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Sample records for cd genome allotetraploid

  1. Genome evolution in the allotetraploid frog Xenopus laevis.

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    Session, Adam M; Uno, Yoshinobu; Kwon, Taejoon; Chapman, Jarrod A; Toyoda, Atsushi; Takahashi, Shuji; Fukui, Akimasa; Hikosaka, Akira; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kondo, Mariko; van Heeringen, Simon J; Quigley, Ian; Heinz, Sven; Ogino, Hajime; Ochi, Haruki; Hellsten, Uffe; Lyons, Jessica B; Simakov, Oleg; Putnam, Nicholas; Stites, Jonathan; Kuroki, Yoko; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Michiue, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Minoru; Bogdanovic, Ozren; Lister, Ryan; Georgiou, Georgios; Paranjpe, Sarita S; van Kruijsbergen, Ila; Shu, Shengquiang; Carlson, Joseph; Kinoshita, Tsutomu; Ohta, Yuko; Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Jenkins, Jerry; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Mitros, Therese; Mozaffari, Sahar V; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Takamasa S; Takagi, Chiyo; Heald, Rebecca; Miller, Kelly; Haudenschild, Christian; Kitzman, Jacob; Nakayama, Takuya; Izutsu, Yumi; Robert, Jacques; Fortriede, Joshua; Burns, Kevin; Lotay, Vaneet; Karimi, Kamran; Yasuoka, Yuuri; Dichmann, Darwin S; Flajnik, Martin F; Houston, Douglas W; Shendure, Jay; DuPasquier, Louis; Vize, Peter D; Zorn, Aaron M; Ito, Michihiko; Marcotte, Edward M; Wallingford, John B; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto; Ueno, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoichi; Veenstra, Gert Jan C; Fujiyama, Asao; Harland, Richard M; Taira, Masanori; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2016-10-20

    To explore the origins and consequences of tetraploidy in the African clawed frog, we sequenced the Xenopus laevis genome and compared it to the related diploid X. tropicalis genome. We characterize the allotetraploid origin of X. laevis by partitioning its genome into two homoeologous subgenomes, marked by distinct families of 'fossil' transposable elements. On the basis of the activity of these elements and the age of hundreds of unitary pseudogenes, we estimate that the two diploid progenitor species diverged around 34 million years ago (Ma) and combined to form an allotetraploid around 17-18 Ma. More than 56% of all genes were retained in two homoeologous copies. Protein function, gene expression, and the amount of conserved flanking sequence all correlate with retention rates. The subgenomes have evolved asymmetrically, with one chromosome set more often preserving the ancestral state and the other experiencing more gene loss, deletion, rearrangement, and reduced gene expression.

  2. Rapid evolutionary divergence of diploid and allotetraploid Gossypium mitochondrial genomes.

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    Chen, Zhiwen; Nie, Hushuai; Wang, Yumei; Pei, Haili; Li, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Lida; Hua, Jinping

    2017-11-13

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is commonly grouped into eight diploid genomic groups and an allotetraploid genomic group, AD. The mitochondrial genomes supply new information to understand both the evolution process and the mechanism of cytoplasmic male sterility. Based on previously released mitochondrial genomes of G. hirsutum (AD 1 ), G. barbadense (AD 2 ), G. raimondii (D 5 ) and G. arboreum (A 2 ), together with data of six other mitochondrial genomes, to elucidate the evolution and diversity of mitochondrial genomes within Gossypium. Six Gossypium mitochondrial genomes, including three diploid species from D and three allotetraploid species from AD genome groups (G. thurberi D 1 , G. davidsonii D 3-d and G. trilobum D 8 ; G. tomentosum AD 3 , G. mustelinum AD 4 and G. darwinii AD 5 ), were assembled as the single circular molecules of lengths about 644 kb in diploid species and 677 kb in allotetraploid species, respectively. The genomic structures of mitochondrial in D group species were identical but differed from the mitogenome of G. arboreum (A 2 ), as well as from the mitogenomes of five species of the AD group. There mainly existed four or six large repeats in the mitogenomes of the A + AD or D group species, respectively. These variations in repeat sequences caused the major inversions and translocations within the mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial genome complexity in Gossypium presented eight unique segments in D group species, three specific fragments in A + AD group species and a large segment (more than 11 kb) in diploid species. These insertions or deletions were most probably generated from crossovers between repetitive or homologous regions. Unlike the highly variable genome structure, evolutionary distance of mitochondrial genes was 1/6th the frequency of that in chloroplast genes of Gossypium. RNA editing events were conserved in cotton mitochondrial genes. We confirmed two near full length of the integration of the mitochondrial

  3. Analysis of Complete Nucleotide Sequences of 12 Gossypium Chloroplast Genomes: Origin and Evolution of Allotetraploids

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    Xu, Qin; Xiong, Guanjun; Li, Pengbo; He, Fei; Huang, Yi; Wang, Kunbo; Li, Zhaohu; Hua, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is a model system for the analysis of polyploidization. Although ascertaining the donor species of allotetraploid cotton has been intensively studied, sequence comparison of Gossypium chloroplast genomes is still of interest to understand the mechanisms underlining the evolution of Gossypium allotetraploids, while it is generally accepted that the parents were A- and D-genome containing species. Here we performed a comparative analysis of 13 Gossypium chloroplast genomes, twelve of which are presented here for the first time. Methodology/Principal Findings The size of 12 chloroplast genomes under study varied from 159,959 bp to 160,433 bp. The chromosomes were highly similar having >98% sequence identity. They encoded the same set of 112 unique genes which occurred in a uniform order with only slightly different boundary junctions. Divergence due to indels as well as substitutions was examined separately for genome, coding and noncoding sequences. The genome divergence was estimated as 0.374% to 0.583% between allotetraploid species and A-genome, and 0.159% to 0.454% within allotetraploids. Forty protein-coding genes were completely identical at the protein level, and 20 intergenic sequences were completely conserved. The 9 allotetraploids shared 5 insertions and 9 deletions in whole genome, and 7-bp substitutions in protein-coding genes. The phylogenetic tree confirmed a close relationship between allotetraploids and the ancestor of A-genome, and the allotetraploids were divided into four separate groups. Progenitor allotetraploid cotton originated 0.43–0.68 million years ago (MYA). Conclusion Despite high degree of conservation between the Gossypium chloroplast genomes, sequence variations among species could still be detected. Gossypium chloroplast genomes preferred for 5-bp indels and 1–3-bp indels are mainly attributed to the SSR polymorphisms. This study supports that the common ancestor of diploid A-genome species in

  4. The genome structure of Arachis hypogaea (Linnaeus, 1753 and an induced Arachis allotetraploid revealed by molecular cytogenetics

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    Eliza F. de M. B. do Nascimento

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut, Arachis hypogaea (Linnaeus, 1753 is an allotetraploid cultivated plant with two subgenomes derived from the hybridization between two diploid wild species, A. duranensis (Krapovickas & W. C. Gregory, 1994 and A. ipaensis (Krapovickas & W. C. Gregory, 1994, followed by spontaneous chromosomal duplication. To understand genome changes following polyploidy, the chromosomes of A. hypogaea, IpaDur1, an induced allotetraploid (A. ipaensis × A. duranensis4x and the diploid progenitor species were cytogenetically compared. The karyotypes of the allotetraploids share the number and general morphology of chromosomes; DAPI+ bands pattern and number of 5S rDNA loci. However, one 5S rDNA locus presents a heteromorphic FISH signal in both allotetraploids, relative to corresponding progenitor. Whilst for A. hypogaea the number of 45S rDNA loci was equivalent to the sum of those present in the diploid species, in IpaDur1, two loci have not been detected. Overall distribution of repetitive DNA sequences was similar in both allotetraploids, although A. hypogaea had additional CMA3+ bands and few slight differences in the LTR-retrotransposons distribution compared to IpaDur1. GISH showed that the chromosomes of both allotetraploids had preferential hybridization to their corresponding diploid genomes. Nevertheless, at least one pair of IpaDur1 chromosomes had a clear mosaic hybridization pattern indicating recombination between the subgenomes, clear evidence that the genome of IpaDur1 shows some instability comparing to the genome of A. hypogaea that shows no mosaic of subgenomes, although both allotetraploids derive from the same progenitor species. For some reasons, the chromosome structure of A. hypogaea is inherently more stable, or, it has been at least, partially stabilized through genetic changes and selection.

  5. Genomic insights into divergence and dual domestication of cultivated allotetraploid cottons.

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    Fang, Lei; Gong, Hao; Hu, Yan; Liu, Chunxiao; Zhou, Baoliang; Huang, Tao; Wang, Yangkun; Chen, Shuqi; Fang, David D; Du, Xiongming; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Sen; Wang, Qiong; Wan, Qun; Liu, Bingliang; Pan, Mengqiao; Chang, Lijing; Wu, Huaitong; Mei, Gaofu; Xiang, Dan; Li, Xinghe; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Han, Bin; Chen, Xiaoya; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen; Huang, Xuehui

    2017-02-20

    Cotton has been cultivated and used to make fabrics for at least 7000 years. Two allotetraploid species of great commercial importance, Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense, were domesticated after polyploidization and are cultivated worldwide. Although the overall genetic diversity between these two cultivated species has been studied with limited accessions, their population structure and genetic variations remain largely unknown. We resequence the genomes of 147 cotton accessions, including diverse wild relatives, landraces, and modern cultivars, and construct a comprehensive variation map to provide genomic insights into the divergence and dual domestication of these two important cultivated tetraploid cotton species. Phylogenetic analysis shows two divergent groups for G. hirsutum and G. barbadense, suggesting a dual domestication processes in tetraploid cottons. In spite of the strong genetic divergence, a small number of interspecific reciprocal introgression events are found between these species and the introgression pattern is significantly biased towards the gene flow from G. hirsutum into G. barbadense. We identify selective sweeps, some of which are associated with relatively highly expressed genes for fiber development and seed germination. We report a comprehensive analysis of the evolution and domestication history of allotetraploid cottons based on the whole genomic variation between G. hirsutum and G. barbadense and between wild accessions and modern cultivars. These results provide genomic bases for improving cotton production and for further evolution analysis of polyploid crops.

  6. Karyotype Stability and Unbiased Fractionation in the Paleo-Allotetraploid Cucurbita Genomes.

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    Sun, Honghe; Wu, Shan; Zhang, Guoyu; Jiao, Chen; Guo, Shaogui; Ren, Yi; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haiying; Gong, Guoyi; Jia, Zhangcai; Zhang, Fan; Tian, Jiaxing; Lucas, William J; Doyle, Jeff J; Li, Haizhen; Fei, Zhangjun; Xu, Yong

    2017-10-09

    The Cucurbita genus contains several economically important species in the Cucurbitaceae family. Here, we report high-quality genome sequences of C. maxima and C. moschata and provide evidence supporting an allotetraploidization event in Cucurbita. We are able to partition the genome into two homoeologous subgenomes based on different genetic distances to melon, cucumber, and watermelon in the Benincaseae tribe. We estimate that the two diploid progenitors successively diverged from Benincaseae around 31 and 26 million years ago (Mya), respectively, and the allotetraploidization happened at some point between 26 Mya and 3 Mya, the estimated date when C. maxima and C. moschata diverged. The subgenomes have largely maintained the chromosome structures of their diploid progenitors. Such long-term karyotype stability after polyploidization has not been commonly observed in plant polyploids. The two subgenomes have retained similar numbers of genes, and neither subgenome is globally dominant in gene expression. Allele-specific expression analysis in the C. maxima × C. moschata interspecific F 1 hybrid and their two parents indicates the predominance of trans-regulatory effects underlying expression divergence of the parents, and detects transgressive gene expression changes in the hybrid correlated with heterosis in important agronomic traits. Our study provides insights into polyploid genome evolution and valuable resources for genetic improvement of cucurbit crops. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytoplasmic and Genomic Effects on Meiotic Pairing in Brassica Hybrids and Allotetraploids from Pair Crosses of Three Cultivated Diploids

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    Cui, Cheng; Ge, Xianhong; Gautam, Mayank; Kang, Lei; Li, Zaiyun

    2012-01-01

    Interspecific hybridization and allopolyploidization contribute to the origin of many important crops. Synthetic Brassica is a widely used model for the study of genetic recombination and “fixed heterosis” in allopolyploids. To investigate the effects of the cytoplasm and genome combinations on meiotic recombination, we produced digenomic diploid and triploid hybrids and trigenomic triploid hybrids from the reciprocal crosses of three Brassica diploids (B. rapa, AA; B. nigra, BB; B. oleracea, CC). The chromosomes in the resultant hybrids were doubled to obtain three allotetraploids (B. juncea, AA.BB; B. napus, AA.CC; B. carinata, BB.CC). Intra- and intergenomic chromosome pairings in these hybrids were quantified using genomic in situ hybridization and BAC-FISH. The level of intra- and intergenomic pairings varied significantly, depending on the genome combinations and the cytoplasmic background and/or their interaction. The extent of intragenomic pairing was less than that of intergenomic pairing within each genome. The extent of pairing variations within the B genome was less than that within the A and C genomes, each of which had a similar extent of pairing. Synthetic allotetraploids exhibited nondiploidized meiotic behavior, and their chromosomal instabilities were correlated with the relationship of the genomes and cytoplasmic background. Our results highlight the specific roles of the cytoplasm and genome to the chromosomal behaviors of hybrids and allopolyploids. PMID:22505621

  8. Toward allotetraploid cotton genome assembly: integration of a high-density molecular genetic linkage map with DNA sequence information

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    2012-01-01

    Background Cotton is the world’s most important natural textile fiber and a significant oilseed crop. Decoding cotton genomes will provide the ultimate reference and resource for research and utilization of the species. Integration of high-density genetic maps with genomic sequence information will largely accelerate the process of whole-genome assembly in cotton. Results In this paper, we update a high-density interspecific genetic linkage map of allotetraploid cultivated cotton. An additional 1,167 marker loci have been added to our previously published map of 2,247 loci. Three new marker types, InDel (insertion-deletion) and SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) developed from gene information, and REMAP (retrotransposon-microsatellite amplified polymorphism), were used to increase map density. The updated map consists of 3,414 loci in 26 linkage groups covering 3,667.62 cM with an average inter-locus distance of 1.08 cM. Furthermore, genome-wide sequence analysis was finished using 3,324 informative sequence-based markers and publicly-available Gossypium DNA sequence information. A total of 413,113 EST and 195 BAC sequences were physically anchored and clustered by 3,324 sequence-based markers. Of these, 14,243 ESTs and 188 BACs from different species of Gossypium were clustered and specifically anchored to the high-density genetic map. A total of 2,748 candidate unigenes from 2,111 ESTs clusters and 63 BACs were mined for functional annotation and classification. The 337 ESTs/genes related to fiber quality traits were integrated with 132 previously reported cotton fiber quality quantitative trait loci, which demonstrated the important roles in fiber quality of these genes. Higher-level sequence conservation between different cotton species and between the A- and D-subgenomes in tetraploid cotton was found, indicating a common evolutionary origin for orthologous and paralogous loci in Gossypium. Conclusion This study will serve as a valuable genomic resource

  9. Next generation sequencing reveals genome downsizing in allotetraploid Nicotiana tabacum, predominantly through the elimination of paternally derived repetitive DNAs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renny-Byfield, S.; Chester, M.; Kovařík, Aleš; Le Comber, S.C.; Grandbastien, M.-A.; Deloger, M.; Nichols, R.A.; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Chase, M.W.; Leitch, A.R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 10 (2011), s. 2843-2854 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702; CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : allopolyploidy * evolution * genome structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.550, year: 2011

  10. Draft genome sequence of an inbred line of Chenopodium quinoa, an allotetraploid crop with great environmental adaptability and outstanding nutritional properties.

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    Yasui, Yasuo; Hirakawa, Hideki; Oikawa, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Masami; Matsuzaki, Chiaki; Ueno, Mariko; Mizuno, Nobuyuki; Nagatoshi, Yukari; Imamura, Tomohiro; Miyago, Manami; Tanaka, Kojiro; Mise, Kazuyuki; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Mizukoshi, Hiroharu; Mori, Masashi; Fujita, Yasunari

    2016-12-01

    Chenopodium quinoa Willd. (quinoa) originated from the Andean region of South America, and is a pseudocereal crop of the Amaranthaceae family. Quinoa is emerging as an important crop with the potential to contribute to food security worldwide and is considered to be an optimal food source for astronauts, due to its outstanding nutritional profile and ability to tolerate stressful environments. Furthermore, plant pathologists use quinoa as a representative diagnostic host to identify virus species. However, molecular analysis of quinoa is limited by its genetic heterogeneity due to outcrossing and its genome complexity derived from allotetraploidy. To overcome these obstacles, we established the inbred and standard quinoa accession Kd that enables rigorous molecular analysis, and presented the draft genome sequence of Kd, using an optimized combination of high-throughput next generation sequencing on the Illumina Hiseq 2500 and PacBio RS II sequencers. The de novo genome assembly contained 25 k scaffolds consisting of 1 Gbp with N50 length of 86 kbp. Based on these data, we constructed the free-access Quinoa Genome DataBase (QGDB). Thus, these findings provide insights into the mechanisms underlying agronomically important traits of quinoa and the effect of allotetraploidy on genome evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  11. Efficient engineering of marker-free synthetic allotetraploids of Saccharomyces.

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    Alexander, William G; Peris, David; Pfannenstiel, Brandon T; Opulente, Dana A; Kuang, Meihua; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-04-01

    Saccharomyces interspecies hybrids are critical biocatalysts in the fermented beverage industry, including in the production of lager beers, Belgian ales, ciders, and cold-fermented wines. Current methods for making synthetic interspecies hybrids are cumbersome and/or require genome modifications. We have developed a simple, robust, and efficient method for generating allotetraploid strains of prototrophic Saccharomyces without sporulation or nuclear genome manipulation. S. cerevisiae×S. eubayanus, S. cerevisiae×S. kudriavzevii, and S. cerevisiae×S. uvarum designer hybrid strains were created as synthetic lager, Belgian, and cider strains, respectively. The ploidy and hybrid nature of the strains were confirmed using flow cytometry and PCR-RFLP analysis, respectively. This method provides an efficient means for producing novel synthetic hybrids for beverage and biofuel production, as well as for constructing tetraploids to be used for basic research in evolutionary genetics and genome stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular and cytogenetic evidence for an allotetraploid origin of Chenopodium quinoa and C. berlandieri (Amaranthaceae).

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    Kolano, Bozena; McCann, Jamie; Orzechowska, Maja; Siwinska, Dorota; Temsch, Eva; Weiss-Schneeweiss, Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Most of the cultivated chenopods are polyploids, but their origin and evolutionary history are still poorly understood. Phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequences of four plastid regions, nrITS and nuclear 5S rDNA spacer region (NTS) of two tetraploid chenopods (2n=4x=36), Andean C. quinoa and North American C. berlandieri, and their diploid relatives allowed inferences of their origin. The phylogenetic analyses confirmed allotetraploid origin of both tetraploids involving diploids of two different genomic groups (genomes A and B) and suggested that these two might share very similar parentage. The hypotheses on the origin of the two allopolyploid species were further tested using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). Several diploid Chenopodium species belonging to the two lineages, genome A and B, suggested by phylogenetic analyses, were tested as putative parental taxa. GISH differentiated two sets of parental chromosomes in both tetraploids and further corroborated their allotetraploid origin. Putative diploid parental taxa have been suggested by GISH for C. quinoa and C. berlandieri. Genome sizes of the analyzed allotetraploids fit nearly perfectly the expected additive values of the putative parental taxa. Directional and uniparental loss of rDNA loci of the maternal A-subgenome was revealed for both C. berlandieri and C. quinoa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric evolution and domestication in allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.

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    Lei Fang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy plays a major role in genome evolution, which corresponds to environmental changes over millions of years. The mechanisms of genome evolution, particularly during the process of domestication, are of broad interest in the fields of plant science and crop breeding. Upland cotton is derived from the hybridization and polyploidization of its ancient A and D diploid ancestors. As a result, cotton is a model for polyploid genome evolution and crop domestication. To explore the genomic mysteries of allopolyploid cotton, we investigated asymmetric evolution and domestication in the A and D subgenomes. Interestingly, more structural rearrangements have been characterized in the A subgenome than in the D subgenome. Correspondingly, more transposable elements, a greater number of lost and disrupted genes, and faster evolution have been identified in the A subgenome. In contrast, the centromeric retroelement (RT-domain related sequence of tetraploid cotton derived from the D subgenome progenitor was found to have invaded the A subgenome centromeres after allotetrapolyploid formation. Although there is no genome-wide expression bias between the subgenomes, as with expression-level alterations, gene expression bias of homoeologous gene pairs is widespread and varies from tissue to tissue. Further, there are more positively selected genes for fiber yield and quality in the A subgenome and more for stress tolerance in the D subgenome, indicating asymmetric domestication. This review highlights the asymmetric subgenomic evolution and domestication of allotetraploid cotton, providing valuable genomic resources for cotton research and enhancing our understanding of the basis of many other allopolyploids.

  14. Sequencing of allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1) provides a resource for fiber improvement.

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    Zhang, Tianzhen; Hu, Yan; Jiang, Wenkai; Fang, Lei; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Jiedan; Zhang, Jinbo; Saski, Christopher A; Scheffler, Brian E; Stelly, David M; Hulse-Kemp, Amanda M; Wan, Qun; Liu, Bingliang; Liu, Chunxiao; Wang, Sen; Pan, Mengqiao; Wang, Yangkun; Wang, Dawei; Ye, Wenxue; Chang, Lijing; Zhang, Wenpan; Song, Qingxin; Kirkbride, Ryan C; Chen, Xiaoya; Dennis, Elizabeth; Llewellyn, Danny J; Peterson, Daniel G; Thaxton, Peggy; Jones, Don C; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Huaitong; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Gaofu; Chen, Shuqi; Tian, Yue; Xiang, Dan; Li, Xinghe; Ding, Jian; Zuo, Qiyang; Tao, Linna; Liu, Yunchao; Li, Ji; Lin, Yu; Hui, Yuanyuan; Cao, Zhisheng; Cai, Caiping; Zhu, Xiefei; Jiang, Zhi; Zhou, Baoliang; Guo, Wangzhen; Li, Ruiqiang; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Upland cotton is a model for polyploid crop domestication and transgenic improvement. Here we sequenced the allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L. acc. TM-1 genome by integrating whole-genome shotgun reads, bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-end sequences and genotype-by-sequencing genetic maps. We assembled and annotated 32,032 A-subgenome genes and 34,402 D-subgenome genes. Structural rearrangements, gene loss, disrupted genes and sequence divergence were more common in the A subgenome than in the D subgenome, suggesting asymmetric evolution. However, no genome-wide expression dominance was found between the subgenomes. Genomic signatures of selection and domestication are associated with positively selected genes (PSGs) for fiber improvement in the A subgenome and for stress tolerance in the D subgenome. This draft genome sequence provides a resource for engineering superior cotton lines.

  15. Development of chromosome-specific markers with high polymorphism for allotetraploid cotton based on genome-wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in diploid cottons (Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich).

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    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Zhang, Youping; Yu, Daoqian; Cheng, Hailiang; Jiang, Pengfei; Yang, Wencui; Wang, Qiaolian; Feng, Xiaoxu; Prosper, Mtawa Andrew; Guo, Xiaoping; Song, Guoli

    2015-02-06

    Tetraploid cotton contains two sets of homologous chromosomes, the At- and Dt-subgenomes. Consequently, many markers in cotton were mapped to multiple positions during linkage genetic map construction, posing a challenge to anchoring linkage groups and mapping economically-important genes to particular chromosomes. Chromosome-specific markers could solve this problem. Recently, the genomes of two diploid species were sequenced whose progenitors were putative contributors of the At- and Dt-subgenomes to tetraploid cotton. These sequences provide a powerful tool for developing chromosome-specific markers given the high level of synteny among tetraploid and diploid cotton genomes. In this study, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) on each chromosome in the two diploid genomes were characterized. Chromosome-specific SSRs were developed by comparative analysis and proved to distinguish chromosomes. A total of 200,744 and 142,409 SSRs were detected on the 13 chromosomes of Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich, respectively. Chromosome-specific SSRs were obtained by comparing SSR flanking sequences from each chromosome with those from the other 25 chromosomes. The average was 7,996 per chromosome. To confirm their chromosome specificity, these SSRs were used to distinguish two homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton through linkage group construction. The chromosome-specific SSRs and previously-reported chromosome markers were grouped together, and no marker mapped to another homologous chromosome, proving that the chromosome-specific SSRs were unique and could distinguish homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton. Because longer dinucleotide AT-rich repeats were the most polymorphic in previous reports, the SSRs on each chromosome were sorted by motif type and repeat length for convenient selection. The primer sequences of all chromosome-specific SSRs were also made publicly available. Chromosome-specific SSRs are efficient tools for chromosome

  16. Similar patterns of rDNA evolution in synthetic and recently formed natural populations of Tragopogon (Asteraceae allotetraploids

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    Soltis Pamela S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tragopogon mirus and T. miscellus are allotetraploids (2n = 24 that formed repeatedly during the past 80 years in eastern Washington and adjacent Idaho (USA following the introduction of the diploids T. dubius, T. porrifolius, and T. pratensis (2n = 12 from Europe. In most natural populations of T. mirus and T. miscellus, there are far fewer 35S rRNA genes (rDNA of T. dubius than there are of the other diploid parent (T. porrifolius or T. pratensis. We studied the inheritance of parental rDNA loci in allotetraploids resynthesized from diploid accessions. We investigate the dynamics and directionality of these rDNA losses, as well as the contribution of gene copy number variation in the parental diploids to rDNA variation in the derived tetraploids. Results Using Southern blot hybridization and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, we analyzed copy numbers and distribution of these highly reiterated genes in seven lines of synthetic T. mirus (110 individuals and four lines of synthetic T. miscellus (71 individuals. Variation among diploid parents accounted for most of the observed gene imbalances detected in F1 hybrids but cannot explain frequent deviations from repeat additivity seen in the allotetraploid lines. Polyploid lineages involving the same diploid parents differed in rDNA genotype, indicating that conditions immediately following genome doubling are crucial for rDNA changes. About 19% of the resynthesized allotetraploid individuals had equal rDNA contributions from the diploid parents, 74% were skewed towards either T. porrifolius or T. pratensis-type units, and only 7% had more rDNA copies of T. dubius-origin compared to the other two parents. Similar genotype frequencies were observed among natural populations. Despite directional reduction of units, the additivity of 35S rDNA locus number is maintained in 82% of the synthetic lines and in all natural allotetraploids. Conclusions Uniparental reductions of

  17. Insights into Interspecific Hybridization Events in Allotetraploid Cotton Formation from Characterization of a Gene-Regulating Leaf Shape.

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    Chang, Lijing; Fang, Lei; Zhu, Yajuan; Wu, Huaitong; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Liu, Chunxiao; Li, Xinghe; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-10-01

    The morphology of cotton leaves varies considerably. Phenotypes, including okra, sea-island, super-okra, and broad leaf, are controlled by a multiple allele locus, L 2 Okra leaf (L 2 °) is an incomplete mutation that alters leaf shape by increasing the length of lobes with deeper sinuses. Using a map-based cloning strategy, we cloned the L 2 locus gene, which encodes a LATE MERISTEM IDENTITY 1 (LMI1)-like transcription factor (GhOKRA). Silencing GhOKRA leads to a change in phenotype from okra to broad leaf. Overexpression of GhOKRA in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly increases the degree of the leaf lobes and changes the leaf shape. Premature termination of translation in GhOKRA results in the production of broad leaves. The sequences of OKRA from diploid progenitor D-genome species, and wild races and domesticated allotetraploid cottons in Gossypium hirsutum show that a premature termination mutation occurred before and after the formation of tetraploid cotton, respectively. This study provides genomic insights into the two interspecific hybridization events: one produced the present broad leaf and another formed okra leaf phenotype with complete OKRA, that occurred during allotetraploid cotton formation. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Characterization of PROFILIN genes from allotetraploid (Gossypium hirsutum) cotton and its diploid progenitors and expression analysis in cotton genotypes differing in fiber characteristics.

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    Argiriou, Anagnostis; Kalivas, Apostolos; Michailidis, Georgios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios

    2012-04-01

    The actin-binding protein profilin (PRF) plays an important role in cell growth and expansion by regulating the organization of the actin filaments. Recent studies have reported association between fiber elongation in cultivated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and PRF expression. In the present study, we cloned four genomic clones from allotetraploid cotton (G. hirsutum) and its putative diploid progenitors (G. arboreum and G. raimondii) designated GhPRF1_A, GhPRF1_D, GaPRF1, and GrPRF1 encoding cotton PRF and characterized their genomic structure, phylogenetic relationships and promoter structure. Sequence analysis of the coding regions of all clones resulted in a single protein product which revealed more than 80% similarity to most plant PRFs and a typical organization with an actin-binding and a polybasic phospholipid binding motif at the carboxy terminus. DNA blot hybridization suggested that PRF gene is present with more than one copy in the allotetraploid species G. hirsutum. Expression analysis performed in various organs of cultivated cotton revealed that the PRF gene was preferentially expressed in cotton fibers. Very low levels of expression were observed in whole flowers, while PRF transcripts were not detected in other organs examined. Furthermore, higher levels of expression were observed at the early stages of cotton fiber development (at 10 days post anthesis), indicative that this gene may play a major role in the early stages of cotton fiber development. Quantitation of the expression by real-time PCR revealed higher expression levels in a G. hirsutum variety with higher fiber percentage compared to a variety with lower percentage. In addition, higher levels of expression were found in cultivated allotetraploid G. barbadense cotton species with higher fiber length in comparison to cultivated allotetraploid G. hirsutum.

  19. A human homolog of the mouse CD8 molecule, Lyt-3: genomic sequence and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P

    1987-01-01

    The CD8 antigen is a marker for those cytotoxic T cells that recognize antigen in the context of class I major histocompatibility antigens (MHC) and has now been identified in many species. In rodents the CD8 antigen is a heterodimer of two distinct chains, Lyt-2 and Lyt-3 in the mouse and OX-8 Mr 32,000 and 37,000 chains in the rat. Human CD8 has consistently been described as a homodimer/homomultimer on mature T cells made up of one chain homologous to the Lyt-2 and OX-8 Mr 32,000 chains. This paper identifies a human equivalent of the second rodent CD8 chain (Lyt-3 and OX-8 Mr 37,000 chains) at the genomic level and shows that this gene is transcribed in human thymocytes and in some acute leukemic T-cell lines. The existence of a human Lyt-3 homolog raises the possibility that human CD8, like mouse CD8, may exist as a heterodimer.

  20. Dynamic Roles for Small RNAs and DNA Methylation during Ovule and Fiber Development in Allotetraploid Cotton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingxin Song

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is essential for plant and animal development. In plants, methylation occurs at CG, CHG, and CHH (H = A, C or T sites via distinct pathways. Cotton is an allotetraploid consisting of two progenitor genomes. Each cotton fiber is a rapidly-elongating cell derived from the ovule epidermis, but the molecular basis for this developmental transition is unknown. Here we analyzed methylome, transcriptome, and small RNAome and revealed distinct changes in CHH methylation during ovule and fiber development. In ovules, CHH hypermethylation in promoters correlated positively with siRNAs, inducing RNA-dependent DNA methylation (RdDM, and up-regulation of ovule-preferred genes. In fibers, the ovule-derived cells generated additional heterochromatic CHH hypermethylation independent of RdDM, which repressed transposable elements (TEs and nearby genes including fiber-related genes. Furthermore, CHG and CHH methylation in genic regions contributed to homoeolog expression bias in ovules and fibers. Inhibiting DNA methylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in cultured ovules has reduced fiber cell number and length, suggesting a potential role for DNA methylation in fiber development. Thus, RdDM-dependent methylation in promoters and RdDM-independent methylation in TEs and nearby genes could act as a double-lock feedback mechanism to mediate gene and TE expression, potentiating the transition from epidermal to fiber cells during ovule and seed development.

  1. Dynamic Roles for Small RNAs and DNA Methylation during Ovule and Fiber Development in Allotetraploid Cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qingxin; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Z. Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for plant and animal development. In plants, methylation occurs at CG, CHG, and CHH (H = A, C or T) sites via distinct pathways. Cotton is an allotetraploid consisting of two progenitor genomes. Each cotton fiber is a rapidly-elongating cell derived from the ovule epidermis, but the molecular basis for this developmental transition is unknown. Here we analyzed methylome, transcriptome, and small RNAome and revealed distinct changes in CHH methylation during ovule and fiber development. In ovules, CHH hypermethylation in promoters correlated positively with siRNAs, inducing RNA-dependent DNA methylation (RdDM), and up-regulation of ovule-preferred genes. In fibers, the ovule-derived cells generated additional heterochromatic CHH hypermethylation independent of RdDM, which repressed transposable elements (TEs) and nearby genes including fiber-related genes. Furthermore, CHG and CHH methylation in genic regions contributed to homoeolog expression bias in ovules and fibers. Inhibiting DNA methylation using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in cultured ovules has reduced fiber cell number and length, suggesting a potential role for DNA methylation in fiber development. Thus, RdDM-dependent methylation in promoters and RdDM-independent methylation in TEs and nearby genes could act as a double-lock feedback mechanism to mediate gene and TE expression, potentiating the transition from epidermal to fiber cells during ovule and seed development. PMID:26710171

  2. Absence of CD59 in Guinea Pigs: Analysis of theCavia porcellusGenome Suggests the Evolution of aCD59Pseudogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, Hani; Zelek, Wioleta M; Hughes, Timothy R; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Morgan, B Paul

    2018-01-01

    CD59 is a membrane-bound regulatory protein that inhibits the assembly of the terminal membrane attack complex (C5b-9) of complement. From its original discovery in humans almost 30 years ago, CD59 has been characterized in a variety of species, from primates to early vertebrates, such as teleost fish. CD59 is ubiquitous in mammals; however, we have described circumstantial evidence suggesting that guinea pigs ( Cavia porcellus ) lack CD59, at least on erythrocytes. In this study, we have used a combination of phylogenetic analyses with syntenic alignment of mammalian CD59 genes to identify the only span of genomic DNA in C. porcellus that is homologous to a portion of mammalian CD59 and show that this segment of DNA is not transcribed. We describe a pseudogene sharing homology to exons 2 through 5 of human CD59 present in the C. porcellus genome. This pseudogene was flanked by C. porcellus homologs of two genes, FBXO3 and ORF91 , a relationship and orientation that were consistent with other known mammalian CD59 genes. Analysis using RNA sequencing confirmed that this segment of chromosomal DNA was not transcribed. We conclude that guinea pigs lack an intact gene encoding CD59; to our knowledge, this is the first report of a mammalian species that does not express a functional CD59. The pseudogene we describe is likely the product of a genomic deletion event during its evolutionary divergence from other members of the rodent order. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Clonal expansion of genome-intact HIV-1 in functionally polarized Th1 CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guinevere Q; Orlova-Fink, Nina; Einkauf, Kevin; Chowdhury, Fatema Z; Sun, Xiaoming; Harrington, Sean; Kuo, Hsiao-Hsuan; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Reddy, Kavidha; Dong, Krista; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Rosenberg, Eric S; Yu, Xu G; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2017-06-30

    HIV-1 causes a chronic, incurable disease due to its persistence in CD4+ T cells that contain replication-competent provirus, but exhibit little or no active viral gene expression and effectively resist combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). These latently infected T cells represent an extremely small proportion of all circulating CD4+ T cells but possess a remarkable long-term stability and typically persist throughout life, for reasons that are not fully understood. Here we performed massive single-genome, near-full-length next-generation sequencing of HIV-1 DNA derived from unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ex vivo-isolated CD4+ T cells, and subsets of functionally polarized memory CD4+ T cells. This approach identified multiple sets of independent, near-full-length proviral sequences from cART-treated individuals that were completely identical, consistent with clonal expansion of CD4+ T cells harboring intact HIV-1. Intact, near-full-genome HIV-1 DNA sequences that were derived from such clonally expanded CD4+ T cells constituted 62% of all analyzed genome-intact sequences in memory CD4 T cells, were preferentially observed in Th1-polarized cells, were longitudinally detected over a duration of up to 5 years, and were fully replication- and infection-competent. Together, these data suggest that clonal proliferation of Th1-polarized CD4+ T cells encoding for intact HIV-1 represents a driving force for stabilizing the pool of latently infected CD4+ T cells.

  4. Genome sequence and comparative genomic analysis of a clinically important strain CD11-4 ofJanibacter melonisisolated from celiac disease patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Atul Munish; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2018-01-01

    Janibacter melonis and other member of this genus are known to cause bacteremia and serious clinical comorbidities, but there is no study reporting about pathogenicity attributes of J. melonis. Janibacter terrae is known to cause lethal infection. Reporting the genome of J. melonis CD11-4 and comparative genomics with other members of genus has provided some novel insights that can enable us to understand the mechanisms responsible for its pathogenicity in humans. Comparative genomic analysis by Rapid Annotation Server and Technology revealed the presence of similar virulence determinant genes in both J. terrae NBRC 107853 T and J. melonis CD11-4. Like J. terrae NBRC 107853 T , J. melonis CD11-4 contained two genes responsible for resistance against β-lactam class of antibiotics and two genes for resistance against fluoroquinolones. Interestingly, J. melonis CD11-4 contained a unique gene coding for multidrug resistance efflux pumps unlike all other members of this genus. It also contained two genes involved in Toxin-antitoxin Systems that were absent in J. terrae NBRC 107853 T but were present in some other members of genus. Genome annotations of J. melonis CD11-4 revealed that it contained similar or more virulence repertoire like J. terrae NBRC 107853 T . Like other gut pathogens, J. melonis possesses key virulence determinant genes for antibiotic resistance, invasion, adhesion, biofilm formation, iron acquisition and to cope with stress response, thereby indicating that strain J. melonis CD11-4 could be a gut pathogen.

  5. Interpopulation hybridization generates meiotically stable rDNA epigenetic variants in allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyášek, Roman; Dobešová, Eva; Húska, Dalibor; Ježková, Ivana; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Kovařík, Aleš

    2016-02-01

    Uniparental silencing of 35S rRNA genes (rDNA), known as nucleolar dominance (ND), is common in interspecific hybrids. Allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus composed of Tragopogon dubius (d) and Tragopogon porrifolius (p) genomes shows highly variable ND. To examine the molecular basis of such variation, we studied the genetic and epigenetic features of rDNA homeologs in several lines derived from recently and independently formed natural populations. Inbred lines derived from T. mirus with a dominant d-rDNA homeolog transmitted this expression pattern over generations, which may explain why it is prevalent among natural populations. In contrast, lines derived from the p-rDNA dominant progenitor were meiotically unstable, frequently switching to co-dominance. Interpopulation crosses between progenitors displaying reciprocal ND resulted in d-rDNA dominance, indicating immediate suppression of p-homeologs in F1 hybrids. Original p-rDNA dominance was not restored in later generations, even in those segregants that inherited the corresponding parental rDNA genotype, thus indicating the generation of additional p-rDNA and d-rDNA epigenetic variants. Despite preserved intergenic spacer (IGS) structure, they showed altered cytosine methylation and chromatin condensation patterns, and a correlation between expression, hypomethylation of RNA Pol I promoters and chromatin decondensation was apparent. Reversion of such epigenetic variants occurred rarely, resulting in co-dominance maintained in individuals with distinct genotypes. Generally, interpopulation crosses may generate epialleles that are not present in natural populations, underlying epigenetic dynamics in young allopolyploids. We hypothesize that highly expressed variants with distinct IGS features may induce heritable epigenetic reprogramming of the partner rDNA arrays, harmonizing the expression of thousands of genes in allopolyploids. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genetic localization of Cd63, a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily, reveals two distinct loci in the mouse genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwynn, B.; Eicher, E.M.; Peters, L.L. [Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME (United States)

    1996-07-15

    The membrane protein CD63, a molecular marker for early stages of melanoma progression, has been associated with platelet storage pool deficiency disorders (SPD). CD63 localizes to the membranes of platelets, lysosomes, and melanosomes, all of which are affected in a specific subgroup of SPD. The cDNA encoding CD63 detects two closely related sequences that map to different regions of the mouse genome. One locus maps to mouse Chromosome (Chr) 10 in a region that shares linkage homology with the human chromosome encoding human CD63. The second locus maps to mouse Chr 18 in a region that bears no known human CD63-related genes. No SPD has been localized to these regions of either the mouse or the human chromosomes. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Chromosome isolation by flow sorting in Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Molnár

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the potential of flow cytometry for chromosome sorting in two wild diploid wheats Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. Flow karyotypes obtained after the analysis of DAPI-stained chromosomes were characterized and content of chromosome peaks was determined. Peaks of chromosome 1U could be discriminated in flow karyotypes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. biuncialis and the chromosome could be sorted with purities exceeding 95%. The remaining chromosomes formed composite peaks and could be sorted in groups of two to four. Twenty four wheat SSR markers were tested for their position on chromosomes of Ae. umbellulata and Ae. comosa using PCR on DNA amplified from flow-sorted chromosomes and genomic DNA of wheat-Ae. geniculata addition lines, respectively. Six SSR markers were located on particular Aegilops chromosomes using sorted chromosomes, thus confirming the usefulness of this approach for physical mapping. The SSR markers are suitable for marker assisted selection of wheat-Aegilops introgression lines. The results obtained in this work provide new opportunities for dissecting genomes of wild relatives of wheat with the aim to assist in alien gene transfer and discovery of novel genes for wheat improvement.

  8. Phenotypic effects of allotetraploidization of wild Arachis and their implications for peanut domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Bertioli, Soraya C M; Moretzsohn, Márcio C; Santos, Silvio P; Brasileiro, Ana C M; Guimarães, Patrícia M; Bertioli, David J; Araujo, Ana Claudia G

    2017-03-01

    Several species of Arachis have been cultivated for their edible seeds, historically and to the present day. The diploid species that have a history of cultivation show relatively small signatures of domestication. In contrast, the tetraploid species A. hypogaea evolved into highly domesticated forms and became a major world crop, the cultivated peanut. It seems likely that allotetraploidization (hybridity and/or tetraploidization) in some way enhanced attractiveness for cultivation. Here we investigate this using six different hybridization and tetraploidization events, from distinct Arachis diploid species, including one event derived from the same wild species that originated peanut. Twenty-six anatomical, morphological, and physiological traits were examined in the induced allotetraploid plants and compared with their wild diploid parents. Nineteen traits were transgressive (showed strong response to hybridization and chromosome duplication): allotetraploids had larger leaves, stomata and epidermal cells than did their diploid parents. In addition, allotetraploids produced more photosynthetic pigments. These traits have the same trend across the different hybrid combinations, suggesting that the changes are more likely due to ploidy rather than hybridity. In contrast, seed dimensions and seed mass did not significantly change in response to hybridization or tetraploidization. We suggest that the original allotetraploid that gave rise to cultivated peanut may have been attractive because of an increase in plant size, different transpiration characteristics, higher photosynthetic capacity, or other characteristics, but contrary to accepted knowledge, increased seed size was unlikely to have been important in the initial domestication. © 2017 Leal-Bertoli et al. Published by the Botanical Society of America. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY-NC).

  9. Multiplex and genome-wide analyses reveal distinctive properties of KIR+ and CD56+ T cells in human blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wing Keung; Rujkijyanont, Piya; Neale, Geoffrey; Yang, Jie; Bari, Rafijul; Gupta, Neha Das; Holladay, Martha; Rooney, Barbara; Leung, Wing

    2014-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on natural killer (NK) cells have been linked to a wide spectrum of health conditions such as chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, pregnancy complications, cancers, and transplant failures. A small subset of effector memory T cells also expresses KIRs. Here, we use modern analytic tools including genome-wide and multiplex molecular, phenotypic, and functional assays to characterize the KIR+ T cells in human blood. We find that KIR+ T cells primarily reside in the CD56+ T population that is distinctively DNAM-1high with a genome-wide quiescent transcriptome, short telomere, and limited TCR excision circles. During cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation in bone marrow transplant recipients, KIR+CD56+ T cells rapidly expanded in real-time, but not KIR+CD56− T cells or KIR+ NK cells. In CMV+ asymptomatic donors, as much as 50% of CD56+ T cells are KIR+, and most are distinguishably KIR2DL2/3+NKG2C+CD57+. Functionally, the KIR+CD56+ T-cell subset lyses cancer cells and CMVpp65-pulsed target cells in a dual KIR-dependent and TCR-dependent manner. Analysis of metabolic transcriptome confirms the immunological memory status of KIR+CD56+ T cells, in contrast to KIR−CD56+ T cells that are more active in energy metabolism and effector differentiation. KIR−CD56+ T cells have >25-fold higher level of expression of RORC than the KIR+ counterpart and are a previously unknown producer of IL-13 rather than IL-17 in multiplex cytokine arrays. Our data provide fundamental insights intoKIR + T cells biologically and clinically. PMID:23858032

  10. The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunia (Petunia hybrida hort. superbissima as revealed by scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Muszyński

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultrastructure of pollen grain surface in allotetraploid petunias was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The pollen grain wall is developed into characteristic pattern of convulations.

  11. Homoeologous Recombination of the V1r1-V1r2 Gene Cluster of Pheromone Receptors in an Allotetraploid Lineage of Teleosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to other olfactory receptor families that exhibit frequent lineage-specific expansions, the vomeronasal type 1 receptor (V1R family exhibits a canonical six-member repertoire in teleosts. V1r1 and V1r2 are present in no more than one copy in all examined teleosts, including salmons, which are ancient polyploids, implying strict evolutionary constraints. However, recent polyploids have not been examined. Here, we identified a young allotetraploid lineage of weatherfishes and investigated their V1r1-V1r2 cluster. We found a novel pattern that the parental V1r1-V1r2 clusters had recombined in the tetraploid genome and that the recombinant was nearly fixed in the tetraploid population. Subsequent analyses suggested strong selective pressure, for both a new combination of paralogs and homogeneity among gene duplicates, acting on the V1r1-V1r2 pair.

  12. BioSMACK: a linux live CD for genome-wide association analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang Bum; Kim, Young Jin; Moon, Sanghoon; Shin, Young-Ah; Go, Min Jin; Kim, Dong-Joon; Lee, Jong-Young; Cho, Yoon Shin

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping technologies have enabled us to conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on a large cohort. However, analyzing millions of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is still a difficult task for researchers conducting a GWAS. Several difficulties such as compatibilities and dependencies are often encountered by researchers using analytical tools, during the installation of software. This is a huge obstacle to any research institute without computing facilities and specialists. Therefore, a proper research environment is an urgent need for researchers working on GWAS. We developed BioSMACK to provide a research environment for GWAS that requires no configuration and is easy to use. BioSMACK is based on the Ubuntu Live CD that offers a complete Linux-based operating system environment without installation. Moreover, we provide users with a GWAS manual consisting of a series of guidelines for GWAS and useful examples. BioSMACK is freely available at http://ksnp.cdc. go.kr/biosmack.

  13. Transgenerationally precipitated meiotic chromosome instability fuels rapid karyotypic evolution and phenotypic diversity in an artificially constructed allotetraploid wheat (AADD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Xiaowan; Bian, Yao; Zhang, Ai; Zhang, Huakun; Wang, Bin; Lv, Ruili; Li, Juzuo; Zhu, Bo; Gong, Lei; Liu, Bao

    2018-01-22

    Whereas a distinct karyotype with defined chromosome number and structure characterizes each biological species, it is intrinsically labile. Polyploidy or whole genome duplication (WGD) has played a pervasive and ongoing role in the evolution of all eukaryotes, and is the most dramatic force known to cause rapid karyotypic reconfiguration, especially at the initial stage. However, issues concerning transgenerational propagation of karyotypic heterogeneity and its translation to phenotypic diversity in nascent allopolyploidy, at the population level, have yet to be studied in detail. Here, we report a large-scale examination of transgenerationally propagated karyotypic heterogeneity and its phenotypic manifestation in an artificially constructed allotetraploid with a genome composition of AADD, i.e., involving two of the three progenitor genomes of polyploid wheat. Specifically, we show that (i) massive organismal karyotypic heterogeneity is precipitated after 12 consecutive generations of selfing from a single euploid founder individual; (ii) there exist dramatic differences in aptitudes between subgenomes and among chromosomes for whole-chromosome gain and/or loss and structural variations; (iii) majority of the numerical and structural chromosomal variations are concurrent due to mutual contingency and possible functional constraint; (iv) purposed and continuous selection and propagation for euploidy over generations did not result in enhanced karyotype stabilization; and (v) extent of karyotypic variation correlates with variability of phenotypic manifestation. Together, our results document that allopolyploidization catalyzes rampant and transgenerationally heritable organismal karyotypic heterogeneity that drives population-level phenotypic diversification, which lends fresh empirical support to the still contentious notion that WGD enhances organismal evolvability. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular

  14. Transfer of Genomics Information to Flow Cytometry: Expression of CD27 and CD44 Discriminates Subtypes of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vášková, M.; Mejstříková, E.; Kalina, T.; Martinková, Patrícia; Omelka, M.; Trka, J.; Starý, J.; Hrušák, O.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 5 (2005), s. 876-878 ISSN 0887-6924 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : transfer * genomics * information * cytometry * expression * discriminates * subtypesacute * lymphoblastic * leukemia Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 6.612, year: 2005

  15. Nuclear glutamine synthetase evolution in Nicotiana: phylogenetics and the origins of allotetraploid and homoploid (diploid) hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, James J; Kelly, Laura J; Leitch, Andrew R; Knapp, Sandra; Chase, Mark W

    2010-04-01

    Interspecies relationships in Nicotiana (Solanaceae) are complex because 40 species are diploid (two sets of chromosomes) and 35 species are allotetraploid (four sets of chromosomes, two from each progenitor diploid species). We sequenced a fragment (containing four introns) of the nuclear gene 'chloroplast-expressed glutamine synthetase' (ncpGS) in 65 species of Nicotiana. Here we present the first phylogenetic analysis based on a low-copy nuclear gene for this well studied and important genus. Diploid species have a single-copy of ncpGS, and allotetraploids as expected have two homeologous copies, each derived from their progenitor diploid. Results were particularly useful for determining the paternal lineage of previously enigmatic taxa (for which our previous analyses had revealed only the maternal progenitors). In particular, we were able to shed light on the origins of the two oldest and largest allotetraploid sections, N. sects. Suaveolentes and Repandae. All homeologues have an intact reading frame and apparently similar rates of divergence, suggesting both remain functional. Difficulties in fitting certain diploid species into the sectional classification of Nicotiana on morphological grounds, coupled with discordance between the ncpGS data and previous trees (i.e. plastid, nuclear ribosomal DNA), indicate a number of homoploid (diploid) hybrids in the genus. We have evidence for Nicotiana glutinosa and Nicotiana linearis being of hybrid origin and patterns of intra-allelic recombination also indicate the possibility of reticulate origins for other diploid species. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A computational search for box C/D snoRNA genes in the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, M C; Giordano, E; Riccardo, S; Digilio, F A; Iazzetti, G; Calogero, R A; Furia, M

    2004-12-12

    In eukaryotes, the family of non-coding RNA genes includes a number of genes encoding small nucleolar RNAs (mainly C/D and H/ACA snoRNAs), which act as guides in the maturation or post-transcriptional modifications of target RNA molecules. Since in Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) only few examples of snoRNAs have been identified so far by cDNA libraries screening, integration of the molecular data with in silico identification of these types of genes could throw light on their organization in the Dm genome. We have performed a computational screening of the Dm genome for C/D snoRNA genes, followed by experimental validation of the putative candidates. Few of the 26 confirmed snoRNAs had been recognized by cDNA library analysis. Organization of the Dm genome was also found to be more variegated than previously suspected, with snoRNA genes nested in both the introns and exons of protein-coding genes. This finding suggests that the presence of additional mechanisms of snoRNA biogenesis based on the alternative production of overlapping mRNA/snoRNA molecules. Additional information is available at http://www.bioinformatica.unito.it/bioinformatics/snoRNAs.

  17. Genome Insight and Comparative Pathogenomic Analysis of Nesterenkonia jeotgali Strain CD08_7 Isolated from Duodenal Mucosa of Celiac Disease Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Atul M.; Nair, Ramesan G.; Kaur, Gurwinder; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder K.; Bhadada, Sanjay K.; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Species of the genus Nesterenkonia have been isolated from different ecological niches, especially from saline habitats and reported as weak human pathogens causing asymptomatic bacteraemia. Here, for the first time we are reporting the genome sequence and pathogenomic analysis of a strain designated as CD08_7 isolated from the duodenal mucosa of a celiac disease patient, identified as Nesterenkonia jeotgali. To date, only five strains of the genus Nesterenkonia (N. massiliensis strain NP1T, Nesterenkonia sp. strain JCM 19054, Nesterenkonia sp. strain F and Nesterenkonia sp. strain AN1) have been whole genome sequenced and annotated. In the present study we have mapped and compared the virulence profile of N. jeotgali strain CD08_7 along with other reference genomes which showed some characteristic features that could contribute to pathogenicity. The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) based genome mining revealed more genes responsible for pathogenicity in strain CD08_7 when compared with the other four sequenced strains. The studied categories were resistance to antibiotic and toxic compounds, invasion and intracellular resistance, membrane transport, stress response, osmotic stress, oxidative stress, phages and prophages and iron acquisition. A total of 1431 protein-encoding genes were identified in the genome of strain CD08_7 among which 163 were predicted to contribute for pathogenicity. Out of 163 genes only 59 were common to other genome, which shows the higher levels of genetic richness in strain CD08_7 that may contribute to its functional versatility. This study provides a comprehensive analysis on genome of N. jeotgali strain CD08_7 and possibly indicates its importance as a clinical pathogen. PMID:28210247

  18. Genome-wide expression profiling analysis to identify key genes in the anti-HIV mechanism of CD4+and CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lijie; Wang, Yunqi; Li, Yi; Dong, Ya; Yang, Aimin; Zhang, Jie; Li, Fengying; Zhang, Rongqiang

    2018-03-06

    Comprehensive bioinformatics analyses were performed to explore the key biomarkers in response to HIV infection of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. The numbers of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells of HIV infected individuals were analyzed and the GEO database (GSE6740) was screened for differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HIV infected CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Gene Ontology enrichment, KEGG pathway analyses, and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network were performed to identify the key pathway and core proteins in anti-HIV virus process of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. Finally, we analyzed the expressions of key proteins in HIV-infected T cells (GSE6740 dataset) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMCs) (GSE511 dataset). 1) CD4 + T cells counts and ratio of CD4 + /CD8 + T cells decreased while CD8 + T cells counts increased in HIV positive individuals; 2) 517 DEGs were found in HIV infected CD4 + and CD8 + T cells at acute and chronic stage with the criterial of P-value CD8 + T cells changed significantly in HIV infection, in which ISG15 gene may play a central role in activating the natural antiviral process of immune cells. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Genome Sequence ofKocuria polarisStrain CD08_4, an Isolate from the Duodenal Mucosa of a Celiac Disease Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Atul Munish; Kumari, Munesh; Kochhar, Rakesh; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Bhadada, Sanjay Kumar; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

    2017-10-26

    We report here the 3.8-Mb genome sequence of Kocuria polaris strain CD08_4, an isolate from the duodenal mucosa of a celiac disease patient. The genome consists of specific virulence determinant genes, antibiotic resistance genes, genes for coping with oxidative stress, and genes responsible for iron acquisition and metabolism, suggestive of its pathogenic attributes. Copyright © 2017 Chander et al.

  20. Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat (Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent over 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat's domestication requires knowledge of the genome of its allo-tetraploid proge...

  1. Transmission of clonal hepatitis C virus genomes reveals the dominant but transitory role of CD8¿ T cells in early viral evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callendret, Benoît; Bukh, Jens; Eccleston, Heather B

    2011-01-01

    replacement in HCV viral populations. This question was addressed in two chimpanzees followed for 8 to 10 years after infection with a well-defined inoculum composed of a clonal genotype 1a (isolate H77C) HCV genome. Detailed characterization of CD8(+) T cell responses combined with sequencing of recovered...

  2. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  3. Functional genomics analysis of vitamin D effects on CD4+ T cells in vivo in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis ‬

    KAUST Repository

    Zeitelhofer, Manuel

    2017-02-15

    Vitamin D exerts multiple immunomodulatory functions and has been implicated in the etiology and treatment of several autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). We have previously reported that in juvenile/adolescent rats, vitamin D supplementation protects from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. Here we demonstrate that this protective effect associates with decreased proliferation of CD4+ T cells and lower frequency of pathogenic T helper (Th) 17 cells. Using transcriptome, methylome, and pathway analyses in CD4+ T cells, we show that vitamin D affects multiple signaling and metabolic pathways critical for T-cell activation and differentiation into Th1 and Th17 subsets in vivo. Namely, Jak/Stat, Erk/Mapk, and Pi3K/Akt/mTor signaling pathway genes were down-regulated upon vitamin D supplementation. The protective effect associated with epigenetic mechanisms, such as (i) changed levels of enzymes involved in establishment and maintenance of epigenetic marks, i.e., DNA methylation and histone modifications; (ii) genome-wide reduction of DNA methylation, and (iii) up-regulation of noncoding RNAs, including microRNAs, with concomitant down-regulation of their protein-coding target RNAs involved in T-cell activation and differentiation. We further demonstrate that treatment of myelin-specific T cells with vitamin D reduces frequency of Th1 and Th17 cells, down-regulates genes in key signaling pathways and epigenetic machinery, and impairs their ability to transfer EAE. Finally, orthologs of nearly 50% of candidate MS risk genes and 40% of signature genes of myelin-reactive T cells in MS changed their expression in vivo in EAE upon supplementation, supporting the hypothesis that vitamin D may modulate risk for developing MS.

  4. Comparative mitochondrial genome analysis reveals the evolutionary rearrangement mechanism in Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liu, G; Zhao, N; Chen, S; Liu, D; Ma, W; Hu, Z; Zhang, M

    2016-05-01

    The genus Brassica has many species that are important for oil, vegetable and other food products. Three mitochondrial genome types (mitotype) originated from its common ancestor. In this paper, a B. nigra mitochondrial main circle genome with 232,407 bp was generated through de novo assembly. Synteny analysis showed that the mitochondrial genomes of B. rapa and B. oleracea had a better syntenic relationship than B. nigra. Principal components analysis and development of a phylogenetic tree indicated maternal ancestors of three allotetraploid species in Us triangle of Brassica. Diversified mitotypes were found in allotetraploid B. napus, in which napus-type B. napus was derived from B. oleracea, while polima-type B. napus was inherited from B. rapa. In addition, the mitochondrial genome of napus-type B. napus was closer to botrytis-type than capitata-type B. oleracea. The sub-stoichiometric shifting of several mitochondrial genes suggested that mitochondrial genome rearrangement underwent evolutionary selection during domestication and/or plant breeding. Our findings clarify the role of diploid species in the maternal origin of allotetraploid species in Brassica and suggest the possibility of breeding selection of the mitochondrial genome. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  5. [Genome Rearrangements in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 with the Involvement of the Plasmid pRhico and the Prophage phiAb-Cd].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsy, E I; Petrova, L P

    2015-12-01

    Alphaproteobacteria of the species Azospirillum brasilense have a multicomponent genome that undergoes frequent spontaneous rearrangements, yielding changes in the plasmid profiles of strains. Specifically, variants (Cd, Sp7.K2, Sp7.1, Sp7.4, Sp7.8, etc.) of the type strainA. brasilense Sp7 that had lost a 115-MDa plasmid were previously selected. In many of them, the molecular weight of a 90-MDa plasmid (p90 or pRhico), which is a kind of "depot" for glycopolymer biosynthesis genes, increased. In this study, a collection of primers was designed to the plasmid pRhico and to the DNA of prophage phiAb-Cd integrated in it. The use ofthese primers in polymerase chain reactions allowed the detection of the probable excision of phiAb-Cd phage from the DNA of A. brasilense variants Sp7.4 and Sp7.8 and other alterations of the pRhico structure in A. brasilense strains Cd, Sp7.K2, and Sp7.8. The developed primers and PCR conditions may be recoin mended for primary analysis of spontaneous plasmid rearrangements in A. brasilense Sp7 and related strains.

  6. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  7. Preemptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy of acute cytomegalovirus infection prevents lethal disease, limits the burden of latent viral genomes, and reduces the risk of virus recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, H P; Kurz, S; Holtappels, R; Reddehase, M J

    1998-03-01

    In the immunocompetent host, primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is resolved by the immune response without causing overt disease. The viral genome, however, is not cleared but is maintained in a latent state that entails a risk of virus recurrence and consequent organ disease. By using murine CMV as a model, we have shown previously that multiple organs harbor latent CMV and that reactivation occurs with an incidence that is determined by the viral DNA load in the respective organ (M. J. Reddehase, M. Balthesen, M. Rapp, S. Jonjic, I. Pavic, and U. H. Koszinowski. J. Exp. Med. 179:185-193, 1994). This predicts that a therapeutic intervention capable of limiting the load of latent viral genome should also reduce the risk of virus recurrence. Here we demonstrate the benefits and the limits of a preemptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy of CMV infection in the immunocompromised bone marrow transplantation recipient. Antiviral CD8 T cells prevented CMV disease and accelerated the resolution of productive infection. The therapy also resulted in a lower load of latent CMV DNA in organs and consequently reduced the incidence of recurrence. The data thus provide a further supporting argument for clinical trials of preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease with CD8 T cells. However, CD8 T cells failed to clear the viral DNA. The therapy-susceptible portion of the DNA load differed between organs and was highest in the lungs. The existence of an invariant, therapy-resistant load suggests a role for immune system evasion mechanisms in the establishment of CMV latency.

  8. Global H3K4me3 genome mapping reveals alterations of innate immunity signaling and overexpression of JMJD3 in human myelodysplastic syndrome CD34+ cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Yue; Chen, Rui; Dimicoli, Sophie; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Neuberg, Donna; Pierce, Sherry; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui; Jia, Yu; Zheng, Hong; Fang, Zhihong; Nguyen, Martin; Ganan-Gomez, Irene; Ebert, Benjamin; Levine, Ross

    2013-01-01

    The molecular bases of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are not fully understood. Trimethylated histone 4 lysine 3 (H3K4me3) is present in promoters of actively transcribed genes and has been shown to be involved in hematopoietic differentiation. We performed a genome-wide H3K4me3 CHIP-Seq analysis of primary MDS bone marrow (BM) CD34+ cells. This resulted in the identification of 36 genes marked by distinct higher levels of promoter H3K4me3 in MDS. A majority of these genes are involved in NF...

  9. CD4 is expressed on a heterogeneous subset of hematopoietic progenitors, which persistently harbor CXCR4 and CCR5-tropic HIV proviral genomes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Nadia T; Zaikos, Thomas D; Terry, Valeri; Taschuk, Frances; McNamara, Lucy A; Onafuwa-Nuga, Adewunmi; Yucha, Ryan; Signer, Robert A J; Riddell Iv, James; Bixby, Dale; Markowitz, Norman; Morrison, Sean J; Collins, Kathleen L

    2017-07-01

    Latent HIV infection of long-lived cells is a barrier to viral clearance. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are a heterogeneous population of cells, some of which are long-lived. CXCR4-tropic HIVs infect a broad range of HSPC subtypes, including hematopoietic stem cells, which are multi-potent and long-lived. However, CCR5-tropic HIV infection is limited to more differentiated progenitor cells with life spans that are less well understood. Consistent with emerging data that restricted progenitor cells can be long-lived, we detected persistent HIV in restricted HSPC populations from optimally treated people. Further, genotypic and phenotypic analysis of amplified env alleles from donor samples indicated that both CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic viruses persisted in HSPCs. RNA profiling confirmed expression of HIV receptor RNA in a pattern that was consistent with in vitro and in vivo results. In addition, we characterized a CD4high HSPC sub-population that was preferentially targeted by a variety of CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIVs in vitro. Finally, we present strong evidence that HIV proviral genomes of both tropisms can be transmitted to CD4-negative daughter cells of multiple lineages in vivo. In some cases, the transmitted proviral genomes contained signature deletions that inactivated the virus, eliminating the possibility that coincidental infection explains the results. These data support a model in which both stem and non-stem cell progenitors serve as persistent reservoirs for CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV proviral genomes that can be passed to daughter cells.

  10. Genome-Based In Silico Identification of New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens Activating Polyfunctional CD8+ T Cells in Human Tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Caccamo, Nadia

    2011-01-01

    infection, because they were absent from M. tuberculosis-noninfected individuals. Control CMV peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramers stained CD8(+) T cells in M. tuberculosis-infected and noninfected individuals equally, whereas Ebola peptide/HLA-A*0201 tetramers were negative. In conclusion, the M. tuberculosis...

  11. Genome editing of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 by CRISPR-Cas9 protects CD4+T cells from HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhepeng; Chen, Shuliang; Jin, Xu; Wang, Qiankun; Yang, Kongxiang; Li, Chenlin; Xiao, Qiaoqiao; Hou, Panpan; Liu, Shuai; Wu, Shaoshuai; Hou, Wei; Xiong, Yong; Kong, Chunyan; Zhao, Xixian; Wu, Li; Li, Chunmei; Sun, Guihong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-01-01

    The main approach to treat HIV-1 infection is combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Although cART is effective in reducing HIV-1 viral load and controlling disease progression, it has many side effects, and is expensive for HIV-1 infected patients who must remain on lifetime treatment. HIV-1 gene therapy has drawn much attention as studies of genome editing tools have progressed. For example, zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 have been utilized to successfully disrupt the HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 or CXCR4, thereby restricting HIV-1 infection. However, the effects of simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 in blocking HIV-1 infection in primary CD4 + T cells has been rarely reported. Furthermore, combination of different target sites of CXCR4 and CCR5 for disruption also need investigation. In this report, we designed two different gRNA combinations targeting both CXCR4 and CCR5, in a single vector. The CRISPR-sgRNAs-Cas9 could successfully induce editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 genes in various cell lines and primary CD4 + T cells. Using HIV-1 challenge assays, we demonstrated that CXCR4-tropic or CCR5-tropic HIV-1 infections were significantly reduced in CXCR4 - and CCR5 -modified cells, and the modified cells exhibited a selective advantage over unmodified cells during HIV-1 infection. The off-target analysis showed that no non-specific editing was identified in all predicted sites. In addition, apoptosis assays indicated that simultaneous disruption of CXCR4 and CCR5 in primary CD4 + T cells by CRISPR-Cas9 had no obvious cytotoxic effects on cell viability. Our results suggest that simultaneous genome editing of CXCR4 and CCR5 by CRISPR-Cas9 can potentially provide an effective and safe strategy towards a functional cure for HIV-1 infection.

  12. Isolation and genome-wide expression and methylation characterization of CD31+ cells from normal and malignant human prostate tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Dan; Deeb, Kristin K.; Ma, Yingyu; Morrison, Carl D.; Liu, Song; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an important component involved in the angiogenesis. Little is known about the global gene expression and epigenetic regulation in tumor endothelial cells. The identification of gene expression and epigenetic difference between human prostate tumor-derived endothelial cells (TdECs) and those in normal tissues may uncover unique biological features of TdEC and facilitate the discovery of new anti-angiogenic targets. We established a method for isolation of CD31+ endothelial cells from malignant and normal prostate tissues obtained at prostatectomy. TdECs and normal-derived ECs (NdECs) showed >90% enrichment in primary culture and demonstrated microvascular endothelial cell characteristics such as cobblestone morphology in monolayer culture, diI-acetyl-LDL uptake and capillary-tube like formation in Matrigel®. In vitro primary cultures of ECs maintained expression of endothelial markers such as CD31, von Willebrand factor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. We then conducted a pilot study of transcriptome and methylome analysis of TdECs and matched NdECs from patients with prostate cancer. We observed a wide spectrum of differences in gene expression and methylation patterns in endothelial cells, between malignant and normal prostate tissues. Array-based expression and methylation data were validated by qRT-PCR and bisulfite DNA pyrosequencing. Further analysis of transcriptome and methylome data revealed a number of differentially expressed genes with loci whose methylation change is accompanied by an inverse change in gene expression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of isolation of ECs from histologically normal prostate and prostate cancer via CD31+ selection. The data, although preliminary, indicates that there exist widespread differences in methylation and transcription between TdECs and NdECs. Interestingly, only a small

  13. Cloning and characterization of homeologous cellulose synthase catalytic subunit 2 genes from allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Triplett, Barbara A; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Hinchliffe, Doug J; Li, Ping; Fang, David D

    2012-02-25

    Cellulose synthase catalytic subunits (CesAs) are the catalytic sites within a multisubunit complex for cellulose biosynthesis in plants. CesAs have been extensively studied in diploid plants, but are not well characterized in polyploid plants. Gossypium hirsutum is an allotetraploid cotton species producing over 90% of the world's cotton fibers. Although G. hirsutum CesAs (GhCesAs) are responsible for cellulose production in cotton fiber, very limited numbers of GhCesA genes have been identified. Here, we report isolating and characterizing a pair of homeologous CesA2 genes and their full-length cDNAs from allotetraploid cotton. The GhCesA2-A(T) gene from the A-subgenome and GhCesA2-D(T) gene from the D-subgenome were screened from a G. hirsutum BAC library. These genes shared 92% sequence similarity throughout the entire sequence. The coding sequences were nearly identical, and the deduced amino acid sequences from GhCesA2-A(T) (1,039 amino acids) and GhCesA2-D(T) (1,040 amino acids) were identical except four amino acids, whereas the noncoding sequences showed divergence. Sequence analyses showed that all exons of GhCesA2-A(T) contained consensus splice donor dinucleotides, but one exon in GhCesA2-D(T) contained nonconsensus splice donor dinucleotides. Although the nonconsensus splice donor dinucleotides were previously suggested to be involved in alternative splice or pseudogenization, our results showed that a majority of GhCesA2-A(T) and GhCesA2-D(T) transcripts consisted of functional and full-length transcripts with little evidence for alternative mRNA isoforms in developing cotton fibers. Expression analyses showed that GhCesA2-A(T) and GhCesA2-D(T) shared common temporal and spatial expression patterns, and they were highly and preferentially expressed during the cellulose biosynthesis stage in developing cotton fibers. The observations of higher expression levels of both GhCesA2-A(T) and GhCesA2-D(T) in developing fibers of one near-isogenic line (NIL

  14. Comparative Genome Analysis Reveals Divergent Genome Size Evolution in a Carnivorous Plant Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giang T. H. Vu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The C-value paradox remains incompletely resolved after >40 yr and is exemplified by 2,350-fold variation in genome sizes of flowering plants. The carnivorous Lentibulariaceae genus , displaying a 25-fold range of genome sizes, is a promising subject to study mechanisms and consequences of evolutionary genome size variation. Applying genomic, phylogenetic, and cytogenetic approaches, we uncovered bidirectional genome size evolution within the genus . The Steyerm. genome (86 Mbp has probably shrunk by retroelement silencing and deletion-biased double-strand break (DSB repair, from an ancestral size of 400 to 800 Mbp to become one of the smallest among flowering plants. The Stapf genome has expanded by whole-genome duplication (WGD and retrotransposition to 1550 Mbp. became allotetraploid after the split from the clade ∼29 Ma. A. St.-Hil. (179 Mbp, a close relative of , proved to be a recent (autotetraploid. Our analyses suggest a common ancestor of the genus a with an intermediate 1C value (400–800 Mbp and subsequent rapid genome size evolution in opposite directions. Many abundant repeats of the larger genome are absent in the smaller, casting doubt on their functionality for the organism, while recurrent WGD seems to safeguard against the loss of essential elements in the face of genome shrinkage. We cannot identify any consistent differences in habitat or life strategy that correlate with genome size changes, raising the possibility that these changes may be selectively neutral.

  15. The genome of Chenopodium quinoa

    KAUST Repository

    Jarvis, David Erwin

    2017-02-08

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.

  16. The genome of Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, David E; Ho, Yung Shwen; Lightfoot, Damien J; Schmöckel, Sandra M; Li, Bo; Borm, Theo J A; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Michell, Craig T; Saber, Noha; Kharbatia, Najeh M; Rupper, Ryan R; Sharp, Aaron R; Dally, Nadine; Boughton, Berin A; Woo, Yong H; Gao, Ge; Schijlen, Elio G W M; Guo, Xiujie; Momin, Afaque A; Negrão, Sónia; Al-Babili, Salim; Gehring, Christoph; Roessner, Ute; Jung, Christian; Murphy, Kevin; Arold, Stefan T; Gojobori, Takashi; Linden, C Gerard van der; van Loo, Eibertus N; Jellen, Eric N; Maughan, Peter J; Tester, Mark

    2017-02-16

    Chenopodium quinoa (quinoa) is a highly nutritious grain identified as an important crop to improve world food security. Unfortunately, few resources are available to facilitate its genetic improvement. Here we report the assembly of a high-quality, chromosome-scale reference genome sequence for quinoa, which was produced using single-molecule real-time sequencing in combination with optical, chromosome-contact and genetic maps. We also report the sequencing of two diploids from the ancestral gene pools of quinoa, which enables the identification of sub-genomes in quinoa, and reduced-coverage genome sequences for 22 other samples of the allotetraploid goosefoot complex. The genome sequence facilitated the identification of the transcription factor likely to control the production of anti-nutritional triterpenoid saponins found in quinoa seeds, including a mutation that appears to cause alternative splicing and a premature stop codon in sweet quinoa strains. These genomic resources are an important first step towards the genetic improvement of quinoa.

  17. Pattern of expression and interaction specificity of multiple G-protein beta (Gβ) subunit isoforms with their potential target proteins reveal functional dominance of BjuGβ1 in the allotetraploid Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Roshan; Sharma, Aprajita; Chandel, Ishita; Bisht, Naveen C

    2017-09-01

    Heterotrimeric G-protein, consisting Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits, interacts with various upstream and downstream effector (target) proteins to regulate a large array of conserved and species-specific biological functions. The targets of G-protein components are recently reported in model plant Arabidopsis thaliana; however limited information is available from crop species. In this study, we utilized yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay to screen the diversity of interacting partners of multiple Gβ subunit isoforms from allotetraploid Brassica juncea, a globally important oilseed and vegetable crop. The three BjuGβ genes (BjuGβ1-3), resulted from whole genome triplication event in Brassica lineage, showed distinct expression profile during plant developmental stages with maximal transcript abundance during reproductive stages. Protein-protein interaction of three BjuGβ proteins (bait) against the Y2H cDNA library (prey) identified a total of 14 and 1 non-redundant targets for BjuGβ1 and BjuGβ2, whereas BjuGβ3 screening surprisingly did not yield any genuine target, thereby suggesting functional dominance of BjuGβ1. The triplicated BjuGβ isoforms showed a high degree of interaction strength and specificity with the identified target proteins, which are known to be involved in diverse biological functions in plants. qRT-PCR analysis further indicated that the expression of BjuGβ-target genes was developmentally regulated under various tissue types studied and showed a high degree of co-expression pattern with the BjuGβ genes, particularly during flower and silique development in B. juncea. Taken together, our data provides novel insights on pattern of expression and interaction specificity governing functional divergence of multiple Gβ subunit proteins in polyploid B. juncea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Wild emmer genome architecture and diversity elucidate wheat evolution and domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avni, Raz; Nave, Moran; Barad, Omer; Baruch, Kobi; Twardziok, Sven O; Gundlach, Heidrun; Hale, Iago; Mascher, Martin; Spannagl, Manuel; Wiebe, Krystalee; Jordan, Katherine W; Golan, Guy; Deek, Jasline; Ben-Zvi, Batsheva; Ben-Zvi, Gil; Himmelbach, Axel; MacLachlan, Ron P; Sharpe, Andrew G; Fritz, Allan; Ben-David, Roi; Budak, Hikmet; Fahima, Tzion; Korol, Abraham; Faris, Justin D; Hernandez, Alvaro; Mikel, Mark A; Levy, Avraham A; Steffenson, Brian; Maccaferri, Marco; Tuberosa, Roberto; Cattivelli, Luigi; Faccioli, Primetta; Ceriotti, Aldo; Kashkush, Khalil; Pourkheirandish, Mohammad; Komatsuda, Takao; Eilam, Tamar; Sela, Hanan; Sharon, Amir; Ohad, Nir; Chamovitz, Daniel A; Mayer, Klaus F X; Stein, Nils; Ronen, Gil; Peleg, Zvi; Pozniak, Curtis J; Akhunov, Eduard D; Distelfeld, Assaf

    2017-07-07

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) is one of the founder crops that likely drove the Neolithic transition to sedentary agrarian societies in the Fertile Crescent more than 10,000 years ago. Identifying genetic modifications underlying wheat's domestication requires knowledge about the genome of its allo-tetraploid progenitor, wild emmer ( T. turgidum ssp. dicoccoides ). We report a 10.1-gigabase assembly of the 14 chromosomes of wild tetraploid wheat, as well as analyses of gene content, genome architecture, and genetic diversity. With this fully assembled polyploid wheat genome, we identified the causal mutations in Brittle Rachis 1 ( TtBtr1 ) genes controlling shattering, a key domestication trait. A study of genomic diversity among wild and domesticated accessions revealed genomic regions bearing the signature of selection under domestication. This reference assembly will serve as a resource for accelerating the genome-assisted improvement of modern wheat varieties. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Comparative Proteomic, Physiological, Morphological, and Biochemical Analyses Reveal the Characteristics of the Diploid Spermatozoa of Allotetraploid Hybrids of Red Crucian Carp (Carassius auratus) and Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Wei; Xu, Kang; Hu, Fangzhou; Zhang, Yi; Wen, Ming; Wang, Jing; Tao, Min; Luo, Kaikun; Zhao, Rurong; Qin, Qinbo; Zhang, Chun; Liu, Jinhui; Liu, Yun; Liu, Shaojun

    2016-02-01

    The generation of diploid spermatozoa is essential for the continuity of tetraploid lineages. The DNA content of diploid spermatozoa from allotetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp and common carp was nearly twice as great as that of haploid spermatozoa from common carp, and the durations of rapid and slow progressive motility were longer. We performed comparative proteomic analyses to measure variations in protein composition between diploid and haploid spermatozoa. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 21 protein spots that changed in abundance were analyzed. As the common carp and the allotetraploid hybrids are not fully sequenced organisms, we identified proteins by Mascot searching against the National Center for Biotechnology Information non-redundant (NR) protein database for the zebrafish (Danio rerio), and verified them against predicted homologous proteins derived from transcriptomes of the testis. Twenty protein spots were identified successfully, belonging to four gene ontogeny categories: cytoskeleton, energy metabolism, the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and other functions, indicating that these might be associated with the variation in diploid spermatozoa. This categorization of variations in protein composition in diploid spermatozoa will provide new perspectives on male polyploidy. Moreover, our approach indicates that transcriptome data are useful for proteomic analyses in organisms lacking full protein sequences. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  20. Molecular pathway profiling of T lymphocyte signal transduction pathways; Th1 and Th2 genomic fingerprints are defined by TCR and CD28-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smeets Ruben L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T lymphocytes are orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Naïve T cells may differentiate into Th1, Th2, Th17 or iTreg phenotypes, depending on environmental co-stimulatory signals. To identify genes and pathways involved in differentiation of Jurkat T cells towards Th1 and Th2 subtypes we performed comprehensive transcriptome analyses of Jurkat T cells stimulated with various stimuli and pathway inhibitors. Results from these experiments were validated in a human experimental setting using whole blood and purified CD4+ Tcells. Results Calcium-dependent activation of T cells using CD3/CD28 and PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a Th1 expression profile reflected by increased expression of T-bet, RUNX3, IL-2, and IFNγ, whereas calcium-independent activation via PMA/CD28 induced a Th2 expression profile which included GATA3, RXRA, CCL1 and Itk. Knock down with siRNA and gene expression profiling in the presence of selective kinase inhibitors showed that proximal kinases Lck and PKCθ are crucial signaling hubs during T helper cell activation, revealing a clear role for Lck in Th1 development and for PKCθ in both Th1 and Th2 development. Medial signaling via MAPkinases appeared to be less important in these pathways, since specific inhibitors of these kinases displayed a minor effect on gene expression. Translation towards a primary, whole blood setting and purified human CD4+ T cells revealed that PMA/CD3 stimulation induced a more pronounced Th1 specific, Lck and PKCθ dependent IFNγ production, whereas PMA/CD28 induced Th2 specific IL-5 and IL-13 production, independent of Lck activation. PMA/CD3-mediated skewing towards a Th1 phenotype was also reflected in mRNA expression of the master transcription factor Tbet, whereas PMA/CD28-mediated stimulation enhanced GATA3 mRNA expression in primary human CD4+ Tcells. Conclusions This study identifies stimulatory pathways and gene expression profiles for in vitro skewing of T helper cell

  1. Genome Sizes in Hepatica Mill: (Ranunculaceae Show a Loss of DNA, Not a Gain, in Polyploids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. J. M. Zonneveld

    2010-01-01

    , and a possible pentaploid. The somatic nuclear DNA contents (2C-value, as measured by flow cytometry with propidium iodide, were shown to range from 33 to 80 pg. The Asiatic and American species, often considered subspecies of H. nobilis, could be clearly distinguished from European H. nobilis. DNA content confirmed the close relationships in the Asiatic species, and these are here considered as subspecies of H. asiatica. Parents for the allotetraploid species could be suggested based on their nuclear DNA content. Contrary to the increase in genome size suggested earlier for Hepatica, a significant (6%–14% loss of nuclear DNA in the natural allopolyploids was found.

  2. Mitochondrial Genomics and CD4 T-cell Count Recovery after Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study 384

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Benjamin J.; Samuels, David C.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Selph, Doug; Canter, Jeffrey A.; Pollard, Richard B.; Haas, David W.; Shafer, Robert; Kalams, Spyros A.; Murdock, Deborah G.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Hulgan, Todd

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation has been associated with time to progression to AIDS and adverse effects from antiretroviral therapy (ART). In this study, full mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data from U.S.-based adult participants in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) study 384 was used to assess associations between mtDNA variants and CD4 T cell recovery with ART. METHODS Full mtDNA sequence was determined using chip-based array sequencing. Sequence and CD4 cell count data was available at baseline and after ART initiation for 423 subjects with HIV RNA levels 1% revealed multiple mtDNA variants marginally associated (P < 0.05 before Bonferroni correction) with CD4 cell recovery. The most significant SNP associations were those tagging the African L2 haplogroup, which was associated with a decreased likelihood of ≥100 cells/mm3 CD4 count increase at week 48 in non-Hispanic blacks (adjusted OR=0.17; 95% CI=0.06–0.53; P=0.002). CONCLUSIONS An African mtDNA haplogroup was associated with CD4 cell recovery after ART in this clinical trial population. These initial findings warrant replication and further investigation in order to confirm the role of mtDNA variation in CD4 cell recovery during ART. PMID:21792066

  3. Reconstructing the Evolution of Brachypodium Genomes Using Comparative Chromosome Painting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Betekhtin

    Full Text Available Brachypodium distachyon is a model for the temperate cereals and grasses and has a biology, genomics infrastructure and cytogenetic platform fit for purpose. It is a member of a genus with fewer than 20 species, which have different genome sizes, basic chromosome numbers and ploidy levels. The phylogeny and interspecific relationships of this group have not to date been resolved by sequence comparisons and karyotypical studies. The aims of this study are not only to reconstruct the evolution of Brachypodium karyotypes to resolve the phylogeny, but also to highlight the mechanisms that shape the evolution of grass genomes. This was achieved through the use of comparative chromosome painting (CCP which hybridises fluorescent, chromosome-specific probes derived from B. distachyon to homoeologous meiotic chromosomes of its close relatives. The study included five diploids (B. distachyon 2n = 10, B. sylvaticum 2n = 18, B. pinnatum 2n = 16; 2n = 18, B. arbuscula 2n = 18 and B. stacei 2n = 20 three allotetraploids (B. pinnatum 2n = 28, B. phoenicoides 2n = 28 and B. hybridum 2n = 30, and two species of unknown ploidy (B. retusum 2n = 38 and B. mexicanum 2n = 40. On the basis of the patterns of hybridisation and incorporating published data, we propose two alternative, but similar, models of karyotype evolution in the genus Brachypodium. According to the first model, the extant genome of B. distachyon derives from B. mexicanum or B. stacei by several rounds of descending dysploidy, and the other diploids evolve from B. distachyon via ascending dysploidy. The allotetraploids arise by interspecific hybridisation and chromosome doubling between B. distachyon and other diploids. The second model differs from the first insofar as it incorporates an intermediate 2n = 18 species between the B. mexicanum or B. stacei progenitors and the dysploidic B. distachyon.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Study among Four Horse Breeds Identifies a Common Haplotype Associated with In Vitro CD3+ T Cell Susceptibility/Resistance to Equine Arteritis Virus Infection ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Yun Young; Bailey, Ernest; Cook, Deborah G.; Coleman, Stephen J.; MacLeod, James N.; Chen, Kuey-Chu; Timoney, Peter J.; Balasuriya, Udeni B. R.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we have shown that horses could be divided into susceptible and resistant groups based on an in vitro assay using dual-color flow cytometric analysis of CD3+ T cells infected with equine arteritis virus (EAV). Here, we demonstrate that the differences in in vitro susceptibility of equine CD3+ T lymphocytes to EAV infection have a genetic basis. To investigate the possible hereditary basis for this trait, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to compare susceptible and resistant phenotypes. Testing of 267 DNA samples from four horse breeds that had a susceptible or a resistant CD3+ T lymphocyte phenotype using both Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip and Sequenom's MassARRAY system identified a common, genetically dominant haplotype associated with the susceptible phenotype in a region of equine chromosome 11 (ECA11), positions 49572804 to 49643932. The presence of a common haplotype indicates that the trait occurred in a common ancestor of all four breeds, suggesting that it may be segregated among other modern horse breeds. Biological pathway analysis revealed several cellular genes within this region of ECA11 encoding proteins associated with virus attachment and entry, cytoskeletal organization, and NF-κB pathways that may be associated with the trait responsible for the in vitro susceptibility/resistance of CD3+ T lymphocytes to EAV infection. The data presented in this study demonstrated a strong association of genetic markers with the trait, representing de facto proof that the trait is under genetic control. To our knowledge, this is the first GWAS of an equine infectious disease and the first GWAS of equine viral arteritis. PMID:21994447

  5. A genome-wide association study in the Japanese population identifies susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes at UBE2E2 and C2CD4A-C2CD4B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Hara, Kazuo; Maeda, Shiro

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of type 2 diabetes (T2D) using 459,359 SNPs in a Japanese population with a three-stage study design (stage 1, 4,470 cases and 3,071 controls; stage 2, 2,886 cases and 3,087 controls; stage 3, 3,622 cases and 2,356 controls). We identified new associat......We conducted a genome-wide association study of type 2 diabetes (T2D) using 459,359 SNPs in a Japanese population with a three-stage study design (stage 1, 4,470 cases and 3,071 controls; stage 2, 2,886 cases and 3,087 controls; stage 3, 3,622 cases and 2,356 controls). We identified new...

  6. Identification of relevant drugable targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using a genome-wide unbiased CD20 guilt-by association approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Mathilde R. W.; Visser, Lydia; Huls, Gerwin; Diepstra, Arjan; van Vugt, Marcel; Ammatuna, Emanuele; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; Vellenga, Edo; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; van Meerten, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Forty percent of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) show resistant disease to standard chemotherapy (CHOP) in combination with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (R). Although many new anti-cancer drugs were developed in the last years, it is unclear which of these drugs

  7. Preemptive CD8 T-Cell Immunotherapy of Acute Cytomegalovirus Infection Prevents Lethal Disease, Limits the Burden of Latent Viral Genomes, and Reduces the Risk of Virus Recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Steffens, Hans-Peter; Kurz, Sabine; Holtappels, Rafaela; Reddehase, Matthias J.

    1998-01-01

    In the immunocompetent host, primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is resolved by the immune response without causing overt disease. The viral genome, however, is not cleared but is maintained in a latent state that entails a risk of virus recurrence and consequent organ disease. By using murine CMV as a model, we have shown previously that multiple organs harbor latent CMV and that reactivation occurs with an incidence that is determined by the viral DNA load in the respective organ (M. J....

  8. Novel genomes and genome constitutions identified by GISH and 5S rDNA and knotted1 genomic sequences in the genus Setaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meicheng; Zhi, Hui; Doust, Andrew N; Li, Wei; Wang, Yongfang; Li, Haiquan; Jia, Guanqing; Wang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Ning; Diao, Xianmin

    2013-04-11

    The Setaria genus is increasingly of interest to researchers, as its two species, S. viridis and S. italica, are being developed as models for understanding C4 photosynthesis and plant functional genomics. The genome constitution of Setaria species has been studied in the diploid species S. viridis, S. adhaerans and S. grisebachii, where three genomes A, B and C were identified respectively. Two allotetraploid species, S. verticillata and S. faberi, were found to have AABB genomes, and one autotetraploid species, S. queenslandica, with an AAAA genome, has also been identified. The genomes and genome constitutions of most other species remain unknown, even though it was thought there are approximately 125 species in the genus distributed world-wide. GISH was performed to detect the genome constitutions of Eurasia species of S. glauca, S. plicata, and S. arenaria, with the known A, B and C genomes as probes. No or very poor hybridization signal was detected indicating that their genomes are different from those already described. GISH was also performed reciprocally between S. glauca, S. plicata, and S. arenaria genomes, but no hybridization signals between each other were found. The two sets of chromosomes of S. lachnea both hybridized strong signals with only the known C genome of S. grisebachii. Chromosomes of Qing 9, an accession formerly considered as S. viridis, hybridized strong signal only to B genome of S. adherans. Phylogenetic trees constructed with 5S rDNA and knotted1 markers, clearly classify the samples in this study into six clusters, matching the GISH results, and suggesting that the F genome of S. arenaria is basal in the genus. Three novel genomes in the Setaria genus were identified and designated as genome D (S. glauca), E (S. plicata) and F (S. arenaria) respectively. The genome constitution of tetraploid S. lachnea is putatively CCC'C'. Qing 9 is a B genome species indigenous to China and is hypothesized to be a newly identified species. The

  9. TU-CD-BRB-07: Identification of Associations Between Radiologist-Annotated Imaging Features and Genomic Alterations in Breast Invasive Carcinoma, a TCGA Phenotype Research Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, A; Net, J [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Brandt, K [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Huang, E [National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Freymann, J; Kirby, J [Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick, MD (United States); Burnside, E [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Morris, E; Sutton, E [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Bonaccio, E [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Giger, M; Jaffe, C [Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Ganott, M; Zuley, M [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center - Magee Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Le-Petross, H [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dogan, B [UT MDACC, Houston, TX (United States); Whitman, G [UTMDACC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine associations between radiologist-annotated MRI features and genomic measurements in breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Methods: 98 TCGA patients with BRCA were assessed by a panel of radiologists (TCGA Breast Phenotype Research Group) based on a variety of mass and non-mass features according to the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS). Batch corrected gene expression data was obtained from the TCGA Data Portal. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to assess correlations between categorical image features and tumor-derived genomic features (such as gene pathway activity, copy number and mutation characteristics). Image-derived features were also correlated with estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) status. Multiple hypothesis correction was done using Benjamini-Hochberg FDR. Associations at an FDR of 0.1 were selected for interpretation. Results: ER status was associated with rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. PR status was associated with internal enhancement. Several components of the PI3K/Akt pathway were associated with rim enhancement as well as heterogeneity. In addition, several components of cell cycle regulation and cell division were associated with imaging characteristics.TP53 and GATA3 mutations were associated with lesion size. MRI features associated with TP53 mutation status were rim enhancement and peritumoral edema. Rim enhancement was associated with activity of RB1, PIK3R1, MAP3K1, AKT1,PI3K, and PIK3CA. Margin status was associated with HIF1A/ARNT, Ras/ GTP/PI3K, KRAS, and GADD45A. Axillary lymphadenopathy was associated with RB1 and BCL2L1. Peritumoral edema was associated with Aurora A/GADD45A, BCL2L1, CCNE1, and FOXA1. Heterogeneous internal nonmass enhancement was associated with EGFR, PI3K, AKT1, HF/MET, and EGFR/Erbb4/neuregulin 1. Diffuse nonmass enhancement was associated with HGF/MET/MUC20/SHIP

  10. Faithful inheritance of cytosine methylation patterns in repeated sequences of the allotetraploid tobacco correlates with the expression of DNA methyltransferase gene families from both parental genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fulneček, Jaroslav; Matyášek, Roman; Kovařík, Aleš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 281, č. 4 (2009), s. 407-420 ISSN 1617-4615 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/06/1432; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/07/0116 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : cytosine methylation * DNA (cytosine-5) methyltransferase * allopolyploidy Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.579, year: 2009

  11. TU-CD-BRB-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Identification of Molecular Phenotypes by Integrating Radiomics and Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossmann, P; Velazquez, E Rios; Parmar, C; Aerts, H [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grove, O; Gillies, R [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); El-Hachem, N [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Leijenaar, R [Research Institute GROW, Maastricht (Netherlands); Haibe-Kains, B [University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lambin, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To uncover the mechanistic connections between radiomic features, molecular pathways, and clinical outcomes, to develop radiomic based predictors of pathway activation states in individual patients, and to assess whether combining radiomic with clinical and genomic data improves prognostication. Methods: We analyzed two independent lung cancer cohorts totaling 351 patients, for whom diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scans, gene-expression profiles, and clinical outcomes were available. The tumor phenotype was characterized based on 636 radiomic features describing tumor intensity, texture, shape and size. We performed an integrative analysis by developing and independently validating association modules of coherently expressed radiomic features and molecular pathways. These modules were statistically tested for significant associations to overall survival (OS), TNM stage, and pathologic histology. Results: We identified thirteen radiomic-pathway association modules (p < 0.05), the most prominent of which were associated with the immune system, p53 pathway, and other pathways involved in cell cycle regulation. Eleven modules were significantly associated with clinical outcomes (p < 0.05). Strong predictive power for pathway activation states in individual patients was observed using radiomics; the strongest per module predictions ranged from an intra-tumor heterogeneity feature predicting RNA III polymerase transcription (AUC 0.62, p = 0.03), to a tumor intensity dispersion feature predicting pyruvate metabolism and citric acid TCA cycle (AUC 0.72, p < 10−{sup 6}). Stepwise combinations of radiomic data with clinical outcomes and gene expression profiles resulted in consistent increases of prognostic power to predict OS (concordance index max = 0.73, p < 10−{sup 9}). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that radiomic approaches permit a non-invasive assessment of molecular and clinical characteristics of tumors, and therefore have the unprecedented

  12. CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Søren K; Møller, Holger J

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is a hemoglobin scavenger receptor exclusively expressed in the monocyte-macrophage system. A particularly high expression is seen in macrophages of the 'alternative activation' phenotype playing a major role in dampening the inflammatory response and in scavenging components of damaged cells...... of hemoglobin to the macrophage may fuel an anti-inflammatory response because heme metabolites have potent anti-inflammatory effects. In addition to being present on the macrophage surface, continuous shedding of the extracellular domain of CD163 leads to substantial amounts of soluble receptor in plasma....... An increased shedding is due to inflammatory stimuli, and a role for soluble CD163 in immune suppression has been proposed. Furthermore, recent data indicate that soluble CD163 may be a valuable diagnostic parameter for monitoring macrophage activation in inflammatory conditions....

  13. Comparative genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily in Gossypium: A focus on Gossypium hirsutum under salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Dong

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs are a superfamily of enzymes which play important role in the scavenging of active aldehydes molecules. In present work, a comprehensive whole-genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily was carried out for an allotetraploid cultivated cotton species, G. hirsutum, as well as in parallel relative to their diploid progenitors, G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Totally, 30 and 58 ALDH gene sequences belong to 10 families were identified from diploid and allotetraploid cotton species, respectively. The gene structures among the members from same families were highly conserved. Whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication might be the major driver for the expansion of ALDH gene superfamily in G. hirsutum. In addition, the expression patterns of GhALDH genes were diverse across tissues. Most GhALDH genes were induced or repressed by salt stress in upland cotton. Our observation shed lights on the molecular evolutionary properties of ALDH genes in diploid cottons and their alloallotetraploid derivatives. It may be useful to mine key genes for improvement of cotton response to salt stress.

  14. Isolation and characterization of the betalain biosynthesis gene involved in hypocotyl pigmentation of the allotetraploid Chenopodium quinoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroki; Miyazato, Akio; Ohki, Shinya; Mizukoshi, Hiroharu; Mori, Masashi

    2018-02-05

    In quinoa seedlings, the pigment betalain accumulates in the hypocotyl. To isolate the genes involved in betalain biosynthesis in the hypocotyl, we performed ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis on the CQ127 variety of quinoa seedlings. While putative amaranthin and celosianin II primarily accumulate in the hypocotyls, this process produced a green hypocotyl mutant (ghy). This MutMap+ method using the quinoa draft genome revealed that the causative gene of the mutant is CqCYP76AD1-1. Our results indicated that the expression of CqCYP76AD1-1 was light-dependent. In addition, the transient expression of CqCYP76AD1-1 in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves resulted in the accumulation of betanin but not isobetanin, and the presence of a polymorphism in CqCYP76A1-2 in the CQ127 variety was shown to have resulted in its loss of function. These findings suggested that CqCYP76AD1-1 is involved in betalain biosynthesis during the hypocotyl pigmentation process in quinoa. To our knowledge, CqCYP76AD1-1 is the first quinoa gene identified by EMS mutagenesis using a draft gene sequence. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Radiosensitivity of CD3-CD8+CD56+ NK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vokurkova, Doris [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Simkova 870, 50038 Hradec Kralove 1 (Czech Republic); Vavrova, Jirina [University of Defence, Faculty of Military Health Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Sinkora, Jiri [Becton Dickinson (Czech Republic); Stoklasova, Alena [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Simkova 870, 50038 Hradec Kralove 1 (Czech Republic); Blaha, Vaclav [University of Defence, Faculty of Military Health Sciences, Department of Radiobiology, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Rezacova, Martina, E-mail: rezacovam@lfhk.cuni.c [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Simkova 870, 50038 Hradec Kralove 1 (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-15

    The effect of lower doses (0.5-3.0 Gy) of gamma radiation on radiosensitivity of CD3-/CD8+ NK cells subpopulation isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy volunteers was studied 48 h after the irradiation. Only a subtle increase in terms of induction of apoptosis (A+ cells), was observed in Annexin positive CD3-/CD8+ NK cells. The assessment of the relative presence of CD3{sup -}/CD8{sup +} NK cells in Annexin negative populations of lymphocytes considerably contributes to the elimination of individual variability and could be useful in biodosimetry. Living CD3-/CD8+; Annexin negative NK cells were analyzed using five-color flow cytometry 16 h after irradiation by the doses of 1-10 Gy. The study was carried out on NK cells subsets CD3-/CD8- CD16+, CD56 (dim) and CD56 (bright). NK cells characterized with their low-density expression of CD56 (dim) are more cytotoxic and express CD16. Those with high-density expression of CD56 (bright) are known for their capacity to produce cytokines following activation of monocytes but their natural cytotoxicity is low; they are classified as CD16- or CD16 (dim). A dose-depending decrease in the relative presence of CD3-/CD8+ NK cells was observed 16 h after ionizing radiation (1-10 Gy). The decrease was highly pronounced in CD56 (bright) subset of NK cells and this subpopulation was considered as the most radiosensitive one. Unfortunately, the most radiosensitive subpopulation of NK cells - CD56bright cannot be used as a biodosimetric marker due to its insufficient amount in peripheral blood.

  16. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte/macrophage-specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants...... are substantially expressed in blood, liver, and spleen, and the short tail variant is the predominant mRNA species. Using cell transfectants in which cDNA encoding the CD163 variants was inserted at the same site in the genome, we evaluated the expression and endocytic properties of the tail variants. Ligand...... uptake analysis showed that cells expressing the CD163 short tail variant exhibited a higher capacity for ligand endocytosis than cells expressing the CD163 long tail variants. The difference in endocytic activity was explained by confocal microscopic analysis, showing marked deviations in subcellular...

  17. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events and Multimedia Implementation Genetics 101 Family Health History Genomics and Diseases Genetic Counseling Genomic Testing Epidemiology Pathogen Genomics Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: Identifying Opportunities to ...

  18. A New Synthetic Allotetraploid (A1A1G2G2) between Gossypium herbaceum and G. australe: Bridging for Simultaneously Transferring Favorable Genes from These Two Diploid Species into Upland Cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Yingying; Chen, Jinjin; Zhang, Tianzhen; Zhou, Baoliang

    2015-01-01

    Gossypium herbaceum, a cultivated diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, A1A1), has favorable traits such as excellent drought tolerance and resistance to sucking insects and leaf curl virus. G. australe, a wild diploid cotton species (2n = 2x = 26, G2G2), possesses numerous economically valuable characteristics such as delayed pigment gland morphogenesis (which is conducive to the production of seeds with very low levels of gossypol as a potential food source for humans and animals) and resistance to insects, wilt diseases and abiotic stress. Creating synthetic allotetraploid cotton from these two species would lay the foundation for simultaneously transferring favorable genes into cultivated tetraploid cotton. Here, we crossed G. herbaceum (as the maternal parent) with G. australe to produce an F1 interspecific hybrid and doubled its chromosome complement with colchicine, successfully generating a synthetic tetraploid. The obtained tetraploid was confirmed by morphology, cytology and molecular markers and then self-pollinated. The S1 seedlings derived from this tetraploid gradually became flavescent after emergence of the fifth true leaf, but they were rescued by grafting and produced S2 seeds. The rescued S1 plants were partially fertile due to the existence of univalents at Metaphase I of meiosis, leading to the formation of unbalanced, nonviable gametes lacking complete sets of chromosomes. The S2 plants grew well and no flavescence was observed, implying that interspecific incompatibility, to some extent, had been alleviated in the S2 generation. The synthetic allotetraploid will be quite useful for polyploidy evolutionary studies and as a bridge for transferring favorable genes from these two diploid species into Upland cotton through hybridization. PMID:25879660

  19. Comparative genomics indicates the mammalian CD33rSiglec locus evolved by an ancient large-scale inverse duplication and suggests all Siglecs share a common ancestral region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huan; de Bono, Bernard; Belov, Katherine; Wong, Emily S; Trowsdale, John; Barrow, Alexander David

    2009-05-01

    The CD33-related sialic acid binding Ig-like lectins (CD33rSiglecs) are predominantly inhibitory receptors expressed on leukocytes. They are distinguishable from conserved Siglecs, such as Sialoadhesin and MAG, by their rapid evolution. A comparison of the CD33rSiglec gene cluster in different mammalian species showed that it can be divided into subclusters, A and B. The two subclusters, inverted in relation to each other, each encode a set of CD33rSiglec genes arranged head-to-tail. Two regions of strong correspondence provided evidence for a large-scale inverse duplication, encompassing the framework CEACAM-18 (CE18) and ATPBD3 (ATB3) genes that seeded the mammalian CD33rSiglec cluster. Phylogenetic analysis was consistent with the predicted inversion. Rodents appear to have undergone wholesale loss of CD33rSiglec genes after the inverse duplication. In contrast, CD33rSiglecs expanded in primates and many are now pseudogenes with features consistent with activating receptors. In contrast to mammals, the fish CD33rSiglecs clusters show no evidence of an inverse duplication. They display greater variation in cluster size and structure than mammals. The close arrangement of other Siglecs and CD33rSiglecs in fish is consistent with a common ancestral region for Siglecs. Expansion of mammalian CD33rSiglecs appears to have followed a large inverse duplication of a smaller primordial cluster over 180 million years ago, prior to eutherian/marsupial divergence. Inverse duplications in general could potentially have a stabilizing effect in maintaining the size and structure of large gene clusters, facilitating the rapid evolution of immune gene families.

  20. Genome-wide mining, characterization, and development of microsatellite markers in gossypium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Fang, Lei; Chen, Jiedan; Hu, Yan; Si, Zhanfeng; Wang, Sen; Chang, Lijing; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2015-06-01

    Although much research has been conducted to characterize microsatellites and develop markers, the distribution of microsatellites remains ambiguous and the use of microsatellite markers in genomic studies and marker-assisted selection is limited. To identify microsatellites for cotton research, we mined 100,290, 83,160, and 56,937 microsatellites with frequencies of 41.2, 49.1, and 74.8 microsatellites per Mb in the recently sequenced Gossypium species: G. hirsutum, G. arboreum, and G. raimondii, respectively. The distributions of microsatellites in their genomes were non-random and were positively and negatively correlated with genes and transposable elements, respectively. Of the 77,996 developed microsatellite markers, 65,498 were physically anchored to the 26 chromosomes of G. hirsutum with an average marker density of 34 markers per Mb. We confirmed 67,880 (87%) universal and 7,705 (9.9%) new genic microsatellite markers. The polymorphism was estimated in above three species by in silico PCR and validated with 505 markers in G. hirsutum. We further predicted 8,825 polymorphic microsatellite markers within G. hirsutum acc. TM-1 and G. barbadense cv. Hai7124. In our study, genome-wide mining and characterization of microsatellites, and marker development were very useful for the saturation of the allotetraploid genetic linkage map, genome evolution studies and comparative genome mapping.

  1. On the allopolyploid origin and genome structure of the closely related species Hordeum secalinum and Hordeum capense inferred by molecular karyotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Ángeles; de Bustos, Alfredo; Jouve, Nicolás

    2017-08-01

    To provide additional information to the many phylogenetic analyses conducted within Hordeum , here the origin and interspecific affinities of the allotetraploids Hordeum secalinum and Hordeum capense were analysed by molecular karyotyping. Karyotypes were determined using genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) to distinguish the sub-genomes and , plus fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)/non-denaturing (ND)-FISH to determine the distribution of ten tandem repetitive DNA sequences and thus provide chromosome markers. Each chromosome pair in the six accessions analysed was identified, allowing the establishment of homologous and putative homeologous relationships. The low-level polymorphism observed among the H. secalinum accessions contrasted with the divergence recorded for the sub-genome of the H. capense accessions. Although accession H335 carries an intergenomic translocation, its chromosome structure was indistinguishable from that of H. secalinum . Hordeum secalinum and H. capense accession H335 share a hybrid origin involving Hordeum marinum subsp. gussoneanum as the genome donor and an unidentified genome progenitor. Hordeum capense accession BCC2062 either diverged, with remodelling of the sub-genome, or its genome was donated by a now extinct ancestor. A scheme of probable evolution shows the intricate pattern of relationships among the Hordeum species carrying the genome (including all H. marinum taxa and the hexaploid Hordeum brachyantherum ). © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. The diabetogenic VPS13C/C2CD4A/C2CD4B rs7172432 variant impairs glucose-stimulated insulin response in 5,722 non-diabetic Danish individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, N; Overvad, M; Sparsø, T

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study in the Japanese population reported two genome-wide significant loci associated with type 2 diabetes of which the VPS13C/C2CD4A/C2CD4B locus was replicated in Europeans. We looked for potential associations between the diabetogenic VPS13C/C2CD4A/C2CD4B rs7172432...

  3. Chromosome studies of european cyprinid fishes: Cross-species painting reveals natural allotetraploid origin of a carassius female with 206 chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knytl, M.; Kalous, L.; Symonová, Radka; Rylková, K.; Ráb, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 139, č. 4 (2013), s. 276-283 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP506/11/P596 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : fish cytogenetic s * genome addition * GISH Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.905, year: 2013

  4. Precision engineering for PRRSV resistance in pigs: Macrophages from genome edited pigs lacking CD163 SRCR5 domain are fully resistant to both PRRSV genotypes while maintaining biological function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Burkard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS is a panzootic infectious disease of pigs, causing major economic losses to the world-wide pig industry. PRRS manifests differently in pigs of all ages but primarily causes late-term abortions and stillbirths in sows and respiratory disease in piglets. The causative agent of the disease is the positive-strand RNA PRRS virus (PRRSV. PRRSV has a narrow host cell tropism, limited to cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. CD163 has been described as a fusion receptor for PRRSV, whereby the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain 5 (SRCR5 region was shown to be an interaction site for the virus in vitro. CD163 is expressed at high levels on the surface of macrophages, particularly in the respiratory system. Here we describe the application of CRISPR/Cas9 to pig zygotes, resulting in the generation of pigs with a deletion of Exon 7 of the CD163 gene, encoding SRCR5. Deletion of SRCR5 showed no adverse effects in pigs maintained under standard husbandry conditions with normal growth rates and complete blood counts observed. Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAMs and peripheral blood monocytes (PBMCs were isolated from the animals and assessed in vitro. Both PAMs and macrophages obtained from PBMCs by CSF1 stimulation (PMMs show the characteristic differentiation and cell surface marker expression of macrophages of the respective origin. Expression and correct folding of the SRCR5 deletion CD163 on the surface of macrophages and biological activity of the protein as hemoglobin-haptoglobin scavenger was confirmed. Challenge of both PAMs and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 1, subtypes 1, 2, and 3 and PMMs with PRRSV genotype 2 showed complete resistance to viral infections assessed by replication. Confocal microscopy revealed the absence of replication structures in the SRCR5 CD163 deletion macrophages, indicating an inhibition of infection prior to gene expression, i.e. at entry/fusion or unpacking stages.

  5. CD133+CD24lo defines a 5-Fluorouracil-resistant colon cancer stem cell-like phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschall, Amy V.; Yang, Dafeng; Lu, Chunwan; Redd, Priscilla S.; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Heaton, Christopher M.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Nayak-Kapoor, Asha; Liu, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the most commonly used drug for patients with advanced colon cancer. However, development of resistance to 5-FU is inevitable in almost all patients. The mechanism by which colon cancer develops 5-FU resistance is still unclear. One recently proposed theory is that cancer stem-like cells underlie colon cancer 5-FU resistance, but the phenotypes of 5-FU-resistant colon cancer stem cells are still controversial. We report here that 5-FU treatment selectively enriches a subset of CD133+ colon cancer cells in vitro. 5-FU chemotherapy also increases CD133+ tumor cells in human colon cancer patients. However, sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells exhibit no increased resistance to 5-FU, and CD133 levels exhibit no correlation with colon cancer patient survival or cancer recurrence. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression between sorted CD133+ colon cancer cells and 5-FU-selected colon cancer cells identifies 207 differentially expressed genes. CD24 is one of the genes whose expression level is lower in the CD133+ and 5-FU-resistant colon cancer cells as compared to CD133+ and 5-FU-sensitive colon cancer cells. Consequently, CD133+CD24lo cells exhibit decreased sensitivity to 5-FU. Therefore, we determine that CD133+CD24lo phenotype defines 5-FU-resistant human colon cancer stem cell-like cells. PMID:27659530

  6. Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+CD27-CD28- T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar-Salazar, Adriana; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Jesser, Renee; Weinberg, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27 - CD28 - T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - cells are regulatory T cells (T R ). CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4 + T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R expressed FoxP3, TGFβ, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFβ inhibition. The CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R . The CMV-CD4 + CD27 - CD28 - T R may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

  7. Soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger J

    2012-01-01

    of sCD163 is unknown, but during inflammation and macrophage activation, sCD163 levels increase acutely due to metalloproteinase-mediated cleavage near the cell membrane. It is now evident that sCD163 is very useful as a biomarker of macrophage activation in various inflammatory diseases...

  8. The high-quality genome of Brassica napus cultivar 'ZS11' reveals the introgression history in semi-winter morphotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fengming; Fan, Guangyi; Hu, Qiong; Zhou, Yongming; Guan, Mei; Tong, Chaobo; Li, Jiana; Du, Dezhi; Qi, Cunkou; Jiang, Liangcai; Liu, Weiqing; Huang, Shunmou; Chen, Wenbin; Yu, Jingyin; Mei, Desheng; Meng, Jinling; Zeng, Peng; Shi, Jiaqin; Liu, Kede; Wang, Xi; Wang, Xinfa; Long, Yan; Liang, Xinming; Hu, Zhiyong; Huang, Guodong; Dong, Caihua; Zhang, He; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yaolei; Li, Liangwei; Shi, Chengcheng; Wang, Jiahao; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Guan, Chunyun; Xu, Xun; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Xin; Chalhoub, Boulos; Hua, Wei; Wang, Hanzhong

    2017-11-01

    Allotetraploid oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) is an agriculturally important crop. Cultivation and breeding of B. napus by humans has resulted in numerous genetically diverse morphotypes with optimized agronomic traits and ecophysiological adaptation. To further understand the genetic basis of diversification and adaptation, we report a draft genome of an Asian semi-winter oilseed rape cultivar 'ZS11' and its comprehensive genomic comparison with the genomes of the winter-type cultivar 'Darmor-bzh' as well as two progenitors. The integrated BAC-to-BAC and whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategies were effective in the assembly of repetitive regions (especially young long terminal repeats) and resulted in a high-quality genome assembly of B. napus 'ZS11'. Within a short evolutionary period (~6700 years ago), semi-winter-type 'ZS11' and the winter-type 'Darmor-bzh' maintained highly genomic collinearity. Even so, certain genetic differences were also detected in two morphotypes. Relative to 'Darmor-bzh', both two subgenomes of 'ZS11' are closely related to its progenitors, and the 'ZS11' genome harbored several specific segmental homoeologous exchanges (HEs). Furthermore, the semi-winter-type 'ZS11' underwent potential genomic introgressions with B. rapa (A r ). Some of these genetic differences were associated with key agronomic traits. A key gene of A03.FLC3 regulating vernalization-responsive flowering time in 'ZS11' was first experienced HE, and then underwent genomic introgression event with A r , which potentially has led to genetic differences in controlling vernalization in the semi-winter types. Our observations improved our understanding of the genetic diversity of different B. napus morphotypes and the cultivation history of semi-winter oilseed rape in Asia. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Sequencing and expression analysis of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ chains in mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zheng; Nie, Pin

    2013-01-01

    The genomic and cDNA sequences of the CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ homologues in the mandarin fish, Siniperca chuats i, were determined. As in other vertebrate CD3 molecules, the deduced amino acid sequences of mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ contained conserved residues and motifs, such as cysteine residues and CXXC and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs. However, mandarin fish CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ showed some differences to their mammalian counterparts, specifically the absence of a negatively charged residue in the transmembrane region of CD3γ/δ. Additionally, while an N -glycosylation site was present in CD3ɛ, the site was not observed in CD3γ/δ. The CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ subunit sequences contain six and five exons, respectively, consistent with homologues from Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar. Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ in mandarin fish are closely related to their counterparts in Acanthopterygian fish. Real-time PCR showed CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were expressed mainly in the thymus and spleen in normal healthy fish and, to a lesser extent, in mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues, such as the intestine and gills. When lymphocytes isolated from head kidney were treated with the mitogens phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin, and polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid, mRNA expression levels of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ were significantly elevated within 12 h of treatment. This indicated the presence of T lymphocytes in the head kidney of teleost fish, and also the recognition of mitogens by the lymphocytes. Mandarin fish infected with the bacterial pathogen Flavobacterium columnare also showed an increase in the expression of CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ mRNA, indicating that CD3γ/δ and CD3ɛ lymphocytes are involved in the immune response of this species.

  10. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines when...

  11. Cancer genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrild, Bodil; Guldberg, Per; Ralfkiær, Elisabeth Methner

    2007-01-01

    Almost all cells in the human body contain a complete copy of the genome with an estimated number of 25,000 genes. The sequences of these genes make up about three percent of the genome and comprise the inherited set of genetic information. The genome also contains information that determines whe...

  12. Sequence-tagged high-density genetic maps of Zoysia japonica provide insights into genome evolution in Chloridoideae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Singh, Ratnesh; Genovesi, Anthony D; Wai, Ching Man; Huang, Xiaoen; Chandra, Ambika; Yu, Qingyi

    2015-06-01

    Zoysiagrass (Zoysia spp.), belonging to the genus Zoysia in the subfamily Chloridoideae, is widely used in domestic lawns, sports fields and as forage. We constructed high-density genetic maps of Zoysia japonica using a restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) approach and an F1 mapping population derived from a cross between 'Carrizo' and 'El Toro'. Two linkage maps were constructed, one for each of the parents. A map consisting of 2408 RAD markers distributed on 21 linkage groups was constructed for 'Carrizo'. Another map with 1230 RAD markers mapped on 20 linkage groups was constructed for 'El Toro'. The average distance between adjacent markers of the two maps was at 0.56 and 1.4 cM, respectively. Comparative genomics analysis was carried out among zoysiagrass, rice and sorghum genomes and a highly conserved collinearity in the gene order was observed among the three genomes. Chromosome collinearity was disrupted at centromeric regions for each chromosome pair between zoysiagrass and sorghum genomes. However, no obvious synteny gaps were observed across the centromeric regions between zoysiagrass and rice genomes. Two homologous chromosomes for each of the 10 sorghum chromosomes were found in the zoysiagrass genome, indicating an allotetraploid origin for zoysiagrass. The reduction of the basic chromosome number from 12 to 10 in chloridoids and panicoids took place via independent single-step nested chromosome fusion events after the two subfamilies diverged from a common ancestor. The genetic maps will assist in genome sequence assembly, targeted gene isolation and comparative genomic analyses among grasses. © 2015 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. CD4+/CD8+ double-positive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana H; Jung, Ji-Won; Steptoe, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP thymocytes are a well-described T cell developmental stage within the thymus. However, once differentiated, the CD4(+) lineage or the CD8(+) lineage is generally considered to be fixed. Nevertheless, mature CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cells have been described in the blood and peripheral...... cells, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations, outside of the thymus, have recently been described to express concurrently ThPOK and Runx3. Considerable heterogeneity exists within the CD4(+)/CD8(+) DP T cell pool, and the function of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cell populations remains controversial, with conflicting...... reports describing cytotoxic or suppressive roles for these cells. In this review, we describe how transcriptional regulation, lineage of origin, heterogeneity of CD4 and CD8 expression, age, species, and specific disease settings influence the functionality of this rarely studied T cell population....

  14. Genome analysis of E. coli isolated from Crohn's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitina, Daria V; Manolov, Alexander I; Kanygina, Alexandra V; Garushyants, Sofya K; Baikova, Julia P; Alexeev, Dmitry G; Ladygina, Valentina G; Kostryukova, Elena S; Larin, Andrei K; Semashko, Tatiana A; Karpova, Irina Y; Babenko, Vladislav V; Ismagilova, Ruzilya K; Malanin, Sergei Y; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Ilina, Elena N; Gorodnichev, Roman B; Lisitsyna, Eugenia S; Aleshkin, Gennady I; Scherbakov, Petr L; Khalif, Igor L; Shapina, Marina V; Maev, Igor V; Andreev, Dmitry N; Govorun, Vadim M

    2017-07-19

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) has been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). The phylogeny of E. coli isolated from Crohn's disease patients (CDEC) was controversial, and while genotyping results suggested heterogeneity, the sequenced strains of E. coli from CD patients were closely related. We performed the shotgun genome sequencing of 28 E. coli isolates from ten CD patients and compared genomes from these isolates with already published genomes of CD strains and other pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains. CDEC was shown to belong to A, B1, B2 and D phylogenetic groups. The plasmid and several operons from the reference CD-associated E. coli strain LF82 were demonstrated to be more often present in CDEC genomes belonging to different phylogenetic groups than in genomes of commensal strains. The operons include carbon-source induced invasion GimA island, prophage I, iron uptake operons I and II, capsular assembly pathogenetic island IV and propanediol and galactitol utilization operons. Our findings suggest that CDEC are phylogenetically diverse. However, some strains isolated from independent sources possess highly similar chromosome or plasmids. Though no CD-specific genes or functional domains were present in all CD-associated strains, some genes and operons are more often found in the genomes of CDEC than in commensal E. coli. They are principally linked to gut colonization and utilization of propanediol and other sugar alcohols.

  15. Chromosomal localization of two novel repetitive sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolano, B; Gardunia, B W; Michalska, M; Bonifacio, A; Fairbanks, D; Maughan, P J; Coleman, C E; Stevens, M R; Jellen, E N; Maluszynska, J

    2011-09-01

    The chromosomal organization of two novel repetitive DNA sequences isolated from the Chenopodium quinoa Willd. genome was analyzed across the genomes of selected Chenopodium species. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis with the repetitive DNA clone 18-24J in the closely related allotetraploids C. quinoa and Chenopodium berlandieri Moq. (2n = 4x = 36) evidenced hybridization signals that were mainly present on 18 chromosomes; however, in the allohexaploid Chenopodium album L. (2n = 6x = 54), cross-hybridization was observed on all of the chromosomes. In situ hybridization with rRNA gene probes indicated that during the evolution of polyploidy, the chenopods lost some of their rDNA loci. Reprobing with rDNA indicated that in the subgenome labeled with 18-24J, one 35S rRNA locus and at least half of the 5S rDNA loci were present. A second analyzed sequence, 12-13P, localized exclusively in pericentromeric regions of each chromosome of C. quinoa and related species. The intensity of the FISH signals differed considerably among chromosomes. The pattern observed on C. quinoa chromosomes after FISH with 12-13P was very similar to GISH results, suggesting that the 12-13P sequence constitutes a major part of the repetitive DNA of C. quinoa.

  16. CdS/CdSSe quantum dots in glass matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CdSSe and melted at 1200–1300°C. The glass samples were transparent and pale yellow in colour due to presence of CdS/CdSSe tiny nano crystal (Q-dots). in situ growth of CdS/CdSSe nano crystals imparts the yellow/orange/red colour to ...

  17. Segmental allotetraploidy and allelic interactions in buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link syn. Cenchrus ciliaris L.) as revealed by genome mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, R W; Burson, B L; Burow, O; Wang, Y W; Chang, C; Li, Z; Paterson, A H; Hussey, M A

    2003-04-01

    Linkage analyses increasingly complement cytological and traditional plant breeding techniques by providing valuable information regarding genome organization and transmission genetics of complex polyploid species. This study reports a genome map of buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare (L.) Link syn. Cenchrus ciliaris L.). Maternal and paternal maps were constructed with restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) segregating in 87 F1 progeny from an intraspecific cross between two heterozygous genotypes. A survey of 862 heterologous cDNAs and gDNAs from across the Poaceae, as well as 443 buffelgrass cDNAs, yielded 100 and 360 polymorphic probes, respectively. The maternal map included 322 RFLPs, 47 linkage groups, and 3464 cM, whereas the paternal map contained 245 RFLPs, 42 linkage groups, and 2757 cM. Approximately 70 to 80% of the buffelgrass genome was covered, and the average marker spacing was 10.8 and 11.3 cM on the respective maps. Preferential pairing was indicated between many linkage groups, which supports cytological reports that buffelgrass is a segmental allotetraploid. More preferential pairing (disomy) was found in the maternal than paternal parent across linkage groups (55 vs. 38%) and loci (48 vs. 15%). Comparison of interval lengths in 15 allelic bridges indicated significantly less meiotic recombination in paternal gametes. Allelic interactions were detected in four regions of the maternal map and were absent in the paternal map.

  18. Comparative Studies of Vertebrate Platelet Glycoprotein 4 (CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Holmes

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelet glycoprotein 4 (CD36 (or fatty acyl translocase [FAT], or scavenger receptor class B, member 3 [SCARB3] is an essential cell surface and skeletal muscle outer mitochondrial membrane glycoprotein involved in multiple functions in the body. CD36 serves as a ligand receptor of thrombospondin, long chain fatty acids, oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDLs and malaria-infected erythrocytes. CD36 also influences various diseases, including angiogenesis, thrombosis, atherosclerosis, malaria, diabetes, steatosis, dementia and obesity. Genetic deficiency of this protein results in significant changes in fatty acid and oxidized lipid uptake. Comparative CD36 amino acid sequences and structures and CD36 gene locations were examined using data from several vertebrate genome projects. Vertebrate CD36 sequences shared 53–100% identity as compared with 29–32% sequence identities with other CD36-like superfamily members, SCARB1 and SCARB2. At least eight vertebrate CD36 N-glycosylation sites were conserved which are required for membrane integration. Sequence alignments, key amino acid residues and predicted secondary structures were also studied. Three CD36 domains were identified including cytoplasmic, transmembrane and exoplasmic sequences. Conserved sequences included N- and C-terminal transmembrane glycines; and exoplasmic cysteine disulphide residues; TSP-1 and PE binding sites, Thr92 and His242, respectively; 17 conserved proline and 14 glycine residues, which may participate in forming CD36 ‘short loops’; and basic amino acid residues, and may contribute to fatty acid and thrombospondin binding. Vertebrate CD36 genes usually contained 12 coding exons. The human CD36 gene contained transcription factor binding sites (including PPARG and PPARA contributing to a high gene expression level (6.6 times average. Phylogenetic analyses examined the relationships and potential evolutionary origins of the vertebrate CD36 gene with vertebrate

  19. Syntenic relationships between the U and M genomes of Aegilops, wheat and the model species Brachypodium and rice as revealed by COS markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Molnár

    Full Text Available Diploid Aegilops umbellulata and Ae. comosa and their natural allotetraploid hybrids Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata are important wild gene sources for wheat. With the aim of assisting in alien gene transfer, this study provides gene-based conserved orthologous set (COS markers for the U and M genome chromosomes. Out of the 140 markers tested on a series of wheat-Aegilops chromosome introgression lines and flow-sorted subgenomic chromosome fractions, 100 were assigned to Aegilops chromosomes and six and seven duplications were identified in the U and M genomes, respectively. The marker-specific EST sequences were BLAST-ed to Brachypodium and rice genomic sequences to investigate macrosyntenic relationships between the U and M genomes of Aegilops, wheat and the model species. Five syntenic regions of Brachypodium identified genome rearrangements differentiating the U genome from the M genome and from the D genome of wheat. All of them seem to have evolved at the diploid level and to have been modified differentially in the polyploid species Ae. biuncialis and Ae. geniculata. A certain level of wheat-Aegilops homology was detected for group 1, 2, 3 and 5 chromosomes, while a clearly rearranged structure was showed for the group 4, 6 and 7 Aegilops chromosomes relative to wheat. The conserved orthologous set markers assigned to Aegilops chromosomes promise to accelerate gene introgression by facilitating the identification of alien chromatin. The syntenic relationships between the Aegilops species, wheat and model species will facilitate the targeted development of new markers specific for U and M genomic regions and will contribute to the understanding of molecular processes related to allopolyploidization.

  20. Expression patterns of bovine CD1 in vivo and assessment of the specificities of the anti-bovine CD1 antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Kim Anh Nguyen

    Full Text Available Research addressing the in vivo effects of T cell activation by lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides is hampered by the absence of a suitable animal model. Mice and rats do not express CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c molecules that present pathogen-derived lipid antigens in humans. In cattle, two CD1A and three CD1B genes are transcribed. The proteins encoded by these genes differ in their antigen binding domains and in their cytoplasmic tails, suggesting that they may traffic differently in the cell and thus have access to different antigens. In the current study, we describe the genomic organization of the bovine CD1 locus and transcription of bovine CD1 genes in freshly isolated dendritic cells and B cells from different tissues. After determining the specificity of previously only partly characterized anti-CD1 antibodies by testing recombinant single chain bovine CD1 proteins and CD1-transfected cells, we were able to determine cell surface protein expression on freshly isolated cells. Our study suggests that CD1b1 and CD1b3 are more broadly expressed than CD1b5, and CD1a2 is more broadly expressed than CD1a1. Pseudoafferent lymph dendritic cells express CD1B genes, but no transcription is detected in lymph nodes. Even though B cells transcribe CD1B genes, there is no evidence of protein expression at the cell surface. Thus, patterns of CD1 protein expression are largely conserved among species.

  1. Expression patterns of bovine CD1 in vivo and assessment of the specificities of the anti-bovine CD1 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Kim Anh; Reinink, Peter; El Messlaki, Chema; Im, Jin S; Ercan, Altan; Porcelli, Steven A; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    Research addressing the in vivo effects of T cell activation by lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides is hampered by the absence of a suitable animal model. Mice and rats do not express CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c molecules that present pathogen-derived lipid antigens in humans. In cattle, two CD1A and three CD1B genes are transcribed. The proteins encoded by these genes differ in their antigen binding domains and in their cytoplasmic tails, suggesting that they may traffic differently in the cell and thus have access to different antigens. In the current study, we describe the genomic organization of the bovine CD1 locus and transcription of bovine CD1 genes in freshly isolated dendritic cells and B cells from different tissues. After determining the specificity of previously only partly characterized anti-CD1 antibodies by testing recombinant single chain bovine CD1 proteins and CD1-transfected cells, we were able to determine cell surface protein expression on freshly isolated cells. Our study suggests that CD1b1 and CD1b3 are more broadly expressed than CD1b5, and CD1a2 is more broadly expressed than CD1a1. Pseudoafferent lymph dendritic cells express CD1B genes, but no transcription is detected in lymph nodes. Even though B cells transcribe CD1B genes, there is no evidence of protein expression at the cell surface. Thus, patterns of CD1 protein expression are largely conserved among species.

  2. CD8 Lineage Commitment in the Absence of CD8

    OpenAIRE

    Goldrath, Ananda W.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Bevan, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    The absence of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity and the failure of MHC class I–restricted T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic thymocytes to mature in CD8α-deficient mice suggest that CD8 may be essential for CD8 lineage commitment. We report that variants of the antigenic peptide that delete TCR transgenic thymocytes from CD8 wild-type but not CD8α-deficient mice can restore positive selection of CD8 lineage cells in the absence of CD8. The positively selected cells down-regulate CD4, up-regulate...

  3. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An important hallmark of biological research is the aspect of 'comparisons'. As the complete genome sequences of numerous organisms have become available, the emphasis in biology has shifted to comparisons at the genome level. Indeed, the last few years have witnessed an exponential rise in the number of ...

  4. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    structions of the tree of life, drug discovery programs, func- tion predictions of hypothetical proteins and genes, regula- tory motifs and other non-coding DNA motifs, and genome ... expertise in assembling sequences. Beginning with the complete genome sequence of the bacterial pathogen Haemophilus influenzae that was ...

  5. Genomic signature of successful colonization of Eurasia by the allopolyploid shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, A; Salcedo, A; Kryvokhyzha, D; Glémin, S; Holm, K; Wright, S I; Lascoux, M

    2016-01-01

    Polyploidization is a dominant feature of flowering plant evolution. However, detailed genomic analyses of the interpopulation diversification of polyploids following genome duplication are still in their infancy, mainly because of methodological limits, both in terms of sequencing and computational analyses. The shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris) is one of the most common weed species in the world. It is highly self-fertilizing, and recent genomic data indicate that it is an allopolyploid, resulting from hybridization between the ancestors of the diploid species Capsella grandiflora and Capsella orientalis. Here, we investigated the genomic diversity of C. bursa-pastoris, its population structure and demographic history, following allopolyploidization in Eurasia. To that end, we genotyped 261 C. bursa-pastoris accessions spread across Europe, the Middle East and Asia, using genotyping-by-sequencing, leading to a total of 4274 SNPs after quality control. Bayesian clustering analyses revealed three distinct genetic clusters in Eurasia: one cluster grouping samples from Western Europe and Southeastern Siberia, the second one centred on Eastern Asia and the third one in the Middle East. Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) supported the hypothesis that C. bursa-pastoris underwent a typical colonization history involving low gene flow among colonizing populations, likely starting from the Middle East towards Europe and followed by successive human-mediated expansions into Eastern Asia. Altogether, these findings bring new insights into the recent multistage colonization history of the allotetraploid C. bursa-pastoris and highlight ABC and genotyping-by-sequencing data as promising but still challenging tools to infer demographic histories of selfing allopolyploids. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. CD8+ and CD4+ cytotoxic T cell escape mutations precede breakthrough SIVmac239 viremia in an elite controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burwitz Benjamin J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-specific T cells are critical components in the containment of immunodeficiency virus infections. While the protective role of CD8+ T cells is well established by studies of CD8+ T cell-mediated viral escape, it remains unknown if CD4+ T cells can also impose sufficient selective pressure on replicating virus to drive the emergence of high-frequency escape variants. Identifying a high frequency CD4+ T cell driven escape mutation would provide compelling evidence of direct immunological pressure mediated by these cells. Results Here, we studied a SIVmac239-infected elite controller rhesus macaque with a 1,000-fold spontaneous increase in plasma viral load that preceded disease progression and death from AIDS-related complications. We sequenced the viral genome pre- and post-breakthrough and demonstrate that CD8+ T cells drove the majority of the amino acid substitutions outside of Env. However, within a region of Gag p27CA targeted only by CD4+ T cells, we identified a unique post-breakthrough mutation, Gag D205E, which abrogated CD4+ T cell recognition. Further, we demonstrate that the Gag p27CA-specific CD4+ T cells exhibited cytolytic activity and that SIV bearing the Gag D205E mutation escapes this CD4+ T cell effector function ex vivo. Conclusions Cumulatively, these results confirm the importance of virus specific CD8+ T cells and demonstrate that CD4+ T cells can also exert significant selective pressure on immunodeficiency viruses in vivo during low-level viral replication. These results also suggest that further studies of CD4+ T cell escape should focus on cases of elite control with spontaneous viral breakthrough.

  7. Cardiovascular genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wung, Shu-Fen; Hickey, Kathleen T; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Gallek, Matthew J

    2013-03-01

    This article provides an update on cardiovascular genomics using three clinically relevant exemplars, including myocardial infarction (MI) and coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, and sudden cardiac death (SCD). ORGANIZATIONAL CONSTRUCT: Recent advances in cardiovascular genomic research, testing, and clinical implications are presented. Genomic nurse experts reviewed and summarized recent salient literature to provide updates on three selected cardiovascular genomic conditions. Research is ongoing to discover comprehensive genetic markers contributing to many common forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including MI and stroke. However, genomic technologies are increasingly being used clinically, particularly in patients with long QT syndrome (LQTS) or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) who are at risk for SCD. Currently, there are no clinically recommended genetic tests for many common forms of CVD even though direct-to-consumer genetic tests are being marketed to healthcare providers and the general public. On the other hand, genetic testing for patients with certain single gene conditions, including channelopathies (e.g., LQTS) and cardiomyopathies (e.g., HCM), is recommended clinically. Nurses play a pivotal role in cardiogenetics and are actively engaged in direct clinical care of patients and families with a wide variety of heritable conditions. It is important for nurses to understand current development of cardiovascular genomics and be prepared to translate the new genomic knowledge into practice. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  8. Haptoglobin and CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, S K

    2001-01-01

    of the complex by HbSR/CD163 and endocytosis in macrophages. The haptoglobin-dependent HbSR/CD163 scavenging system for hemoglobin clearance prevents toxic effects of hemoglobin in plasma and kidney and explains the decrease in the haptoglobin plasma concentration in patients with accelerated hemolysis. The Hb......The plasma protein haptoglobin and the endocytic hemoglobin receptor HbSR/CD163 are key molecules in the process of removing hemoglobin released from ruptured erythrocytes. Hemoglobin in plasma is instantly bound with high affinity to haptoglobin--an interaction leading to the recognition......SR/CD163 activity may be of quantitative importance for iron uptake in macrophages in general and for some iron-associated pathological processes, e.g. the atherogenesis-promoting oxidation of LDL leading to foam cell formation and apoptosis in the vessel wall....

  9. Haptoglobin and CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Moestrup, S K

    2001-01-01

    The plasma protein haptoglobin and the endocytic hemoglobin receptor HbSR/CD163 are key molecules in the process of removing hemoglobin released from ruptured erythrocytes. Hemoglobin in plasma is instantly bound with high affinity to haptoglobin--an interaction leading to the recognition of the ......SR/CD163 activity may be of quantitative importance for iron uptake in macrophages in general and for some iron-associated pathological processes, e.g. the atherogenesis-promoting oxidation of LDL leading to foam cell formation and apoptosis in the vessel wall....... of the complex by HbSR/CD163 and endocytosis in macrophages. The haptoglobin-dependent HbSR/CD163 scavenging system for hemoglobin clearance prevents toxic effects of hemoglobin in plasma and kidney and explains the decrease in the haptoglobin plasma concentration in patients with accelerated hemolysis. The Hb...

  10. CdSxTe1-x Alloying in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-05-01

    A CdSxTe1-x layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdSxTe1-x layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdSxTe1-x region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdSxTe1-x layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdSxTe1-x alloy films were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both radio-frequency-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdSxTe1-x films of lower S content (x<0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, while those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl2 heat treatment at ~400 degrees C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O2/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl2 heat treatment (HT). Films sputtered in O2 partial pressure have a much wider bandgap (BG) than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films.

  11. CdSxTe1-x Alloying in CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    A CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and coevaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both radio-frequency-magnetron-sputtered and coevaporated CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films of lower S content (x < 0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment at {approx}400 C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O{sub 2}/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment. Films sputtered in O{sub 2} partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films.

  12. The gene expression profile of CD11c+ CD8α- dendritic cells in the pre-diabetic pancreas of the NOD mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Beumer

    Full Text Available Two major dendritic cell (DC subsets have been described in the pancreas of mice: The CD11c+ CD8α- DCs (strong CD4+ T cell proliferation inducers and the CD8α+ CD103+ DCs (T cell apoptosis inducers. Here we analyzed the larger subset of CD11c+ CD8α- DCs isolated from the pancreas of pre-diabetic NOD mice for genome-wide gene expression (validated by Q-PCR to elucidate abnormalities in underlying gene expression networks. CD11c+ CD8α- DCs were isolated from 5 week old NOD and control C57BL/6 pancreas. The steady state pancreatic NOD CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a reduced expression of several gene networks important for the prime functions of these cells, i.e. for cell renewal, immune tolerance induction, migration and for the provision of growth factors including those for beta cell regeneration. A functional in vivo BrdU incorporation test showed the reduced proliferation of steady state pancreatic DC. The reduced expression of tolerance induction genes (CD200R, CCR5 and CD24 was supported on the protein level by flow cytometry. Also previously published functional tests on maturation, immune stimulation and migration confirm the molecular deficits of NOD steady state DC. Despite these deficiencies NOD pancreas CD11c+ CD8α- DCs showed a hyperreactivity to LPS, which resulted in an enhanced pro-inflammatory state characterized by a gene profile of an enhanced expression of a number of classical inflammatory cytokines. The enhanced up-regulation of inflammatory genes was supported by the in vitro cytokine production profile of the DCs. In conclusion, our data show that NOD pancreatic CD11c+ CD8α- DCs show various deficiencies in steady state, while hyperreactive when encountering a danger signal such as LPS.

  13. CD3+CD8+CD161high Tc17 cells are depleted in HIV-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardbo, Julie Christine; Hartling, Hans Jakob; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    CD8+ Tc17 cells with pro-inflammatory properties have only recently been acknowledged, and Tc17 cells in HIV-infection are undescribed. CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and the production of Interleukin-17 were examined in untreated and treated HIV-infected patients, HIV-HCV co-infected patients...... and healthy controls. Depletion of CD3+CD8+CD161 Tc17 cells and diminished production of Interleukin-17 in HIV-infected patients was found. The level of Tc17 cells was associated with the level of the CD4+ count in treated patients....

  14. Mammalian CD1 and MR1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinink, Peter; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2016-08-01

    All higher vertebrates share the fundamental components of the adaptive immune system: the B cell receptor, the T cell receptor, and classical MHC proteins. At a more detailed level, their immune systems vary considerably, especially with respect to the non-polymorphic MHC class I-like proteins. In mammals, the CD1 family of lipid-presenting proteins is encoded by clusters of genes of widely divergent sizes and compositions. Another MHC class I-like protein, MR1, is typically encoded by a single gene that is highly conserved among species. Based on mammalian genomes and the available data on cellular expression profiles and protein structure, we review MR1 genes and families of CD1 genes in modern mammals from a genetic and functional perspective. Understanding the CD1 and MR1 systems across animal species provides insights into the specialized functions of the five types of CD1 proteins and facilitates careful consideration of animal models for human diseases in which immune responses to lipids and bacterial metabolites play a role.

  15. Genomic Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Genomic Imprinting - Some Interesting Implications for the Evolution of Social Behaviour. Raghavendra Gadagkar. General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 58-68 ...

  16. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells restrict memory CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursar, Mischo; Bonhagen, Kerstin; Fensterle, Joachim; Köhler, Anne; Hurwitz, Robert; Kamradt, Thomas; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2002-12-16

    CD4+ T cell help is important for the generation of CD8+ T cell responses. We used depleting anti-CD4 mAb to analyze the role of CD4+ T cells for memory CD8+ T cell responses after secondary infection of mice with the intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, or after boost immunization by specific peptide or DNA vaccination. Surprisingly, anti-CD4 mAb treatment during secondary CD8+ T cell responses markedly enlarged the population size of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. After boost immunization with peptide or DNA, this effect was particularly profound, and antigen-specific CD8+ T cell populations were enlarged at least 10-fold. In terms of cytokine production and cytotoxicity, the enlarged CD8+ T cell population consisted of functional effector T cells. In depletion and transfer experiments, the suppressive function could be ascribed to CD4+CD25+ T cells. Our results demonstrate that CD4+ T cells control the CD8+ T cell response in two directions. Initially, they promote the generation of a CD8+ T cell responses and later they restrain the strength of the CD8+ T cell memory response. Down-modulation of CD8+ T cell responses during infection could prevent harmful consequences after eradication of the pathogen.

  17. Genome-wide identification and characterization of phospholipase C gene family in cotton (Gossypium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yanmei; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) are important regulatory enzymes involved in several lipid and Ca 2+ -dependent signaling pathways. Previous studies have elucidated the versatile roles of PLC genes in growth, development and stress responses of many plants, however, the systematic analyses of PLC genes in the important fiber-producing plant, cotton, are still deficient. In this study, through genome-wide survey, we identified twelve phosphatidylinositol-specific PLC (PI-PLC) and nine non-specific PLC (NPC) genes in the allotetraploid upland cotton Gossypium hirsutum and nine PI-PLC and six NPC genes in two diploid cotton G. arboretum and G.raimondii, respectively. The PI-PLC and NPC genes of G. hirsutum showed close phylogenetic relationship with their homologous genes in the diploid cottons and Arabidopsis. Segmental and tandem duplication contributed greatly to the formation of the gene family. Expression profiling indicated that few of the PLC genes are constitutely expressed, whereas most of the PLC genes are preferentially expressed in specific tissues and abiotic stress conditions. Promoter analyses further implied that the expression of these PLC genes might be regulated by MYB transcription factors and different phytohormones. These results not only suggest an important role of phospholipase C members in cotton plant development and abiotic stress response but also provide good candidate targets for future molecular breeding of superior cotton cultivars.

  18. Genome-wide identification and characterization of JAZ gene family in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Xia, Xiao-Cong; Han, Li-Hong; Ni, Ping; Yan, Jing-Qiu; Tao, Miao; Huang, Geng-Qing; Li, Xue-Bao

    2017-06-05

    Plant JAZ (Jasmonate ZIM-domain) proteins play versatile roles in multiple aspects of plant development and defense. However, little is known about the JAZ family in allotetraploid upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) so far. In this study, 30 non-redundant JAZ genes were identified in upland cotton through genome-wide screening. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 30 proteins in cotton JAZ family are further divided into five groups (I - V), and members in the same group share highly conserved motif structures. Subcellular localization assay demonstrated that GhJAZ proteins are localized in the cell nucleus. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that GhJAZs display different expression patterns in cotton tissues, and most of them could be induced by Jasmonic (JA). Furthermore, some GhJAZ genes are preferentially expressed in cotton ovules and fibers, and showed differential expression in ovules of wild type cotton and fiberless mutant (fl) during fiber initiation. GhJAZ proteins could interact with each other to form homodimer or heterodimer, and they also interacted with some JA signaling regulators and the proteins involved in cotton fiber initiation. Collectively, our data suggested that some GhJAZ proteins may play important roles in cotton fiber initiation and development by regulating JA signaling as well as some fiber-related proteins.

  19. Translational Genomics for the Improvement of Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpita, Nicholas; McCann, Maureen

    2014-05-07

    Our objectives were to apply bioinformatics and high throughput sequencing technologies to identify and classify the genes involved in cell wall formation in maize and switchgrass. Targets for genetic modification were to be identified and cell wall materials isolated and assayed for enhanced performance in bioprocessing. We annotated and assembled over 750 maize genes into gene families predicted to function in cell wall biogenesis. Comparative genomics of maize, rice, and Arabidopsis sequences revealed differences in gene family structure. In addition, differences in expression between gene family members of Arabidopsis, maize and rice underscored the need for a grass-specific genetic model for functional analyses. A forward screen of mature leaves of field-grown maize lines by near-infrared spectroscopy yielded several dozen lines with heritable spectroscopic phenotypes, several of which near-infrared (nir) mutants had altered carbohydrate-lignin compositions. Our contributions to the maize genome sequencing effort built on knowledge of copy number variation showing that uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. For example, although about 25% of all duplicated genes remain genome-wide, all of the cellulose synthase (CesA) homologs were retained. We showed that guaiacyl and syringyl lignin in lignocellulosic cell-wall materials from stems demonstrate a two-fold natural variation in content across a population of maize Intermated B73 x Mo7 (IBM) recombinant inbred lines, a maize Association Panel of 282 inbreds and landraces, and three populations of the maize Nested Association Mapping (NAM) recombinant inbred lines grown in three years. We then defined quantitative trait loci (QTL) for stem lignin content measured using pyrolysis molecular-beam mass spectrometry, and glucose and xylose yield measured using an enzymatic hydrolysis assay. Among five multi-year QTL for lignin

  20. [Nutrition genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedová, L; Seda, O

    2004-01-01

    The importance of nutrition for human health and its influence on the onset and course of many diseases are nowadays considered as proven. Only the recent development of molecular biology and biochemical methods allows the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of diet constituent actions and their subsequent effect on homeostatic mechanisms in health and disease states. The availability of the draft human genome sequence as well as the genome sequences of model organisms, combined with the functional and integrative genomics approaches of systems biology, bring about the possibility to identify alleles and haplotypes responsible for specific reaction to the dietary challenge in susceptible individuals. Such complex interactions are studied within the newly conceived field, the nutrition genomics (nutrigenomics). Using the tools of highly parallel analyses of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome, the nutrition genomics pursues its ultimate goal, i.e. the individualized diet, respecting not only quantitative and qualitative nutritional needs and the actual health status, but also the genetic predispositions of an individual. This approach should lead to prevention of the onset of such diseases as obesity, hypertension or type 2 diabetes, or enhance the efficiency of their therapy.

  1. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício R Lopes

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs, many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  2. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fabrício R; Jjingo, Daudi; da Silva, Carlos R M; Andrade, Alan C; Marraccini, Pierre; Teixeira, João B; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Pereira, Gonçalo A G; Pereira, Luiz Filipe P; Vanzela, André L L; Wang, Lu; Jordan, I King; Carareto, Claudia M A

    2013-01-01

    Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs), many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed) under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  3. Downregulation of CD44 reduces doxorubicin resistance of CD44+CD24- breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc PV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Pham Van Phuc, Phan Lu Chinh Nhan, Truong Hai Nhung, Nguyen Thanh Tam, Nguyen Minh Hoang, Vuong Gia Tue, Duong Thanh Thuy, Phan Kim NgocLaboratory of Stem Cell Research and Application, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh, VietnamBackground: Cells within breast cancer stem cell populations have been confirmed to have a CD44+CD24- phenotype. Strong expression of CD44 plays a critical role in numerous types of human cancers. CD44 is involved in cell differentiation, adhesion, and metastasis of cancer cells.Methods: In this study, we reduced CD44 expression in CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells and investigated their sensitivity to an antitumor drug. The CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells were isolated from breast tumors; CD44 expression was downregulated with siRNAs followed by treatment with different concentrations of the antitumor drug.Results: The proliferation of CD44 downregulated CD44+CD24- breast cancer stem cells was decreased after drug treatment. We noticed treated cells were more sensitive to doxorubicin, even at low doses, compared with the control groups.Conclusions: It would appear that expression of CD44 is integral among the CD44+CD24- cell population. Reducing the expression level of CD44, combined with doxorubicin treatment, yields promising results for eradicating breast cancer stem cells in vitro. This study opens a new direction in treating breast cancer through gene therapy in conjunction with chemotherapy.Keywords: antitumor drugs, breast cancer stem cells, CD44, CD44+CD24- cells, doxorubicin

  4. Marine genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Ribeiro, Ângela Maria; Foote, Andrew David; Kupczok, Anne

    2017-01-01

    evolutionary biology of non-model organisms to species of commercial relevance for fishing, aquaculture and biomedicine. Instead of providing an exhaustive list of available genomic data, we rather set to present contextualized examples that best represent the current status of the field of marine genomics.......Marine ecosystems occupy 71% of the surface of our planet, yet we know little about their diversity. Although the inventory of species is continually increasing, as registered by the Census of Marine Life program, only about 10% of the estimated two million marine species are known. This lag......-throughput sequencing approaches have been helping to improve our knowledge of marine biodiversity, from the rich microbial biota that forms the base of the tree of life to a wealth of plant and animal species. In this review, we present an overview of the applications of genomics to the study of marine life, from...

  5. Listeria Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  6. Genome-Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Cadmium Stress in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youko Oono

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice growth is severely affected by toxic concentrations of the nonessential heavy metal cadmium (Cd. To elucidate the molecular basis of the response to Cd stress, we performed mRNA sequencing of rice following our previous study on exposure to high concentrations of Cd (Oono et al., 2014. In this study, rice plants were hydroponically treated with low concentrations of Cd and approximately 211 million sequence reads were mapped onto the IRGSP-1.0 reference rice genome sequence. Many genes, including some identified under high Cd concentration exposure in our previous study, were found to be responsive to low Cd exposure, with an average of about 11,000 transcripts from each condition. However, genes expressed constitutively across the developmental course responded only slightly to low Cd concentrations, in contrast to their clear response to high Cd concentration, which causes fatal damage to rice seedlings according to phenotypic changes. The expression of metal ion transporter genes tended to correlate with Cd concentration, suggesting the potential of the RNA-Seq strategy to reveal novel Cd-responsive transporters by analyzing gene expression under different Cd concentrations. This study could help to develop novel strategies for improving tolerance to Cd exposure in rice and other cereal crops.

  7. Expression of CD44 variants in human inflammatory synovitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, L.P. [Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Haynes, B.F.; McCachren, S. [Duke Univ. Arthritis Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The cell surface hyaluronate receptor CD44 has previously been shown to have immunomodulatory activity and to be upregulated in inflammatory synovitis. Since these findings were reported, the genomic structure of CD44 has been delineated, and multiple splice variants have been described. Therefore, we determined which CD44 variant exons are present during inflammatory synovitis by a combination of Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of synovial RNA. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the sites of expression of individual v6 and v9 exons in synovial tissue. The standard (S) or hematopoietic isoform, CD44S, was the predominant form of CD44 expressed in synovium and was expressed by most cell types. Other isoforms, containing alternatively spliced exons in the proximal extracellular domain, were found by RT-PCR, but at lower levels than CD44S. The second most prevalent form was CD44E, which has an insertion of three exons (v8-v10) in the proximal extracellular domain. Immunohistochemical studies showed that reactivity with v9-specific antibodies was primarily in macrophages, particularly those in the synovial lining layer. CD44 exon v6, previously reported to be important in immune activation and in epithelial tumor metastasis, was also expressed in synovial lining cells and in occasional synovial interstitial cells. The presence of CD44 variants containing v9 in rheumatoid synovial macrophages may be important in the adhesion and activation of mononuclear phagocytes in the synovium and, thus, may be a target for novel antiinflammatory therapies in the future. The role of CD44 isoforms in cellular adhesion, immune activation, and joint erosion in inflammatory synovitis deserves further study. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 56 refs.

  8. Temporal kinetics of CD8+CD28+and CD8+CD28-T lymphocytes in the injured rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Lin, Yu-Hong; Shi, Ling-Ling; Yao, Zong-Feng; Xie, Xiu-Mei; Jiang, Zheng-Song; Tang, Jie; Hu, Jian-Guo; Lü, He-Zuo

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to explore the temporal changes of cytotoxic CD8 + CD28 + and regulatory CD8 + CD28 - T-cell subsets in the lesion microenvironment after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, by combination of immunohistochemistry (IHC) and flow cytometry (FCM). In the sham-opened spinal cord, few CD8 + T cells were found. After SCI, the CD8 + T cells were detected at one day post-injury (dpi), then markedly increased and were significantly higher at 3, 7, and 14 dpi compared with one dpi (p CD8 + T cells, more than 90% were CD28 + , and there were only small part of CD28 - ( CD8 + T cells were significantly decreased, and few could be found in good condition at 21 and 28 dpi. Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) staining showed that the percentages of apoptotic/necrotic CD8 + cells at 14 dpi and 21 dpi were significantly higher than those of the other early time-points (p CD8 + T cells could rapidly infiltrate into the injured spinal cords and survive two weeks, however, cytotoxic CD8 + T cells were dominant. Therefore, two weeks after injury might be the "time window" for treating SCI by prolonging survival times and increasing the fraction of CD8 + regulatory T-cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cephalopod genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertin, Caroline B.; Bonnaud, Laure; Brown, C. Titus

    2012-01-01

    The Cephalopod Sequencing Consortium (CephSeq Consortium) was established at a NESCent Catalysis Group Meeting, ``Paths to Cephalopod Genomics-Strategies, Choices, Organization,'' held in Durham, North Carolina, USA on May 24-27, 2012. Twenty-eight participants representing nine countries (Austri...... in this white paper......., Australia, China, Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Spain and the USA) met to address the pressing need for genome sequencing of cephalopod mollusks. This group, drawn from cephalopod biologists, neuroscientists, developmental and evolutionary biologists, materials scientists, bioinformaticians and researchers...

  10. CD150 is a member of a family of genes that encode glycoproteins on the surface of hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N; Morra, M; Wu, C; Gullo, C; Howie, D; Coyle, T; Engel, P; Terhorst, C

    2001-07-01

    Human CD150 (SLAM) is a glycoprotein expressed on the surface of T, B, natural killer, and dendritic cells. The extracellular domain of CD150 is the receptor for measles virus and CD150 acts as a co-activator on T and B cells. We characterized the mouse and human CD150 genes, each of which comprises seven exons spanning approximately 32 kb. Mouse CD150 mRNA was detected in T cells and in most thymocyte subsets, except CD4-8- cells. Surprisingly, the CD4-8- thymocytes of CD3gammadeltanull mice, but not of Ragnull or severe combined immunodeficiency mice, expressed CD150. Whereas high levels of CD150 were found in Th1 cells, only small amounts were detectable in Th2 cells. CD150 expression was up-regulated upon in vitro activation of mouse T cells by anti-CD3. The complete mouse CD150 gene is highly homologous to its human orthologue in terms of nucleotide sequences and intron/exon organization. The human genomic sequences indicate that all isoforms detected so far have arisen from alternative splicing events. As judged by fluorescence in situ hybridization, mouse CD150 mapped to Chromosome (Chr) 1, band 1H2.2-2.3, and human CD150 was found on Chr 1q22. Human and mouse CD150 share sequence homologies with six other genes, five of which - CD84, CD229 (Ly-9), CD244 (2B4), CD48, and 19A - are localized in a 250-kb segment in close proximity to the human gene. Their location and their sequence similarities strongly suggest that the CD150 family of cell surface receptors arose via successive duplications of a common ancestral gene.

  11. Removal of Cd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These metals may pose serious threats to both human health and the environment. This study investigated the potential of mixed clay, obtained from the Tundulu area, in removing, Cd2+, Cr3+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Pb2+ and Zn2+ cations and AsO43- anions from aqueous solutions using batch equilibrium technique. Qualitative ...

  12. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 6 (2001), s. 425-430 ISSN 0001-2815. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.864, year: 2001

  13. CD antigens 2002

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 10 (2002), s. 3877-3880 ISSN 0006-4971. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.631, year: 2002

  14. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 5 (2002), s. 2083-2086 ISSN 0022-1767. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 7.014, year: 2002

  15. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 103, č. 4 (2001), s. 401-406 ISSN 0019-2805 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2001

  16. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2001), s. 556-562 ISSN 1066-5099 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2001

  17. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 10 (2001), s. 2841-2847 ISSN 0014-2980 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.990, year: 2001

  18. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 211, č. 2 (2001), s. 81-85 ISSN 0008-8749 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.604, year: 2001

  19. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2002), s. 71-76 ISSN 0893-3952. [Conference on Human leucocyte differentiation antigens /7./. Harrogate, 20.06.2000-25.06.2000] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules, HLDA Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2002

  20. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 5 (2001), s. 685-690 ISSN 0741-5400 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7052904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD * leukocyte antigens Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.516, year: 2001

  1. CD antigens 2001

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mason, D.; Andre, P.; Bensussan, A.; Buckley, C.; Civin, C.; Clark, E.; de Haas, M.; Goyert, S.; Hadam, M.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Meuer, S.; Morrissey, J.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Shaw, S.; Simmons, D.; Uguccioni, M.; van der Schoot, E.; Vivier, E.; Zola, H.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 9 (2001), s. 1095-1098 ISSN 0953-8178 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/99/0349 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : antigen * CD * leukocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2001

  2. Review of CD Rom

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    "The Virtual Surgeon consists of a ground breaking series of CD-ROMs, which aims to provide surgeons with a new and powerful training tool. It provides surgeons with the most accurate and realistic model of the knee available, and our developments in animation allow them to see all aspects of the surgical procedure.

  3. Cd-Sb-Al system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belotskij, D.P.; Dundich, M.S.; Kotsyumakha, M.P.; Makhova, M.K.; Lesina, N.V.; Noval'kovskij, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    The methods of differential-thermal, microstructural analyses and measuring microhardness are used to investigate the phase diagrams of polythermal sections CdSb-AlSb, CdSb-Al, Cd-AlSb, Cdsub(0.5)Alsub(0.5)-Sb, CdSb-Alsub(0.2)Cdsub(0.8) of the ternary system Cd-Sb-Al. The liquidus projection of the Cd-Sb-Al system is plotted; it has been found that the surface of aluminium antimonide formation occupies a large part of the phase diagram in the field of which the lamination region is located

  4. CdS/CdSSe quantum dots in glass matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    –5 nm are uniformly distributed into the glass matrix. Keywords. CdS; CdSSe; nanocrystals; glasses; optical filters. 1. Introduction. Today nanostructured materials and quantum dots have immense importance in the field of optoelectronics and.

  5. Genome Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 9. Genome Imprinting - The Silencing of ... General Article Volume 5 Issue 9 September 2000 pp 49-57 ... M T Tanuja1. Drosophila Stock Centre, Department of Studies in Zoology, University of Mysore Manasagangotri Mysore 570 006, India.

  6. Genome Imprinting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ring pathological condition cystic fibrosis is due to inheritance of both copies of chromosome 7 from the mother. Similarly,. Prader-Willi syndrome in humans is due to the inheritance of both copies of chromosome 15 from the mother. Human Triploids. The triploid (Le. 3 copies of the haploid genome are present instead of the ...

  7. genome editing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-11

    Feb 11, 2016 ... What history tells us. XL. The success story of the expression 'genome editing'. MICHEL MORANGE. Centre Cavaillès, République des Savoirs: Lettres, Sciences, Philosophie USR 3608, Ecole. Normale Supérieure, 29 Rue d'Ulm, 75230, Paris Cedex 05, France. (Fax, 33-144-323941; Email, ...

  8. Ancient genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Allentoft, Morten Erik; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed a revolution in ancient DNA (aDNA) research. Although the field's focus was previously limited to mitochondrial DNA and a few nuclear markers, whole genome sequences from the deep past can now be retrieved. This breakthrough is tightly connected to the massive sequen...

  9. Comparative Genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 8. Comparative Genomics - A Powerful New Tool in Biology. Anand K Bachhawat. General Article Volume 11 Issue 8 August 2006 pp 22-40. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  10. Mobilization of retrotransposons in synthetic allotetraploid tobacco

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petit, M.; Guidat, C.; Daniel, J.; Montoriol, E.; Bui, Q.T.; Lim, K.Y.; Kovařík, Aleš; Leitch, A.R.; Grandbastien, M.-A.; Mhiri, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 186, č. 1 (2010), s. 135-147 ISSN 0028-646X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) MEB020823; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/07/0116 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : allopolyploidy * evolution * retrotransposition Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 6.516, year: 2010

  11. CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Regulatory T Cell Subsets in Mediating Autoimmune Reactivity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żabińska, Marcelina; Krajewska, Magdalena; Kościelska-Kasprzak, Katarzyna; Jakuszko, Katarzyna; Bartoszek, Dorota; Myszka, Marta; Klinger, Marian

    2016-10-01

    The available clinical as well as experimental studies implicate participation of T regulatory (Treg) subsets in the pathogenesis and course of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Introduction of the CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory subpopulations analysis into immunological processes assessment and disease activation prognosis in patients with lupus nephritis (LN) may improve monitoring of disease activity and enable an early, and thus more effective, therapeutic treatment. The main goal of the study was to investigate whether the quantitative changes of Treg subpopulations are related to the clinical status of patients with LN. Fifty-four adult SLE patients divided into two groups according to their SLEDAI and renal SLEDAI scores were enrolled into the study. Subpopulations of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) phenotypes were determined by flow cytometry. The control group had higher absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells compared with the study group (p < 0.001). Also, significant inverse correlation in the absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells and SLEDAI score was observed. There were significant differences in the percentage and absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) lymphocytes between active and non-active LN groups. The study group had statistically lower values of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) cells, both in the percentage (p < 0.001) as well as their absolute number (p = 0.014) compared to the control group. There were also statistically significant positive correlations between the absolute number of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs. (1) reduction in the number of regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) cells is a promising indicator of the activity of SLE, particularly of renal involvement; (2) determination of the number of regulatory cells using the CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-) phenotype is unreliable in patients with SLE.

  12. Various domains of the B-cell regulatory molecule CD72 has diverged at different rates in mammals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Cathrine Bie; Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Fredholm, Merete

    2007-01-01

    We report the cloning of the porcine B-cell co-receptor CD72, as well as genomic mapping and examination of transcription. The B-cell receptor (BCR) complex mediates signalling upon antigen recognition by the membrane bound BCR. Several co-receptors modulate this signal positively or negatively. CD......72 has been shown to be a negatively regulating BCR co-receptor. We isolated and sequenced three porcine CD72 transcript variants. Using a pig radiation hybrid panel we found the porcien CD72 gene to be located on chromosome 1q21-28 in a region syntenic to human chromosome 9. The porcine CD72 gene...

  13. Genetic Variance in Cadmium Tolerance and Accumulation in Wheat Materials Differing in Ploidy and Genome at Seedling Stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ci, D; Jiang, D; Wollenweber, B

    2010-01-01

    and cluster analysis, Triticum boeoticum Boiss was found to be the most Cd-tolerant variety exhibiting low Cd translocation rates, whereas T. aestivum cv. Huixianhong and Jinghui 1 were identified as the most Cd-sensitive varieties showing also higher Cd translocation rates.......Cadmium (Cd) tolerance and accumulation in wheat varieties differing in ploidy and genome were investigated at seedling stage under controlled environmental conditions. The wheat varieties included six diploid, eight tetraploid, seven hexaploid and three octoploid species together with wheat...... translocation (ratio of SCA to total Cd accumulation in plants) of the wheat varieties differing in ploidies generally decreased from octoploid to diploid, except for material containing the CCUU genome. It was found that Cd tolerance of these 24 wheat varieties varied with different ploidy and genomes...

  14. Personal genomics services: whose genomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurwitz, David; Bregman-Eschet, Yael

    2009-07-01

    New companies offering personal whole-genome information services over the internet are dynamic and highly visible players in the personal genomics field. For fees currently ranging from US$399 to US$2500 and a vial of saliva, individuals can now purchase online access to their individual genetic information regarding susceptibility to a range of chronic diseases and phenotypic traits based on a genome-wide SNP scan. Most of the companies offering such services are based in the United States, but their clients may come from nearly anywhere in the world. Although the scientific validity, clinical utility and potential future implications of such services are being hotly debated, several ethical and regulatory questions related to direct-to-consumer (DTC) marketing strategies of genetic tests have not yet received sufficient attention. For example, how can we minimize the risk of unauthorized third parties from submitting other people's DNA for testing? Another pressing question concerns the ownership of (genotypic and phenotypic) information, as well as the unclear legal status of customers regarding their own personal information. Current legislation in the US and Europe falls short of providing clear answers to these questions. Until the regulation of personal genomics services catches up with the technology, we call upon commercial providers to self-regulate and coordinate their activities to minimize potential risks to individual privacy. We also point out some specific steps, along the trustee model, that providers of DTC personal genomics services as well as regulators and policy makers could consider for addressing some of the concerns raised below.

  15. CD4+CD28+KIR+CD11ahiT cells correlate with disease activity and are characterized by a pro-inflammatory epigenetic and transcriptional profile in lupus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensterblum, Elizabeth; Renauer, Paul; Coit, Patrick; Strickland, Faith M; Kilian, Nathan C; Miller, Shaylynn; Ognenovski, Mikhail; Wren, Jonathan D; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Lewis, Emily E; Maksimowicz-McKinnon, Kathleen; McCune, W Joseph; Richardson, Bruce C; Sawalha, Amr H

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to comprehensively characterize CD4+CD28+ T cells overexpressing CD11a and KIR genes, and examine the relationship between this T cell subset, genetic risk, and disease activity in lupus. The size of the CD4+CD28+KIR+CD11a hi T cell subset was determined by flow cytometry, and total genetic risk for lupus was calculated in 105 female patients using 43 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci. Primary CD4+CD28+KIR+CD11a hi T cells were isolated from lupus patients or were induced from healthy individuals using 5-azacytidine. Genome-wide DNA methylation was analyzed using an array-based approach, and the transcriptome was assessed by RNA sequencing. Transcripts in the CDR3 region were used to assess the TCR repertoire. Chromatin accessibility was determined using ATAC-seq. A total of 31,019 differentially methylated sites were identified in induced KIR+CD11a hi T cells with >99% being hypomethylated. RNA sequencing revealed a clear pro-inflammatory transcriptional profile. TCR repertoire analysis suggests less clonotype diversity in KIR+CD11a hi compared to autologous KIR-CD11a low T cells. Similarly, primary KIR+CD11a hi T cells isolated from lupus patients were hypomethylated and characterized by a pro-inflammatory chromatin structure. We show that the genetic risk for lupus was significantly higher in African-American compared to European-American lupus patients. The demethylated CD4+CD28+KIR+CD11a hi T cell subset size was a better predictor of disease activity in young (age ≤ 40) European-American patients independent of genetic risk. CD4+CD28+KIR+CD11a hi T cells are demethylated and characterized by pro-inflammatory epigenetic and transcriptional profiles in lupus. Eliminating these cells or blocking their pro-inflammatory characteristics might present a novel therapeutic approach for lupus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nutritional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovas, Jose M; Corella, Dolores

    2004-01-01

    Nutritional genomics has tremendous potential to change the future of dietary guidelines and personal recommendations. Nutrigenetics will provide the basis for personalized dietary recommendations based on the individual's genetic make up. This approach has been used for decades for certain monogenic diseases; however, the challenge is to implement a similar concept for common multifactorial disorders and to develop tools to detect genetic predisposition and to prevent common disorders decades before their manifestation. The preliminary results involving gene-diet interactions for cardiovascular diseases and cancer are promising, but mostly inconclusive. Success in this area will require the integration of different disciplines and investigators working on large population studies designed to adequately investigate gene-environment interactions. Despite the current difficulties, preliminary evidence strongly suggests that the concept should work and that we will be able to harness the information contained in our genomes to achieve successful aging using behavioral changes; nutrition will be the cornerstone of this endeavor.

  17. [Progress on XerCD/dif site-specific recombination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, De-Qiao; Wang, Yu-Min; Zheng, Tao

    2012-08-01

    In Escherichia coli, 10% to 15% of growing bacteria produce chromosome dimers during DNA replication. These dimers are resolved by XerC and XerD, two chromosome recombinases that target the dif sequence in the replication terminus of chromosome. Phage CTXΦ integrates into vibrio cholerae chromosome in a site-specific manner. However, CTXΦ genome does not encode any recombinase, while recombinase XerC and XerD, which is coded by vibrio cholerae chromosome are required for the integration of CTXΦ into the vibrio cholerae chromosome. The CTXΦ integration site overlaps with the dif site. The wide distribution of XerCD recombinase and dif site among bacteria genome suggests that it may be universal in resolve of chromosome dimers and phage integration. In this article, we reviewed the research progresses on chromosome dimer resolve and phage integration through XerCD/dif site-specific recombination.

  18. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a

  19. Amplifying recombination genome-wide and reshaping crossover landscapes in Brassicas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Pelé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination by crossovers (COs is tightly regulated, limiting its key role in producing genetic diversity. However, while COs are usually restricted in number and not homogenously distributed along chromosomes, we show here how to disrupt these rules in Brassica species by using allotriploid hybrids (AAC, 2n = 3x = 29, resulting from the cross between the allotetraploid rapeseed (B. napus, AACC, 2n = 4x = 38 and one of its diploid progenitors (B. rapa, AA, 2n = 2x = 20. We produced mapping populations from different genotypes of both diploid AA and triploid AAC hybrids, used as female and/or as male. Each population revealed nearly 3,000 COs that we studied with SNP markers well distributed along the A genome (on average 1 SNP per 1.25 Mbp. Compared to the case of diploids, allotriploid hybrids showed 1.7 to 3.4 times more overall COs depending on the sex of meiosis and the genetic background. Most surprisingly, we found that such a rise was always associated with (i dramatic changes in the shape of recombination landscapes and (ii a strong decrease of CO interference. Hybrids carrying an additional C genome exhibited COs all along the A chromosomes, even in the vicinity of centromeres that are deprived of COs in diploids as well as in most studied species. Moreover, in male allotriploid hybrids we found that Class I COs are mostly responsible for the changes of CO rates, landscapes and interference. These results offer the opportunity for geneticists and plant breeders to dramatically enhance the generation of diversity in Brassica species by disrupting the linkage drag coming from limits on number and distribution of COs.

  20. In ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies depletes CD4+CD25+ T cells in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2013-01-01

    The CD4(+)CD25(+) cells have T regulatory cell properties in chickens. This study investigated the effect of in ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies (0.5 mg/egg) on CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion and on amounts of interleukin-2 mRNA and interferon-γ mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells posthatch. Anti-chicken CD25 or PBS (control) was injected into 16-d-old embryos. Chicks hatched from eggs injected with anti-chicken CD25 antibodies had a lower CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood until 25 d posthatch. The anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection nearly depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the blood until 16 d posthatch. At 30 d posthatch, the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the anti-CD25-antibody-injected group was comparable with the percentage in the control group. At 16 d posthatch, the anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection decreased CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the thymus, spleen, and cecal tonsils. Chickens hatched from anti-CD25-antibody-injected eggs had approximately 25% of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the cecal tonsils and thymus compared with those in the cecal tonsils and thymus of the control group. The CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of chicks hatched from anti-chicken-CD25-injected eggs had higher amounts of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 mRNA than CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the control group. It could be concluded that injecting anti-chicken CD25 antibodies in ovo at 16 d of incubation nearly depleted the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells until 25 d posthatch.

  1. Critical role for thymic CD19+CD5+CD1dhiIL-10+ regulatory B cells in immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chen; Ma, Ning; Xiao, He; Wang, Xiaoqian; Zheng, Mingke; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Wang, Renxi

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that besides the spleen, LNs, peripheral blood, and thymus contain a regulatory IL-10-producing CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cell subset that may play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. Indeed, this population was identified in the murine thymus, and furthermore, when cocultured with CD4(+) T cells, this population of B cells supported the maintenance of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro, in part, via the CD5-CD72 interaction. Mice homozygous for Cd19(Cre) (CD19(-/-)) express B cells with impaired signaling and humoral responses. Strikingly, CD19(-/-) mice produce fewer CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and a greater percentage of CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. Consistent with these results, transfer of thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells into CD19(-/-) mice resulted in significantly up-regulated numbers of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs with a concomitant reduction in CD4(+)CD8(-) and CD4(-)CD8(+) T cell populations in the thymus, spleen, and LNs but not in the BM of recipient mice. In addition, thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi) B cells significantly suppressed autoimmune responses in lupus-like mice via up-regulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs and IL-10-producing Bregs. This study suggests that thymic CD19(+)CD5(+)CD1d(hi)IL-10(+) Bregs play a critical role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  2. Differential characteristics of CD133(+) and CD133 (-) Jurkat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarlou, Azadeh; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; AkhavanRahnama, Mahshid; Bohloli, Mahbobeh; Mossahebi-Mohammadi, Majid

    2015-06-01

    T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological disease including malignancy of T cell precursors. There are some T-ALL patients that are drug-resistant. A major cause of treatment failure in cancers can be associated with the existence of cancer stem cells. The identification of these cell populations helps us to clarify resistance mechanisms and rely on special markers for recognizing cancer stem cells. CD133 is one of the markers that is used for the identification of cancer stem cells. In this study, we evaluated CD133(+) and CD133(-) characteristic cells in Jurkat cells by assay proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis. CD133(+) and CD133(-) Jurkat cells were separated and immediately analyzed for proliferation, invasion, and doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Proliferation, invasion, and resistance to chemotherapy of CD133(+) Jurkat cells were significantly more than CD133(-) Jurkat cells. Also, our results showed that CD133(+) Jurkat cells expressed ABCG2 gene more than CD133(-) Jurkat cells. In conclusion, CD133 marker could be introduced as a specific marker of cancer stem cells in Jurkat cell line.

  3. The classical CD14 CD16 monocytes, but not the patrolling CD14 CD16 monocytes, promote Th17 responses to Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeekens, S.P.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Joosten, L.A.B.; Jacobs, L.; Jansen, T.; Williams, D.L.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Kullberg, B.J.; Netea, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the functional differences between cluster of differentiation (CD)14(++) CD16(-) and CD14(+) CD16(+) monocytes during anti-Candida host defense. CD14(++) CD16(-) are the "classical" monocytes and represent the majority of circulating monocytes in humans, while

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Genome-Wide 6K SNP Array for Diploid Sweet Cherry and Tetraploid Sour Cherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace, Cameron; Bassil, Nahla; Main, Dorrie; Ficklin, Stephen; Rosyara, Umesh R.; Stegmeir, Travis; Sebolt, Audrey; Gilmore, Barbara; Lawley, Cindy; Mockler, Todd C.; Bryant, Douglas W.; Wilhelm, Larry; Iezzoni, Amy

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput genome scans are important tools for genetic studies and breeding applications. Here, a 6K SNP array for use with the Illumina Infinium® system was developed for diploid sweet cherry (Prunus avium) and allotetraploid sour cherry (P. cerasus). This effort was led by RosBREED, a community initiative to enable marker-assisted breeding for rosaceous crops. Next-generation sequencing in diverse breeding germplasm provided 25 billion basepairs (Gb) of cherry DNA sequence from which were identified genome-wide SNPs for sweet cherry and for the two sour cherry subgenomes derived from sweet cherry (avium subgenome) and P. fruticosa (fruticosa subgenome). Anchoring to the peach genome sequence, recently released by the International Peach Genome Initiative, predicted relative physical locations of the 1.9 million putative SNPs detected, preliminarily filtered to 368,943 SNPs. Further filtering was guided by results of a 144-SNP subset examined with the Illumina GoldenGate® assay on 160 accessions. A 6K Infinium® II array was designed with SNPs evenly spaced genetically across the sweet and sour cherry genomes. SNPs were developed for each sour cherry subgenome by using minor allele frequency in the sour cherry detection panel to enrich for subgenome-specific SNPs followed by targeting to either subgenome according to alleles observed in sweet cherry. The array was evaluated using panels of sweet (n = 269) and sour (n = 330) cherry breeding germplasm. Approximately one third of array SNPs were informative for each crop. A total of 1825 polymorphic SNPs were verified in sweet cherry, 13% of these originally developed for sour cherry. Allele dosage was resolved for 2058 polymorphic SNPs in sour cherry, one third of these being originally developed for sweet cherry. This publicly available genomics resource represents a significant advance in cherry genome-scanning capability that will accelerate marker-locus-trait association discovery, genome

  5. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  6. Genome-Wide Dosage-Dependent and -Independent Regulation Contributes to Gene Expression and Evolutionary Novelty in Plant Polyploids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changqing; Ko, Dae Kwan; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Polyploidy provides evolutionary and morphological novelties in many plants and some animals. However, the role of genome dosage and composition in gene expression changes remains poorly understood. Here, we generated a series of resynthesized Arabidopsis tetraploids that contain 0-4 copies of Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabidopsis arenosa genomes and investigated ploidy and hybridity effects on gene expression. Allelic expression can be defined as dosage dependent (expression levels correlate with genome dosages) or otherwise as dosage independent. Here, we show that many dosage-dependent genes contribute to cell cycle, photosynthesis, and metabolism, whereas dosage-independent genes are enriched in biotic and abiotic stress responses. Interestingly, dosage-dependent genes tend to be preserved in ancient biochemical pathways present in both plant and nonplant species, whereas many dosage-independent genes belong to plant-specific pathways. This is confirmed by an independent analysis using Arabidopsis phylostratigraphic map. For A. thaliana loci, the dosage-dependent alleles are devoid of TEs and tend to correlate with H3K9ac, H3K4me3, and CG methylation, whereas the majority of dosage-independent alleles are enriched with TEs and correspond to H3K27me1, H3K27me3, and CHG (H = A, T, or C) methylation. Furthermore, there is a parent-of-origin effect on nonadditively expressed genes in the reciprocal allotetraploids especially when A. arenosa is used as the pollen donor, leading to metabolic and morphological changes. Thus, ploidy, epigenetic modifications, and cytoplasmic-nuclear interactions shape gene expression diversity in polyploids. Dosage-dependent expression can maintain growth and developmental stability, whereas dosage-independent expression can facilitate functional divergence between homeologs (subfunctionalization and/or neofunctionalization) during polyploid evolution. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for

  7. Reverse Vaccinology: Developing Vaccines in the Era of Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sette, Alessandro; Rappuoli, Rino

    2012-01-01

    The sequence of microbial genomes made all potential antigens of each pathogen available for vaccine development. This increased by orders of magnitude potential vaccine targets in bacteria, parasites, and large viruses and revealed virtually all their CD4+ and CD8+ T cell epitopes. The genomic information was first used for the development of a vaccine against serogroup B meningococcus, and it is now being used for several other bacterial vaccines. In this review, we will first summarize the impact that genome sequencing has had on vaccine development, and then we will analyze how the genomic information can help further our understanding of immunity to infection or vaccination and lead to the design of better vaccines by diving into the world of T cell immunity. PMID:21029963

  8. Neoplasia hematodérmica CD4+ CD56+ en la infancia Hematodermic CD4+ CD56+ neoplasm in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A. Rojas Bilbao

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available La neoplasia hematodérmica CD4+ CD56+ con fenotipo de célula dendrítica plasmocitoide es una rara y agresiva neoplasia recientemente reconocida por la WHO-EORTC classification. Afecta adultos de edad media y ancianos, siendo muy pocos los casos descriptos en niños. Presentamos el caso de una niña de 12 años con grave retraso mental, estigmas genéticos y múltiples lesiones cutáneas localizadas en miembros inferiores y superiores. Histológicamente se observó un infiltrado dérmico difuso de células pequeñas y medianas con expresión de CD4, CD56, CD43 y S100 así como de marcadores dendríticos plasmocitoides: CD 123 y BDCA-2 confirmados por citometría de flujo, sin compromiso de sangre periférica ni médula ósea. Cumpliendo dos semanas de tratamiento para leucemia linfoblástica aguda evolucionó con remisión clínica de las lesiones cutaneas.Hematodermic CD4+ CD56+ neoplasm with plasmacytoid dendritic cell phenotype is a rare and aggressive neoplasm recently recognized by the WHO-EORTC classification. It generally appears in elderly adults, exceptionally in childhood. We present a 12-year-old girl with severe mental retardation, genetic clinical features and multiple nodular cutaneous lesions on legs and arms. Histologically the nodules showed diffuse dermal infiltrate of medium and small cells and expression of CD4, CD56, CD43, S100 and plasmacytoid dendritic markers: CD123, BDCA-2 under flow cytometry study. Peripheral blood and bone marrow were not involved. Clinical remission of cutaneous lesions was observed after two weeks of acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy.

  9. Decreased CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– T cell ratio can sensitively predict poor outcome for patients with complicated Crohn disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shi-xue; Gu, Hong-xiang; Lin, Qian-yi; Wu, Yan-kun; Wang, Xiao-yan; Huang, Shao-zhuo; Xing, Tiao-si; Chen, Min-hua; Zhang, Qing-fang; Zheng, Zhong-wen; Sha, Wei-hong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Crohn disease (CD) with complications such as penetrating, stricturing, and perianal disease is called complicated CD. The aim of this study is to test the efficiency with which the CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– cell balance can predict a subsequent active stage in patients with newly diagnosed complicated CD. Seventeen patients with complicated CD and 48 CD patients with no complications were enrolled. Blood CD8+ T cells were tested from all of the 65 newly diagnosed CD patients upon enrollment. The potential risk factors were compared between the 2 groups. A 30-week follow-up was performed, and the efficiency of the CD8+ cell balance at predicting active CD was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristic curves. The cumulative remission lasting rates (CRLRs) were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Compared with the control CD group, patients with complicated CD were predominantly male and younger in age; they also had lower body mass indices (BMIs), higher Crohn disease activity indices (CDAIs), higher immunosuppressant and steroid prescription rates, and significantly higher surgical rates. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– balance was associated with BMI, CDAI, steroids, and surgery. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratios were significantly lower at week 0 and on the 6th, 22nd, and 30th week during follow-up with a shorter lasting time of remission for the complicated CD patients. The CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratio could accurately predict the active stage for the patients with complicated CD, and the highest sensitivity (89.2%) and specificity (85.3%) were found when the ratio was 1.03. Treatment with steroids and surgery, along with a significantly lower CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28– ratio and lower CRLRs, was closely related to a worse outcome for the patients with complicated CD. Patients requiring steroids and surgery experience more severe disease activity and thus a disequilibrated immunological balance, which could be the main reason for a decreased CD8+CD28+/CD8

  10. IL-2 and IL-15 regulate CD154 expression on activated CD4 T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bonyhadi, M; Odum, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The cellular and humoral immune system is critically dependent upon CD40-CD154 (CD40 ligand) interactions between CD40 expressed on B cells, macrophages, and dendritic cells, and CD154 expressed primarily on CD4 T cells. Previous studies have shown that CD154 is transiently expressed on CD4 T cells...... of CD154 expression. This has significant impact on our understanding of the acquired immune response and may provide insight concerning the mechanisms underlying several immunological diseases....

  11. The platypus genome unraveled.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen J

    2008-06-13

    The genome of the platypus has been sequenced, assembled, and annotated by an international genomics team. Like the animal itself the platypus genome contains an amalgam of mammal, reptile, and bird-like features.

  12. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Folkersen, Lasse; Skov, Søren

    2012-01-01

    we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+) T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype...... than the NKG2D(-) CD4(+) T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+) T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation...... CD4(+) T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+) CD4(+) T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression....

  13. Breast cancers radiation-resistance: key role of the cancer stem cells marker CD24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensimon, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of radiation-resistant breast cancer cells, responsible for relapse after radiotherapy. The 'Cancer Stem Cells' (CSC) theory describes a radiation-resistant cellular sub-population, with enhanced capacity to induce tumors and proliferate. In this work, we show that only the CSC marker CD24-/low defines a radiation resistant cell population, able to transmit the 'memory' of irradiation, expressed as long term genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. We show that CD24 is not only a marker, but is an actor of radiation-response. So, CD24 expression controls cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ROS level before and after irradiation. As a result, CD24-/low cells display enhanced radiation-resistance and genomic stability. For the first time, our results attribute a role to CD24-/low CSCs in the transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, by providing informations on tumor intrinsic radiation-sensitivity, CD24- marker could help to design new radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  14. CD4+CD25+CD127low FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Ali; Ebrahimpour, Soheil; Maleki, Iradj; Abediankenari, Saeid; Mohammadnia Afrouzi, Mousa

    2018-02-16

    Regulatory T (Treg) cell play a key role in autoimmune diseases. We evaluated the regulatory function and frequency of Treg cells and secreted IL-10, IL-35 concentration in Crohn's disease (CD). Twenty-three patients with CD and 25 healthy controls (HC) were included in this study. We analysed the alteration of Tregs frequency using flow cytometry for CD4, CD25, CD127 and FoxP3 markers. Surface expression of CD4, CD25 and CD127 markers were used for isolation of a relatively pure Treg cells. Suppressive activity of Tregs was determined by measuring their ability to inhibit the proliferation of T responder (Tres) cells. In addition, the amounts of IL-10 and IL-35 cytokines in co-culture supernatants were measured by ELISA assay after stimulation with anti-CD2/CD3/CD28. CD patients had significantly lower frequency of CD4+ CD25+ CD127low FoxP3+ Treg cells in comparison with controls (‎2.17 ± 1.04 vs.2.83 ± 1.07, p=0.0352)‎. Additionally, Treg cells mediated suppression was not significantly different in CD patients compared to controls. There was a significant difference in IL-10 secretion in response to anti-CD2/CD3/CD28 stimulation compared with HC (p= 0.0074). The frequency of CD4+ CD25+ CD127 low FoxP3+ Tregs decreased in active stage of CD but there was no impaired suppressive function of CD4+ CD25+ ‎CD127low FoxP3+Treg cells. We suggest that an alteration in the ‎balance of Tregs and T effectors may contribute to pathogenesis of CD.‎.

  15. Death Induced by CD95 or CD95 Ligand Elimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Hadji

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD95 (Fas/APO-1, when bound by its cognate ligand CD95L, induces cells to die by apoptosis. We now show that elimination of CD95 or CD95L results in a form of cell death that is independent of caspase-8, RIPK1/MLKL, and p53, is not inhibited by Bcl-xL expression, and preferentially affects cancer cells. All tumors that formed in mouse models of low-grade serous ovarian cancer or chemically induced liver cancer with tissue-specific deletion of CD95 still expressed CD95, suggesting that cancer cannot form in the absence of CD95. Death induced by CD95R/L elimination (DICE is characterized by an increase in cell size, production of mitochondrial ROS, and DNA damage. It resembles a necrotic form of mitotic catastrophe. No single drug was found to completely block this form of cell death, and it could also not be blocked by the knockdown of a single gene, making it a promising way to kill cancer cells.

  16. Comparative mapping in intraspecific populations uncovers a high degree of macrosynteny between A- and B-genome diploid species of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yufang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important oilseed crop with an allotetraploid genome (AABB, 2n = 4x = 40. Both the low level of genetic variation within the cultivated gene pool and its polyploid nature limit the utilization of molecular markers to explore genome structure and facilitate genetic improvement. Nevertheless, a wealth of genetic diversity exists in diploid Arachis species (2n = 2x = 20, which represent a valuable gene pool for cultivated peanut improvement. Interspecific populations have been used widely for genetic mapping in diploid species of Arachis. However, an intraspecific mapping strategy was essential to detect chromosomal rearrangements among species that could be obscured by mapping in interspecific populations. To develop intraspecific reference linkage maps and gain insights into karyotypic evolution within the genus, we comparatively mapped the A- and B-genome diploid species using intraspecific F2 populations. Exploring genome organization among diploid peanut species by comparative mapping will enhance our understanding of the cultivated tetraploid peanut genome. Moreover, new sources of molecular markers that are highly transferable between species and developed from expressed genes will be required to construct saturated genetic maps for peanut. Results A total of 2,138 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers were developed by mining a tetraploid peanut EST assembly including 101,132 unigenes (37,916 contigs and 63,216 singletons derived from 70,771 long-read (Sanger and 270,957 short-read (454 sequences. A set of 97 SSR markers were also developed by mining 9,517 genomic survey sequences of Arachis. An SSR-based intraspecific linkage map was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between K 9484 (PI 298639 and GKBSPSc 30081 (PI 468327 in the B-genome species A. batizocoi. A high degree of macrosynteny was observed

  17. Genome cartography: charting the apicomplexan genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissinger, Jessica C; DeBarry, Jeremy

    2011-08-01

    Genes reside in particular genomic contexts that can be mapped at many levels. Historically, 'genetic maps' were used primarily to locate genes. Recent technological advances in the determination of genome sequences have made the analysis and comparison of whole genomes possible and increasingly tractable. What do we see if we shift our focus from gene content (the 'inventory' of genes contained within a genome) to the composition and organization of a genome? This review examines what has been learned about the evolution of the apicomplexan genome as well as the significance and impact of genomic location on our understanding of the eukaryotic genome and parasite biology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... Angiosperm families, 73 of which were from herbarium material with ages up to 146 years old. For 84 specimens, a sufficient number of paired-end reads were generated (in total 9.4 × 1012 nucleotides), yielding successful plastome assemblies for 74 specimens. Those derived from herbarium specimens have lower...... fractions of plastome-derived reads compared with those from fresh and silica-gel-dried specimens, but total herbarium assembly lengths are only slightly shorter. Specimens from wet-tropical conditions appear to have a higher number of contigs per assembly and lower N50 values. We find no significant...

  19. Cd8 enhancer E8I and Runx factors regulate CD8α expression in activated CD8+ T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Hammad; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Tenno, Mari; Kopf, Aglaja; Boucheron, Nicole; Carpenter, Andrea C.; Egawa, Takeshi; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2011-01-01

    Cd8a and Cd8b1 coreceptor gene (Cd8) expression is tightly controlled during T-cell development by the activity of five Cd8 enhancers (E8I–E8V). Here we demonstrate a unique transcriptional program regulating CD8 expression during CD8+ effector T-cell differentiation. The Cd8 enhancer E8I and Runx/core-binding factor-β (CBFβ) complexes were required for the establishment of this regulatory circuit, because E8I-, Runx3-, or CBFβ-deficient CD8+ T cells down-regulated CD8α expression during acti...

  20. CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells from FIV+ cats induce a unique anergic profile in CD8+ lymphocyte targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tompkins Mary B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using the FIV model, we reported previously that CD4+CD25+ T regulatory (Treg cells from FIV+ cats are constitutively activated and suppress CD4+CD25- and CD8+ T cell immune responses. In an effort to further explore Treg-mediated suppression, we asked whether Treg cells induce anergy through the alteration of production of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors. Results Lymphocytes were obtained from control or FIV+ cats and sorted by FACS into CD4+CD25+ and CD8+ populations. Following co-culture with CD4+CD25+ cells, CD8+ targets were examined by Western blot for changes in cyclins D3, E and A, retinoblastoma (Rb protein, as well as the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1. Following co-culture with CD4+CD25+cells, we observed up-regulation of p21cip1 and cyclin E, with down-regulation of cyclin D3, in CD8+ cells from FIV+ cats. As expected, CD8+ targets from control cats were quiescent with little up-regulation of p21cip1 and cyclin E. There was also a lack of Rb phosphorylation in CD8+ targets consistent with late G1 cell cycle arrest. Further, IL-2 mRNA was down regulated in CD8+ cells after co-culture with CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Following CD4+CD25+ co-culture, CD8+ targets from FIV+ cats also had increased Foxp3 mRNA expression; however, these CD8+Foxp3+ cells did not exhibit suppressor function. Conclusions Collectively, these data suggest that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells from FIV+ cats induce CD8+ anergy by disruption of normal G1 to S cell cycle progression.

  1. Description of an elasmobranch TCR coreceptor: CD8α from Rhinobatos productus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J.D.; Farrugia, T.J.; Woodson, J.; Laing, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role for the control and eradication of intracellular pathogens. To learn more about the evolutionary origins of the first signal (Signal 1) for T-cell activation, we cloned CD8α from an elasmobranch, Rhinobatos productus. Similar to full-length CD8α cDNAs from other vertebrates, Rhpr-CD8α (1800 bp) encodes a 219 amino acid open reading frame composed of a signal peptide, an extracellular IgSF V domain and a stalk/hinge region followed by a well-conserved transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail. Overall, the mature Rhpr-CD8α protein (201 aa) displays ~30% amino acid identity with mammalian CD8α including absolute conservation of cysteine residues involved in the IgSf V domain fold and dimerization of CD8αα and CD8αβ. One prominent feature is the absence of the LCK association motif (CXC) that is needed for achieving signal 1 in tetrapods. Both elasmobranch and teleost CD8α protein sequences possess a similar but distinctly different motif (CXH) in the cytoplasmic tail. The overall genomic structure of CD8α has been conserved during the course of vertebrate evolution both for the number of exons and phase of splicing. Finally, quantitative RTPCR demonstrated that elasmobranch CD8α is expressed in lymphoid-rich tissues similar to CD8 in other vertebrates. The results from this study indicate the existence of CD8 prior to the emergence of the gnathostomes (>450 MYA) while providing evidence that the canonical LCK association motif in mammals is likely a derived characteristic of tetrapod CD8α, suggesting potential differences for T-cell education and activation in the various gnathostomes.

  2. Immune evasion by gammaherpesvirus genome maintenance proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Neil

    2010-04-01

    Viruses that establish lifelong latent infections must ensure that the viral genome is maintained within the latently infected cell throughout the life of the host, yet at the same time must also be capable of avoiding elimination by the immune surveillance system. Gammaherpesviruses, which include the human viruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, establish latent infections in lymphocytes. Infection of this dynamic host-cell population requires that the viruses have appropriate strategies for enabling the viral genome to persist while these cells go through rounds of mitosis, but at the same time must avoid detection by host CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). The majority of gammaherpesviruses studied have been found to encode a specific protein that is critical for maintenance of the viral genome within latently infected cells. This protein is termed the genome maintenance protein (GMP). Due to its vital role in long-term latency, this offers the immune system a crucial target for detection and elimination of virus-infected cells. GMPs from different gammaherpesviruses have evolved related strategies that allow the protein to be present within latently infected cells, but to remain effectively hidden from circulating CD8(+) CTLs. In this review, I will summarize the role of the GMPs and highlight the available data describing the immune-evasion properties of these proteins.

  3. Increased expression of CD80, CD86 and CD70 on T cells from HIV-infected individuals upon activation in vitro: regulation by CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, K. C.; Otto, S. A.; Lens, S. M.; Kolbach, D. N.; van Lier, R. A.; Miedema, F.; Meyaard, L.

    1996-01-01

    T cells express CD28 and CD27 which transduce co-stimulatory signals after interaction with their ligands on antigen-presenting cells (APC). These ligands, CD80, CD86 and CD70, are also expressed to some extent on activated T cells. Here, we show that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected

  4. The biological difference between CD13+CD133+ and CD13¬CD133¬liver cancer cells and its clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-long JIN

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the biological difference between CD13+CD133+ and CD13-CD133- hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells in HuH7 cell line and its clinical significance. Methods The status of proliferation, phase of the cell cycle, tumor formation in vivo, differentiation, and their chemoresistance to 5-FU and pirarubicin of CD13+CD133+ and CD13-CD133-HCC cells were studied to analyze the clinical implication of CD13+CD133+HCC cell subset. Results The proliferation rate of CD13+CD133+HCC cells was significantly higher than that of CD13-CD133-HCC cells. The cell-cycle phase study showed that 78.45% of the CD13+CD133+HCC cells were in the G0/G1 phase, 2.19% in G2/M phase, and 19.36% in S phase, while 62.18% CD13-CD133-HCC cells were in the G0/G1 phase, 11.88% in G2/M phase, and 25.95% in S phase. Limiting dilution analysis of HuH7 cells revealed that 1×103 CD13+CD133+ cells could form the tumor, while 1×105 CD13-CD133- cells did. CD13+CD133+ cells showed chemoresistance to 5-FU and pirarubicin, while other three subsets succumbed to the drugs. Conclusion CD13+CD133+ cancer cells in HuH7 showed the characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which might contribute to the relapse and metastasis of liver cancer, and they may be the main target for chemotherapy in human liver cancer.

  5. CD44 in hematological neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertweck, Magdalena Katharina; Erdfelder, Felix; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2011-05-01

    The CD44 protein family spans a large group of transmembrane glycoproteins acquired by alternative splicing and post-translational modifications. The great heterogeneity in molecular structure is reflected in its various important functions: CD44 mediates (1) interaction between cell and extracellular matrix, (2) signal submission, e.g., by acting as co-receptor for membrane-spanning receptor tyrosine kinases or by association with intracellular molecules initiating several signaling pathways, and (3) anchor function connecting to the cytoskeleton via the ezrin-radixin-moesin protein family. The expression pattern of the different CD44 isoforms display strong variations dependent on cell type, state of activation, and differentiation stage. In hematopoietic cells, CD44 mediates interaction of progenitor cells and bone marrow stroma during hematopoiesis, regulates maturation, and activation-induced cell death in T cells, influences neutrophil and macrophage migration as well as cytokine production, and participates in lymphocyte extravasation and migration. CD44 is involved in development and progress of hematological neoplasias by enhancement of apoptotic resistance, invasiveness, as well as regulation of bone marrow homing, and mobilization of leukemia-initiating cells into the peripheral blood. Thereby altered CD44 expression functions as marker for worse prognosis in most hematological malignancies. Additionally, CD44 expression levels can be used to distinguish between different hematological neoplasias and subtypes. Concerning new treatment strategies, CD44 displays promising potential either by direct targeting of CD44 expressed on the malignant cells or reversing an acquired resistance to primary treatment mediated through altered CD44 expression. The former can be achieved by antibody or hyaluronan-based immunotherapy.

  6. National Human Genome Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Director Organization Reports & Publications Español The National Human Genome Research Institute conducts genetic and genomic research, funds ... genomic literacy among physicians. Funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), The Universal Genomics Instructor Handbook ...

  7. Methodologies for evaluating CD-matching of CD-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Hiroki; Ke, Chih-Ming; Cheng, Ya-Chun; Wang, Yu-His

    2009-03-01

    As CD-SEM's precision is severely controlled by sub-nanometer level, we have to evaluate not only repeatability of tools but also CD-matching between the individual tools. However, it is not easy to measure the CD-matching precisely +/- 0.1nm due to repeatability error, stability change, carryover effect, statistical fluctuation of sampling, etc. varying in the individual tools. In this work uncertainty of ABBA test is experimentally estimated with self-ABBA test. Sample's carryover trend that dominates uncertainty of the test can be checked. Mathematical consideration implements precise calculation of the ABBA test.

  8. Evolution of the CD163 family and its relationship to the bovine gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin Cynthia L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR domain is an ancient and conserved protein domain. CD163 and WC1 molecules are classed together as group B SRCR superfamily members, along with Spα, CD5 and CD6, all of which are expressed by immune system cells. There are three known types of CD163 molecules in mammals, CD163A (M130, coded for by CD163, CD163b (M160, coded for by CD163L1 and CD163c-α (CD163L1 or SCART, while their nearest relative, WC1, is encoded by a multigene family so far identified in the artiodactyl species of cattle, sheep, and pigs. Results We annotated the bovine genome and identified genes coding for bovine CD163A and CD163c-α but found no evidence for CD163b. Bovine CD163A is widely expressed in immune cells, whereas CD163c-α transcripts are enriched in the WC1+ γδ T cell population. Phylogenetic analyses of the CD163 family genes and WC1 showed that CD163c-α is most closely related to WC1 and that chicken and platypus have WC1 orthologous genes, previously classified as among their CD163 genes. Conclusion Since it has been shown that WC1 plays an important role in the regulation of γδ T cell responses in cattle, which, like chickens, have a high percentage of γδ T cells in their peripheral blood, CD163c-α may play a similar role, especially in species lacking WC1 genes. Our results suggest that gene duplications resulted in the expansion of CD163c-α-like and WC1-like molecules. This expanded repertoire was retained by species known as "γδ T cell high", but homologous SRCR molecules were maintained by all mammals.

  9. Differential number of CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells in peripheral blood of patients with congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fritzenwanger M

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC which are characterised by the simulateous expression of CD34, CD133 and vascular endothelial growth receptor 2 (VEGF 2 are involved in the pathophysiology of congestive heart failure (CHF and their number and function is reduced in CHF. But so far our knowledge about the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (CPC expressing the early hematopoietic marker CD133 and CD34 in CHF is spares and therefore we determined their number and correlated them with New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class. Methods CD34 and CD133 surface expression was quantified by flow cytometry in the peripheral venous blood of 41 healthy adults and 101 patients with various degrees of CHF. Results CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells correlated inversely with age. Both the number of CD34+ and of CD34+/CD133+ cells inversely correlated with NYHA functional class. The number of CD133+ cells was not affected by NYHA class. Furthermore the number of CD133+ cells did not differ between control and CHF patients. Conclusion In CHF the release of CD34+, CD133+ and CD34+/CD133+ cells from the bone marrow seems to be regulated differently. Modulating the releasing process in CHF may be a tool in CHF treatment.

  10. Nanostructured CdS/CdSSe glass composite for photonic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work describes the synthesis of CdS/CdSSe glass nanocomposites and its characterization. A few glass compositions were optimized and the optimized host glass was remelted along with different semiconductors like CdS and CdSSe at high temperature. The CdS/CdSSe is present in amorphous state in the ...

  11. Determination of normal expression patterns of CD86, CD210a, CD261, CD262, CD264, CD358, and CD361 in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf-Oliveira, Renata Cristina Messores; Auat, Mariangeles; Cardoso, Chandra Chiappin; Santos-Pirath, Iris Mattos; Lange, Barbara Gil; Pires-Silva, Jéssica; Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello de; Dametto, Gisele Cristina; Pirolli, Mayara Marin; Colombo, Maria Daniela Holthausen Périco; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia

    2018-02-01

    In 2010, new monoclonal antibodies were submitted to the 9th International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens, and there are few studies demonstrating normal expression patterns of these markers. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine the normal patterns of cell expression of CD86, CD210a, CD261, CD262, CD264, CD358, and CD361 in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) samples by flow cytometry. In the present study, CD86 was expressed only in monocytes and B lymphocytes in PB and in monocytes and plasma cells in BM. Regarding CD210a expression, in PB samples, monocytes and NK cells showed weak expression, while neutrophils, B and T lymphocytes, and basophils showed weak and partial expression. In BM samples, expression of CD210a was observed in eosinophils, monocytes, and B and T/NK lymphocytes. Weak expression of CD210a was also observed in neutrophilic cells and plasma cells. All B cell maturation stages had weak expression of CD210a except for immature B cells, which did not express this marker. In the present study, no cell type in PB samples showed positivity for CD261 and, in BM samples, there was very weak expression in neutrophilic series, monocytes, and B lymphocytes. Conversely, plasma cells showed positivity for CD261 with a homogeneous expression. For CD262, there was weak expression in monocytes, neutrophils, and B lymphocytes in PB samples and weak expression in monocytes, B lymphocytes, and plasma cells in BM samples. The evaluation of CD264 showed very weak expression in B cells in PB samples and no expression in BM cells. Very weak expression of CD358 was observed in neutrophils, monocytes, and B lymphocytes in PB and BM samples. In addition, in BM samples, plasma cells and T lymphocytes showed weak expression of CD358. In relation to the maturation stages of B cells, there was weak expression in pro-B cel, pre-B cell, and mature B cell. In the present study, it was possible to observe expression of CD361 in all

  12. The kangaroo genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J.; Graves, Jennifer A. Marshall

    2003-01-01

    The kangaroo genome is a rich and unique resource for comparative genomics. Marsupial genetics and cytology have made significant contributions to the understanding of gene function and evolution, and increasing the availability of kangaroo DNA sequence information would provide these benefits on a genomic scale. Here we summarize the contributions from cytogenetic and genetic studies of marsupials, describe the genomic resources currently available and those being developed, and explore the benefits of a kangaroo genome project. PMID:12612602

  13. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Sukhamrit Kaur; Sandeep Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computin...

  14. CD-ROMs in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K.

    The CD-ROM has become a major data storage medium in astronomy. The release of the Digitized Sky Survey is the most recent example of this phenomena. I will summarize the large scale jukebox technologies available for making the DSS available over LANs (Local Area Networks). I will also give an overview of the developments in disciplines such as medicine, chemistry and business, where CD-ROMs have been used to distribute the full text of journals. These factors may give us insights into the future role of CD-ROMs.

  15. CD-ROM-aided Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    CD-ROM has rapidly evolved as a new information medium with large capacity, In the U.S. it is predicted that it will become two hundred billion yen market in three years, and thus CD-ROM is strategic target of database industry. Here in Japan the movement toward its commercialization has been active since this year. Shall CD-ROM bussiness ever conquer information market as an on-disk database or electronic publication? Referring to some cases of the applications in the U.S. the author views marketability and the future trend of this new optical disk medium.

  16. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-01-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org. PMID:23748955

  17. Genome Maps, a new generation genome browser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Ignacio; Salavert, Francisco; Sanchez, Rubén; de Maria, Alejandro; Alonso, Roberto; Escobar, Pablo; Bleda, Marta; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2013-07-01

    Genome browsers have gained importance as more genomes and related genomic information become available. However, the increase of information brought about by new generation sequencing technologies is, at the same time, causing a subtle but continuous decrease in the efficiency of conventional genome browsers. Here, we present Genome Maps, a genome browser that implements an innovative model of data transfer and management. The program uses highly efficient technologies from the new HTML5 standard, such as scalable vector graphics, that optimize workloads at both server and client sides and ensure future scalability. Thus, data management and representation are entirely carried out by the browser, without the need of any Java Applet, Flash or other plug-in technology installation. Relevant biological data on genes, transcripts, exons, regulatory features, single-nucleotide polymorphisms, karyotype and so forth, are imported from web services and are available as tracks. In addition, several DAS servers are already included in Genome Maps. As a novelty, this web-based genome browser allows the local upload of huge genomic data files (e.g. VCF or BAM) that can be dynamically visualized in real time at the client side, thus facilitating the management of medical data affected by privacy restrictions. Finally, Genome Maps can easily be integrated in any web application by including only a few lines of code. Genome Maps is an open source collaborative initiative available in the GitHub repository (https://github.com/compbio-bigdata-viz/genome-maps). Genome Maps is available at: http://www.genomemaps.org.

  18. Characterization of the CD14++CD16+ monocyte population in human bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Mandl

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have divided blood monocytes according to their expression of the surface markers CD14 and CD16 into following subsets: classical CD14(++CD16(-, intermediate CD14(++CD16(+ and nonclassical CD14(+CD16(++ monocytes. These subsets differ in phenotype and function and are further correlated to cardiovascular disease, inflammation and cancer. However, the CD14/CD16 nature of resident monocytes in human bone marrow remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a major population of CD14(++CD16(+ monocytes by using cryopreserved bone marrow mononuclear cells from healthy donors. These cells express essential monocyte-related antigens and chemokine receptors such as CD11a, CD18, CD44, HLA-DR, Ccr2, Ccr5, Cx3cr1, Cxcr2 and Cxcr4. Notably, the expression of Ccr2 was inducible during culture. Furthermore, sorted CD14(++CD16(+ bone marrow cells show typical macrophage morphology, phagocytic activity, angiogenic features and generation of intracellular oxygen species. Side-by-side comparison of the chemokine receptor profile with unpaired blood samples also demonstrated that these rather premature medullar monocytes mainly match the phenotype of intermediate and partially of (nonclassical monocytes. Together, human monocytes obviously acquire their definitive CD14/CD16 signature in the bloodstream and the medullar monocytes probably transform into CD14(++CD16- and CD14(+CD16(++ subsets which appear enriched in the periphery.

  19. CD8+CD25+ T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8 + T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8 + CD25 + T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8 + CD25 + T cells reduced CD4 + T cell proliferation and CD8 + cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8 + CD25 + T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8 + CD25 + T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8 + T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8 + CD25 + T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8 + CD25 + T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8 + CD25 + T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8 + CD25 + T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8 + CD25 + from total CD8 + T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8 + CD25 − T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 + CD25 + T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4 + T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8 + CD25 + T cells in experimental atherosclerosis

  20. Tracking of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses after an acute resolving viral infection: a study of parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4(+) T...

  1. CTL escape and increased viremia irrespective of HIV-specific CD4+ T-helper responses in two HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geels, Mark J.; Jansen, Christine A.; Baan, Elly; de Cuyper, Iris M.; van Schijndel, Gijs J. M.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Goudsmit, Jaap; Pollakis, Georgios; Miedema, Frank; Paxton, William A.; van Baarle, Debbie

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether development of mutations leads to loss of CD8 T-cell recognition in HIV-1 infection and is possibly linked to alterations in HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in 2 HIV-infected individuals. In patient, H434 full genome sequencing of HIV-1 biological clones at early and

  2. CD8+CD28+/CD8+CD28-T cell equilibrium can predict the active stage for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shi-Xue; Gu, Hong-Xiang; Lin, Qian-Yi; Huang, Shao-Zhuo; Xing, Tiao-Si; Zhang, Qing-Fang; Wu, Gang; Chen, Min-Hua; Tan, Wan-Er; Jian, Hong-Jian; Zheng, Zhong-Wen; Zhong, Tao; Zhang, Min-Hai; Cheng, Xing-Fang; Huang, Peng; Liao, Guang-Jie; Sha, Wei-Hong

    2017-12-01

    The balance of blood CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cells has been verified to be vital for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), but their role in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) remains unknown. This investigation aimed to evaluate the efficiency of the balance in predicting the active stage in IBD patients. Fifty-three IBD subjects, including 31 UC and 22 Crohn's disease (CD) patients, were enrolled, and their peripheral blood CD8 + CD28 + and CD8 + CD28 - T cell levels were tested using flow cytometry. The risk factors related to prognosis were compared between UC and CD patients. A 1-year follow-up was performed for all the IBD patients, and the CD8 + T cells and their ratio were compared at the 3rd, 6th, 9th, and 12th months during follow-up. The sensitivity and specificity of the CD8 + T cell level and balance were analyzed through receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. The cumulative remission lasting rates (CRLRs) under the different factors were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Higher prescription rates of immunosuppressants, steroids, probiotics, and biological agents (BAs) were found in CD subjects in comparison to UC subjects (P=0.005, 0.024, 0.034, and 0.001), as was a higher active rate during follow-up (95.5% of CD patients vs 67.7% of UC patients, P=0.035). The CD8 + CD28 + T cell level and the CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cell ratio were significantly higher in UC patients than in CD patients, but the reverse was true for CD8 + CD28 - T cells during follow-up at the 9th and 12th month (all PCD8 + CD28 + and CD8 + CD28 - T cell numbers and the CD8 + CD28 + /CD8 + CD28 - T cell ratio in predicting the active stage were found to be significant, with areas under the curves (AUCs) of 0.883, 0.098, and 0.913 for UC subjects (with 95% CI: 0.709-0.940, 0.009-0.188, and 0.842-1.003; P=0.001, 0.00, and 0.000) and 0.812, 0.078, and 0.898 for CD subjects (with 95% CI: 0.683-0.957, 0.003-0.158, and 0.837-0.998; P=0.003, 0.00, and 0.000). The cut

  3. Differential Effect of Cytomegalovirus Infection with Age on the Expression of CD57, CD300a, and CD161 on T-Cell Subpopulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hassouneh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunosenescence is a progressive deterioration of the immune system with aging. It affects both innate and adaptive immunity limiting the response to pathogens and to vaccines. As chronic cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is probably one of the major driving forces of immunosenescence, and its persistent infection results in functional and phenotypic changes to the T-cell repertoire, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of CMV-seropositivity and aging on the expression of CD300a and CD161 inhibitory receptors, along with the expression of CD57 marker on CD4+, CD8+, CD8+CD56+ (NKT-Like and CD4−CD8− (DN T-cell subsets. Our results showed that, regardless of the T-cell subset, CD57−CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals, whereas CD57−CD161+CD300a+ T-cells decrease. Similarly, CD57+CD161−CD300a+ T-cells expand with age in CMV-seropositive individuals in all subsets except in DN cells and CD57−CD161+CD300a− T-cells decrease in all T-cell subsets except in CD4+ T-cells. Besides, in young individuals, CMV latent infection associates with the expansion of CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD4+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57−CD161−CD300a+CD8+, CD57+CD161−CD300a+NKT-like, and CD57+CD161−CD300a+DN T-cells. Moreover, in young individuals, CD161 expression on T-cells is not affected by CMV infection. Changes of CD161 expression were only associated with age in the context of CMV latent infection. Besides, CD300a+CD57+CD161+ and CD300a−CD57+CD161+ phenotypes were not found in any of the T-cell subsets studied except in the DN subpopulation, indicating that in the majority of T-cells, CD161 and CD57 do not co-express. Thus, our results show that CMV latent infection impact on the immune system depends on the age of the individual, highlighting the importance of including CMV serology in any study regarding immunosenescence.

  4. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  5. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  6. Dynamic Changes in Fetal Microchimerism in Maternal Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, CD4+ and CD8+ Cells in Normal Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Waldorf, Kristina M.; Gammill, Hilary S.; Lucas, Joëlle; Aydelotte, Tessa M.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Lambert, Nathalie C.; Nelson, J. Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objective Cell trafficking during pregnancy results in persistence of small populations of fetal cells in the mother, known as fetal microchimerism (FMc). Changes in cell-free fetal DNA during gestation have been well-described, however, less is known about dynamic changes in fetal immune cells in maternal blood. We investigated FMc in maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) longitudinally across gestation. Study Design Thirty-five women with normal pregnancies were studied. FMc was identified in PBMC, CD4+ and CD8+ subsets employing quantitative PCR assays targeting fetal-specific genetic polymorphisms. FMc quantities were reported as fetal genome equivalents (gEq) per 1,000,000 gEq mother’s cells. Poisson regression modeled the rate of FMc detection. Main Outcome Measure FMc in PBMC Results The probability of detecting one fetal cell equivalent increased 6.2-fold each trimester [Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) 95% CI: 1.73, 21.91; p=0.005]. Although FMC in PBMC was not detected for the majority of time points, 7 of 35 women had detectable FMc during pregnancy at one or more time points, with the majority of positive samples being from the third trimester. There was a suggestion of greater HLA-sharing in families where women had FMc in PBMC. FMc was detected in 9% of CD4+ (2/23) and 18% of CD8+ (3/25) subsets. Conclusions FMc in PBMC increased as gestation progressed and was found within CD4+ and CD8+ subsets in some women in the latter half of gestation. A number of factors could influence cellular FMc levels including subclinical fetal-maternal interface changes and events related to parturition. Whether FMc during pregnancy predicts persistent FMc and/or correlates with fetal-maternal HLA-relationships also merits further study. PMID:20569981

  7. Genomics With Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhamrit Kaur

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomics is study of genome which provides large amount of data for which large storage and computation power is needed. These issues are solved by cloud computing that provides various cloud platforms for genomics. These platforms provides many services to user like easy access to data easy sharing and transfer providing storage in hundreds of terabytes more computational power. Some cloud platforms are Google genomics DNAnexus and Globus genomics. Various features of cloud computing to genomics are like easy access and sharing of data security of data less cost to pay for resources but still there are some demerits like large time needed to transfer data less network bandwidth.

  8. Cis and trans acting factors involved in human cytomegalovirus experimental and natural latent infection of CD14 (+ monocytes and CD34 (+ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyprian C Rossetto

    Full Text Available The parameters involved in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV latent infection in CD14 (+ and CD34 (+ cells remain poorly identified. Using next generation sequencing we deduced the transcriptome of HCMV latently infected CD14 (+ and CD34 (+ cells in experimental as well as natural latency settings. The gene expression profile from natural infection in HCMV seropositive donors closely matched experimental latency models, and included two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, RNA4.9 and RNA2.7 as well as the mRNAs encoding replication factors UL84 and UL44. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on experimentally infected CD14 (+ monocytes followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq were employed to demonstrate both UL84 and UL44 proteins interacted with the latent viral genome and overlapped at 5 of the 8 loci identified. RNA4.9 interacts with components of the polycomb repression complex (PRC as well as with the MIE promoter region where the enrichment of the repressive H3K27me3 mark suggests that this lncRNA represses transcription. Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE, which identifies nucleosome-depleted viral DNA, was used to confirm that latent mRNAs were associated with actively transcribed, FAIRE analysis also showed that the terminal repeat (TR region of the latent viral genome is depleted of nucleosomes suggesting that this region may contain an element mediating viral genome maintenance. ChIP assays show that the viral TR region interacts with factors associated with the pre replication complex and a plasmid subclone containing the HCMV TR element persisted in latently infected CD14 (+ monocytes, strongly suggesting that the TR region mediates viral chromosome maintenance.

  9. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  10. [Changes of CD34(+) and CD71(+)CD45(-) cell levels in bone marrow of MDS and AA patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen-Yu; Tian, Xu; Li, Ying; Yang, Mei-Rong; Zhang, Song; Wang, Xie-Ming; Zhang, Hai-Xia; Cheng, Nai-Yao

    2014-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the changes of CD34(+) and CD71(+)CD45(-) cell levels in MDS and AA patients. A total of 25 cases MDS and 43 cases of AA (18 cases SAA and 25 cases of NSAA) from January 2010 to October 2013 in the Department of Hematology, affiliated hospital of Hebei United University were enrolled in this study. The complete blood count, bone marrow smears, bone marrow biopsy, karyotype analysis and bone marrow blood cell immune genotyping (mainly the proportion of CD34(+) cells, CD71(+)CD45(-) cells in nucleated cells) were carried out for all patients; the changes of CD34(+) and CD71(+)CD45(-) cell levels in patients with MDS and AA (SAA NSAA) were compared; the differences of white blood cell count, platelet count and hemoglobin concentration in patients with count of CD71(+)CD45(-) ≥ 15% or MDS group was higher than that in AA (NSAA and SAA) group (P MDS group was higher than that in SAA (P MDS group. In MDS group with CD71(+)CD45(-) ≥ 15%, the platelet count was significantly higher than that in NSAA group (P MDS and NSAA group with CD71(+)CD45(-) 0.05). It is concluded that the count of CD34(+) cells in MDS patients is significantly higher than that in AA and SAA patients. The count of CD71(+)CD45(-) cells in MDS group is significantly higher than that of SAA group. The platelet count in MDS patients with CD71(+)CD45(-) cells ≥ 15% is significantly higher than that of the NSAA group.

  11. Immunohistochemical analysis of CD31, CD36, and CD44 antigens in human omentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ayse; Akkus, Murat; Nergiz, Yusuf; Yuruker, Sinan

    2004-03-01

    Milky spots in the human omental tissue are known to be consisting of lymphocytes, macrophages and mast cells. Our goal was to evaluate the relationship of lymphoid cells and macrophages with vasculature and stromal components. In this study we examined the biopsy specimens obtained from the adult patients whom were operated for different purposes in the General Surgery Department of Dicle University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. We used CD31 as an endothelial cell marker, CD36 which is known to react with microvascular endothelium and adipocytes, and CD44 which is a hyaluronic acid receptor using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique. We observed that CD31 was mainly reactive with vascular endothelial cells and platelets, CD36 was reactive with microvascular endothelium and adipocytes and CD44 was mainly expressed by the endothelial cells of high endothelial venules, fibroblasts in stromal compartments and by large mononuclear cells. We determined the structural and immunophenotypic features of omental lymphoid tissue components stressing vascular and stromal elements, and we briefly discussed the significance of the expression of these molecules in the determined locations.

  12. CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Containing Directly Deposited CdSxTe1-x Alloy Layers: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-07-01

    A CdSxTe1-x layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdSxTe1-x layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdSxTe1-x region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdSxTe1-x layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdSxTe1-x alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both RF-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdSxTe1-x films of lower S content (x<0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl2 heat treatment (HT) at ~400 degrees C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O2/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl2 HT. Films sputtered in O2 partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films. Initial PV device results show that the introduction of a directly-deposited CdSxTe1-x alloy layer into the device structure produces devices of comparable performance to those without the alloy layer when a CdCl2 HT is performed. Further investigation is required to determine whether the CdCl2 heat treatment step can be altered or eliminated through direct deposition of the alloy layer.

  13. CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Containing Directly-Deposited CdSxTe1-x Alloy Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duenow, J. N.; Dhere, R. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; To, B.; Pankow, J. W.; Kuciauskas, D.; Gessert, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    A CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer forms by interdiffusion of CdS and CdTe during the fabrication of thin-film CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. The CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer is thought to be important because it relieves strain at the CdS/CdTe interface that would otherwise exist due to the 10% lattice mismatch between these two materials. Our previous work [1] has indicated that the electrical junction is located in this interdiffused CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} region. Further understanding, however, is essential to predict the role of this CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} layer in the operation of CdS/CdTe devices. In this study, CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy films were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and co-evaporation from CdTe and CdS sources. Both RF-magnetron-sputtered and co-evaporated CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films of lower S content (x<;0.3) have a cubic zincblende (ZB) structure akin to CdTe, whereas those of higher S content have a hexagonal wurtzite (WZ) structure like that of CdS. Films become less preferentially oriented as a result of a CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment (HT) at {approx}400 C for 5 min. Films sputtered in a 1% O{sub 2}/Ar ambient are amorphous as deposited, but show CdTe ZB, CdS WZ, and CdTe oxide phases after a CdCl{sub 2} HT. Films sputtered in O{sub 2} partial pressure have a much wider bandgap than expected. This may be explained by nanocrystalline size effects seen previously [2] for sputtered oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) films. Initial PV device results show that the introduction of a directly-deposited CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} alloy layer into the device structure produces devices of comparable performance to those without the alloy layer when a CdCl{sub 2} HT is performed. Further investigation is required to determine whether the CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment step can be altered or eliminated through direct deposition of the alloy layer.

  14. Human CD56bright NK Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Tatiana; Poli, Aurélie; Cuapio, Angelica

    2016-01-01

    Human NK cells can be subdivided into various subsets based on the relative expression of CD16 and CD56. In particular, CD56(bright)CD16(-/dim) NK cells are the focus of interest. They are considered efficient cytokine producers endowed with immunoregulatory properties, but they can also become...

  15. Thin-film CdS/CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyan, Y.S.; Perez-Albuerne, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    A thin-film solar cell with the configuration soda-lime glass ITO/CdS/CdTe/Au was reported earlier to have more than 10% conversion efficiency. To further improve the low-cost potential of the device, an SnO/sub 2/ layer was developed to replace ITO, and a new contact to CdTe using Ni or stainless steel to replace Au. The contact also improves the stability of the device. A low-cost method for monolithic integration of these cells to make a module is discussed. By this method, a module of 32 cm/sup 2/ area and 8.5% efficiency was fabricated. A simple and effective ''cross-cut'' method for minimizing the effects of shorting defects is also described

  16. Diet and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Graeme P

    2007-01-01

    Cancer results from a disordered and unstable genome - the degree of abnormality progresses as the process of oncogenesis proceeds. Such genomic instability appears to be subject to control by environmental factors as evidenced by the number of cancers that are either caused by specific environmental agents (lung, skin, cervix) or else regulated by a broader range of agents such as effect of diet on gastric and colorectal cancers. Dietary factors might interact in several ways with the genome to protect against cancer. An agent might interact directly with the genome and regulate expression (as a genetic or epigenetic regulator) or indirectly by influencing DNA 'repair' responses and so improve genomic stability. Research now shows that diet-genomic interactions in cancer go beyond interactions with the normal genome and involve enhancement of normal cellular responses to DNA damage such that genome stability is more effectively maintained. Activation of apoptosis may be a key to protection.

  17. Rat Genome Database (RGD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is a collaborative effort between leading research institutions involved in rat genetic and genomic research to collect, consolidate,...

  18. CD4-regulatory cells in COPD patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, Lucy J C; Starkey, Cerys; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The numbers of airway CD8 and B lymphocytes are increased in COPD patients, suggesting an autoimmune process. CD4-regulatory T cells control autoimmunity but have not been studied in patients with COPD. OBJECTIVE: To compare T-regulatory cell numbers in the BAL from COPD patients......, smokers with normal lung function, and healthy nonsmokers (HNS). METHODS: BAL and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were obtained from 26 COPD patients, 19 smokers, and 8 HNS. Flow cytometry was performed for regulatory phenotypic markers. RESULTS: COPD patients had increased BAL CD8...... numbers compared to smokers and HNS. CD4 numbers were similar between groups. There was increased BAL CD4CD25(bright) expression in smokers (median 28.8%) and COPD patients (median 23.1%) compared to HNS (median 0%). Increased FoxP3 expression was confirmed in BAL CD4CD25(bright) cells. BAL CD4CD25 cells...

  19. Comparative analysis of CD8 expressed on mature CD4+ CD8+ T cell clones cultured with IL-4 and that on CD8+ T cell clones: implication for functional significance of CD8 beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hori, T.; Paliard, X.; de Waal Malefijt, R.; Ranes, M.; Spits, H.

    1991-01-01

    Interleukin (IL-4) can induce CD8 expression on mature CD4+ T cells. To study this phenomenon in more detail, we characterized CD8 expressed on IL-4-induced CD4+ CD8+ (double positive) T cell clones in comparison with that on CD8+ T cell clones. Using 2ST8-5H7 mAb that detects CD8 beta expression,

  20. CD27 instructs CD4+ T cells to provide help for the memory CD8+ T cell response after protein immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Yanling; Peperzak, Victor; Keller, Anna M.; Borst, Jannie

    2008-01-01

    For optimal quality, memory CD8(+) T cells require CD4(+) T cell help. We have examined whether CD4(+) T cells require CD27 to deliver this help, in a model of intranasal OVA protein immunization. CD27 deficiency reduced the capacity of CD4(+) T cells to support Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell

  1. Exploiting the genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Koonin, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-09-11

    In 1997, JASON conducted a DOE-sponsored study of the human genome project with special emphasis on the areas of technology, quality assurance and quality control, and informatics. The present study has two aims: first, to update the 1997 Report in light of recent developments in genome sequencing technology, and second, to consider possible roles for the DOE in the ''post-genomic" era, following acquisition of the complete human genome sequence.

  2. Genomic prediction using subsampling

    OpenAIRE

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the?genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each rou...

  3. CD103 is a marker for alloantigen-induced regulatory CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uss, Elena; Rowshani, Ajda T.; Hooibrink, Berend; Lardy, Neubury M.; van Lier, René A. W.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.

    2006-01-01

    The alphaEbeta7 integrin CD103 may direct lymphocytes to its ligand E-cadherin. CD103 is expressed on T cells in lung and gut and on allograft-infiltrating T cells. Moreover, recent studies have documented expression of CD103 on CD4+ regulatory T cells. Approximately 4% of circulating CD8+ T cells

  4. An optimized multilayer structure of CdS layer for CdTe solar cells application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Junfeng; Liao Cheng; Jiang Tao; Spanheimer, C.; Haindl, G.; Fu, Ganhua; Krishnakumar, V.; Zhao Kui; Klein, A.; Jaegermann, W.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Two different methods to prepare CdS films for CdTe solar cells. → A new multilayer structure of window layer for the CdTe solar cell. → Thinner CdS window layer for the solar cell than the standard CdS layer. → Higher performance of solar cells based on the new multilayer structure. - Abstract: CdS layers grown by 'dry' (close space sublimation) and 'wet' (chemical bath deposition) methods are deposited and analyzed. CdS prepared with close space sublimation (CSS) has better crystal quality, electrical and optical properties than that prepared with chemical bath deposition (CBD). The performance of CdTe solar cell based on the CSS CdS layer has higher efficiency than that based on CBD CdS layer. However, the CSS CdS suffers from the pinholes. And consequently it is necessary to prepare a 150 nm thin film for CdTe/CdS solar cell. To improve the performance of CdS/CdTe solar cells, a thin multilayer structure of CdS layer (∼80 nm) is applied, which is composed of a bottom layer (CSS CdS) and a top layer (CBD CdS). That bi-layer film can allow more photons to pass through it and significantly improve the short circuit current of the CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  5. Interleukin-4 mediates CD8 induction on human CD4+ T-cell clones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paliard, X.; Malefijt, R. W.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1988-01-01

    CD4 and CD8 antigens are simultaneously expressed on most of the cortical thymocytes, that weakly express the T-cell antigen receptor(TCR)/CD3 complex. Mature peripheral T cells, however, strongly express the TCR complex and are positive for either CD4 or CD8. Nevertheless, a small percentage of

  6. Quantitative variations of CD4 + CD25 + cells in Peking duckwhite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop a chimera via microinjection of poultry xenogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), and to assess its immune tolerance based on variations in proportion of CD4+CD25+ cells in CD4+ cells (specific CD4+CD25+ cells). Methods: BMMSCs were flush out from femurs and tibias of ...

  7. Percentages of CD4+CD161+ and CD4−CD8−CD161+ T Cells in the Synovial Fluid Are Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Miao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. CD161 has been identified as a marker of human IL-17-producing T cells that are implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. This study aimed to investigate the potential link between the percentage of CD161+ T cells and disease activity in RA patients. Methods. Peripheral blood (PB from 54 RA patients and 21 healthy controls was evaluated. Paired synovial fluid (SF (n = 17 was analyzed. CD161 expression levels on CD4+, CD8+, and CD4−CD8− T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. Results. The percentage of CD4+CD161+ T cells in RA SF was higher than RA PB, and it was positively correlated with DAS28, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, and C-reactive protein (CRP. CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage was decreased in RA PB and was further reduced in RA SF, and its level in SF was inversely correlated with DAS28, ESR, and CRP. However, CD8+CD161+ T cell percentage was neither changed in RA PB and SF nor correlated with disease activity indices. Conclusion. An increased CD4+CD161+ T cell percentage and a decreased CD4−CD8−CD161+ T cell percentage are present in RA SF and are associated with disease activity, and the accumulation of CD4+CD161+ T cells in SF may contribute to the local inflammation of RA.

  8. Ebolavirus comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Leuze, Michael R.; Nookaew, Intawat

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the largest documented for this virus. To examine the dynamics of this genome, we compare more than 100 currently available ebolavirus genomes to each other and to other viral genomes. Based on oligomer frequency analysis, the family Filoviridae forms...

  9. Immune Checkpoint Function of CD85j in CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Claire E; Qi, Qian; Hutter-Saunders, Jessica; Gupta, Sheena; Jadhav, Rohit; Newell, Evan; Maecker, Holden; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2017-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increased susceptibility to infection and a failure to control latent viruses thought to be driven, at least in part, by alterations in CD8 T cell function. The aging T cell repertoire is characterized by an accumulation of effector CD8 T cells, many of which express the negative regulatory receptor CD85j. To define the biological significance of CD85j expression on CD8 T cells and to address the question whether presence of CD85j in older individuals is beneficial or detrimental for immune function, we examined the specific attributes of CD8 T cells expressing CD85j as well as the functional role of CD85j in antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses during immune aging. Here, we show that CD85j is mainly expressed by terminally differentiated effector (TEMRAs) CD8 T cells, which increase with age, in cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and in males. CD85j + CMV-specific cells demonstrate clonal expansion. However, TCR diversity is similar between CD85j + and CD85j - compartments, suggesting that CD85j does not directly impact the repertoire of antigen-specific cells. Further phenotypic and functional analyses revealed that CD85j identifies a specific subset of CMV-responsive CD8 T cells that coexpress a marker of senescence (CD57) but retain polyfunctional cytokine production and expression of cytotoxic mediators. Blocking CD85j binding enhanced proliferation of CMV-specific CD8 T cells upon antigen stimulation but did not alter polyfunctional cytokine production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD85j characterizes a population of "senescent," but not exhausted antigen-specific effector CD8 T cells and indicates that CD85j is an important checkpoint regulator controlling expansion of virus-specific T cells during aging. Inhibition of CD85j activity may be a mechanism to promote stronger CD8 T cell effector responses during immune aging.

  10. Role of CD40 ligand and CD28 in induction and maintenance of antiviral CD8+ effector T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Susanne; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Marker, O

    2000-01-01

    and extensively, whereas vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) spreads poorly. We found that the primary response of CD40L-/- mice toward VSV is significantly impaired; proliferation of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells is reduced 2- to 3-fold, few CD8+ cells acquire an activated phenotype, and little functional activity...... is induced. Very similar results were obtained in VSV-infected, CD28-deficient mice. In contrast, neither CD40L nor CD28 was required for induction of a primary CD8+ response toward LCMV. Surprisingly, lack of CD4+ T cells had no impact on the primary immune response toward any of the viruses, even though...... the CD40 ligand dependence demonstrated for VSV would be expected to be associated with CD4 dependence. Upon coinfection of VSV-infected mice with LCMV, the requirement for CD40 ligand (but not CD28) could be partially bypassed, as evidenced by a 3-fold increase in the frequency of VSV-specific CD8+ T...

  11. Concurrent hypermulticolor monitoring of CD31, CD34, CD45 and CD146 endothelial progenitor cell markers for acute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Yumi [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Myung Hyun [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Hyuk, Song Woo [Cardiology College of Medicine, Korea University (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soo Young [College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Joon Myong, E-mail: jmsong@snu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-Ro, Gwanak Gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We observe EPCs and HPCs in patient for AMI diagnosis. • We detect two EPC subtypes using quantum dot and AOTF. • Quantum dot has narrower emission wavelength range than fluorescence dye. • AOTF provide smaller spectral interference than bandpass filters. • Quantum dot and AOTF are suitable for detecting large number of molecular markers concurrently. - Abstract: The circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in blood of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patient have been monitored in many previous studies. The number of circulating EPC increases in the blood of patients at onset of the AMI. EPC is originated from bone marrow. It performs vessel regeneration. There are many markers used for detecting EPC. Four of these markers, CD31, CD34, CD45, and CD146, were concurrently detected at the single cell level for the identification of EPC in the present preliminary study. The CD45 negative cell sorting was performed to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) acquired from four AMI patients with a magnetic bead sorter, since, EPCs expressed CD45 negative or dim. The resultant PBMC eluents were treated with quantum-antibody conjugates for the probing four different markers of EPCs and then applied to a high-content single cell imaging cytometer using acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). The use of quantum dot, with narrow emission wavelength range and AOTF enabling cellular image at a particular single wavelength, is very advantageous for accurate high-content AMI diagnosis based on simultaneous monitoring of many markers. The number of EPC increased as compared with control in three of four AMI patients. In this approach, two EPC subtypes were found, CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(−) as early outgrowth EPCs and CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(+) as late outgrowth EPCs. Patient 1 had CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(−/dim), CD146(+) cells whose percentage was 4.21% of cells. Patient 2 had 2.38% of CD31(+), CD34(+), CD45(

  12. Changes in Reactivity In Vitro of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25− T Cell Subsets in Transplant Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce M. Hall

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Transplant tolerance induced in adult animals is mediated by alloantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ T cells, yet in many models, proliferation of CD4+ T cells from hosts tolerant to specific-alloantigen in vitro is not impaired. To identify changes that may diagnose tolerance, changes in the patterns of proliferation of CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25− T cells from DA rats tolerant to Piebald Virol Glaxo rat strain (PVG cardiac allografts and from naïve DA rats were examined. Proliferation of CD4+ T cells from both naïve and tolerant hosts was similar to both PVG and Lewis stimulator cells. In mixed lymphocyte culture to PVG, proliferation of naïve CD4+CD25− T cells was greater than naïve CD4+ T cells. In contrast, proliferation of CD4+CD25− T cells from tolerant hosts to specific-donor PVG was not greater than CD4+ T cells, whereas their response to Lewis and self-DA was greater than CD4+ T cells. Paradoxically, CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts did not proliferate to PVG, but did to Lewis, whereas naïve CD4+CD25+ T cells proliferate to both PVG and Lewis but not to self-DA. CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant, but not naïve hosts, expressed receptors for interferon (IFN-γ and IL-5 and these cytokines promoted their proliferation to specific-alloantigen PVG but not to Lewis or self-DA. We identified several differences in the patterns of proliferation to specific-donor alloantigen between cells from tolerant and naïve hosts. Most relevant is that CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts failed to proliferate or suppress to specific donor in the absence of either IFN-γ or IL-5. The proliferation to third-party and self of each cell population from tolerant and naïve hosts was similar and not affected by IFN-γ or IL-5. Our findings suggest CD4+CD25+ T cells that mediate transplant tolerance depend on IFN−γ or IL-5 from alloactivated Th1 and Th2 cells.

  13. Comparative genomics of Lactobacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Blom, Jochen; Palva, Airi; Siezen, Roland J.; de Vos, Willem M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The genus Lactobacillus includes a diverse group of bacteria consisting of many species that are associated with fermentations of plants, meat or milk. In addition, various lactobacilli are natural inhabitants of the intestinal tract of humans and other animals. Finally, several Lactobacillus strains are marketed as probiotics as their consumption can confer a health benefit to host. Presently, 154 Lactobacillus species are known and a growing fraction of these are subject to draft genome sequencing. However, complete genome sequences are needed to provide a platform for detailed genomic comparisons. Therefore, we selected a total of 20 genomes of various Lactobacillus strains for which complete genomic sequences have been reported. These genomes had sizes varying from 1.8 to 3.3 Mb and other characteristic features, such as G+C content that ranged from 33% to 51%. The Lactobacillus pan genome was found to consist of approximately 14 000 protein‐encoding genes while all 20 genomes shared a total of 383 sets of orthologous genes that defined the Lactobacillus core genome (LCG). Based on advanced phylogeny of the proteins encoded by this LCG, we grouped the 20 strains into three main groups and defined core group genes present in all genomes of a single group, signature group genes shared in all genomes of one group but absent in all other Lactobacillus genomes, and Group‐specific ORFans present in core group genes of one group and absent in all other complete genomes. The latter are of specific value in defining the different groups of genomes. The study provides a platform for present individual comparisons as well as future analysis of new Lactobacillus genomes. PMID:21375712

  14. Selective regain of egfr gene copies in CD44+/CD24-/low breast cancer cellular model MDA-MB-468

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Antje

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased transcription of oncogenes like the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is frequently caused by amplification of the whole gene or at least of regulatory sequences. Aim of this study was to pinpoint mechanistic parameters occurring during egfr copy number gains leading to a stable EGFR overexpression and high sensitivity to extracellular signalling. A deeper understanding of those marker events might improve early diagnosis of cancer in suspect lesions, early detection of cancer progression and the prediction of egfr targeted therapies. Methods The basal-like/stemness type breast cancer cell line subpopulation MDA-MB-468 CD44high/CD24-/low, carrying high egfr amplifications, was chosen as a model system in this study. Subclones of the heterogeneous cell line expressing low and high EGF receptor densities were isolated by cell sorting. Genomic profiling was carried out for these by means of SNP array profiling, qPCR and FISH. Cell cycle analysis was performed using the BrdU quenching technique. Results Low and high EGFR expressing MDA-MB-468 CD44+/CD24-/low subpopulations separated by cell sorting showed intermediate and high copy numbers of egfr, respectively. However, during cell culture an increase solely for egfr gene copy numbers in the intermediate subpopulation occurred. This shift was based on the formation of new cells which regained egfr gene copies. By two parametric cell cycle analysis clonal effects mediated through growth advantage of cells bearing higher egfr gene copy numbers could most likely be excluded for being the driving force. Subsequently, the detection of a fragile site distal to the egfr gene, sustaining uncapped telomere-less chromosomal ends, the ladder-like structure of the intrachromosomal egfr amplification and a broader range of egfr copy numbers support the assumption that dynamic chromosomal rearrangements, like breakage-fusion-bridge-cycles other than proliferation drive the gain

  15. Structure and functional regulation of the CD38 promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Li; Iqbal, Jameel; Zaidi, Samir; Zhu Linglng; Zhang Xuefeng; Peng Yuanzheng; Moonga, Baljit S.; Zaidi, Mone

    2006-01-01

    CD38 has multiple roles in biology, including T lymphocyte signaling, neutrophil migration, neurotransmission, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and bone remodeling. To study the transcriptional control of the CD38 gene, we cloned a putative 1.8 kb promoter fragment from a rabbit genomic DNA library. Primer extension analysis indicated two transcription start sites consistent with the absence of a TATA box. Sequence analysis revealed several AP-1, AP-4, myo-D, GATA, and SP-1 sequences. MC3T3.E1 (osteoblast) or RAW-C3 (osteoclast precursor macrophage) cells were then transfected with the CD38 promoter or its deletion fragments ligated to the luciferase reporter gene. Except for the shortest 41 bp fragment, all fragments showed significant luciferase activity. There was a marked stimulation of basal activity in the 93 bp fragment that contained a GC box and SP-1 site. Furthermore, there were significant differences in the activity of the fragments in MC3T3.E1 and RAW-C3 cells. Intracellular Ca 2+ elevations by ionomycin (10 μM) in MC3T3.E1 cells inhibited promoter activity, except in the short 41 bp. In contrast, cAMP elevation by exposure to forskolin (100 μM) inhibited activation of all fragments, except the 0.6 and 1.2 kb fragments. Finally, TNF-α stimulated promoter activity in RAW-C3 cells transfected with the 93 bp and 1.0 kb fragments, consistent with the stimulation of CD38 mRNA by TNF-α. Physiologically, therefore, modulation of the expression of the NAD + -sensing enzyme, CD38, by Ca 2+ , cAMP, and cytokines, such as TNF-α may contribute to coupling the intense metabolic activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts to their respective bone-resorbing and bone-forming functions

  16. Studies in CdSe/CdS nanophosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chander, Harish

    2006-01-01

    Nanophosphors, also known as quantum dots, are being studied vigorously as these show enhanced efficiency and performance with great potential for tailoring properties. Nano size of these materials is responsible for opening novel applications everyday. Thin film light emitting devices, high definition TV, non-linear optical devices, ultra sensitive detectors and new white light sources are just few to mention. A lot of effort is being put in for using nanophosphors as fluorescent labels in biological applications. Many nanophosphors (quantum dots - QDs) of CdSe, CdS and combinations thereof exhibiting very high quality have been synthesised and studied. Quantum yield as high as 85% and a peaked emission have been reported. The potential of these materials has convinced the world that future belongs to them and serious attention needs to be diverted in research and development of these. In the present work, an attempt is made to review important studies made in the field of CdS/CdSe based nanophosphors with significant observations and results. Various upcoming applications of the family are highlighted. (author)

  17. A genome blogger manifesto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corpas Manuel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cheap prices for genomic testing have revolutionized consumers’ access to personal genomics. Exploration of personal genomes poses significant challenges for customers wishing to learn beyond provider customer reports. A vibrant community has spontaneously appeared blogging experiences and data as a way to learn about their personal genomes. No set of values has publicly been described to date encapsulating ideals and code of conduct for this community. Here I present a first attempt to address this vacuum based on my own personal experiences as genome blogger.

  18. CD1: From Molecules to Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, D Branch; Suliman, Sara

    2017-01-01

    The human cluster of differentiation (CD)1 system for antigen display is comprised of four types of antigen-presenting molecules, each with a distinct functional niche: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Whereas CD1 proteins were thought solely to influence T-cell responses through display of amphipathic lipids, recent studies emphasize the role of direct contacts between the T-cell receptor and CD1 itself. Moving from molecules to diseases, new research approaches emphasize human CD1-transgenic mouse models and the study of human polyclonal T cells in vivo or ex vivo in disease states. Whereas the high genetic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded antigen-presenting molecules provides a major hurdle for designing antigens that activate T cells in all humans, the simple population genetics of the CD1 system offers the prospect of discovering or designing broadly acting immunomodulatory agents.

  19. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...... chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling...

  20. Surface preparation effects on efficient indium-tin-oxide-CdTe and CdS-CdTe heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthen, J. G.; Fahrenbruch, A. L.; Bube, R. H.; Zesch, J. C.

    1983-05-01

    The effects of CdTe surface preparation and subsequent junction formation have been investigated through characterization of ITO/CdTe and CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells formed by electron beam evaporation of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) and CdS onto single crystal p-type CdTe. Surfaces investigated include air-cleaved (110) surfaces, bromine-in-methanol etched (110) and (111) surfaces, and teh latter surfaces subjected to a hydrogen heat treatment. Both air-cleaved and hydrogen heat treated surfaces have a stoichiometric Cd to Te ratio. The ITO/CdTe junction formation process involves an air heat treatment, which ahs serious effects on the behavior of junctions formed on these surfaces. Etched surfaces which have a large excesss of Te, are less affected by the junction formation process and result in ITO/CdTe heterojunctions with solar efficiencies of 9% (Vsc =20 mA/cm2). Use of low-doped CdTe results in junctions characterized by considerably larger open-circuit votages (Voc =0.81 V) which are attributable to increasing diode factors caused by a shift from interfacial recombination to recombination in the depletion region. Resulting solar efficiencies reach 10.5% which is the highest value reported to date for a genuine CdTe heterojunction, CdS/CdTe heterojunctions show a strong dependence on CdTe surface condition, but less influence on the junction formation process. Solar efficiencies of 7.5% on an etched and heat treated surface are observed. All of these ITO/CdTe and CdS/CdTe heterojunctions have been stable for at least 10 months.

  1. T helper-independent activation of human CD8+ cells: the role of CD28 costimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gool, S W; Zhang, Y; Kasran, A; de Boer, M; Ceuppens, J L

    1996-07-01

    The concept that activation of MHC class I-restricted CD8+ cells entirely depends on help from MHC class II-restricted CD4+ T cells has recently been supplemented with an alternative model in which CD8+ cells can directly be activated by MHC class I-expressing professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), which are able to deliver an accessory signal. The authors analysed the role of CD28-mediated costimulation for T helper cell-independent activation of purified human CD8+ T cells in two different in vitro models. Freshly isolated CD8+ cells could be activated (proliferation, IL-2 production and cytotoxic activity) by anti-CD3-presenting Fc gamma R+ mouse cells transfected with the human CD28 ligand, CD80, as the only accessory signal. On the other hand, activation of CD8+ cells by allogeneic MHC class I on EBV-transformed B cells, which express two different CD28 ligands, CD80 and CD86, also proceeded very efficiently (proliferation, cytotoxic activity and CD25 expression), but was either not, or only partially, blocked by anti-CD80 and anti-CD86 MoAb or CTLA-4Ig. This indicates that other costimulatory signals are also effective, and that CD28 triggering is not absolutely required for initial T-cell activation. CsA and CD80/CD86-blocking agents were synergistic in completely inhibiting activation of CD8+ cells in the MLR with allogeneic B-cell lines. This combination also induced non-responsiveness of CD8+ cells upon restimulation in the absence of blocking agents. Therefore, although professional APC can apparently provide multiple costimulatory signals for direct activation of CD8+ T cells, the signal derived from CD80/CD86 is unique in providing CsA-resistance.

  2. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis.

  3. CD8 beta chain influences CD8 alpha chain-associated Lck kinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The CD8 molecule plays an important role in the differentiation of CD8+ T cells in the thymus and in their normal function in the periphery. CD8 exists on the cell surface in two forms, the alpha alpha homodimer and the alpha beta heterodimer. Recent studies indicate an important role for the CD8 beta chain in thymic development of CD8+ T cells and suggest that signaling via CD8 alpha beta may be distinct from CD8 alpha alpha. To better understand these differences, we introduced the CD8 beta...

  4. The CD39 molecule defines distinct cytotoxic subsets within alloactivated human CD8-positive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, C; Mansur, I; Schmid, M; Dastot, H; Gélin, C; Mahouy, G; Boumsell, L; Bensussan, A

    1992-10-01

    Lymphocyte activation induces or increases the expression of several surface structures, none of which is characteristic of an activated cell subset. In particular, structures such as CD45RO, CD25, CD26, CD49b, CD54, CD71 are expressed by the vast majority of lymphocytes at various times following in vitro activation. CD39 molecules were originally identified on activated B lymphocytes and have recently been described on activated T cell clones. In the present report, we have characterized phenotypically and functionally defined cell subsets generated during an in vitro allostimulation. Results indicated that the percentage of CD39+ cells reached a maximum at day 6 and remained stable thereafter. We demonstrate that CD39 expression allows the identification within the allosensitized CD8+ cytotoxic cells of distinct subsets of cells mediating allo cytotoxic T lymphocyte or natural killer (NK)-like reactivity. More precisely, CD8+CD39+ alloactivated cells mainly mediate specific killer activity, whereas CD8+CD39- alloactivated cells predominantly exhibit NK-like reactivity. Further, we show a high functional correlation associated with the lack of CD39 expression on NK-like alloactivated CD8+ cells, while there is no association with CD56 or CD57 NK-associated structures.

  5. Active RNA replication of hepatitis C virus downregulates CD81 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Yuan Ke

    Full Text Available So far how hepatitis C virus (HCV replication modulates subsequent virus growth and propagation still remains largely unknown. Here we determine the impact of HCV replication status on the consequential virus growth by comparing normal and high levels of HCV RNA expression. We first engineered a full-length, HCV genotype 2a JFH1 genome containing a blasticidin-resistant cassette inserted at amino acid residue of 420 in nonstructural (NS protein 5A, which allowed selection of human hepatoma Huh7 cells stably-expressing HCV. Short-term establishment of HCV stable cells attained a highly-replicating status, judged by higher expressions of viral RNA and protein as well as higher titer of viral infectivity as opposed to cells harboring the same genome without selection. Interestingly, maintenance of highly-replicating HCV stable cells led to decreased susceptibility to HCV pseudotyped particle (HCVpp infection and downregulated cell surface level of CD81, a critical HCV entry (coreceptor. The decreased CD81 cell surface expression occurred through reduced total expression and cytoplasmic retention of CD81 within an endoplasmic reticulum -associated compartment. Moreover, productive viral RNA replication in cells harboring a JFH1 subgenomic replicon containing a similar blasticidin resistance gene cassette in NS5A and in cells robustly replicating full-length infectious genome also reduced permissiveness to HCVpp infection through decreasing the surface expression of CD81. The downregulation of CD81 surface level in HCV RNA highly-replicating cells thus interfered with reinfection and led to attenuated viral amplification. These findings together indicate that the HCV RNA replication status plays a crucial determinant in HCV growth by modulating the expression and intracellular localization of CD81.

  6. Genome Editing in Cotton with the CRISPR/Cas9 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing is an important tool for gene functional studies as well as crop improvement. The recent development of the CRISPR/Cas9 system using single guide RNA molecules (sgRNAs to direct precise double strand breaks in the genome has the potential to revolutionize agriculture. Unfortunately, not all sgRNAs are equally efficient and it is difficult to predict their efficiency by bioinformatics. In crops such as cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L., with labor-intensive and lengthy transformation procedures, it is essential to minimize the risk of using an ineffective sgRNA that could result in the production of transgenic plants without the desired CRISPR-induced mutations. In this study, we have developed a fast and efficient method to validate the functionality of sgRNAs in cotton using a transient expression system. We have used this method to validate target sites for three different genes GhPDS, GhCLA1, and GhEF1 and analyzed the nature of the CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations. In our experiments, the most frequent type of mutations observed in cotton cotyledons were deletions (∼64%. We prove that the CRISPR/Cas9 system can effectively produce mutations in homeologous cotton genes, an important requisite in this allotetraploid crop. We also show that multiple gene targeting can be achieved in cotton with the simultaneous expression of several sgRNAs and have generated mutations in GhPDS and GhEF1 at two target sites. Additionally, we have used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to produce targeted gene fragment deletions in the GhPDS locus. Finally, we obtained transgenic cotton plants containing CRISPR/Cas9-induced gene editing mutations in the GhCLA1 gene. The mutation efficiency was very high, with 80.6% of the transgenic lines containing mutations in the GhCLA1 target site resulting in an intense albino phenotype due to interference with chloroplast biogenesis.

  7. CD11c/CD18 Dominates Adhesion of Human Monocytes, Macrophages and Dendritic Cells over CD11b/CD18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Noémi; Lukácsi, Szilvia; Ungai-Salánki, Rita; Orgován, Norbert; Szabó, Bálint; Horváth, Róbert; Erdei, Anna; Bajtay, Zsuzsa

    Complement receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18) belong to the family of beta2 integrins and are expressed mainly by myeloid cell types in humans. Previously, we proved that CR3 rather than CR4 plays a key role in phagocytosis. Here we analysed how CD11b and CD11c participate in cell adhesion to fibrinogen, a common ligand of CR3 and CR4, employing human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs) highly expressing CD11b as well as CD11c. We determined the exact numbers of CD11b and CD11c on these cell types by a bead-based technique, and found that the ratio of CD11b/CD11c is 1.2 for MDDCs, 1.7 for MDMs and 7.1 for monocytes, suggesting that the function of CD11c is preponderant in MDDCs and less pronounced in monocytes. Applying state-of-the-art biophysical techniques, we proved that cellular adherence to fibrinogen is dominated by CD11c. Furthermore, we found that blocking CD11b significantly enhances the attachment of MDDCs and MDMs to fibrinogen, demonstrating a competition between CD11b and CD11c for this ligand. On the basis of the cell surface receptor numbers and the measured adhesion strength we set up a model, which explains the different behavior of the three cell types.

  8. CD11c/CD18 Dominates Adhesion of Human Monocytes, Macrophages and Dendritic Cells over CD11b/CD18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noémi Sándor

    Full Text Available Complement receptors CR3 (CD11b/CD18 and CR4 (CD11c/CD18 belong to the family of beta2 integrins and are expressed mainly by myeloid cell types in humans. Previously, we proved that CR3 rather than CR4 plays a key role in phagocytosis. Here we analysed how CD11b and CD11c participate in cell adhesion to fibrinogen, a common ligand of CR3 and CR4, employing human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs highly expressing CD11b as well as CD11c. We determined the exact numbers of CD11b and CD11c on these cell types by a bead-based technique, and found that the ratio of CD11b/CD11c is 1.2 for MDDCs, 1.7 for MDMs and 7.1 for monocytes, suggesting that the function of CD11c is preponderant in MDDCs and less pronounced in monocytes. Applying state-of-the-art biophysical techniques, we proved that cellular adherence to fibrinogen is dominated by CD11c. Furthermore, we found that blocking CD11b significantly enhances the attachment of MDDCs and MDMs to fibrinogen, demonstrating a competition between CD11b and CD11c for this ligand. On the basis of the cell surface receptor numbers and the measured adhesion strength we set up a model, which explains the different behavior of the three cell types.

  9. Inflammation in disseminated lesions: an analysis of CD4+, CD20+, CD68+, CD31+ and vW+ cells in non-ulcerated lesions of disseminated leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayana Santos Mendes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated leishmaniasis (DL differs from other clinical forms of the disease due to the presence of many non-ulcerated lesions (papules and nodules in non-contiguous areas of the body. We describe the histopathology of DL non-ulcerated lesions and the presence of CD4-, CD20-, CD68-, CD31- and von Willebrand factor (vW-positive cells in the inflamed area. We analysed eighteen biopsies from non-ulcerated lesions and quantified the inflamed areas and the expression of CD4, CD20, CD68, CD31 and vW using Image-Pro software (Media Cybernetics. Diffuse lymphoplasmacytic perivascular infiltrates were found in dermal skin. Inflammation was observed in 3-73% of the total biopsy area and showed a significant linear correlation with the number of vW+ vessels. The most common cells were CD68+ macrophages, CD20+ B-cells and CD4+ T-cells. A significant linear correlation between CD4+ and CD20+ cells and the size of the inflamed area was also found. Our findings show chronic inflammation in all DL non-ulcerated lesions predominantly formed by macrophages, plasmacytes and T and B-cells. As the inflamed area expanded, the number of granulomas and extent of the vascular framework increased. Thus, we demonstrate that vessels may have an important role in the clinical evolution of DL lesions.

  10. Relationship between soluble CD25 and gene expression in healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhelt, Sophie; Ratzer, Rikke Lenhard; Christensen, Jeppe Romme

    2017-01-01

    Genome wide association studies and fine mapping has established a firm link between the IL2RA gene, encoding the interleukin-2 receptor α-chain CD25, and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy......-networks were focused around NFKB1, TNF, BCL6 and STAT1. Eighteen genes correlated with sCD25 with rho≥0.707 in relapsing remitting MS versus 33 in secondary progressive and 34 in primary progressive MS. None had a FDR

  11. Production and characterization of CdTe films for CdS/CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, A.K.; Chaudhuri, S.

    1988-01-01

    Cadmium telluride is considered as one of the most promising materials in the field of semiconductor devices due to its near ideal band gap for most efficient conversion of solar energy. It can also be prepared in both n and p type forms so that solar cell with homojunction or heterojunction configurations can be obtained. Earlier CdTe was mostly used in single crystal form for device fabrication. But the devices produced were not cost effective. The obvious answer to this problem is to opt for thin film technology for preparing device grade CdTe films. The fundamental problem of producing device grade CdTe films is associated with inherent high resistivity and a low carrier life time. The authors report, in this paper, studies on the CdTe films produced by hot wall vacuum evaporation. The films were deposited onto glass, molybdenum and single crystal NaCl substrates under various experimental conditions. The optimum values of the deposition parameters were uniquely determined to obtain best quality film for the fabrication of the solar cell. The stoichiometry of the film was tested

  12. CD4dullCD8bright double-positive T-lymphocytes have a phenotype of granzyme Bpos CD8pos memory T-lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentenaar, R. J.; Wever, P. C.; van Diepen, F. N.; Schellekens, P. T.; Wertheim, P. M.; ten Berge, I. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: T-lymphocytes that co-express CD4 and CD8 antigens may be found in small percentages in the peripheral blood of healthy individuals, and have a CD4brightCD8dull phenotype. CD4dullCD8bright T-lymphocytes have been found only in temporal association with some viral infections. METHODS:

  13. Photodeposition of Pt on Colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukovic, Gordana; Merkle, Maxwell G.; Nelson, James H.; Hughes, Steven M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-08-06

    colloidal CdS and CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals. Among the II-VI semiconductors, CdS is of particular interest because it has the correct band alignment for water photolysis[2] and has been demonstrated to be photocatalytically active.[11-16] We have found that the photoexcitation of CdS and CdSe/CdS in the presence of an organometallic Pt precursor leads to deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the semiconductor surface. Stark differences are observed in the Pt nanoparticle location on the two substrates, and the photodeposition can be completely inhibited by the modification of the semiconductor surface. Our results suggest that tuning of the semiconductor band structure, spatial organization and surface chemistry should be crucial in the design of photocatalytic nanostructures.

  14. Genomic research in Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poke, Fiona S; Vaillancourt, René E; Potts, Brad M; Reid, James B

    2005-09-01

    Eucalyptus L'Hérit. is a genus comprised of more than 700 species that is of vital importance ecologically to Australia and to the forestry industry world-wide, being grown in plantations for the production of solid wood products as well as pulp for paper. With the sequencing of the genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the recent completion of the first tree genome sequence, Populus trichocarpa, attention has turned to the current status of genomic research in Eucalyptus. For several eucalypt species, large segregating families have been established, high-resolution genetic maps constructed and large EST databases generated. Collaborative efforts have been initiated for the integration of diverse genomic projects and will provide the framework for future research including exploiting the sequence of the entire eucalypt genome which is currently being sequenced. This review summarises the current position of genomic research in Eucalyptus and discusses the direction of future research.

  15. Bioinformatics decoding the genome

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Deutsch, Sam; Michielin, Olivier; Thomas, Arthur; Descombes, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Extracting the fundamental genomic sequence from the DNA From Genome to Sequence : Biology in the early 21st century has been radically transformed by the availability of the full genome sequences of an ever increasing number of life forms, from bacteria to major crop plants and to humans. The lecture will concentrate on the computational challenges associated with the production, storage and analysis of genome sequence data, with an emphasis on mammalian genomes. The quality and usability of genome sequences is increasingly conditioned by the careful integration of strategies for data collection and computational analysis, from the construction of maps and libraries to the assembly of raw data into sequence contigs and chromosome-sized scaffolds. Once the sequence is assembled, a major challenge is the mapping of biologically relevant information onto this sequence: promoters, introns and exons of protein-encoding genes, regulatory elements, functional RNAs, pseudogenes, transposons, etc. The methodological ...

  16. The Role of the CD39/CD73 Purinergic Pathway in Modulating Arterial Thrombosis in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covarrubias, R; Chepurko, E; Reynolds, A; Huttinger, ZM; Huttinger, R; Stanfill, K; Wheeler, DG; Novitskaya, T; Robson, SC; Dwyer, KM; Cowan, PJ; Gumina, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating blood cells and endothelial cells express Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (CD39) and ecto-5’-nucleotidase (CD73). CD39 hydrolyzes extracellular ATP or ADP to AMP. CD73 hydrolyzes AMP to adenosine. The goal of this study was to examine the interplay between CD39 and CD73 cascade in arterial thrombosis. Approach and Results To determine how CD73 activity influences in vivo thrombosis, the time to FeCl3-induced arterial thrombosis was measured in CD73-null mice. In response to 5% FeCl3, but not to 10% FeCl3, there was a significant decrease in the time to thrombosis in CD73-null mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. In mice overexpressing CD39, ablation of CD73 did not inhibit the prolongation in the time to thrombosis conveyed by CD39 overexpression. However, the CD73 inhibitor α-β-methylene-ADP nullified the prolongation in the time to thrombosis in hC39-Tg/CD73-null mice. To determine if hematopoietic-derived cells or endothelial cell CD39 activity regulates in vivo arterial thrombus, bone marrow transplant studies were conducted. FeCl3-induced arterial thrombosis in chimeric mice revealed a significant prolongation in the time to thrombosis in hCD39-Tg reconstituted WT mice, but not on WT reconstituted hCD39-Tg mice. Monocyte depletion with clodronate-loaded liposomes normalized the time to thrombosis in hCD39-Tg mice compared to hCD39-Tg mice treated with control liposomes, demonstrating that increased CD39 expression on monocytes protects against thrombosis. Conclusions These data demonstrate that ablation of CD73 minimally effects in vivo thrombosis, but increased CD39 expression on hematopoietic-derived cells, especially monocytes, attenuates in vivo arterial thrombosis. PMID:27417582

  17. A novel Cd8-cis-regulatory element preferentially directs expression in CD44hiCD62L+ CD8+ T cells and in CD8αα+ dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Shinya; Hombauer, Matthias; Hassan, Hammad; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Yasmin, Nighat; Naoe, Yoshinori; Bilic, Ivan; Moser, Mirjam A; Hainberger, Daniela; Mayer, Herbert; Seiser, Christian; Bergthaler, Andreas; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Ellmeier, Wilfried

    2015-04-01

    CD8 coreceptor expression is dynamically regulated during thymocyte development and is tightly controlled by the activity of at least 5 different cis-regulatory elements. Despite the detailed characterization of the Cd8 loci, the regulation of the complex expression pattern of CD8 cannot be fully explained by the activity of the known Cd8 enhancers. In this study, we revisited the Cd8ab gene complex with bioinformatics and transgenic reporter gene expression approaches to search for additional Cd8 cis-regulatory elements. This led to the identification of an ECR (ECR-4), which in transgenic reporter gene expression assays, directed expression preferentially in CD44(hi)CD62L(+) CD8(+) T cells, including innate-like CD8(+) T cells. ECR-4, designated as Cd8 enhancer E8VI, was bound by Runx/CBFβ complexes and Bcl11b, indicating that E8VI is part of the cis-regulatory network that recruits transcription factors to the Cd8ab gene complex in CD8(+) T cells. Transgenic reporter expression was maintained in LCMV-specific CD8(+) T cells upon infection, although short-term, in vitro activation led to a down-regulation of E8VI activity. Finally, E8VI directed transgene expression also in CD8αα(+) DCs but not in CD8αα-expressing IELs. Taken together, we have identified a novel Cd8 enhancer that directs expression in CD44(hi)CD62L(+) CD8(+) T cells, including innate-like and antigen-specific effector/memory CD8(+) T cells and in CD8αα(+) DCs, and thus, our data provide further insight into the cis-regulatory networks that control CD8 expression. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  18. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  19. Surface passivation for CdTe devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Matthew O.; Perkins, Craig L.; Burst, James M.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a method for surface passivation for CdTe devices is provided. The method includes adjusting a stoichiometry of a surface of a CdTe material layer such that the surface becomes at least one of stoichiometric or Cd-rich; and reconstructing a crystalline lattice at the surface of the CdTe material layer by annealing the adjusted surface.

  20. Phenotypical analysis of ectoenzymes CD39/CD73 and adenosine receptor 2A in CD4+ CD25high Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ling; Sugiyama, Hideaki; Zhang, Qi; Yan, Kexiang; Fang, Xu; McCormick, Thomas S; Cooper, Kevin D; Huang, Qiong

    2018-02-01

    CD39 and CD73 are two novel cell surface markers of CD25 high Foxp3 + regulatory T-cells (Tregs). Concordant expression of these two ectoenzymes not only discriminate Tregs from other cell populations, but also generates pericellular adenosine, which has been reported to suppress proliferation of activated T effector (Teff) cells. Because it is currently unclear whether human ectoenzymes (CD39/CD73) are involved in the impaired suppressive activity of Tregs in psoriasis, we examined the frequencies and phenotypes of CD39/CD73-expressing Tregs and related receptor adenosine receptor 2A (A 2A R) in peripheral blood of patients with different types of psoriasis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMBC) were prepared from patients with three different types of psoriasis (psoriasis vulgaris, pustular psoriasis and erythrodermic psoriasis). CD4 + cells were separated from PBMC by negative selection on midiMACS columns, and the frequencies and phenotypes of CD39 and CD73 expressing Tregs, and A 2A R expressing Teff were all determined by flow cytometry analysis. Blood from healthy volunteers served as controls. The expression of single CD73 + Tregs was markedly reduced (approximately 50%) in psoriasis vulgaris, compared to normal controls. In pustular psoriasis, the mean numbers of CD39 + Tregs and A 2A R + Teff was significantly lower than in normal controls. Among three different types of psoriasis, CD39 expression was strikingly reduced in the blood Treg population of pustular psoriasis patients. Decreased CD73 + Tregs levels were observed in psoriasis vulgaris compared to pustular psoriasis and erythrodermic psoriasis. The differences in the expression of CD39 - and CD73 - Tregs may be a factor in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. © 2017 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  1. Photovoltaic Properties of CdSe/CdS and CdS/CdSe Core-Shell Particles Synthesized by Use of Uninterrupted Precipitation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selene Coria-Monroy, C.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Martínez-Alonso, Claudia; Moreno-Romero, Paola M.; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Carlos A.; Corona-Corona, Israel; Hu, Hailin

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) are good electron acceptors for hybrid solar cells. CdSe and CdS nanoparticles can be prepared at low temperatures (60-80°C) from alkaline aqueous solutions of a cadmium salt, sodium citrate, and thiourea, as sulfur source, or sodium selenosulfate, as selenium source. Under the same experimental conditions, the reaction kinetics for CdS were faster than for CdSe. Formation of CdSe/CdS core-shell particles (type I: CdSe as core and CdS as shell) could be achieved by use of an uninterrupted one-step process by setting high and low solution temperatures for the core and shell compounds, respectively. The yield of the CdSe product was higher at a pH 8.5-9.5 whereas that of the CdS product was higher at higher pH (10-11). Therefore, formation of the "inverse" CdS/CdSe structure (type II: CdS as core and CdSe as shell) was possible in a one-step solution process by choosing a high solution pH for the core and a lower pH for the shell. Photoluminescence spectra and electron micrographs confirmed formation of the two types of core-shell particle. The photovoltaic performance of heterojunctions prepared with core-shell particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), also suggested formation of core-shell particles. Both the photovoltage and photocurrent density of hybrid solar cells depended on the shell compound and not on the core. It was shown that the interface of the heterojunctions plays is important in solar cell applications, and its modification could be realized by incorporating different shell compounds on core particles.

  2. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  3. Evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weedall, Gareth D.; Hall, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a human pathogen that causes amoebic dysentery and leads to significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding the genome and evolution of the parasite will help explain how, when and why it causes disease. Here we review current knowledge about the evolutionary genomics of Entamoeba: how differences between the genomes of different species may help explain different phenotypes, and how variation among E. histolytica parasites reveals patterns of population structure. The imminent expansion of the amount genome data will greatly improve our knowledge of the genus and of pathogenic species within it. PMID:21288488

  4. Genomics of Clostridium tetani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Holger; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Chapeton-Montes, Diana; Plourde, Lucile; Speck, Denis; Popoff, Michel R

    2015-05-01

    Genomic information about Clostridium tetani, the causative agent of the tetanus disease, is scarce. The genome of strain E88, a strain used in vaccine production, was sequenced about 10 years ago. One additional genome (strain 12124569) has recently been released. Here we report three new genomes of C. tetani and describe major differences among all five C. tetani genomes. They all harbor tetanus-toxin-encoding plasmids that contain highly conserved genes for TeNT (tetanus toxin), TetR (transcriptional regulator of TeNT) and ColT (collagenase), but substantially differ in other plasmid regions. The chromosomes share a large core genome that contains about 85% of all genes of a given chromosome. The non-core chromosome comprises mainly prophage-like genomic regions and genes encoding environmental interaction and defense functions (e.g. surface proteins, restriction-modification systems, toxin-antitoxin systems, CRISPR/Cas systems) and other fitness functions (e.g. transport systems, metabolic activities). This new genome information will help to assess the level of genome plasticity of the species C. tetani and provide the basis for detailed comparative studies. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenotypic alteration of CD8+ T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is associated with epigenetic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiazhu; Xu, Xiaojing; Lee, Eun-Joon; Shull, Austin Y; Pei, Lirong; Awan, Farrukh; Wang, Xiaoling; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Deng, Libin; Xin, Hong-Bo; Zhong, Wenxun; Liang, Jinhua; Miao, Yi; Wu, Yujie; Fan, Lei; Li, Jianyong; Xu, Wei; Shi, Huidong

    2016-06-28

    Immunosuppression is a prevalent clinical feature in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, with many patients demonstrating increased susceptibility to infections as well as increased failure of an antitumor immune response. However, much is currently not understood regarding the precise mechanisms that attribute to this immunosuppressive phenotype in CLL. To provide further clarity to this particular phenomenon, we analyzed the T-cell profile of CLL patient samples within a large cohort and observed that patients with an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio had a shorter time to first treatment as well as overall survival. These observations coincided with higher expression of the immune checkpoint receptor PD-1 in CLL patient CD8+ T cells when compared to age-matched healthy donors. Interestingly, we discovered that increased PD-1 expression in CD8+ T cells corresponds with decreased DNA methylation levels in a distal upstream locus of the PD-1 gene PDCD1. Further analysis using luciferase reporter assays suggests that the identified PDCD1 distal upstream region acts as an enhancer for PDCD1 transcription and this region becomes demethylated during activation of naïve CD8+ T cells by anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies and IL2. Finally, we conducted a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis comparing CD8+ T cells from CLL patients against healthy donors and identified additional differentially methylated genes with known immune regulatory functions including CCR6 and KLRG1. Taken together, our findings reveal the occurrence of epigenetic reprogramming taking place within CLL patient CD8+ T cells and highlight the potential mechanism of how immunosuppression is accomplished in CLL.

  6. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balu, Alina M.; Campelo, Juan M.; Luque, Rafael; Rajabi, Fatemeh; Romero, Antonio A.

    2010-01-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  7. Soluble macrophage-derived CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The soluble form of the haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp-Hb) scavenger receptor (sCD163) is a specific plasma/serum marker for macrophage activity. Here, we have characterized molecular forms in serum and investigated a role of sCD163 as a binder of Hp-Hb complexes. METHODS: The sCD163...

  8. Giant omental lipoblastoma and CD56 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Go Miyano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of giant omental lipoblastoma in a 13-month-old boy, which was treated successfully by total excision. Tumor cells were positive for S100, CD34 and CD56. This is the first report of lipoblastoma expressing CD56, a fact that could be used to differentiate lipoblastoma from liposarcoma.

  9. White-Light Diffraction with a CD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Dragia Trifonov; Nikolaev, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Various wave optics experiments can be carried out using an ordinary compact disc. The CD is suitable for use as a diffraction grating. For instance, a standard CD (700 MB) has 625 lines/mm. In this article, the authors describe two white-light diffraction demonstrations for a large audience, realizable using a CD (as reflection or transmission…

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of CD4+ T Cells in Coeliac Disease Reveals Imprint of BACH2 and IFNγ Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molloy, Ben; Dominguez Castro, Patricia; Cormican, Paul; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; McManus, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies have to date identified 43 genome wide significant coeliac disease susceptibility (CD) loci comprising over 70 candidate genes. However, how altered regulation of such disease associated genes contributes to CD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recently there has been considerable emphasis on characterising cell type specific and stimulus dependent genetic variants. Therefore in this study we used RNA sequencing to profile over 70 transcriptomes of CD4+ T cells, a cell type crucial for CD pathogenesis, in both stimulated and resting samples from individuals with CD and unaffected controls. We identified extensive transcriptional changes across all conditions, with the previously established CD gene IFNy the most strongly up-regulated gene (log2 fold change 4.6; Padjusted = 2.40x10-11) in CD4+ T cells from CD patients compared to controls. We show a significant correlation of differentially expressed genes with genetic studies of the disease to date (Padjusted = 0.002), and 21 CD candidate susceptibility genes are differentially expressed under one or more of the conditions used in this study. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of immune related processes. Co-expression network analysis identified several modules of coordinately expressed CD genes. Two modules were particularly highly enriched for differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10-16) and highlighted IFNy and the genetically associated transcription factor BACH2 which showed significantly reduced expression in coeliac samples (log2FC -1.75; Padjusted = 3.6x10-3) as key regulatory genes in CD. Genes regulated by BACH2 were very significantly over-represented among our differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10-16) indicating that reduced expression of this master regulator of T cell differentiation promotes a pro-inflammatory response and strongly corroborates genetic evidence that BACH2 plays an important role in CD pathogenesis. PMID:26444573

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of CD4+ T Cells in Coeliac Disease Reveals Imprint of BACH2 and IFNγ Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma M Quinn

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have to date identified 43 genome wide significant coeliac disease susceptibility (CD loci comprising over 70 candidate genes. However, how altered regulation of such disease associated genes contributes to CD pathogenesis remains to be elucidated. Recently there has been considerable emphasis on characterising cell type specific and stimulus dependent genetic variants. Therefore in this study we used RNA sequencing to profile over 70 transcriptomes of CD4+ T cells, a cell type crucial for CD pathogenesis, in both stimulated and resting samples from individuals with CD and unaffected controls. We identified extensive transcriptional changes across all conditions, with the previously established CD gene IFNy the most strongly up-regulated gene (log2 fold change 4.6; P(adjusted = 2.40x10(-11 in CD4+ T cells from CD patients compared to controls. We show a significant correlation of differentially expressed genes with genetic studies of the disease to date (P(adjusted = 0.002, and 21 CD candidate susceptibility genes are differentially expressed under one or more of the conditions used in this study. Pathway analysis revealed significant enrichment of immune related processes. Co-expression network analysis identified several modules of coordinately expressed CD genes. Two modules were particularly highly enriched for differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16 and highlighted IFNy and the genetically associated transcription factor BACH2 which showed significantly reduced expression in coeliac samples (log2FC -1.75; P(adjusted = 3.6x10(-3 as key regulatory genes in CD. Genes regulated by BACH2 were very significantly over-represented among our differentially expressed genes (P<2.2x10(-16 indicating that reduced expression of this master regulator of T cell differentiation promotes a pro-inflammatory response and strongly corroborates genetic evidence that BACH2 plays an important role in CD pathogenesis.

  12. Distinct and overlapping effector functions of expanded human CD4+, CD8α+ and CD4-CD8α- invariant natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent O'Reilly

    Full Text Available CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells have diverse immune stimulatory/regulatory activities through their ability to release cytokines and to kill or transactivate other cells. Activation of iNKT cells can protect against multiple diseases in mice but clinical trials in humans have had limited impact. Clinical studies to date have targeted polyclonal mixtures of iNKT cells and we proposed that their subset compositions will influence therapeutic outcomes. We sorted and expanded iNKT cells from healthy donors and compared the phenotypes, cytotoxic activities and cytokine profiles of the CD4(+, CD8α(+ and CD4(-CD8α(- double-negative (DN subsets. CD4(+ iNKT cells expanded more readily than CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells upon mitogen stimulation. CD8α(+ and DN iNKT cells most frequently expressed CD56, CD161 and NKG2D and most potently killed CD1d(+ cell lines and primary leukemia cells. All iNKT subsets released Th1 (IFN-γ and TNF-α and Th2 (IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines. Relative amounts followed a CD8α>DN>CD4 pattern for Th1 and CD4>DN>CD8α for Th2. All iNKT subsets could simultaneously produce IFN-γ and IL-4, but single-positivity for IFN-γ or IL-4 was strikingly rare in CD4(+ and CD8α(+ fractions, respectively. Only CD4(+ iNKT cells produced IL-9 and IL-10; DN cells released IL-17; and none produced IL-22. All iNKT subsets upregulated CD40L upon glycolipid stimulation and induced IL-10 and IL-12 secretion by dendritic cells. Thus, subset composition of iNKT cells is a major determinant of function. Use of enriched CD8α(+, DN or CD4(+ iNKT cells may optimally harness the immunoregulatory properties of iNKT cells for treatment of disease.

  13. The multi-functionality of CD40L and its receptor CD40 in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lievens, Dirk; Eijgelaar, Wouter J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Lutgens, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Disrupting the CD40-CD40L co-stimulatory pathway reduces atherosclerosis and induces a stable atherosclerotic plaque phenotype that is low in inflammation and high in fibrosis. Therefore, inhibition of the CD40-CD40L pathway is an attractive therapeutic target to reduce clinical complications of

  14. The CD40-CD40L Dyad in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarts, Suzanne A. B. M.; Seijkens, Tom T. P.; van Dorst, Koos J. F.; Dijkstra, Christine D.; Kooij, Gijs; Lutgens, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The CD40-CD40L dyad is an immune checkpoint regulator that promotes both innate and adaptive immune responses and has therefore an essential role in the development of inflammatory diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In MS, CD40 and CD40L are expressed on immune cells present in blood and

  15. Expression of CD80 and CD86 on T lymphocytes and monocytes of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: For T lymphocytes to get optimally activated, they need costimulatory signals that can be provided efficiently by costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 Objective: This study was done to assess the expression of costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 on T lymphocytes and monocytes of asthmatic children.

  16. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  17. Human B1 cells in umbilical cord and adult peripheral blood express the novel phenotype CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70−

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Daniel O.; Holodick, Nichol E.

    2011-01-01

    B1 cells differ in many ways from conventional B cells, most prominently in the production of natural immunoglobulin, which is vitally important for protection against pathogens. B1 cells have also been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune dyscrasias and malignant diseases. It has been impossible to accurately study B1 cells during health and illness because the nature of human B1 cells has not been successfully defined. This has produced controversy regarding the existence of human B1 cells. Here, we determined the phenotype of human B1 cells by testing sort-purified B cell fractions for three fundamental B1 cell functions based on mouse studies: spontaneous IgM secretion, efficient T cell stimulation, and tonic intracellular signaling. We found that a small population of CD20+CD27+CD43+ cells present in both umbilical cord and adult peripheral blood fulfilled these criteria and expressed a skewed B cell receptor repertoire. These B cells express little or no surface CD69 and CD70, both of which are markedly up-regulated after activation of CD20+CD27−CD43− (naive) and CD20+CD27+CD43− (memory) B cells. This work identifies human B1 cells as CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70−. We determined that the proportion of B1 cells declines with age, which may contribute to disease susceptibility. Identification of human B1 cells provides a foundation for future studies on the nature and role of these cells in human disease. PMID:21220451

  18. Evaluation of Stem Cell Markers, CD44/CD24 in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Hashemi Arabi

    2014-05-01

    Four breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 ، T47D ، MDA-MB231 and MDA-MB468 were purchased from National cell Bank of Iran based in Iran Pasture Institute and were cultured in high glucose DMEM supplemented with 10% FCS. Cells were stained with antiCD44-PE and antiCD24-FITC antibodies and Status of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells were evaluated using flow cytometer and fluorescent microscopy.Evaluation of CD44 and CD24 as markers of breast cancer stem cells showed that MDA-MB231 with 97±1.2% CD44+/CD24-/low cells is significantly different from the others that they were mainly CD44 and CD24 positive cells(p

  19. Induction of cytotoxic CD8+CD56+ T cells from human thymocytes by interleukin-15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, S; Nissen, Mogens Holst; Ødum, N

    2001-01-01

    CD8(+) CD56(+) cells isolated from human peripheral blood lymphocytes have been shown recently to represent a population of cytotoxic active T cells. However, it is not known if these cells are intrathymically or extrathymically developed or how these cells are influenced by growth factors....... In the present study, we investigated the effects of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-15 on human thymocytes with respect to development of CD8(+) CD56(+) T cells. Freshly isolated thymocytes contain few CD8(+) CD56(+) cells, but the number of these cells increases significantly when thymocytes are grown...... in the presence of IL-15 or IL-2. However, IL-15 induced a significantly higher fraction of CD8(+) CD56(+) cells compared with IL-2. Thus, although IL-2 and IL-15 are known to have a number of redundant functions, we here demonstrate that IL-15 is superior to IL-2 in inducing CD8(+) CD56(+) T cells from cultures...

  20. Piezoelectric effect in CdTe/CdMnTe and CdTe/CdZnTe quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Regis

    1994-01-01

    Materials with zinc-blende type structure are piezoelectric: any strain along a polar axis generates an electrical polarisation. Strained quantum wells of cubic II-VI or III-V semiconductors, grown along [111] or [112] axis, exhibit a strong built-in piezo-electric field (100 kV/cm for 1% strains). Such structures are very promising for applications to optical modulation, but it is necessary to study first the physical properties of piezoelectric heterostructures before they can be used in optical devices. For this purpose, we have performed an optical study of strained CdTe/CdMnTe or CdTe/CdZnTe quantum wells coherently grown by molecular beam epitaxy on [111] or [112] oriented substrates. Effects of piezoelectric field on optical and electronic properties of quantum wells have been analyzed in terms of the envelop function model, taking into account the effects of biaxial strains for [hhk] growth axis. Moreover, we have proposed an original way of measuring piezoelectric field in strained quantum wells, and we have used this method to show that CdTe exhibits strong non-linearities for piezoelectric field versus strain. This effect has never been mentioned before. We have also performed measurements of the piezoelectric coefficient e14 under high hydrostatic pressure inducing strains up to 2%, which shows that part of the non-linear effect is a volume effect. We have also studied the effects of the piezoelectric field on excitons in quantum wells. The binding energy decreases slightly when the electric field increases, but the oscillator strength, for the fundamental transition, decreases dramatically with the overlap of the envelope wavefunctions of electrons and holes. We have performed a modelization of an exciton in a piezoelectric quantum well using two variational parameters. This model provides an accurate calculation of excitonic absorption. Our experimental and theoretical results are in very good agreement, without any fitting parameters, for a large

  1. The 106Cd family problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornelas, A.; Galaviz, D.; Fulop, Zs.; Gyurky, G.; Kiss, G.G.; Mate, Z.; Somorjai, E.; Mohr, P.; Rauscher, T.; Sonnabend, K.; Zilges, A.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The 35 stable nuclei located on the proton rich side of the valley of stability whose production cannot be explained in the framework of the slow and rapid neutron capture process are called the p-nuclei. These are thought to be produced by photodisintegration reactions on the neutron rich stable isotopes under high temperatures (T 9 ∼ 2-3, billion Kelvin) and short time intervals to avoid complete photodisintegration to the nickel and iron isotopes. A possible site for these reactions are the C,N,O layers of a Type II Supernovae. A full understanding of the explosion mechanisms of Type II Supernovae is required to more precisely determine where the necessary conditions for the process can be found. The 106 Cd isotope is an important piece of the puzzle and the study of the 106 Cd alpha-nuclear potential is a necessary requirement to better describe the full reaction network. The aim of this work is to extend the knowledge of the alpha nucleus potentials for p-nuclei at energies close to the astrophysically relevant window for the photodisintegration reaction (γ, α). The elastic scattering of α particles has been observed at different energies above and below the Coulomb barrier of the p-nucleus 106 Cd at the ATOMKI cyclotron laboratory. The main problem in the study of 106 Cd α-nucleus potential is the 'Family Problem' which implies there are several different potentials that describe the experimental data with similar precision. The problem was presented in previous articles and was treated with more detail in. The current results from the Family Problem can be seen in Fig. 1. The families obtained provide a better description of the capture data than the McFadden global α-nuclear potential. Further analysis of the families will allow for the determination of the most suited family to describe the experimental data. The 106 Cd family problem is currently being treated in a full length article, soon to be published

  2. Assessment of Cd-induced genotoxic damage in Urtica pilulifera L. using RAPD-PCR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhan Dogan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants can be used as biological indicators in assessing the damage done by bioaccumulation of heavy metals and their negative impact on the environment. In the present research, Roman nettle (Urtica pilulifera L. was employed as a bioindicator for cadmium (Cd pollution. The comparisons between unexposed and exposed plant samples revealed inhibition of the root growth (∼25.96% and ∼45.92% after treatment with 100 and 200 µmol/L Cd concentrations, respectively, reduction in the total soluble protein quantities (∼53.92% and ∼66.29% after treatment with 100 and 200 µmol/L Cd concentrations, respectively and a gradual genomic instability when the Cd concentrations were increased. The results indicated that alterations in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD profiles, following the Cd treatments, included normal band losses and emergence of new bands, when compared to the controls. Also, the obtained data from F1 plants, utilized for analysis of genotoxicity, revealed that DNA alterations, occurring in parent plants due to Cd pollution, were transmitted to the next generation.

  3. The Loss of TET2 Promotes CD8+T Cell Memory Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Shannon A; Gohil, Mercy; Banks, Lauren B; Cotton, Renee M; Johnson, Matthew E; Stelekati, Erietta; Wells, Andrew D; Wherry, E John; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2018-01-01

    T cell differentiation requires appropriate regulation of DNA methylation. In this article, we demonstrate that the methylcytosine dioxygenase ten-eleven translocation (TET)2 regulates CD8 + T cell differentiation. In a murine model of acute viral infection, TET2 loss promotes early acquisition of a memory CD8 + T cell fate in a cell-intrinsic manner without disrupting Ag-driven cell expansion or effector function. Upon secondary recall, TET2-deficient memory CD8 + T cells demonstrate superior pathogen control. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified a number of differentially methylated regions in TET2-deficient versus wild-type CD8 + T cells. These differentially methylated regions did not occur at the loci of differentially expressed memory markers; rather, several hypermethylated regions were identified in known transcriptional regulators of CD8 + T cell memory fate. Together, these data demonstrate that TET2 is an important regulator of CD8 + T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Regulation and gene expression profiling of NKG2D positive human cytomegalovirus-primed CD4+ T-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helle Jensen

    Full Text Available NKG2D is a stimulatory receptor expressed by natural killer (NK cells, CD8(+ T-cells, and γδ T-cells. NKG2D expression is normally absent from CD4(+ T-cells, however recently a subset of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells has been found, which is specific for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. This particular subset of HCMV-specific NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possesses effector-like functions, thus resembling the subsets of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells found in other chronic inflammations. However, the precise mechanism leading to NKG2D expression on HCMV-specific CD4(+ T-cells is currently not known. In this study we used genome-wide analysis of individual genes and gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA to investigate the gene expression profile of NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, generated from HCMV-primed CD4(+ T-cells. We show that the HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells possess a higher differentiated phenotype than the NKG2D(- CD4(+ T-cells, both at the gene expression profile and cytokine profile. The ability to express NKG2D at the cell surface was primarily determined by the activation or differentiation status of the CD4(+ T-cells and not by the antigen presenting cells. We observed a correlation between CD94 and NKG2D expression in the CD4(+ T-cells following HCMV stimulation. However, knock-down of CD94 did not affect NKG2D cell surface expression or signaling. In addition, we show that NKG2D is recycled at the cell surface of activated CD4(+ T-cells, whereas it is produced de novo in resting CD4(+ T-cells. These findings provide novel information about the gene expression profile of HCMV-primed NKG2D(+ CD4(+ T-cells, as well as the mechanisms regulating NKG2D cell surface expression.

  5. Computational genomics of hyperthermophiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werken, van de H.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    With the ever increasing number of completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes and the subsequent use of functional genomics tools, e.g. DNA microarray and proteomics, computational data analysis and the integration of microbial and molecular data is inevitable. This thesis describes the computational

  6. The Lotus japonicus genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    , carbon/nitrogen and secondary metabolism, as well as advances made in high-throughput genomic and genetic approaches. Research focusing on model plants has underpinned the recent growth in plant genomics and genetics and provided a basis for investigations of major crop species. In the legume family...

  7. Phanerochaete chrysosporium genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis F. Larrondo; Rafael Vicuna; Dan Cullen

    2005-01-01

    A high quality draft genome sequence has been generated for the lignocellulose-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium (Martinez et al. 2004). Analysis of the genome in the context of previously established genetics and physiology is presented. Transposable elements and their potential relationship to genes involved in lignin degradation are systematically...

  8. Genome-Scale Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergdahl, Basti; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus; Machado, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An introduction to genome-scale models, how to build and use them, will be given in this chapter. Genome-scale models have become an important part of systems biology and metabolic engineering, and are increasingly used in research, both in academica and in industry, both for modeling chemical pr...

  9. Safeguarding genome integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Syljuåsen, Randi G

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms that preserve genome integrity are highly important during the normal life cycle of human cells. Loss of genome protective mechanisms can lead to the development of diseases such as cancer. Checkpoint kinases function in the cellular surveillance pathways that help cells to cope with DNA...

  10. Human genome I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    An international conference, Human Genome I, was held Oct. 2-4, 1989 in San Diego, Calif. Selected speakers discussed: Current Status of the Genome Project; Technique Innovations; Interesting regions; Applications; and Organization - Different Views of Current and Future Science and Procedures. Posters, consisting of 119 presentations, were displayed during the sessions. 119 were indexed for inclusion to the Energy Data Base

  11. Breeding-assisted genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    The revolution of inexpensive sequencing has ushered in an unprecedented age of genomics. The promise of using this technology to accelerate plant breeding is being realized with a vision of genomics-assisted breeding that will lead to rapid genetic gain for expensive and difficult traits. The reality is now that robust phenotypic data is an increasing limiting resource to complement the current wealth of genomic information. While genomics has been hailed as the discipline to fundamentally change the scope of plant breeding, a more symbiotic relationship is likely to emerge. In the context of developing and evaluating large populations needed for functional genomics, none excel in this area more than plant breeders. While genetic studies have long relied on dedicated, well-structured populations, the resources dedicated to these populations in the context of readily available, inexpensive genotyping is making this philosophy less tractable relative to directly focusing functional genomics on material in breeding programs. Through shifting effort for basic genomic studies from dedicated structured populations, to capturing the entire scope of genetic determinants in breeding lines, we can move towards not only furthering our understanding of functional genomics in plants, but also rapidly improving crops for increased food security, availability and nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cd4As2Br3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kars

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of Cd4As2Br3 (tetracadmium biarsenide tribromide were grown by a chemical transport reaction. The structure is isotypic with the members of the cadmium and mercury pnictidohalides family with general formula M4A2X3 (M = Cd, Hg; A = P, As, Sb; X = Cl, Br, I and contains two independent As atoms on special positions with site symmetry -3 and two independent Cd atoms, of which one is on a special position with site symmetry -3. The Cd4As2Br3 structure consists of AsCd4 tetrahedra sharing vertices with isolated As2Cd6 octahedra that contain As–As dumbbells in the centre of the octahedron. The Br atoms are located in the voids of this three-dimensional arrangement and bridge the different polyhedra through Cd...Br contacts.

  13. Study of Cd Te recrystallization by hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez V, C.; Albor A, M. L.; Galarza G, U.; Aguilar H, J. R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Fisica, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Gonzalez T, M. A. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Computo, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Flores M, J. M. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia y Materiales, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Jimenez O, D. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, SEPI, Nueva Industrial Vallejo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2017-11-01

    Cd Te thin films solar cells are currently produced using a layer sequence of glass/FTO/CdS/Cd Te/metal contact (Cu/Ag), these films are deposited by two different techniques, chemical bath deposition (CBD) and close space vapour transport (CSVT). In order to reach reasonable conversion efficiencies, the device has to be thermally treated in a hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} atmosphere. This study was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence, Sem-EDS, four probe method and Sims profiling of Cd Te. These analyses confirm the presence of hydrated CdCl{sub 2} and Cd Te phases on Cd Te surface and shown a good recrystallization morphology helping to the carriers mobility along the structure. Using the thermal treatment was possible to reduce the resistivity of Cd Te thin film; it is a result to the Cl migration along the Cd Te solar cell structure, reducing the defects between CdS and Cd Te thin films. A strong Cd Te thin film recrystallization was observed by the implementation of a hydrated-CdCl{sub 2} treatment doing to this a good candidate to Cd Te solar cells process. (Author)

  14. CD160-Associated CD8 T-Cell Functional Impairment Is Independent of PD-1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Selena; Banga, Riddhima; Bellanger, Florence; Pellaton, Céline; Farina, Alex; Comte, Denis; Harari, Alexandre; Perreau, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Expression of co-inhibitory molecules is generally associated with T-cell dysfunction in chronic viral infections such as HIV or HCV. However, their relative contribution in the T-cell impairment remains unclear. In the present study, we have evaluated the impact of the expression of co-inhibitory molecules such as 2B4, PD-1 and CD160 on the functions of CD8 T-cells specific to influenza, EBV and CMV. We show that CD8 T-cell populations expressing CD160, but not PD-1, had reduced proliferation capacity and perforin expression, thus indicating that the functional impairment in CD160+ CD8 T cells may be independent of PD-1 expression. The blockade of CD160/CD160-ligand interaction restored CD8 T-cell proliferation capacity, and the extent of restoration directly correlated with the ex vivo proportion of CD160+ CD8 T cells suggesting that CD160 negatively regulates TCR-mediated signaling. Furthermore, CD160 expression was not up-regulated upon T-cell activation or proliferation as compared to PD-1. Taken together, these results provide evidence that CD160-associated CD8 T-cell functional impairment is independent of PD-1 expression. PMID:25255144

  15. Musa sebagai Model Genom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RITA MEGIA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available During the meeting in Arlington, USA in 2001, the scientists grouped in PROMUSA agreed with the launching of the Global Musa Genomics Consortium. The Consortium aims to apply genomics technologies to the improvement of this important crop. These genome projects put banana as the third model species after Arabidopsis and rice that will be analyzed and sequenced. Comparing to Arabidopsis and rice, banana genome provides a unique and powerful insight into structural and in functional genomics that could not be found in those two species. This paper discussed these subjects-including the importance of banana as the fourth main food in the world, the evolution and biodiversity of this genetic resource and its parasite.

  16. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribute...... to next generation. The main goal of this study was to see the potential of using genomic prediction in a commercial Barley breeding program. The data used in this study was from Nordic Seed company which is located in Denmark. Around 350 advanced lines were genotyped with 9K Barely chip from Illumina....... Traits used in this study were grain yield, plant height and heading date. Heading date is number days it takes after 1st June for plant to head. Heritabilities were 0.33, 0.44 and 0.48 for yield, height and heading, respectively for the average of nine plots. The GBLUP model was used for genomic...

  17. The genome editing revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stella, Stefano; Montoya, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    -Cas system has become the main tool for genome editing in many laboratories. Currently the targeted genome editing technology has been used in many fields and may be a possible approach for human gene therapy. Furthermore, it can also be used to modifying the genomes of model organisms for studying human......In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a blooming of targeted genome editing systems and applications. The area was revolutionized by the discovery and characterization of the transcription activator-like effector proteins, which are easier to engineer to target new DNA sequences than...... sequence). This ribonucleoprotein complex protects bacteria from invading DNAs, and it was adapted to be used in genome editing. The CRISPR ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecule guides to the specific DNA site the Cas9 nuclease to cleave the DNA target. Two years and more than 1000 publications later, the CRISPR...

  18. Investigate Global Chromosomal Interaction by Hi-C in Human Naive CD4 T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Riley, Nicole; Thompson, Ryan; Sharma, Siddhartha

    2018-01-01

    Hi-C is a methodology developed to reveal chromosomal interactions from a genome-wide perspective. Here, we described a protocol for generating Hi-C sequencing libraries in resting and activated human naive CD4 T cells to investigate activation-induced chromatin structure re-arrangement in T cell activation followed by a section reviewing the general concepts of Hi-C data analysis.

  19. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the non...

  20. Synthesis and photoelectrochemical properties of CdWO{sub 4} and CdS/CdWO{sub 4} nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weina [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zheng, Chunhua [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Officer College of the Chinese People' s Armed Police Forces, Chengdu 610213 (China); Hua, Hao; Yang, Qi; Chen, Lin [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Xi, Yi, E-mail: yxi6@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu, Chenguo, E-mail: hucg@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-02-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile CHM strategy is employed for the first time to synthesize CdWO{sub 4} nanowire and nanoflower arrays on cadmium foils. • The photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties are measured on the electrodes made of the CdWO{sub 4} nanowire and nanoflower arrays. • The photocurrent density of the nanowire electrode reaches 0.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, which is 3 times as much as that of the nanoflower electrode. • CdS nanoparticles are deposited on CdWO{sub 4} nanowire arrays to form a CdS/CdWO{sub 4} heterojunction to improve the PEC properties. • The remarkably enhanced photoresponse is achieved on the CdS/CdWO{sub 4} which is twice as much as that on the pure CdWO{sub 4} electrode. - Abstract: A facile composite-salt-mediated strategy is employed for the first time to synthesize CdWO{sub 4} nanowire and nanoflower arrays on cadmium foil substrates. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties are measured on the electrodes made of the CdWO{sub 4} nanowire and nanoflower arrays under the simulated sunlight illumination. Both electrodes display high sensitive response and photocurrent stability. The photocurrent density of the nanowire arrays electrode reach 0.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, which is about 3 times as much as that of the nanoflower array electrode. To improve the visible light photocurrent response, CdS nanoparticles are deposited on the CdWO{sub 4} nanowire arrays to form a CdS/CdWO{sub 4} heterojunction. Remarkably enhanced photoresponse is observed on the CdS/CdWO{sub 4} heterostructure and the photocurrent intensity is about twice as much as that of the electrode made of the pure CdWO{sub 4} nanowire arrays. The photoelectric mechanism is also discussed by the crystal structure and morphology characterization, optical band gap and carrier mobility analysis. This work presents a new design of a photoelectrochemical device for possible applications in photoelectrolysis of water and solar cells or highly sensitive light detection.

  1. Low expression of CD39(+) /CD45RA(+) on regulatory T cells (Treg ) cells in type 1 diabetic children in contrast to high expression of CD101(+) /CD129(+) on Treg cells in children with coeliac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkesson, K; Tompa, A; Rydén, A; Faresjö, M

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and coeliac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. As T1D and coeliac disease share the same risk genes, patients risk subsequently developing the other disease. This study aimed to investigate the expression of T helper (Th), T cytotoxic (Tc) and regulatory T cells (Treg ) in T1D and/or coeliac disease children in comparison to healthy children. Subgroups of T cells (Th : CD4(+) or Tc : CD8(+) ); naive (CD27(+) CD28(+) CD45RA(+) CCR7(+) ), central memory (CD27(+) CD28(+) CD45RA(-) CCR7(+) ), effector memory (early differentiated; CD27(+) CD28(+) CD45RA(-) CCR7(-) and late differentiated; CD27(-) CD28(-) CD45RA(-) CCR7(-) ), terminally differentiated effector cells (TEMRA; CD27(-) CD28(-) CD45RA(+) CCR7(-) ) and Treg (CD4(+) CD25(+) FOXP3(+) CD127(-) ) cells, and their expression of CD39, CD45RA, CD101 and CD129, were studied by flow cytometry in T1D and/or coeliac disease children or without any of these diseases (reference group). Children diagnosed with both T1D and coeliac disease showed a higher percentage of TEMRA CD4(+) cells (P coeliac disease had a higher MFI of CD101 (P coeliac disease have a higher percentage of differentiated CD4(+) cells compared to CD8(+) cells. T1D children show signs of low CD39(+) /CD45RA(+) Treg cells that may indicate loss of suppressive function. Conversely, children with coeliac disease show signs of CD101(+) /CD129(+) Treg cells that may indicate suppressor activity. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  2. Low expression of CD39+/CD45RA+ on regulatory T cells (Treg) cells in type 1 diabetic children in contrast to high expression of CD101+/CD129+ on Treg cells in children with coeliac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkesson, K; Tompa, A; Rydén, A; Faresjö, M

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and coeliac disease are both characterized by an autoimmune feature. As T1D and coeliac disease share the same risk genes, patients risk subsequently developing the other disease. This study aimed to investigate the expression of T helper (Th), T cytotoxic (Tc) and regulatory T cells (Treg) in T1D and/or coeliac disease children in comparison to healthy children. Subgroups of T cells (Th : CD4+ or Tc : CD8+); naive (CD27+CD28+CD45RA+CCR7+), central memory (CD27+CD28+CD45RA−CCR7+), effector memory (early differentiated; CD27+CD28+CD45RA−CCR7− and late differentiated; CD27−CD28−CD45RA−CCR7−), terminally differentiated effector cells (TEMRA; CD27−CD28−CD45RA+CCR7−) and Treg (CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127−) cells, and their expression of CD39, CD45RA, CD101 and CD129, were studied by flow cytometry in T1D and/or coeliac disease children or without any of these diseases (reference group). Children diagnosed with both T1D and coeliac disease showed a higher percentage of TEMRA CD4+ cells (P coeliac disease had a higher MFI of CD101 (P coeliac disease have a higher percentage of differentiated CD4+ cells compared to CD8+ cells. T1D children show signs of low CD39+/CD45RA+ Treg cells that may indicate loss of suppressive function. Conversely, children with coeliac disease show signs of CD101+/CD129+ Treg cells that may indicate suppressor activity. PMID:25421756

  3. Can arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi reduce Cd uptake and alleviate Cd toxicity of Lonicera japonica grown in Cd-added soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiu-Yun; Zhuo, Feng; Long, Shi-Hui; Zhao, Hai-Di; Yang, Dan-Jing; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Li, Shao-Shan; Jing, Yuan-Xiao

    2016-02-01

    A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to study the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi-Glomus versiforme (Gv) and Rhizophagus intraradices (Ri) on the growth, Cd uptake, antioxidant indices [glutathione reductase (GR), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate (ASA), glutathione (GSH) and malonaldehyde (MDA)] and phytochelatins (PCs) production of Lonicera japonica in Cd-amended soils. Gv and Ri significantly increased P acquisition, biomass of shoots and roots at all Cd treatments. Gv significantly decreased Cd concentrations in shoots and roots, and Ri also obviously reduced Cd concentrations in shoots but increased Cd concentrations in roots. Meanwhile, activities of CAT, APX and GR, and contents of ASA and PCs were remarkably higher in Gv/Ri-inoculated plants than those of uninoculated plants, but lower MDA and GSH contents in Gv/Ri-inoculated plants were found. In conclusion, Gv and Ri symbiosis alleviated Cd toxicity of L. japonica through the decline of shoot Cd concentrations and the improvement of P nutrition, PCs content and activities of GR, CAT, APX in inoculated plants, and then improved plant growth. The decrease of shoot Cd concentrations in L. japonica inoculated with Gv/Ri would provide a clue for safe production of this plant from Cd-contaminated soils.

  4. Phytozome Comparative Plant Genomics Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodstein, David; Batra, Sajeev; Carlson, Joseph; Hayes, Richard; Phillips, Jeremy; Shu, Shengqiang; Schmutz, Jeremy; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2014-09-09

    The Dept. of Energy Joint Genome Institute is a genomics user facility supporting DOE mission science in the areas of Bioenergy, Carbon Cycling, and Biogeochemistry. The Plant Program at the JGI applies genomic, analytical, computational and informatics platforms and methods to: 1. Understand and accelerate the improvement (domestication) of bioenergy crops 2. Characterize and moderate plant response to climate change 3. Use comparative genomics to identify constrained elements and infer gene function 4. Build high quality genomic resource platforms of JGI Plant Flagship genomes for functional and experimental work 5. Expand functional genomic resources for Plant Flagship genomes

  5. Effects of in vivo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody on regulatory T cell depletion and CD4+CD25- T cell properties in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2012-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are defined as CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in chickens. This study examined the effects of an anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody injection (0.5 mg/bird) on in vivo depletion of Tregs and the properties of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells in Treg-depleted birds. The CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood was lower at 8 d post injection than at 0 d. Anti-CD25-mediated CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion in blood was maximum at 12 d post injection. The anti-CD25 antibody injection depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the spleen and cecal tonsils, but not in the thymus, at 12 d post antibody injection. CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of birds injected with the anti-chicken CD25 antibody had higher proliferation and higher IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts than the controls at 12 d post injection. At 20 d post injection, CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the blood, spleen and thymus were comparable to that of the 0 d post injection. It could be concluded that anti-chicken CD25 injection temporarily depleted Treg population and increased and IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells at 12d post injection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Personal genomes, participatory genomics and the anonymity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-02

    Dec 2, 2014 ... gies which have enabled miniaturization, large-scale paral- lelization and improved readout coupled with highly scala- ble data capture and analysis tools, commonly known as. 'next generation' sequencing technologies (Mardis 2008). The cost of whole genome sequencing has been expected to be as ...

  7. Demonstration of strong enterobacterial reactivity of CD4+CD25- T cells from conventional and germ-free mice which is counter-regulated by CD4+CD25+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Kristensen, Nanna N

    2004-01-01

    Unfractionated CD4+ T cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and peripheral lymph nodes are unresponsive when exposed to enterobacterial antigens in vitro. Under similar conditions, CD4+ T cells depleted in vivo or in vitro of CD4+CD25+ T cells proliferate extensively. The CD4+CD25- T...

  8. Chromosome Rearrangements in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS): Report of a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) in Two Half Sibs With Features of CdLS and Review of Reported CdLS Cases With Chromosome Rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeScipio, Cheryl; Kaur, Maninder; Yaeger, Dinah; Innis, Jeffrey W.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS; OMIM 122470) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by multisystem involvement, cognitive delay, limb defects, and characteristic facial features. Recently, mutations in NIPBL have been found in ~50% of individuals with CdLS. Numerous chromosomal rearrangements have been reported in individuals with CdLS. These rearrangements may be causative of a CdLS phenotype, result in a phenocopy, or be unrelated to the observed phenotype. We describe two half siblings with a der(3)t(3;12)(p25.3;p13.3) chromosomal rearrangement, clinical features resembling CdLS, and phenotypic overlap with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Region-specific BAC probes were used to fine-map the breakpoint region by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH analysis places the chromosome 3 breakpoint distal to RP11-115G3 on 3p25.3; the chromosome 12 breakpoint is distal to BAC RP11-88D16 on 12p13.3. A review of published cases of terminal 3p deletions and terminal 12p duplications indicates that the findings in these siblings are consistent with the del(3)(p25) phenotype. Given the phenotypic overlap with CdLS, we have reviewed the reported cases of chromosomal rearrangements involved in CdLS to better elucidate other potential loci that could harbor additional CdLS genes. Additionally, to identify chromosome rearrangements, genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed on eight individuals with typical CdLS and without identifiable deletion or mutation of NIPBL. No pathologic rearrangements were identified. PMID:16075459

  9. Studies of CdS/CdTe interface: Comparison of CdS films deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jun-feng; Fu, Gan-hua; Krishnakumar, V.; Schimper, Hermann-Josef; Liao, Cheng; Jaegermann, Wolfram; Besland, M.P.

    2015-01-01

    The CdS layers were deposited by two different methods, close space sublimation (CSS) and chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. The CdS/CdTe interface properties were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TEM images showed a large CSS-CdS grain size in the range of 70-80 nm. The interface between CSS-CdS and CdTe were clear and sharp, indicating an abrupt hetero-junction. On the other hand, CBD-CdS layer had much smaller grain size in the 5-10 nm range. The interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe was not as clear as CSS-CdS. With the stepwise coverage of CdTe layer, the XPS core levels of Cd 3d and S 2p in CSS-CdS had a sudden shift to lower binding energies, while those core levels shifted gradually in CBD-CdS. In addition, XPS depth profile analyses indicated a strong diffusion in the interface between CBD-CdS and CdTe. The solar cells prepared using CSS-CdS yielded better device performance than the CBD-CdS layer. The relationships between the solar cell performances and properties of CdS/CdTe interfaces were discussed. - Highlights: • Studies of CdS deposited by close space sublimation and chemical bath deposition • An observation of CdS/CdTe interface by transmission electron microscope • A careful investigation of CdS/CdTe interface by X ray photoelectron spectra • An easier diffusion at the chemical bath deposition CdS and CdTe interface

  10. Penetration effects in 111Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannatiempo, A.; Perego, A.; Passeri, A.

    1984-01-01

    Penetration effects in the conversion process of the 7/2 + ->5/2 + , 171 keV and 5/2 + ->1/2 + , 245 keV transitions in 111 Cd have been investigated. The decay of 111 In has been studied to deduce the relative intensity of the K-conversion lines Isub(K)(171)/Isub(K)(245) and the ratio Isub(K)(245)/Isub(L+M...)(245). The values obtained for the penetration parameters of the two transitions are 0 1 (245)<=1.9. (orig.)

  11. CD152 (CTLA-4) regulates effector functions of CD8+ T lymphocytes by repressing Eomesodermin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Johannes K; Knieke, Karin; Kolar, Paula; Reiner, Steven L; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes are required for effective host defense against pathogens and also for mediating effector responses against uncontrolled proliferating self-tissues. In this study, we determine that individual CD8(+) T cells are tightly controlled in their effector functions by CD152 (CTLA-4). We demonstrate that signals induced by CD152 reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma and granzyme B expressing CD8(+) T cells independently of the transcription factors T-bet or cKrox by selectively inhibiting accumulation of Eomesodermin mRNA and protein. Ectopic expression of Eomesodermin reversed the CD152-mediated inhibition of effector molecule production. Additionally, enhanced cytotoxicity of individual CD8(+) T cells differentiated in the absence of CD152 signaling was determined in vivo. These novel insights extend our understanding of how immune responses of CD8(+) T cells are selectively modulated.

  12. Soluble CD36- a marker of the (pathophysiological) role of CD36 in the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koonen, Debby P Y; Jensen, Majken Karoline; Handberg, Aase

    2011-01-01

    associated with obesity and lipid components of the metabolic syndrome, with risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Recently, non-cell bound CD36 was identified in human plasma and was termed soluble CD36 (sCD36). In this review we will describe the functions of CD36 in tissues and address the role of s......CD36 is a class B scavenger receptor observed in many cell types and tissues throughout the body. Recent literature has implicated CD36 in the pathogenesis of metabolic dysregulation such as found in obesity, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Genetic variation at the CD36 loci have been......CD36 in the context of the metabolic syndrome. We will also highlight recent findings from human genetic studies looking at the CD36 locus in relation to metabolic profile in the general population. Finally, we present a model in which insulin resistance, oxLDL, low-grade inflammation and liver...

  13. Electrical properties of MIS devices on CdZnTe/HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Seok; Jeoung, Y. T.; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Jae Mook; Song, Jinhan; Ann, S. Y.; Lee, Ji Y.; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, Sun-Ung; Park, Mann-Jang; Lee, S. D.; Suh, Sang-Hee

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, we report the capacitance-voltage (C-V) properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices on CdTe/HgCdTe by the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and CdZnTe/HgCdTe by thermal evaporation. In MOCVD, CdTe layers are directly grown on HgCdTe using the metal organic sources of DMCd and DiPTe. HgCdTe layers are converted to n-type and the carrier concentration, ND is low 1015 cm-3 after Hg-vacancy annealing at 260 degrees Celsius. In thermal evaporation, CdZnTe passivation layers were deposited on HgCdTe surfaces after the surfaces were etched with 0.5 - 2.0% bromine in methanol solution. To investigate the electrical properties of the MIS devices, the C-V measurement is conducted at 80 K and 1 MHz. C-V curve of MIS devices on CdTe/HgCdTe by MOCVD has shown nearly flat band condition and large hysteresis, which is inferred to result from many defects in CdTe layer induced during Hg-vacancy annealing process. A negative flat band voltage (VFB approximately equals -2 V) and a small hysteresis have been observed for MIS devices on CdZnTe/HgCdTe by thermal evaporation. It is inferred that the negative flat band voltage results from residual Te4+ on the surface after etching with bromine in methanol solution.

  14. Adoptive immunotherapy of cancer with polyclonal, 108-fold hyperexpanded, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Julian A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy is dose dependent and optimally requires participation of antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we isolated tumor-sensitized T cells and activated them in vitro using conditions that led to greater than 108-fold numerical hyperexpansion of either the CD4+ or CD8+ subset while retaining their capacity for in vivo therapeutic efficacy. Murine tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN cells were segregated to purify the CD62Llow subset, or the CD4+ subset thereof. Cells were then propagated through multiple cycles of anti-CD3 activation with IL-2 + IL-7 for the CD8+ subset, or IL-7 + IL-23 for the CD4+ subset. A broad repertoire of TCR Vβ families was maintained throughout hyperexpansion, which was similar to the starting population. Adoptive transfer of hyper-expanded CD8+ T cells eliminated established pulmonary metastases, in an immunologically specific fashion without the requirement for adjunct IL-2. Hyper-expanded CD4+ T cells cured established tumors in intracranial or subcutaneous sites that were not susceptible to CD8+ T cells alone. Because accessibility and antigen presentation within metastases varies according to anatomic site, maintenance of a broad repertoire of both CD4+ and CD8+ T effector cells will augment the overall systemic efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy.

  15. The Story of CD4+CD28− T Cells Revisited: Solved or Still Ongoing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Maly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CD4+CD28− T cells are a unique type of proinflammatory T cells characterised by blockade of costimulatory CD28 receptor expression at the transcriptional level, which is still reversible by IL-12. In healthy individuals older than 65 years, these cells may accumulate to up to 50% of total CD4+ T lymphocytes as in many immune-mediated diseases, immunodeficiency, and specific infectious diseases. Here we focus on CD4+CD28− T cells in chronic immune-mediated diseases, summarizing various phenotypic and functional characteristics, which vary depending on the underlying disease, disease activity, and concurrent treatment. CD4+CD28− T cells present as effector/memory cells with increased replicative history and oligoclonality but reduced apoptosis. As an alternative costimulatory signal instead of CD28, not only natural killer cell receptors and Toll-like receptors, but also CD47, CTLA-4, OX40, and 4-1BB have to be considered. The proinflammatory and cytotoxic capacities of these cells indicate an involvement in progression and maintenance of chronic immune-mediated disease. So far it has been shown that treatment with TNF-α blockers, abatacept, statins, and polyclonal antilymphocyte globulins (ATG mediates reduction of the CD4+CD28− T cell level. The clinical relevance of targeting CD4+CD28− T cells as a therapeutic option has not been examined so far.

  16. High temperature continuous flow synthesis of CdSe/CdS/ZnS, CdS/ZnS, and CdSeS/ZnS nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Matt S; Kumar, Vivek; Bonita, Yolanda; Deshpande, Kishori; Kenis, Paul J A

    2015-10-14

    Continuous flow reactors show great promise for large-scale synthesis of quantum dots. Here, we discuss results for the synthesis of multi-layered Cd-based hybrid nanocrystals - CdSe/CdS/ZnS, CdS/ZnS, and CdSeS/ZnS - in a continuous flow reactor. The simple reactor design and liquid-phase chemistry obviate the need for preheating or in-line mixing, and the chosen reactor dimensions and operating conditions allow for high flow rates (∼10 mL min(-1)). Additionally, the simple reactor design is well suited for scale-up. The CdSe/CdS/ZnS particles synthesized at elevated temperatures in the reactor exhibit quantum yields of over 60% at longer wavelengths (red region). The shell growth for these particles is conducted without the need for complex dropwise addition or SILAR shell growth procedures used in batch reactors. CdS-based particles were shown to have a higher performance when using octadecene-S instead of TOP-S, which improved the quality of shell growth. In addition, stoichiometric synthesis of the alternate CdSeS/ZnS alloy particles was conducted, removing the need for a large excess of S to offset the lower S reactivity. CdSeS/ZnS alloy nanoparticles exhibit quantum yields of about 50% in the intermediate wavelength range (500-600 nm).

  17. Aqueous synthesis of glutathione-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe/CdSe/ZnS core/shell/shell nanocrystal heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Anirban; Deng, Zhengtao; Liu, Yan

    2012-05-29

    Here we demonstrate the aqueous synthesis of colloidal nanocrystal heterostructures consisting of the CdTe core encapsulated by CdS/ZnS or CdSe/ZnS shells using glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide, as the capping ligand. The inner CdTe/CdS and CdTe/CdSe heterostructures have type-I, quasi-type-II, or type-II band offsets depending on the core size and shell thickness, and the outer CdS/ZnS and CdSe/ZnS structures have type-I band offsets. The emission maxima of the assembled heterostructures were found to be dependent on the CdTe core size, with a wider range of spectral tunability observed for the smaller cores. Because of encapsulation effects, the formation of successive shells resulted in a considerable increase in the photoluminescence quantum yield; however, identifying optimal shell thicknesses was required to achieve the maximum quantum yield. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements revealed that the decrease in the quantum yield of thick-shell nanocrystals was caused by a substantial decrease in the radiative rate constant. By tuning the diameter of the core and the thickness of each shell, a broad range of high quantum yield (up to 45%) nanocrystal heterostructures with emission ranging from visible to NIR wavelengths (500-730 nm) were obtained. This versatile route to engineering the optical properties of nanocrystal heterostructures will provide new opportunities for applications in bioimaging and biolabeling.

  18. Cycling G1 CD34+/CD38+ cells potentiate the motility and engraftment of quiescent G0 CD34+/CD38-/low severe combined immunodeficiency repopulating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Tamara; Kahn, Joy; Kollet, Orit; Petit, Isabelle; Samira, Sarit; Shivtiel, Shoham; Ben-Hur, Herzl; Peled, Amnon; Piacibello, Wanda; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of human stem cell expansion ex vivo is not fully understood. Furthermore, little is known about the mechanisms of human stem cell homing/repopulation and the role that differentiating progenitor cells may play in these processes. We report that 2- to 3-day in vitro cytokine stimulation of human cord blood CD34(+)-enriched cells induces the production of short-term repopulating, cycling G1 CD34(+)/CD38(+) cells with increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 secretion as well as increased migration capacity to the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and homing to the bone marrow of irradiated nonobese diabetic severe/combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. These cycling G1 cells enhance SDF-1-mediated in vitro migration and in vivo homing of quiescent G0 CD34(+) cells, which is partially abrogated after inhibition of MMP-2/-9 activity. Moreover, the engraftment potential of quiescent G0 SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) is also increased by the cycling G1 CD34(+)/CD38(+) cells. This effect is significantly abrogated after incubation of cycling G1 cells with a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody. Our data suggest synergistic interactions between accessory cycling G1 CD34(+)/CD38(+) committed progenitor cells and quiescent, primitive G0 CD34(+)/CD38(-/low) SRC/stem cells, the former increasing the motility and engraftment potential of the latter, partly via secretion of MMP-9.

  19. The Banana Genome Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droc, Gaëtan; Larivière, Delphine; Guignon, Valentin; Yahiaoui, Nabila; This, Dominique; Garsmeur, Olivier; Dereeper, Alexis; Hamelin, Chantal; Argout, Xavier; Dufayard, Jean-François; Lengelle, Juliette; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; Cenci, Alberto; Pitollat, Bertrand; D’Hont, Angélique; Ruiz, Manuel; Rouard, Mathieu; Bocs, Stéphanie

    2013-01-01

    Banana is one of the world’s favorite fruits and one of the most important crops for developing countries. The banana reference genome sequence (Musa acuminata) was recently released. Given the taxonomic position of Musa, the completed genomic sequence has particular comparative value to provide fresh insights about the evolution of the monocotyledons. The study of the banana genome has been enhanced by a number of tools and resources that allows harnessing its sequence. First, we set up essential tools such as a Community Annotation System, phylogenomics resources and metabolic pathways. Then, to support post-genomic efforts, we improved banana existing systems (e.g. web front end, query builder), we integrated available Musa data into generic systems (e.g. markers and genetic maps, synteny blocks), we have made interoperable with the banana hub, other existing systems containing Musa data (e.g. transcriptomics, rice reference genome, workflow manager) and finally, we generated new results from sequence analyses (e.g. SNP and polymorphism analysis). Several uses cases illustrate how the Banana Genome Hub can be used to study gene families. Overall, with this collaborative effort, we discuss the importance of the interoperability toward data integration between existing information systems. Database URL: http://banana-genome.cirad.fr/ PMID:23707967

  20. Establishment and Identification of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Lines with Stable Expression of Soluble CD40 Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIANG Hua-wei

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To establish the Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cell lines with stable expression of soluble CD40 ligands (sCD40L. Methods: Recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L, enzyme digestion and sequencing identification were obtained by cloning sCD40L coding sequences into eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP from carrier pDC316-sCD40 containing sCD40L. CHO cells were transfected by electroporation, followed by screening of resistant clones with G418, after which monoclones were obtained by limited dilution assay and multiply cultured. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope were applied to observe the expression of green fluorescent protein, while sCD40L expression was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from aspects of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA and protein, respectively. CHO-sCD40L was cultured together with MDA-MB-231 cells to compare the expression changes of surface molecule fatty acid synthase (Fas by flow cytometer and observe the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells after Fas activated antibodies (CH-11 were added 24 h later. Results: Plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-sCD40L was successfully established, and cell lines with stable expression of sCD40L were obtained with cloned culture after CHO cell transfection, which was named as B11. Flow cytometer and reverted fluorescence microscope showed >90% expression of green fluorescent protein, while PCR, RT-PCR and ELISA suggested integration of sCD40L genes into cell genome DNA, transcription of sCD40L mRNA and sCD40L protein expression being (4.5±2.1 ng/mL in the supernatant of cell culture, respectively. After co-culture of B11 and MDA-MB-231 cells, the surface Fas expression of MDA-MB-231 cells was increased from (3±1.02 % to (34.8±8.75%, while the apoptosis rate 24 h after addition of CH11 from (5.4±1.32% to (20.7±5.24%, and the differences

  1. Involvement of CD244 in regulating CD4+ T cell immunity in patients with active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfen Yang

    Full Text Available CD244 (2B4 is a member of the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family of immune cell receptors and it plays an important role in modulating NK cell and CD8(+ T cell immunity. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of CD244/2B4 on CD4(+ T cells from active TB patients and latent infection individuals. Active TB patients had significantly elevated CD244/2B4 expression on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells compared with latent infection individuals. The frequencies of CD244/2B4-expressing antigen-specific CD4(+ T cells were significantly higher in retreatment active TB patients than in new active TB patients. Compared with CD244/2B4-dull and -middle CD4(+ T cells, CD244/2B4-bright CD4(+ T cell subset had significantly reduced expression of IFN-γ, suggesting that CD244/2B4 expression may modulate IFN-γ production in M. tuberculosis antigen-responsive CD4(+ T cells. Activation of CD244/2B4 signaling by cross-linking led to significantly decreased production of IFN-γ. Blockage of CD244/2B4 signaling pathway of T cells from patients with active TB resulted in significantly increased production of IFN-γ, compared with isotype antibody control. In conclusion, CD244/2B4 signaling pathway has an inhibitory role on M. tuberculosis antigen-specific CD4(+ T cell function.

  2. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Perrone

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23% of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001; in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively. No relationship was evident with tumour size (T and regional lymph node (N status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004. Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  3. In situ identification of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells in primary human breast carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giuseppe; Gaeta, Laura Maria; Zagami, Mariagiovanna; Nasorri, Francesca; Coppola, Roberto; Borzomati, Domenico; Bartolozzi, Francesco; Altomare, Vittorio; Trodella, Lucio; Tonini, Giuseppe; Santini, Daniele; Cavani, Andrea; Muda, Andrea Onetti

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer cells with the CD44+/CD24- phenotype have been reported to be tumourigenic due to their enhanced capacity for cancer development and their self-renewal potential. The identification of human tumourigenic breast cancer cells in surgical samples has recently received increased attention due to the implications for prognosis and treatment, although limitations exist in the interpretation of these studies. To better identify the CD44+/CD24- cells in routine surgical specimens, 56 primary breast carcinoma cases were analysed by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, and the results were compared using flow cytometry analysis to correlate the amount and distribution of the CD44+/CD24- population with clinicopathological features. Using these methods, we showed that the breast carcinoma cells displayed four distinct sub-populations based on the expression pattern of CD44 and CD24. The CD44+/CD24- cells were found in 91% of breast tumours and constituted an average of 6.12% (range, 0.11%-21.23%) of the tumour. A strong correlation was found between the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cells in primary tumours and distant metastasis development (p = 0.0001); in addition, there was an inverse significant association with ER and PGR status (p = 0.002 and p = 0.001, respectively). No relationship was evident with tumour size (T) and regional lymph node (N) status, differentiation grade, proliferative index or HER2 status. In a multivariate analysis, the percentage of CD44+/CD24- cancer cells was an independent factor related to metastasis development (p = 0.004). Our results indicate that confocal analysis of fluorescence-labelled breast cancer samples obtained at surgery is a reliable method to identify the CD44+/CD24- tumourigenic cell population, allowing for the stratification of breast cancer patients into two groups with substantially different relapse rates on the basis of CD44+/CD24- cell percentage.

  4. Genomic signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Shmulevich, Ilya

    2007-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) can be defined as the analysis, processing, and use of genomic signals to gain biological knowledge, and the translation of that knowledge into systems-based applications that can be used to diagnose and treat genetic diseases. Situated at the crossroads of engineering, biology, mathematics, statistics, and computer science, GSP requires the development of both nonlinear dynamical models that adequately represent genomic regulation, and diagnostic and therapeutic tools based on these models. This book facilitates these developments by providing rigorous mathema

  5. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  6. Traditional medicine and genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ′Omics′ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  7. Traditional medicine and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    'Omics' developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  8. Human Genome Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The DOE Human Genome program has grown tremendously, as shown by the marked increase in the number of genome-funded projects since the last workshop held in 1991. The abstracts in this book describe the genome research of DOE-funded grantees and contractors and invited guests, and all projects are represented at the workshop by posters. The 3-day meeting includes plenary sessions on ethical, legal, and social issues pertaining to the availability of genetic data; sequencing techniques, informatics support; and chromosome and cDNA mapping and sequencing.

  9. What Is a Genome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron David Goldman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The genome is often described as the information repository of an organism. Whether millions or billions of letters of DNA, its transmission across generations confers the principal medium for inheritance of organismal traits. Several emerging areas of research demonstrate that this definition is an oversimplification. Here, we explore ways in which a deeper understanding of genomic diversity and cell physiology is challenging the concepts of physical permanence attached to the genome as well as its role as the sole information source for an organism.

  10. Human Genome Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, S. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Cornwall, J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dally, W. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Dyson, F. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Fortson, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Joyce, G. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Kimble, H. J. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Lewis, N. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Max, C. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Prince, T. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Schwitters, R. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Weinberger, P. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office; Woodin, W. H. [The MITRE Corporation, McLean, VA (US). JASON Program Office

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  11. Genomic insights into tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagan, James E

    2014-05-01

    Prevalent since pre-history, human tuberculosis - caused by the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis - remains a major source of death worldwide. Moreover, increasing drug resistance poses the threat of disease resurgence. However, the expanding application of genomic techniques is providing new avenues for combating this old foe. Whole-genome sequencing, comparative genomics and systems biology are generating new insights into the origins and ongoing evolution of M. tuberculosis, as well as the molecular basis for its pathogenicity. These have important implications for our perspective of the disease, development of new drugs and vaccines, and treatment of patients using existing therapeutics.

  12. Single Enzyme Direct Biomineralization of CdSe and CdSe-CdS Core-Shell Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhou; Lu, Li; Kiely, Christopher J; Berger, Bryan W; McIntosh, Steven

    2017-04-19

    Biomineralization is the process by which biological systems synthesize inorganic materials. Herein, we demonstrate an engineered cystathionine γ-lyase enzyme, smCSE that is active for the direct aqueous phase biomineralization of CdSe and CdSe-CdS core-shell nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are formed in an otherwise unreactive buffered solution of Cd acetate and selenocystine through enzymatic turnover of the selenocystine to form a reactive precursor, likely H 2 Se. The particle size of the CdSe core nanocrystals can be tuned by varying the incubation time to generated particle sizes between 2.74 ± 0.63 nm and 4.78 ± 1.16 nm formed after 20 min and 24 h of incubation, respectively. Subsequent purification and introduction of l-cysteine as a sulfur source facilitates the biomineralization of a CdS shell onto the CdSe cores. The quantum yield of the resulting CdSe-CdS core-shell particles is up to 12% in the aqueous phase; comparable to that reported for more traditional chemical synthesis routes for core-shell particles of similar size with similar shell coverage. This single-enzyme route to functional nanocrystals synthesis reveals the powerful potential of biomineralization processes.

  13. Increased T cell expression of CD154 (CD40-ligand) in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Krakauer, M; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients with sec......CD154 (CD40-ligand, gp39), expressed on activated T cells, is crucial in T cell-dependent immune responses and may be involved in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cerebro-spinal fluid and peripheral blood T cell expression of CD154 in MS by flow cytometry. Patients...

  14. Characterization of circulating CD4+ CD8+ lymphocytes in healthy individuals prompted by identification of a blood donor with a markedly elevated level of CD4+ CD8+ lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, H E; Golding, J; York, J

    1994-01-01

    During flow cytometric analysis of lymphocytes from healthy donors, we identified a donor (donor A) with 22% CD4+ CD8+ cells (versus values of < 4% for 65 other controls). To determine if CD4+ CD8+ cells from donor A and other controls were similar, we first defined the phenotypic profile of control CD4+ CD8+ cells. Enriched CD4+ CD8+ cell populations for 10 controls were prepared by a two-step positive selection scheme with anti-CD4-coated magnetic beads and anti-CD8-coated culture flasks; t...

  15. NUP98/11p15 translocations affect CD34+ cells in myeloid and T lymphoid leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, Barbara; Nofrini, Valeria; Barba, Gianluca; Matteucci, Caterina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gorello, Paolo; Beverloo, Berna; Vitale, Antonella; Wlodarska, Iwona; Vandenberghe, Peter; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We assessed lineage involvement by NUP98 translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Single cell analysis by FICTION (Fluorescence Immunophenotype and Interphase Cytogenetics as a Tool for Investigation of Neoplasms) showed that, despite diverse partners, i.e. NSD1, DDX10, RAP1GDS1, and LNP1, NUP98 translocations always affected a CD34+/CD133+ hematopoietic precursor. Interestingly the abnormal clone included myelomonocytes, erythroid cells, B- and T- lymphocytes in MDS/AML and only CD7+/CD3+ cells in T-ALL. The NUP98-RAP1GDS1 affected different hematopoietic lineages in AML and T-ALL. Additional specific genomic events, were identified, namely FLT3 and CEBPA mutations in MDS/AML, and NOTCH1 mutations and MYB duplication in T-ALL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Synthesis of near-infrared-emitting CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS heterostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping

    2014-04-01

    Near-infrared-emitting quantum dots (QDs) were fabricated via organic synthesis strategies through constructing CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS multishell heterostructure. An effective shell-coating route was developed for multishell growth on CdTe cores. Core/shell growth was monitored by absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy observation. Yellow emitting CdTe cores were coated with a CdSe shell to generate type II structure. This yields core/shell QDs with red photoluminescence. The passivation by the ZnSe shell having a substantially wide bandgap confines the excitons within the CdTe/CdSe interface and isolates them from the solution environment and consequently improves the stability of the heterostructure. An additional ZnS shell was deposited around the outer layer of CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe QDs to form a heterostructure through the reaction between zinc oleate and trioctylphosphine sulfur in the crude CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe solution. By varying CdTe core size and each shell thickness, the PL wavelength of the obtained heterostructure can span from 580 to 770 nm. The PL efficiency is quenched in CdTe QDs in diluted solution but increases substantially up to 24% for CdTe/CdSe core/shell QDs. The PL efficiency of CdTe/CdSe/ZnSe/ZnS QDs with average diameter of 5.4 nm and a PL peak wavelength of 770 nm is 20%.

  17. Recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goozner, Robert E.; Long, Mark O.; Drinkard, Jr., William F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CdTe photovoltaic cells and manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with a leaching solution comprising nitric acid and water, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating the glass substrate from the liquid leachate and electrolyzing the leachate to separate Cd from Te, wherein the Te is deposits onto a cathode while the Cd remains in solution.

  18. Sympathetic Cooling of Trapped Cd+ Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Blinov, B. B.; Deslauriers, L.; Lee, P.; Madsen, M. J.; Miller, R.; Monroe, C.

    2001-01-01

    We sympathetically cool a trapped 112Cd+ ion by directly Doppler-cooling a 114Cd+ ion in the same trap. This is the first demonstration of optically addressing a single trapped ion being sympathetically cooled by a different species ion. Notably, the experiment uses a single laser source, and does not require strong focusing. This paves the way toward reducing decoherence in an ion trap quantum computer based on Cd+ isotopes.

  19. Electrophysical properties of nCdS/pCdTe heterosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muzafarova, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: In this work results of research of electrophysical properties n CdS/pCdTe heterostructure are given. It is shown that at density of current 10 -8 -10 -5 A.cm -2 vol tamper characteristics in hetero system CdTe/CdS is described by thermo ionic law, and in the range 10 -4 -10 -2 A .cm -2 the current in heterostructure is limited by recombination in electronic neutral part of high-resistance of solid structure CdTe 1-x S x . Certain life time τ p and length of diffusion L p of non basic current carriers in solid structure CdTe 1-x S x , as well as superficial recombination rate v R on border of section between CdS and solid structures were considered at influence of irradiation and γ-quanta on the mechanism of current in n CdS/pCdTe heterostructure. From the analysis of dependence doze of sites the direct volt-ampere characteristics were obtained. It is shown that monotonous increase of doze of irradiation and γ-quanta leads to nonmonotonous change of micro parameters of nCdS/pCdTe heterostructure, superficial recombination rate - v R , values of both τ p and lengths of diffusion L p of non basic carriers of potential barrier - qφ B . On border of CdTe 1-x S x there is CdS-solid structure. (author)

  20. Scaffold protein JLP mediates TCR-initiated CD4+T cell activation and CD154 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qi; Yang, Cheng; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Zhaowei; Liu, Shan; Fu, Dou; Rahman, Rahmat N; Nakazato, Ryota; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Kung, Sam K P; Ding, Guohua; Wang, Huiming

    2017-07-01

    CD4 + T-cell activation and its subsequent induction of CD154 (CD40 ligand, CD40L) expression are pivotal in shaping both the humoral and cellular immune responses. Scaffold protein JLP regulates signal transduction pathways and molecular trafficking inside cells, thus represents a critical component in maintaining cellular functions. Its role in regulating CD4 + T-cell activation and CD154 expression, however, is unclear. Here, we demonstrated expression of JLP in mouse tissues of lymph nodes, thymus, spleen, and also CD4 + T cells. Using CD4+ T cells from jlp-deficient and jlp-wild-type mice, we demonstrated that JLP-deficiency impaired T-cell proliferation, IL-2 production, and CD154 induction upon TCR stimulations, but had no impacts on the expression of other surface molecules such as CD25, CD69, and TCR. These observed impaired T-cell functions in the jlp-/- CD4 + T cells were associated with defective NF-AT activation and Ca 2 + influx, but not the MAPK, NF-κB, as well as AP-1 signaling pathways. Our findings indicated that, for the first time, JLP plays a critical role in regulating CD4 + T cells response to TCR stimulation partly by mediating the activation of TCR-initiated Ca 2+ /NF-AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh, E-mail: Chyuk@cshs.org

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  2. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  3. Rice Genomics: Gene discovery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    There is a need for discovering candidate genes( a lot of them all over the genome indeed ) and the unlimited allelic variation that can productively take over rice metabolism when cellular water content falls below threshold levels.

  4. Lophotrochozoan mitochondrial genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valles, Yvonne; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-10-01

    Progress in both molecular techniques and phylogeneticmethods has challenged many of the interpretations of traditionaltaxonomy. One example is in the recognition of the animal superphylumLophotrochozoa (annelids, mollusks, echiurans, platyhelminthes,brachiopods, and other phyla), although the relationships within thisgroup and the inclusion of some phyla remain uncertain. While much ofthis progress in phylogenetic reconstruction has been based on comparingsingle gene sequences, we are beginning to see the potential of comparinglarge-scale features of genomes, such as the relative order of genes.Even though tremendous progress is being made on the sequencedetermination of whole nuclear genomes, the dataset of choice forgenome-level characters for many animals across a broad taxonomic rangeremains mitochondrial genomes. We review here what is known aboutmitochondrial genomes of the lophotrochozoans and discuss the promisethat this dataset will enable insight into theirrelationships.

  5. Genomic definition of species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crkvenjakov, R.; Drmanac, R.

    1991-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the definition of species based on the assumption that genome is the fundamental level for the origin and maintenance of biological diversity. For this view to be logically consistent it is necessary to assume the existence and operation of the new law which we call genome law. For this reason the genome law is included in the explanation of species phenomenon presented here even if its precise formulation and elaboration are left for the future. The intellectual underpinnings of this definition can be traced to Goldschmidt. We wish to explore some philosophical aspects of the definition of species in terms of the genome. The point of proposing the definition on these grounds is that any real advance in evolutionary theory has to be correct in both its philosophy and its science.

  6. The rise of genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissenbach, Jean

    2016-01-01

    A brief history of the development of genomics is provided. Complete sequencing of genomes of uni- and multicellular organisms is based on important progress in sequencing and bioinformatics. Evolution of these methods is ongoing and has triggered an explosion in data production and analysis. Initial analyses focused on the inventory of genes encoding proteins. Completeness and quality of gene prediction remains crucial. Genome analyses profoundly modified our views on evolution, biodiversity and contributed to the detection of new functions, yet to be fully elucidated, such as those fulfilled by non-coding RNAs. Genomics has become the basis for the study of biology and provides the molecular support for a bunch of large-scale studies, the omics. Copyright © 2016 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Annotating individual human genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A; Topol, Eric J; Schork, Nicholas J

    2011-10-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ANNOTATING INDIVIDUAL HUMAN GENOMES*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkamani, Ali; Scott-Van Zeeland, Ashley A.; Topol, Eric J.; Schork, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technologies have made it possible to rapidly, accurately and affordably sequence entire individual human genomes. As impressive as this ability seems, however, it will not likely to amount to much if one cannot extract meaningful information from individual sequence data. Annotating variations within individual genomes and providing information about their biological or phenotypic impact will thus be crucially important in moving individual sequencing projects forward, especially in the context of the clinical use of sequence information. In this paper we consider the various ways in which one might annotate individual sequence variations and point out limitations in the available methods for doing so. It is arguable that, in the foreseeable future, DNA sequencing of individual genomes will become routine for clinical, research, forensic, and personal purposes. We therefore also consider directions and areas for further research in annotating genomic variants. PMID:21839162

  9. Epidemiology & Genomics Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, in the National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, funds research in human populations to understand the determinants of cancer occurrence and outcomes.

  10. Genomics and fish adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Antunes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The completion of the human genome sequencing in 2003 opened a new perspective into the importance of whole genome sequencing projects, and currently multiple species are having their genomes completed sequenced, from simple organisms, such as bacteria, to more complex taxa, such as mammals. This voluminous sequencing data generated across multiple organisms provides also the framework to better understand the genetic makeup of such species and related ones, allowing to explore the genetic changes underlining the evolution of diverse phenotypic traits. Here, recent results from our group retrieved from comparative evolutionary genomic analyses of varied fish species will be considered to exemplify how gene novelty and gene enhancement by positive selection might have been determinant in the success of adaptive radiations into diverse habitats and lifestyles.

  11. A multi-omic analysis of human naïve CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Getnet, Derese; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S; Kumar, Praveen; Huang, Tai-Chung; Pinto, Sneha M; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Iwasaki, Mio; Shaw, Patrick G; Wu, Xinyan; Zhong, Jun; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A; Raju, Rajesh; Bowman, Caitlyn; Danilova, Ludmila; Cutler, Jevon; Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Drake, Charles G; Prasad, T S Keshava; Marchionni, Luigi; Murakami, Peter N; Scott, Alan F; Shi, Leming; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Irizarry, Rafael; Cope, Leslie; Ishihama, Yasushi; Wang, Charles; Gowda, Harsha; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-11-06

    Cellular function and diversity are orchestrated by complex interactions of fundamental biomolecules including DNA, RNA and proteins. Technological advances in genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics and proteomics have enabled massively parallel and unbiased measurements. Such high-throughput technologies have been extensively used to carry out broad, unbiased studies, particularly in the context of human diseases. Nevertheless, a unified analysis of the genome, epigenome, transcriptome and proteome of a single human cell type to obtain a coherent view of the complex interplay between various biomolecules has not yet been undertaken. Here, we report the first multi-omic analysis of human primary naïve CD4+ T cells isolated from a single individual. Integrating multi-omics datasets allowed us to investigate genome-wide methylation and its effect on mRNA/protein expression patterns, extent of RNA editing under normal physiological conditions and allele specific expression in naïve CD4+ T cells. In addition, we carried out a multi-omic comparative analysis of naïve with primary resting memory CD4+ T cells to identify molecular changes underlying T cell differentiation. This analysis provided mechanistic insights into how several molecules involved in T cell receptor signaling are regulated at the DNA, RNA and protein levels. Phosphoproteomics revealed downstream signaling events that regulate these two cellular states. Availability of multi-omics data from an identical genetic background also allowed us to employ novel proteogenomics approaches to identify individual-specific variants and putative novel protein coding regions in the human genome. We utilized multiple high-throughput technologies to derive a comprehensive profile of two primary human cell types, naïve CD4+ T cells and memory CD4+ T cells, from a single donor. Through vertical as well as horizontal integration of whole genome sequencing, methylation arrays, RNA-Seq, miRNA-Seq, proteomics, and

  12. Depth profiling study of in situ CdCl{sub 2} treated CdTe/CdS heterostructure with glancing angle incidence X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vamsi Krishna, K.; Dutta, V

    2004-03-01

    CdTe thin films have been deposited using spray pyrolysis technique without and with in situ CdCl{sub 2} treatment. Scanning electron microscopy studies show enhanced grain growth in the presence of CdCl{sub 2}. Glancing angle incidence X-ray diffraction is used for the micro structural study of polycrystalline CdS/CdTe heterostructure at different depths by changing the incident angle. Spraying of CdCl{sub 2} on CdS prior to CdTe deposition promotes S diffusion throughout CdTe film and also Te diffusion into CdS. Whereas spraying of CdCl{sub 2} in between CdTe deposition prevents S diffusion partially and Te diffusion completely. There is an associated change in the microstress of the CdTe film at different layers. The films without CdCl{sub 2} treatment show compressive microstress varying from -98 to -158 MPa with increasing incident angle. CdCl{sub 2} spray during CdTe deposition shows compressive microstress, which varies from -98 MPa at the interface to -19 MPa near the surface and CdCl{sub 2} spray prior to CdTe deposition leads to a mildly tensile stress, from +40 to +20 MPa, which is very close to the standard shear stress of {approx}10 MPa for CdTe.

  13. CD25, CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes as a tool to predict acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleslawski, Emmanuel; BenOthman, Samia; Grabar, Sophie; Correia, Leonor; Podevin, Philippe; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Soubrane, Olivier; Calmus, Yvon; Conti, Filomena

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 (which reflects the degree of T-cell activation) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells constitutes a useful means of measuring the immune status of liver transplant recipients. Fifty-two patients enrolled in a prospective randomized study comparing cyclosporine and tacrolimus as the principal immunosuppressive drugs were monitored prospectively. The expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 was analyzed on CD3-, CD4- and CD8-positive cells from whole blood using flow cytometry. The prognostic value of baseline and day 14 measurements regarding acute rejection was examined using Kaplan-Meier estimates for univariate analyses and the Cox model for multivariate analyses. The mean frequencies of CD28 and CD38-expressing T cells were significantly higher in patients with acute rejection (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), whereas the frequency CD25-expressing T cells did not differ significantly. Under univariate analysis, baseline CD25 levels, the type of calcineurin inhibitor, as well as the CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were associated with the subsequent development of acute rejection. Under multivariate analysis, only CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were independently associated with acute rejection. The evaluation of CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a simple marker that could be used routinely in clinical practice to assess the level of immunosuppression.

  14. The human genome project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worton, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Human Genome Project is a massive international research project, costing 3 to 5 billion dollars and expected to take 15 years, which will identify the all the genes in the human genome - i.e. the complete sequence of bases in human DNA. The prize will be the ability to identify genes causing or predisposing to disease, and in some cases the development of gene therapy, but this new knowledge will raise important ethical issues

  15. The Genomic Standards Consortium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cochrane, Guy

    2011-01-01

    A vast and rich body of information has grown up as a result of the world's enthusiasm for 'omics technologies. Finding ways to describe and make available this information that maximise its usefulness has become a major effort across the 'omics world. At the heart of this effort is the Genomic S...... and quantity of contextual information about our public collections of genomes, metagenomes, and marker gene sequences....

  16. Decoding the human genome

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit; Antonerakis, S E

    2002-01-01

    Decoding the Human genome is a very up-to-date topic, raising several questions besides purely scientific, in view of the two competing teams (public and private), the ethics of using the results, and the fact that the project went apparently faster and easier than expected. The lecture series will address the following chapters: Scientific basis and challenges. Ethical and social aspects of genomics.

  17. Human Germline Genome Editing

    OpenAIRE

    Ormond, Kelly E.; Mortlock, Douglas P.; Scholes, Derek T.; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C.; Faucett, W. Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa’ A.; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E.

    2017-01-01

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Gen...

  18. Molluscan Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simison, W. Brian; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    In the last 20 years there have been dramatic advances in techniques of high-throughput DNA sequencing, most recently accelerated by the Human Genome Project, a program that has determined the three billion base pair code on which we are based. Now this tremendous capability is being directed at other genome targets that are being sampled across the broad range of life. This opens up opportunities as never before for evolutionary and organismal biologists to address questions of both processes and patterns of organismal change. We stand at the dawn of a new 'modern synthesis' period, paralleling that of the early 20th century when the fledgling field of genetics first identified the underlying basis for Darwin's theory. We must now unite the efforts of systematists, paleontologists, mathematicians, computer programmers, molecular biologists, developmental biologists, and others in the pursuit of discovering what genomics can teach us about the diversity of life. Genome-level sampling for mollusks to date has mostly been limited to mitochondrial genomes and it is likely that these will continue to provide the best targets for broad phylogenetic sampling in the near future. However, we are just beginning to see an inroad into complete nuclear genome sequencing, with several mollusks and other eutrochozoans having been selected for work about to begin. Here, we provide an overview of the state of molluscan mitochondrial genomics, highlight a few of the discoveries from this research, outline the promise of broadening this dataset, describe upcoming projects to sequence whole mollusk nuclear genomes, and challenge the community to prepare for making the best use of these data.

  19. Investigation of biocompatible and protein sensitive highly luminescent quantum dots/nanocrystals of CdSe, CdSe/ZnS and CdSe/CdS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnesh, R. K.; Mehata, Mohan Singh

    2017-05-01

    The size and shape dependent semiconductor quantum dots (0D nanoparticles) with color tunability demonstrating significant influence in a biological system and considered as ideal probes. Here, a non-coordinated colloidal approach was used for the synthesis of CdSe, CdSe/ZnS and CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) of 3-4 nm. The synthesized nanocrystals show a high crystallinity, examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM). The core-shell semiconductor QDs exhibit stronger photoluminescence (PL) as compared to the core QDs. The strong PL with small full-width half maximum (FWHM) indicates that the prepared QDs have a nearly uniform size distribution and well dispersibility. The quantum yield (QY) of core-shell QDs increases due to the surface passivation. Further, the PL of BSA is quenched strongly by the presence of core-shell QDs and follows the well-known Stern-Volmer (S-V) relation, whereas the PL lifetime does not follow the S-V relation, demonstrating that the observed quenching is predominantly static in nature. Among CdSe core, CdSe/ZnS and CdSe/CdS core-shell QDs, the CdSe/ZnS QDs shows the least cytotoxicity and most biocompatibility. Thus, the prepared core-shell QDs are biocompatible and exhibit strong sensing ability.

  20. Immunity to experimental Salmonella typhimurium infections in rats. Transfer of immunity with primed CD4+CD25high and CD4+CD25low T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, P; Brandt, L; Jørgensen, T

    1994-01-01

    M and IgG antibodies. Cell sorting revealed that 2/3 of the primed CD4+ T lymphocytes expressed high levels of CD25. Cell transfer revealed that both CD25high and CD25low expression populations could induce immunity against a lethal dose of S. typhimurium, whilst antibody analysis revealed that antibody...... levels were not correlated with protection against S. typhimurium infections, although it showed that a higher and more persistent level of specific IgG antibodies was produced in animals receiving the CD4+CD25high fraction. It is concluded that 10(4) primed CD4+ T lymphocytes can induce immunity......The protective effect of primed CD4+ T lymphocytes against a lethal dose of 10(8) viable Salmonella typhimurium was studied in Lewis rats. Primed CD4+ T lymphocytes were obtained by inoculating Lewis rats with a non-lethal dose of 10(6) viable S. typhimurium. Four weeks after the infection, spleen...

  1. Fabrication and characterization of Ag-Cd/CdO materials produced by incorporation of CdO particles to liquid Ag-Cd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equihua-Guillen, F.; Ruiz-Mondragon, J.; Servin-Castaneda, R.; Orozco-Gonzalez, P.; Zaldivar-Cadena, A.; Martinez-Villafane, F.; Villarreal-Garza, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    In the present work it has been investigated the kinetic behavior of internal oxidation processes of strips of Ag-Cd/CdO materials fabricated by adding CdO particles (size of 5 and 20 μm) in liquid Ag-Cd alloys. It has been established the metallurgical mechanism that controls the formation of the thickness covered with CdO particles produced by internal oxidation of the Ag-Cd/CdO material. It has been developed, successfully, a metallographic preparation technique for characterizing the morphology, size and distribution of CdO particles produced by heat treatment of internal oxidation on the surface of each sample based on the distance from the original surface to the boundary of dispersed CdO particles. The material strips were sequentially roughed on its surface and the roughing thickness was measured in the cross section of each new surface to determine the number of particles per area and average particle size. (Author)

  2. Whole-gene analysis of two groups of hepatitis B virus C/D inter-genotype recombinant strains isolated in Tibet, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiezhu Liu

    Full Text Available Tibet is a highly hepatitis B virus (HBV endemic area. Two types of C/D recombinant HBV are commonly isolated in Tibet and have been previously described. In an effort to better understand the molecular characteristic of these C/D recombinant strains from Tibet, we undertook a multistage random sampling project to collect HBsAg positive samples. Molecular epidemiological and bio-informational technologies were used to analyze the characteristics of the sequences found in this study. There were 60 samples enrolled in the survey, and we obtained 19 whole-genome sequences. 19 samples were all C/D recombinant, and could be divided into two sub-types named C/D1 and C/D2 according to the differences in the location of the recombinant breakpoint. The recombination breakpoint of the 10 strains belonging to the C/D1 sub-type was located at nt750, while the 9 stains belonging to C/D2 had their recombination break point at nt1530. According to whole-genome sequence analysis, the 19 identified strains belong to genotype C, but the nucleotide distance was more than 5% between the 19 strains and sub-genotypes C1 to C15. The distance between C/D1with C2 was 5.8±2.1%, while the distance between C/D2 with C2 was 6.4±2.1%. The parental strain was most likely sub-genotype C2. C/D1 strains were all collected in the middle and northern areas of Tibet including Lhasa, Linzhi and Ali, while C/D2 was predominant in Shannan in southern Tibet. This indicates that the two recombinant genotypes are regionally distributed in Tibet. These results provide important information for the study of special HBV recombination events, gene features, virus evolution, and the control and prevention policy of HBV in Tibet.

  3. Whole-gene analysis of two groups of hepatitis B virus C/D inter-genotype recombinant strains isolated in Tibet, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiezhu; Wang, Fuzhen; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Feng; Meng, Qingling; Zhang, Guomin; Cui, Fuqiang; Dunzhu, Dorji; Yin, Wenjiao; Bi, Shengli; Shen, Liping

    2017-01-01

    Tibet is a highly hepatitis B virus (HBV) endemic area. Two types of C/D recombinant HBV are commonly isolated in Tibet and have been previously described. In an effort to better understand the molecular characteristic of these C/D recombinant strains from Tibet, we undertook a multistage random sampling project to collect HBsAg positive samples. Molecular epidemiological and bio-informational technologies were used to analyze the characteristics of the sequences found in this study. There were 60 samples enrolled in the survey, and we obtained 19 whole-genome sequences. 19 samples were all C/D recombinant, and could be divided into two sub-types named C/D1 and C/D2 according to the differences in the location of the recombinant breakpoint. The recombination breakpoint of the 10 strains belonging to the C/D1 sub-type was located at nt750, while the 9 stains belonging to C/D2 had their recombination break point at nt1530. According to whole-genome sequence analysis, the 19 identified strains belong to genotype C, but the nucleotide distance was more than 5% between the 19 strains and sub-genotypes C1 to C15. The distance between C/D1with C2 was 5.8±2.1%, while the distance between C/D2 with C2 was 6.4±2.1%. The parental strain was most likely sub-genotype C2. C/D1 strains were all collected in the middle and northern areas of Tibet including Lhasa, Linzhi and Ali, while C/D2 was predominant in Shannan in southern Tibet. This indicates that the two recombinant genotypes are regionally distributed in Tibet. These results provide important information for the study of special HBV recombination events, gene features, virus evolution, and the control and prevention policy of HBV in Tibet.

  4. An update on MyoD evolution in teleosts and a proposed consensus nomenclature to accommodate the tetraploidization of different vertebrate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Macqueen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MyoD is a muscle specific transcription factor that is essential for vertebrate myogenesis. In several teleost species, including representatives of the Salmonidae and Acanthopterygii, but not zebrafish, two or more MyoD paralogues are conserved that are thought to have arisen from distinct, possibly lineage-specific duplication events. Additionally, two MyoD paralogues have been characterised in the allotetraploid frog, Xenopus laevis. This has lead to a confusing nomenclature since MyoD paralogues have been named outside of an appropriate phylogenetic framework. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we initially show that directly depicting the evolutionary relationships of teleost MyoD orthologues and paralogues is hindered by the asymmetric evolutionary rate of Acanthopterygian MyoD2 relative to other MyoD proteins. Thus our aim was to confidently position the event from which teleost paralogues arose in different lineages by a comparative investigation of genes neighbouring myod across the vertebrates. To this end, we show that genes on the single myod-containing chromosome of mammals and birds are retained in both zebrafish and Acanthopterygian teleosts in a striking pattern of double conserved synteny. Further, phylogenetic reconstruction of these neighbouring genes using Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods supported a common origin for teleost paralogues following the split of the Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii. CONCLUSION: Our results strongly suggest that myod was duplicated during the basal teleost whole genome duplication event, but was subsequently lost in the Ostariophysi (zebrafish and Protacanthopterygii lineages. We propose a sensible consensus nomenclature for vertebrate myod genes that accommodates polyploidization events in teleost and tetrapod lineages and is justified from a phylogenetic perspective.

  5. Clinical Trials Using Anti-CD19/CD28/CD3zeta CAR Gammaretroviral Vector-transduced Autologous T Lymphocytes KTE-C19

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI supports clinical trials that test new and more effective ways to treat cancer. Find clinical trials studying anti-cd19/cd28/cd3zeta car gammaretroviral vector-transduced autologous t lymphocytes kte-c19.

  6. Impact of HIV on CD8+ T cell CD57 expression is distinct from that of CMV and aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available Chronic antigenic stimulation by cytomegalovirus (CMV is thought to increase "immunosenesence" of aging, characterized by accumulation of terminally differentiated CD28- CD8+ T cells and increased CD57, a marker of proliferative history. Whether chronic HIV infection causes similar effects is currently unclear.We compared markers of CD8+ T cell differentiation (e.g., CD28, CD27, CCR7, CD45RA and CD57 expression on CD28- CD8+ T cells in healthy HIV-uninfected adults with and without CMV infection and in both untreated and antiretroviral therapy (ART-suppressed HIV-infected adults with asymptomatic CMV infection.Compared to HIV-uninfected adults without CMV (n=12, those with asymptomatic CMV infection (n=31 had a higher proportion of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 (P=0.005. Older age was also associated with greater proportions of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 (rho: 0.47, P=0.007. In contrast, untreated HIV-infected CMV+ participants (n=55 had much lower proportions of CD28- CD8+ cells expressing CD57 than HIV-uninfected CMV+ participants (P<0.0001 and were enriched for less well-differentiated CD28- transitional memory (TTR CD8+ T cells (P<0.0001. Chronically HIV-infected adults maintaining ART-mediated viral suppression (n=96 had higher proportions of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 than untreated patients (P<0.0001, but continued to have significantly lower levels than HIV-uninfected controls (P=0.001. Among 45 HIV-infected individuals initiating their first ART regimen, the proportion of CD28-CD8+ T cells expressing CD57 declined (P<0.0001, which correlated with a decline in percent of transitional memory CD8+ T cells, and appeared to be largely explained by a decline in CD28-CD57- CD8+ T cell counts rather than an expansion of CD28-CD57+ CD8+ T cell counts.Unlike CMV and aging, which are associated with terminal differentiation and proliferation of effector memory CD8+ T cells, HIV inhibits this process, expanding less well

  7. Human social genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven W Cole

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural "social signal transduction" pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving.

  8. RadGenomics project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Harada, Yoshinobu

    2002-01-01

    Human health is determined by a complex interplay of factors, predominantly between genetic susceptibility, environmental conditions and aging. The ultimate aim of the RadGenomics (Radiation Genomics) project is to understand the implications of heterogeneity in responses to ionizing radiation arising from genetic variation between individuals in the human population. The rapid progression of the human genome sequencing and the recent development of new technologies in molecular genetics are providing us with new opportunities to understand the genetic basis of individual differences in susceptibility to natural and/or artificial environmental factors, including radiation exposure. The RadGenomics project will inevitably lead to improved protocols for personalized radiotherapy and reductions in the potential side effects of such treatment. The project will contribute to future research into the molecular mechanisms of radiation sensitivity in humans and will stimulate the development of new high-throughput technologies for a broader application of biological and medical sciences. The staff members are specialists in a variety of fields, including genome science, radiation biology, medical science, molecular biology, and informatics, and have joined the RadGenomics project from various universities, companies, and research institutes. The project started in April 2001. (author)

  9. How the genome folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman Aiden, Erez

    2012-02-01

    I describe Hi-C, a novel technology for probing the three-dimensional architecture of whole genomes by coupling proximity-based ligation with massively parallel sequencing. Working with collaborators at the Broad Institute and UMass Medical School, we used Hi-C to construct spatial proximity maps of the human genome at a resolution of 1Mb. These maps confirm the presence of chromosome territories and the spatial proximity of small, gene-rich chromosomes. We identified an additional level of genome organization that is characterized by the spatial segregation of open and closed chromatin to form two genome-wide compartments. At the megabase scale, the chromatin conformation is consistent with a fractal globule, a knot-free conformation that enables maximally dense packing while preserving the ability to easily fold and unfold any genomic locus. The fractal globule is distinct from the more commonly used globular equilibrium model. Our results demonstrate the power of Hi-C to map the dynamic conformations of whole genomes.

  10. Comparative Genome Viewer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molineris, I.; Sales, G.

    2009-01-01

    The amount of information about genomes, both in the form of complete sequences and annotations, has been exponentially increasing in the last few years. As a result there is the need for tools providing a graphical representation of such information that should be comprehensive and intuitive. Visual representation is especially important in the comparative genomics field since it should provide a combined view of data belonging to different genomes. We believe that existing tools are limited in this respect as they focus on a single genome at a time (conservation histograms) or compress alignment representation to a single dimension. We have therefore developed a web-based tool called Comparative Genome Viewer (Cgv): it integrates a bidimensional representation of alignments between two regions, both at small and big scales, with the richness of annotations present in other genome browsers. We give access to our system through a web-based interface that provides the user with an interactive representation that can be updated in real time using the mouse to move from region to region and to zoom in on interesting details.

  11. Comparative Genomics of Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien J. Mazurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the apicomplexan parasites, Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, were considered the same species. However, the two parasites, now considered distinct species, exhibit significant differences in host range, infectivity, and pathogenicity, and their sequenced genomes exhibit only 95–97% identity. The availability of the complete genome sequences of these organisms provides the potential to identify the genetic variations that are responsible for the phenotypic differences between the two parasites. We compared the genome organization and structure, gene composition, the metabolic and other pathways, and the local sequence identity between the genes of these two Cryptosporidium species. Our observations show that the phenotypic differences between C. hominis and C. parvum are not due to gross genome rearrangements, structural alterations, gene deletions or insertions, metabolic capabilities, or other obvious genomic alterations. Rather, the results indicate that these genomes exhibit a remarkable structural and compositional conservation and suggest that the phenotypic differences observed are due to subtle variations in the sequences of proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and its host.

  12. A Buyer's Guide to CD-ROM Selection: CD-ROM Product Directories and Review Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Paul Travis

    1990-01-01

    Describes the scope and types of information available to potential buyers of CD-ROM products in product directories and review tools. Extensive listings of CD-ROM product directories, journals, newsletters, and product reviews are appended. (16 references) (CLB)

  13. Diagnostic value of CD14 + CD16 + monocytes in neonatal sepsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gamal, Nahla M Heshmat, Abeer A Shehab, Ayman F Hasaneen. Abstract. Background: The majority of monocytes (MO) are strongly positive for CD14 and negative for CD16. The phenotype and function of peripheral blood monocytes change ...

  14. CD81 and CD19 as Marker of Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zahab, Zakia; Gad, Niveen M; Sabry, Seham; Nassib, Sherif A

    2017-06-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus is systematic auto-immune disease characterized by abnormal activation of B cell with production of autoantibodies. Due to its heterogeneous course, there is a need for new markers to help in diagnosing and monitoring disease activity. The aim of this study was to identify the immunopathological role of CD19 and CD81 expression in patients with SLE and their correlation with the disease activity. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from 40 SLE patients (20 active and 20 inactive) and 20 controls. All were subjected to CBC, Anti-ds DNA, Redial immunodiffusion (RID) for C3 and C4 as activity markers, and detection of CD19 and CD81 surface expression using flow cytometry. CD19 and CD81 were significantly reduced and correlated with disease activity. It is concluded that CD 19 and CD 81 are potential markers for diagnosing and monitoring SLE patients. Copyright© by the Egyptian Association of Immunologists.

  15. Roles of 1,25(OH2D3 and Vitamin D Receptor in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus by Regulating the Activation of CD4+ T Cells and the PKCδ/ERK Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jie He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The study aims to elucidate the roles of 1,25(OH2D3 and vitamin D receptor (VDR in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE by regulating the activation of CD4+ T cells and the PKCδ/ERK signaling pathway. Methods: From January 2013 to December 2015, a total of 130 SLE patients, 137 RA patients and 130 healthy controls were selected in this study. Serum levels of 1,25(OH2D3 and VDR mRNA expression were detected by ELISA and real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR. Density gradient centrifugation was performed to separate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs. CD4+ T cells were separated using magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS. CD4+T cells in logarithmic growth phase were collected and assigned into 9 groups: the normal control group, the normal negative control (NC group, the VDR siRNA group, the RA control group, the RA NC group, the VDR over-expressed RA group, the SLE control group, the SLE NC group, and the VDR over-expressed SLE group. The mRNA and protein expressions of VDR, PKCδ, ERK1/2, CD11a, CD70 and CD40L were detected by RT-qPCR and Western blotting. Bisulfite genomic sequencing was conducted to monitor the methylation status of CD11a, CD70 and CD40L. Results: Compared with healthy controls, serum 1,25(OH2D3 level and VDR mRNA expression in peripheral blood were decreased in SLE patients and RA patients. With the increase of concentrations of 1,25(OH2D3 treatment, the VDR mRNA expression and DNA methylation levels of CD11a, CD70 and CD40L were declined, while the expressions of PKCδ, ERK1/2, CD11a, CD70 and CD40L were elevated in SLE, RA and normal CD4+T cells. Compared with the SLE contro, RA control, SLE NC and RA NC groups, the expressions of PKCδ, ERK1/2, CD11a, CD70 and CD40L decreased but DNA methylation levels of CD11a, CD70 and CD40L increased in the VDR over-expressed SLE group and VDR over-expressed RA group. However, compared with the normal

  16. Structural biology at York Structural Biology Laboratory; laboratory information management systems for structural genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dohnálek, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 3 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of Structural Biologists /4./. 10.03.2005-12.03.2005, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05008 Keywords : structural biology * LIMS * structural genomics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  17. The role of CD40 in CD40L- and antibody-mediated platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Florian; Ingersoll, Susan B; Amirkhosravi, Ali; Meyer, Todd; Siddiqui, Farooq A; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Walker, Jamie M; Amaya, Mildred; Desai, Hina; Francis, John L

    2005-06-01

    Our initial finding that CD40- and CD40 ligand (CD40L)-deficient mice displayed prolonged tail bleeding and platelet function analyzer (PFA-100) closure times prompted us to further investigate the role of the CD40-CD40L dyad in primary hemostasis and platelet function. Recombinant human soluble CD40L (rhsCD40L), chemical cross-linking of which suggested a trimeric structure of the protein in solution, activated platelets in a CD40-dependent manner as evidenced by increased CD62P expression. CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb) M3, which completely blocked rhsCD40L-induced platelet activation, also prolonged PFA-100 closure times of normal human blood. In contrast, CD40 mAb G28-5 showed less potential in blocking rhsCD40L-induced CD62P expression and did not affect PFA-100 closure times. However, when added to the platelets after rhsCD40L, G28-5 significantly enhanced the platelet response by causing clustering of, and signaling through, FcgammaRII. Similarly, higher order multimeric immune complexes formed at a 1/3 molar ratio of M90, a CD40L mAb, to rhsCD40L induced strong Fcgamma RII-mediated platelet activation when translocated to the platelet surface in a CD40-dependent manner, including the induction of morphological shape changes, fibrinogen binding, platelet aggregation, dense granule release, microparticle generation and monocyte-platelet-conjugate formation. The results suggest that CD40 may play a role in primary hemostasis and platelet biology by two independent mechanisms: First, by functioning as a primary signaling receptor for CD40L and, second, by serving as a docking molecule for CD40L immune complexes. The latter would also provide a potential mechanistic explanation for the unexpected high incidence of CD40L mAb-associated thrombotic events in recent human and animal studies.

  18. ADP ribosyl-cyclases (CD38/CD157), social skills and friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Anne; Malavasi, Fabio; Israel, Salomon; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Yap, Von Bing; Monakhov, Mikhail; Chew, Soo Hong; Lai, Poh San; Ebstein, Richard P

    2017-04-01

    Why some individuals seek social engagement while others shy away has profound implications for normal and pathological human behavior. Evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT), the paramount human social hormone, and CD38 that governs OT release, contribute to individual differences in social skills from intense social involvement to extreme avoidance that characterize autism. To explore the neurochemical underpinnings of sociality, CD38 expression of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) was measured in Han Chinese undergraduates. First, CD38 mRNA levels were correlated with lower Autism Quotient (AQ), indicating enhanced social skills. AQ assesses the extent of autistic-like traits including the propensity and dexterity needed for successful social engagement in the general population. Second, three CD157 eQTL SNPs in the CD38/CD157 gene region were associated with CD38 expression. CD157 is a paralogue of CD38 and is contiguous with it on chromosome 4p15. Third, association was also observed between the CD157 eQTL SNPs, CD38 expression and AQ. In the full model, CD38 expression and CD157 eQTL SNPs altogether account for a substantial 14% of the variance in sociality. Fourth, functionality of CD157 eQTL SNPs was suggested by a significant association with plasma oxytocin immunoreactivity products. Fifth, the ecological validity of these findings was demonstrated with subjects with higher PBL CD38 expression having more friends, especially for males. Furthermore, CD157 sequence variation predicts scores on the Friendship questionnaire. To summarize, this study by uniquely leveraging various measures reveals salient elements contributing to nonkin sociality and friendship, revealing a likely pathway underpinning the transition from normality to psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. CdS nanobubbles and Cd-DMS nanosheets: solvothermal synthesis and formation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Miao; Zhan, Hongbing

    2013-02-01

    CdS nanobubbles and Cd-DMS nanosheets have been prepared by a solvothermal method from a solution of Cd2+ in dimethyl sulfoxide in the absence of elemental S. A formation mechanism for the nanobubble morphology arising during the CdS nanocrystal growth has been proposed, based on the results of transmission electron microscopy and photoluminescence spectrophotometry. The correlation of the morphology with reaction time was also suggested, and may be applicable to the solvothermal synthesis of other nanomaterials.

  20. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  1. Human memory CD8 T cell effector potential is epigenetically preserved during in vivo homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsamed, Hossam A; Moustaki, Ardiana; Fan, Yiping; Dogra, Pranay; Ghoneim, Hazem E; Zebley, Caitlin C; Triplett, Brandon M; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Youngblood, Ben

    2017-06-05

    Antigen-independent homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells is vital for sustaining long-lived T cell-mediated immunity. In this study, we report that maintenance of human memory CD8 T cell effector potential during in vitro and in vivo homeostatic proliferation is coupled to preservation of acquired DNA methylation programs. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of primary human naive, short-lived effector memory (T EM ), and longer-lived central memory (T CM ) and stem cell memory (T SCM ) CD8 T cells identified effector molecules with demethylated promoters and poised for expression. Effector-loci demethylation was heritably preserved during IL-7- and IL-15-mediated in vitro cell proliferation. Conversely, cytokine-driven proliferation of T CM and T SCM memory cells resulted in phenotypic conversion into T EM cells and was coupled to increased methylation of the CCR7 and Tcf7 loci. Furthermore, haploidentical donor memory CD8 T cells undergoing in vivo proliferation in lymphodepleted recipients also maintained their effector-associated demethylated status but acquired T EM -associated programs. These data demonstrate that effector-associated epigenetic programs are preserved during cytokine-driven subset interconversion of human memory CD8 T cells. © 2017 Abdelsamed et al.

  2. Overexpression of CD97 confers an invasive phenotype in glioblastoma cells and is associated with decreased survival of glioblastoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Safaee

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of invasion in glioblastoma (GBM relate to differential expression of proteins conferring increased motility and penetration of the extracellular matrix. CD97 is a member of the epidermal growth factor seven-span transmembrane family of adhesion G-protein coupled receptors. These proteins facilitate mobility of leukocytes into tissue. In this study we show that CD97 is expressed in glioma, has functional effects on invasion, and is associated with poor overall survival. Glioma cell lines and low passage primary cultures were analyzed. Functional significance was assessed by transient knockdown using siRNA targeting CD97 or a non-target control sequence. Invasion was assessed 48 hours after siRNA-mediated knockdown using a Matrigel-coated invasion chamber. Migration was quantified using a scratch assay over 12 hours. Proliferation was measured 24 and 48 hours after confirmed protein knockdown. GBM cell lines and primary cultures were found to express CD97. Knockdown of CD97 decreased invasion and migration in GBM cell lines, with no difference in proliferation. Gene-expression based Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed using The Cancer Genome Atlas, demonstrating an inverse relationship between CD97 expression and survival. GBMs expressing high levels of CD97 were associated with decreased survival compared to those with low CD97 (p = 0.007. CD97 promotes invasion and migration in GBM, but has no effect on tumor proliferation. This phenotype may explain the discrepancy in survival between high and low CD97-expressing tumors. This data provides impetus for further studies to determine its viability as a therapeutic target in the treatment of GBM.

  3. MCT4 surpasses the prognostic relevance of the ancillary protein CD147 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Nies, Anne T.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Scharpf, Marcus; Fend, Falko; Kruck, Stephan; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Cluster of differentiation 147 (CD147/BSG) is a transmembrane glycoprotein mediating oncogenic processes partly through its role as binding partner for monocarboxylate transporter MCT4/SLC16A3. As demonstrated for MCT4, CD147 is proposed to be associated with progression in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this study, we evaluated the prognostic relevance of CD147 in comparison to MCT4/SLC16A3 expression and DNA methylation. Methods CD147 protein expression was assessed in two independent ccRCC-cohorts (n = 186, n = 59) by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays and subsequent manual as well as automated software-supported scoring (Tissue Studio, Definien sAG). Epigenetic regulation of CD147 was investigated using RNAseq and DNA methylation data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. These results were validated in our cohort. Relevance of prognostic models for cancer-specific survival, comprising CD147 and MCT4 expression or SLC16A3 DNA methylation, was compared using chi-square statistics. Results CD147 protein expression generated with Tissue Studio correlated significantly with those from manual scoring (P BSG promoter was not associated with expression. Comparison of prognostic relevance of CD147/BSG and MCT4/SLC16A3, showed higher significance for MCT4 expression and superior prognostic power for DNA methylation at specific CpG-sites in the SLC16A3 promoter (e.g. CD147 protein: P = 0.7780, Harrell's c-index = 53.7% vs. DNA methylation: P = 0.0076, Harrell's c-index = 80.0%). Conclusions Prognostic significance of CD147 protein expression could not surpass that of MCT4, especially of SLC16A3 DNA methylation, corroborating the role of MCT4 as prognostic biomarker for ccRCC. PMID:26384346

  4. A Review on Genomics APIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Swaminathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The constant improvement and falling prices of whole human genome Next Generation Sequencing (NGS has resulted in rapid adoption of genomic information at both clinics and research institutions. Considered together, the complexity of genomics data, due to its large volume and diversity along with the need for genomic data sharing, has resulted in the creation of Application Programming Interface (API for secure, modular, interoperable access to genomic data from different applications, platforms, and even organizations. The Genomics APIs are a set of special protocols that assist software developers in dealing with multiple genomic data sources for building seamless, interoperable applications leading to the advancement of both genomic and clinical research. These APIs help define a standard for retrieval of genomic data from multiple sources as well as to better package genomic information for integration with Electronic Health Records. This review covers three currently available Genomics APIs: a Google Genomics, b SMART Genomics, and c 23andMe. The functionalities, reference implementations (if available and authentication protocols of each API are reviewed. A comparative analysis of the different features across the three APIs is provided in the Discussion section. Though Genomics APIs are still under active development and have yet to reach widespread adoption, they hold the promise to make building of complicated genomics applications easier with downstream constructive effects on healthcare.

  5. Levels of human platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand depend on haplotypes of CD40LG-CD40-ITGA2

    OpenAIRE

    Aloui, Chaker; Prigent, Antoine; Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Fagan, Jocelyne; Cognasse, Fabrice; Chakroun, Tahar; Garraud, Olivier; Laradi, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    Increased circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is commonly associated with inflammatory disorders. We aimed to investigate whether gene polymorphisms in CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 are associated with a propensity to secrete sCD40L; thus, we examined this issue at the level of human platelets, the principal source of sCD40L. We performed single polymorphism and haplotype analyses to test for the effect of twelve polymorphisms across the CD40LG, CD40 and ITGA2 genes in blood donors. ITGA2 prese...

  6. CD4+ T cell effects on CD8+ T cell location defined using bioluminescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Azadniv

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes of the CD8+ class are critical in delivering cytotoxic function and in controlling viral and intracellular infections. These cells are "helped" by T lymphocytes of the CD4+ class, which facilitate their activation, clonal expansion, full differentiation and the persistence of memory. In this study we investigated the impact of CD4+ T cells on the location of CD8+ T cells, using antibody-mediated CD4+ T cell depletion and imaging the antigen-driven redistribution of bioluminescent CD8+ T cells in living mice. We documented that CD4+ T cells influence the biodistribution of CD8+ T cells, favoring their localization to abdominal lymph nodes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this was associated with an increase in the expression of specific integrins. The presence of CD4+ T cells at the time of initial CD8+ T cell activation also influences their biodistribution in the memory phase. Based on these results, we propose the model that one of the functions of CD4+ T cell "help" is to program the homing potential of CD8+ T cells.

  7. Reactivity of naive CD4+CD25- T cells against gut microflora in healthy mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Lundsgaard, Dorthe; Kjellev, Stine

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that conventional as well as germ-free CD4+ T cells depleted of CD25+ cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the periphery proliferate specifically in response to enterobacterial antigen exposure whereas unfractionated CD4+ T cells are not reactive under...

  8. CD81 and CD9 work independently as extracellular components upon fusion of sperm and oocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoko Ohnami

    2012-05-01

    When a sperm and oocyte unite into one cell upon fertilization, membranous fusion between the sperm and oocyte occurs. In mice, Izumo1 and a tetraspanin molecule CD9 are required for sperm-oocyte fusion as one of the oocyte factors, and another tetraspanin molecule CD81 is also thought to involve in this process. Since these two tetraspanins often form a complex upon cell-cell interaction, it is probable that such a complex is also formed in sperm-oocyte interaction; however, this possibility is still under debate among researchers. Here we assessed this problem using mouse oocytes. Immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated that both CD9 and CD81 were widely distributed outside the oocyte cell membrane, but these molecules were separate, forming bilayers, confirmed by immunobiochemical analysis. Electron-microscopic analysis revealed the presence of CD9- or CD81-incorporated extracellular structures in those bilayers. Finally, microinjection of in vitro-synthesized RNA showed that CD9 reversed a fusion defect in CD81-deficient oocytes in addition to CD9-deficient oocytes, but CD81 failed in both oocytes. These results suggest that both CD9 and CD81 independently work upon sperm-oocyte fusion as extracellular components.

  9. Immunoexpression of CD30 and CD30 ligand in deciduas from spontaneous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Trovato

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, using immunohistochemistry, we studied the expression of CD30 and CD30-L in 35 deciduas obtained from women following elective abortion during normal physiological gestation and in 60 deciduas obtained from women after spontaneous abortion with or without signs of inflammation. The main difference was noticed in the first trimester of gestation in which was found a decrease in CD30/CD30-L-positive decidual glandular and stromal cells in a greater number of cases of spontaneous abortions with respect to cases of physiological pregnancies (70% vs 50%, p<0.05. In addition, deciduas from spontaneous abortions with inflammation and without inflammation reacted similarly. The reduced expression of CD30 and CD30-L and their cellular pattern detected in the deciduas from spontaneous abortions suggest that the CD30/CD30-L system is crucial for preventing abortions in the first trimester. And furthermore, the distinctive expression of CD30/CD30- L in deciduas from physiological pregnancies may indicate that the CD30/CD30-L system exerts its main role in the first trimester.

  10. Increased Aqueous Humor CD4+/CD8+ Lymphocyte Ratio in Sarcoid Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Namita; Chevour, Priyanka; Mahendradas, Padmamalini; Venkatesh, Anitha; Kawali, Ankush; Shetty, Rohit; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Sethu, Swaminathan

    2018-02-08

    To determine aqueous humor CD4+/CD8+ T-lymphocyte ratio changes in sarcoid and non-sarcoid uveitis with anterior chamber involvement. The case-control study includes 61 patients with either anterior uveitis, intermediate uveitis with anterior spill, or panuveitis. A total of 21 of them were categorized as sarcoid uveitis and 40 as non-sarcoid uveitis according to diagnostic criteria. CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the aqueous humor was determined using flow cytometry. Significantly higher CD4+/CD8+ ratio in the aqueous humor was observed in patients with sarcoid uveitis (6.3 ± 1.4; mean ± SEM) compared to non-sarcoid uveitis (1.6 ± 0.1; mean ± SEM). Whole blood CD4+/CD8+ ratio was not elevated in subjects with sarcoid and non-sarcoid uveitis. Aqueous humor CD4+/CD8+ ratio >3.5 was observed to be associated with sarcoid uveitis (OR 38, 95% CI 7.0-205.2). Increased aqueous humor CD4+/CD8+ ratio in sarcoid uveitis. Immunophenotyping of localized lymphocytosis in aqueous humor could be utilized as an additional confirmatory marker for ocular sarcoidosis.

  11. A transferable force field for CdS-CdSe-PbS-PbSe solid systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Zhaochuan; Koster, Rik S.; Wang, Shuaiwei; Fang, Changming; Yalcin, Anil O.; Tichelaar, Frans D.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; van Huis, Marijn A.; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.

    2014-01-01

    A transferable force field for the PbSe-CdSe solid system using the partially charged rigid ion model has been successfully developed and was used to study the cation exchange in PbSe-CdSe heteronanocrystals [A. O. Yalcin et al., "Atomic resolution monitoring of cation exchange in CdSe-PbSe

  12. Daoy medulloblastoma cells that express CD133 are radioresistant relative to CD133- cells, and the CD133+ sector is enlarged by hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, Ed R.; Foutch, Jennifer L.; Maki, Guitta

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Primary medulloblastoma and glioblastoma multiforme tumor cells that express the surface marker CD133 are believed to be enriched for brain tumor stem cells because of their unique ability to initiate or reconstitute tumors in immunodeficient mice. This study sought to characterize the radiobiological properties and marker expression changes of CD133+ vs. CD133- cells of an established medulloblastoma cell line. Methods and Materials: Daoy and D283 Med cell lines were stained with fluorescently labeled anti-CD133 antibody and sorted into CD133+ and CD133- populations. The effect of oxygen (2% vs. 20%) on CD133 expression was measured. Both populations were analyzed for marker stability, cell cycle distribution, and radiosensitivity. Results: CD133+ Daoy cells restored nearly native CD133+ and CD133- populations within 18 days, whereas CD133- cells remained overwhelmingly CD133-. Culturing Daoy cells in 2% oxygen rather than the standard 20% oxygen increased their CD133 expression 1.6-fold. CD133+ Daoy cells were radioresistant via the β-parameter of the linear-quadratic model relative to CD133- Daoy cells, although their α-parameters and cell cycle distributions were identical. Conclusions: Restoration of the original CD133+ and CD133- populations from CD133+ Daoy cells in serum is further evidence that CD133+ cells are functionally distinct from CD133- cells. The radioresistance of CD133+ compared with CD133- Daoy cells is consistent with better repair of sublethal damage. Enlargement of the CD133+ sector is a new feature of the hypoxic response

  13. Nuclear localization of CD26 induced by a humanized monoclonal antibody inhibits tumor cell growth by modulating of POLR2A transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohji Yamada

    Full Text Available CD26 is a type II glycoprotein known as dipeptidyl peptidase IV and has been identified as one of the cell surface markers associated with various types of cancers and a subset of cancer stem cells. Recent studies have suggested that CD26 expression is involved in tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. The CD26 is shown in an extensive intracellular distribution, ranging from the cell surface to the nucleus. We have previously showed that the humanized anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody (mAb, YS110, exhibits inhibitory effects on various cancers. However, functions of CD26 on cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of impaired tumor growth by YS110 treatment are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment with YS110 induced nuclear translocation of both cell-surface CD26 and YS110 in cancer cells and xenografted tumor. It was shown that the CD26 and YS110 were co-localized in nucleus by immunoelectron microscopic analysis. In response to YS110 treatment, CD26 was translocated into the nucleus via caveolin-dependent endocytosis. It was revealed that the nuclear CD26 interacted with a genomic flanking region of the gene for POLR2A, a subunit of RNA polymerase II, using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. This interaction with nuclear CD26 and POLR2A gene consequently led to transcriptional repression of the POLR2A gene, resulting in retarded cell proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, the impaired nuclear transport of CD26 by treatment with an endocytosis inhibitor or expressions of deletion mutants of CD26 reversed the POLR2A repression induced by YS110 treatment. These findings reveal that the nuclear CD26 functions in the regulation of gene expression and tumor growth, and provide a novel mechanism of mAb-therapy related to inducible translocation of cell-surface target molecule into the nucleus.

  14. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  15. CD40: novel association with Crohn's disease and replication in multiple sclerosis susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Blanco-Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A functional polymorphism located at -1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD lesions. METHODOLOGY: Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI = 1.12 (1.01-1.23]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI = 1.19 (1.06-1.33]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI = 1.04 (0.93-1.17]. CONCLUSION: The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions.

  16. Intranets for the CD-ROM Librarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzing, Matthew M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines library intranet applications, focusing on distribution of software, storage for graphics and audiovisuals, and networking CD-ROM products. Discusses potential problems, and describes an intranet being built at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's (New York) library and its effects on the CD-ROM collection. Highlights the Special Libraries…

  17. CD8(+) T Cells Produce the Chemokine CXCL10 in Response to CD27/CD70 Costimulation To Promote Generation of the CD8(+) Effector T Cell Pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peperzak, Victor; Veraar, Elise A. M.; Xiao, Yanling; Babala, Nikolina; Thiadens, Klaske; Brugmans, Marieke; Borst, Jannie

    2013-01-01

    Various cell types can produce the chemokine CXCL10 in response to IFN-gamma stimulation. CXCL10 is generally viewed as a proinflammatory chemokine that promotes recruitment of CD8(+) and Th1-type CD4(+) effector T cells to infected or inflamed nonlymphoid tissues. We show that CXCL10 plays a role

  18. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposited a novel CdS/CdSe composite window layer for CdTe thin film solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Bo; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel CdS/CdSe composite windows for CdTe cell were prepared by pulsed laser deposition. • SEM images show that CdS/CdSe composite windows are stacking together as the design. • CdTe cells with CdS/CdSe composite windows improved the blue response. • CdTe cells with composite windows show an obvious red shift in the absorption edge. • The volume proportion of CdSe affects the performance of CdTe solar cell. - Abstract: A novel CdS/CdSe composite window structure was designed and then the corresponding films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an improved window layer for CdTe-based solar cells. Two types of this composite window structure with 5 cycles and 10 cycles CdS/CdSe respectively both combined with CdS layers were prepared at 200 °C compared with pure CdS window layer and finally were applied into CdTe thin film solar cells. The cross section and surface morphology of the two composite window layers were monitored by using scanning electron microscopy and the result shows that the pulsed laser deposited composite window layers with good crystallinity are stacking together as the design. The devices based on CdS/CdSe composite window layers have demonstrated the enhanced photocurrent collection from both short and long wavelength regions compared to CdS/CdTe solar cell. The efficiency of the best reference CdS/CdTe solar cell was 10.72%. And the device with 5 cycles CdS/CdSe composite window showed efficiency of 12.61% with V OC of 772.92 mV, J SC of 25.11 mA/cm 2 and FF of 64.95%. In addition, there are some differences which exist within the optical transmittance spectra and QE curves between the two CdS/CdSe composite window samples, indicating that the volume proportion of CdSe may influence the performance of CdTe thin film solar cell.

  19. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposited a novel CdS/CdSe composite window layer for CdTe thin film solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Bo; Li, Bing, E-mail: libing70@126.com; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-03-30

    Highlights: • Novel CdS/CdSe composite windows for CdTe cell were prepared by pulsed laser deposition. • SEM images show that CdS/CdSe composite windows are stacking together as the design. • CdTe cells with CdS/CdSe composite windows improved the blue response. • CdTe cells with composite windows show an obvious red shift in the absorption edge. • The volume proportion of CdSe affects the performance of CdTe solar cell. - Abstract: A novel CdS/CdSe composite window structure was designed and then the corresponding films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an improved window layer for CdTe-based solar cells. Two types of this composite window structure with 5 cycles and 10 cycles CdS/CdSe respectively both combined with CdS layers were prepared at 200 °C compared with pure CdS window layer and finally were applied into CdTe thin film solar cells. The cross section and surface morphology of the two composite window layers were monitored by using scanning electron microscopy and the result shows that the pulsed laser deposited composite window layers with good crystallinity are stacking together as the design. The devices based on CdS/CdSe composite window layers have demonstrated the enhanced photocurrent collection from both short and long wavelength regions compared to CdS/CdTe solar cell. The efficiency of the best reference CdS/CdTe solar cell was 10.72%. And the device with 5 cycles CdS/CdSe composite window showed efficiency of 12.61% with V{sub OC} of 772.92 mV, J{sub SC} of 25.11 mA/cm{sup 2} and FF of 64.95%. In addition, there are some differences which exist within the optical transmittance spectra and QE curves between the two CdS/CdSe composite window samples, indicating that the volume proportion of CdSe may influence the performance of CdTe thin film solar cell.

  20. Transcriptomics and methylomics of CD4-positive T cells in arsenic-exposed women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engström, Karin; Wojdacz, Tomasz K; Marabita, Francesco; Ewels, Philip; Käller, Max; Vezzi, Francesco; Prezza, Nicola; Gruselius, Joel; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Arsenic, a carcinogen with immunotoxic effects, is a common contaminant of drinking water and certain food worldwide. We hypothesized that chronic arsenic exposure alters gene expression, potentially by altering DNA methylation of genes encoding central components of the immune system. We therefore analyzed the transcriptomes (by RNA sequencing) and methylomes (by target-enrichment next-generation sequencing) of primary CD4-positive T cells from matched groups of four women each in the Argentinean Andes, with fivefold differences in urinary arsenic concentrations (median concentrations of urinary arsenic in the lower- and high-arsenic groups: 65 and 276 μg/l, respectively). Arsenic exposure was associated with genome-wide alterations of gene expression; principal component analysis indicated that the exposure explained 53% of the variance in gene expression among the top variable genes and 19% of 28,351 genes were differentially expressed (false discovery rate arsenic group. Arsenic exposure was associated with genome-wide DNA methylation; the high-arsenic group had 3% points higher genome-wide full methylation (>80% methylation) than the lower-arsenic group. Differentially methylated regions that were hyper-methylated in the high-arsenic group showed enrichment for immune-related gene ontologies that constitute the basic functions of CD4-positive T cells, such as isotype switching and lymphocyte activation and differentiation. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water was related to changes in the transcriptome and methylome of CD4-positive T cells, both genome wide and in specific genes, supporting the hypothesis that arsenic causes immunotoxicity by interfering with gene expression and regulation.

  1. Uptake and translocation of 109Cd and stable Cd within tobacco plants (Nicotiana sylvestris)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosén, K.; Eriksson, J.; Vinichuk, M.

    2012-01-01

    The availability, uptake, and translocation of recently added ( 109 Cd) and naturally occurring (stable) soil Cd within tobacco plants were compared. 109 Cd was added to soil in two treatments, A (0.25 MBq kg soil −1 DW) and B (eight-fold dose): stable Cd was measured in both treatments. Both the added and the stable Cd were higher in leaves and reproductive structures of the plant than in stalks and roots. The uptake of 109 Cd was 5.3 kBq plant −1 for treatment A and 36.7 kBq plant −1 for treatment B, and about 26 μg plant −1 for stable Cd. Leaves of the tobacco plants accumulated 40–45% of the total 109 Cd and about 50% of total stable Cd taken up by the plant. Cadmium concentration in the plant was three times higher than in roots and two times higher than the concentration in soil: the concentration in roots was lower than in the soil. - Capsule: The availability, uptake, and translocation of recently added ( 109 Cd) and naturally occurring (stable) soil Cd within tobacco plants (Nicotiana sylvestris) were investigated. - Highlights: ► We compared uptake recently added and naturally occurring soil Cd by tobacco plant. ► Both added and stable Cd display similar uptake and translocation within the plant. ► Leaves of tobacco plants accumulate half of the total Cd taken up by the plant. ► Recently added 109 Cd to soil is more available than naturally occurring cadmium.

  2. Genomes to Proteomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panisko, Ellen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Grigoriev, Igor [USDOE Joint Genome Inst., Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Daly, Don S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Baker, Scott E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  3. Decreased Expression of T-Cell Costimulatory Molecule CD28 on CD4 and CD8 T Cells of Mexican Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Bernal-Fernandez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with tuberculosis frequently develop anergy, a state of T-cell hyporesponsiveness in which defective T-cell costimulation could be a factor. To know if the expression of T-cell costimulatory molecules was altered in tuberculosis, we analyzed the peripheral blood T-cell phenotype of 23 Mexican patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. There was severe CD4 (P<.001 and CD8 (P<.01 lymphopenia and upregulation of costimulatory molecule CD30 on CD4 and CD8 T cells (P<.05; this increase was higher in relapsing tuberculosis. The main finding was severe downregulation of the major costimulatory molecule CD28 on both CD8 and CD4 T cells (P<.001. Depletion of the CD4/CD28 subset, a hitherto undescribed finding, is relevant because CD4 T cells constitute the main arm of the cell-mediated antimycobacterial immune response.

  4. Physical properties of Bi doped CdTe thin films grown by CSVT and their influence on the CdS/CdTe solar cells PV-properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigil-Galan, O.; Sanchez-Meza, E.; Ruiz, C.M.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Morales-Acevedo, A.; Cruz-Gandarilla, F.; Aguilar-Hernandez, J.; Saucedo, E.; Contreras-Puente, G.; Bermudez, V.

    2007-01-01

    The physical properties of Bi doped CdTe films, grown on glass substrates by the Closed Space Transport Vapour (CSVT) method, from different Bi doped CdTe powders are presented. The CdTe:Bi films were characterized using Photoluminescence, Hall effect, X-Ray diffraction, SEM and Photoconductivity measurements. Moreover, CdS/CdTe:Bi solar cells were made and their characteristics like short circuit current density (J sc ), open circuit voltage (V OC ), fill factor (FF) and efficiency (η) were determined. These devices were fabricated from Bi doped CdTe layers deposited on CdS with the same growth conditions than those used for the single CdTe:Bi layers. A correlation between the CdS/CdTe:Bi solar cell characteristics and the physical properties of the Bi doped CdTe thin films are presented and discussed

  5. Creating Virtual CD-ROM Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kam Woods

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 20 years, more than 100,000 CD-ROM titles have been published including thousands of collections of government documents and data. CD-ROMs present preservation challenges at the bit level and in ensuring usability of the preserved artifact. We present techniques we have developed to archive and support user access to a collection of approximately 2,900 CD-ROMs published under the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP by the United States Government Printing Office (GPO. The project provides web-based access to CD-ROM contents using both migration and emulation and supports remote execution of the raw CD-ROM images. Our project incorporates off-the-shelf, primarily open-source software. The raw data and (METS metadata are made available through AFS, a standard distributed file system, to encourage sharing among libraries.

  6. CD163 and its role in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chyczewski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mononuclear phagocytes represent a heterogeneous population of cells with individual subpopulations exerting different pro- or anti-inflammatory functions. CD163 is a monocyte/macrophage specific marker expressed predominantly on cells which possess strong anti-inflammatory potential. The expression of CD163 is strongly induced by anti-inflammatory mediators such as glucocorticoids and interleukin-10, while being inhibited by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interferon-gamma. CD163-expressing mononuclear phagocytes, as well as soluble CD163, may both take part in downregulating an inflammatory response. It seems, therefore, that CD163 may be an interesting target for therapeutic modulation of the inflammatory response. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 3, 365–374

  7. CD40 is functionally expressed on human thymic epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galy, A. H.; Spits, H.

    1992-01-01

    CD40 is a prominent B cell Ag also found on certain epithelial cells and on carcinomas. In this report, we analyzed CD40 distribution in the human thymus. CD40 was not found on the majority of CD45-positive thymocytes, but was present in a CD45-negative stromal cell population. Immunohistology

  8. Genome Sequences of Oryza Species

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Masahiko

    2018-02-14

    This chapter summarizes recent data obtained from genome sequencing, annotation projects, and studies on the genome diversity of Oryza sativa and related Oryza species. O. sativa, commonly known as Asian rice, is the first monocot species whose complete genome sequence was deciphered based on physical mapping by an international collaborative effort. This genome, along with its accurate and comprehensive annotation, has become an indispensable foundation for crop genomics and breeding. With the development of innovative sequencing technologies, genomic studies of O. sativa have dramatically increased; in particular, a large number of cultivars and wild accessions have been sequenced and compared with the reference rice genome. Since de novo genome sequencing has become cost-effective, the genome of African cultivated rice, O. glaberrima, has also been determined. Comparative genomic studies have highlighted the independent domestication processes of different rice species, but it also turned out that Asian and African rice share a common gene set that has experienced similar artificial selection. An international project aimed at constructing reference genomes and examining the genome diversity of wild Oryza species is currently underway, and the genomes of some species are publicly available. This project provides a platform for investigations such as the evolution, development, polyploidization, and improvement of crops. Studies on the genomic diversity of Oryza species, including wild species, should provide new insights to solve the problem of growing food demands in the face of rapid climatic changes.

  9. Accurate and robust genomic prediction of celiac disease using statistical learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gad Abraham

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Practical application of genomic-based risk stratification to clinical diagnosis is appealing yet performance varies widely depending on the disease and genomic risk score (GRS method. Celiac disease (CD, a common immune-mediated illness, is strongly genetically determined and requires specific HLA haplotypes. HLA testing can exclude diagnosis but has low specificity, providing little information suitable for clinical risk stratification. Using six European cohorts, we provide a proof-of-concept that statistical learning approaches which simultaneously model all SNPs can generate robust and highly accurate predictive models of CD based on genome-wide SNP profiles. The high predictive capacity replicated both in cross-validation within each cohort (AUC of 0.87-0.89 and in independent replication across cohorts (AUC of 0.86-0.9, despite differences in ethnicity. The models explained 30-35% of disease variance and up to ∼43% of heritability. The GRS's utility was assessed in different clinically relevant settings. Comparable to HLA typing, the GRS can be used to identify individuals without CD with ≥99.6% negative predictive value however, unlike HLA typing, fine-scale stratification of individuals into categories of higher-risk for CD can identify those that would benefit from more invasive and costly definitive testing. The GRS is flexible and its performance can be adapted to the clinical situation by adjusting the threshold cut-off. Despite explaining a minority of disease heritability, our findings indicate a genomic risk score provides clinically relevant information to improve upon current diagnostic pathways for CD and support further studies evaluating the clinical utility of this approach in CD and other complex diseases.

  10. S and Te inter-diffusion in CdTe/CdS hetero junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, J. Pantoja [Cuerpo Academico-Energia y Sustentabilidad, Universidad Politecnica de Chiapas, Eduardo J. Selvas S/N, Col. Magisterial, Tuxtla Gutierrez 29010, Chiapas (Mexico); Gomez Barojas, E. [CIDS-ICUAP, Apdo. Postal 1651, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Silva Gonzalez, R.; Pal, U. [Instituto de Fisica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2007-09-22

    Effects of post formation thermal annealing of the CdTe-CdS device on the inter-diffusion of S and Te at the junction in a substrate configuration device have been studied by Auger electron spectroscopy. While the migration of S and Te atoms increases with annealing temperature, the extent of S diffusion is always higher than the diffusion of Te atoms. Inter-diffusion of S and Te causes the formation of CdTe{sub 1-x}S{sub x} ternary compound at the CdTe-CdS interface. (author)

  11. High mobility 2D electron gas in CdTe/CdMgTe heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karczewski, G.; Jaroszynski, J.; Kurowski, M.; Barcz, A.; Wojtowicz, T.; Kossut, J.

    1997-01-01

    We report on iodine doping of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE)-grown Cd(Mn)Te quasi-bulk films and modulation-doped CdTe/Cd 1-y Mg y Te two-dimensional (2D) single quantum well structures. Modulation doping with iodine of CdTe/Cd 1-y Mg y Te structures resulted in fabrication of a 2D electron gas with mobility exceeding 10 5 cm 2 /(Vs). This is the highest mobility reported in wide-gap II-VI materials

  12. Alterations in CD200-CD200R1 System during EAE Already Manifest at Presymptomatic Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Valente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis, activated microglia/macrophages appear in active lesions and in normal appearing white matter. However, whether they play a beneficial or a detrimental role in the development of the pathology remains a controversial issue. The production of pro-inflammatory molecules by chronically activated microglial cells is suggested to contribute to the progression of neurodegenerative processes in neurological disease. In the healthy brain, neurons control glial activation through several inhibitory mechanisms, such as the CD200-CD200R1 interaction. Therefore, we studied whether alterations in the CD200-CD200R1 system might underlie the neuroinflammation in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis. We determined the time course of CD200 and CD200R1 expression in the brain and spinal cord of an EAE mouse model from presymptomatic to late symptomatic stages. We also assessed the correlation with associated glial activation, inflammatory response and EAE severity. Alterations in CD200 and CD200R1 expression were mainly observed in spinal cord regions in the EAE model, mostly a decrease in CD200 and an increase in CD200R1 expression. A decrease in the expression of the mRNA encoding a full CD200 protein was detected before the onset of clinical signs, and remained thereafter. A decrease in CD200 protein expression was observed from the onset of clinical signs. By contrast, CD200R1 expression increased at EAE onset, when a glial reaction associated with the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory markers occurred, and continued to be elevated during the pathology. Moreover, the magnitude of the alterations correlated with severity of the EAE mainly in spinal cord. These results suggest that neuronal-microglial communication through CD200-CD200R1 interaction is compromised in EAE. The early decreases in CD200 expression in EAE suggest that this downregulation might also

  13. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  14. Human genetics in rheumatoid arthritis guides a high-throughput drug screen of the CD40 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Although genetic and non-genetic studies in mouse and human implicate the CD40 pathway in rheumatoid arthritis (RA, there are no approved drugs that inhibit CD40 signaling for clinical care in RA or any other disease. Here, we sought to understand the biological consequences of a CD40 risk variant in RA discovered by a previous genome-wide association study (GWAS and to perform a high-throughput drug screen for modulators of CD40 signaling based on human genetic findings. First, we fine-map the CD40 risk locus in 7,222 seropositive RA patients and 15,870 controls, together with deep sequencing of CD40 coding exons in 500 RA cases and 650 controls, to identify a single SNP that explains the entire signal of association (rs4810485, P = 1.4×10(-9. Second, we demonstrate that subjects homozygous for the RA risk allele have ∼33% more CD40 on the surface of primary human CD19+ B lymphocytes than subjects homozygous for the non-risk allele (P = 10(-9, a finding corroborated by expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 1,469 healthy control individuals. Third, we use retroviral shRNA infection to perturb the amount of CD40 on the surface of a human B lymphocyte cell line (BL2 and observe a direct correlation between amount of CD40 protein and phosphorylation of RelA (p65, a subunit of the NF-κB transcription factor. Finally, we develop a high-throughput NF-κB luciferase reporter assay in BL2 cells activated with trimerized CD40 ligand (tCD40L and conduct an HTS of 1,982 chemical compounds and FDA-approved drugs. After a series of counter-screens and testing in primary human CD19+ B cells, we identify 2 novel chemical inhibitors not previously implicated in inflammation or CD40-mediated NF-κB signaling. Our study demonstrates proof-of-concept that human genetics can be used to guide the development of phenotype-based, high-throughput small-molecule screens to identify potential novel

  15. Nitric oxide inhibits the accumulation of CD4+CD44hiTbet+CD69lo T cells in mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, John E; Torrado, Egidio; Tighe, Michael; Fountain, Jeffrey J; Solache, Alejandra; Strutt, Tara; Swain, Susan; Appelberg, Rui; Cooper, Andrea M

    2012-12-01

    Animals lacking the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene (nos2(-/-)) are less susceptible to Mycobacterium avium strain 25291 and lack nitric oxide-mediated immunomodulation of CD4(+) T cells. Here we show that the absence of nos2 results in increased accumulation of neutrophils and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells within the M. avium containing granuloma. Examination of the T-cell phenotype in M. avium infected mice demonstrated that CD4(+)CD44(hi) effector T cells expressing the Th1 transcriptional regulator T-bet (T-bet(+)) were specifically reduced by the presence of nitric oxide. Importantly, the T-bet(+) effector population could be separated into CD69(hi) and CD69(lo) populations, with the CD69(lo) population only able to accumulate during chronic infection within infected nos2(-/-) mice. Transcriptomic comparison between CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD69(hi) and CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD69(lo) populations revealed that CD4(+)CD44(hi)CD69(lo) cells had higher expression of the integrin itgb1/itga4 (VLA-4, CD49d/CD29). Inhibition of Nos2 activity allowed increased accumulation of the CD4(+) CD44(hi)T-bet(+)CD69(lo) population in WT mice as well as increased expression of VLA-4. These data support the hypothesis that effector T cells in mycobacterial granulomata are not a uniform effector population but exist in distinct subsets with differential susceptibility to the regulatory effects of nitric oxide. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. High soluble CD30, CD25 and IL-6 may identify patients with worse survival in CD30+ cutaneous lymphomas and early mycosis fungoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, Marshall E.; Pavlov, Igor; Delgado, Julio C.; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Histopathology alone cannot predict outcome of patients with CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30CLPD) and early mycosis fungoides (MF). To test the hypothesis that serum cytokines/cytokine receptors provide prognostic information in these disorders, we measured soluble CD30 (sCD30), sCD25, and selected cytokines in cell cultures and sera of 116 patients with CD30CLPD and 96 patients with early MF followed up to 20 years. Significant positive correlation was found between sCD30 levels and sCD25, CD40L, IL-6, and IL-8, suggesting CD30+ neoplastic cells secrete these cytokines, but not Th2 cytokines. In vitro studies confirmed sCD30, sCD25, IL-6 and IL-8 are secreted by CD30CLPD-derived cell lines. CD30CLPD patients with above normal sCD30 and sCD25 had worse overall and disease-related survivals, but only sCD30 retained significance in Cox models that included advanced age. High sCD30 also identified patients with worse survival in early MF. Increased IL-6 and IL-8 correlated with poor disease-related survival in CD30CLPD patients, We conclude that: (1) neoplastic cells of some CD30CLPD patients do not resemble Th2 cells, (2) high serum sCD30, sCD25, IL-6, and perhaps IL-8 levels may provide prognostic information useful for patient management. PMID:22071475

  17. Recirculation of lymphocyte subsets (CD5+, CD4+, CD8+, T19+ and B cells) through fetal lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpton, W G; Washington, E A; Cahill, R N

    1989-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper examine the cell-surface phenotype (CD5, CD4, CD8, T19, MHC class II and sIg) and cell output of lymphocyte subsets circulating through a subcutaneous lymph node in the sheep fetus, in an environment unaffected by foreign antigen and circulating immunoglobulins. CD4+ lymphocytes were the major T-cell subset in fetal lymph and were clearly enriched in lymph compared with blood, whereas T19+, CD8+ and B lymphocytes were not. It seems likely that in the fetus CD4+ lymphocytes are extracted from the blood at a faster rate than are other T-cell subsets and B cells. There was a much higher percentage of CD8+ and T null cells and a lower percentage of MHC class II+ and B cells circulating in the fetal lymph than in adult lymph, while the percentage of T19+ lymphocytes in fetal blood was twice that in the adult. Although the hourly cell output from an adult prescapular lymph node was far higher than that from a fetal lymph node, the circulation of lymphocytes through fetal lymph nodes was much greater per gram lymph node weight than that through adult lymph nodes. The wholesale recirculation in the fetus of all the major T-cell subsets found in the adult is paradoxical because it is not known what function they serve in the fetus in the absence of antigen and ongoing immune responses, although clearly they are not memory cells. PMID:2481644

  18. Correlation of CD4 counts and CD4/CD8 ratio with HIV-infection associated oral manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, F M A; Vaghela, V P; Chindia, M L

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between oral lesions arising from HIV infection and CD4/CD8 cell ratios is of relevance in clinical assessment of immune suppression. To correlate the prevalence of oral manifestations arising from HIV infection and the levels of CD4/CD8 cell ratios. A cross-sectional study. Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. Two hundred and seven HIV-infected patients in medical wards were recruited in the study. Seventy eight (37.7%) were male and 129 (62.3%) female, with an age range of 18-73 years (mean=34.81 years). Oral manifestations encountered with highest prevalence in the oral cavity included: hyperplastic candidosis (labial mucosa) 15%, erythematous candidosis (gingival) 5%, angular cheilitis 32.4%, herpes simplex (corner of the mouth) 0.5%, persistent oral ulceration (labial mucosa) 0.5%, Parotid enlargement 2% and Kaposis sarcoma (hard/soft palate) 2.9%. The prevalence of oral manifestations was higher with low CD4 count <200 cell/mm3 and mean CD4/CD8<0.39(95%CI 0.32-0.48).

  19. Costimulation of Naive CD8+ Lymphocytes Induces CD4 Expression and Allows Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Scott G.; Korin, Yael D.; Roth, Michael D.; Landay, Alan; Zack, Jerome A.

    1998-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection requires cell surface expression of CD4. Costimulation of CD8+/CD4− T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies or by allogeneic dendritic cells induced expression of CD4 and rendered these CD8 cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection. Naive CD45RA+ cells responded with greater expression of CD4 than did CD45RO+ cells. CD8+ lymphocytes derived from fetal or newborn sources exhibited a greater tendency to express CD4, consistent with their naive states. This mechanism of infection suggests HIV-induced perturbation of the CD8 arm of the immune response and could explain the generally rapid disease progression seen in HIV-infected children. PMID:9765450

  20. Electrochemical study of CdS/CdTe solar cells prepared by electrochemical deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmas, V.; Llabres, J.

    1985-01-01

    The growth conditions of thin films of cadmium telluride, using the electrochemical deposition technique, for the production of p-CdTe/n-CdS heterojunction solar cells are presented in this communication. Special attention is paid to the examination of parameters controlling and limiting the growth of CdTe samples presenting one or other type of majority change carriers. Voltammograms were performed under different conditions for growth mechanism determination. In particular, the growth kinetic function on stainless steel and cadmium sulfide substrates is shown. Heterojunctions were prepared by electrochemically depositing CdTe (type P) on CdS thin films, deposited in high vacuum. The aim of this study is characterization of low cost production of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions solar cells by electrochemical deposition

  1. Increased plasma levels of microparticles expressing CD39 and CD133 in acute liver injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmelzle, Moritz; Splith, Katrin; Wiuff Andersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that CD133 and CD39 are expressed by hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), which are mobilized after liver injury and target sites of injury, limit vascular inflammation, and boost hepatic regeneration. Plasma microparticles (MP) expressing CD39 can block...... sacrificed and plasma MP were isolated by ultracentrifugation. HSC and CD133 MP levels were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Patients were enrolled with acute (n=5) and acute on chronic (n=5) liver injury with matched controls (n=7). Blood was collected at admission and plasma CD133 and CD39...... MP subsets were analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. RESULTS: HSC and CD133 MP levels were significantly increased only in the plasma of wild-type mice with acetaminophen hepatotoxicity (P

  2. Genomics of Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Pavlicev, Mihaela; Muglia, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms controlling human birth timing at term, or resulting in preterm birth, have been the focus of considerable investigation, but limited insights have been gained over the past 50 years. In part, these processes have remained elusive because of divergence in reproductive strategies and physiology shown by model organisms, making extrapolation to humans uncertain. Here, we summarize the evolution of progesterone signaling and variation in pregnancy maintenance and termination. We use this comparative physiology to support the hypothesis that selective pressure on genomic loci involved in the timing of parturition have shaped human birth timing, and that these loci can be identified with comparative genomic strategies. Previous limitations imposed by divergence of mechanisms provide an important new opportunity to elucidate fundamental pathways of parturition control through increasing availability of sequenced genomes and associated reproductive physiology characteristics across diverse organisms. PMID:25646385

  3. Genomics of Salmonella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Rocio; McClelland, Michael; Santiviago, Carlos A.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    Progress in the study of Salmonella survival, colonization, and virulence has increased rapidly with the advent of complete genome sequencing and higher capacity assays for transcriptomic and proteomic analysis. Although many of these techniques have yet to be used to directly assay Salmonella growth on foods, these assays are currently in use to determine Salmonella factors necessary for growth in animal models including livestock animals and in in vitro conditions that mimic many different environments. As sequencing of the Salmonella genome and microarray analysis have revolutionized genomics and transcriptomics of salmonellae over the last decade, so are new high-throughput sequencing technologies currently accelerating the pace of our studies and allowing us to approach complex problems that were not previously experimentally tractable.

  4. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  5. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  6. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1 and HBV Co-Infected Individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Lee

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus (HBV and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC subsets by the HBV.To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals.Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing.All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (P<0.04. In the CD4+ and CD56+ subset of 2 HBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R were detected in a minor percentage of the population.HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation.

  7. Downregulation of IL-12 and a novel negative feedback system mediated by CD25+CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kojiro; Tateishi, Shoko; Kubo, Kanae; Mimura, Toshihide; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kanda, Hiroko

    2005-01-01

    CD25 + CD4 + regulatory T cells suppress immune responses and are believed to play roles in preventing autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the suppression and the regulation of their homeostasis remain to be elucidated. Here we show that these regulatory T cells downregulated CD25 - CD4 + T-cell-mediated production of IL-12 from antigen-presenting cells, which can act as a growth factor for CD25 - CD4 + T cells. We further found that CD25 + CD4 + T cells, despite their well-documented 'anergic' nature, proliferate significantly in vitro only when CD25 - CD4 + T cells are present. Notably, this proliferation was strongly dependent on IL-2 and relatively independent of IL-12. Thus, CD25 + CD4 + T cells suppress CD25 - CD4 + T-cell responses, at least in part, by inhibiting IL-12 production while they themselves can undergo proliferation with the mediation of CD25 - CD4 + T cells in vitro. These results offer a novel negative feedback system involving a tripartite interaction among CD25 + CD4 + and CD25 - CD4 + T cells, and APCs that may contribute to the termination of immune responses

  8. Improved flow cytometric identification of myelopoiesis by the simultaneous labelling with CD13, CD14 and CD66 monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, J; Meyer, K; Broe, M K

    1996-01-01

    in the fast determination of remission state. In MDS, the immature myeloid component could be distinguished in patients defined according to the FAB classification with the possibility of identifying aberrant phenotypes, the assay should also be of interest in other myeloproliferative disorders. Moreover......The aim of the present study was to increase our knowledge of myelopoiesis evaluated by flow cytometry. We therefore designed a triple-marker assay employing monoclonal antibodies against the CD13 (immature), the CD14 (monocytic), and the CD66 (mature myeloid) antigens using three...

  9. The clinical significance of the CD163+ and CD68+ macrophages in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Qun Kong

    Full Text Available Our previous study has found that the abundance of peritumoral CD68(+ macrophages was associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC after resection. However, CD68 staining could not discriminate the protumoral or tumoricidal subpopulations from pan-macrophages. CD163 is a marker of alternatively activated macrophages. In this study, the clinical significance of CD163(+ cells in tumors and peritumoral liver tissues was evaluated in a cohort of 295 patients with HCC after curative resection. We found that the density of CD163(+ cells was well correlated with that of CD68(+ cells in both tumors and peritumoral liver tissues but was much more. Immunostaining on consecutive sections and flow cytometry assay on surgical resected specimens further supported the findings that the CD163(+ cells was more abundant than CD68(+ cells. The density of peritumoral CD68(+ cells was associated with poor recurrence-free survival (RFS and poor overall survival (OS (P = 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively, whereas the CD163(+ cells have no prognostic values either in tumors or in peritumoral liver tissues. In another cohort of 107 HCC patients, preoperative plasma concentration of soluble form of CD163 (sCD163 was associated with active hepatitis-related factors but not associated with the markers of tumor invasion. In conclusion, both the CD163(+ cells local infiltration and plasma sCD163 were of limited significance in HCC, and they were more likely markers related to active hepatitis rather than tumor progression.

  10. CD90 and CD24 Co-Expression Is Associated with Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Xiucong; Zhu, Jianhui; Yang, Rui; Tan, Zhijing; An, Mingrui; Shi, Jiaqi; Lubman, David M

    2016-01-01

    Thy-1 (CD90) has been shown to be a potential marker for several different types of cancer. However, reports on CD90 expression in pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions are still limited where PanINs are the most important precursor lesion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Herein, we investigate candidate markers for PanIN lesions by examining the distribution and trend of CD90 and CD24 expression as well as their co-expression in various stages of PanINs. Thirty cases of PanINs, which were confirmed histopathologically and clinically, were used to evaluate protein expression of CD90 and CD24 by immunofluoresence double staining. CD90 was found to be mainly expressed in stroma around lesion ducts while not observed in acini and islets in PanINs. CD90 also showed increased expression in PanIN III compared to PanIN III. CD24 was mainly present in the cytoplasm and membrane of pancreatic ductal epithelia, especially in the apical epithelium of the duct. CD24 had higher expression in PanIN III compared with PanIN IIIIII or PanIN III. CD90 was expressed around CD24 sites, but there was little overlap between cells that expressed each of these proteins. A correlation analysis showed that these two proteins have a moderate relationship with PanIN stages respectively. These results suggest that co-expression of CD90 and CD24 may have an important role in the development and progression of PanINs, which is also conducive to early detection and treatment of PDAC.

  11. Evidence implicating the Ras pathway in multiple CD28 costimulatory functions in CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit V Janardhan

    Full Text Available CD28 costimulation is a critical event in the full activation of CD4(+ T cells that augments cytokine gene transcription, promotes cytokine mRNA stability, prevents induction of anergy, increases cellular metabolism, and increases cell survival. However, despite extensive biochemical analysis of the signaling events downstream of CD28, molecular pathways sufficient to functionally replace the diverse aspects of CD28-mediated costimulation in normal T cells have not been identified. Ras/MAPK signaling is a critical pathway downstream of T cell receptor stimulation, but its role in CD28-mediated costimulation has been controversial. We observed that physiologic CD28 costimulation caused a relocalization of the RasGEF RasGRP to the T cell-APC interface by confocal microscopy. In whole cell biochemical analysis, CD28 cross-linking with either anti-CD28 antibody or B7.1-Ig augmented TCR-induced Ras activation. To determine whether Ras signaling was sufficient to functionally mimic CD28 costimulation, we utilized an adenoviral vector encoding constitutively active H-Ras (61L to transduce normal, Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR transgenic CD4(+ T cells. Like costimulation via CD28, active Ras induced AKT, JNK and ERK phosphorylation. In addition, constitutive Ras signaling mimicked the ability of CD28 to costimulate IL-2 protein secretion, prevent anergy induction, increase glucose uptake, and promote cell survival. Importantly, we also found that active Ras mimicked the mechanism by which CD28 costimulates IL-2 production: by increasing IL-2 gene transcription, and promoting IL-2 mRNA stability. Finally, active Ras was able to induce IL-2 production when combined with ionomycin stimulation in a MEK-1-dependent fashion. Our results are consistent with a central role for Ras signaling in CD28-mediated costimulation.

  12. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the chemical ... needed to build the entire human body. A gene traditionally refers to the unit of DNA that ...

  13. Methanococcus jannaschii genome: revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Olsen, G. J.; Klenk, H. P.; White, O.; Woese, C. R.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of genomic sequences is necessarily an ongoing process. Initial gene assignments tend (wisely) to be on the conservative side (Venter, 1996). The analysis of the genome then grows in an iterative fashion as additional data and more sophisticated algorithms are brought to bear on the data. The present report is an emendation of the original gene list of Methanococcus jannaschii (Bult et al., 1996). By using a somewhat more updated database and more relaxed (and operator-intensive) pattern matching methods, we were able to add significantly to, and in a few cases amend, the gene identification table originally published by Bult et al. (1996).

  14. Elevated levels of peripheral blood CD14(bright) CD16+ and CD14(dim) CD16+ monocytes may contribute to the development of retinopathy in patients with juvenile onset type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryba-Stanisławowska, Monika; Myśliwska, Jolanta; Juhas, Ulana; Myśliwiec, Małgorzata

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to analyze the CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocyte subsets in juvenile-onset complication-free diabetes mellitus type 1 in the context of their association with microvascular complications. 61 children with type 1 diabetes and 30 healthy individuals were enrolled in a study. CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes were quantified in peripheral blood by means of flow cytometry. At the time of sampling blood glucose concentration was taken along with biochemical measurement of renal function, CRP and glycosylated hemoglobin. The Spearman's correlations were used to compare the relationship between CD16(+) monocyte subsets and the clinical parameters that can predict the development of microangiopathies. The flow cytometric analysis of monocyte subsets in peripheral blood of analyzed subjects revealed that the numbers of CD14(bright) CD16(+) and CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes were significantly higher in patients with type 1 diabetes than in the healthy individuals. As to the relationship between CD16(+) monocyte subsets and the clinical parameters that can predict development of microangiopathies, it was shown that both CD16(+) subsets were associated with increased risk of retinopathy development, defined as retinopathy development value. Elevated levels of intermediate CD14(bright) CD16(+) and non-classical CD14(dim) CD16(+) monocytes predict development of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 1 diabetes. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparative Genomics Reveals High Genomic Diversity in the Genus Photobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae is a large marine bacterial family, which can constitute up to 50% of the prokaryotic population in marine waters. Photobacterium is the second largest genus in the family and we used comparative genomics on 35 strains representing 16 of the 28 species described so far, to understand the genomic diversity present in the Photobacterium genus. Such understanding is important for ecophysiology studies of the genus. We used whole genome sequences to evaluate phylogenetic relationships using several analyses (16S rRNA, MLSA, fur , amino-acid usage, ANI), which allowed us to identify two misidentified strains. Genome analyses also revealed occurrence of higher and lower GC content clades, correlating with phylogenetic clusters. Pan- and core-genome analysis revealed the conservation of 25% of the genome throughout the genus, with a large and open pan-genome. The major source of genomic diversity could be traced to the smaller chromosome and plasmids. Several of the physiological traits studied in the genus did not correlate with phylogenetic data. Since horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is often suggested as a source of genetic diversity and a potential driver of genomic evolution in bacterial species, we looked into evidence of such in Photobacterium genomes. Genomic islands were the source of genomic differences between strains of the same species. Also, we found transposase genes and CRISPR arrays that suggest multiple encounters with foreign DNA. Presence of genomic exchange traits was widespread and abundant in the genus, suggesting a role in genomic evolution. The high genetic variability and indications of genetic exchange make it difficult to elucidate genome evolutionary paths and raise the awareness of the roles of foreign DNA in the genomic evolution of environmental organisms.

  16. Interethnic diversity of the CD209 (rs4804803 gene promoter polymorphism in African but not American sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenelle A. Noble

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the genomic diversity of CD209 gene promoter polymorphism could assist in clarifying disease pathophysiology as well as contribution to co-morbidities. CD209 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with susceptibility to infection. We hypothesize that CD209 mutant variants occur at a higher frequency among Africans and in sickle cell disease. We analyzed the frequency of the CD209 gene (rs4804803 in healthy control and sickle cell disease (SCD populations and determined association with disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples collected from 145 SCD and 231 control Africans (from Mali, 331 SCD and 379 control African Americans and 159 Caucasians. Comparative analysis among and between groups was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. Per ethnic diversification, we found significant disparity in genotypic (23.4% versus 16.9% versus 3.2% and allelic frequencies (48.7% versus 42.1% versus 19.8% of the homozygote mutant variant of the CD209 (snp 309A/G gene promoter between Africans, African Americans and Caucasians respectively. Comparative evaluation between disease and control groups reveal a significant difference in genotypic (10.4% versus 23.4%; p = 0.002 and allelic frequencies (39.7% versus 48.7%; p = 0.02 of the homozygote mutant variant in African SCD and healthy controls respectively, an observation that is completely absent among Americans. Comparing disease groups, we found no difference in the genotypic (p = 0.19 or allelic (p = 0.72 frequencies of CD209 homozygote mutant variant between Africans and Americans with sickle cell disease. The higher frequency of CD209 homozygote mutant variants in the African control group reveals a potential impairment of the capacity to mount an immune response to infectious diseases, and possibly delineate susceptibility to or severity of infectious co-morbidities within and between groups.

  17. Human CD8+ T lymphocytes can be divided into CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ cells with different requirements for activation and differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.; Brouwer, M.; Miedema, F.; van Lier, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The functional distinction between CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ cells within the human CD4+ T cell subset is well established. This study was undertaken to investigate whether a similar division can be made within the CD8+ T cell population. A quantitative comparison was made of the requirements for

  18. Memory CD4 T cells in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zens, Kyra D; Farber, Donna L

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly among young children and the elderly. Current vaccines induce neutralizing antibody responses directed toward highly variable viral surface proteins, resulting in limited heterosubtypic protection to new viral serotypes. By contrast, memory CD4 T cells recognize conserved viral proteins and are cross-reactive to multiple influenza strains. In humans, virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were found to be the protective correlate in human influenza challenge studies, suggesting their key role in protective immunity. In mouse models, memory CD4 T cells can mediate protective responses to secondary influenza infection independent of B cells or CD8 T cells, and can influence innate immune responses. Importantly, a newly defined, tissue-resident CD4 memory population has been demonstrated to be retained in lung tissue and promote optimal protective responses to an influenza infection. Here, we review the current state of results regarding the generation of memory CD4 T cells following primary influenza infection, mechanisms for their enhanced efficacy in protection from secondary challenge including their phenotype, localization, and function in the context of both mouse models and human infection. We also discuss the generation of memory CD4 T cells in response to influenza vaccines and its future implications for vaccinology.

  19. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasques, L.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, L.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-17

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A.

  20. CD5-positive and CD5-negative human B cells converge to an indistinguishable population on signalling through B-cell receptors and CD40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagro, A; McCloskey, N; Challa, A; Holder, M; Grafton, G; Pound, J D; Gordon, J

    2000-10-01

    Whether CD5 on B cells marks a subset functionally distinct from the conventional CD5 negative (CD5neg) adult population or is more an indicator of activation, remains contentious. Here we have investigated whether CD5 positive (CD5pos) and CD5neg B cells can be distinguished in terms of their response to surrogate signals aimed to model, in vitro, T-cell dependent (TD) and T-independent (TI) encounters with antigen in vivo: the predominantly CD5pos B-cell population found in cord blood, CD5 B cells positively selected from tonsils and their CD5neg counterparts, were compared. Neonatal B cells displayed a near-identical phenotype to that of adult CD5pos B cells, being characterized by uniform immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin D (IgD), CD23 and CD44 coexpression. When cultured with anti-IgM maintained at high density on CD32-tranfected mouse L cells to model TI responses or on CD40 ligand (CD40L)-bearing L cells (with or without captured anti-IgM) to model TD encounters, DNA synthesis was stimulated to a similar extent in all three populations. Focusing on CD5 and CD23, we found that - although the signals delivered promoted distinct profiles of expression - under each condition of activation, the phenotypes that emerged for adult CD5pos and CD5neg B cells were remarkably similar. Neonatal B cells displayed a greater diminution in CD5 expression than adult CD5pos B cells following CD40 signals but otherwise the two populations again behaved similarly. The inclusion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) to cultures where cells were costimulated via surface (s)IgM and CD40 resulted in a complete loss of CD5 expression and a corresponding hyperexpression of CD23, irrespective of the population studied. The near-identical response of CD5pos and CD5neg B cells to surrogate TD or TI signals in vitro and their convergence to indistinguishable phenotypes is wholly supportive of CD5 being a fluctuating marker of activation rather than it delineating functionally distinct subsets.

  1. Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ regulatory T cells are correlated to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-su; Wang, Xu-hua; Zhao, Xiang-yu; Chang, Ying-jun; Xu, Lan-ping; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2014-07-01

    Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were found to be involved in disease progression in tumor-bearing mouse models and cancer patients recently. We attempted to define whether this subset of T cells were related to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells among the CD4+ T cell population from the bone marrow of relapsed patients, patients with positive minimal residual disease (MRD+) and healthy donors was examined by flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were also stained with the intracellular markers to determine the cytokine (TGF-β, IL-2 and IL-10) secretion. The results showed that the frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69 + T cells was markedly increased in patients in the relapsed group and the MRD + group compared to the healthy donor group. The percentage of this subset of T cells was significantly decreased after effective intervention treatment. We also analyzed the reconstitution of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at various time points after allo-HSCT, and the results showed that this subset of T cells reconstituted rapidly and reached a relatively higher level at +60 d in patients compared to controls. The incidence of either MRD+ or relapse in patients with a high frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells (>7%) was significantly higher than that of patients with a low frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at +60 d, +90 d and +270 d after transplant. However, our preliminary data indicated that CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells may not exert immunoregulatory function via cytokine secretion. This study provides the first clinical evidence of a correlation between non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ Tregs and leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT and suggests that exploration of new methods of adoptive immunotherapy may be beneficial. Further research related to regulatory mechanism behind this phenomenon would be necessary.

  2. Soluble ectodomain CD163 and extracellular vesicle-associated CD163 are two differently regulated forms of â €soluble CD163' in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etzerodt, Anders; Berg, Ronan M.G.; Plovsing, Ronni R.

    2017-01-01

    for macrophage activity and inflammation. The present study disclosed that 10% of sCD163 in healthy persons is actually extracellular vesicle (EV)-associated CD163 not being cleaved and shed. Endotoxin injection of human volunteers caused a selective increase in the ectodomain CD163, while septic patients...... exhibited high levels of both soluble ectodomain CD163 and extracellular vesicle (EV) CD163, the latter representing up 60% of total plasma CD163. A poor prognosis of septic patients measured as the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score correlated with the increase in membrane-associated CD163...

  3. CdTe devices and method of manufacturing same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Noufi, Rommel; Dhere, Ramesh G.; Albin, David S.; Barnes, Teresa; Burst, James; Duenow, Joel N.; Reese, Matthew

    2015-09-29

    A method of producing polycrystalline CdTe materials and devices that incorporate the polycrystalline CdTe materials are provided. In particular, a method of producing polycrystalline p-doped CdTe thin films for use in CdTe solar cells in which the CdTe thin films possess enhanced acceptor densities and minority carrier lifetimes, resulting in enhanced efficiency of the solar cells containing the CdTe material are provided.

  4. Elevated Temperature Photophysical Properties and Morphological Stability of CdSe and CdSe/CdS Nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowland, Clare E. [Department; Center; Fedin, Igor [Department; Diroll, Benjamin T. [Center; Liu, Yuzi [Center; Talapin, Dmitri V. [Center; Department; Schaller, Richard D. [Department; Center

    2018-01-03

    Elevated temperature optoelectronic performance of semiconductor nanomaterials remains an important issue for applications. Here we examine two-dimensional CdSe nanoplatelets (NPs) and CdS/CdSe/CdS shell/core/shell sandwich NPs at temperatures ranging from 300-700 K using static and transient spectroscopies as well as in-situ transmission electron microscopy. NPs exhibit reversible changes in PL intensity, spectral position, and emission linewidth with temperature elevation up to ~500 K, losing a factor of ~8 to 10 in PL intensity at 400 K relative to ambient. Temperature elevation above ~500 K yields thickness dependent, irreversible degradation in optical properties. Electron microscopy relates stability of the NP morphology up to near 600 K followed by sintering and evaporation at still higher temperatures. The mechanism of reversible PL loss, based on differences in decay dynamics between time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption, arise primarily from hole trapping in both NPs and sandwich NPs.

  5. CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation are associated with HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie R Cockerham

    Full Text Available The association between the host immune environment and the size of the HIV reservoir during effective antiretroviral therapy is not clear. Progress has also been limited by the lack of a well-accepted assay for quantifying HIV during therapy. We examined the association between multiple measurements of HIV and T cell activation (as defined by markers including CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5 and PD-1 in 30 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected adults. We found a consistent association between the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing HLA-DR and the frequency of resting CD4+ T cells containing HIV DNA. This study highlights the need to further examine this relationship and to better characterize the biology of markers commonly used in HIV studies. These results may also have implications for reactivation strategies.

  6. Kainuun matkailu cd-romin verkkokirjoittamisprosessi

    OpenAIRE

    Vähäkuopus, Tarja

    2000-01-01

    Kajaanin Puhelinosuuskunnan Virtual Kainuu -projekti tuotti viime talvena omana tuotteenaan Kainuu cd-romin, jonka jatkoksi luotiin Kainuun matkailu cd-rom. Tämän cd-romin tekstiosuuden, käsikirjoituksen loi syksyllä 1999 Eija Lappalainen, Niina Karjalainen ja Tarja Vähäkuopus. Tämä raporttiosuus kertoo projektin, eli tässä tapauksessa tuotteen tekemisestä, verkkokirjoittamisesta. Koko opinnäytetyö koostuu itse tuotteesta, tekemisen prosessista ja raportista. Ennen tekstin kirj...

  7. Monocyte/macrophage-derived soluble CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten N; Abildgaard, Niels; Maniecki, Maciej B

    2014-01-01

    in bone marrow samples than in the matched blood samples, which indicate a localized production of sCD163 within the bone marrow microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS: Soluble CD163 was found to be a prognostic marker in patients with multiple myeloma. This may indicate that macrophages and/or monocytes have......OBJECTIVES: Macrophages play an important role in cancer by suppression of adaptive immunity and promotion of angiogenesis and metastasis. Tumor-associated macrophages strongly express the hemoglobin scavenger receptor CD163, which can also be found as a soluble protein in serum and other body...

  8. Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Results from the Human Genome Project revealed that the human genome contains 20,000 to 25,000 genes. A gene contains (encodes) the information that each cell uses...

  9. Chromatin dynamics in genome stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nair, Nidhi; Shoaib, Muhammad; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2017-01-01

    Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote ...... of chromatin structure regulation in maintaining genome integrity by multiple mechanisms including facilitating DNA repair and directly suppressing endogenous DNA damage.......Genomic DNA is compacted into chromatin through packaging with histone and non-histone proteins. Importantly, DNA accessibility is dynamically regulated to ensure genome stability. This is exemplified in the response to DNA damage where chromatin relaxation near genomic lesions serves to promote...... access of relevant enzymes to specific DNA regions for signaling and repair. Furthermore, recent data highlight genome maintenance roles of chromatin through the regulation of endogenous DNA-templated processes including transcription and replication. Here, we review research that shows the importance...

  10. Human mesenchymal stromal cells enhance the immunomodulatory function of CD8+CD28− regulatory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiuli; Zheng, Haiqing; Chen, Xiaoyong; Peng, Yanwen; Huang, Weijun; Li, Xiaobo; Li, Gang; Xia, Wenjie; Sun, Qiquan; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2015-01-01

    One important aspect of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-mediated immunomodulation is the recruitment and induction of regulatory T (Treg) cells. However, we do not yet know whether MSCs have similar effects on the other subsets of Treg cells. Herein, we studied the effects of MSCs on CD8+CD28− Treg cells and found that the MSCs could not only increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells, but also enhance CD8+CD28−T cells' ability of hampering naive CD4+ T-cell proliferation and activation, decreasing the production of IFN-γ by activated CD4+ T cells and inducing the apoptosis of activated CD4+ T cells. Mechanistically, the MSCs affected the functions of the CD8+CD28− T cells partially through moderate upregulating the expression of IL-10 and FasL. The MSCs had no distinct effect on the shift from CD8+CD28+ T cells to CD8+CD28− T cells, but did increase the proportion of CD8+CD28− T cells by reducing their rate of apoptosis. In summary, this study shows that MSCs can enhance the regulatory function of CD8+CD28− Treg cells, shedding new light on MSCs-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25482073

  11. CD4+ CD25+ cells in type 1 diabetic patients with other autoimmune manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia S. Abd Elaziz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple autoimmune disorders in diabetics may indicate underlying primary defects of immune regulation. The study aims at estimation of defects of CD4+ CD25+high cells among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations, and identification of disease characteristics in those children. Twenty-two cases with type 1 diabetes associated with other autoimmune diseases were recruited from the Diabetic Endocrine and Metabolic Pediatric Unit (DEMPU, Cairo University along with twenty-one normal subjects matched for age and sex as a control group. Their anthropometric measurements, diabetic profiles and glycemic control were recorded. Laboratory investigations included complete blood picture, glycosylated hemoglobin, antithyroid antibodies, celiac antibody panel and inflammatory bowel disease markers when indicated. Flow cytometric analysis of T-cell subpopulation was performed using anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies. Three cases revealed a proportion of CD4+ CD25+high below 0.1% and one case had zero counts. However, this observation did not mount to a significant statistical difference between the case and control groups neither in percentage nor absolute numbers. Significant statistical differences were observed between the case and the control groups regarding their height, weight centiles, as well as hemoglobin percentage, white cell counts and the absolute lymphocytic counts. We concluded that, derangements of CD4+ CD25+high cells may exist among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations indicating defects of immune controllers.

  12. Cd-tolerant Suillus luteus: A fungal insurance for pines exposed to Cd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krznaric, Erik [Environmental Biology Group, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Verbruggen, Nathalie [Laboratoire de Physiologie et de Genetique Moleculaire des Plantes, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, CP242, Bd du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Wevers, Jan H.L. [Environmental Biology Group, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Carleer, Robert [Laboratory of Applied Chemistry, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Vangronsveld, Jaco [Environmental Biology Group, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Colpaert, Jan V., E-mail: jan.colpaert@uhasselt.b [Environmental Biology Group, Centre for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Agoralaan, Gebouw D, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2009-05-15

    Soil metal pollution can trigger evolutionary adaptation in soil-borne organisms. An in vitro screening test showed cadmium adaptation in populations of Suillus luteus (L.: Fr.) Roussel, an ectomycorrhizal fungus of pine trees. Cadmium stress was subsequently investigated in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings inoculated with a Cd-tolerant S. luteus, isolated from a heavy metal contaminated site, and compared to plants inoculated with a Cd-sensitive isolate from a non-polluted area. A dose-response experiment with mycorrhizal pines showed better plant protection by a Cd-adapted fungus: more fungal biomass and a higher nutrient uptake at high Cd exposure. In addition, less Cd was transferred to aboveground plant parts. Because of the key role of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for tree fitness, the evolution of Cd tolerance in an ectomycorrhizal partner such as S. luteus can be of major importance for the establishment of pine forests on Cd-contaminated soils. - The evolutionary adaptation for higher Cd tolerance in Suillus luteus, an ectomycorrhizal fungus, is of major importance for the amelioration of Cd toxicity in pine trees exposed to high Cd concentrations.

  13. Diphtheria toxin-based anti-human CD19 immunotoxin for targeting human CD19+tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qian; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Huiping; Huang, Qi; Madsen, Joren C; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Wang, Zhirui

    2017-05-01

    CD19 is expressed on normal and neoplastic B cells and is a promising target for immunotherapy. However, there is still an unmet need to further develop novel therapeutic drugs for the treatment of the refractory/relapsing human CD19 + tumors. We have developed a diphtheria toxin-based anti-human CD19 immunotoxin for targeting human CD19 + tumors. We have constructed three isoforms of the CD19 immunotoxin: monovalent, bivalent, and foldback diabody. In vitro binding affinity and efficacy analysis demonstrated that the bivalent isoform had the highest binding affinity and in vitro efficacy. The in vivo efficacy of the CD19 immunotoxins was assessed using human CD19 + JeKo-1 tumor-bearing NOD/SCID IL-2 receptor γ -/- (NSG) mouse model. In these animals, CD19 immunotoxins significantly prolonged the median survival from 31 days in controls to 34, 36, and 40 days in animals receiving the monovalent isoform, foldback diabody isoform, and bivalent isoform, respectively. The bivalent CD19 immunotoxin is a promising therapeutic drug candidate for targeting relapsing/refractory human CD19 + tumors. © 2017 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cd-tolerant Suillus luteus: A fungal insurance for pines exposed to Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krznaric, Erik; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Wevers, Jan H.L.; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Colpaert, Jan V.

    2009-01-01

    Soil metal pollution can trigger evolutionary adaptation in soil-borne organisms. An in vitro screening test showed cadmium adaptation in populations of Suillus luteus (L.: Fr.) Roussel, an ectomycorrhizal fungus of pine trees. Cadmium stress was subsequently investigated in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings inoculated with a Cd-tolerant S. luteus, isolated from a heavy metal contaminated site, and compared to plants inoculated with a Cd-sensitive isolate from a non-polluted area. A dose-response experiment with mycorrhizal pines showed better plant protection by a Cd-adapted fungus: more fungal biomass and a higher nutrient uptake at high Cd exposure. In addition, less Cd was transferred to aboveground plant parts. Because of the key role of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis for tree fitness, the evolution of Cd tolerance in an ectomycorrhizal partner such as S. luteus can be of major importance for the establishment of pine forests on Cd-contaminated soils. - The evolutionary adaptation for higher Cd tolerance in Suillus luteus, an ectomycorrhizal fungus, is of major importance for the amelioration of Cd toxicity in pine trees exposed to high Cd concentrations.

  15. The Function of CD3+CD56+ NKT-Like Cells in HIV-Infected Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells are one of the critical effectors in the immune response to viral infection and tumors, but the functional features of NKT-like cells in HIV infection have been rarely reported. In this study, we observed and described the state of NKT-like cell functions in primary HIV-infected individuals (PHIs, chronic HIV-infected individuals (CHIs, long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs, and HIV-negative controls (NCs. The results showed that the percentage of IFN-γ+CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells was notably higher in LTNPs compared with CHIs, and the proportion of CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells with dual function (IFN-γ+CD107a+ NKT-like cells in LTNPs was also much higher than in CHIs. Additionally, the percentages of IFN-γ+CD107a+ NKT-like cells negatively correlated with viral load. Taken together, our data demonstrated that good functions of CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells in LTNPs likely occurred as a protective mechanism that slows down HIV disease progression.

  16. The function of CD3+CD56+ NKT-like cells in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongjun; Cui, Xiaojian; Cui, Chen; Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Fangyuan; Zhang, Zining; Fu, Yajing; Xu, Junjie; Chu, Zhenxing; Liu, Jing; Han, Xiaoxu; Liao, Christina; Wang, Yanan; Cao, Yaming; Shang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells are one of the critical effectors in the immune response to viral infection and tumors, but the functional features of NKT-like cells in HIV infection have been rarely reported. In this study, we observed and described the state of NKT-like cell functions in primary HIV-infected individuals (PHIs), chronic HIV-infected individuals (CHIs), long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs), and HIV-negative controls (NCs). The results showed that the percentage of IFN-γ(+)CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells was notably higher in LTNPs compared with CHIs, and the proportion of CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells with dual function (IFN-γ(+)CD107a(+) NKT-like cells) in LTNPs was also much higher than in CHIs. Additionally, the percentages of IFN-γ(+)CD107a(+) NKT-like cells negatively correlated with viral load. Taken together, our data demonstrated that good functions of CD3(+)CD56(+) NKT-like cells in LTNPs likely occurred as a protective mechanism that slows down HIV disease progression.

  17. Expression of CD55, CD59, and CD35 on red blood cells of β-thalassaemia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçtekin, Belkls; Kurtoǧlu, Erdal; Yildiz, Mustafa; Bozkurt, Selen

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study β-thalassaemia (β-Thal) is considered a severe, progressive haemolytic anaemia, which needs regular blood transfusions for life expectancy. Complement-mediated erythrocyte destruction can cause both intravascular and extravascular haemolysis. Complement regulatory proteins protect cells from such effects of the complement system. We aimed to perform quantitative analysis of membrane-bound complement regulators, CD55 (decay accelerating factor – DAF), CD35 (complement receptor type 1 – CR1), and CD59 (membrane attack complex inhibitory factor – MACIF) on peripheral red blood cells by flow cytometry. Material and methods The present study was carried out on 47 β-thalassemia major (β-TM) patients, 20 β-thalassaemia intermedia (β-TI) patients, and 17 healthy volunteers as control subjects. Results CD55 levels of β-TM patients (58.64 ±17.06%) were significantly decreased compared to β-TI patients (83.34 ±13.82%) and healthy controls (88.57 ±11.69%) (p < 0.01). CD59 levels of β-TM patients were not significantly different than β-TI patients and controls, but CD35 levels were significantly lower in the β-TM patients (3.56 ±4.87%) and β-TI patients (12.48 ±9.19%) than in the control group (39.98 ±15.01%) (p < 0.01). Conclusions Low levels of CD55 and CD35 in thalassaemia major patients indicates a role for them in the aetiopathogenesis of haemolysis in this disease, and also this defect in a complement system may be responsible for the chronic complications seen in these patients. PMID:28680334

  18. The Nostoc punctiforme Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John C. Meeks

    2001-12-31

    Nostoc punctiforme is a filamentous cyanobacterium with extensive phenotypic characteristics and a relatively large genome, approaching 10 Mb. The phenotypic characteristics include a photoautotrophic, diazotrophic mode of growth, but N. punctiforme is also facultatively heterotrophic; its vegetative cells have multiple development alternatives, including terminal differentiation into nitrogen-fixing heterocysts and transient differentiation into spore-like akinetes or motile filaments called hormogonia; and N. punctiforme has broad symbiotic competence with fungi and terrestrial plants, including bryophytes, gymnosperms and an angiosperm. The shotgun-sequencing phase of the N. punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 genome has been completed by the Joint Genome Institute. Annotation of an 8.9 Mb database yielded 7432 open reading frames, 45% of which encode proteins with known or probable known function and 29% of which are unique to N. punctiforme. Comparative analysis of the sequence indicates a genome that is highly plastic and in a state of flux, with numerous insertion sequences and multilocus repeats, as well as genes encoding transposases and DNA modification enzymes. The sequence also reveals the presence of genes encoding putative proteins that collectively define almost all characteristics of cyanobacteria as a group. N. punctiforme has an extensive potential to sense and respond to environmental signals as reflected by the presence of more than 400 genes encoding sensor protein kinases, response regulators and other transcriptional factors. The signal transduction systems and any of the large number of unique genes may play essential roles in the cell differentiation and symbiotic interaction properties of N. punctiforme.

  19. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  20. Genomic prediction using subsampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Alencar; Xu, Shizhong; Muir, William; Rainey, Katy Martin

    2017-03-24

    Genome-wide assisted selection is a critical tool for the genetic improvement of plants and animals. Whole-genome regression models in Bayesian framework represent the main family of prediction methods. Fitting such models with a large number of observations involves a prohibitive computational burden. We propose the use of subsampling bootstrap Markov chain in genomic prediction. Such method consists of fitting whole-genome regression models by subsampling observations in each round of a Markov Chain Monte Carlo. We evaluated the effect of subsampling bootstrap on prediction and computational parameters. Across datasets, we observed an optimal subsampling proportion of observations around 50% with replacement, and around 33% without replacement. Subsampling provided a substantial decrease in computation time, reducing the time to fit the model by half. On average, losses on predictive properties imposed by subsampling were negligible, usually below 1%. For each dataset, an optimal subsampling point that improves prediction properties was observed, but the improvements were also negligible. Combining subsampling with Gibbs sampling is an interesting ensemble algorithm. The investigation indicates that the subsampling bootstrap Markov chain algorithm substantially reduces computational burden associated with model fitting, and it may slightly enhance prediction properties.

  1. The Rhodobacter capsulatus genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haselkorn, R.; Lapidus, A.; Kogan, Y.; Vlček, Čestmír; Pačes, Jan; Pačes, Václav; Ulbrich, P.; Pečenková, Tamara; Rebrekov, D.; Milgram, A.; Mazur, M.; Cox, R.; Kyrpides, N.; Ivanova, N.; Kapatral, V.; Los, T.; Lykidis, A.; Mikhailova, N.; Reznik, G.; Vasieva, O.; Fonstein, M.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 1 (2001), s. 43-52 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A079 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : genome * expression * gene Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.739, year: 2001

  2. Functional genomics of tomato

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... very first challenge before scientists working on tomato functional biology is to exploit this high-quality reference sequence for tapping of the ... and exploitation of the genomic diversity present in Solanum genus, in general, and ..... associated with this tool retain its labour-intensive nature, ineffectiveness for ...

  3. Searching for genomic constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lio', P.; Ruffo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have analyzed general properties of very long DNA sequences belonging to simple and complex organisms, by using different correlation methods. They have distinguished those base compositional rules that concern the entire genome which they call 'genomic constraints' from the rules that depend on the 'external natural selection' acting on single genes, i. e. protein-centered constraints. They show that G + C content, purine / pyrimidine distributions and biological complexity of the organism are the most important factors which determine base compositional rules and genome complexity. Three main facts are here reported: bacteria with high G + C content have more restrictions on base composition than those with low G + C content; at constant G + C content more complex organisms, ranging from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes (e.g. human) display an increase of repeats 10-20 nucleotides long, which are also partly responsible for long-range correlations; work selection of length 3 to 10 is stronger in human and in bacteria for two distinct reasons. With respect to previous studies, they have also compared the genomic sequence of the archeon Methanococcus jannaschii with those of bacteria and eukaryotes: it shows sometimes an intermediate statistical behaviour

  4. Better chocolate through genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobroma cacao, the cacao or chocolate tree, is a tropical understory tree whose seeds are used to make chocolate. And like any important crop, cacao is the subject of much research. On September 15, 2010, scientists publicly released a preliminary sequence of the cacao genome--which contains all o...

  5. Genomics of human longevity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagboom, P. E.; Beekman, M.; Passtoors, W. M.; Deelen, J.; Vaarhorst, A. A.M.; Boer, J. M.; Van Den Akker, E. B.; Van Heemst, D.; De Craen, A. J.M.; Maier, A. B.; Rozing, M.; Mooijaart, S. P.; Heijmans, B. T.; Westendorp, R. G.J.

    2011-01-01

    In animal models, single-gene mutations in genes involved in insulin/IGF and target of rapamycin signalling pathways extend lifespan to a considerable extent. The genetic, genomic and epigenetic influences on human longevity are expected to be much more complex. Strikingly however, beneficial

  6. CD 4 + CD 25 + T cells maintain homeostasis by promoting TER - 119 cell development and inhibiting T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaimin Rifa’i

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells involved in the regulation of self- tolerance and normality of homeostasis. CD122 deficient mice are model animals that have an abnormal immune system characteristically have a high number of activated T cells and TER-119 cell decreased. Here we showed evidence that the transfer of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells derived from normal mice to CD122- defficient neonates prevent the development of activated memory T cells and elicit TER-119 differentiation. Bone marrow reconstitution derived from CD122-/- mice to normal mice resulting tolerance to individual that genetically different. Importantly, CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells derived from normal mice can replace CD4+ CD25+ cells derived from CD122-/- mice. The results of this experiment suggest that regulatory T cells from normal mice exert a critical role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and controlling hematopoietic disorder.

  7. Increased Expression of CD200 on Circulating CD11b+ Monocytes in Patients with Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads K; Hviid, Thomas V F

    2013-01-01

    the ligand and the receptor are expressed on a broad spectrum of cell types, we set out to study the expression of CD200 and CD200R on CD11b+ monocytes, granulocytes, and subsets of T lymphocytes. DESIGN: Prospective, case-control study. PARTICIPANTS: The study population consisted of 62 patients...... blood was obtained and stained with monoclonal antibodies and analyzed using flow cytometry within 6 hours of phlebotomy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The percentage of CD11b+ monocytes, granulocytes, and CD4+/CD8+ T lymphocytes positive for CD200 or CD200R in patients and controls, respectively. RESULTS......: Patients with neovascular AMD had a higher percentage of CD11b+CD200+ monocytes and CD200+ monocytes compared with controls. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the intergroup differences observed were independent of age. Moreover, an age-related increment in CD200 expression on monocytes...

  8. Identification and characterization of two CD4 alleles in Microminipigs

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Tatsuya; Nishii, Naohito; Takashima, Satoshi; Takasu, Masaki; Imaeda, Noriaki; Aiki-Oshimo, Kayo; Yamazoe, Kazuaki; Kakisaka, Michinori; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Aida, Yoko; Kametani, Yoshie; Kulski, Jerzy K.; Ando, Asako; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background We previously identified two phenotypes of CD4+ cells with and without reactions to anti-pig CD4 monoclonal antibodies by flow cytometry in a herd of Microminipigs. In this study, we analyzed the coding sequences of CD4 and certified the expression of CD4 molecules in order to identify the genetic sequence variants responsible for the positive and negative PBMCs reactivity to anti-pig CD4 monoclonal antibodies. Results We identified two CD4 alleles, CD4.A and CD4.B, corresponding t...

  9. Impact of CD68/(CD3+CD20 ratio at the invasive front of primary tumors on distant metastasis development in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemí Eiró

    Full Text Available Tumors are infiltrated by macrophages, T and B-lymphocytes, which may favor tumor development by promoting angiogenesis, growth and invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical relevance of the relative amount of macrophages (CD68⁺, T-cells (CD3⁺ and B-cells (CD20⁺ at the invasive front of breast carcinomas, and the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs either at the invasive front or at the tumor center. We performed an immunohistochemical study counting CD3, CD20 and CD68 positive cells at the invasive front, in 102 breast carcinomas. Also, tissue sections were stained with MMP-2, -9, -11, -14 and TIMP-2 antibodies, and immunoreactivity location, percentage of reactive area and intensity were determined at the invasive front and at the tumor center. The results showed that an increased CD68 count and CD68/(CD3+CD20 ratio were directly associated with both MMP-11 and TIMP-2 expression by mononuclear inflammatory cells at the tumor center (p = 0.041 and p = 0.025 for CD68 count and p = 0.001 and p = 0.045 for ratio, respectively for MMP-11 and TIMP-2. In addition, a high CD68/(CD3+CD20 ratio (>0.05 was directly associated with a higher probability of shortened relapse-free survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that CD68/(CD3+CD20 ratio was an independent factor associated with distant relapse-free survival (RR: 2.54, CI: (1.23-5.24, p<0.01. Therefore, CD68/(CD3+CD20 ratio at the invasive front could be used as an important prognostic marker.

  10. Identification of Stem-Like Cells in Atrial Myxoma by Markers CD44, CD19, and CD45

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xianghe; Liu, Danni; Cui, Jian; Zhou, Manqian; Liu, Na

    2016-01-01

    Atrial myxoma is the most frequent tumor arising mainly in atrial septum and its origin remains uncertain. It has been reported that a subpopulation of stem-like cells are present in benign tumors and responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. In this study, we investigated whether stem-like cells could contribute to the atrial cardiac myxoma. Immunohistology data confirmed that a population of cells bearing the surface markers CD19, CD45, and CD44 resided in a mucopolysaccharide-rich matrix of myxoma. Moreover, we isolated myxoma cells with phase-bright culture method and confirmed that myxoma derived cells express robust level of CD19, CD45, and CD44. Furthermore, the pluripotency of this population of cells also was validated by cardiomyocytes and smooth muscle cells differentiation in vitro. Our results indicate that primary cardiac myxoma may arise from mesenchymal stem cells with the ability to generate tumors with multilineage differentiation. In conclusion, this study for the first time verified that stem-like cells are present in atrial myxoma and this population of cells may have the capacity for myxoma initiation and progression. PMID:28115941

  11. Time-resolved photoluminescence study of CdSe/CdMnS/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. R. [Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Department of Physics, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Delikanli, S.; Demir, H. V., E-mail: volkan@bilkent.edu.tr [LUMINOUS Center of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Materials Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Department of Physics, UNAM−Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Scrace, T.; Zhang, P.; Norden, T.; Petrou, A., E-mail: petrou@buffalo.edu [Department of Physics, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Thomay, T.; Cartwright, A. N. [Department of Electrical Engineering, State University of New York, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States)

    2016-06-13

    We used photoluminescence spectroscopy to resolve two emission features in CdSe/CdMnS/CdS and CdSe/CdS core/multi-shell nanoplatelet heterostructures. The photoluminescence from the magnetic sample has a positive circular polarization with a maximum centered at the position of the lower energy feature. The higher energy feature has a corresponding signature in the absorption spectrum; this is not the case for the low-energy feature. We have also studied the temporal evolution of these features using a pulsed-excitation/time-resolved photoluminescence technique to investigate their corresponding recombination channels. A model was used to analyze the temporal dynamics of the photoluminescence which yielded two distinct timescales associated with these recombination channels. The above results indicate that the low-energy feature is associated with recombination of electrons with holes localized at the core/shell interfaces; the high-energy feature, on the other hand, is excitonic in nature with the holes confined within the CdSe cores.

  12. Genome stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaften, G.W. van

    2006-01-01

    Genome stability is closely linked to cancer. Most, if not all tumor cells show some form of genome instability, mutations can range from single point mutations to gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy. Genome instability is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis. In order

  13. Evaluation of the Association between CD4, CD8 and CD25 Cell Counts and SLE in Active Disease and in Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawale, Archana; Bohara, Vinay; Bichile, L S

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the correlation between the levels of CD4, CD8 and CD25 cells and SLE disease in active phase and in remission. A total of 25 SLE patients, aged between 18-60 years, and fulfilling the ACR criteria with preferential Renal and CNS involvement were included in this study. Baseline CD4/CD8 and CD25 counts, lab parameters etc were conducted. Approximately at the end of 6 months with the settlement of the disease activity blood sample was drawn for the CD4, CD8 and CD25 counts and other lab parameters. ESR showed a statistical significant decrease while the SLEDAI score and proteinuria showed a decreasing trend as the patients underwent remission. The C3 showed an increasing trend, while the C4 showed more or less a stable pattern. Rise in %CD4 and %CD25 count was statistically significant. There was negative correlation between % CD4 count and SLEDAI score, while positive correlation between % CD25 count and SLEDAI score. %CD4 count is a sensitive, specific, reliable and valid marker of active disease in SLE and can be used to follow disease activity. %CD25 count can also be used as a marker to follow disease activity.

  14. Circulating CD3+CD4+CD161+ Cells Are Associated with Early Complications after Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Eun Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore if measurement of pretransplant circulating CD161-expressing cells, in addition to clinical risk factors, could predict mucositis and infections in patients with multiple myeloma (MM undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT. To determine if CD161-expressing cells are likely to predict early complications, namely, mucositis (≥grade 3, infections, and cytomegalovirus (CMV reactivation, we prospectively examined CD161-expressing cells (CD3+CD4+CD161+ and CD3+CD8+CD161+ in peripheral blood samples from 108 patients with MM undergoing ASCT. After adjusting for factors identified by univariate analysis that predicted mucositis (≥grade 3, infection before engraftment, and CMV reactivation, multivariate analyses revealed that the low proportion of CD3+CD4+CD161+ cells in peripheral blood was an independent predictor of mucositis (≥grade 3 (P=0.020, infections before engraftment (P=0.014, and CMV reactivation (P=0.010. In addition, we found that female sex and decreased glomerular filtration rate were independent factors for predicting mucositis. Female sex and severe pulmonary comorbidity were independent factors for predicting infection before engraftment. We found that the proportion of circulating CD3+CD4+CD161+ cells is useful for predicting the occurrence of early complications, including mucositis and infections, after ASCT in patients with MM.

  15. Stokes shift and fine-structure splitting in CdSe / CdTe invert type-II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Worasak Sukkabot

    2018-01-09

    Jan 9, 2018 ... methodology is explained in §2. Section 3 presents the analysis of the Stokes shift and FSS in CdSe/CdTe invert ... Theory and methodology. CdSe/CdTe invert type-II and CdTe/CdSe type-II core/ ... and exchange matrix elements are defined in the third term and fourth term, respectively. The detailed cal-.

  16. Variants of CD36 gene and their association with CD36 protein expression in platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianguo; Liu, Ying; Hong, Xiaozhen; Chen, Shu; Ma, Kairong; Lan, Xiaofei; Ying, Yanling; He, Ji; Zhu, Faming; Lv, Hangjun

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between CD36 expression level in platelets and polymorphism of the CD36 gene still needs to be explored. Here, we investigated polymorphisms of the CD36 gene and CD36 expression level in platelets in the Chinese Han population. Materials and methods A total of 477 samples were sequenced for exons 2 to 14 of the CD36 gene using a polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing method. In 192 of these individuals the expression levels of CD36 antigen were analysed by flow cytometry. The genotype-phenotype relationship in platelets was analysed. Results A total of 22 variants of the CD36 gene were identified, of which five variants (111 A>T, 681 C>A, 1172–1183 del12b, 1236 delT and 1395 A>C) were novel variations, and nine were also found in single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) but had not been confirmed in individuals with CD36 deficiency. Two variants (329–332 delAC and 1228–1239 del12bp) in the coding region are the most frequent mutations in the Chinese population. Type II CD36 deficiency was identified in seven of 192 individuals, giving a frequency of 3.6%. Individuals with CD36 variations or wild-type genotypes both showed CD36 antigen negative, low-level and high-level expression patterns in platelets. The frequency of the nt-132 A>C polymorphism in the 5′-UTR is relatively high in the Chinese population (0.3516): the expression of CD36 was lower in individuals with nt-132 A>C than in those with the wild-type genotype. Discussion The distribution of CD36 gene variants in the Chinese population is different from that previously reported. The levels of expression of CD36 antigen in platelets are not determined directly by the genotypes of the CD36 coding region. This suggests that the molecular basis of type II CD36 deficiency may be derived from combined effects of coding region and potential cis-regulatory elements in the 5′-UTR of the CD36 gene. PMID:24960640

  17. Transcription factor regulation of CD8+ T-cell memory and exhaustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John

    2010-07-01

    During an infection, antigen-specific CD8+ T cells undergo numerous cellular and transcriptional changes as they develop from naive T cells into effector and memory cells. However, when the antigen persists in a chronic infection, the cellular programs governing effector and memory development are influenced by chronic stimulation, and dysfunctional or exhausted CD8+ T cells are generated. Recently, exhausted CD8+ T cells were found to differ dramatically from naive and functional memory CD8+ T cells on a transcriptional level, demonstrating that exposure to chronic antigen can impact T cells at a fundamental level. While transcriptional changes in CD8+ T cells during memory development is currently a topic of particular interest, the transcriptional changes related to exhaustion and other forms of T-cell dysfunction have received less attention. New computational methods are not only uncovering important transcription factors in these developmental processes but are also going further to define and connect these transcription factors into transcriptional modules that work in parallel to control cell fate and state. Understanding the molecular processes behind the development of CD8+ T-cell memory and exhaustion should not only increase our understanding of the immune system but also could reveal therapeutic targets and treatments for infectious and immunological diseases. Here, we provide a basic overview of acute and chronic viral infections and the transcription factors known to influence the development of virus-specific T cells in both settings. We also discuss recent innovations in genomic and computational tools that could be used to enhance the way we understand the development of T-cell responses to infectious disease.

  18. Anti-CD40-mediated cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Sufia Butt; Sørensen, Jesper Freddie; Olsen, Barbara Nicola

    2014-01-01

    activation and thus enhancement of immune responses. Treatment with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been exploited in several cancer immunotherapy studies in mice and led to the development of anti-CD40 antibodies for clinical use. Here, Dacetuzumab and Lucatumumab are in the most advanced stage...... with other cancer immunotherapies, in particular interleukin (IL)-2. An in-depth analysis of this immunotherapy is provided elsewhere. In the present review, we provide an update of the most recent clinical trials with anti-CD40 antibodies. We present and discuss recent and ongoing clinical trials...... in this field, including clinical studies which combine anti-CD40 treatment with other cancer-treatments, such as Rituximab and Tremelimumab....

  19. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  20. Superantigen presentation by human retinal pigment epithelial cells to T cells is dependent on CD2-CD58 and CD18-CD54 molecule interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Junker, N; Kaestel, C G

    2001-01-01

    Human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells are capable of presenting bacterial superantigens (SAg) to T cells in vitro by ligation of MHC class II molecules on RPE cells with the T cell receptor. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement of adhesion molecules in presentation....... Proliferation was measured by (3)H-thymidine incorporation assay. In selected experiments, either RPE or T cells were pre-treated with blocking antibodies specific for cell surface molecules. For comparison, dendritic cells were used as superantigen presenting cells for T cells. This study showed...... that presentation of SEA by RPE cells to resting T cells was dependent on the presence of the molecules CD2, CD58 and CD18, CD54. The cycling status of T cells was decisive, thus resting T cells but not activated T cells were capable to proliferate in response to SEA presentation. Proliferation of T cells induced...

  1. Personnel Research Science (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Womer, Norman K

    2005-01-01

    ELECTRONIC FILE CHARACTERISTICS: 8 files; MS Word (.DOC). PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 1.97 MB. ABSTRACT: This research is motivated by two important but very different problems facing the Navy...

  2. Private STINET Handbook (CD-ROM)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedrick, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    ...: 1 CD-ROM; 4 3/4 in.; 11.0 MB. ABSTRACT: This handbook provides instruction in the searching of the Technical Reports, Research Summaries and Independent Research and Development databases in Private STINET...

  3. Alternative pathway for the development of Vα14+ NKT cells directly from CD4-CD8- thymocytes that bypasses the CD4+CD8+ stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtsoodol, Nyambayar; Shigeura, Tomokuni; Aihara, Minako; Ozawa, Ritsuko; Kojo, Satoshi; Harada, Michishige; Endo, Takaho A; Watanabe, Takashi; Ohara, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2017-03-01

    Although invariant V α 14 + natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are thought to be generated from CD4 + CD8 + double-positive (DP) thymocytes, the developmental origin of CD4 - CD8 - double-negative (DN) NKT cells still remains unresolved. Here we provide definitive genetic evidence obtained, through studies of mice with DP-stage-specific ablation of expression of the gene encoding the recombinase component RAG-2 (Rag2) and by a fate-mapping approach, that supports the proposal of the existence of an alternative developmental pathway through which a fraction of DN NKT cells with strong T-helper-type-1 (T H 1)-biased and cytotoxic characteristics develop from late DN-stage thymocytes, bypassing the DP stage. These findings provide new insight into understanding of the development of NKT cells and propose a role for timing of expression of the invariant T cell antigen receptor in determining the functional properties of NKT cells.

  4. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  5. GenomeGraphs: integrated genomic data visualization with R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spellman Paul T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological studies involve a growing number of distinct high-throughput experiments to characterize samples of interest. There is a lack of methods to visualize these different genomic datasets in a versatile manner. In addition, genomic data analysis requires integrated visualization of experimental data along with constantly changing genomic annotation and statistical analyses. Results We developed GenomeGraphs, as an add-on software package for the statistical programming environment R, to facilitate integrated visualization of genomic datasets. GenomeGraphs uses the biomaRt package to perform on-line annotation queries to Ensembl and translates these to gene/transcript structures in viewports of the grid graphics package. This allows genomic annotation to be plotted together with experimental data. GenomeGraphs can also be used to plot custom annotation tracks in combination with different experimental data types together in one plot using the same genomic coordinate system. Conclusion GenomeGraphs is a flexible and extensible software package which can be used to visualize a multitude of genomic datasets within the statistical programming environment R.

  6. GenomeGraphs: integrated genomic data visualization with R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durinck, Steffen; Bullard, James; Spellman, Paul T; Dudoit, Sandrine

    2009-01-06

    Biological studies involve a growing number of distinct high-throughput experiments to characterize samples of interest. There is a lack of methods to visualize these different genomic datasets in a versatile manner. In addition, genomic data analysis requires integrated visualization of experimental data along with constantly changing genomic annotation and statistical analyses. We developed GenomeGraphs, as an add-on software package for the statistical programming environment R, to facilitate integrated visualization of genomic datasets. GenomeGraphs uses the biomaRt package to perform on-line annotation queries to Ensembl and translates these to gene/transcript structures in viewports of the grid graphics package. This allows genomic annotation to be plotted together with experimental data. GenomeGraphs can also be used to plot custom annotation tracks in combination with different experimental data types together in one plot using the same genomic coordinate system. GenomeGraphs is a flexible and extensible software package which can be used to visualize a multitude of genomic datasets within the statistical programming environment R.

  7. Performance Study of CdS/Co-Doped-CdSe Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping Zou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to optimize the charge transfer path in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs, we employed successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method to dope CdSe with Co for fabricating CdS/Co-doped-CdSe QDSCs constructed with CdS/Co-doped-CdSe deposited on mesoscopic TiO2 film as photoanode, Pt counter electrode, and sulfide/polysulfide electrolyte. After Co doping, the bandgap of CdSe quantum dot decreases, and the conduction band and valence band all improve, forming a cascade energy level which is more conducive to charge transport inside the solar cell and reducing the recombination of electron-hole thus improving the photocurrent and ultimately improving the power conversion efficiency. This work has not been found in the literature.

  8. Possible association of CD3 and CD4 polymorphisms with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabanbasani, M Z; Buyse, I; Legius, E; Decorte, R; Marynen, P; Bouillon, R; Cassiman, J J

    1994-01-01

    Population and family studies show that predisposition to type I diabetes (IDDM) is multifactorial, and that polymorphisms in the MHC region contribute substantially to the susceptibility to IDDM. In the present study the association of polymorphisms in the CD4 and the delta subunit of CD3 with IDDM were examined in a Belgian population. We observed that the frequency of the CD A4/A4 genotype and of the CD3 91 allele were significantly increased P = 0.0077) and decreased (P = 3.8 x 10(-5), respectively, in IDDM compared with controls. These results therefore suggest that CD4, CD3 or neighbouring genes might contribute to IDDM susceptibility. These results are, however, preliminary and cannot be considered as established until re-tested in a new population. PMID:8082309

  9. In-line CD metrology with combined use of scatterometry a