitoring of the power amplifier behaviour within the base station. Our model reflects the expe...

  19. Value-based pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Netseva-Porcheva Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of the paper is to present the value-based pricing. Therefore, the comparison between two approaches of pricing is made - cost-based pricing and value-based pricing. The 'Price sensitively meter' is presented. The other topic of the paper is the perceived value - meaning of the perceived value, the components of perceived value, the determination of perceived value and the increasing of perceived value. In addition, the best company strategies in matrix 'value-cost' are outlined. .

  20. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ...) to increase competitive advantage, innovation, and mission effectiveness. Network-based effectiveness occurs due to the influence of various factors such as people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  1. Case-based reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Kolodner, Janet

    1993-01-01

    Case-based reasoning is one of the fastest growing areas in the field of knowledge-based systems and this book, authored by a leader in the field, is the first comprehensive text on the subject. Case-based reasoning systems are systems that store information about situations in their memory. As new problems arise, similar situations are searched out to help solve these problems. Problems are understood and inferences are made by finding the closest cases in memory, comparing and contrasting the problem with those cases, making inferences based on those comparisons, and asking questions whe

  2. Strengths-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ledertoug, Mette Marie

    -being. The Ph.D.-project in Strength-based learning took place in a Danish school with 750 pupils age 6-16 and a similar school was functioning as a control group. The presentation will focus on both the aware-explore-apply processes and the practical implications for the schools involved, and on measurable......Strength-based learning - Children͛s Character Strengths as Means to their Learning Potential͛ is a Ph.D.-project aiming to create a strength-based mindset in school settings and at the same time introducing strength-based interventions as specific tools to improve both learning and well...

  3. Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Monitoring Knowledge Base (MKB) is a compilation of emissions measurement and monitoring techniques associated with air pollution control devices, industrial...

  4. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  5. Design and realization of transparent solar modules based on luminescent solar concentrators integrating nanostructured photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez‐Solano, Alberto; Delgado‐Sánchez, José‐Maria; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Miranda‐Muñoz, José M.; Lozano, Gabriel; Sancho, Diego; Sánchez‐Cortezón, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Herein, we present a prototype of a photovoltaic module that combines a luminescent solar concentrator integrating one‐dimensional photonic crystals and in‐plane CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells. Highly uniform and wide‐area nanostructured multilayers with photonic crystal properties were deposited by a cost‐efficient and scalable liquid processing amenable to large‐scale fabrication. Their role is to both maximize light absorption in the targeted spectral range, determined by the fluorophore employed, and minimize losses caused by emission at angles within the escape cone of the planar concentrator. From a structural perspective, the porous nature of the layers facilitates the integration with the thermoplastic polymers typically used to encapsulate and seal these modules. Judicious design of the module geometry, as well as of the optical properties of the dielectric mirrors employed, allows optimizing light guiding and hence photovoltaic performance while preserving a great deal of transparency. Optimized in‐plane designs like the one herein proposed are of relevance for building integrated photovoltaics, as ease of fabrication, long‐term stability and improved performance are simultaneously achieved. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27656090

  6. Design and realization of transparent solar modules based on luminescent solar concentrators integrating nanostructured photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Solano, Alberto; Delgado-Sánchez, José-Maria; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miranda-Muñoz, José M; Lozano, Gabriel; Sancho, Diego; Sánchez-Cortezón, Emilio; Míguez, Hernán

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we present a prototype of a photovoltaic module that combines a luminescent solar concentrator integrating one-dimensional photonic crystals and in-plane CuInGaSe 2 (CIGS) solar cells. Highly uniform and wide-area nanostructured multilayers with photonic crystal properties were deposited by a cost-efficient and scalable liquid processing amenable to large-scale fabrication. Their role is to both maximize light absorption in the targeted spectral range, determined by the fluorophore employed, and minimize losses caused by emission at angles within the escape cone of the planar concentrator. From a structural perspective, the porous nature of the layers facilitates the integration with the thermoplastic polymers typically used to encapsulate and seal these modules. Judicious design of the module geometry, as well as of the optical properties of the dielectric mirrors employed, allows optimizing light guiding and hence photovoltaic performance while preserving a great deal of transparency. Optimized in-plane designs like the one herein proposed are of relevance for building integrated photovoltaics, as ease of fabrication, long-term stability and improved performance are simultaneously achieved. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Game-Based Teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Thorkild

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines theoretical and empirical perspectives on how Game-Based Teaching can be integrated within the context of formal schooling. Initially, this is done by describing game scenarios as models for possible actions that need to be translated into curricular knowledge practices...... approaches to game-based teaching, which may or may not correspond with the pedagogical models of particular games....

  8. Secure base stations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Peter; Brusilovsky, Alec; McLellan, Rae; Mullender, Sape J.; Polakos, Paul

    2009-01-01

    With the introduction of the third generation (3G) Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) base station router (BSR) and fourth generation (4G) base stations, such as the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Long Term Evolution (LTE) Evolved Node B (eNB), it has become important to

  9. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y.; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a

  10. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  11. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  12. Zero-Based Budgeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichowski, Chester

    1979-01-01

    The zero-based budgeting approach is designed to achieve the greatest benefit with the fewest undesirable consequences. Seven basic steps make up the zero-based decision-making process: (1) identifying program goals, (2) classifying goals, (3) identifying resources, (4) reviewing consequences, (5) developing decision packages, (6) implementing a…

  13. Office-based anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    infection, and consistency in nursing personnel. In the USA 17 -. 24% of all elective ambulatory surgery is ... knowledge base or personality to deal with the OBA environment. Compared with hospitals, office-based facilities currently ... disease or major cardiovascular risk factors). Intravenous access via a flexible cannula is.

  14. Knowledge base mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, M; Furukawa, K; Makinouchi, A; Mizoguchi, T; Mizoguchi, F; Yamasaki, H

    1982-01-01

    One of the principal goals of the Fifth Generation Computer System Project for the coming decade is to develop a methodology for building knowledge information processing systems which will provide people with intelligent agents. The key notion of the fifth generation computer system is knowledge used for problem solving. In this paper the authors describe the plan of Randd on knowledge base mechanisms. A knowledge representation system is to be designed to support knowledge acquisition for the knowledge information processing systems. The system will include a knowledge representation language, a knowledge base editor and a debugger. It is also expected to perform as a kind of meta-inference system. In order to develop the large scale knowledge base systems, a knowledge base mechanism based on the relational model is to be studied in the earlier stage of the project. Distributed problem solving is also one of the main issues of the project. 19 references.

  15. Skull base tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Servico de Radiologia, Rua Professor Lima Basto, 1093 Lisboa Codex (Portugal)], E-mail: borgesalexandra@clix.pt

    2008-06-15

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  16. Evidence-based radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafslund, Bjorg; Clare, Judith; Graverholt, Birgitte; Wammen Nortvedt, Monica

    2008-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) offers the integration of the best research evidence with clinical knowledge and expertise and patient values. EBP is a well known term in health care. This paper discusses the implementation of EBP into radiography and introduces the term evidence-based radiography. Evidence-based radiography is radiography informed and based on the combination of clinical expertise and the best available research-based evidence, patient preferences and resources available. In Norway, EBP in radiography is being debated and radiographers are discussing the challenges of implementing EBP in both academic and clinical practice. This discussion paper explains why EBP needs to be a basis for a radiography curriculum and a part of radiographers' practice. We argue that Norwegian radiographers must increase participation in research and developing practice within their specific radiographic domain

  17. Skull base tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base

  18. Common-image gathers in the offset domain from reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge; Zhang, Minyu

    2014-01-01

    Kirchhoff migration is flexible to output common-image gathers (CIGs) in the offset domain by imaging data with different offsets separately. These CIGs supply important information for velocity model updates and amplitude-variation-with-offset (AVO

  19. Design-Based Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Karsten; Christensen, Ove; Petersen, Trine Brun

    2012-01-01

    I denne artikel introduceres Design Based Research for første gang på dansk i et videnskabeligt tidsskrift. Artiklen præsenterer de grundlæggende antagelser, som ligger til grund for Design Based Research-traditionen, og artiklen diskuterer de principper, som ligger til grund for gennemførelse af...... et DBR-forskningsprojekt. Med udgangspunkt i forsknings- og udviklingsprojektet ELYK: E-læring, Yderområder og Klyngedannelse, præsenteres den innovationsmodel, som projektet har udviklet med udgangspunkt i Design Based Research traditionen. ELYKs DBR innovationsmodel har vist sig effektiv i forhold...

  20. Nature-based integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitkänen, Kati; Oratuomi, Joose; Hellgren, Daniela

    Increased attention to, and careful planning of the integration of migrants into Nordic societies is ever more important. Nature based integration is a new solution to respond to this need. This report presents the results of a Nordic survey and workshop and illustrates current practices of nature...... based integration by case study descriptions from Denmark, Sweden Norway and Finland. Across Nordic countries several practical projects and initiatives have been launched to promote the benefits of nature in integration and there is also growing academic interest in the topic. Nordic countries have...... the potential of becoming real forerunners in nature based integration even at the global scale....

  1. Data base management study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  2. Value-based pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netseva-Porcheva Tatyana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the paper is to present the value-based pricing. Therefore, the comparison between two approaches of pricing is made - cost-based pricing and value-based pricing. The 'Price sensitively meter' is presented. The other topic of the paper is the perceived value - meaning of the perceived value, the components of perceived value, the determination of perceived value and the increasing of perceived value. In addition, the best company strategies in matrix 'value-cost' are outlined. .

  3. QuickBase

    CERN Document Server

    Conner, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Ready to put Intuit's QuickBase to work? Our new Missing Manual shows you how to capture, modify, share, and manage data and documents with this web-based data-sharing program quickly and easily. No longer do you have to coordinate your team through a blizzard of emails or play frustrating games of "guess which document is the right one."QuickBase saves your organization time and money, letting you manage and share the information that makes your business tick: sales figures, project timelines, drafts of documents, purchase or work requests--whatever information you need to keep business flowi

  4. Cheboygan Vessel Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Cheboygan Vessel Base (CVB), located in Cheboygan, Michigan, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). CVB was established by congressional...

  5. Hanscom Air Force Base

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MIT Lincoln Laboratory occupies 75 acres (20 acres of which are MIT property) on the eastern perimeter of Hanscom Air Force Base, which is at the nexus of Lexington,...

  6. Network-Based Effectiveness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friman, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ... (extended from Leavitt, 1965). This text identifies aspects of network-based effectiveness that can benefit from a better understanding of leadership and management development of people, procedures, technology, and organizations...

  7. WormBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible...

  8. Kelomehele preemia Baseli festivalil

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Baselis festivalil "VIPER - International Festival for Film Video and New Media" tunnistati parimaks CD-ROMiks Gustav Deutschi/Anna Schimeki "Odysee today", netiprojektiks itaallaste "01.ORG", äramärkimispreemia - Raivo Kelomehe "Videoweaver"

  9. Risk based modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, O.J.V.; Baker, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Risk based analysis is a tool becoming available to both engineers and managers to aid decision making concerning plant matters such as In-Service Inspection (ISI). In order to develop a risk based method, some form of Structural Reliability Risk Assessment (SRRA) needs to be performed to provide a probability of failure ranking for all sites around the plant. A Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) can then be carried out to combine these possible events with the capability of plant safety systems and procedures, to establish the consequences of failure for the sites. In this way the probability of failures are converted into a risk based ranking which can be used to assist the process of deciding which sites should be included in an ISI programme. This paper reviews the technique and typical results of a risk based ranking assessment carried out for nuclear power plant pipework. (author)

  10. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    , the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7...... model and in general problem based and project based learning. We apply the principle of teach as you preach. The poster aims to outline the visitors’ workshop programme showing the results of some recent evaluations.......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However...

  11. Biomimetics: nature based innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    "Based on the concept that nature offers numerous sources of inspiration for inventions related to mechanisms, materials, processes, and algorithms, this book covers the topic of biomimetics and the inspired innovation...

  12. BaseMap

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The goal of this project is to provide a convenient base map that can be used as a starting point for CA projects. It's simple, but designed to work at a number of...

  13. PHENANTHROLINE TEMPLATED SCHIFF BASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA in intercalative mode and in the development of unique chemotherapeutics where they impact on the ... between base pairs of DNA. .... h, i, j, k belong to fragmentation products of impap. ..... Sm(III) complex and herring sperm DNA. Bull.

  14. Lunar resource base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulley, John; Wise, Todd K.; Roy, Claude; Richter, Phil

    A lunar base that exploits local resources to enhance the productivity of a total SEI scenario is discussed. The goals were to emphasize lunar science and to land men on Mars in 2016 using significant amounts of lunar resources. It was assumed that propulsion was chemical and the surface power was non-nuclear. Three phases of the base build-up are outlined, the robotic emplacement of the first elements is detailed and a discussion of future options is included.

  15. Participatory design based research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dau, Susanne; Bach Jensen, Louise; Falk, Lars

    This poster reveal how participatory design based research by the use of a CoED inspired creative process can be used for designing solutions to problems regarding students study activities outside campus.......This poster reveal how participatory design based research by the use of a CoED inspired creative process can be used for designing solutions to problems regarding students study activities outside campus....

  16. Maintaining Relationship Based Procurement

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Alliance and relationship projects are increasingin number and represent a large pool of work. Tobe successful relationship style contracts dependon soft-dollar factors, particularly the participants'ability to work together within an agreedframework, generally they are not based on lowbid tendering. Participants should be prepared todo business in an open environment based ontrust and mutually agreed governance. Theresearch evaluates relationship maintenance inthe implementation phase of con...

  17. Game-based telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, B; Flynn, Sheryl M; Rizzo, A A

    2009-03-01

    This article summarizes the recent accomplishments and current challenges facing game-based virtual reality (VR) telerehabilitation. Specifically this article addresses accomplishments relative to realistic practice scenarios, part to whole practice, objective measurement of performance and progress, motivation, low cost, interaction devices and game design. Furthermore, a description of the current challenges facing game based telerehabilitation including the packaging, internet capabilities and access, data management, technical support, privacy protection, seizures, distance trials, scientific scrutiny and support from insurance companies.

  18. REST based mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  19. Swarm-based medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putora, Paul Martin; Oldenburg, Jan

    2013-09-19

    Occasionally, medical decisions have to be taken in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. Other sources can be drawn upon to fill in the gaps, including experience and intuition. Authorities or experts, with their knowledge and experience, may provide further input--known as "eminence-based medicine". Due to the Internet and digital media, interactions among physicians now take place at a higher rate than ever before. With the rising number of interconnected individuals and their communication capabilities, the medical community is obtaining the properties of a swarm. The way individual physicians act depends on other physicians; medical societies act based on their members. Swarm behavior might facilitate the generation and distribution of knowledge as an unconscious process. As such, "swarm-based medicine" may add a further source of information to the classical approaches of evidence- and eminence-based medicine. How to integrate swarm-based medicine into practice is left to the individual physician, but even this decision will be influenced by the swarm.

  20. Evidence-Based Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hartung, Thomas; Stephens, Martin

    Evidence-based toxicology (EBT) was introduced independently by two groups in 2005, in the context of toxicological risk assessment and causation as well as based on parallels between the evaluation of test methods in toxicology and evidence-based assessment of diagnostics tests in medicine. The role model of evidence-based medicine (EBM) motivated both proposals and guided the evolution of EBT, whereas especially systematic reviews and evidence quality assessment attract considerable attention in toxicology.Regarding test assessment, in the search of solutions for various problems related to validation, such as the imperfectness of the reference standard or the challenge to comprehensively evaluate tests, the field of Diagnostic Test Assessment (DTA) was identified as a potential resource. DTA being an EBM discipline, test method assessment/validation therefore became one of the main drivers spurring the development of EBT.In the context of pathway-based toxicology, EBT approaches, given their objectivity, transparency and consistency, have been proposed to be used for carrying out a (retrospective) mechanistic validation.In summary, implementation of more evidence-based approaches may provide the tools necessary to adapt the assessment/validation of toxicological test methods and testing strategies to face the challenges of toxicology in the twenty first century.

  1. LDEF materials data bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  2. Paper based electronics platform

    KAUST Repository

    Nassar, Joanna Mohammad

    2017-07-20

    A flexible and non-functionalized low cost paper-based electronic system platform fabricated from common paper, such as paper based sensors, and methods of producing paper based sensors, and methods of sensing using the paper based sensors are provided. A method of producing a paper based sensor can include the steps of: a) providing a conventional paper product to serve as a substrate for the sensor or as an active material for the sensor or both, the paper product not further treated or functionalized; and b) applying a sensing element to the paper substrate, the sensing element selected from the group consisting of a conductive material, the conductive material providing contacts and interconnects, sensitive material film that exhibits sensitivity to pH levels, a compressible and/or porous material disposed between a pair of opposed conductive elements, or a combination of two of more said sensing elements. The method of sensing can further include measuring, using the sensing element, a change in resistance, a change in voltage, a change in current, a change in capacitance, or a combination of any two or more thereof.

  3. Superresolution Imaging Using Resonant Multiples and Plane-wave Migration Velocity Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2017-08-28

    Seismic imaging is a technique that uses seismic echoes to map and detect underground geological structures. The conventional seismic image has the resolution limit of λ/2, where λ is the wavelength associated with the seismic waves propagating in the subsurface. To exceed this resolution limit, this thesis develops a new imaging method using resonant multiples, which produces superresolution images with twice or even more the spatial resolution compared to the conventional primary reflection image. A resonant multiple is defined as a seismic reflection that revisits the same subsurface location along coincident reflection raypath. This reverberated raypath is the reason for superresolution imaging because it increases the differences in reflection times associated with subtle changes in the spatial location of the reflector. For the practical implementation of superresolution imaging, I develop a post-stack migration technique that first enhances the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of resonant multiples by a moveout-correction stacking method, and then migrates the post-stacked resonant multiples with the associated Kirchhoff or wave-equation migration formula. I show with synthetic and field data examples that the first-order resonant multiple image has about twice the spatial resolution compared to the primary reflection image. Besides resolution, the correct estimate of the subsurface velocity is crucial for determining the correct depth of reflectors. Towards this goal, wave-equation migration velocity analysis (WEMVA) is an image-domain method which inverts for the velocity model that maximizes the similarity of common image gathers (CIGs). Conventional WEMVA based on subsurface-offset, angle domain or time-lag CIGs requires significant computational and memory resources because it computes higher dimensional migration images in the extended image domain. To mitigate this problem, I present a new WEMVA method using plane-wave CIGs. Plane-wave CIGs reduce the

  4. Layer-by-Layer Nanoassembly of Copper Indium Gallium Selenium Nanoparticle Films for Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of CIGS nanoparticles interdigited with polymers have been fabricated through a cost-effective nonvacuum film deposition process called layer-by-layer (LbL nanoassembly. CIGS nanoparticles synthesized by heating copper chloride, indium chloride, gallium chloride, and selenium in oleylamine were dispersed in water, and desired surface charges were obtained through pH regulation and by coating the particles with polystyrene sulfonate (PSS. Raising the pH of the nanoparticle dispersion reduced the zeta-potential from +61 mV at pH 7 to −51 mV at pH 10.5. Coating the CIGS nanoparticles with PSS (CIGS-PSS produced a stable dispersion in water with −56.9 mV zeta-potential. Thin films of oppositely charged CIGS nanoparticles (CIGS/CIGS, CIGS nanoparticles and PSS (CIGS/PSS, and PSS-coated CIGS nanoparticles and polyethylenimine (CIGS-PSS/PEI were constructed through the LbL nanoassembly. Film thickness and resistivity of each bilayer of the films were measured, and photoelectric properties of the films were studied for solar cell applications. Solar cell devices fabricated with a 219 nm CIGS film, when illuminated by 50 W light-source, produced 0.7 V open circuit voltage and 0.3 mA/cm2 short circuit current density.

  5. Gossip-Based Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Roy; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Miranda, Hugo; Rodrigues, Luís

    Gossip-based networking has emerged as a viable approach to disseminate information reliably and efficiently in large-scale systems. Initially introduced for database replication [222], the applicability of the approach extends much further now. For example, it has been applied for data aggregation [415], peer sampling [416] and publish/subscribe systems [845]. Gossip-based protocols rely on a periodic peer-wise exchange of information in wired systems. By changing the way each peer is selected for the gossip communication, and which data are exchanged and processed [451], gossip systems can be used to perform different distributed tasks, such as, among others: overlay maintenance, distributed computation, and information dissemination (a collection of papers on gossip can be found in [451]). In a wired setting, the peer sampling service, allowing for a random or specific peer selection, is often provided as an independent service, able to operate independently from other gossip-based services [416].

  6. Iron-based superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Peter D; Yin, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents an in-depth review of experimental and theoretical studies on the newly discovered Fe-based superconductors.  Following the Introduction, which places iron-based superconductors in the context of other unconventional superconductors, the book is divided into three sections covering sample growth, experimental characterization, and theoretical understanding.  To understand the complex structure-property relationships of these materials, results from a wide range of experimental techniques and theoretical approaches are described that probe the electronic and magnetic proper

  7. Evidence-Based Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    Systems development is replete with projects that represent substantial resource investments but result in systems that fail to meet users’ needs. Evidence-based development is an emerging idea intended to provide means for managing customer-vendor relationships and working systematically toward...... meeting customer needs. We are suggesting that the effects of the use of a system should play a prominent role in the contractual definition of IT projects and that contract fulfilment should be determined on the basis of evidence of these effects. Based on two ongoing studies of home-care management...

  8. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  9. Process-based costing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J; Forbes, Sarah; Redford, Linda; Swagerty, Daniel L; Taunton, Roma Lee

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how quality improvement affects costs is important. Unfortunately, low-cost, reliable ways of measuring direct costs are scarce. This article builds on the principles of process improvement to develop a costing strategy that meets both criteria. Process-based costing has 4 steps: developing a flowchart, estimating resource use, valuing resources, and calculating direct costs. To illustrate the technique, this article uses it to cost the care planning process in 3 long-term care facilities. We conclude that process-based costing is easy to implement; generates reliable, valid data; and allows nursing managers to assess the costs of new or modified processes.

  10. Inkjet-based micromanufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Korvink, Jan G; Shin, Dong-Youn; Brand, Oliver; Fedder, Gary K; Hierold, Christofer; Tabata, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet-based Micromanufacturing Inkjet technology goes way beyond putting ink on paper: it enables simpler, faster and more reliable manufacturing processes in the fields of micro- and nanotechnology. Modern inkjet heads are per se precision instruments that deposit droplets of fluids on a variety of surfaces in programmable, repeating patterns, allowing, after suitable modifications and adaptations, the manufacturing of devices such as thin-film transistors, polymer-based displays and photovoltaic elements. Moreover, inkjet technology facilitates the large-scale production of flexible RFID tr

  11. On multivariate Wilson bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bownik, Marcin; Jakobsen, Mads Sielemann; Lemvig, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    A Wilson system is a collection of finite linear combinations of time frequency shifts of a square integrable function. In this paper we give an account of the construction of bimodular Wilson bases in higher dimensions from Gabor frames of redundancy two.......A Wilson system is a collection of finite linear combinations of time frequency shifts of a square integrable function. In this paper we give an account of the construction of bimodular Wilson bases in higher dimensions from Gabor frames of redundancy two....

  12. Supramolecular fluorene based materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbel, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of noncovalent interactions in order to manipulate and control the self-assembly and morphology of electroactive fluorene-based materials. The supramolecular arrangement of p-conjugated polymers and oligomers can strongly influence their electronic and photophysical

  13. EPICS based DAQ system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Weixing; Chen Yongzhong; Zhou Weimin; Ye Kairong; Liu Dekang

    2002-01-01

    EPICS is the most popular developing platform to build control system and beam diagnostic system in modern physics experiment facilities. An EPICS based data acquisition system was built in Redhat 6.2 operation system. The system is successfully used in the beam position monitor mapping, it improves the mapping process a lot

  14. Scenario-based strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehr, Thomas; Lorenz, Ullrich; Willert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    -based efficacy and robustness. To facilitate the colla- borative strategizing in teams, we propose a matrix with robustness and efficacy as the two axes, which we call the Parmenides Matrix. We assess the impact of the novel approach by applying it in two cases, at a govern- mental agency (German Environmental...

  15. Dictionary Based Image Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Dahl, Vedrana Andersen

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method for weakly supervised segmentation of natural images, which may contain both textured or non-textured regions. Our texture representation is based on a dictionary of image patches. To divide an image into separated regions with similar texture we use an implicit level sets...

  16. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Sarfraz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  17. Surfel Based Geometry Resonstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vedrana; Aanæs, Henrik; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas

    2010-01-01

    We propose a method for retrieving a piecewise smooth surface from noisy data. In data acquired by a scanning process sampled points are almost never on the discontinuities making reconstruction of surfaces with sharp features difficult. Our method is based on a Markov Random Field (MRF) formulat...

  18. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  19. Evidence-based policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Nina Holm

    2013-01-01

    -makers and the research community (e.g. Boden & Epstein 2006; House of Commons 2006; Cartwright et al 2009; Rod 2010; Vohnsen 2011). This article intends to draw out some general pitfalls in the curious meeting of science and politics by focusing on a particular attempt to make evidence-based legislation in Denmark (for...

  20. Project-Based Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajcik, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Project-based science is an exciting way to teach science that aligns with the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"). By focusing on core ideas along with practices and crosscutting concepts, classrooms become learning environments where teachers and students engage in science by designing and carrying out…

  1. Financing Competency Based Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Annette

    Literature on the background, causes, and current prevalence of competency based programs is synthesized in this report. According to one analysis of the actual and probable costs of minimum competency testing, estimated costs for test development, test administration, bureaucratic structures, and remedial programs for students who cannot pass the…

  2. Computer Based Expert Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, James D.; Ferrara, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    Claims knowledge-based expert computer systems can meet needs of rural schools for affordable expert advice and support and will play an important role in the future of rural education. Describes potential applications in prediction, interpretation, diagnosis, remediation, planning, monitoring, and instruction. (NEC)

  3. Community-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Community-Based Care Basic Facts & Information A variety of healthcare options ... day care centers are either in churches or community centers. Adult day care is commonly used to care for people who ...

  4. Polymer based tunneling sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tianhong (Inventor); Wang, Jing (Inventor); Zhao, Yongjun (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a polymer based circuit by the following steps. A mold of a design is formed through a lithography process. The design is transferred to a polymer substrate through a hot embossing process. A metal layer is then deposited over at least part of said design and at least one electrical lead is connected to said metal layer.

  5. Evidence-based guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovira, Àlex; Wattjes, Mike P; Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    diagnosis in patients with MS. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the implementation of MRI of the brain and spinal cord in the diagnosis of patients who are suspected of having MS. These guidelines are based on an extensive review of the recent literature, as well as on the personal...

  6. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  7. Internet based benchmarking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogetoft, Peter; Nielsen, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the design of interactive, internet based benchmarking using parametric (statistical) as well as nonparametric (DEA) models. The user receives benchmarks and improvement potentials. The user is also given the possibility to search different efficiency frontiers and hereby to explore...

  8. Problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie; Kirschner, Paul A.; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Loyens, S. M. M., Kirschner, P. A., & Paas, F. (2011). Problem-based learning. In S. Graham (Editor-in-Chief), A. Bus, S. Major, & L. Swanson (Associate Editors), APA educational psychology handbook: Vol. 3. Application to learning and teaching (pp. 403-425). Washington, DC: American Psychological

  9. Base tree property

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, B.; Doucha, Michal; Hrušák, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2015), s. 69-81 ISSN 0167-8094 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : forcing * Boolean algebras * base tree Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.614, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11083-013-9316-2

  10. unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the effect of the substitutional groups of the Schiff base on the oxidation and reduction potentials, we used ... Electrochemistry of these complexes showed that the presence of electron .... a solution of the ligand (1 mmol) in methanol (15 mL).

  11. Home-based care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs. Patience Edoho Samson-Akpan

    study was to ascertain the relationship between home-based care and quality of life of PLWHA in support groups in. Calabar South Local Government Area. A correlational design was utilized and a purposive sample of 74 PLWHA participated in the study. A self developed and well validated questionnaire was used for data ...

  12. Mutually unbiased bases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutually unbiased bases play an important role in quantum cryptography [2] and in the optimal determination of the density operator of an ensemble [3,4]. A density operator ρ in N-dimensions depends on N2 1 real quantities. With the help of MUB's, any such density operator can be encoded, in an optimal way, in terms of ...

  13. Scenario-based strategizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehr, Thomas; Lorenz, Ullrich; Willert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    For over 40 years, scenarios have been promoted as a key technique for forming strategies in uncertain en- vironments. However, many challenges remain. In this article, we discuss a novel approach designed to increase the applicability of scenario-based strategizing in top management teams. Drawi...... Ministry) and a firm affected by disruptive change (Bosch, leading global supplier of technology and solutions)....

  14. 80537 based distance relay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Knud Ole Helgesen

    1999-01-01

    A method for implementing a digital distance relay in the power system is described.Instructions are given on how to program this relay on a 80537 based microcomputer system.The problem is used as a practical case study in the course 53113: Micocomputer applications in the power system.The relay...

  15. Mojave Base Station Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koscielski, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    A 12.2 meter diameter X-Y mount antenna was reconditioned for use by the crustal dynamic project as a fixed base station. System capabilities and characteristics and key performance parameters for subsystems are presented. The implementation is completed.

  16. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Martini, C.; Boumans, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce "rational consensus", that is, "mathematical aggregation", by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  17. Model-based consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the rational-consensus method is to produce “rational consensus”, that is, “mathematical aggregation”, by weighing the performance of each expert on the basis of his or her knowledge and ability to judge relevant uncertainties. The measurement of the performance of the experts is based on

  18. Animation-based Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vistisen, Peter

    This thesis is based on the results of a three-year long PhD-study at the Department of Communication and Psychology at Aalborg University. The thesis consist of five original papers, a book manuscript, as well as a linking text with the thesis’ research questions, research design, and summary...

  19. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature, a chirp in the local spatial frequency of interference fringes of an interference pattern is reduced by mathematical manipulation of the recorded light intensity...

  20. Performance based fault diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Different aspects of fault detection and fault isolation in closed-loop systems are considered. It is shown that using the standard setup known from feedback control, it is possible to formulate fault diagnosis problems based on a performance index in this general standard setup. It is also shown...

  1. Schiff base ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Low-temperature stoichiometric Schiff base reaction in air in 3 : 1 mole ratio between benz- aldehyde and triethylenetetramine (trien) in methanol yields a novel tetraaza µ-bis(bidentate) acyclic ligand L. It was .... electrochemical work was performed as reported in ..... change in ligand shape through change in oxidation.

  2. ISFET based enzyme sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, Bart H.; Bergveld, Piet

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews the results that have been reported on ISFET based enzyme sensors. The most important improvement that results from the application of ISFETs instead of glass membrane electrodes is in the method of fabrication. Problems with regard to the pH dependence of the response and the

  3. Microcontroller base process emulator

    OpenAIRE

    Jovrea Titus Claudiu

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a microcontroller base emulator for a conventional industrial process. The emulator is made with microcontroller and is used for testing and evaluating the performances of the industrial regulators. The parameters of the emulated process are fully customizable online and downloadable thru a serial communication from a personal computer.

  4. REST based service composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Ingstrup, Mads; Pløger, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing work developing and testing a Service Composition framework based upon the REST architecture named SECREST. A minimalistic approach have been favored instead of a creating a complete infrastructure. One focus has been on the system's interaction model. Indeed, an aim...

  5. Convolution based profile fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kern, A.; Coelho, A.A.; Cheary, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In convolution based profile fitting, profiles are generated by convoluting functions together to form the observed profile shape. For a convolution of 'n' functions this process can be written as, Y(2θ)=F 1 (2θ)x F 2 (2θ)x... x F i (2θ)x....xF n (2θ). In powder diffractometry the functions F i (2θ) can be interpreted as the aberration functions of the diffractometer, but in general any combination of appropriate functions for F i (2θ) may be used in this context. Most direct convolution fitting methods are restricted to combinations of F i (2θ) that can be convoluted analytically (e.g. GSAS) such as Lorentzians, Gaussians, the hat (impulse) function and the exponential function. However, software such as TOPAS is now available that can accurately convolute and refine a wide variety of profile shapes numerically, including user defined profiles, without the need to convolute analytically. Some of the most important advantages of modern convolution based profile fitting are: 1) virtually any peak shape and angle dependence can normally be described using minimal profile parameters in laboratory and synchrotron X-ray data as well as in CW and TOF neutron data. This is possible because numerical convolution and numerical differentiation is used within the refinement procedure so that a wide range of functions can easily be incorporated into the convolution equation; 2) it can use physically based diffractometer models by convoluting the instrument aberration functions. This can be done for most laboratory based X-ray powder diffractometer configurations including conventional divergent beam instruments, parallel beam instruments, and diffractometers used for asymmetric diffraction. It can also accommodate various optical elements (e.g. multilayers and monochromators) and detector systems (e.g. point and position sensitive detectors) and has already been applied to neutron powder diffraction systems (e.g. ANSTO) as well as synchrotron based

  6. Integrated Case Based and Rule Based Reasoning for Decision Support

    OpenAIRE

    Eshete, Azeb Bekele

    2009-01-01

    This project is a continuation of my specialization project which was focused on studying theoretical concepts related to case based reasoning method, rule based reasoning method and integration of them. The integration of rule-based and case-based reasoning methods has shown a substantial improvement with regards to performance over the individual methods. Verdande Technology As wants to try integrating the rule based reasoning method with an existing case based system. This project focu...

  7. Rock properties data base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, R.; Gorski, B.; Gyenge, M.

    1991-03-01

    As mining companies proceed deeper and into areas whose stability is threatened by high and complex stress fields, the science of rock mechanics becomes invaluable in designing underground mine strata control programs. CANMET's Mining Research Laboratories division has compiled a summary of pre- and post-failure mechanical properties of rock types which were tested to provide design data. The 'Rock Properties Data Base' presents the results of these tests, and includes many rock types typical of Canadian mine environments. The data base also contains 'm' and 's' values determined using Hoek and Brown's failure criteria for both pre- and post-failure conditions. 7 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs., 1 append.

  8. Sparse approximation with bases

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book systematically presents recent fundamental results on greedy approximation with respect to bases. Motivated by numerous applications, the last decade has seen great successes in studying nonlinear sparse approximation. Recent findings have established that greedy-type algorithms are suitable methods of nonlinear approximation in both sparse approximation with respect to bases and sparse approximation with respect to redundant systems. These insights, combined with some previous fundamental results, form the basis for constructing the theory of greedy approximation. Taking into account the theoretical and practical demand for this kind of theory, the book systematically elaborates a theoretical framework for greedy approximation and its applications.  The book addresses the needs of researchers working in numerical mathematics, harmonic analysis, and functional analysis. It quickly takes the reader from classical results to the latest frontier, but is written at the level of a graduate course and do...

  9. Problem Based Game Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    At Aalborg University’s department of Medialogy, we are utilizing the Problem Based Learning method to encourage students to solve game design problems by pushing the boundaries and designing innovative games. This paper is concerned with describing this method, how students employ it in various ...... projects and how they learn to analyse, design, and develop for innovation by using it. We will present various cases to exemplify the approach and focus on how the method engages students and aspires for innovation in digital entertainment and games.......At Aalborg University’s department of Medialogy, we are utilizing the Problem Based Learning method to encourage students to solve game design problems by pushing the boundaries and designing innovative games. This paper is concerned with describing this method, how students employ it in various...

  10. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... in the academic institutions. Thus, there is a need of comprehensive technology support system to cater the demands of all educational actors. Cloud Computing is one such comprehensive and user-friendly technology support environment that is the need of an hour. Cloud computing is the emerging technology that has...

  11. Knowledge based maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, A [Hamburgische Electacitaets-Werke AG Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The establishment of maintenance strategies is of crucial significance for the reliability of a plant and the economic efficiency of maintenance measures. Knowledge about the condition of components and plants from the technical and business management point of view therefore becomes one of the fundamental questions and the key to efficient management and maintenance. A new way to determine the maintenance strategy can be called: Knowledge Based Maintenance. A simple method for determining strategies while taking the technical condition of the components of the production process into account to the greatest possible degree which can be shown. A software with an algorithm for Knowledge Based Maintenance leads the user during complex work to the determination of maintenance strategies for this complex plant components. (orig.)

  12. Knowledge based maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, A. [Hamburgische Electacitaets-Werke AG Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The establishment of maintenance strategies is of crucial significance for the reliability of a plant and the economic efficiency of maintenance measures. Knowledge about the condition of components and plants from the technical and business management point of view therefore becomes one of the fundamental questions and the key to efficient management and maintenance. A new way to determine the maintenance strategy can be called: Knowledge Based Maintenance. A simple method for determining strategies while taking the technical condition of the components of the production process into account to the greatest possible degree which can be shown. A software with an algorithm for Knowledge Based Maintenance leads the user during complex work to the determination of maintenance strategies for this complex plant components. (orig.)

  13. Conducting Polymer Based Nanobiosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul Soon Park

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, conducting polymer (CP nanomaterials have been used in a variety of fields, such as in energy, environmental, and biomedical applications, owing to their outstanding chemical and physical properties compared to conventional metal materials. In particular, nanobiosensors based on CP nanomaterials exhibit excellent performance sensing target molecules. The performance of CP nanobiosensors varies based on their size, shape, conductivity, and morphology, among other characteristics. Therefore, in this review, we provide an overview of the techniques commonly used to fabricate novel CP nanomaterials and their biosensor applications, including aptasensors, field-effect transistor (FET biosensors, human sense mimicking biosensors, and immunoassays. We also discuss prospects for state-of-the-art nanobiosensors using CP nanomaterials by focusing on strategies to overcome the current limitations.

  14. Fusion safety data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laats, E.T.; Hardy, H.A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this Fusion Safety Data Base Program is to provide a repository of data for the design and development of safe commercial fusion reactors. The program is sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fusion Energy. The function of the program is to collect, examine, permanently store, and make available the safety data to the entire US magnetic-fusion energy community. The sources of data will include domestic and foreign fusion reactor safety-related research programs. Any participant in the DOE Program may use the Data Base Program from his terminal through user friendly dialog and can view the contents in the form of text, tables, graphs, or system diagrams

  15. Maintaining Relationship Based Procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Davis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alliance and relationship projects are increasingin number and represent a large pool of work. Tobe successful relationship style contracts dependon soft-dollar factors, particularly the participants'ability to work together within an agreedframework, generally they are not based on lowbid tendering. Participants should be prepared todo business in an open environment based ontrust and mutually agreed governance. Theresearch evaluates relationship maintenance inthe implementation phase of constructionalliances - a particular derivative of relationshipstyle contracts. To determine the factors thatcontribute to relationship maintenance forty-nineexperienced Australian alliance projectmanagers were interviewed. The main findingswere; the development of relationships early inthe project form building blocks of success fromwhich relationships are maintained and projectvalue added; quality facilitation plays animportant part in relationship maintenance and ahybrid organisation created as a result of alliancedevelopment overcomes destructiveorganisational boundaries. Relationshipmaintenance is integral to alliance project controland failure to formalise it and pay attention toprocess and past outcomes will undermine analliance project's potential for success.

  16. Location-based Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Christensen, Knud

    on the market. However, CPM is primarily an activity based method that takes the activity as the unit of focus and there is criticism raised, specifically in the case of construction projects, on the method for deficient management of construction work and continuous flow of resources. To seek solutions...... to the identified limitations of the CPM method, an alternative planning and scheduling methodology that includes locations is tested. Location-based Scheduling (LBS) implies a shift in focus, from primarily the activities to the flow of work through the various locations of the project, i.e. the building. LBS uses...... the graphical presentation technique of Line-of-balance, which is adapted for planning and management of work-flows that facilitates resources to perform their work without interruptions caused by other resources working with other activities in the same location. As such, LBS and Lean Construction share...

  17. Trajectory Based Traffic Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Andersen, Ove; Lewis-Kelham, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point-and-click a......We present the INTRA system for interactive path-based traffic analysis. The analyses are developed in collaboration with traffic researchers and provide novel insights into conditions such as congestion, travel-time, choice of route, and traffic-flow. INTRA supports interactive point......-and-click analysis, due to a novel and efficient indexing structure. With the web-site daisy.aau.dk/its/spqdemo/we will demonstrate several analyses, using a very large real-world data set consisting of 1.9 billion GPS records (1.5 million trajectories) recorded from more than 13000 vehicles, and touching most...

  18. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  19. Spintronics-based computing

    CERN Document Server

    Prenat, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to spintronics-based computing for the next generation of ultra-low power/highly reliable logic, which is widely considered a promising candidate to replace conventional, pure CMOS-based logic. It will cover aspects from device to system-level, including magnetic memory cells, device modeling, hybrid circuit structure, design methodology, CAD tools, and technological integration methods. This book is accessible to a variety of readers and little or no background in magnetism and spin electronics are required to understand its content.  The multidisciplinary team of expert authors from circuits, devices, computer architecture, CAD and system design reveal to readers the potential of spintronics nanodevices to reduce power consumption, improve reliability and enable new functionality.  .

  20. Knowledge Based Economy Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Madalina Cristina Tocan

    2012-01-01

    The importance of knowledge-based economy (KBE) in the XXI century is evident. In the article the reflection of knowledge on economy is analyzed. The main point is targeted to the analysis of characteristics of knowledge expression in economy and to the construction of structure of KBE expression. This allows understanding the mechanism of functioning of knowledge economy. The authors highlight the possibility to assess the penetration level of KBE which could manifest itself trough the exist...

  1. Luxury-based Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Shiro Kuwahara

    2006-01-01

    Assuming that there exists a preference for luxury goods and a knowledge spillover from luxury goods production to goods production, this paper constructs an endogenous economic growth model. The model predicts two steady states: one is a steady positive growth state with regard to luxury goods production, and the other is a zero growth state in the absence of luxury goods production. Thus, this study examines the polarization of economies based on luxury goods consumption

  2. Base Stability of Aminocyclopropeniums

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory Weapons and Materials Research Directorate (ATTN: RDRL-WMM-G) 2800 Powder...Mill Road Adelphi, MD 20783-1138 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-TR-8204 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...fuel cells to test their utility in anion exchange membranes. While the aminocyclopropeniums showed poor base stability, the cyclopropenium cation

  3. Granular loess classification based

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browzin, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses how loess might be identified by two index properties: the granulometric composition and the dry unit weight. These two indices are necessary but not always sufficient for identification of loess. On the basis of analyses of samples from three continents, it was concluded that the 0.01-0.5-mm fraction deserves the name loessial fraction. Based on the loessial fraction concept, a granulometric classification of loess is proposed. A triangular chart is used to classify loess

  4. Educational Process Material Base

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Ozerova; Irina Zabaturina; Vera Kuznetsova; Galina Kovaleva

    2012-01-01

    Based on the data obtained by the Institute for Statistical Studies and the Economics of Knowledge, National Research University - Higher School of Economics Olga Ozerova - Head of the Department for Statistics of Education, Institute for Statistical Studies and the Economics of Knowledge, National Research University - Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation. Email: Address: 18 Myasnitskaya St., Moscow, 101000, Russian Federation.Irina Zabaturina - senior resea...

  5. Supramolecular fluorene based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Abbel, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the use of noncovalent interactions in order to manipulate and control the self-assembly and morphology of electroactive fluorene-based materials. The supramolecular arrangement of p-conjugated polymers and oligomers can strongly influence their electronic and photophysical properties. Therefore, a detailed understanding of such organisation processes is essential for the optimisation of the performance of these materials as applied in optoelectronic devices. In order to...

  6. Graphene-based Nanoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Electrodes were fabricated by drop casting solutions containing the graphene oxide (GO)/CNT/MnAc materials onto titanium (Ti) or stainless steel current...silicon carbide (SiC) substrate can induce a splitting of up to 0.3 eV between the maximum of the valence and minimum of the conduction bands at the...simultaneously hinders the formation of multilayer graphene domains. These results are based on a diffusion-segregation model for carbon precipitation on a Ni

  7. Spiritual-based Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pruzan, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Although far from mainstream, the concept of spiritual-based leadership is emerging as an inclusive and yet highly personal approach to leadership that integrates a leader’s inner perspectives on identity, purpose, responsibility and success with her or his decisions and actions in the outer world...... of business—and therefore it is also emerging as a significant framework for understanding, practicing, communicating and teaching the art and profession of leadership....

  8. Arduino based laser control

    OpenAIRE

    Bernal Muñoz, Ferran

    2015-01-01

    ARDUINO is a vey usefull platform for prototypes. In this project ARDUINO will be used for controling a Semiconductor Tuneable Laser. [ANGLÈS] Diode laser for communications control based on an Arduino board. Temperature control implementation. Software and hardware protection for the laser implementation. [CASTELLÀ] Control de un láser de comunicaciones ópticas desde el ordenador utilizando una placa Arduino. Implementación de un control de temperatura y protección software y hardware ...

  9. Design bases - Concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Llanos Ros, M.

    1993-01-01

    The most suitable title for Section 2 is 'Design Bases', which covers not only calculation but also the following areas: - Structural design concepts. - Project criteria. - Material specifications. These concepts are developed in more detail in the following sections. The numbering in this document is neither complete nor hierarchical since, for easier cross referencing, it corresponds to the paragraphs of Eurocode 2 Part 1 (hereinafter 'EUR-2') which are commented on. (author)

  10. Biosphere data base revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Andersson, K.; Sundblad, B.

    1985-12-01

    The turnover of long-lived radionuclides in the biosphere has been modelled some time ago and the exposure to man was calculated. The nuclides were long-lived actinides and fission products leaking from a simulated deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel. The data base for these calculations has been updated in the present work and in addition a number of nuclides that were not included in the earlier work have been treated. (G.B.)

  11. Air Force Smart Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-19

    initiates notification to all personnel on the base, the giant voice announces a lock down, everyone’s smart device shows an alarm requesting...location of the detected sound, they easily find a hunter and send his picture back to the IOC, where the hunter’s identity is verified through facial...computer goes into sleep mode, the thermostat goes back to unoccupied mode and his door locks as he walks through. Meanwhile over in the IOC

  12. Polypeptide based hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Hanay, Saltuk

    2018-01-01

    There is a need for biocompatible, biodegradable, 3-D printable and stable hydrogels especially in the areas of tissue engineering, drug delivery, bio-sensing technologies and antimicrobial coatings. The main aim of this Ph.D. work was to fabricate polypeptide based hydrogel which may find a potential application in those fields. Focusing on tyrosine or tryptophan-containing copolypeptides prepared by NCarboxyanhydride (NCA) polymerizations, three different crosslinking strategies have been t...

  13. Knowledge-based utility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chwalowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    This presentation provides industry examples of successful marketing practices by companies facing deregulation and competition. The common thread through the examples is that long term survival of today's utility structure is dependent on the strategic role of knowledge. As opposed to regulated monopolies which usually own huge physical assets and have very little intelligence about their customers, unregulated enterprises tend to be knowledge-based, characterized by higher market value than book value. A knowledge-based enterprise gathers data, creates information and develops knowledge by leveraging it as a competitive weapon. It institutionalizes human knowledge as a corporate asset for use over and over again by the use of databases, computer networks, patents, billing, collection and customer services (BCCS), branded interfaces and management capabilities. Activities to become knowledge-based such as replacing inventory/fixed assets with information about material usage to reduce expenditure and achieve more efficient operations, and by focusing on integration and value-adding delivery capabilities, were reviewed

  14. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  15. As bases do petismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Samuels

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A partir dos dados do ESEB de 2002 o autor realiza um estudo das bases eleitorais do PT e de hipóteses sobre a natureza do petismo. Através de técnicas estatísticas multivariadas, são testadas relações do petismo com variáveis demográficas, socioeconômicas e variáveis relativas a questões políticas específicas. Os resultados apontam que apenas a escolaridade tem uma associação específica com o petismo, com implicações para o seu comportamento sócio-político.Based on the results of the 2002 Brazilian Electoral Study, the author analyses the electoral bases of the Worker´s Party and the factors associated with the "petismo". The relationships between the "petismo"and the socioeconomic, demographic and political variables are tested using multivariate analysis. The results indicate that the only "social category"associated with "petismo"is level of education, and it has clear implications to their social and political behavior.

  16. Value-based genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Pan, Kathy; Fakih, Marwan; Pal, Sumanta; Salgia, Ravi

    2018-03-20

    Advancements in next-generation sequencing have greatly enhanced the development of biomarker-driven cancer therapies. The affordability and availability of next-generation sequencers have allowed for the commercialization of next-generation sequencing platforms that have found widespread use for clinical-decision making and research purposes. Despite the greater availability of tumor molecular profiling by next-generation sequencing at our doorsteps, the achievement of value-based care, or improving patient outcomes while reducing overall costs or risks, in the era of precision oncology remains a looming challenge. In this review, we highlight available data through a pre-established and conceptualized framework for evaluating value-based medicine to assess the cost (efficiency), clinical benefit (effectiveness), and toxicity (safety) of genomic profiling in cancer care. We also provide perspectives on future directions of next-generation sequencing from targeted panels to whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing and describe potential strategies needed to attain value-based genomics.

  17. Exposure to electronic cigarettes impairs pulmonary anti-bacterial and anti-viral defenses in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Sussan

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7 x 10(11 free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections.

  18. Nanoplatform-based molecular imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    "Nanoplathform-Based Molecular Imaging provides rationale for using nanoparticle-based probes for molecular imaging, then discusses general strategies for this underutilized, yet promising, technology...

  19. Encapsulado de Embriones Somáticos y Embriones Cigóticos para Obtención de Semillas Artificiales de Raulí (Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl.) Oerst.)

    OpenAIRE

    Cartes R, Priscila; Castellanos B, Hermes; Ríos L, Darcy; Sáez C, Katia; Spierccolli H, Scarlette; Sánchez O, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Somatic and zygotic embryos from mature seeds of rauli-beech, Nothofagus alpina (Poepp. & Endl.) Oerst., were encapsulated in different artificial endosperms in order to generate a cover that fulfills the function of nourishment and protection of the embryos, facilitating their later germination. The content of sodium alginate varied by 4%, 3%, and 2%, as did the immersion time in calcium chloride (CaCl2), which acts as complexing agent. The artificial endosperm components of the Murashige an...

  20. Improving the efficiency of copper indium gallium (Di-)selenide (CIGS) solar cells through integration of a moth-eye textured resist with a refractive index similar to aluminum doped zinc oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoorn, M.M.A.; Kniknie, B.J.; Deelen, J. van; Xu, M.; Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Ee, R.J. van; Belt, R. van de; Buskens, P.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Textured transparent conductors are widely used in thin-film silicon solar cells. They lower the reflectivity at interfaces between different layers in the cell and/or cause an increase in the path length of photons in the Si absorber layer, which both result in an increase in the number of absorbed

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of a photovoltaic material based on CuIn0.5Ga0.5Se2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos Báez, Y. T.; Fuquen Peña, D. A.; Gómez-Cuaspud, J. A.; Vera-López, E.; Pineda-Triana, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The present work report, the synthesis and characterization of the CuIn0.5Ga0.5Se2 system (abbreviated CIGS), by the implementation of a hydrothermal route, in order to obtain a solid with appropriate properties in terms of surface, morphological and texture properties for potential applications in the design of photovoltaic cells. The synthesis was carried out using the corresponding stoichiometric quantities (Cu:In:Ga:Se 1:0.5:0.5:2), which were mixed in a Teflon vessel under stirring conditions. The homogeneous solution was treated in a steel autoclave at 300°C for 72 hours at the end of which the resulting material was characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Rietveld refinement. The results of the structural characterization allowed to confirm the obtaining of a chalcopyrite type structure, with a I-42 d (122) structure and cell parameters a=0.570, b=0.570, c=1.140nm, α=90, β=90, γ=90° oriented along (1 0 4) facet, detecting the presence of a secondary phases, related with CuInSe and CuIn metallic selenides, derived from synthesis process. The structural refinement allowing to validate the obtaining of a nanometric crystalline material (10-20nm) for potential applications in field of photovoltaic technology.

  2. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  3. Characteristics Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, E.D.; Moore, R.S. (Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Serial Numbers Database System (SNDB) contains detailed data about individual, historically discharged LWR spent fuel assemblies. This data includes the reactor where used, the year the assemblies were discharged, the pool where they are currently stored, assembly type, burnup, weight, enrichment, and an estimate of their radiological properties. This information is distributed on floppy disks to users in the nuclear industry to assist in planning for the permanent nuclear waste repository. This document describes the design and development of the SNDB. It provides a complete description of the file structures and an outline of the major code modules. It serves as a reference for a programmer maintaining the system, or for others interested in the technical detail of this database. This is the initial version of the SNDB. It contains historical data through December 31, 1987, obtained from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA obtains the data from the utility companies via the RW-859 Survey Form. It evaluates and standardizes the data and distributes the resulting batch level database as a large file on magnetic tape. The Characteristics Data Base obtains this database for use in the LWR Quantities Data Base. Additionally, the CDB obtains the individual assembly level detail from EIA for use in the SNDB. While the Quantities Data Base retains only the level of detail necessary for its reporting, the SNDB does retain and use the batch level data to assist in the identification of a particular assembly serial number. We expect to update the SNDB on an annual basis, as new historical data becomes available.

  4. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  5. Knowledge based Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heebøll, John

    This book is dedicated enterprising people with a technical or a scientific background who consider commercializing ideas and inventions within their field of expertise via a new business activity or a new company. It aims at distilling experiences from many successful and not so successful start......-up ventures from the Technical University of Denmark, 1988 – 2008 into practical, portable knowledge that can be used by future knowledge-based entrepreneurs to set up new companies efficiently or to stay away from it; to do what’s needed and avoid the pitfalls....

  6. Polymerization Using Phosphazene Bases

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2015-09-01

    In the recent rise of metal-free polymerization techniques, organic phosphazene superbases have shown their remarkable strength as promoter/catalyst for the anionic polymerization of various types of monomers. Generally, the complexation of phosphazene base with the counterion (proton or lithium cation) significantly improves the nucleophilicity of the initiator/chain end resulting in highly enhanced polymerization rates, as compared with conventional metalbased initiating systems. In this chapter, the general features of phosphazenepromoted/catalyzed polymerizations and the applications in macromolecular engineering (synthesis of functionalized polymers, block copolymers, and macromolecular architectures) are discussed with challenges and perspectives being pointed out.

  7. Web Based Customized Design

    OpenAIRE

    Moi, Morten Benestad

    2013-01-01

    This thesis studies the methods needed to create a web based application to remotely customize a CAD model. This includes customizing a CAD model by using a graphical user interface to be able to remotely control the inputs to- and outputs from the model in NX, and to get the result sent back to the user. Using CAD systems such as NX requires intensive training, is often a slow process and gives a lot of room for errors. An intuitive, simple user interface will eliminate the need for CAD trai...

  8. Location-based games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing-Duun, Stine

    In this dissertation, it is explored which prerequisites are necessary in location-based games (LBGs) to make meaningful the meeting between players and spatiality with an emphasis on physical locations. Throughout the dissertation, it has been shown that LBGs affect players’ perception of and be...... possible. The practical contribution is my creation of the LBG Visions of Sara. People continue to play this game in Odense more than two years after its launch, and DJEEO uses it as a showcase, enabling the company to sell similar LBGs....

  9. LIGHTWEIGHT CONCRETE BASED GRANSHLAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NETESA M. I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Concrete advisable to obtain a low strength with local secondary resources for recycling and reduce the environmental burden on the environment. But it is important to design such concrete compositions with a reduced flow of cement. It is known that the coefficient of efficiency of use of cement in the concrete of the heavy and B10 is less than about 0.5, which is almost two times smaller than in class B15 concrete and above. Even lower coefficient of efficiency in light concrete cement low strength. Therefore, it is important to find patterns determining the composition of lightweight concrete based on local-products industry with more efficient use of cement in them. Purpose.. Based on the analysis of earlier research results, including with the use of methods of mathematical planning of experiments to determine the concrete contents, which can provide the requirements for the underlying layers of the floor, the compressive strength of which should correspond to the class B5. It is important to provide the required strength at minimum flow of the cement, which is the most expensive and energy-intensive part of concrete. Conclusion. Analysis of the test results of control samples of concrete in 28-day-old, the following laws. The required tensile strength of concrete compressive strength of 7.0 MPa can be obtained in the test range when used in formulations as a filler as the Dnieper hydroelectric power station fly ash and tailings Krivoy Rog iron ore YuGOK. To ensure providing the required characteristic strength of the concrete in the underlying layers of the floor is advisable to use a nominal composition per cubic meter of concrete: cement 160 kg granshlaka Plant named after Petrovsky, 675 kg of fly ash Dnieper HPP 390 kg, 400 kg of sand, 230 liters of water. Thus, while ensuring rational grain composition components can obtain the desired strength lightweight concrete based granshlaka plant Petrovsky, using as fillers

  10. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M; Met, Ö; Svane, I M

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... to transiently affect in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  12. WAP - based telemedicine applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, K.; Zhang, Y.T.

    2001-01-01

    Telemedicine refers to the utilization of telecommunication technology for medical diagnosis, treatment, and patient care. Its aim is to provide expert-based health care to remote sites through telecommunication and information technologies. The significant advances in technologies have enabled the introduction of a broad range of telemedicine applications, which are supported by computer networks, wireless communication, and information superhighway. For example, some hospitals are using tele-radiology for remote consultation. Such a system includes medical imaging devices networked with computers and databases. Another growing area is patient monitoring, in which sensors are used to acquire biomedical signals, such as electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, and body temperature, from a remote patient, who could be in bed or moving freely. The signals are then relayed to remote systems for viewing and analysis. Telemedicine can be divided into two basic modes of operations: real-time mode, in which the patient data can be accessed remotely in real-time, and store-and-forward mode, in which the acquired data does not have to be accessed immediately. In the recent years, many parties have demonstrated various telemedicine applications based on the Internet and cellular phone as these two fields have been developing rapidly. A current, recognizable trend in telecommunication is the convergence of wireless communication and computer network technologies. This has been reflected in recently developed telemedicine systems. For example, in 1998 J. Reponen, et al. have demonstrated transmission and display of computerized tomography (CT) examinations using a remote portable computer wirelessly connected to a computer network through TCP/IP on a GSM cellular phone. Two years later, they carried out the same tests with a GSM-based wireless personal digital assistant (PDA). The WAP (Wireless Application Protocol) Forum was founded in 1997 to create a global protocol

  13. Mars base buildup scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacic, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station

  14. Agent-Based Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jędrzejowicz, Piotr; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of original research works by leading specialists focusing on novel and promising approaches in which the multi-agent system paradigm is used to support, enhance or replace traditional approaches to solving difficult optimization problems. The editors have invited several well-known specialists to present their solutions, tools, and models falling under the common denominator of the agent-based optimization. The book consists of eight chapters covering examples of application of the multi-agent paradigm and respective customized tools to solve  difficult optimization problems arising in different areas such as machine learning, scheduling, transportation and, more generally, distributed and cooperative problem solving.

  15. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    In a method for performing a refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid such as chemical composition or temperature by observing an apparent angular shift in an interference fringe pattern produced by back or forward scattering interferometry, ambiguities in the measurement caused...... by the apparent shift being consistent with one of a number of numerical possibilities for the real shift which differ by 2n are resolved by combining measurements performed on the same sample using light paths therethrough of differing lengths....

  16. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  17. Chitosan-based nanocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available , and hygiene devices. They thus represent a strong and emerging answer for improved and eco-friendly materials. This chapter reviews the recent developments in the area of chitosan-based nanocomposites, with a special emphasis on clay-containing nanocomposites...-sized mineral fillers like silica, talc, and clay are added to reduce the cost and improve chitosan’s performance in some way. However, the mechanical properties such as elongation at break and tensile strength of these composites decrease with the incorporation...

  18. Droplet based microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  19. DVD Based Electronic Pulser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Scott J.; Pratt, Rick M.; Hughes, Michael A.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Pitts, W K.; Robinson, Eric E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and testing of a DVD based electronic pulser system (DVDEPS). Such a device is used to generate pulse streams for simulation of both gamma and neutron detector systems. The DVDEPS reproduces a random pulse stream of a full HPGe spectrum as well as a digital pulse stream representing the output of a neutron multiplicity detector. The exchangeable DVD media contains over an hour of data for both detector systems and can contain an arbitrary gamma spectrum and neutron pulse stream. The data is written to the DVD using a desktop computer program from either actual or simulated spectra. The targeted use of the DVDEPS is authentication or validation of monitoring equipment for non-proliferation purposes, but it is also of general use whenever a complex data stream is required. The DVD based pulser combines the storage capacity and simplicity of DVD technology with commonly available electronic components to build a relatively inexpensive yet highly capable testing instrument

  20. Evidence-based surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Rems

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgery is setting a new ground by the reign of evidence that was brought up by the Evidence Based Medicine (EBM. While experiences and opinion of an expert count the least by the principles of EBM, randomized controlled trials (RCT and other comparative studies have gained their importance. Recommendations that were included in guidelines represent a demanding shift in surgeon’s professional thinking. Their thinking and classical education have not yet been completely based on the results of such studies and are still very very much master-pupil centred. Assessment of someone’s own experiences is threatened by objectivity as negative experiences get recorded in deeper memory. Randomized studies and meta-analyses do appear also in surgery. However, they demand an extra knowledge about critical assessment.Conclusions: Setting a patient to the foreground brings a surgeon’s decision to the field of EBM. The process has already begun and cannot be avoided. Decision hierarchy moves from the experience field to the evidence territory but to a lesser extent when compared to the rest of medicine. There exist objective restrictions with approving a new paradigm. However, these should not stop the process of EBM implementation. Finally, there is an ethic issue to be considered. Too slow activities in research, education and critical assessment can bring the surgeon to the position when a well-informed patient loses his/her trust.

  1. Microlaser-based displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstedt, Robert; Fink, Charles G.; Flint, Graham W.; Hargis, David E.; Peppler, Philipp W.

    1997-07-01

    Laser Power Corporation has developed a new type of projection display, based upon microlaser technology and a novel scan architecture, which provides the foundation for bright, extremely high resolution images. A review of projection technologies is presented along with the limitations of each and the difficulties they experience in trying to generate high resolution imagery. The design of the microlaser based projector is discussed along with the advantage of this technology. High power red, green, and blue microlasers have been designed and developed specifically for use in projection displays. These sources, in combination with high resolution, high contrast modulator, produce a 24 bit color gamut, capable of supporting the full range of real world colors. The new scan architecture, which reduces the modulation rate and scan speeds required, is described. This scan architecture, along with the inherent brightness of the laser provides the fundamentals necessary to produce a 5120 by 4096 resolution display. The brightness and color uniformity of the display is excellent, allowing for tiling of the displays with far fewer artifacts than those in a traditionally tiled display. Applications for the display include simulators, command and control centers, and electronic cinema.

  2. SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. CANAVAN

    2001-02-01

    Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

  3. Challenge Based Innovation gala

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Utriainen, Tuuli Maria; Toivonen, Harri; Nordberg, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Challenge Based Innovation gala   There’s a new experiment starting in CERN called IdeaLab where we work together with detector R&D researchers to help them to bridge their knowledge into a more human, societally oriented context. Currently we are located in B153, but will move our activities to a new facility next to the Globe in May 2014. One of our first pilot projects is a 5 month course CBI (Challenge Based Innovation) where two multidisciplinary student teams join forces with Edusafe & TALENT projects at CERN. Their goal is to discover what kind of tools for learning could be created in collaboration with the two groups. After months of user interviews and low resolution prototyping they are ready to share the results with us in the form of an afternoon gala. We warmly welcome you to join us to see the students' results and experience the prototypes they have conceived. The event is in three parts, you are welcome to visit all of them,...

  4. [Competence based medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabó, Jorge G; Buraschi, Jorge; Olcese, Juan; Buraschi, María; Duro, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The strategy of curriculum planning in the majority of the Schools of Medicine has shifted, in the past years, from curriculum models based in contents to outcome oriented curricula. Coincidently the interest in defining and evaluating the clinical competences that a graduate must have has grown. In our country, and particularly in the Associated Hospitals belonging to the Unidad Regional de Enseñanza IV of the UBA School of Medicine, evidence has been gathered showing that the acquisition of clinical competences during the grade is in general insufficient. The foundations and characteristics of PREM (Programa de Requisitos Esenciales Mínimos) are described. PREM is a tool to promote the apprenticeship of abilities and necessary skills for the practice of medicine. The objective of the program is to promote the apprenticeship of a well defined list of core competences considered indispensable for a general practitioner. An outcome oriented curriculum with a clear definition of the expected knowledge, skills and attitudes of a graduate of the programme, the promotion of learning experiences centered in the practice and evaluation tools based in direct observation of the student's performance should contribute to close the gap between what the Medicine Schools traditionally teach and evaluate, and what the doctor needs to know and needs to do to perform correctly its profession.

  5. Constraint-based reachability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Gotlieb

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Iterative imperative programs can be considered as infinite-state systems computing over possibly unbounded domains. Studying reachability in these systems is challenging as it requires to deal with an infinite number of states with standard backward or forward exploration strategies. An approach that we call Constraint-based reachability, is proposed to address reachability problems by exploring program states using a constraint model of the whole program. The keypoint of the approach is to interpret imperative constructions such as conditionals, loops, array and memory manipulations with the fundamental notion of constraint over a computational domain. By combining constraint filtering and abstraction techniques, Constraint-based reachability is able to solve reachability problems which are usually outside the scope of backward or forward exploration strategies. This paper proposes an interpretation of classical filtering consistencies used in Constraint Programming as abstract domain computations, and shows how this approach can be used to produce a constraint solver that efficiently generates solutions for reachability problems that are unsolvable by other approaches.

  6. Metasurface-Based Polarimeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The state of polarization (SOP is an inherent property of light that can be used to gain crucial information about the composition and structure of materials interrogated with light. However, the SOP is difficult to experimentally determine since it involves phase information between orthogonal polarization states, and is uncorrelated with the light intensity and frequency, which can be easily determined with photodetectors and spectrometers. Rapid progress on optical gradient metasurfaces has resulted in the development of conceptually new approaches to the SOP characterization. In this paper, we review the fundamentals of and recent developments within metasurface-based polarimeters. Starting by introducing the concepts of generalized Snell’s law and Stokes parameters, we explain the Pancharatnam–Berry phase (PB-phase which is instrumental for differentiating between orthogonal circular polarizations. Then we review the recent progress in metasurface-based polarimeters, including polarimeters, spectropolarimeters, orbital angular momentum (OAM spectropolarimeters, and photodetector integrated polarimeters. The review is ended with a short conclusion and perspective for future developments.

  7. Risk-based safety indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the following issues: The objectives of the risk-based indicator programme. The characteristics of the risk-based indicators. The objectives of risk-based safety indicators - in monitoring safety; in PSA applications. What indicators? How to produce the risk based indicators? PSA requirements

  8. MS Based Metabonomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Want, Elizabeth J.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2010-03-01

    Metabonomics is the latest and least mature of the systems biology triad, which also includes genomics and proteomics, and has its origins in the early orthomolecular medicine work pioneered by Linus Pauling and Arthur Robinson. It was defined by Nicholson and colleagues in 1999 as the quantitative measurement of perturbations in the metabolite complement of an integrated biological system in response to internal or external stimuli, and is often used today to describe many non-global types of metabolite analyses. Applications of metabonomics are extensive and include toxicology, nutrition, pharmaceutical research and development, physiological monitoring and disease diagnosis. For example, blood samples from millions of neonates are tested routinely by mass spectrometry (MS) as a diagnostic tool for inborn errors of metabolism. The metabonome encompasses a wide range of structurally diverse metabolites; therefore, no single analytical platform will be sufficient. Specialized sample preparation and detection techniques are required, and advances in NMR and MS technologies have led to enhanced metabonome coverage, which in turn demands improved data analysis approaches. The role of MS in metabonomics is still evolving as instrumentation and software becomes more sophisticated and as researchers realize the strengths and limitations of current technology. MS offers a wide dynamic range, high sensitivity, and reproducible, quantitative analysis. These attributes are essential for addressing the challenges of metabonomics, as the range of metabolite concentrations easily exceeds nine orders of magnitude in biofluids, and the diversity of molecular species ranges from simple amino and organic acids to lipids and complex carbohydrates. Additional challenges arise in generating a comprehensive metabolite profile, downstream data processing and analysis, and structural characterization of important metabolites. A typical workflow of MS-based metabonomics is shown in Figure

  9. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  10. Non-Toxic Buffer Layers in Flexible Cu(In,GaSe2 Photovoltaic Cell Applications with Optimized Absorber Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Asaduzzaman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorber layer thickness gradient in Cu(In1−xGaxSe2 (CIGS based solar cells and several substitutes for typical cadmium sulfide (CdS buffer layers, such as ZnS, ZnO, ZnS(O,OH, Zn1−xSnxOy (ZTO, ZnSe, and In2S3, have been analyzed by a device emulation program and tool (ADEPT 2.1 to determine optimum efficiency. As a reference type, the CIGS cell with CdS buffer provides a theoretical efficiency of 23.23% when the optimum absorber layer thickness was determined as 1.6 μm. It is also observed that this highly efficient CIGS cell would have an absorber layer thickness between 1 μm and 2 μm whereas the optimum buffer layer thickness would be within the range of 0.04–0.06 μm. Among all the cells with various buffer layers, the best energy conversion efficiency of 24.62% has been achieved for the ZnO buffer layer based cell. The simulation results with ZnS and ZnO based buffer layer materials instead of using CdS indicate that the cell performance would be better than that of the CdS buffer layer based cell. Although the cells with ZnS(O,OH, ZTO, ZnSe, and In2S3 buffer layers provide slightly lower efficiencies than that of the CdS buffer based cell, the use of these materials would not be deleterious for the environment because of their non-carcinogenic and non-toxic nature.

  11. Plasma based accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Allen [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    The concept of laser-induced plasma wakefields as a technique to accelerate charged particles was introduced 35 years ago as a means to go beyond the accelerating gradients possible with metallic cavities supporting radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Significant developments in laser technology have made possible the pulse intensity needed to realize this concept, and rapid progress is now underway in the realization of laser-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. It has also been realized that similar accelerating gradients can be produced by particle beams propagating in plasmas, and experimental programs have also been undertaken to study this possibility. Positive results have been achieved with electron-driven plasma wakefields, and a demonstration experiment with proton-driven wakefields is under construction at CERN. The concepts behind these different schemes and their pros and cons are described, as well as the experimental results achieved. An outlook for future practical uses of plasma based accelerators will also be given.

  12. Gossip-Based Broadcast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, João; Pereira, José; Rodrigues, Luís

    Gossip, or epidemic, protocols have emerged as a powerful strategy to implement highly scalable and resilient reliable broadcast primitives on large scale peer-to-peer networks. Epidemic protocols are scalable because they distribute the load among all nodes in the system and resilient because they have an intrinsic level of redundancy that masks node and network failures. This chapter provides an introduction to gossip-based broadcast on large-scale unstructured peer-to-peer overlay networks: it surveys the main results in the field, discusses techniques to build and maintain the overlays that support efficient dissemination strategies, and provides an in-depth discussion and experimental evaluation of two concrete protocols, named HyParView and Plumtree.

  13. Sensory bases of navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, J L

    1998-10-08

    Navigating animals need to know both the bearing of their goal (the 'map' step), and how to determine that direction (the 'compass' step). Compasses are typically arranged in hierarchies, with magnetic backup as a last resort when celestial information is unavailable. Magnetic information is often essential to calibrating celestial cues, though, and repeated recalibration between celestial and magnetic compasses is important in many species. Most magnetic compasses are based on magnetite crystals, but others make use of induction or paramagnetic interactions between short-wavelength light and visual pigments. Though odors may be used in some cases, most if not all long-range maps probably depend on magnetite. Magnetitebased map senses are used to measure only latitude in some species, but provide the distance and direction of the goal in others.

  14. Graphene based biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürel, Hikmet Hakan, E-mail: hhakan.gurel@kocaeli.edu.tr [Kocaeli University, Kocaeli (Turkey); Salmankurt, Bahadır [Sakarya University, Sakarya (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Nanometer-sized graphene as a 2D material has unique chemical and electronic properties. Because of its unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties, its interesting shape and size make it a promising nanomaterial in many biological applications. It is expected that biomaterials incorporating graphene will be developed for the graphene-based drug delivery systems and biomedical devices. The interactions of biomolecules and graphene are long-ranged and very weak. Development of new techniques is very desirable for design of bioelectronics sensors and devices. In this work, we present first-principles calculations within density functional theory to calculate effects of charging on nucleobases on graphene. It is shown that how modify structural and electronic properties of nucleobases on graphene by applied charging.

  15. Integrated data base program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notz, K.J.

    1981-01-01

    The IDB Program provides direct support to the DOE Nuclear Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Programs and their lead sites and support contractors by providing and maintaining a current, integrated data base of spent fuel and radioactive waste inventories and projections. All major waste types (HLW, TRU, and LLW) and sources (government, commerical fuel cycle, and I/I) are included. A major data compilation was issued in September, 1981: Spent Fuel and Radioactive Waste Inventories and Projections as of December 31, 1980, DOE/NE-0017. This report includes chapters on Spent Fuel, HLW, TRU Waste, LLW, Remedial Action Waste, Active Uranium Mill Tailings, and Airborne Waste, plus Appendices with more detailed data in selected areas such as isotopics, radioactivity, thermal power, projections, and land usage. The LLW sections include volumes, radioactivity, thermal power, current inventories, projected inventories and characteristics, source terms, land requirements, and a breakdown in terms of government/commercial and defense/fuel cycle/I and I

  16. Nickel base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, R.C.; Korenko, M.K.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel based alloy, the characteristic of which is that it mainly includes in percentages by weight: 57-63 Ni, 7-18 Cr, 10-20 Fe, 4-6 Mo, 1-2 Nb, 0.2-0.8 Si, 0.01-0.05 Zr, 1.0-2.5 Ti, 1.0-2.5 Al, 0.02-0.06 C and 0.002-0.015 B. The aim is to create new nickel-chromium alloys, hardened in a solid solution and by precipitation, that are stable, exhibit reduced swelling and resistant to plastic deformation inside the reactor. These alloys of the gamma prime type have improved mechanical strengthm swelling resistance, structural stability and welding properties compared with Inconel 625 [fr

  17. Rate based failure detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brett Emery Trabun; Gamage, Thoshitha Thanushka; Bakken, David Edward

    2018-01-02

    This disclosure describes, in part, a system management component and failure detection component for use in a power grid data network to identify anomalies within the network and systematically adjust the quality of service of data published by publishers and subscribed to by subscribers within the network. In one implementation, subscribers may identify a desired data rate, a minimum acceptable data rate, desired latency, minimum acceptable latency and a priority for each subscription. The failure detection component may identify an anomaly within the network and a source of the anomaly. Based on the identified anomaly, data rates and or data paths may be adjusted in real-time to ensure that the power grid data network does not become overloaded and/or fail.

  18. Behavior based safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudhikumaran, T.V.; Mehta, S.C.; Goyal, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    Behaviour Based Safety (popularly known as BBS) is a new methodology for achieving injury free work place and total Safety Culture. BBS is successfully being implemented and is being practiced as a work methodology for achieving a loss and injury free work environment and work practice. Through BBS, it was brought out that the root causes of all Industrial accidents some how originate from the 'at risk' behaviour of some individual or group of individuals at some level. The policy of NPCIL is to excel in the field of Industrial and Fire Safety in comparison to international standards. This article indents to bring out the various parameters helping in installing BBS programme at any plant. (author)

  19. Fuel cycle based safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Montmollin, J.M.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Gupta, D.

    1985-07-01

    In NPT safeguards the same model approach and absolute-quantity inspection goals are applied at present to all similar facilities, irrespective of the State's fuel cycle. There is a continuing interest and activity on the part of the IAEA in new NPT safeguards approaches that more directly address a State's nuclear activities as a whole. This fuel cycle based safeguards system is expected to a) provide a statement of findings for the entire State rather than only for individual facilities; b) allocate inspection efforts so as to reflect more realistically the different categories of nuclear materials in the different parts of the fuel cycle and c) provide more timely and better coordinated information on the inputs, outputs and inventories of nuclear materials in a State. (orig./RF) [de

  20. Bases para proyectiles dirigidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1959-03-01

    Full Text Available Aunque actualmente no se ha llegado a una línea general de métodos o sistemas que gobiernen un tipo característico de rampa y servicios auxiliares necesarios para el lanzamiento al espacio de proyectiles dirigidos a grandes alturas y distancias, las experiencias obtenidas en diferentes ensayos, utilizando distintos tipos de proyectiles y trayectorias balísticas, han sentado toda una serie de procedimientos, datos y conclusiones de gran valor balístico que, aun teniendo en cuenta la continua evolución del proyectil, sus formas, combustibles y alcances, se conocen ya, con bastante aproximación, las condiciones mínimas que ha de reunir una base dedicada a este tipo de lanzamientos.

  1. Situation based housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund Mortensen, Peder; Welling, Helen; Wiell Nordberg, Lene

    2007-01-01

    of the average family's lifestyle. These dwellings were ground-breaking when they were built, but today are clearly a product of their time. The reaction to functionalism and the postwar mass production gave rise to flexible dwelling with countless possibilities for room division. The housing of this period has...... characteristics which in the long run have proven to be unfortunate both in terms in terms of durability and architectural quality. Today there is a focus on the development of more open and functionally non-determined housing. A number of new housing schemes in and around Copenhagen reveal a variety...... of approaches to these goals. This working paper reviews not only a selection of new housing types, but also dwellings from the past, which each contain an aspect of changeability. Our study is based on information from users in the selected housing schemes, gathered from questionnaires, information about...

  2. Liaison based assembly design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  3. Touching base with OPERA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Three seminars – at CERN, at Gran Sasso and in Japan – and an article calling for the scrutiny of the scientific community: the OPERA Collaboration opened its research publicly. In addition to huge press coverage, this triggered welcome reactions from colleagues around the world, many of whom will attempt to independently interpret and reproduce the measurement. OPERA’s Spokesperson touches base with the Bulletin.   The CERN Main Auditorium was crowded as OPERA Physics co-ordinator Dario Autiero presented the results of their research (23 September 2011). According to the OPERA strategy, the results of the measurements are in the hands of the scientific community and, as for any other scientific result, several months will be needed before other groups will be able to perform an independent measurement. In the meantime, the OPERA Collaboration is dealing with an avalanche of emails from the scientific community, members of the general public, and the press. &...

  4. Pathway-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jack W

    2016-02-03

    New technologies for acquisition of genomic data, while offering unprecedented opportunities for genetic discovery, also impose severe burdens of interpretation and penalties for multiple testing. The Pathway-based Analyses Group of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 19 (GAW19) sought reduction of multiple-testing burden through various approaches to aggregation of highdimensional data in pathways informed by prior biological knowledge. Experimental methods testedincluded the use of "synthetic pathways" (random sets of genes) to estimate power and false-positive error rate of methods applied to simulated data; data reduction via independent components analysis, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-SNP interaction, and use of gene sets to estimate genetic similarity; and general assessment of the efficacy of prior biological knowledge to reduce the dimensionality of complex genomic data. The work of this group explored several promising approaches to managing high-dimensional data, with the caveat that these methods are necessarily constrained by the quality of external bioinformatic annotation.

  5. Refractive index based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A refractive index based measurement of a property of a fluid is measured in an apparatus comprising a variable wavelength coherent light source (16), a sample chamber (12), a wavelength controller (24), a light sensor (20), a data recorder (26) and a computation apparatus (28), by - directing...... coherent light having a wavelength along an input light path, - producing scattering of said light from each of a plurality of interfaces within said apparatus including interfaces between said fluid and a surface bounding said fluid, said scattering producing an interference pattern formed by said...... scattered light, - cyclically varying the wavelength of said light in said input light path over a 1 nm to 20nm wide range of wavelengths a rate of from 10Hz to 50 KHz, - recording variation of intensity of the interfering light with change in wavelength of the light at an angle of observation...

  6. Transaction based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunka, Frantisek; Matula, Jiri

    2017-07-01

    Transaction based approach is utilized in some methodologies in business process modeling. Essential parts of these transactions are human beings. The notion of agent or actor role is usually used for them. The paper on a particular example describes possibilities of Design Engineering Methodology for Organizations (DEMO) and Resource-Event-Agent (REA) methodology. Whereas the DEMO methodology can be regarded as a generic methodology having its foundation in the theory of Enterprise Ontology the REA methodology is regarded as the domain specific methodology and has its origin in accountancy systems. The results of these approaches is that the DEMO methodology captures everything that happens in the reality with a good empirical evidence whereas the REA methodology captures only changes connected with economic events. Economic events represent either change of the property rights to economic resource or consumption or production of economic resources. This results from the essence of economic events and their connection to economic resources.

  7. Pitch Based Sound Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai; Kjems, U

    2006-01-01

    A sound classification model is presented that can classify signals into music, noise and speech. The model extracts the pitch of the signal using the harmonic product spectrum. Based on the pitch estimate and a pitch error measure, features are created and used in a probabilistic model with soft......-max output function. Both linear and quadratic inputs are used. The model is trained on 2 hours of sound and tested on publicly available data. A test classification error below 0.05 with 1 s classification windows is achieved. Further more it is shown that linear input performs as well as a quadratic......, and that even though classification gets marginally better, not much is achieved by increasing the window size beyond 1 s....

  8. Telephone-Based Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccio, Mindy; Sanna, Rashel S; Adams, Sara R; Goler, Nancy C; Brown, Susan D; Neugebauer, Romain S; Ferrara, Assiamira; Wiley, Deanne M; Bellamy, David J; Schmittdiel, Julie A

    2017-03-01

    Many Americans continue to smoke, increasing their risk of disease and premature death. Both telephone-based counseling and in-person tobacco cessation classes may improve access for smokers seeking convenient support to quit. Little research has assessed whether such programs are effective in real-world clinical populations. Retrospective cohort study comparing wellness coaching participants with two groups of controls. Kaiser Permanente Northern California, a large integrated health care delivery system. Two hundred forty-one patients who participated in telephonic tobacco cessation coaching from January 1, 2011, to March 31, 2012, and two control groups: propensity-score-matched controls, and controls who participated in a tobacco cessation class during the same period. Wellness coaching participants received an average of two motivational interviewing-based coaching sessions that engaged the patient, evoked their reason to consider quitting, and helped them establish a quit plan. Self-reported quitting of tobacco and fills of tobacco cessation medications within 12 months of follow-up. Logistic regressions adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and primary language. After adjusting for confounders, tobacco quit rates were higher among coaching participants vs. matched controls (31% vs. 23%, p Coaching participants and class attendees filled tobacco-cessation prescriptions at a higher rate (47% for both) than matched controls (6%, p coaching was as effective as in-person classes and was associated with higher rates of quitting compared to no treatment. The telephonic modality may increase convenience and scalability for health care systems looking to reduce tobacco use and improve health.

  9. Model Based Temporal Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Marla J.; Spinrad, Paul R.; Fall, Thomas C.

    1988-03-01

    Systems that assess the real world must cope with evidence that is uncertain, ambiguous, and spread over time. Typically, the most important function of an assessment system is to identify when activities are occurring that are unusual or unanticipated. Model based temporal reasoning addresses both of these requirements. The differences among temporal reasoning schemes lies in the methods used to avoid computational intractability. If we had n pieces of data and we wanted to examine how they were related, the worst case would be where we had to examine every subset of these points to see if that subset satisfied the relations. This would be 2n, which is intractable. Models compress this; if several data points are all compatible with a model, then that model represents all those data points. Data points are then considered related if they lie within the same model or if they lie in models that are related. Models thus address the intractability problem. They also address the problem of determining unusual activities if the data do not agree with models that are indicated by earlier data then something out of the norm is taking place. The models can summarize what we know up to that time, so when they are not predicting correctly, either something unusual is happening or we need to revise our models. The model based reasoner developed at Advanced Decision Systems is thus both intuitive and powerful. It is currently being used on one operational system and several prototype systems. It has enough power to be used in domains spanning the spectrum from manufacturing engineering and project management to low-intensity conflict and strategic assessment.

  10. Mainstreaming gesture based interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gestures are a common way of interaction with mobile devices. They emerged especially with the iPhone production. Gestures in currently used devices are usually based on the original gestures presented by Apple in its iOS (iPhone Operating System. Therefore, there is a wide agreement on the mobile gesture design. In last years, it is possible to see experiments with gesture usage also in the other areas of consumer electronics and computers. The examples can include televisions, large projections etc. These gestures can be marked as spatial or 3D gestures. They are connected with a natural 3D environment rather than with a flat 2D screen. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a comparable design agreement within the spatial gestures. Various projects are based on completely different gesture sets. This situation is confusing for their users and slows down spatial gesture adoption.This paper is focused on the standardization of spatial gestures. The review of projects focused on spatial gesture usage is provided in the first part. The main emphasis is placed on the usability point-of-view. On the basis of our analysis, we argue that the usability is the key issue enabling the wide adoption. The mobile gesture emergence was possible easily because the iPhone gestures were natural. Therefore, it was not necessary to learn them.The design and implementation of our presentation software, which is controlled by gestures, is outlined in the second part of the paper. Furthermore, the usability testing results are provided as well. We have tested our application on a group of users not instructed in the implemented gestures design. These results were compared with the other ones, obtained with our original implementation. The evaluation can be used as the basis for implementation of similar projects.

  11. DNA-based machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  12. Base Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett Sondreal; John Hendrikson

    2009-03-31

    In June 2009, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed 11 years of research under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40320 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy (OFE) and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). A wide range of diverse research activities were performed under annual program plans approved by NETL in seven major task areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, (6) advanced materials, and (7) strategic studies. This report summarizes results of the 67 research subtasks and an additional 50 strategic studies. Selected highlights in the executive summary illustrate the contribution of the research to the energy industry in areas not adequately addressed by the private sector alone. During the period of performance of the agreement, concerns have mounted over the impact of carbon emissions on climate change, and new programs have been initiated by DOE to ensure that fossil fuel resources along with renewable resources can continue to supply the nation's transportation fuel and electric power. The agreement has addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration while expanding the supply and use of domestic energy resources for energy security. It has further contributed to goals for near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources (e.g., wind-, biomass-, and coal-based electrical generation).

  13. The office based CHIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passariello F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fausto Passariello,1 Stefano Ermini,2 Massimo Cappelli,3 Roberto Delfrate,4 Claude Franceschi5 1Centro Diagnostico Aquarius, Napoli, Italy; 2Private Practice, Grassina, Italy; 3Private Practice, Firenze, Italy; 4Casa di Cure Figlie di Maria, Cremona, Italy; 5Hospital St Joseph, Service d'Explorations Vasculaires, Paris, France Abstract: The cure Conservatrice Hémodynamique de l'Insuffisance Veineuse en Ambulatoire (CHIVA can be office based (OB. The OB-CHIVA protocol is aimed at transferring CHIVA procedures to specialists rooms. The protocol will check the feasibility of OB-CHIVA, data pertaining to recurrence, and will offer the opportunity to study saphenous femoral junction (SFJ stump evolution, the role of the washing vessels and the arch recanalization rate, and gather new data about the effect of the length of the treated saphenous vein. A simplified diagnostic procedure will allow an essential ultrasound examination of the venous net while a schematic and easily readable algorithm guides therapeutic choices. The Riobamba draining crossotomy (RDC tactic is composed of a set of OB procedures. While some of these procedures are, at the moment, only proposals, others are already applied. Devices generally used in ablative procedures such as Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER, radio frequency, steam, and mechanical devices are used in this context to serve to conservative interventions for CHIVA. New techniques have also been proposed for devalvulation and tributary disconnection. Detailed follow-up is necessary in order to determine the effects of therapy and possible disease evolution. Finally, information is added about the informed consent and the ethical considerations of OB-CHIVA research. Keywords: CHIVA, office based procedures, LASER, RF, steam

  14. Organic Biochar Based Fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans-Peter; Pandit, Bishnu Hari; Cornelissen, Gerard; Kammann, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Biochar produced in cost-efficient flame curtain kilns (Kon-Tiki) was nutrient enriched either with cow urine or with dissolved mineral (NPK) fertilizer to produce biochar-based fertilizers containing between 60-100 kg N, 5-60 kg P2O5 and 60-100 kg K2O, respectively, per ton of biochar. In 21 field trials nutrient-enriched biochars were applied at rates of 0.5 to 2 t ha-1 into the root zone of 13 different annual and perennial crops. Treatments combining biochar, compost and organic or chemical fertilizer were evaluated; control treatments contained the same amounts of nutrients but without biochar. All nutrient-enriched biochar substrates improved yields compared to their respective no-biochar controls. Biochar enriched with dissolved NPK produced on average 20% ± 5.1% (N=4) higher yields than standard NPK fertilization without biochar. Cow urine-enriched biochar blended with compost resulted on average in 123% ± 76.7% (N=13) higher yields compared to the organic farmer practice with cow urine-blended compost and outcompeted NPK-enriched biochar (same nutrient dose) by 103% ± 12.4% (N=4) on average. 21 field trials robustly revealed that low-dosage root zone application of organic biochar-based fertilizers caused substantial yield increases in rather fertile silt loam soils compared to traditional organic fertilization and to mineral NPK- or NPK-biochar fertilization. This can likely be explained by the nutrient carrier effect of biochar causing a slow nutrient release behavior, more balanced nutrient fluxes and reduced nutrient losses especially when liquid organic nutrients are used for the biochar enrichment. The results promise new pathways for optimizing organic farming and improving on-farm nutrient cycling.

  15. Loyalty-based management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichheld, F F

    1993-01-01

    Despite a flurry of activities aimed at serving customers better, few companies have systematically revamped their operations with customer loyalty in mind. Instead, most have adopted improvement programs ad hoc, and paybacks haven't materialized. Building a highly loyal customer base must be integral to a company's basic business strategy. Loyalty leaders like MBNA credit cards are successful because they have designed their entire business systems around customer loyalty--a self-reinforcing system in which the company delivers superior value consistently and reinvents cash flows to find and keep high-quality customers and employees. The economic benefits of high customer loyalty are measurable. When a company consistently delivers superior value and wins customer loyalty, market share and revenues go up, and the cost of acquiring new customers goes down. The better economics mean the company can pay workers better, which sets off a whole chain of events. Increased pay boosts employee moral and commitment; as employees stay longer, their productivity goes up and training costs fall; employees' overall job satisfaction, combined with their experience, helps them serve customers better; and customers are then more inclined to stay loyal to the company. Finally, as the best customers and employees become part of the loyalty-based system, competitors are left to survive with less desirable customers and less talented employees. To compete on loyalty, a company must understand the relationships between customer retention and the other parts of the business--and be able to quantify the linkages between loyalty and profits. It involves rethinking and aligning four important aspects of the business: customers, product/service offering, employees, and measurement systems.

  16. LEU{sub b}ased Fission Mo-99 Process with Reduced Solid Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seungkon; Lee, Suseung; Jung, Sunghee; Hong, Soonbog; Jang, Kyungduk; Choi, Sang Mu; Lee, Jun Sig; Lim, Incheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    {sup 99m} Tc emits 140 keV of very low gamma-ray radiation energy, as low as conventional diagnostic X-ray, and has short half-life of 6.0058 hours. Therefore, as radioactive tracer, {sup 99m} Tc provides high quality diagnostic images but keeps total patient radiation exposure low. Depending on the tagging pharmaceuticals and procedures, {sup 99m} Tc can be applied for the diagnostics of various target organs and diseases: brain, myocardium, thyroid, lungs, liver, gallbladder, kidneys, skeleton, blood and tumors. More than 95% of {sup 99}Mo is produced through fission of {sup 235}U worldwide because, {sup 99m}o generated from the fission (fission {sup 99}Mo) exhibits very high specific activity (<100 Ci/g). Over 90% of fission {sup 99}Mo producers have been used highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets so far. However, the IAEA recommends the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) to the {sup 99}Mo producers for nonproliferation reason. These days, worldwide {sup 99}Mo supply is not only insufficient but also unstable. Because, most of the main {sup 99}Mo production reactors are about 50 years old and suffered from frequent and unscheduled shutdown. Planned weekly productivity of 2000 Ci fission {sup 99}Mo, in a 6-day reference, will cover 100% domestic demand of Korea, as well as 20% of international market. It is expected to replace 4.3 million USD ($800/Ci) of {sup 99}Mo import for domestic market while exporting 82.8 million USD for world market, annually.

  17. Microstructure characterization of the soda-lime-glass/copper-indium-gallium-selenium interface in Cu-poor Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian, E-mail: wangjustb@gmail.com; Qiao, Yi; Zhu, Jie, E-mail: jiezhu@ustb.edu.cn

    2015-05-29

    The microstructure characteristics of the soda-lime-glass/Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (SLG/CIGS) interface in Cu-poor CIGS films are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and selected area electronic diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns show very sharp and strong spots, indicating the main structure of CIGS chalcopyrite. Small dispersed crystals with size distribution from 2 to 5 nm seem to be embedded in amorphous matrix, and additional spots indicate the presence of an ordered vacancy compound (OVC). This observation is consistent with the Raman results, and the OVC phase with the nanoclusters exists in the CIGS matrix, instead of layer structure. Lattice distortion results in local changes in contrast. Some pseudo-disordered structure is observed, however, the structure is actually the chalcopyrite CIGS structure. 180° rotation twins are also observed at the SLG/CIGS interface. Lattice distortion is widely observed at the interface of the Cu-poor CIGS films, and the extra spots could be caused by different lattice orientations. - Highlights: • Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) were prepared on bare soda-lime-glass (SLG) substrates. • Microstructure of the SLG/CIGS interface was investigated. • An ordered vacancy compound (OVC) phase was observed. • The OVC phase with nanoclusters exists in the CIGS matrix, instead of layer structure. • 180° rotation twins were observed at the SLG/CIGS interface.

  18. Foundry based approach for InP based PIC development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Europe is making significant investments in development of generic photonic foundry platform infrastructures for InP-based and Silicon Photonic ICs. Here we present the present status for the InP-based JePPIX platform.

  19. NMR studies concerning base-base interactions in oligonucleotides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogen, Y.T. van den.

    1988-01-01

    Two main subjects are treated in the present thesis. The firsst part principally deals with the base-base interactions in single-stranded oligoribonucleotides. The second part presents NMR and model-building studies of DNA and RNA duplexes containing an unpaired base. (author). 242 refs.; 26 figs.; 24 tabs

  20. Computer-based multi-channel analyzer based on internet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xinzhi; Ning Jiaoxian

    2001-01-01

    Combined the technology of Internet with computer-based multi-channel analyzer, a new kind of computer-based multi-channel analyzer system which is based on browser is presented. Its framework and principle as well as its implementation are discussed