WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccrboh gene encoding

  1. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-l-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  2. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Ethanol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Thomas D.; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of beverage alcohol (ethanol) on the body are determined largely by the rate at which it and its main breakdown product, acetaldehyde, are metabolized after consumption. The main metabolic pathway for ethanol involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Seven different ADHs and three different ALDHs that metabolize ethanol have been identified. The genes encoding these enzymes exist in different variants (i.e., alleles), many of which differ by a single DNA building block (i.e., single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]). Some of these SNPs result in enzymes with altered kinetic properties. For example, certain ADH1B and ADH1C variants that are commonly found in East Asian populations lead to more rapid ethanol breakdown and acetaldehyde accumulation in the body. Because acetaldehyde has harmful effects on the body, people carrying these alleles are less likely to drink and have a lower risk of alcohol dependence. Likewise, an ALDH2 variant with reduced activity results in acetaldehyde buildup and also has a protective effect against alcoholism. In addition to affecting drinking behaviors and risk for alcoholism, ADH and ALDH alleles impact the risk for esophageal cancer. PMID:23134050

  3. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  4. Mosaic tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Philip J; Amodeo, Nina; Roberts, Adam P

    2016-12-01

    First reported in 2003, mosaic tetracycline resistance genes are a subgroup of the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs). They are formed when two or more RPP-encoding genes recombine resulting in a functional chimera. To date, the majority of mosaic genes are derived from sections of three RPP genes, tet(O), tet(W) and tet(32), with others comprising tet(M) and tet(S). In this first review of mosaic genes, we report on their structure, diversity and prevalence, and suggest that these genes may be responsible for an under-reported contribution to tetracycline resistance in bacteria.

  5. The Sulfolobicin Genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius Encode Novel Antimicrobial Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, Albert F.; Rohulya, Olha V.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Crenarchaea, such as Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii, produce antimicrobial proteins called sulfolobicins. These antimicrobial proteins inhibit the growth of closely related species. Here we report the identification of the sulfolobicin-encoding genes in S. acidocaldarius. The acti

  6. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C;

    1993-01-01

    this antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern...... hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development...

  7. Functional analysis of plastid-encoded genes

    OpenAIRE

    Swiatek, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Plastid chromosomes from the variety of plant species contain several conserved open reading frames of unknown function, which most probably represent functional genes. The primary aim of this thesis was the analysis of the role of two such ORFs, designated ycfs or hypothetical chloroplast reading frames, namely ycf9 (ORF62) and ycf10 (ORF229, cemA). Both were analyzed in Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) via their inactivation using biolistic plastid transformation. A new experiment...

  8. Bioinformatics analysis and detection of gelatinase encoded gene in Lysinibacillussphaericus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Shahimi, Safiyyah; Khalid, Rozida Mohd.; Ayob, Mohd. Khan; Bakar, Mohd. Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we performed bioinformatics analysis toward genome sequence of Lysinibacillussphaericus (L. sphaericus) to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. L. sphaericus was isolated from soil and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and bovine gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species of meat, respectively. The main focus of this research is to identify the gelatinase encoded gene within the bacteria of L. Sphaericus using bioinformatics analysis of partially sequence genome. From the research study, three candidate gene were identified which was, gelatinase candidate gene 1 (P1), NODE_71_length_93919_cov_158.931839_21 which containing 1563 base pair (bp) in size with 520 amino acids sequence; Secondly, gelatinase candidate gene 2 (P2), NODE_23_length_52851_cov_190.061386_17 which containing 1776 bp in size with 591 amino acids sequence; and Thirdly, gelatinase candidate gene 3 (P3), NODE_106_length_32943_cov_169.147919_8 containing 1701 bp in size with 566 amino acids sequence. Three pairs of oligonucleotide primers were designed and namely as, F1, R1, F2, R2, F3 and R3 were targeted short sequences of cDNA by PCR. The amplicons were reliably results in 1563 bp in size for candidate gene P1 and 1701 bp in size for candidate gene P3. Therefore, the results of bioinformatics analysis of L. Sphaericus resulting in gene encoded gelatinase were identified.

  9. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca......D) encoding N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase upstream of prs, and a gene homologous to ctc downstream of prs. cDNA synthesis with a B. caldolyticus gcaD-prs-ctc-specified mRNA as template, followed by amplification utilising the polymerase chain reaction indicated that the three genes are co......-transcribed. Comparison of amino acid sequences revealed a high similarity among PRPP synthases across a wide phylogenetic range. An E. coli strain harbouring the B. caldolyticus prs gene in a multicopy plasmid produced PRPP synthase activity 33-fold over the activity of a haploid B. caldolyticus strain. B. caldolyticus...

  10. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  11. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  12. Selection for Genes Encoding Secreted Proteins and Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Robert D.; Gu, Qimin; Goddard, Audrey; Rosenthal, Arnon

    1996-07-01

    Extracellular proteins play an essential role in the formation, differentiation, and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Despite that, the systematic identification of genes encoding these proteins has not been possible. We describe here a highly efficient method to isolate genes encoding secreted and membrane-bound proteins by using a single-step selection in yeast. Application of this method, termed signal peptide selection, to various tissues yielded 559 clones that appear to encode known or novel extracellular proteins. These include members of the transforming growth factor and epidermal growth factor protein families, endocrine hormones, tyrosine kinase receptors, serine/threonine kinase receptors, seven transmembrane receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, plasma proteins, and ion channels. The eventual identification of most, or all, extracellular signaling molecules will advance our understanding of fundamental biological processes and our ability to intervene in disease states.

  13. Structure of the gene encoding columbid annexin Icp35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitti, Y S; Horseman, N D

    1991-07-22

    The cp35 gene, encoding an annexin I (AnxI) cropsac 35-kDa protein (cp35) from the pigeon, consists of 13 exons and twelve introns. The borders of exons 2-13 were mapped by comparison with the known cDNA sequence. A 5-kb sequence containing exons 1, 2, and 3, and 1.4 kb of 5'-flanking DNA, is presented. The transcription start point was mapped by S1 nuclease protection. The region of the cp35 mRNA sequence, which we had previously shown to be profoundly different from mammalian anxI, is located in the first half of exon 3. Whereas human anxI is known to be single copy, Southern analysis of pigeon genomic DNA and genomic clones demonstrated multiple anxI genes in the pigeon, diverging significantly in their 5'-termini. Pigeon vimentin, on the other hand, is encoded by a single-copy gene as it is in other birds and mammals. These experiments have demonstrated that the cp35 mRNA is transcribed from its individual gene and is not a product of alternative processing of the pigeon homolog of mammalian anxI. We speculate that the diversification of anxI genes in Columbid birds allowed the recruitment of one of these genes (cp35) for unique regulation by prolactin in the absence of post-translational regulation via residues encoded by exons 2 and 3.

  14. Identification and use of genes encoding amatoxin and phallotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen, Heather E.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong; Scott-Craig, John S.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptide toxins and toxin production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Amanita species encoding Amanita peptides, specifically relating to amatoxins and phallotoxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for detecting Amanita peptide toxin genes for identifying Amanita peptide-producing mushrooms and for diagnosing suspected cases of mushroom poisoning. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for diagnosing and monitoring suspected cases of mushroom poisoning in patients.

  15. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  16. Identification of β-haemolysin-encoding genes in Streptococcus anginosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asam, D; Mauerer, S; Walheim, E; Spellerberg, B

    2013-08-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is an emerging pathogen, but little is known about its virulence factors. To detect the genes responsible for β-haemolysis we performed genomic mutagenesis of the β-haemolytic S. anginosus type strain ATCC 12395 using the vector pGhost9:ISS1. Integration site analysis of 15 non-haemolytic mutants identified a gene cluster with high homology to the genes of the streptolysin S (SLS) encoding sag gene cluster of S. pyogenes. The gene cluster harbours 10 open reading frames displaying significant similarities to the S. pyogenes genes sagA-sagI, with the identities on protein level ranging from 38 to 87%. Complementation assays of S. anginosus sagB and sagD integration mutants with the respective genes confirmed their importance for β-haemolysin production and suggest the presence of post-translational modifications in S. anginosus SLS similar to SLS of S. pyogenes. Characterization of the S. anginosus haemolysin in comparison to the S. pyogenes SLS showed that the haemolysin is surface bound, but in contrast to S. pyogenes neither fetal calf serum nor RNA was able to stabilize the haemolysin of S. anginosus in culture supernatants. Inhibition of β-haemolysis by polyethylene glycol of different sizes was carried out, giving no evidence of a pore-forming haemolytic mechanism. Analysis of a whole genome shotgun sequence of Streptococcus constellatus, a closely related streptococcal species that belongs to the S. anginosus group, revealed a similar sag gene cluster. Employing a genomic mutagenesis strategy we were able to determine an SLS encoding gene cluster in S. anginosus and demonstrate its importance for β-haemolysin production in S. anginosus.

  17. The sulfolobicin genes of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encode novel antimicrobial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellen, Albert F; Rohulya, Olha V; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Wagner, Michaela; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2011-09-01

    Crenarchaea, such as Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and Sulfolobus tokodaii, produce antimicrobial proteins called sulfolobicins. These antimicrobial proteins inhibit the growth of closely related species. Here we report the identification of the sulfolobicin-encoding genes in S. acidocaldarius. The active sulfolobicin comprises two proteins that are equipped with a classical signal sequence. These proteins are secreted by the cells and found to be membrane vesicle associated. Gene inactivation studies demonstrate that both proteins are required for the bacteriostatic antimicrobial activity. Sulfolobicins constitute a novel class of antimicrobial proteins without detectable homology to any other protein.

  18. Expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins: a macroarray study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futyma, Konrad; Miotła, Paweł; Różyńska, Krystyna; Zdunek, Małgorzata; Semczuk, Andrzej; Rechberger, Tomasz; Wojcierowski, Jacek

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is one of the most common gynecological malignancies in Poland, with well-established risk factors. Genetic instability and molecular alterations responsible for endometrial carcinogenesis have been systematically investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate, by means of cDNA macroarrays, the expression profiles of genes encoding extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in ECs. Tissue specimens were collected during surgical procedures from 40 patients with EC, and control tissue was collected from 9 patients with uterine leiomyomas. RNA was isolated and RT-PCR with radioisotope-labeled cDNA was performed. The levels of ECM protein gene expression in normal endometrial tissues were compared to the expression of these genes in EC specimens. Statistically significant differences in gene expression, stratified by clinical stage of the ECs, were detected for aggrecan, vitronectin, tenascin R, nidogen and two collagen proteins: type VIII chain α1 and type XI chain α2. All of these proteins were overexpressed in stage III endometrial carcinomas compared to levels in stage I and II uterine neoplasms. In conclusion, increased expression of genes encoding ECM proteins may play an important role in facilitating accelerated disease progression of human ECs.

  19. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  20. [Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2011-02-14

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is a common genetic skin disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:250 caused by mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin. This disorder manifests itself within the first year of life and is clinically characterized by dry, scaly skin, keratosis pilaris, palmar hyperlinearity and atopic manifestations. Patients with a severe phenotype are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, whereas heterozygous patients show mild disease, suggesting semidominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. We present a patient with classic severe ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema and two loss-of-function mutations.

  1. The pea gene NA encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Sandra E; Elliott, Robert C; Helliwell, Chris A; Poole, Andrew T; Reid, James B

    2003-01-01

    The gibberellin (GA)-deficient dwarf na mutant in pea (Pisum sativum) has severely reduced internode elongation, reduced root growth, and decreased leaflet size. However, the seeds develop normally. Two genes, PsKAO1 and PsKAO2, encoding cytochrome P450 monooxygenases of the subfamily CYP88A were isolated. Both PsKAO1 and PsKAO2 had ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO) activity, catalyzing the three steps of the GA biosynthetic pathway from ent-kaurenoic acid to GA(12) when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). In addition to the intermediates ent-7alpha-hydroxykaurenoic acid and GA(12)-aldehyde, some additional products of the pea KAO activity were detected, including ent-6alpha,7alpha-dihydroxykaurenoic acid and 7beta-hydroxykaurenolide. The NA gene encodes PsKAO1, because in two independent mutant alleles, na-1 and na-2, PsKAO1 had altered sequences and the five-base deletion in PsKAO1 associated with the na-1 allele cosegregated with the dwarf na phenotype. PsKAO1 was expressed in the stem, apical bud, leaf, pod, and root, organs in which GA levels have previously been shown to be reduced in na plants. PsKAO2 was expressed only in seeds and this may explain the normal seed development and normal GA biosynthesis in seeds of na plants.

  2. Co-transcriptional folding is encoded within RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing RNA structure prediction programs fold a completely synthesized RNA molecule. However, within the cell, RNA molecules emerge sequentially during the directed process of transcription. Dedicated experiments with individual RNA molecules have shown that RNA folds while it is being transcribed and that its correct folding can also depend on the proper speed of transcription. Methods The main aim of this work is to study if and how co-transcriptional folding is encoded within the primary and secondary structure of RNA genes. In order to achieve this, we study the known primary and secondary structures of a comprehensive data set of 361 RNA genes as well as a set of 48 RNA sequences that are known to differ from the originally transcribed sequence units. We detect co-transcriptional folding by defining two measures of directedness which quantify the extend of asymmetry between alternative helices that lie 5' and those that lie 3' of the known helices with which they compete. Results We show with statistical significance that co-transcriptional folding strongly influences RNA sequences in two ways: (1 alternative helices that would compete with the formation of the functional structure during co-transcriptional folding are suppressed and (2 the formation of transient structures which may serve as guidelines for the co-transcriptional folding pathway is encouraged. Conclusions These findings have a number of implications for RNA secondary structure prediction methods and the detection of RNA genes.

  3. Cloning of two genes encoding Rab7 in Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surmacz, Liliana; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2006-01-01

    Rab7 is a small GTPase that plays a crucial role in the regulation of transport from early to late endosomes and lysosomes, phagosome maturation and in lysosomal biogenesis in mammalian cells. It contains conserved and unique sequence elements that mediate its function. Two Rab7 genes, Rab7a (703 bp) and Rab7b (707 bp) were identified in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium by PCR amplification. They contain three short introns of different lengths (28-32 bp) and sequence located at identical positions in both genes. The presence of two Rab7 genes in the Paramecium genome was confirmed by Southern hybridization analysis performed with six different restriction enzymes. Expression of both genes was assessed by Northern blot and RT-PCR. Two transcripts of 1.8 and 2.2 kb were identified by hybridization analysis. The cloned complementary DNAs, both of 618 nucleotides in length, encode polypeptides of 206 amino acids that are 97.6% identical and differ in their C-termini. The predicted protein sequences of Rab7a and Rab7b contain all characteristic domains essential for Rab function: the effector domain (YRATVGADF) and four GTP-binding consensus sequences (GDSGVGKT, WDTAGQ, NKLD, SAK) as well as the prenylation motif (-CC) at the C-terminus indispensable for Rab binding to the membrane. Similarity searches revealed 81.6-82.1% homology of Paramecium Rab7 isoforms to human Rab7 and a lack of an insert typical for the Kinetoplastida - the species that appeared earlier in evolution. Paramecium is the first free-living lower eukaryote in which homologues of Rab7 have been identified that exhibit features similar to those of mammalian Rab7.

  4. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA lig...

  5. [Association of schizophrenia with variations in genes encoding transcription factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyajyan, A S; Atshemyan, S A; Zakharyan, R V

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal plasticity and immune system play a key role in pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Identification of genetic factors contributing to these alterations will significantly encourage elucidation of molecular etiopathomechanisms of this disorder. Transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and Ier5 are the important regulators of neuronal plasticity and immune response. In the present work we investigated a potential association of schizophrenia with a number of single nucleotide polymorphisms of c-Fos-,c-Jun and Ier5 encoding genes (FOS, JUN, and IER5 respectively). Genotyping of DNA samples of patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals was performed using polymerase chain reaction with allele specific primers. The results obtained demonstrated association between schizophrenia and FOS rs1063169, FOS rs7101, JUN rs11688, and IER5 rs6425663 polymorphisms. Namely, it was found that the inheritance of FOS rs1063169*T, JUN rs11688*A, and IER5 rs6425663*T minor variants decreases risk for development of schizophrenia whereas the inheritance of FOS rs7101*T minor variant, especially its homozygous form, increases risk for development of this disorder.

  6. Tracing the origin and evolution of plant TIR-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoqin; Pang, Hui; Li, Mimi; Chen, Jianqun; Hang, Yueyu

    2014-08-10

    Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-encoding proteins represent one of the most important families of disease resistance genes in plants. Studies that have explored the functional details of these genes tended to focus on only a few limited groups; the origin and evolutionary history of these genes were therefore unclear. In this study, focusing on the four principal groups of TIR-encoding genes, we conducted an extensive genome-wide survey of 32 fully sequenced plant genomes and Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) from the gymnosperm Pinus taeda and explored the origins and evolution of these genes. Through the identification of the TIR-encoding genes, the analysis of chromosome positions, the identification and analysis of conserved motifs, and sequence alignment and phylogenetic reconstruction, our results showed that the genes of the TIR-X family (TXs) had an earlier origin and a wider distribution than the genes from the other three groups. TIR-encoding genes experienced large-scale gene duplications during evolution. A skeleton motif pattern of the TIR domain was present in all spermatophytes, and the genes with this skeleton pattern exhibited a conserved and independent evolutionary history in all spermatophytes, including monocots, that followed their gymnosperm origin. This study used comparative genomics to explore the origin and evolutionary history of the four main groups of TIR-encoding genes. Additionally, we unraveled the mechanism behind the uneven distribution of TIR-encoding genes in dicots and monocots.

  7. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  8. Species-specific duplications of NBS-encoding genes in Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan; Li, Yingjun; Huang, Kaihui; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in protecting plants from infection by diverse pathogens in the environment. The nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) class of genes is one of the largest R gene families. Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) is resistant to Chestnut Blight Disease, but relatively little is known about the resistance mechanism. We identified 519 NBS-encoding genes, including 374 NBS-LRR genes and 145 NBS-only genes. The majority of Ka/Ks were less than 1, suggesting the purifying selection operated during the evolutionary history of NBS-encoding genes. A minority (4/34) of Ka/Ks in non-TIR gene families were greater than 1, showing that some genes were under positive selection pressure. Furthermore, Ks peaked at a range of 0.4 to 0.5, indicating that ancient duplications arose during the evolution. The relationship between Ka/Ks and Ks indicated greater selective pressure on the newer and older genes with the critical value of Ks = 0.4–0.5. Notably, species-specific duplications were detected in NBS-encoding genes. In addition, the group of RPW8-NBS-encoding genes clustered together as an independent clade located at a relatively basal position in the phylogenetic tree. Many cis-acting elements related to plant defense responses were detected in promoters of NBS-encoding genes. PMID:26559332

  9. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of NBS-encoding genes in Rutaceae fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Lan, Hong; Zeng, Wenfang; Liu, Chaoyang; Xu, Jidi; Deng, Xiuxin

    2011-02-01

    The nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes are the largest class of disease resistance genes in plants. However, our understanding of the evolution of NBS-LRR genes in Rutaceae fruit crops is rather limited. We report an evolutionary study of 103 NBS-encoding genes isolated from Poncirus trifoliata (trifoliate orange), Citrus reticulata (tangerine) and their F(1) progeny. In all, 58 of the sequences contained a continuous open reading frame. Phylogenetic analysis classified the 58 NBS genes into nine clades, eight of which were genus specific. This was taken to imply that most of the ancestors of these NBS genes evolved after the genus split. The motif pattern of the 58 NBS-encoding genes was consistent with their phylogenetic profile. An extended phylogenetic analysis, incorporating citrus NBS genes from the public database, classified 95 citrus NBS genes into six clades, half of which were genus specific. RFLP analysis showed that citrus NBS-encoding genes have been evolving rapidly, and that they are unstable when passed through an intergeneric cross. Of 32 NBS-encoding genes tracked by gene-specific PCR, 24 showed segregation distortion among a set of 94 F(1) individuals. This study provides new insight into the evolution of Rutaceae NBS genes and their behaviour following an intergeneric cross.

  10. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT ge

  11. The gusBC genes of Escherichia coli encode a glucuronide transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, WJ; Wilson, KJ; Xie, H; Knol, J; Suzuki, S; Rutherford, NG; Henderson, PJF; Jefferson, RA

    2005-01-01

    Two genes, gusB and gusC, from a natural fecal isolate of Escherichia coli are shown to encode proteins responsible for transport of beta-glucuronides with synthetic [C-14] phenyl-l-thio-beta-D-glucuronide as the substrate. These genes are located in the gus operon downstream of the gusA gene on the

  12. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (penterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates.

  13. The presence of two S-layer-protein-encoding genes is conserved among species related to Lactobacillus acidophilus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, H.J.; Kolen, C.P.A.M.; Pot, B.; Kersters, K.; Pouwels, P.H.

    1996-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the type strain of Lactobacillus acidophilus possesses two S-protein-encoding genes, one of which is silent, on a chromosomal segment of 6 kb. The S-protein-encoding gene in the expression site can be exchanged for the silent S-protein-encoding gene by inversion of this

  14. In silicio search for genes encoding peroxisomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kal, A J; Hettema, E H; van den Berg, M; Koerkamp, M G; van Ijlst, L; Distel, B; Tabak, H F

    2000-01-01

    The biogenesis of peroxisomes involves the synthesis of new proteins that after, completion of translation, are targeted to the organelle by virtue of peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS). Two types of PTSs have been well characterized for import of matrix proteins (PTS1 and PTS2). Induction of the genes encoding these matrix proteins takes place in oleate-containing medium and is mediated via an oleate response element (ORE) present in the region preceding these genes. The authors have searched the yeast genome for OREs preceding open reading frames (ORFs), and for ORFs that contain either a PTS1 or PTS2. Of the ORFs containing an ORE, as well as either a PTS1 or a PTS2, many were known to encode bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins. In addition, candidate genes were identified as encoding putative new peroxisomal proteins. For one case, subcellular location studies validated the in silicio prediction. This gene encodes a new peroxisomal thioesterase.

  15. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification is pro...

  16. Characterization of a Soil Metagenome-Derived Gene Encoding Wax Ester Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nam Hee; Park, Ji-Hye; Chung, Eunsook; So, Hyun-Ah; Lee, Myung Hwan; Kim, Jin-Cheol; Hwang, Eul Chul; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-02-01

    A soil metagenome contains the genomes of all microbes included in a soil sample, including those that cannot be cultured. In this study, soil metagenome libraries were searched for microbial genes exhibiting lipolytic activity and those involved in potential lipid metabolism that could yield valuable products in microorganisms. One of the subclones derived from the original fosmid clone, pELP120, was selected for further analysis. A subclone spanning a 3.3 kb DNA fragment was found to encode for lipase/esterase and contained an additional partial open reading frame encoding a wax ester synthase (WES) motif. Consequently, both pELP120 and the full length of the gene potentially encoding WES were sequenced. To determine if the wes gene encoded a functioning WES protein that produced wax esters, gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was conducted using ethyl acetate extract from an Escherichia coli strain that expressed the wes gene and was grown with hexadecanol. The ethyl acetate extract from this E. coli strain did indeed produce wax ester compounds of various carbon-chain lengths. DNA sequence analysis of the full-length gene revealed that the gene cluster may be derived from a member of Proteobacteria, whereas the clone does not contain any clear phylogenetic markers. These results suggest that the wes gene discovered in this study encodes a functional protein in E. coli and produces wax esters through a heterologous expression system.

  17. Occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus aureus causing mastitis in lactating goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daneelly H. Ferreira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal enterotoxins are the leading cause of human food poisoning worldwide. Staphylococcus spp. are the main mastitis-causing agents in goats and frequently found in high counts in goat milk. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus aureus associated with mastitis in lactating goats in Paraiba State, Brazil. Milk samples (n=2024 were collected from 393 farms. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 55 milk samples. Classical (sea, seb, sec, sed, see and novel (seg, seh, sei enterotoxin-encoding genes were investigated by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR. From thirty-six tested isolates, enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in 7 (19.5% S. aureus. The gene encoding enterotoxin C (seC was identified in six isolates, while seiwas observed in only one isolate. The genes sea, seb, sed, see, seg and seh were not observed amongst the S. aureus investigated in this study. In summary, S. aureus causing mastitis in goats can harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes and seC was the most frequent gene observed amongst the investigated isolates. This finding is important for surveillance purposes, since enterotoxin C should be investigated in human staphylococcal food poisoning outbreaks caused by consumption of goat milk and dairy products.

  18. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Homologous Proteins Encoded by UL2 and UL23 genes of Herpesviridae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-ding LIU; Wen-juan WU; Min HONG; Hai-jing SHI; Shao-hui MA; Jing-jing WANG; Hong-ling ZHAO; Yun LIAO; Qi-han LI

    2007-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the Herpesviridae β-gene play a critical role in the replication stage of the virus. In this paper, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence that someβ-gene products, such as UL2 and UL23 from HSV1, have their homologous genes in its family, and also exist in prokaryotic organisms, indicating that these viruses appear to have been assembled over evolutionary time by numerous independent events of horizontal gene transfer.

  20. Organization and expression of two tandemly oriented genes encoding ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activase in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundle, S J; Zielinski, R E

    1991-03-15

    We have isolated and structurally characterized genomic DNA and cDNA sequences encoding ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rbu-P2 carboxylase) activase from barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Three Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase (Rca) polypeptides are encoded in the barley genome by two closely linked, tandemly oriented nuclear genes (RcaA and RcaB); cDNAs encoding each of the three Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase polypeptides were isolated from cDNA libraries of barley leaf mRNA. RcaA produces two mRNAs, which encode polypeptides of 42 and 46 kDa, by an alternative splicing mechanism identical to that previously reported for spinach and Arabidopsis Rca genes (Werneke, J.M., Chatfield, J.M., and Ogren, W. L. (1989) Plant Cell 1, 815-825). RcaB is transcribed to produce a single mRNA, which encodes a mature peptide of 42 kDa. Genomic Southern blots indicate that RcaA and RcaB represent the entire Rbu-P2 carboxylase activase gene family in barley. The genes share 80% nucleotide sequence identity, and the 42-kDa polypeptides encoded by RcaA and RcaB share 87% amino acid sequence identity. Coding regions of the two barley Rca genes are separated by 1 kilobase pair of flanking DNA. DNA sequence motifs similar to those thought to control light-regulated gene expression in other nuclear-encoded plastid polypeptide genes are found at the 5' end of both barley Rca genes. Probes specific to three mRNAs were used to determine the relative contribution each species makes to the total Rca mRNA pool.

  1. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the [beta]-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. [beta]-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for [beta]-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to [beta]-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  2. How are exons encoding transmembrane sequences distributed in the exon-intron structure of genes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Ryusuke; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes raises a question about the distribution of transmembrane regions in membrane proteins. Were exons that encode transmembrane regions formed simply by inserting introns into preexisting genes or by some kind of exon shuffling? To answer this question, the exon-per-gene distribution was analyzed for all genes in 40 eukaryotic genomes with a particular focus on exons encoding transmembrane segments. In 21 higher multicellular eukaryotes, the percentage of multi-exon genes (those containing at least one intron) within all genes in a genome was high (>70%) and with a mean of 87%. When genes were grouped by the number of exons per gene in higher eukaryotes, good exponential distributions were obtained not only for all genes but also for the exons encoding transmembrane segments, leading to a constant ratio of membrane proteins independent of the exon-per-gene number. The positional distribution of transmembrane regions in single-pass membrane proteins showed that they are generally located in the amino or carboxyl terminal regions. This nonrandom distribution of transmembrane regions explains the constant ratio of membrane proteins to the exon-per-gene numbers because there are always two terminal (i.e., the amino and carboxyl) regions - independent of the length of sequences.

  3. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA>) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium gene prsA, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, has been cloned, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The amino acid sequence derived from the S. typhimurium gene is 99% identical to the derived Escherichia coli sequence and 47% identical to...

  4. Escherichia coli rpiA> gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Maigaard, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    The rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A was cloned from phage 1A2(471) of the Kohara gene library. Subcloning, restriction, and complementation analyses revealed an 1,800-bp SspI-generated DNA fragment that contained the entire control and coding sequences. This DNA fragment was seque...

  5. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O;

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is onl...

  6. Chromosomal location of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1983-01-01

    by conjugation. Transductional analysis of the prs region established the gene order as purB-fadR-dadR-tre-pth-prs-hemA-trp. Two additional mutations were identified in the mutant: one in gsk, the gene encoding guanosine kinase, and one in lon, conferring a mucoid colony morphology. The contribution of each...

  7. Characterization of the gene encoding a fibrinogen-related protein expressed in Crassostrea gigas hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skazina, M A; Gorbushin, A M

    2016-07-01

    Four exons of the CgFrep1 gene (3333 bp long) encode a putative fibrinogen-related protein (324 aa) bearing a single C-terminal FBG domain. Transcripts of the gene obtained from hemocytes of different Pacific oysters show prominent individual variation based on SNP and indels of tandem repeats resulted in polymorphism of N-terminus of the putative CgFrep1 polypeptide. The polypeptide chain bears N-terminal coiled-coil region potentially acting as inter-subunit interface in the protein oligomerization. It is suggested that CgFrep1 gene encodes the oligomeric lectin composed of at least two subunits.

  8. Identification, mapping, and cloning of the gene encoding cyanase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Y C; Parsell, D; Anderson, P M; Fuchs, J A

    1987-06-01

    The gene in Escherichia coli for cyanase, designated cynS, was localized to a BglII restriction site approximately 1.7 kilobases from the lacA end of the lac operon. The gene was cloned into the pUC13 vector. Maxicell analysis of plasmid-encoded proteins confirmed that the BglII site is in the region encoding the structural gene for cyanase. Cyanase-deficient strains had increased sensitivity to cyanate and were not able to use cyanate as a nitrogen source.

  9. Identification, mapping, and cloning of the gene encoding cyanase in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Y C; Parsell, D; Anderson, P. M.; Fuchs, J A

    1987-01-01

    The gene in Escherichia coli for cyanase, designated cynS, was localized to a BglII restriction site approximately 1.7 kilobases from the lacA end of the lac operon. The gene was cloned into the pUC13 vector. Maxicell analysis of plasmid-encoded proteins confirmed that the BglII site is in the region encoding the structural gene for cyanase. Cyanase-deficient strains had increased sensitivity to cyanate and were not able to use cyanate as a nitrogen source.

  10. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Shan M.; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U.

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged ...

  11. Molecular evolution of genes encoding ribonucleases in ruminant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Confalone, E; Beintema, JJ; Sasso, MP; Carsana, A; Palmieri, M; Vento, MT; Furia, A

    1995-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis, based on the primary structures of mammalian pancreatic-type ribonucleases, indicated that gene duplication events, which occurred during the evolution of ancestral ruminants, gave rise to the three paralogous enzymes present in the bovine species. Herein we report data that d

  12. Absence of repellents in Ustilago maydis induces genes encoding small secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teertstra, Wieke R; Krijgsheld, Pauline; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-08-01

    The rep1 gene of the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis encodes a pre-pro-protein that is processed in the secretory pathway into 11 peptides. These so-called repellents form amphipathic amyloid fibrils at the surface of aerial hyphae. A SG200 strain in which the rep1 gene is inactivated (∆rep1 strain) is affected in aerial hyphae formation. We here assessed changes in global gene expression as a consequence of the inactivation of the rep1 gene. Microarray analysis revealed that only 31 genes in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain had a fold change in expression of ≥2. Twenty-two of these genes were up-regulated and half of them encode small secreted proteins (SSPs) with unknown functions. Seven of the SSP genes and two other genes that are over-expressed in the ∆rep1 SG200 strain encode proteins that can be classified as secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SCRPs). Interestingly, most of the SCRPs are predicted to form amyloids. The SCRP gene um00792 showed the highest up-regulation in the ∆rep1 strain. Using GFP as a reporter, it was shown that this gene is over-expressed in the layer of hyphae at the medium-air interface. Taken together, it is concluded that inactivation of rep1 hardly affects the expression profile of U. maydis, despite the fact that the mutant strain has a strong reduced ability to form aerial hyphae.

  13. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  14. Characterization of transcript processing of the gene encoding precerebellin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavety, B; Morgan, J I

    1998-12-10

    Precerebellin-1 (Cbln1) is a cerebellum-specific protein that shares significant sequence identity with the globular domains of the complement components C1qA, B and C, suggesting some common aspects of function and/or structure. As the C1q complex is composed of heterotrimers of C1qA, B and C it was hypothesized that multiple precerebellins may exist in a ternary complex. Northern blotting for cbln1 revealed multiple bands that could represent further family members or alternatively spliced variants. To discriminate these alternatives, probes derived from different regions of the cbln1 gene were used to identify and clone the transcripts detected on Northern blots. Four independent transcripts were repeatedly cloned from an adult mouse cerebellum cDNA library. Upon sequencing, all of these clones were found to be derived from the cbln1 gene and no additional precerebellin-related genes were isolated. Moreover, these clones accounted for the four cbln1-hybridizing bands (1.9, 2. 2, 3.2 and 5.5 kb) detected on Northern blots of adult cerebellum RNA. With one possible exception, these clones were all derived through alterations in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of cbln1 that did not affect the coding sequence. This was achieved by the use of two polyadenylation sites and alternative (non-canonical) splicing in the 3'-UTR. Some additional variation in mRNA structure is provided by the use of alternative transcription start sites in cbln1. The possible significance of this level of diversity in the 3'-UTR is discussed.

  15. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  16. Structures of genes encoding TATA box-binding proteins from Trimeresurus gramineus and T. flavoviridis snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding the Trimeresurus gramineus (Tg; green habu snake) TATA-box-binding protein (TgTBP) was cloned and sequenced. The cDNA encodes a 33-kDa protein with an extensive sequence similarity to those derived from other organisms, except for the N-terminal domain. Genes encoding TgTBP and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf; habu snake) TBP (TfTBP) were isolated using a TgTBP cDNA and their nt sequences were determined. They are the first TBP genes entirely sequenced in higher animals. Both genes span over 15 kb and are constructed from eight exons and seven introns. Comparison of the loci of introns on the aligned amino-acid sequences of TBP from six organisms (Tg, Tf, mouse, Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Acanthamoeba castellanii) indicated that there are three highly conserved loci in the C-terminal domain.

  17. A family of microRNAs encoded by myosin genes governs myosin expression and muscle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, Eva; Quiat, Daniel; Johnson, Brett A.; Sutherland, Lillian B.; Qi, Xiaoxia; Richardson, James A.; Kelm, Robert J.; Olson, Eric N.

    2009-01-01

    Myosin is the primary regulator of muscle strength and contractility. Here we show that three myosin genes, Myh6, Myh7, and Myh7b, encode related microRNAs (miRNAs) within their introns, which, in turn, control muscle myosin content, myofiber identity and muscle performance. Within the adult heart, the Myh6 gene, encoding a fast myosin, co-expresses miR-208a, which regulates the expression of two slow myosins and their intronic miRNAs, Myh7/miR-208b and Myh7b/miR-499, respectively. miR-208b and miR-499 are functionally redundant, and play a dominant role in the specification of muscle fiber identity by activating slow and repressing fast myofiber gene programs. The actions of these miRNAs are mediated by a collection of transcriptional repressors of slow myofiber genes. These findings reveal that myosin genes not only encode the major contractile proteins of muscle, but act more broadly to influence muscle function by encoding a network of intronic miRNAs that control muscle gene expression and performance. PMID:19922871

  18. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  19. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  20. Co-expression of a Saccharomyces diastaticus glucoamylase-encoding gene and a Bacillus amyloliquefaciens alpha-amylase-encoding gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn, A J; Pretorius, I S

    1991-04-01

    A glucoamylase-encoding gene (STA2) from Saccharomyces diastaticus and an alpha-amylase-encoding gene (AMY) from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were cloned separately into a yeast-integrating shuttle vector (YIp5), generating recombinant plasmids pSP1 and pSP2, respectively. The STA2 and AMY genes were jointly cloned into YIp5, generating plasmid pSP3. Subsequently, the dominant selectable marker APH1, encoding resistance to Geneticin G418 (GtR), was cloned into pSP3, resulting in pSP4. For enhanced expression of GtR, the APH1 gene was fused to the GAL10 promoter and terminated by the URA3 terminator, resulting in pSP5. Plasmid pSP5 was converted to a circular minichromosome (pSP6) by the addition of the ARS1 and CEN4 sequences. Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with plasmids pSP1 through pSP6, stably produced and secreted glucoamylase and/or alpha-amylase. Brewers' and distillers' yeast transformed with pSP6 were also capable of secreting amylolytic enzymes. Yeast transformants containing pSP1, pSP2 and pSP3 assimilated soluble starch with an efficiency of 69%, 84% and 93%, respectively. The major starch hydrolysis products produced by crude amylolytic enzymes found in the culture broths of the pSP1-, pSP2- and pSP3-containing transformants, were glucose, glucose and maltose (1:1), and glucose and maltose (3:1), respectively. These results confirmed that co-expression of the STA2 and AMY genes synergistically enhanced starch degradation.

  1. Characterization of the FKBP12-Encoding Genes in Aspergillus fumigatus.

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    Katie Falloon

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis, largely caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is responsible for a growing number of deaths among immunosuppressed patients. Immunosuppressants such as FK506 (tacrolimus that target calcineurin have shown promise for antifungal drug development. FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs form a complex with calcineurin in the presence of FK506 (FKBP12-FK506 and inhibit calcineurin activity. Research on FKBPs in fungi is limited, and none of the FKBPs have been previously characterized in A. fumigatus. We identified four orthologous genes of FKBP12, the human FK506 binding partner, in A. fumigatus and designated them fkbp12-1, fkbp12-2, fkbp12-3, and fkbp12-4. Deletional analysis of the four genes revealed that the Δfkbp12-1 strain was resistant to FK506, indicating FKBP12-1 as the key mediator of FK506-binding to calcineurin. The endogenously expressed FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm and nuclei under normal growth conditions but also to the hyphal septa following FK506 treatment, revealing its interaction with calcineurin. The FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein didn't localize at the septa in the presence of FK506 in the cnaA deletion background, confirming its interaction with calcineurin. Testing of all deletion strains in the Galleria mellonella model of aspergillosis suggested that these proteins don't play an important role in virulence. While the Δfkbp12-2 and Δfkbp12-3 strains didn't show any discernable phenotype, the Δfkbp12-4 strain displayed slight growth defect under normal growth conditions and inhibition of the caspofungin-mediated "paradoxical growth effect" at higher concentrations of the antifungal caspofungin. Together, these results indicate that while only FKBP12-1 is the bona fide binding partner of FK506, leading to the inhibition of calcineurin in A. fumigatus, FKBP12-4 may play a role in basal growth and the caspofungin-mediated paradoxical growth response. Exploitation of differences between A

  2. Differences in dinucleotide frequencies of thermophilic genes encoding water soluble and membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroshi NAKASHIMA; Yuka KURODA

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence frequencies of the dinucleotides of genes of three thermophilic and three mesophilic species from both archaea and eubacteria were investigated in this study. The genes encoding water soluble proteins were rich in the dinucleotides of purine dimers, whereas the genes encoding membrane proteins were rich in pyrimidine dimers. The dinucleotides of purine dimers are the counterparts of pyrimidine dimers in a double-stranded DNA. The purine/pyrimidine dimers were favored in the thermophiles but not in the mesophiles, based on comparisons of observed and expected frequencies. This finding is in agreement with our previous study which showed that purine/pyrimidine dimers are positive factors that increase the thermal stability of DNA. The dinucleotides AA, AG, and GA are components of the codons of charged residues of Glu, Asp, Lys, and Arg, and the dinucleotides TT, CT, and TC are components of the codons of hydrophobic residues of Leu, He, and Phe. This is consistent with the suitabilities of the different amino acid residues for water soluble and membrane proteins. Our analysis provides a picture of how thermophilic species produce water soluble and membrane proteins with distinctive characters: the genes encoding water soluble proteins use DNA sequences rich in purine dimers, and the genes encoding membrane proteins use DNA sequences rich in pyrimidine dimers on the opposite strand.

  3. Biovar diversity is reflected by variations of genes encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruifu, Y; Minli, Z; Guo, Z; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    Five oligonucleotide primers derived from the gene encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum were designed to evaluate the relationship between the urease gene and biovar diversity of this organism. Five combinations of these primers were tested by PCR and the result revealed that there were variations in urease genes among different serovars of U. urealyticum. This result, in agreement with other PCRs based on other functionally unrelated (rRNA and MB antigen) genes, may reflect the phylogenetic relationship among organisms taxonomically classified as U. urealyticum.

  4. Intra- and inter-generic transfer of pathogenicity island-encoded virulence genes by cos phages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, John; Carpena, Nuria; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Ram, Geeta; Novick, Richard P; Penadés, José R

    2015-05-01

    Bacteriophage-mediated horizontal gene transfer is one of the primary driving forces of bacterial evolution. The pac-type phages are generally thought to facilitate most of the phage-mediated gene transfer between closely related bacteria, including that of mobile genetic elements-encoded virulence genes. In this study, we report that staphylococcal cos-type phages transferred the Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island SaPIbov5 to non-aureus staphylococcal species and also to different genera. Our results describe the first intra- and intergeneric transfer of a pathogenicity island by a cos phage, and highlight a gene transfer mechanism that may have important implications for pathogen evolution.

  5. Cloning and characterization of the gsk gene encoding guanosine kinase of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harlow, Kenneth W.; Nygaard, Per; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1995-01-01

    The Escherichia coli gsk gene encoding guanosine kinase was cloned from the Kohara gene library by complementation of the E. coli gsk-1 mutant allele. The cloned DNA fragment was sequenced and shown to encode a putative polypeptide of 433 amino acids with a molecular mass of 48,113 Da. Minicell...... analysis established the subunit Mr as 43,500. Primer extension analysis indicated the presence of an adequate Pribnow box and suggested that the transcript contained a 110-base leader sequence. Strains harboring the gsk gene on multicopy plasmids overexpressed both guanosine and inosine kinase activities....... N-terminal sequence and amino acid composition analyses of the 43,500-Mr polypeptide band confirmed the correct reading frame assignment and the identity of this band as the gsk gene product. Comparison of the amino acid sequence with the protein database revealed similarity to regions of other...

  6. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  7. Characterization of genes encoding for acquired bacitracin resistance in Clostridium perfringens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Charlebois

    Full Text Available Phenotypic bacitracin resistance has been reported in Clostridium perfringens. However, the genes responsible for the resistance have not yet been characterized. Ninety-nine C. perfringens isolates recovered from broilers and turkeys were tested for phenotypic bacitracin resistance. Bacitracin MIC(90 (>256 µg/ml was identical for both turkey and chicken isolates; whereas MIC(50 was higher in turkey isolates (6 µg/ml than in chicken isolates (3 µg/ml. Twenty-four of the 99 isolates showed high-level bacitracin resistance (MIC breakpoint >256 µg/ml and the genes encoding for this resistance were characterized in C. perfringens c1261_A strain using primer walking. Sequence analysis and percentages of amino acid identity revealed putative genes encoding for both an ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase in C. perfringens c1261_A strain. These two mechanisms were shown to be both encoded by the putative bcrABD operon under the control of a regulatory gene, bcrR. Efflux pump inhibitor thioridazine was shown to increase significantly the susceptibility of strain c1261_A to bacitracin. Upstream and downstream from the bcr cluster was an IS1216-like element, which may play a role in the dissemination of this resistance determinant. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with prior double digestion with I-CeuI/MluI enzymes followed by hybridization analyses revealed that the bacitracin resistance genes bcrABDR were located on the chromosome. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that this gene cluster is expressed under bacitracin stress. Microarray analysis revealed the presence of these genes in all bacitracin resistant strains. This study reports the discovery of genes encoding for a putative ABC transporter and an overproduced undecaprenol kinase associated with high-level bacitracin resistance in C. perfringens isolates from turkeys and broiler chickens.

  8. ohr, Encoding an Organic Hydroperoxide Reductase, Is an In Vivo-Induced Gene in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    OpenAIRE

    Shea, Robin J.; Mulks, Martha H.

    2002-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, a disease characterized by pulmonary necrosis and hemorrhage caused in part by neutrophil degranulation. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of this disease, we have developed an in vivo expression technology (IVET) system to identify genes that are specifically up-regulated during infection. One of the genes that we have identified as being induced in vivo is ohr, encoding organic hydroperoxide reducta...

  9. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  10. Mutations in genes encoding subunits of RNA polymerases I and III cause Treacher Collins syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauwerse, J.G.; Dixon, J.; Seland, S.; Ruivenkamp, C.A.; Haeringen, A. van; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Peters, D.J.; Boers, A.C.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Maiwald, R.; Zweier, C.; Kerr, B.; Cobo, A.M.; Toral, J.F.; Hoogeboom, A.J.M.; Lohmann, D.R.; Hehr, U.; Dixon, M.J.; Breuning, M.H.; Wieczorek, D.

    2011-01-01

    We identified a deletion of a gene encoding a subunit of RNA polymerases I and III, POLR1D, in an individual with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). Subsequently, we detected 20 additional heterozygous mutations of POLR1D in 252 individuals with TCS. Furthermore, we discovered mutations in both allele

  11. A multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding exfoliative toxins from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To develop a multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding the exfoliative toxins ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD from Staphylococcus hyicus and to estimate the prevalence of exfoliative toxins among Staph. hyicus isolates from Danish pig herds with exudative epidermitis (EE). Methods and Results...

  12. Phenotypical Manifestations of Mutations in the Genes Encoding Subunits of the Cardiac Sodium Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Brugada, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the gene encoding for the major sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) in the heart, SCN5A, has been shown to cause a number of arrhythmia syndromes (with or without structural changes in the myocardium), including the long-QT syndrome (type 3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) cardiac conduction di

  13. The Drosophila gene brainiac encodes a glycosyltransferase putatively involved in glycosphingolipid synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwientek, Tilo; Keck, Birgit; Levery, Steven B

    2002-01-01

    The Drosophila genes fringe and brainiac exhibit sequence similarities to glycosyltransferases. Drosophila and mammalian fringe homologs encode UDP-N-acetylglucosamine:fucose-O-Ser beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modulate the function of Notch family receptors. The biological function...

  14. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  15. Two genes encoding new carotenoid-modifying enzymes in the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, Julia A; Bryant, Donald A

    2006-09-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum produces chlorobactene as its primary carotenoid. Small amounts of chlorobactene are hydroxylated by the enzyme CrtC and then glucosylated and acylated to produce chlorobactene glucoside laurate. The genes encoding the enzymes responsible for these modifications of chlorobactene, CT1987, and CT0967, have been identified by comparative genomics, and these genes were insertionally inactivated in C. tepidum to verify their predicted function. The gene encoding chlorobactene glucosyltransferase (CT1987) has been named cruC, and the gene encoding chlorobactene lauroyltransferase (CT0967) has been named cruD. Homologs of these genes are found in the genomes of all sequenced green sulfur bacteria and filamentous anoxygenic phototrophs as well as in the genomes of several nonphotosynthetic bacteria that produce similarly modified carotenoids. The other bacteria in which these genes are found are not closely related to green sulfur bacteria or to one another. This suggests that the ability to synthesize modified carotenoids has been a frequently transferred trait.

  16. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Unusually high frequency of genes encoding vegetative insecticidal proteins in an Australian Bacillus thuringiensis collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, Cheryl E; Court, Leon; Boets, Annemie; Mourant, Roslyn; Van Rie, Jeroen; Akhurst, Raymond J

    2008-09-01

    Of 188 Australian Bacillus thuringiensis strains screened for genes encoding soluble insecticidal proteins by polymerase chain reaction/restriction-length fragment polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 87% showed the presence of such genes. Although 135 isolates (72%) produced an RFLP pattern identical to that expected for vip3A genes, 29 isolates possessed a novel vip-like gene. The novel vip-like gene was cloned from B. thuringiensis isolate C81, and sequence analysis demonstrated that it was 94% identical to the vip3Ba1 gene. The new gene was designated vip3Bb2. Cell-free supernatants from both the B. thuringiensis strain C81 and from Escherichia coli expressing the Vip3Bb2 protein were toxic for the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera.

  18. DNA-SEQUENCE DETERMINATION AND FUNCTIONAL-CHARACTERIZATION OF THE OCT-PLASMID-ENCODED ALKJKL GENES OF PSEUDOMONAS-OLEOVORANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.B.; EGGINK, G; ENEQUIST, H; Witholt, Bernard; Bos, R

    1992-01-01

    The alkBFGHJKL and alkST operons encode enzymes that allow Pseudomonas putida (oleovorans) to metabolize alkanes. In this paper we report the nucleotide sequence of a 4592 bp region of the alkBFGHJKL operon encoding the AlkJ, AlkK and AlkL polypeptides. The alkJ gene encodes a protein of 59 kilodalt

  19. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Knoll

    Full Text Available There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide association study (GWAS data from a case-control approach on 453 extremely obese children and adolescents and 435 lean adult controls were used for GSEA. For independent confirmation, we analyzed 705 obesity GWAS trios (extremely obese child and both biological parents and a population-based GWAS sample (KORA F4, n = 1,743. A meta-analysis was performed on all three samples. In each sample, the distribution of significance levels between the respective gene set and those of all genes was compared using the leading-edge-fraction-comparison test (cut-offs between the 50(th and 95(th percentile of the set of all gene-wise corrected p-values as implemented in the MAGENTA software. In the case-control sample, significant enrichment of associations with obesity was observed above the 50(th percentile for the set of the 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0103. This finding was not confirmed in the trios (p(GSEA,50 = 0.5991, but in KORA (p(GSEA,50 = 0.0398. The meta-analysis again indicated a trend for enrichment (p(MAGENTA,50 = 0.1052, p(MAGENTA,75 = 0.0251. The GSEA revealed that weak association signals for obesity might be enriched in the gene set of 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes.

  20. Structure and expression of nuclear genes encoding rubisco activase. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, R.E.

    1994-06-01

    Rubisco activase (Rca) is a soluble chloroplast protein that catalyzes the activation of rubisco, the enzyme that initiates the photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle, to catalytic competency. Rca in barley consists of three polypeptides, one of 46- and two of 42-kDa, but the quaternary structure of the protein is not known. The authors have isolated and completely sequenced 8.8 kb of barley genomic DNA containing two, tandemly oriented activase genes (RcaA and RcaB) and three different cDNAs encoding the 42- and 46-kDa Rca polypeptide isoforms. Genomic Southern blot assays indicate that these sequences represent the entire Rca gene family in barley. Pre-mRNAs transcribed from the RcaA gene are alternatively spliced to give mRNAs encoding both 46- (RcaA1) and 42-kDa (RcaA2) Rca isoforms. The RcaB gene encodes a single polypeptide of 42 kDa. Primer extension and northern blot assays indicate that RcaB mRNA is expressed at a level that is 10- to 100-fold lower than RcaA mRNA. Analyses at the mRNA and protein level showed that Rca gene expression is coordinated by that of the rubisco subunits during barley leaf development.

  1. Expression patterns of genes encoding plasma membrane aquaporins during fruit development in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Ren; Li, Dianbo; Xu, Fengfeng; Sun, Qianqian; Zhao, Bin; Mao, Ai-Jun; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2015-11-01

    Aquaporins are membrane channels precisely regulating water movement through cell membranes in most living organisms. Despite the advances in the physiology of fruit development, their participation during fruit development in cucumber still barely understood. In this paper, the expressions of 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (PIPs) were analyzed during cucumber fruit development in our work. Based on the homology search with known PIPs from rice, Arabidopsis and strawberry, 12 cucumber PIP genes subfamily members were identified. Cellular localization assays indicated that CsPIPs were localized in the plasma membrane. The qRT-PCR analysis of CsPIPs showed that 12 CsPIPs were differentially expressed during fruit development. These results suggest that 12 genes encoding plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (CsPIPs) play very important roles in cucumber life cycle and the data generated will be helpful in understanding their precise roles during fruit development in cucumber.

  2. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  3. Filamentous-haemagglutinin-like protein genes encoded on a plasmid of Moraxella bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Tsutomu; Sarataphan, Nopporn; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Takai, Shinji

    2006-11-26

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid, pMBO-1, from Moraxella bovis strain Epp63 was determined. We identified 30 open reading frames (ORFs) encoded by the 44,215bp molecule. Two large ORFs, flpA and flpB, encoding proteins with similarity to Bordetella pertussis filamentous haemagglutinin (FHA), were identified on the same plasmid. The gene for a specific accessory protein (Fap), which may play a role in the secretion of Flp protein, was also identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of total RNA isolated from M. bovis Epp63 indicated that the flpA, flpB, and fap genes are all transcribed. Southern blot analysis indicated that the flp and fap genes are present in other clinical isolates of geographically diverse M. bovis.

  4. Cloning and expression analysis of a prion protein encoding gene in guppy ( Poecilia reticulata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suihan; Wei, Qiwei; Yang, Guanpin; Wang, Dengqiang; Zou, Guiwei; Chen, Daqing

    2008-11-01

    The full length cDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy ( Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding genomic DNA were cloned. The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a protein of 515 amino acids, which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP. The cloned genomic DNA fragment corresponding to the cDNA was 3720 bp in length, consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons. The 5' untranslated region of cDNA originated from the 2 exons, while the ORF originated from the second exon. Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues including brain, eye, liver, intestine, muscle and tail, its transcript was most abundant in the brain. In addition, the transcription of the gene was enhanced by 5 salinity, implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  5. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Karlyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection.

  6. Identification and characterization of the Vibrio anguillarum prtV gene encoding a new metalloprotease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫照兰; 郭东升; 茅云翔; 叶旭红; 邹玉霞; 肖鹏; 郝斌

    2010-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a prtV-like gene from Vibrio anguillarum M3 strain.This prtV gene encodes a putative protein of 918 amino acids,and is highly homologous to the V.cholerae prtV gene.We found that a prtV insertion mutant strain displayed lower gelatinase activity on gelatin agar,lower protease activity against azocasein,and lower activity for four glycosidases.This prtV mutant strain also had increased activity for two esterases in its extracellular products,as analyzed by the API ZYM system.In additi...

  7. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiwen; SUN Xiuqin; ZHANG Jinxing; ZAN Jindong

    2008-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned.It was not interrupted by an intron.This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream,indicating that its transcription may be intensive,and should have an important function.It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested,demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene.Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  8. Isolation and molecular characterisation of the gene encoding eburicol 14α-demethylase (CYP51) from Penicillium italicum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nistelrooy, J.G.M. van; Brink, J.M. van den; Kan, J.A.L. van; Gorcom, R.F.M. van; Waard, M.A. de

    1996-01-01

    The CYP51 gene encoding eburicol 14α-demethylase (P450(14DM)) was cloned from a genomic library of the filamentous fungal plant pathogen Penicillium italicum, by heterologous hybridisation with the corresponding gene encoding lanosterol 14α-demethylase from the yeast Candida tropicalis. The nucleoti

  9. Analysis of Genes Encoding Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, María-Cruz; Espinal, Paula; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Pascual, Álvaro; Ayala, Juan A.; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information on the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to β-lactams. This study presents an analysis of the allelic variations of PBP genes in A. baumannii isolates. Twenty-six A. baumannii clinical isolates (susceptible or resistant to carbapenems) from three teaching hospitals in Spain were included. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile, clonal pattern, and genomic species identification were also evaluated. Based on the six complete genomes of A. baumannii, the PBP genes were identified, and primers were designed for each gene. The nucleotide sequences of the genes identified that encode PBPs and the corresponding amino acid sequences were compared with those of ATCC 17978. Seven PBP genes and one monofunctional transglycosylase (MGT) gene were identified in the six genomes, encoding (i) four high-molecular-mass proteins (two of class A, PBP1a [ponA] and PBP1b [mrcB], and two of class B, PBP2 [pbpA or mrdA] and PBP3 [ftsI]), (ii) three low-molecular-mass proteins (two of type 5, PBP5/6 [dacC] and PBP6b [dacD], and one of type 7 (PBP7/8 [pbpG]), and (iii) a monofunctional enzyme (MtgA [mtgA]). Hot spot mutation regions were observed, although most of the allelic changes found translated into silent mutations. The amino acid consensus sequences corresponding to the PBP genes in the genomes and the clinical isolates were highly conserved. The changes found in amino acid sequences were associated with concrete clonal patterns but were not directly related to susceptibility or resistance to β-lactams. An insertion sequence disrupting the gene encoding PBP6b was identified in an endemic carbapenem-resistant clone in one of the participant hospitals. PMID:21947403

  10. Significant prognostic values of nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial complex I subunits in tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L D; Sun, H F; Bai, Y; Gao, S P; Jiang, H L; Jin, W

    2016-01-01

    In cancer biology, it remains still open question concerning the oncogenic versus oncosuppressor behavior of metabolic genes, which includes those encoding mitochondrial complex I (CI) subunits. The prognostic value of nuclear genome mRNAs expression of CI subunits is to be evaluated in the tumor patients. We used the Kaplan Meier plotter database, the cBio Cancer Genomics Portal, and the Oncomine in which gene expression data and survival information were from thousands of tumor patients to assess the relevance of nuclear genome mRNAs level of CI subunits to patients' survival, as well as their alterations in gene and expression level in tumors. We presented that the relative expression level of overwhelming majority of the nuclear genes of CI subunits with survival significance (overall survival, relapse free survival, progression free survival, distant metastasis free survival, post progression survival, and first progression), had consistent effects for patients in each type of four tumors separately, including breast cancer, ovarian cancer, lung cancer, and gastric cancer. However, in gene level, frequent cumulative or individual alteration of these genes could not significantly affect patients' survival and the overexpression of the individual gene was not ubiquitous in tumors versus normal tissues. Given that reprogrammed energy metabolism was viewed as an emerging hallmark of tumor, thus tumor patients' survival might potentially to be evaluated by certain threshold for overall expression of CI subunits. Comprehensive understanding of the nuclear genome encoded CI subunits may have guiding significance for the diagnosis and prognosis in tumor patients.

  11. MYB98 positively regulates a battery of synergid-expressed genes encoding filiform apparatus localized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punwani, Jayson A; Rabiger, David S; Drews, Gary N

    2007-08-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation.

  12. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications.

  13. Cloning and Characterization of Largemouth Bass (Micropterus salmoides) Myostatin Encoding Gene and Its Promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shengjie; BAI Junjie; WANG Lin

    2008-01-01

    Myostatin or GDF-8, a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, has been demonstrated to be a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass in mammals. In the present study, we obtained a 5.64kb sequence of myostatin encoding gene and its promoter from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). The myostatin encoding gene consisted of three exons (488bp, 371 bp and 1779bp, respectively) and two introns (390bp and 855 bp, respectively). The intron-exon boundaries were conservative in comparison with those of mammalian myostatin encoding genes, whereas the size of introns was smaller than that of mammals. Se- quence analysis of 1.569kb of the largemouth bass myostatin gene promoter region revealed that it contained two TATA boxes, one CAAT box and nine putative E-boxes. Putative muscle growth response elements for myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), serum response factor (SRF), activator protein 1 (API), etc.. and muscle-specific Mt binding site (MTBF) were also detected. Some of the transcription factor binding sites were conserved among five teleost species. This information will be useful for studying the tran- scriptional regulation of myostatin in fish.

  14. Analysis of the Genes Encoding the Histones of Microsporidia Nosema bombycis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are essential components of eukaryotic chromosomes, the objective of the study is to provide some new insights into its evolution through analysis of N. bombycis Histone genes at genomic level. In the study, genes encoding core Histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 from Nosema bombycis were analyzed by multiple sequence alignments. Analysis showed that: each type of the core Histone genes, sharing high similarity with each other in both coding and non-coding regions, has low copy number. Multiple sequence alignments showed N. bombycis core Histones diverge obviously, relative-rate test revealed Histone proteins have accelerated in the evolutionary rate of amino acid substitution. The distance between the stop codon and consensus poly (A signal is compacted, no conserved hair-pin element was found in 3'-untranslated regions of Histone mRNAs and overlapping gene transcription was observed in the downstream region of Histone variant H3_3, that implies there maybe have only single class of core Histone genes encoding replication-independent Histones in N. bombycis. Surveying the upstream of the coding region of all core Histone genes, there were no canonical TATA or CAAT boxes except that a common Histone motif (TTTCCCTCC was discovered. Moreover, no similar Histone motif mentioned above existed in Encephalitozoon cuniculi, the closely related organisms. That means that similar Histone motif maybe exists in microsporidian last common ancestor, N. bombycis retained Histone motif, while E. cuniculi have lost Histone motif after the differentiation from the common ancestor with the change of the host. Therefore the analysis of the genes encoding the Histones ofN. bombycis revealed that there maybe have two evolution directions in microsporidia, that is, genome extreme compact and mild compact, during the course of evolution. It contributes us to have the knowledge of that there have different genome size in microsporidia and provide useful

  15. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  16. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-06-13

    The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  17. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Silby

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  18. The ctnG gene encodes carbonic anhydrase involved in mycotoxin citrinin biosynthesis from Monascus aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ping; Tang, Xiao; Wu, Wei; Xu, Yang; Huang, Zhi-Bing; He, Qing-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin, a fungal secondary metabolite of polyketide origin, is moderately nephrotoxic to vertebrates, including humans. Citrinin is synthesised by condensation of acetyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA. Six genes involved in the citrinin biosynthesis, including pksCT, ctnA and ctnB, have been cloned in Monascus purpureus. The pksCT gene encodes a polyketide synthase; ctnA is a regulatory factor; and ctnB encodes an oxidoreductase. When the three genes were respectively disrupted, the disruption strains drastically decreased citrinin production or barely produced citrinin. Ten new genes have been discovered in Monascus aurantiacus besides the above six genes. One of these gene displayed the highest similarity to the β-carbonic anhydrase gene from Aspergillus oryzae (74% similarity) and was designated ctnG. To learn more about the citrinin biosynthetic pathway, a ctnG-replacement vector was constructed to disrupt ctnG with the hygromycin resistance gene as the selection marker, then transformed into M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 by a protoplast-PEG method. The citrinin content of three disruptants was reduced to about 50%, meanwhile pigment production decreased by 23%, respectively, over those of the wild-type strains. ctnG was deduced to be involved in the formation of malonyl-CoA as a common precursor of red pigments and citrinin. Therefore, the disruption of the ctnG gene decreased citrinin and pigment production. M. aurantiacus Li AS3.4384 can produce higher concentrations of citrinin than other strains such as M. purpureus and M. ruber. Establishing the function of citrinin biosynthetic genes in M. aurantiacus is helpful in understanding the citrinin synthetic pathway and adopting some strategies to control contamination.

  19. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the ADH7 gene encoding human class IV ({sigma}) ADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hirokazu; Baraona, E.; Lieber, C.S. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    1996-01-15

    The ADH7 gene encoding human Class IV ({sigma}) alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) was cloned from a Caucasian genomic DNA library and characterized. It has nine exons and eight introns that span about 22 kb, and its intron insertion is identical to that of the other ADH genes (ADH1 to ADH5). The nucleotide sequences of the exons encoding 374 amino acids are identical to the previously reported cDNA sequence of {sigma} ADH. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis showed that ADH7 is located on human chromosome 4q23-q24, close to the ADH cluster locus (4q21-q25). These data are consistent with the view that Class IV ADH is a member of the ADH family and is phylogenetically close to the other ADHs. 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The promoter of the glucoamylase-encoding gene of Aspergillus niger functions in Ustilago maydis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.L. (Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)); Gaskell, J.; Cullen, D. (Dept. of Agriculture, Madison, WI (United States)); Berka, R.M.; Yang, M.; Henner, D.J. (Genentech Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States))

    1990-01-01

    Promoter sequences from the Aspergillus niger glucoamylase-encoding gene (glaA) were linked to the bacterial hygromycin (Hy) phosphotransferase-encoding gene (hph) and this chimeric marker was used to select Hy-resistant (Hy[sup R]) Ustilago maydis transformants. This is an example of an Ascomycete promoter functioning in a Basidiomycete. Hy[sup R] transformants varied with respect to copy number of integrated vector, mitotic stability, and tolerance to Hy. Only 216 bp of glaA promoter sequence is required for expression in U. maydis but this promoter is not induced by starch as it is in Aspergillus spp. The transcription start points are the same in U. maydis and A. niger.

  1. Sca1, a previously undescribed paralog from autotransporter protein-encoding genes in Rickettsia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoult Didier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the 17 genes encoding autotransporter proteins of the "surface cell antigen" (sca family in the currently sequenced Rickettsia genomes, ompA, sca5 (ompB and sca4 (gene D, have been extensively used for identification and phylogenetic purposes for Rickettsia species. However, none of these genes is present in all 20 currently validated Rickettsia species. Of the remaining 14 sca genes, sca1 is the only gene to be present in all nine sequenced Rickettsia genomes. To estimate whether the sca1 gene is present in all Rickettsia species and its usefulness as an identification and phylogenetic tool, we searched for sca1genes in the four published Rickettsia genomes and amplified and sequenced this gene in the remaining 16 validated Rickettsia species. Results Sca1 is the only one of the 17 rickettsial sca genes present in all 20 Rickettsia species. R. prowazekii and R. canadensis exhibit a split sca1 gene whereas the remaining species have a complete gene. Within the sca1 gene, we identified a 488-bp variable sequence fragment that can be amplified using a pair of conserved primers. Sequences of this fragment are specific for each Rickettsia species. The phylogenetic organization of Rickettsia species inferred from the comparison of sca1 sequences strengthens the classification based on the housekeeping gene gltA and is similar to those obtained from the analyses of ompA, sca5 and sca4, thus suggesting similar evolutionary constraints. We also observed that Sca1 protein sequences have evolved under a dual selection pressure: with the exception of typhus group rickettsiae, the amino-terminal part of the protein that encompasses the predicted passenger domain, has evolved under positive selection in rickettsiae. This suggests that the Sca1 protein interacts with the host. In contrast, the C-terminal portion containing the autotransporter domain has evolved under purifying selection. In addition, sca1 is transcribed in R. conorii

  2. Detection of Leishmania spp. based on the gene encoding HSP20

    OpenAIRE

    Montalvo, Ana M; Departamento de Parasitología, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Pedro Kourí. La Habana, Cuba.; Fraga, Jorge; Departamento de Parasitología, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Pedro Kourí. La Habana, Cuba.; Rodríguez, Omaira; Laboratorio de referencia e investigación en enfermedades tropicales de sanidad militar. Bogotá, Colombia.; Blanco, Orestes; Departamento de Parasitología, Instituto de Medicina Tropical Pedro Kourí. La Habana, Cuba.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; García, Ana L.; Universidad de San Simón. Cochabamba, Bolivia.; Valencia, Braulio M; Instituto de Medicina Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Muskus, Carlos; Programa de Estudio y Control de Enfermedades Tropicales, Universidad de Antioquia. Medellín, Colombia.; Van der Auwera, Gert; Biomedical Sciences Department. Institute of Tropical Medicine of Antwerp. Amberes, Bélgica.; Requena, José M; Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa. Madrid, España.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Explore a new target for molecular diagnosis of Leishmania. Materials and methods. We evaluated the utility of the gene that encodes the heat shock protein 20-kDa (Hsp20) for detecting Leishmania by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR was normalized and analytical parameters were determined, as well as the validity and diagnostic accuracy, and concordance with the PCR - 18S. PCR-Hsp20 with DNA was obtained from a group of clinical samples from different sources. Results. The anal...

  3. Enterotoxigenicity of Vibrio parahaemolyticus with and without genes encoding thermostable direct hemolysin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nishibuchi, M.; Fasano, A; Russell, R G; Kaper, J B

    1992-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus produces a thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diarrheal disease caused by this organism. However, previous studies attempting to demonstrate the contribution of the hemolysin to virulence have been inconclusive. We investigated this putative virulence factor by using an isogenic TDH-negative (TDH-) strain constructed by specifically inactivating the two copies of the tdh gene encoding TDH. The enterotoxigenicities of the...

  4. Enterotoxin-Encoding Genes in Staphylococcus spp. from Food Handlers in a University Restaurant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sabina Dos Santos Paulino; Cidral, Thiago André; Soares, Maria José dos Santos; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Food handlers carrying enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus are a potential source of food poisoning. The aim of this study was to analyze genes encoding enterotoxins in coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CoPS) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) isolated from the anterior nostrils and hands of food handlers at a university restaurant in the city of Natal, Northeast Brazil. Thirty food handlers were screened for the study. The isolates were subjected to Gram staining, a bacitracin sensitivity test, mannitol fermentation, and catalase and coagulase tests. CoNS and CoPS strains were subsequently identified by a Vitek 2 System (BioMerieux, France) and various biochemical tests. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect genes for enterotoxins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and I (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei) and a disc-diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to several classes of antimicrobials. All food handlers presented staphylococci on their hands and/or noses. The study found 58 Staphylococcus spp., of which 20.7% were CoPS and 79.3% were CoNS. S. epidermidis was the most prevalent species. Twenty-nine staphylococci (50%) were positive for one or more enterotoxin genes, and the most prevalent genes were seg and sei, each with a frequency of 29.3%. Indeed, CoNS encoded a high percentage of enterotoxin genes (43.5%). However, S. aureus encoded even more enterotoxin genes (75%). Most isolates showed sensitivity to the antibiotics used for testing, except for penicillin (only 35% sensitive). The results from this study reinforce that coagulase-negative as well as coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from food handlers are capable of genotypic enterotoxigenicity.

  5. Cloning and Characterization of upp, a Gene Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. The gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (upp) was cloned from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The gene was sequenced...... construction of an internal deletion, a upp mutant was constructed by a double-crossover event. This implicated the utilization of a plasmid with a thermosensitive origin of replication and a new and easy way to screen for double crossover events in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial strains...

  6. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng eHan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis.

  7. Escherichia coli rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Maigaard, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    The rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A was cloned from phage 1A2(471) of the Kohara gene library. Subcloning, restriction, and complementation analyses revealed an 1,800-bp SspI-generated DNA fragment that contained the entire control and coding sequences. This DNA fragment was seque......The rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A was cloned from phage 1A2(471) of the Kohara gene library. Subcloning, restriction, and complementation analyses revealed an 1,800-bp SspI-generated DNA fragment that contained the entire control and coding sequences. This DNA fragment...... was confirmed by amino-terminal analysis of partially purified ribose phosphate isomerase A. Our data indicate that the enzyme is composed of two identical subunits. The 5' end of the rpiA-specified transcript was analyzed by primer extension, which revealed a well-conserved -10 region 34 bp upstream...... strains harboring the rpiA gene in a multicopy plasmid contained up to 42-fold as much ribose phosphate isomerase A activity as the haploid strain....

  8. Genome analysis and identification of gelatinase encoded gene in Enterobacter aerogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahimi, Safiyyah; Mutalib, Sahilah Abdul; Khalid, Rozida Abdul; Repin, Rul Aisyah Mat; Lamri, Mohd Fadly; Bakar, Mohd Faizal Abu; Isa, Mohd Noor Mat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, bioinformatic analysis towards genome sequence of E. aerogenes was done to determine gene encoded for gelatinase. Enterobacter aerogenes was isolated from hot spring water and gelatinase species-specific bacterium to porcine and fish gelatin. This bacterium offers the possibility of enzymes production which is specific to both species gelatine, respectively. Enterobacter aerogenes was partially genome sequenced resulting in 5.0 mega basepair (Mbp) total size of sequence. From pre-process pipeline, 87.6 Mbp of total reads, 68.8 Mbp of total high quality reads and 78.58 percent of high quality percentage was determined. Genome assembly produced 120 contigs with 67.5% of contigs over 1 kilo base pair (kbp), 124856 bp of N50 contig length and 55.17 % of GC base content percentage. About 4705 protein gene was identified from protein prediction analysis. Two candidate genes selected have highest similarity identity percentage against gelatinase enzyme available in Swiss-Prot and NCBI online database. They were NODE_9_length_26866_cov_148.013245_12 containing 1029 base pair (bp) sequence with 342 amino acid sequence and NODE_24_length_155103_cov_177.082458_62 which containing 717 bp sequence with 238 amino acid sequence, respectively. Thus, two paired of primers (forward and reverse) were designed, based on the open reading frame (ORF) of selected genes. Genome analysis of E. aerogenes resulting genes encoded gelatinase were identified.

  9. Structures of genes encoding phospholipase A2 inhibitors from the serum of Trimeresurus flavoviridis snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Chijiwa, T; Nakashima, K; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, S; Kihara, H; Ohno, M

    1997-05-20

    Inhibitors (PLIs) against snake venom gland phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) have been found in their sera. A cDNA encoding a PLI from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf, habu snake, Crotalinae) serum, cPLI-A, was isolated from the Tf liver cDNA library and sequenced. Northern blot analysis with cPLI-A showed that PLIs are expressed only in liver. Genes for PLIs, gPLI-A and gPLI-B, were isolated from the Tf genomic DNA library and their nucleotide (nt) sequences were determined. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns, and exon 4 encoded the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD)-like motif. Comparison of the nt sequences between gPLI-A and gPLI-B showed that these genes are highly homologous, including introns, except that exon 3 is rich in nonsynonymous nt substitutions which are almost four times as frequent as synonymous nt substitutions. This evolutionary feature of PLI genes is different from that of venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes in which nonsynonymous nt substitutions are spread over the entire mature protein-coding region.

  10. A putative gene cluster from a Lyngbya wollei bloom that encodes paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis.

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    Troco K Mihali

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds.

  11. Genes encoding novel secreted and transmembrane proteins are temporally and spatially regulated during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis

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    González Mauricio

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphogenetic events that shape the Drosophila melanogaster embryo are tightly controlled by a genetic program in which specific sets of genes are up-regulated. We used a suppressive subtractive hybridization procedure to identify a group of developmentally regulated genes during early stages of D. melanogaster embryogenesis. We studied the spatiotemporal activity of these genes in five different intervals covering 12 stages of embryogenesis. Results Microarrays were constructed to confirm induction of expression and to determine the temporal profile of isolated subtracted cDNAs during embryo development. We identified a set of 118 genes whose expression levels increased significantly in at least one developmental interval compared with a reference interval. Of these genes, 53% had a phenotype and/or molecular function reported in the literature, whereas 47% were essentially uncharacterized. Clustering analysis revealed demarcated transcript groups with maximum gene activity at distinct developmental intervals. In situ hybridization assays were carried out on 23 uncharacterized genes, 15 of which proved to have spatiotemporally restricted expression patterns. Among these 15 uncharacterized genes, 13 were found to encode putative secreted and transmembrane proteins. For three of them we validated our protein sequence predictions by expressing their cDNAs in Drosophila S2R+ cells and analyzed the subcellular distribution of recombinant proteins. We then focused on the functional characterization of the gene CG6234. Inhibition of CG6234 by RNA interference resulted in morphological defects in embryos, suggesting the involvement of this gene in germ band retraction. Conclusion Our data have yielded a list of developmentally regulated D. melanogaster genes and their expression profiles during embryogenesis and provide new information on the spatiotemporal expression patterns of several uncharacterized genes. In particular, we

  12. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding LipL21 in the vaccinal leptospira serovars

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    Rasoul Hoseinpur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease in humans and animals, caused by the bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Gene expressing LipL21 is one of the genes identified in the bacterium, existing only in the pathogenic strains. The aim of this study was to cloning and analyzing the sequence of the gene encoding surface lipoprotein, LipL21, in five vaccinal leptospira serovars in Iran. Material and Methods: Pathogenic Leptospira interrogans serovars were cultured in EMJH medium with 10% rabbit serum. After genomic DNA extraction, PCR with specific primers was employed and the resulting product inserted in a vector then transferred into E. Coli DH5&alpha. The recombinant plasmids were finally sent for sequencing. Results: The analysis of gene lipL21 in domestic vaccinal serovars and comparison of them with other serovars in the GenBank database revealed that three vaccinal serovars serjo hardjo, canicola and pomona had 100% similarity with each other and grippotyphosa serovar had the highest difference with the vaccinal serovars. In general, the results showed that this gene is a highly conserved gene in the domestic vaccinal serovars and serovars in the GenBank database with more than 95.7 percent similarity. Conclusion: These results showed that the gene, lipL21, is highly conserved in the vaccinal serovars (similarities > 96.4 %. Therefore, the gene encoding surface protein LipL21 can serve as a useful serologic test with high specificity and sensitivity for diagnosis of leptospirosis in clinical samples and in future as an effective subunit vaccine candidate to be used.

  13. Molecular characterization of genes encoding inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in the bed bug (Cimex lectularius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidala, Praveen; Mittapelly, Priyanka; Jones, Susan C; Piermarini, Peter M; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-04-01

    The molecular genetics of inward-rectifier potassium (Kir) channels in insects is poorly understood. To date, Kir channel genes have been characterized only from a few representative dipterans (i.e., fruit flies and mosquitoes). The goal of the present study was to characterize Kir channel cDNAs in a hemipteran, the bed bug (Cimex lectularius). Using our previously reported bed bug transcriptome (RNA-seq), we identified two cDNAs that encode putative Kir channels. One was a full-length cDNA that encodes a protein belonging to the insect 'Kir3' clade, which we designate as 'ClKir3'. The other was a partial cDNA that encodes a protein with similarity to both the insect 'Kir1' and 'Kir2' clades, which we designate as 'ClKir1/2'. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that ClKir1/2 and ClKir3 exhibited peak expression levels in late-instar nymphs and early-instar nymphs, respectively. Furthermore, ClKir3, but not ClKir1/2, showed tissue-specific expression in Malpighian tubules of adult bed bugs. Lastly, using an improved procedure for delivering double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to male and female bed bugs (via the cervical membrane) we demonstrate rapid and systemic knockdown of ClKir3 transcripts. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the bed bug possesses at least two genes encoding Kir channels, and that RNAi is possible for at least Kir3, thereby offering a potential approach for elucidating the roles of Kir channel genes in bed bug physiology.

  14. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

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    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  15. Identification and characterization of multiple Spidroin 1 genes encoding major ampullate silk proteins in Nephila clavipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, W A; Marcotte, W R

    2008-09-01

    Spider dragline silk is primarily composed of proteins called major ampullate spidroins (MaSps) that consist of a large repeat array flanked by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. Until recently, there has been little evidence for more than one gene encoding each of the two major spidroin silk proteins, MaSp1 and MaSp2. Here, we report the deduced N-terminal domain sequences for two distinct MaSp1 genes from Nephila clavipes (MaSp1A and MaSp1B) and for MaSp2. All three MaSp genes are co-expressed in the major ampullate gland. A search of the GenBank database also revealed two distinct MaSp1 C-terminal domain sequences. Sequencing confirmed that both MaSp1 genes are present in all seven Nephila clavipes spiders examined. The presence of nucleotide polymorphisms in these genes confirmed that MaSp1A and MaSp1B are distinct genetic loci and not merely alleles of the same gene. We experimentally determined the transcription start sites for all three MaSp genes and established preliminary pairing between the two MaSp1 N- and C-terminal domains. Phylogenetic analysis of these new sequences and other published MaSp N- and C-terminal domain sequences illustrated that duplications of MaSp genes may be widespread among spider species.

  16. Cloning and sequence analysis of a gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIP) play important roles in plant defense of pathogen, especially fungi. A pair of degenerated primers is designed based on the conserved sequence of 20 other known pgip genes and used to amplify Gossypium barbadense cultivation 7124 cDNA library by touch-down PCR. A 561 bp internal fragment of the pgip gene is obtained and used to design the primers for rapid amplification of cDNA ends. A composite pgip gene sequence is constructed from the products of 5′ and 3′ RACE, which are 666 bp and 906 bp respectively. Analysis of nucleic acid sequence shows 69.2% and 68.7% similarity to Citrus and Poncirus pgip genes, respectively. Its open reading frame of the gene encodes a polypeptide of 330 amino acids, in which 10 leucine-rich repeats arrange tandemly. A new set of primers is designed to the 5′ and 3′ ends of the gene, which allows amplification of the full-length gene from the cotton cDNA library. Genomic DNA analysis reveals that this gene has no intron.

  17. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity.

  18. Cloning and expression profiles of 15 genes encoding WRKY transcription factor in wheat (Triticum aestivem L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualing Wu; Zhongfu Ni; Yingyin Yao; Ganggang Guo; Qixin Sun

    2008-01-01

    WRKY proteins are involved in various physiological processes, including biotic and abiotic stress responses, hormone responses and development. However, no systematic identification, expression and function analysis of WRKY genes in wheat were reported. In this study, we isolated 15 wheat cDNAs with complete open reading frame (ORF) encoding putative WRKY proteins using in silico cloning. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 15 wheat WRKY genes belonged to three major WRKY groups. Expression analysis revealed that most genes expressed drastically in leaf, except TaWRKY10 which expressed in crown intensively. Four genes were strongly up-regulated with the senescence of leaves. Eight genes were responsive to low temperature, high temperature, NaCl or PEG treatment. Moreover, differential expression patterns were also observed between wheat hybrid and its parents, and some genes were more responsive to PEG treatment in the hybrid. These results demonstrated that wheat WRKY genes are involved in leaf senescing and abiotic stresses. And the changed expression of these WRKY genes in hybrid might contribute to the heterosis by improving the stress tolerance in hybrids.

  19. Hypoxia: adapting to high altitude by mutating EPAS-1, the gene encoding HIF-2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Patot, Martha C Tissot; Gassmann, Max

    2011-01-01

    Living at high altitude is demanding and thus drives adaptational mechanisms. The Tibetan population has had a longer evolutionary period to adapt to high altitude than other mountain populations such as Andeans. As a result, some Tibetans living at high altitudes do not show markedly elevated red blood cell production as compared to South American high altitude natives such as Quechuas or Aymaras, thereby avoiding high blood viscosity creating cardiovascular risk. Unexpectedly, the responsible mutation(s) reducing red blood cell production do not involve either the gene encoding the blood hormone erythropoietin (Epo), or the corresponding regulatory sequences flanking the Epo gene. Similarly, functional mutations in the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene that represents the oxygen-dependent subunit of the HIF-1 heterodimer, the latter being the main regulator of over 100 hypoxia-inducible genes, have not been described so far. It was not until very recently that three independent groups showed that the gene encoding HIF-2α, EPAS-1 (Wenger et al. 1997), represents a key gene mutated in Tibetan populations adapted to living at high altitudes (Beall et al. 2010 , Yi et al. 2010 , Simonson et al. 2010). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors were first identified by the description of HIF-1 (Semenza et al. 1991 , 1992), which was subsequently found to enhance transcription of multiple genes that encode proteins necessary for rescuing from hypoxic exposure, including erythropoietic, angiogenic and glycolytic proteins. Then HIF-2 was identified (Ema et al. 1997 ; Flamme et al. 1997 ; Hogenesch et al. 1997 ; and Tian et al. 1997) and although it is highly similar to HIF-1 and has the potential to bind (Camenisch et al. 2001) and mediate (Mole et al. 2009) many of the same genes as HIF-1, its biological actions in response to hypoxia are distinct from those of HIF-1 (reviewed by Loboda et al. 2010). By now, several of these HIF-2 mediated

  20. A corm-specific gene encodes tarin, a major globulin of taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, I C; Castro, L A; Neshich, G; de Almeida, E R; de Sá, M F; Mello, L V; Monte-Neshich, D C

    1995-04-01

    A gene encoding a globulin from a major taro (Colocasia esculenta L. Schott) corm protein family, tarin (G1, ca. 28 kDa) was isolated from a lambda Charon 35 library, using a cDNA derived from a highly abundant corm-specific mRNA, as probe. The gene, named tar1, and the corresponding cDNA were characterized and compared. No introns were found. The major transcription start site was determined by primer extension analysis. The gene has an open reading frame (ORF) of 765 bp, and the deduced amino acid sequence indicated a precursor polypeptide of 255 residues that is post-translationally processed into two subunits of about 12.5 kDa each. The deduced protein is 45% homologous to curculin, a sweet-tasting protein found in the fruit pulp of Curculigo latifolia and 40% homologous to a mannose-binding lectin from Galanthus nivalis. Significant similarity was also found at the nucleic acid sequence level with genes encoding lectins from plant species of the Amaryllidaceae and Lilliaceae families.

  1. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nagarajan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dsRNA binding protein (RBP encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5–71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV.

  2. Characterization and Expression of Genes Encoding Three Small Heat Shock Proteins in Sesamia inferens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae

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    Meng Sun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pink stem borer, Sesamia inferens (Walker, is a major pest of rice and is endemic in China and other parts of Asia. Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs encompass a diverse, widespread class of stress proteins that have not been characterized in S. inferens. In the present study, we isolated and characterized three S. inferens genes that encode members of the α-crystallin/sHSP family, namely, Sihsp21.4, Sihsp20.6, and Sihsp19.6. The three cDNAs encoded proteins of 187, 183 and 174 amino acids with calculated molecular weights of 21.4, 20.6 and 19.6 kDa, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the three genes showed strong similarity to sHSPs identified in other lepidopteran insects. Sihsp21.4 contained an intron, but Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 lacked introns. Real-time quantitative PCR analyses revealed that Sihsp21.4 was most strongly expressed in S. inferens heads; Whereas expression of Sihsp20.6 and Sihsp19.6 was highest in eggs. The three S. inferens sHSP genes were up-regulated during low temperature stress. In summary, our results show that S. inferens sHSP genes have distinct regulatory roles in the physiology of S. inferens.

  3. [Cloning and structure of gene encoded alpha-latrocrustoxin from the Black widow spider venom].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilevich, V N; Luk'ianov, S A; Grishin, E V

    1999-07-01

    The primary structure of the crusta gene encoding alpha-latrocrustoxin (alpha-LCT), a high molecular mass neurotoxin specific to crustaceans, was determined in the black widow spider Latrodectus mactans tredicimguttatus genome. The total length of the sequenced DNA was 4693 bp. The structural part of the black widow spider chromosome gene encoding alpha-LCT does not contain introns. The sequenced DNA contains a single extended open reading frame (4185 bp) and encodes a protein precursor of alpha-LCT, comprising 1395 aa. We assume the Met residue at position -10 relative to the N-terminal residue of Glu1 of the mature toxin to be the first one in the protein precursor. The calculated molecular mass of the precursor (156147 Da) exceeds that of the mature toxin by approximately 30 kDa. These data are in agreement with the notion that over the course of maturation the protein precursor undergoes double processing--cleavage of a decapeptide from the N-terminal part and of a approximately 200-aa fragment from the C-terminal part. alpha-LCT displayed a number of imperfect ankyrin-like repeats and areas of structural homology with earlier studied latrotoxins; the highest homology degree (62%) was revealed with alpha-latroinsectotoxin (alpha-LIT).

  4. Genome-wide identification and mapping of NBS-encoding resistance genes in Solanum tuberosum group phureja.

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    Roberto Lozano

    Full Text Available The majority of disease resistance (R genes identified to date in plants encode a nucleotide-binding site (NBS and leucine-rich repeat (LRR domain containing protein. Additional domains such as coiled-coil (CC and TOLL/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domains can also be present. In the recently sequenced Solanum tuberosum group phureja genome we used HMM models and manual curation to annotate 435 NBS-encoding R gene homologs and 142 NBS-derived genes that lack the NBS domain. Highly similar homologs for most previously documented Solanaceae R genes were identified. A surprising ∼41% (179 of the 435 NBS-encoding genes are pseudogenes primarily caused by premature stop codons or frameshift mutations. Alignment of 81.80% of the 577 homologs to S. tuberosum group phureja pseudomolecules revealed non-random distribution of the R-genes; 362 of 470 genes were found in high density clusters on 11 chromosomes.

  5. A plasmid-encoded UmuD homologue regulates expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa SOS genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Magaña, Amada; Alva-Murillo, Nayeli; Chávez-Moctezuma, Martha P; López-Meza, Joel E; Ramírez-Díaz, Martha I; Cervantes, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa plasmid pUM505 contains the umuDC operon that encodes proteins similar to error-prone repair DNA polymerase V. The umuC gene appears to be truncated and its product is probably not functional. The umuD gene, renamed umuDpR, possesses an SOS box overlapped with a Sigma factor 70 type promoter; accordingly, transcriptional fusions revealed that the umuDpR gene promoter is activated by mitomycin C. The predicted sequence of the UmuDpR protein displays 23 % identity with the Ps. aeruginosa SOS-response LexA repressor. The umuDpR gene caused increased MMC sensitivity when transferred to the Ps. aeruginosa PAO1 strain. As expected, PAO1-derived knockout lexA-  mutant PW6037 showed resistance to MMC; however, when the umuDpR gene was transferred to PW6037, MMC resistance level was reduced. These data suggested that UmuDpR represses the expression of SOS genes, as LexA does. To test whether UmuDpR exerts regulatory functions, expression of PAO1 SOS genes was evaluated by reverse transcription quantitative PCR assays in the lexA-  mutant with or without the pUC_umuD recombinant plasmid. Expression of lexA, imuA and recA genes increased 3.4-5.3 times in the lexA-  mutant, relative to transcription of the corresponding genes in the lexA+ strain, but decreased significantly in the lexA- /umuDpR transformant. These results confirmed that the UmuDpR protein is a repressor of Ps. aeruginosa SOS genes controlled by LexA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, however, did not show binding of UmuDpR to 5' regions of SOS genes, suggesting an indirect mechanism of regulation.

  6. Decay of genes encoding the oomycete flagellar proteome in the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis.

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    Howard S Judelson

    Full Text Available Zoospores are central to the life cycles of most of the eukaryotic microbes known as oomycetes, but some genera have lost the ability to form these flagellated cells. In the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans, genes encoding 257 proteins associated with flagella were identified by comparative genomics. These included the main structural components of the axoneme and basal body, proteins involved in intraflagellar transport, regulatory proteins, enzymes for maintaining ATP levels, and others. Transcripts for over three-quarters of the genes were up-regulated during sporulation, and persisted to varying degrees in the pre-zoospore stage (sporangia and motile zoospores. Nearly all of these genes had orthologs in other eukaryotes that form flagella or cilia, but not species that lack the organelle. Orthologs of 211 of the genes were also absent from a sister taxon to P. infestans that lost the ability to form flagella, the downy mildew Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Many of the genes retained in H. arabidopsidis were also present in other non-flagellates, suggesting that they play roles both in flagella and other cellular processes. Remnants of the missing genes were often detected in the H. arabidopsidis genome. Degradation of the genes was associated with local compaction of the chromosome and a heightened propensity towards genome rearrangements, as such regions were less likely to share synteny with P. infestans.

  7. Phylogenetic and evolutionary analysis of NBS-encoding genes in Rosaceae fruit crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang; Wen, Xiaopeng; Deng, Xiuxin

    2007-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships of the nucleotide binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance gene homologues (RGHs) among 12 species in five genera of Rosaceae fruit crops were evaluated. A total of 228 Rosaceous RGHs were deeply separated into two distinct clades, designated as TIR (sequences within this clade containing a Toll Interleukin-1 Receptor domain) and NonTIR (sequences lacking a TIR domain). Most Rosaceous RGH genes were phylogenetically distinct from Arabidopsis, Rice or Pine genes, except for a few Rosaceous members which grouped closely with Arabidopsis genes. Within Rosaceae, sequences from multiple species were often phylogenetically clustered together, forming heterogenous groups, however, apple- and chestnut rose-specific groups really exist. Gene duplication followed by sequence divergence were proposed as the mode for the evolution of a large number of distantly or closely related RGH genes in Rosaceae, and this mode may play a role in the generation of new resistance specificity. Positively selected sites within NBS-coding region were detected and thus nucleotide variation within NBS domain may function in determining disease resistance specificity. This study also discusses the synteny of a genomic region that encompass powdery mildew resistance locus among Malus, Prunus and Rosa, which may have potential use for fruit tree disease breeding and important gene cloning.

  8. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim...... were used to associate genetic variation to SP-D, respiratory distress (RD), oxygen requirement, and respiratory support. RESULTS: The 5'-upstream SFTPD SNP rs1923534 and the 3 structural SNPs rs721917, rs2243639, and rs3088308 were associated with the SP-D level. The same SNPs were associated with RD......, a requirement for supplemental oxygen, and a requirement for respiratory support. Haplotype analyses identified 3 haplotypes that included the minor alleles of rs1923534, rs721917, and rs3088308 that exhibited highly significant associations with decreased SP-D levels and decreased ORs for RD, oxygen...

  9. The Hd0053 gene of Haemophilus ducreyi encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Sun, Mingchi; Huang, Shengshu; Yu, Hai; Chokhawala, Harshal A; Thon, Vireak; Chen, Xi

    2007-09-21

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes chancroid, a sexually transmitted genital ulcer disease. Different lipooligosaccharide (LOS) structures have been identified from H. ducreyi strain 35000, including those sialylated glycoforms. Surface LOS of H. ducreyi is considered an important virulence factor that is involved in ulcer formation, cell adhesion, and invasion of host tissue. Gene Hd0686 of H. ducreyi, designated lst (for lipooligosaccharide sialyltransferase), was identified to encode an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that is important for the formation of sialylated LOS. Here, we show that Hd0053 of H. ducreyi genomic strain 35000HP, the third member of the glycosyltransferase family 80 (GT80), also encodes an alpha2,3-sialyltransferase that may be important for LOS sialylation.

  10. Function-Based Metagenomic Library Screening and Heterologous Expression Strategy for Genes Encoding Phosphatase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar, Genis A Castillo; Nacke, Heiko; Daniel, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphate from inorganic and organic phosphorus compounds can be mediated enzymatically. Phosphate-releasing enzymes, comprising acid and alkaline phosphatases, are recognized as useful biocatalysts in applications such as plant and animal nutrition, bioremediation and diagnostic analysis. Metagenomic approaches provide access to novel phosphatase-encoding genes. Here, we describe a function-based screening approach for rapid identification of genes conferring phosphatase activity from small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries derived from various environments. This approach bears the potential for discovery of entirely novel phosphatase families or subfamilies and members of known enzyme classes hydrolyzing phosphomonoester bonds such as phytases. In addition, we provide a strategy for efficient heterologous phosphatase gene expression.

  11. Identification and characterization of the Vibrio anguillarum prtV gene encoding a new metalloprotease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhaolan; Guo, Dongsheng; Mao, Yunxiang; Ye, Xuhong; Zou, Yuxia; Xiao, Peng; Hao, Bin

    2010-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a prtV-like gene from Vibrio anguillarum M3 strain. This prtV gene encodes a putative protein of 918 amino acids, and is highly homologous to the V. cholerae prtV gene. We found that a prtV insertion mutant strain displayed lower gelatinase activity on gelatin agar, lower protease activity against azocasein, and lower activity for four glycosidases. This prtV mutant strain also had increased activity for two esterases in its extracellular products, as analyzed by the API ZYM system. In addition, the prtV mutant strain exhibited decreased growth in turbot intestinal mucus and reduced hemolytic activity on turbot erythrocytes. Infection experiments showed that the LD50 of the prtV mutant strain increased by at least 1 log compared to the wild-type in turbot fish. We propose that prtV plays an important role in the pathogenesis of V. anguillarum.

  12. Screening and analysis of hepatocellular carcinomaassociated antigens and their encoding genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yongyu; WANG Hongcheng; LI Yan; PANG Xuewen; SUN Wensheng; CHEN Weifeng

    2003-01-01

    Identification of hepatocellular carcinoma- associated tumor antigens is necessary and pivotal for specific immunotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In the present study, HCC cDNAs are constructed into ZAP cDNA expression library and screened by sera of patients with HCC. The positive clones are DNA sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics. Thirty-one genes of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens are identified, of which 1 is unknown and 30 are known. The proteins encoded by these known genes can be classified into 8 categories: constitutive molecules of hepatocytes, RNA transcription and splicing-associated molecules, protein metabolism-associated molecules, energy synthesis-associated molecules, signal transduction molecules, cell adhesion molecules, immunosuppressive molecules, and proteins with unknown function. Among these genes, CAGE is a cancer-testis (CT) antigen. It is concluded that identification of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens provides potential targets for immunotherapy of HCC patients and facilitates explanation of carcinogenesis of HCC.

  13. PRS1 is a key member of the gene family encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Andrew T.; Beiche, Flora; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne;

    1997-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the metabolite phosphoribosyl-pyrophosphate (PRPP) is required for purine, pyrimidine, tryptophan and histidine biosynthesis. Enzymes that can synthesize PRPP can be encoded by at least four genes. We have studied 5-phospho-ribosyl-1(α)-pyrophosphate synthetases (PRS......) genetically and biochemically. Each of the four genes, all of which are transcribed, has been disrupted in haploid yeast strains of each mating type and although all disruptants are able to grow on complete medium, differences in growth rate and enzyme activity suggest that disruption of PRS1 or PRS3 has...... a significant effect on cell metabolism, whereas disruption of PRS2 or PRS4 has little measurable effect. Using Western blot analysis with antisera raised against peptides derived from the non-homology region (NHR) and the N-terminal half of the PRS1 gene product it has been shown that the NHR is not removed...

  14. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality.

  15. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  16. Evolutionary Characteristics of Missing Proteins: Insights into the Evolution of Human Chromosomes Related to Missing-Protein-Encoding Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aishi; Li, Guang; Yang, Dong; Wu, Songfeng; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Xu, Ping; He, Fuchu

    2015-12-01

    Although the "missing protein" is a temporary concept in C-HPP, the biological information for their "missing" could be an important clue in evolutionary studies. Here we classified missing-protein-encoding genes into two groups, the genes encoding PE2 proteins (with transcript evidence) and the genes encoding PE3/4 proteins (with no transcript evidence). These missing-protein-encoding genes distribute unevenly among different chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene clusters. In the view of evolutionary features, PE3/4 genes tend to be young, spreading at the nonhomology chromosomal regions and evolving at higher rates. Interestingly, there is a higher proportion of singletons in PE3/4 genes than the proportion of singletons in all genes (background) and OTCSGs (organ, tissue, cell type-specific genes). More importantly, most of the paralogous PE3/4 genes belong to the newly duplicated members of the paralogous gene groups, which mainly contribute to special biological functions, such as "smell perception". These functions are heavily restricted into specific type of cells, tissues, or specific developmental stages, acting as the new functional requirements that facilitated the emergence of the missing-protein-encoding genes during evolution. In addition, the criteria for the extremely special physical-chemical proteins were first set up based on the properties of PE2 proteins, and the evolutionary characteristics of those proteins were explored. Overall, the evolutionary analyses of missing-protein-encoding genes are expected to be highly instructive for proteomics and functional studies in the future.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LysR PA4203 regulator NmoR acts as a repressor of the PA4202 nmoA> gene, encoding a nitronate monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercammen, Ken; Wei, Qing; Charlier, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    The PA4203 gene encodes a LysR regulator and lies between the ppgL gene (PA4204), which encodes a periplasmic gluconolactonase, and, in the opposite orientation, the PA4202 (nmoA) gene, coding for a nitronate monooxygenase, and ddlA (PA4201), encoding a d-alanine alanine ligase. The intergenic re...

  18. The lethal toxin from Australian funnel-web spiders is encoded by an intronless gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Sandy Steffany; Wilson, David; Mattick, John S; King, Glenn F

    2012-01-01

    Australian funnel-web spiders are generally considered the most dangerous spiders in the world, with envenomations from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus resulting in at least 14 human fatalities prior to the introduction of an effective anti-venom in 1980. The clinical envenomation syndrome resulting from bites by Australian funnel-web spiders is due to a single 42-residue peptide known as δ-hexatoxin. This peptide delays the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, which results in spontaneous repetitive firing and prolongation of action potentials, thereby causing massive neurotransmitter release from both somatic and autonomic nerve endings. Here we show that δ-hexatoxin from the Australian funnel-web spider Hadronyche versuta is produced from an intronless gene that encodes a prepropeptide that is post-translationally processed to yield the mature toxin. A limited sampling of genes encoding unrelated venom peptides from this spider indicated that they are all intronless. Thus, in distinct contrast to cone snails and scorpions, whose toxin genes contain introns, spiders may have developed a quite different genetic strategy for evolving their venom peptidome.

  19. The lethal toxin from Australian funnel-web spiders is encoded by an intronless gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Steffany Pineda

    Full Text Available Australian funnel-web spiders are generally considered the most dangerous spiders in the world, with envenomations from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus resulting in at least 14 human fatalities prior to the introduction of an effective anti-venom in 1980. The clinical envenomation syndrome resulting from bites by Australian funnel-web spiders is due to a single 42-residue peptide known as δ-hexatoxin. This peptide delays the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, which results in spontaneous repetitive firing and prolongation of action potentials, thereby causing massive neurotransmitter release from both somatic and autonomic nerve endings. Here we show that δ-hexatoxin from the Australian funnel-web spider Hadronyche versuta is produced from an intronless gene that encodes a prepropeptide that is post-translationally processed to yield the mature toxin. A limited sampling of genes encoding unrelated venom peptides from this spider indicated that they are all intronless. Thus, in distinct contrast to cone snails and scorpions, whose toxin genes contain introns, spiders may have developed a quite different genetic strategy for evolving their venom peptidome.

  20. A Pin gene families encoding components of auxin efflux carriers in Brassica juncea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the sequence information of Arabidopsis PIN1, two cDNAs encoding PIN homologues fromBrassica juncea, Bjpin2 and Bjpin3, were isolated through cDNA library screening. Bjpin2 and Bjpin3encoded proteins containing 640 and 635 amino acid residues, respectively, which shared 97.5% identities witheach other and were highly homologous to Arabidopsis PIN1, PIN2 and other putative PIN proteins. BjPIN2and BjPIN3 had similar structures as AtPIN proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that Bjpin2 wasexpressed in stem, leaf and floral tissues, while Bjpin3 was expressed predominantly in stem and hypocotyls.Two promoter fragments of pin genes, Bjpin-X and Bjpin-Z, were isolated by 'genome walking' techniqueusing primers at 5'-end of pin cDNA. Promoter-gus fusion studies revealed the GUS activities driven byBjpin-X were at internal side of xylem and petal; while those driven by Bjpin-Z were detected at leaf vein,epidermal cell and cortex of stem, vascular tissues and anther. Results of the pin genes with differentexpression patterns in B. juncea suggested the presence of a gene family.

  1. Cloning and sequence analysis of gene encoding plasma aquaporin of Tamarix albiflonum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yuzhi; YANG Chuanping; ZHANG Daoyuan; WANG Yucheng

    2007-01-01

    Plant aquaporins are water-selected-channels in plants and are involved in seed germination,cell elongation,stoma movement,fertilization and so on.Some plant aquapotins also play an important role in drought stress response.In this paper,the gene encoding the Tamarix albiflonum Aquaporin (AQP) was amplified by 5'rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) on the basis of the sequence information obtained from the expressed sequence tag of the subtractive hybridization library constructed under PEG6000 stress.The cDNA of the T.albiflonum AQP gene is 1,043 bp long,encoding a protein of 287 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 30.9 kDa,has 6 transmembrane regions,and possessing the major intrinsic protein (MIP) family signal consensus sequence SGXHXNPAVT and the higher plant plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) highly conservative sequence GGGANXXXXGY and TGI/TNPARSL /FGAA I/VI/VF/YN.A comparative molecular analysis of the nucleotide sequence in National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) databases showed that it shared 95% homology with the gene ofArabidopsis thaliana (MIP-C),with a theoretical isoelectric point 8.84.

  2. Cloning and Characterization of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Encoding Gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueying; SUI Zhenghong; ZHANG Xuecheng

    2006-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene (gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  3. Identification and characterization of the Arabidopsis gene encoding the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis enzyme uroporphyrinogen III synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fui-Ching; Cheng, Qi; Saha, Kaushik; Heinemann, Ilka U; Jahn, Martina; Jahn, Dieter; Smith, Alison G

    2008-03-01

    UROS (uroporphyrinogen III synthase; EC 4.2.1.75) is the enzyme responsible for the formation of uroporphyrinogen III, the precursor of all cellular tetrapyrroles including haem, chlorophyll and bilins. Although UROS genes have been cloned from many organisms, the level of sequence conservation between them is low, making sequence similarity searches difficult. As an alternative approach to identify the UROS gene from plants, we used functional complementation, since this does not require conservation of primary sequence. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was constructed in which the HEM4 gene encoding UROS was deleted. This mutant was transformed with an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library in a yeast expression vector and two colonies were obtained that could grow in the absence of haem. The rescuing plasmids encoded an ORF (open reading frame) of 321 amino acids which, when subcloned into an Escherichia coli expression vector, was able to complement an E. coli hemD mutant defective in UROS. Final proof that the ORF encoded UROS came from the fact that the recombinant protein expressed with an N-terminal histidine-tag was found to have UROS activity. Comparison of the sequence of AtUROS (A. thaliana UROS) with the human enzyme found that the seven invariant residues previously identified were conserved, including three shown to be important for enzyme activity. Furthermore, a structure-based homology search of the protein database with AtUROS identified the human crystal structure. AtUROS has an N-terminal extension compared with orthologues from other organisms, suggesting that this might act as a targeting sequence. The precursor protein of 34 kDa translated in vitro was imported into isolated chloroplasts and processed to the mature size of 29 kDa. Confocal microscopy of plant cells transiently expressing a fusion protein of AtUROS with GFP (green fluorescent protein) confirmed that AtUROS was targeted exclusively to chloroplasts in vivo.

  4. The Novel Gene CRNDE Encodes a Nuclear Peptide (CRNDEP Which Is Overexpressed in Highly Proliferating Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Michal Szafron

    Full Text Available CRNDE, recently described as the lncRNA-coding gene, is overexpressed at RNA level in human malignancies. Its role in gametogenesis, cellular differentiation and pluripotency has been suggested as well. Herein, we aimed to verify our hypothesis that the CRNDE gene may encode a protein product, CRNDEP. By using bioinformatics methods, we identified the 84-amino acid ORF encoded by one of two CRNDE transcripts, previously described by our research team. This ORF was cloned into two expression vectors, subsequently utilized in localization studies in HeLa cells. We also developed a polyclonal antibody against CRNDEP. Its specificity was confirmed in immunohistochemical, cellular localization, Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments, as well as by showing a statistically significant decrease of endogenous CRNDEP expression in the cells with transient shRNA-mediated knockdown of CRNDE. Endogenous CRNDEP localizes predominantly to the nucleus and its expression seems to be elevated in highly proliferating tissues, like the parabasal layer of the squamous epithelium, intestinal crypts or spermatocytes. After its artificial overexpression in HeLa cells, in a fusion with either the EGFP or DsRed Monomer fluorescent tag, CRNDEP seems to stimulate the formation of stress granules and localize to them. Although the exact role of CRNDEP is unknown, our preliminary results suggest that it may be involved in the regulation of the cell proliferation. Possibly, CRNDEP also participates in oxygen metabolism, considering our in silico results, and the correlation between its enforced overexpression and the formation of stress granules. This is the first report showing the existence of a peptide encoded by the CRNDE gene.

  5. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Kelder, B; Applebaum, J; Chicchi, G; Shapiro, J A; Pasleau, F.; Kopchick, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fi...

  6. Rapid identification of genes encoding DNA polymerases by function-based screening of metagenomic libraries derived from glacial ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carola; Herath, Judith; Rockstroh, Stephanie; Daniel, Rolf

    2009-05-01

    Small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries were constructed from glacial ice of the Northern Schneeferner, which is located on the Zugspitzplatt in Germany. Subsequently, these libraries were screened for the presence of DNA polymerase-encoding genes by complementation of an Escherichia coli polA mutant. Nine novel genes encoding complete DNA polymerase I proteins or domains typical of these proteins were recovered.

  7. Rapid Identification of Genes Encoding DNA Polymerases by Function-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries Derived from Glacial Ice▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries were constructed from glacial ice of the Northern Schneeferner, which is located on the Zugspitzplatt in Germany. Subsequently, these libraries were screened for the presence of DNA polymerase-encoding genes by complementation of an Escherichia coli polA mutant. Nine novel genes encoding complete DNA polymerase I proteins or domains typical of these proteins were recovered.

  8. Effects of Shensong Yangxin capsule on pacemaker channels encoded by human HCN4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Li-ping; LI Ning; WU Yi-ling; PU Jie-lin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Shensong Yangxin (SSYX) is one of the compound recipes of Chinese materia medica including 12ingredients such as Panax ginseng, dwarf lilyturf tuber,nardostachys root, etc. Small-scale randomized multi-centre clinical trials suggested that SSYX reduced the number of ventricular extrasystoles in patients with or without structural heart disease.1 Besides excellent antiarrhythmic efficacy,2 SSYX also improved bradycardia in some patients, which was evidenced by animal studies3 as well. However, the antiarrhythmic mechanisms of SSYX have not been fully understood.Our previous studies have explored effect of SSYX on many channels except hyperpolarization-activated cation channel encoded by human hHCN4 gene.4

  9. Identification and characterization of an oleate hydratase-encoding gene from Bifidobacterium breve

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kerry Joan; Motherway, Mary O'Connell; Hennessey, Alan A; Brodhun, Florian; Ross, R Paul; Feussner, Ivo; Stanton, Catherine; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are common commensals of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. Previous studies have suggested that a bifidobacterial myosin cross reactive antigen (MCRA) protein plays a role in bacterial stress tolerance, while this protein has also been linked to the biosynthesis of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) in bifidobacteria. In order to increase our understanding on the role of MCRA in bifidobacteria we created and analyzed an insertion mutant of the MCRA-encoding gene of B. breve NCFB 2258. Our results demonstrate that the MCRA protein of B. breve NCFB 2258 does not appear to play a role in CLA production, yet is an oleate hydratase, which contributes to bifidobacterial solvent stress protection. PMID:23851389

  10. Expression analysis of the Theileria parva subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Schmuckli-Maurer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva transforms bovine lymphocytes inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Proteins released from the parasite are assumed to contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell and parasite persistence. With 85 members, genes encoding subtelomeric variable secreted proteins (SVSPs form the largest gene family in T. parva. The majority of SVSPs contain predicted signal peptides, suggesting secretion into the host cell cytoplasm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed SVSP expression in T. parva-transformed cell lines established in vitro by infection of T or B lymphocytes with cloned T. parva parasites. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed mRNA expression for a wide range of SVSP genes. The pattern of mRNA expression was largely defined by the parasite genotype and not by host background or cell type, and found to be relatively stable in vitro over a period of two months. Interestingly, immunofluorescence analysis carried out on cell lines established from a cloned parasite showed that expression of a single SVSP encoded by TP03_0882 is limited to only a small percentage of parasites. Epitope-tagged TP03_0882 expressed in mammalian cells was found to translocate into the nucleus, a process that could be attributed to two different nuclear localisation signals. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis reveals a complex pattern of Theileria SVSP mRNA expression, which depends on the parasite genotype. Whereas in cell lines established from a cloned parasite transcripts can be found corresponding to a wide range of SVSP genes, only a minority of parasites appear to express a particular SVSP protein. The fact that a number of SVSPs contain functional nuclear localisation signals suggests that proteins released from the parasite could contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell. This initial characterisation will facilitate future studies on the regulation of SVSP gene

  11. Isolation and Functional Characterisation of the Genes Encoding △8-Sphingolipid Desaturase from Brassica rapa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Li; Li-Ying Song; Wei-Bo Yin; Yu-Hong Chen; Liang Chen; Ji-Lin Li; Richard R.-C. Wang; Zan-Min Hu

    2012-01-01

    △8-Sphingolipid desaturase is the key enzyme that catalyses desaturation at the C8 position of the long-chain base of sphingolipids in higher plants.There have been no previous studies on the genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases in Brassica rapa.In this study,four genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases from B.rapa were isolated and characterised.Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these genes could be divided into two groups:BrD8A,BrD8C and BrD8D in group Ⅰ,and BrD8B in group Ⅱ.The two groups of genes diverged before the separation of Arabidopsis and Brassica.Though the four genes shared a high sequence similarity,and their coding desaturases all located in endoplasmic reticulum,they exhibited distinct expression patterns.Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that BrD8A/B/C/D were functionally diverse △8-sphingolipid desaturases that catalyse different ratios of the two products 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine.The aluminium tolerance of transgenic yeasts expressing BrD8A/B/C/D was enhanced compared with that of control cells.Expression of BrD8A in A rabidopsis changed the ratio of 8(Z):8(E)-C 18-phytosphingenine in transgenic plants.The information reported here provides new insights into the biochemical functional diversity and evolutionary relationship of △8-sphingolipid desaturase in plants and lays a foundation for further investigation of the mechanism of 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine biosynthesis.

  12. Construction, cloning, and expression of synthetic genes encoding spider dragline silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, J T; McGrath, K P; DiGirolamo, C M; Kaplan, D L

    1995-08-29

    Synthetic genes encoding recombinant spider silk proteins have been constructed, cloned, and expressed. Protein sequences were derived from Nephila clavipes dragline silk proteins and reverse-translated to the corresponding DNA sequences. Codon selection was chosen to maximize expression levels in Escherichia coli. DNA "monomer" sequences were multimerized to encode high molecular weight synthetic spider silks using a "head-to-tail" construction strategy. Multimers were cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and the encoded silk proteins were expressed in E. coli upon induction with IPTG. Four multimer, ranging in size from 14.7 to 41.3 kDa, were chosen for detailed analysis. These proteins were isolated by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and purified using reverse-phase HPLC. The composition and identity of the purified proteins were confirmed by amino acid composition analysis, N-terminal sequencing, laser desorption mass spectroscopy, and Western analysis using antibodies reactive to native spider dragline silk. Circular dichroism measurements indicate that the synthetic spider silks have substantial beta-sheet structure.

  13. Genome mining demonstrates the widespread occurrence of gene clusters encoding bacteriocins in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Fewer, David P; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2011-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting biological activities. Many of these are peptides and the end products of a non-ribosomal pathway. However, several cyanobacterial peptide classes were recently shown to be produced through the proteolytic cleavage and post-translational modification of short precursor peptides. A new class of bacteriocins produced through the proteolytic cleavage and heterocyclization of precursor proteins was recently identified from marine cyanobacteria. Here we show the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin gene clusters in cyanobacteria through comparative analysis of 58 cyanobacterial genomes. A total of 145 bacteriocin gene clusters were discovered through genome mining. These clusters encoded 290 putative bacteriocin precursors. They ranged in length from 28 to 164 amino acids with very little sequence conservation of the core peptide. The gene clusters could be classified into seven groups according to their gene organization and domain composition. This classification is supported by phylogenetic analysis, which further indicated independent evolutionary trajectories of gene clusters in different groups. Our data suggests that cyanobacteria are a prolific source of low-molecular weight post-translationally modified peptides.

  14. Genome mining demonstrates the widespread occurrence of gene clusters encoding bacteriocins in cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are a rich source of natural products with interesting biological activities. Many of these are peptides and the end products of a non-ribosomal pathway. However, several cyanobacterial peptide classes were recently shown to be produced through the proteolytic cleavage and post-translational modification of short precursor peptides. A new class of bacteriocins produced through the proteolytic cleavage and heterocyclization of precursor proteins was recently identified from marine cyanobacteria. Here we show the widespread occurrence of bacteriocin gene clusters in cyanobacteria through comparative analysis of 58 cyanobacterial genomes. A total of 145 bacteriocin gene clusters were discovered through genome mining. These clusters encoded 290 putative bacteriocin precursors. They ranged in length from 28 to 164 amino acids with very little sequence conservation of the core peptide. The gene clusters could be classified into seven groups according to their gene organization and domain composition. This classification is supported by phylogenetic analysis, which further indicated independent evolutionary trajectories of gene clusters in different groups. Our data suggests that cyanobacteria are a prolific source of low-molecular weight post-translationally modified peptides.

  15. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  16. Modeling the fitness consequences of a cyanophage-encoded photosynthesis gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G Bragg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phages infecting marine picocyanobacteria often carry a psbA gene, which encodes a homolog to the photosynthetic reaction center protein, D1. Host encoded D1 decays during phage infection in the light. Phage encoded D1 may help to maintain photosynthesis during the lytic cycle, which in turn could bolster the production of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs for phage genome replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To explore the consequences to a phage of encoding and expressing psbA, we derive a simple model of infection for a cyanophage/host pair--cyanophage P-SSP7 and Prochlorococcus MED4--for which pertinent laboratory data are available. We first use the model to describe phage genome replication and the kinetics of psbA expression by host and phage. We then examine the contribution of phage psbA expression to phage genome replication under constant low irradiance (25 microE m(-2 s(-1. We predict that while phage psbA expression could lead to an increase in the number of phage genomes produced during a lytic cycle of between 2.5 and 4.5% (depending on parameter values, this advantage can be nearly negated by the cost of psbA in elongating the phage genome. Under higher irradiance conditions that promote D1 degradation, however, phage psbA confers a greater advantage to phage genome replication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These analyses illustrate how psbA may benefit phage in the dynamic ocean surface mixed layer.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Pan, Jin; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-03-01

    A gene ( NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a cDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop) D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA). The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVScl to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  18. [Lignocellulose degrading bacteria and their genes encoding cellulase/hemicellulase in rumen--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Furong; Zhu, Yaxin; Dong, Xiuzhu; Liu, Lihua; Huang, Li; Dai, Xin

    2010-08-01

    Rumen of ruminant animals is known as a natural reactor involved in highly efficient lignocelluloses degradation. Rumen fibrolytic microbes have attracted an increasing attention for their potential value in biofuel research. Studies on rumen microbes have traditionally entailed the isolation of fibrolytic bacteria and subsequent analysis of fibrolytic enzymes. Developments in genomic and metagenomic approaches have made it possible to isolate directly genes and gene clusters encoding fibrolytic activities from rumen samples, permitting a global analysis of mechanisms of degradation of lignocellulose in rumen. Research in this field shows that lignocellulose degradation in rumen is a complex process involving a number of different microbes and is effected by a huge array of hydrolytic enzymes in a concerted fashion. This review briefly summarizes results from recent studies, especially metagenomic studies, on lignocellulose degradation in rumen.

  19. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaolei; YU Jianzhong; ZHU Baohua; PAN Kehou; PAN Jin; YANG Guanpin

    2011-01-01

    A gene (NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a eDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop)D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA).The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1 to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  20. Bioinformatic identification of genes encoding C1q-domain containing proteins in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    C1q is the first subcomponent of classical pathway in the complement system and a major link between innate and acquired immunities. The globular (gC1q) domain similar with C1q was also found in many non-complement C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins which have similar crystal structure to that of the multifunctional tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, and also have diverse functions. In this study, we identified a total of 52 independent gene sequences encoding C1q-domain-containing proteins through comprehensive searches of zebrafish genome, cDNA and EST databases. In comparison to 31 orthologous genes in human and different numbers in other species, a significant selective pressure was suggested during vertebrate evolution. Domain organization of C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins mainly includes a leading signal peptide, a collagen-like region of variable length, and a C-terminal C1q domain. There are 11 highly conserved residues within the C1q domain, among which 2 are invariant within the zebrafish gene set. A more extensive database searches also revealed homologous C1qDC proteins in other vertebrates, invertebrates and even bacterium, but no homologous sequences for encoding C1qDC proteins were found in many species that have a more recent evolutionary history with zebrafish. Therefore, further studies on C1q-domain-containing genes among different species will help us understand evolutionary mechanism of innate and acquired immunities.

  1. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding cysteine proteases from senescent leaves of Gossypium hirsutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Fafu; YU Shuxun; HAN Xiulan; FAN Shuli

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding a cysteine proteinase was isolated from senescent leave of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cv liaomian No. 9 by utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), and a set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal the conserved sequences of plant cysteine protease genes. The cDNA, which designated Ghcysp gene, contained 1368 bp terminating in a poly(A)+ trail, and included a putative 5′(98 bp) and a 3′(235 bp) non-coding region. The opening reading frame (ORF) encodes polypeptide 344 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.88 kD and theoretical pI of 4.80. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence in the GenBank database has shown considerable sequence similarity to a novel family of plant cysteine proteases. This putative cotton Ghcysp protein shows from 67% to 82% identity to the other plants. All of them share catalytic triad of residues, which are highly conserved in three regions. Hydropaths analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that the Ghcysp is a potential membrane protein and localizes to the vacuole, which has a transmembrane helix between resides 7-25. A characteristic feature of Ghcysp is the presence of a putative vacuole-targeting signal peptide of 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal region. The expression of Ghcysp gene was determined using northern blot analysis. The Ghcysp mRNA levels are high in development senescent leaf but below the limit of detection in senescent root, hypocotyl, faded flower, 6 d post anthesis ovule, and young leaf.

  2. Life without putrescine: disruption of the gene-encoding polyamine oxidase in Ustilago maydis odc mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Guzmán-de-Peña, Doralinda; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2010-11-01

    In previous communications the essential role of spermidine in Ustilago maydis was demonstrated by means of the disruption of the genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and spermidine synthase (SPE). However, the assignation of specific roles to each polyamine in different cellular functions was not possible because the spermidine added to satisfy the auxotrophic requirement of odc/spe double mutants is partly back converted into putrescine. In this study, we have approached this problem through the disruption of the gene-encoding polyamine oxidase (PAO), required for the conversion of spermidine into putrescine, and the construction of odc/pao double mutants that were unable to synthesize putrescine by either ornithine decarboxylation or retroconversion from spermidine. Phenotypic analysis of the mutants provided evidence that putrescine is only an intermediary in spermidine biosynthesis, and has no direct role in cell growth, dimorphic transition, or any other vital function of U. maydis. Nevertheless, our results show that putrescine may play a role in the protection of U. maydis against salt and osmotic stress, and possibly virulence. Evidence was also obtained that the retroconversion of spermidine into putrescine is not essential for U. maydis growth but may be important for its survival under natural conditions.

  3. OsHT, a Rice Gene Encoding for a Plasma-Membrane Localized Histidine Transporter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di LIU; Wei GONG; Yong BAI; Jing-Chu LUO; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Using a degenerative probe designed according to the most conservative region of a known Lys- and His-specific amino acid transporter (LHT1) from Arabidopsis, we isolated a full-length cDNA named OsHT (histidine transporter of Oryza sativa L.) by screening the rice cDNA library. The cDNA is 1.3kb in length and the open reading frame encodes for a 441 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 49 kDa. Multiple sequence alignments showed that OsHT shares a high degree of sequence conservation at the deduced amino acid level with the Arabidopsis LHT1 and six putative lysine and histidine transporters. Computational analysis indicated that OsHT is an integral membrane protein with 11 putative transmembrane helices. This was confirmed by the transient expression assay because the OsHT-GFP fusion protein was, indeed, localized mainly in the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Functional complementation experiments demonstrated that OsHT was able to work as a histidine transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that OsHT is a gene that encodes for a histidine transporter from rice.This is the first time that an LHT-type amino acid transporter gene has been cloned from higher plants other than A rabidopsis.

  4. Characterization of a gene which encodes a mannosyltransferase homolog of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Alessandra A; Gómez, Francisco J; Pereira, Maristela; Felipe, M Sueli S; Jesuino, Rosália S A; Deepe, George S; de Almeida Soares, Célia M

    2002-08-01

    We screened an expression library of the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with a pool of human sera that was pre-adsorbed with mycelium, from patients with paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). A sequence (PbYmnt) was obtained and characterized. A genomic clone was obtained by PCR of P. brasiliensis total DNA. The sequence contained a single open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein of 357 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 39.78 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibited identity to mannosyl- and glycosyltransferases from several sources. A DXD motif was present in the translated gene and this sequence is characteristic of the glycosyltransferases. Hydropathy analysis revealed a single transmembrane region near the amino terminus of the molecule that suggested a type II membrane protein. The PbYmnt was expressed preferentially in the yeast parasitic phase. The accession number of the nucleotide sequence of PbYmnt and its flanking regions is AF374353. A recombinant protein was generated in Escherichia coli. Our data suggest that PbYmnt encodes one member of a glycosyltransferase family of proteins and that our strategy was useful in the isolation of differentially expressed genes.

  5. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the gene encoding the extracellular metalloprotease of Aeromonas caviae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, K; Toma, C; Honma, Y

    2000-01-01

    A gene (apk) encoding the extracellular protease of Aeromonas caviae Ae6 has been cloned and sequenced. For cloning the gene, the DNA genomic library was screened using skim milk LB agar. One clone harboring plasmid pKK3 was selected for sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the 3.5 kb region of pKK3 revealed a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,785 bp encoding 595 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide contained a putative 16-amino acid signal peptide followed by a large propeptide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified recombinant protein (APK) was consistent with the DNA sequence. This result suggested a mature protein of 412 amino acids with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. However, the molecular mass of purified recombinant APK revealed 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, suggesting that further processing at the C-terminal region took place. The 2 motifs of zinc binding sites deduced are highly conserved in the APK as well as in other zinc metalloproteases including Vibrio proteolyticus neutral protease, Emp V from Vibrio vulnificus, HA/P from Vibrio cholerae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA, Zincov, 1,10-phenanthroline and tetraethylenepentamine while unaffected by the other inhibitors tested. The protease showed maximum activity at pH 7.0 and was inactivated by heating at 80 C for 15 min. These results together suggest that APK belongs to the thermolysin family of metalloendopeptidases.

  6. Three synonymous genes encode calmodulin in a reptile, the Japanese tortoise, Clemmys japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouji Shimoda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three distinct calmodulin (CaM-encoding cDNAs were isolated from a reptile, the Japanese tortoise (Clemmys japonica, based on degenerative primer PCR. Because of synonymous codon usages, the deduced amino acid (aa sequences were exactly the same in all three genes and identical to the aa sequence of vertebrate CaM. The three cDNAs, referred to as CaM-A, -B, and -C, seemed to belong to the same type as CaMI, CaMII, and CaMIII, respectively, based on their sequence identity with those of the mammalian cDNAs and the glutamate codon biases. Northern blot analysis detected CaM-A and -B as bands corresponding to 1.8 kb, with the most abundant levels in the brain and testis, while CaM-C was detected most abundantly in the brain as bands of 1.4 and 2.0 kb. Our results indicate that, in the tortoise, CaM protein is encoded by at least three non-allelic genes, and that the ‘multigene-one protein' principle of CaM synthesis is applicable to all classes of vertebrates, from fishes to mammals.

  7. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Prion Protein Encoding Gene in Guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Suihan; WEI Qiwei; YANG Guanpin; WANG Dengqiang; ZOU Guiwei; CHEN Daqing

    2008-01-01

    The full length eDNA of a prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of guppy (Poecilia reticulata) and the corresponding ge-nomic DNA were cloned.The cDNA was 2245 bp in length and contained an open reading frame (ORF) of 1545 bp encoding a pro-tein of 515 amino acids,which held all typical structural characteristics of the functional PrP.The cloned genomic DNA fragmentcorresponding to the eDNA was 3720 bp in length,consisting of 2 introns and 2 exons.The 5' untranslated region of eDNA origi-nated from the 2 exons,while the ORF originated from the second exon.Although the gene was transcribed in diverse tissues in-cluding brain,eye,liver,intestine,muscle and tail,its transcript was most abundant in the brain.In addition,the transcription of thegene was enhanced by 5 salinity,implying that it was associated with the response of guppy to saline stress.

  8. Lipophilic proteins encoded by mitochondrial and nuclear genes in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küntzel, H; Pieniaźek, N J; Pieniaźek, D; Leister, D E

    1975-06-01

    Mitochondrial proteins soluble in neutral chloroform-methanol (2:1) were separated from lipids by ether precipitation and resolved by Sephadex G-200 filtration in the presence of dodecylsulfate into two major fractions eluting in the excluded region (peak I) and in a region of an apparent molecular weight 8000 (peak II). Residual phospholipids are found only in peak II. Peak I consists of several aggregated small polypeptides of molecular weights around 8000, which can be disaggregated by mild oxidation with performic acid. Cycloheximide stimulates almost two-fold incorporation of radioactive phenylalanine into peak I proteins but inhibits labelling of peak II proteins by 95%. Chloramphenicol and ethidium bromide inhibit the synthesis of peak I proteins by 70% and 95% respectively, but do not affect labelling of peak II proteins. At least 30% of the translation products of mitochondrial DNA in vitro behave like peak I proteins: they are soluble in organic solvents, they aggregate in dodecylsulfate buffer after removal of phospholipids and they contain species of molecular weights around 8000 that disaggregate upon oxidation. The data strongly suggest that the proteins of peak I are encoded by mitochondrial genes and synthesized on mitochondrial ribosomes, whereas the proteins of peak II are encoded by nuclear genes and synthesized on cytoplasmic ribosomes. Both groups of lipophilic proteins are very similar in their molecular weights, but the mitochondrially coded peak I proteins have the unique property of forming large heat-stable aggregates in the presence of dodecylsulfate.

  9. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  10. [Expression of genes encoding defense factors in the snail Planorbarius corneus (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) infested with trematodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, E E; Tsymbalenko, N V; Ataev, G L

    2010-01-01

    Because many species of gastropods are intermediate hosts for trematodes, these molluscs are often used as model-organisms in the studies of invertebrate immune system. Revealing of the ways in which the defense factors functioning became possible due to the use of the methods of molecular biology. Contemporary molecular methods allow analyzing the defense factors allocations and levels of their expression. We investigated the expression of genes encoding defense factors in gastropods by the example of the snail Planorbarius corneus from water bodies of the Leningrad Oblast under infestation with trematods. The snails naturally infested with the parthenites of trematode species belonging to the families Strigeidae, Notocotylidae, Plagiorchiidae, and Schistosomatida were used as the experimental sample. Uninfested snails were used as a control sample. Several genes encoding the factors, which have been recently found involved in the anti-trematode defense reactions in pulmonates, were chosen, namely fibrinogen-related protein, C-lectin, calcium-binding protein, and cystatin-like protein. The genes' expression was analyzed on total mRNA samples by the reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction. It was shown than expression levels of the genes under consideration are different in uninfested snails and in the snails infested with different trematode species. Thus, in the mollusks infested with the parthenites of Cotylurus sp. and Bilharziella polonica, the expression levels of the genes of all factors under study were increased, while in the infested Notocotylus sp. n Plagiorchis sp., only expression levels of C-lectin and cystatin-like protein were increased. Results of the expression analysis confirm the role of hemocytes and cells of hepatopancreas in the production of humoral defense factors. In the snails infested with trematodes, the expression levels of C-lectin and calcium-binding protein genes are increased in haemocytes, while the genes of

  11. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  12. Ammonia-regulated expression of a soybean gene encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase in transgenic Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, G H; Hirel, B; Marsolier, M C; Ridge, R W; Verma, D P

    1991-01-01

    A full-length cDNA clone encoding cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS), expressed in roots and root nodules of soybean, was isolated by direct complementation of an Escherichia coli gln A- mutant. This sequence is induced in roots by the availability of ammonia. A 3.5-kilobase promoter fragment of a genomic clone (lambda GS15) corresponding to this cDNA was isolated and fused with a reporter [beta-glucuronidase (GUS)] gene. The GS-GUS fusion was introduced into a legume (Lotus corniculatus) and a nonlegume (tobacco) plant by way of Agrobacterium-mediated transformations. This chimeric gene was found to be expressed in a root-specific manner in both tobacco and L. corniculatus, the expression being restricted to the growing root apices and the vascular bundles of the mature root. Treatment with ammonia increased the expression of this chimeric gene in the legume background (i.e., L. corniculatus); however, no induction was observed in tobacco roots. Histochemical localization of GUS activity in ammonia-treated transgenic L. corniculatus roots showed a uniform distribution across all cell types. These data suggest that the tissue specificity of the soybean cytosolic GS gene is conserved in both tobacco and L. corniculatus; however, in the latter case, this gene is ammonia inducible. Furthermore, the ammonia-enhanced GS gene expression in L. corniculatus is due to an increase in transcription. That this gene is directly regulated by externally supplied or symbiotically fixed nitrogen is also evident from the expression of GS-GUS in the infection zone, including the uninfected cells, and the inner cortex of transgenic L. corniculatus nodules, where a flux of ammonia is encountered by this tissue. The lack of expression of GS-GUS in the outer cortex of the nodules suggests that ammonia may not be able to diffuse outside the endodermis.

  13. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  14. Isolation and characterization of 17 different genes encoding putative endopolygalacturonase genes from Rhizopus oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polygalacturonase enzymes are a valuable aid in the retting of flax for production of linens and, more recently, production of biofuels from citrus wastes. In a search of the recently sequenced Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 genome database, 18 putative endopolygalacturonase genes were identified, w...

  15. Molecular and genetic analysis of the gene encoding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strand exchange protein Sep1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishkoff, D X; Johnson, A W; Kolodner, R D

    1991-05-01

    Vegetatively grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain an activity that promotes a number of homologous pairing reactions. A major portion of this activity is due to strand exchange protein 1 (Sep1), which was originally purified as a 132,000-Mr species (R. Kolodner, D. H. Evans, and P. T. Morrison, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:5560-5564, 1987). The gene encoding Sep1 was cloned, and analysis of the cloned gene revealed a 4,587-bp open reading frame capable of encoding a 175,000-Mr protein. The protein encoded by this open reading frame was overproduced and purified and had a relative molecular weight of approximately 160,000. The 160,000-Mr protein was at least as active in promoting homologous pairing as the original 132,000-Mr species, which has been shown to be a fragment of the intact 160,000-Mr Sep1 protein. The SEP1 gene mapped to chromosome VII within 20 kbp of RAD54. Three Tn10LUK insertion mutations in the SEP1 gene were characterized. sep1 mutants grew more slowly than wild-type cells, showed a two- to fivefold decrease in the rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination between his4 heteroalleles, and were delayed in their ability to return to growth after UV or gamma irradiation. Sporulation of sep1/sep1 diploids was defective, as indicated by both a 10- to 40-fold reduction in spore formation and reduced spore viability of approximately 50%. The majority of sep1/sep1 diploid cells arrested in meiosis after commitment to recombination but prior to the meiosis I cell division. Return-to-growth experiments showed that sep1/sep1 his4X/his4B diploids exhibited a five- to sixfold greater meiotic induction of His+ recombinants than did isogenic SEP1/SEP1 strains. sep1/sep1 mutants also showed an increased frequency of exchange between HIS4, LEU2, and MAT and a lack of positive interference between these markers compared with wild-type controls. The interaction between sep1, rad50, and spo13 mutations suggested that SEP1 acts in meiosis in a pathway that is

  16. The Pun1 gene for pungency in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Charles; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl; Liu, Kede; Mazourek, Michael; Moore, Shanna L; Yoo, Eun Young; Kim, Byung-Dong; Paran, Ilan; Jahn, Molly M

    2005-06-01

    Pungency in Capsicum fruits is due to the accumulation of the alkaloid capsaicin and its analogs. The biosynthesis of capsaicin is restricted to the genus Capsicum and results from the acylation of an aromatic moiety, vanillylamine, by a branched-chain fatty acid. Many of the enzymes involved in capsaicin biosynthesis are not well characterized and the regulation of the pathway is not fully understood. Based on the current pathway model, candidate genes were identified in public databases and the literature, and genetically mapped. A published EST co-localized with the Pun1 locus which is required for the presence of capsaicinoids. This gene, AT3, has been isolated and its nucleotide sequence has been determined in an array of genotypes within the genus. AT3 showed significant similarity to acyltransferases in the BAHD superfamily. The recessive allele at this locus contains a deletion spanning the promoter and first exon of the predicted coding region in every non-pungent accession tested. Transcript and protein expression of AT3 was tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Virus-induced gene silencing of AT3 resulted in a decrease in the accumulation of capsaicinoids, a phenotype consistent with pun1. In conclusion, gene mapping, allele sequence data, expression profile and silencing analysis collectively indicate that the Pun1 locus in pepper encodes a putative acyltransferase, and the pun1 allele, used in pepper breeding for nearly 50 000 years, results from a large deletion at this locus.

  17. Molecular characterization of genes encoding the quinolone resistance determining regions of Malaysian Streptococcus pneumoniae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes encoding the quinolones resistance determining regions (QRDRs in Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected by PCR and the sequence analysis was carried out to identify point mutations within these regions. The study was carried out to observe mutation patterns among S. pneumoniae strains in Malaysia. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 100 isolates was determined against various antibiotics, out of which 56 strains were categorised to have reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (≥2 μg/mL. These strains were subjected to PCR amplification for presence of the gyrA, parC , gyrB and parE genes. Eight representative strains with various susceptibilities to fluoroquinolones were sequenced. Two out of the eight isolates that were sequenced were shown to have a point mutation in the gyrA gene at position Ser81. The detection of mutation at codon Ser81 of the gyrA gene suggested the potential of developing fluoroquinolone resistance among S. pneumoniae isolates in Malaysia. However, further experimental work is required to confirm the involvement of this mutation in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Malaysia.

  18. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPR184w gene encodes the glycogen debranching enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, M A; Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    The YPR184w gene encodes a 1536-amino acid protein that is 34-39% identical to the mammal, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans glycogen debranching enzyme. The N-terminal part of the protein possesses the four conserved sequences of the alpha-amylase superfamily, while the C-terminal part displays 50% similarity with the C-terminal of other eukaryotic glycogen debranching enzymes. Reliable measurement of alpha-1,4-glucanotransferase and alpha-1, 6-glucosidase activity of the yeast debranching enzyme was determined in strains overexpressing YPR184w. The alpha-1, 4-glucanotransferase activity of a partially purified preparation of debranching enzyme preferentially transferred maltosyl units than maltotriosyl. Deletion of YPR184w prevents glycogen degradation, whereas overexpression had no effect on the rate of glycogen breakdown. In response to stress and growth conditions, the transcriptional control of YPR184w gene, renamed GDB1 (for Glycogen DeBranching gene), is strictly identical to that of other genes involved in glycogen metabolism.

  19. The pep4 gene encoding proteinase A is involved in dimorphism and pathogenesis of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soberanes-Gutiérrez, Cinthia V; Juárez-Montiel, Margarita; Olguín-Rodríguez, Omar; Hernández-Rodríguez, César; Ruiz-Herrera, José; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes

    2015-10-01

    Vacuole proteases have important functions in different physiological processes in fungi. Taking this aspect into consideration, and as a continuation of our studies on the analysis of the proteolytic system of Ustilago maydis, a phytopathogenic member of the Basidiomycota, we have analysed the role of the pep4 gene encoding the vacuolar acid proteinase PrA in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of the fungus. After confirmation of the location of the protease in the vacuole using fluorescent probes, we obtained deletion mutants of the gene in sexually compatible strains of U. maydis (FB1 and FB2), and analysed their phenotypes. It was observed that the yeast to mycelium dimorphic transition induced by a pH change in the medium, or the use of a fatty acid as sole carbon source, was severely reduced in Δpep4 mutants. In addition, the virulence of the mutants in maize seedlings was reduced, as revealed by the lower proportion of plants infected and the reduction in size of the tumours induced by the pathogen, when compared with wild-type strains. All of these phenotypic alterations were reversed by complementation of the mutant strains with the wild-type gene. These results provide evidence of the importance of the pep4 gene for the morphogenesis and virulence of U. maydis.

  20. BAGEL3: Automated identification of genes encoding bacteriocins and (non-)bactericidal posttranslationally modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heel, Auke J; de Jong, Anne; Montalbán-López, Manuel; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2013-07-01

    Identifying genes encoding bacteriocins and ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) can be a challenging task. Especially those peptides that do not have strong homology to previously identified peptides can easily be overlooked. Extensive use of BAGEL2 and user feedback has led us to develop BAGEL3. BAGEL3 features genome mining of prokaryotes, which is largely independent of open reading frame (ORF) predictions and has been extended to cover more (novel) classes of posttranslationally modified peptides. BAGEL3 uses an identification approach that combines direct mining for the gene and indirect mining via context genes. Especially for heavily modified peptides like lanthipeptides, sactipeptides, glycocins and others, this genetic context harbors valuable information that is used for mining purposes. The bacteriocin and context protein databases have been updated and it is now easy for users to submit novel bacteriocins or RiPPs. The output has been simplified to allow user-friendly analysis of the results, in particular for large (meta-genomic) datasets. The genetic context of identified candidate genes is fully annotated. As input, BAGEL3 uses FASTA DNA sequences or folders containing multiple FASTA formatted files. BAGEL3 is freely accessible at http://bagel.molgenrug.nl.

  1. Biodiversity of genes encoding anti-microbial traits within plant associated microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Kamel Mousa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The plant is an attractive versatile home for diverse associated microbes. A subset of these microbes produce a diversity of anti-microbial natural products including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, heterocylic nitrogenous compounds, volatile compounds, bacteriocins and lytic enzymes. In recent years, detailed molecular analysis has led to a better understanding of the underlying genetic mechanisms. New genomic and bioinformatic tools have permitted comparisons of orthologous genes between species, leading to predictions of the associated evolutionary mechanisms responsible for diversification at the genetic and corresponding biochemical levels. The purpose of this review is to describe the biodiversity of biosynthetic genes of plant-associated bacteria and fungi that encode selected examples of antimicrobial natural products. For each compound, the target pathogen and biochemical mode of action are described, in order to draw attention to the complexity of these phenomena. We review recent information of the underlying molecular diversity and draw lessons through comparative genomic analysis of the orthologous genes. We conclude by discussing emerging themes and gaps, discuss the metabolic pathways in the context of the phylogeny and ecology of their microbial hosts, and discuss potential evolutionary mechanisms that led to the diversification of biosynthetic gene clusters.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  3. Gene cloning and characterization of the protein encoded by the Neospora caninum bradyzoite-specific antigen gene BAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, T; Narabu, S; Yanai, Y; Hatano, Y; Ito, A; Imai, S; Ike, K

    2013-06-01

    Neospora caninum is an Apicomplexan parasite that causes repeated abortion and stillbirth in cattle. The aim of this study was to clone the gene encoding the N. caninum orthologue (NcBAG1) of the Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoite-specific protein TgBAG1 and characterize its expression pattern in the parasite. Isolation of the full-length 684-bp gene revealed that it shared 78.3% sequence similarity with TgBAG1. NcBAG1 encodes a predicted protein of 227 amino acids with 80.3% similarity to TgBAG1. A putative signal peptide sequence and an invariant GVL motif characteristic of small heat-shock proteins were identified in the predicted N. caninum amino acid sequence. We expressed the NcBAG1 gene as a recombinant glutathione S-transferase fusion protein (rNcBAG1) in Escherichia coli and used the purified 60 kDa protein to obtain a monoclonal antibody (Mab). rNcBAG1 reacted to Mabs specific for NcBAG1 and TgBAG1. No reaction between the NcBAG1 Mab and N. caninum tachyzoites was observed. Although the predicted molecular mass of NcBAG1 is 25 kDa, Western blot analysis of parasite lysates using the NcBAG1 Mab revealed a cross-reactive protein of approximately 30 kDa. Additionally, immunofluorescence assays using the tachyzoite-specific Mab for NcSAG1 and the bradyzoite-specific Mab for TgBAG1 or NcSAG4 revealed NcBAG1-specific expression in bradyzoites in cultures exposed to sodium nitroprusside, a reagent that increases the frequency of bradyzoites. Interestingly, the NcBAG1 protein was identified in the cytoplasm of the bradyzoite-stage parasites. This preliminary analysis of the NcBAG1 gene will assist investigations into the role of this protein in N. caninum .

  4. Evidence of gene conversion in genes encoding the Gal/GalNac lectin complex of Entamoeba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Weedall

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica, uses a lectin complex on its cell surface to bind to mucin and to ligands on the intestinal epithelia. Binding to mucin is necessary for colonisation and binding to intestinal epithelia for invasion, therefore blocking this binding may protect against amoebiasis. Acquired protective immunity raised against the lectin complex should create a selection pressure to change the amino acid sequence of lectin genes in order to avoid future detection. We present evidence that gene conversion has occurred in lineages leading to E. histolytica strain HM1:IMSS and E. dispar strain SAW760. This evolutionary mechanism generates diversity and could contribute to immune evasion by the parasites.

  5. Characterization of the gene encoding the polymorphic immunodominant molecule, a neutralizing antigen of Theileria parva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toye, P.G.; Metzelaar, M.J.; Wijngaard, P.L.J. [Univ. Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Theileria parva, a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite related to Plasmodium spp., causes the disease East Coast fever, an acute and usually fatal lymphoproliferative disorder of cattle in Africa. Previous studies using sera from cattle that have survived infection identified a polymorphic immunodominant molecule (PIM) that is expressed by both the infective sporozoite stage of the parasite and the intracellular schizont. Here we show that mAb specific for the PIM Ag can inhibit sporozoite invasion of lymphocytes in vitro. A cDNA clone encoding the PIM Ag of the T. parva (Muguga) stock was obtained by using these mAb in a novel eukaryotic expression cloning system that allows isolation of cDNA encoding cytoplasmic or surface Ags. To establish the molecular basis of the polymorphism of PIM, the cDNA of the PIM Ag from a buffalo-derived T. parva stock was isolated and its sequence was compared with that of the cattle-derived Muguga PIM. The two cDNAs showed considerable identity in both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} regions, but there was substantial sequence divergence in the central regions. Several types of repeated sequences were identified in the variant regions. In the Muguga form of the molecule, there were five tandem repeats of the tetrapeptide, QPEP, that were shown, by transfection of a deleted version of the PIM gene, not to react with several anti-PIM mAbs. By isolating and sequencing the genomic version of the gene, we identified two small introns in the 3{prime} region of the gene. Finally, we showed that polyclonal rat Abs against recombinant PIM neutralize sporozoite infectivity in vitro, suggesting that the PIM Ag should be evaluated for its capacity to immunize cattle against East Coast Fever.

  6. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ICL2 Gene Encodes a Mitochondrial 2-Methylisocitrate Lyase Involved in Propionyl-Coenzyme A Metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik, Marijke A.H.; Kötter, Peter; Salomons, Florian A.; Klei, Ida J. van der; Dijken, Johannes P. van; Pronk, Jack T.

    2000-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ICL1 gene encodes isocitrate lyase, an essential enzyme for growth on ethanol and acetate. Previous studies have demonstrated that the highly homologous ICL2 gene (YPR006c) is transcribed during the growth of wild-type cells on ethanol. However, even when multiple copies

  7. Prevalence of genes encoding for members of the staphylococcal leukotoxin family among clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Eiff, Christof; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus nasal and blood isolates (N = 429) were tested by polymerase chain reaction for the prevalence of genes that encode leukocidal toxins. The leukotoxin genes lukE+lukD were found at high prevalence, significantly more so in blood (82%) than in nasal isolates (6

  8. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L.; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. PMID:26475106

  9. Molecular cloning and primary sequence analysis of a gene encoding a putative shitinase gene in Brassica oleracea var.capitata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANGGUOQING; YONGYANBAI; 等

    1996-01-01

    Chitinase,which catalyzes the hydrolysis of the β-1,4-acetyl-D-glucosamine linkages of the fungal cell wall polymer chitin,is involved in inducible plants defense system.By construction of cabbage(Brassica oleracea var. capitata) genomic library and screening the library with pRCH8,a probe of rice chitinase gene fragment,a chitinase genomic sequence was isolated.The complete uncleotide sequence of the putative cabbage chitinase gene (cabch29) was determined,with its longest open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 413 aa.This polypeptide consists of a 21 aa N-terminal signal peptide,two chitin-binding domains different from those of other classes of plant chitinases,and a catalytic domain.Homology analysis illustrated that this cabch29 gene has 58.8% identity at the nucleotide level with the pRCH8 ORF probe and has 50% identity at the amino acid level tiwh the catalytic domains of chitinase from bean,maize and sugar beet.Meanwhile,several kinds of cis-elements,such as TATA box,CAAT box,GATA motif,ASF-1 binding site,wound-response elements and AATAAA,have also been discovered in the flanking region of cabch29 gene.

  10. Modulation of Gene Expression by Polymer Nanocapsule Delivery of DNA Cassettes Encoding Small RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yan

    Full Text Available Small RNAs, including siRNAs, gRNAs and miRNAs, modulate gene expression and serve as potential therapies for human diseases. Delivery to target cells remains the fundamental limitation for use of these RNAs in humans. To address this challenge, we have developed a nanocapsule delivery technology that encapsulates small DNA molecules encoding RNAs into a small (30 nm polymer nanocapsule. For proof of concept, we transduced DNA expression cassettes for three small RNAs. In one application, the DNA cassette encodes an shRNA transcriptional unit that downregulates CCR5 and protects from HIV-1 infection. The DNA cassette nanocapsules were further engineered for timed release of the DNA cargo for prolonged knockdown of CCR5. Secondly, the nanocapsules provide an efficient means for delivery of gRNAs in the CRISPR/Cas9 system to mutate integrated HIV-1. Finally, delivery of microRNA-125b to mobilized human CD34+ cells enhances survival and expansion of the CD34+ cells in culture.

  11. Generation of MANAbodies specific to HLA-restricted epitopes encoded by somatically mutated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skora, Andrew D; Douglass, Jacqueline; Hwang, Michael S; Tam, Ada J; Blosser, Richard L; Gabelli, Sandra B; Cao, Jianhong; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2015-08-11

    Mutant epitopes encoded by cancer genes are virtually always located in the interior of cells, making them invisible to conventional antibodies. We here describe an approach to identify single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) specific for mutant peptides presented on the cell surface by HLA molecules. We demonstrate that these scFvs can be successfully converted to full-length antibodies, termed MANAbodies, targeting "Mutation-Associated Neo-Antigens" bound to HLA. A phage display library representing a highly diverse array of single-chain variable fragment sequences was first designed and constructed. A competitive selection protocol was then used to identify clones specific for mutant peptides bound to predefined HLA types. In this way, we obtained two scFvs, one specific for a peptide encoded by a common KRAS mutant and the other by a common epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant. The scFvs bound to these peptides only when the peptides were complexed with HLA-A2 (KRAS peptide) or HLA-A3 (EGFR peptide). We converted one scFv to a full-length antibody (MANAbody) and demonstrate that the MANAbody specifically reacts with mutant peptide-HLA complex even when the peptide differs by only one amino acid from the normal, WT form.

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of complete gene encoding an alkaline lipase from Penicillium cyclopium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H M; Wu, M C; Guo, J; Li, J F

    2011-01-01

    The complete gene (PG37 lipI) encoding an alkaline lipase (PG37 LipI) was cloned from the genomic DNA of Penicillium cyclopium PG37. The cloned PG37 lipI is 2020 bp in length, consisting of 632 bp of the 5' flanking promoter region and 1388 bp of the downstream fragment that contains 6 exons and 5 short introns. The promoter region harbors putative TATA box, CAAT box and several transcription factor binding sites. The open reading frame (ORF) encodes a PG37 LipI of 285 amino acid residues, which was predicted to contain a 20-aa signal peptide, a 7-aa propeptide and a 258-aa mature peptide with a conserved motif Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly. However, PG37 LipI shows only 32%, 30%, 28% and 26% identity with lipases of Aspergillus parasiticus, Penicillium camembertii, Thermomyces lanuginosus and Rhizomucor miehei, respectively. It was predicted that the main secondary structures of PG37 LipI are alpha-helix and random coil. Three amino acid residues, Ser132-Asp188-His241, compose the enzymatic active center in the tertiary structure.

  13. Characterization of a ribonuclease gene and encoded protein from the reptile, Iguana iguana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitto, Takeaki; Lin, Cynthia; Dyer, Kimberly D; Wagner, Robert A; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2005-06-06

    In this work we identify an intronless open reading frame encoding an RNase A ribonuclease from genomic DNA from the Iguana iguana IgH2 cell line. The iguana RNase is expressed primarily in pancreas, and represents the majority of the specific enzymatic activity in this tissue. The encoded sequence shares many features with its better-known mammalian counterparts including the crucial His12, Lys40 and His114 catalytic residues and efficient hydrolytic activity against yeast tRNA substrate (k(cat)/K(m)=6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)), albeit at a reduced pH optimum (pH 6.0). Although the catalytic activity of the iguana RNase is not diminished by human placental RI, iguana RNase is not bactericidal nor is it cytotoxic even at micromolar concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis indicates moderate (46%) amino acid sequence similarity to a pancreatic RNase isolated from Chelydra serpentina (snapping turtle) although no specific relationship could be determined between these RNases and the pancreatic ribonucleases characterized among mammalian species. Further analysis of ribonucleases from non-mammalian vertebrate species is needed in order to define relationships and lineages within the larger RNase A gene superfamily.

  14. The Eukaryotic DNMT2 Genes Encode a New Class of Cytosine-5 DNA Methyltransferases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-YaTang; M.NarsaReddy; VanyaRasheva; Tai-LinLee; Meng-JauLin; Ming-ShiuHung; C.-K.JamesShen

    2005-01-01

    DNMT2 is a subgroup of the eukaryotic cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferase gene family. Unlike the other family members, proteins encoded by DNMT2 genes were not known before to possess DNA methyltransferase activities. Most recently, we have showm that thegenome of Drosophila S2 cells stably expressing an exogenous Drosophila dDNMT2 cDNA became anoma-lously methylated at the 5'-positions of cytosines(Reddy, M. N., Tang, L. Y., Lee, T. L., and Shen, C.-K. J.(2003) Oncogene, in press). We present evidence here that the genomes of transgenic flies overexpressing the dDnmt2 protein also became hypermethylated at specific regions. Furthermore, transient transfection studies in combination with sodium bisulfite sequencing demonstrated that dDnmt2 as well as its mousc ortholog, mDnmt2, are capable of methylating a cotrans-fected plasmid DNA. These data provide solid evidence that the fly and mouse DNMT2 gene products are genuine cytosine-5 DNA methyltransferases.

  15. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Miao

    Full Text Available Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  17. Analysis of a polygalacturonase gene of Ustilago maydis and characterization of the encoded enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castruita-Domínguez, José P; González-Hernández, Sandra E; Polaina, Julio; Flores-Villavicencio, Lérida L; Alvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Flores-Martínez, Alberto; Ponce-Noyola, Patricia; Leal-Morales, Carlos A

    2014-05-01

    Ustilago maydis is a pathogenic fungus that produces the corn smut. It is a biotrophic parasite that depends on living plant tissues for its proliferation and development. Polygalacturonases are secreted by pathogens to solubilize the plant cell-wall and are required for pathogen virulence. In this paper, we report the isolation of a U. maydis polygalacturonase gene (Pgu1) and the functional and structural characterization of the encoded enzyme. The U. maydis Pgu1 gene is expressed when the fungus is grown in liquid culture media containing different carbon sources. In plant tissue, the expression increased as a function of incubation time. Pgu1 gene expression was detected during plant infection around 10 days post-infection with U. maydis FB-D12 strain in combination with teliospore formation. Synthesis and secretion of active recombinant PGU1 were achieved using Pichia pastoris, the purified enzyme had a optimum temperature of 34 °C, optimum pH of 4.5, a Km of 57.84 g/L for polygalacturonic acid, and a Vmax of 28.9 µg/min mg. Structural models of PGU1 based on homologous enzymes yielded a typical right-handed β-helix fold of pectinolytic enzymes classified in the glycosyl hydrolases family 28, and the U. maydis PGU1 is related with endo rather than exo polygalacturonases.

  18. Structure and expression of the gene encoding the vasoactive intestinal peptide precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linder, S.; Barkhem, T.; Norberg, A.; Persson, H.; Schalling, M.; Hoekfelt, T.; Magnusson, G.

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the human vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and the histidine-methionine amide (PHM-27) peptide hormone was isolated from lambda phage libraries. The human gene was found to be composed of seven exons spanning approx. = 9 kilobase pairs. The first exon codes for an untranslated leader sequence, and the second exon codes for a putative signal peptide. DNA sequences coding for the VIP and PHM-27 hormones are located in two different exons. Southern blot analysis with genomic DNA suggested that a single copy of the VIP/PHM-27 gene is present in the human haploid genome. The expression of VIP/PHM-27 precursor mRNA in various tissues in the rate was analyzed by RNA gel blot hybridization. In the organs examined, expression was only detected in the brain and duodenum. RNA isolated from various regions of the rat brain - including the cortex, hypothalamus, and hippocampus - hybridized to both VIP- and PHM-27-specific probes. The same pattern of hybridization was found when VIP- and PHM-27-specific probes were used, suggested that possible differences in the localization of VIP and PHM-27 peptides between different brain regions cannot be accounted for by differential RNA processing.

  19. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  20. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment.

  1. The fas operon of Rhodococcus fascians encodes new genes required for efficient fasciation of host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, M; Vereecke, D; Temmerman, W; Van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1994-01-01

    Three virulence loci (fas, att, and hyp) of Rhodococcus fascians D188 have been identified on a 200-kb conjugative linear plasmid (pFiD188). The fas locus was delimited to a 6.5-kb DNA fragment by insertion mutagenesis, single homologous disruptive recombination, and in trans complementation of different avirulent insertion mutants. The locus is arranged as a large operon containing six open reading frames whose expression is specifically induced during the interaction with host plants. One predicted protein is homologous to P-450 cytochromes from actinomycetes. The putative ferredoxin component is of a novel type containing additional domains homologous to transketolases from chemoautotrophic, photosynthetic, and methylotrophic microorganisms. Genetic analysis revealed that fas encodes, in addition to the previously identified ipt, at least two new genes that are involved in fasciation development, one of which is only required on older tobacco plants. PMID:8169198

  2. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Wang, Christian W.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.;

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human...... endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full......-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support...

  3. The abp gene in Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 encodes a GH27 β-L-arabinopyranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Rachel; Alalouf, Onit; Tabachnikov, Orly; Zolotnitsky, Gennady; Shoham, Gil; Shoham, Yuval

    2012-07-30

    In this study we demonstrate that the abp gene in Geobacillus stearothermophilus T-6 encodes a family 27 glycoside hydrolase β-L-arabinopyranosidase. The catalytic constants towards the chromogenic substrate pNP-β-L-arabinopyranoside were 0.8±0.1 mM, 6.6±0.3 s(-1), and 8.2±0.3 s(-1) mM(-1) for K(m), k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m), respectively. (13)C NMR spectroscopy unequivocally showed that Abp is capable of removing β-L-arabinopyranose residues from the natural arabino-polysaccharide, larch arabinogalactan. Most family 27 enzymes are active on galactose and contain a conserved Asp residue, whereas in Abp this residue is Ile67, which shifts the specificity of the enzyme towards arabinopyranoside.

  4. Human subtelomeric WASH genes encode a new subclass of the WASP family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V Linardopoulou

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Subtelomeres are duplication-rich, structurally variable regions of the human genome situated just proximal of telomeres. We report here that the most terminally located human subtelomeric genes encode a previously unrecognized third subclass of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein family, whose known members reorganize the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular stimuli. This new subclass, which we call WASH, is evolutionarily conserved in species as diverged as Entamoeba. We demonstrate that WASH is essential in Drosophila. WASH is widely expressed in human tissues, and human WASH protein colocalizes with actin in filopodia and lamellipodia. The VCA domain of human WASH promotes actin polymerization by the Arp2/3 complex in vitro. WASH duplicated to multiple chromosomal ends during primate evolution, with highest copy number reached in humans, whose WASH repertoires vary. Thus, human subtelomeres are not genetic junkyards, and WASH's location in these dynamic regions could have advantageous as well as pathologic consequences.

  5. The daf-4 gene encodes a bone morphogenetic protein receptor controlling C. elegans dauer larva development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, M; Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Albert, P S; Massagué, J; Riddle, D L

    1993-10-14

    The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family is a conserved group of signalling molecules within the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily. This group, including the Drosophila decapentaplegic (dpp) protein and the mammalian BMPs, mediates cellular interactions and tissue differentiation during development. Here we show that a homologue of human BMPs controls a developmental switch in the life cycle of the free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Starvation and overcrowding induce C. elegans to form a developmentally arrested, third-stage dauer larva. The daf-4 gene, which acts to inhibit dauer larva formation and promote growth, encodes a receptor protein kinase similar to the daf-1, activin and TGF-beta receptor serine/threonine kinases. When expressed in monkey COS cells, the daf-4 receptor binds human BMP-2 and BMP-4. The daf-4 receptor is the first to be identified for any growth factor in the BMP family.

  6. OVER-EXPRESSION OF GENE ENCODING FATTY ACID METABOLIC ENZYMES IN FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Alimuddin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 have important nutritional benefits in humans. EPA and DHA are mainly derived from fish, but the decline in the stocks of major marine capture fishes could result in these fatty acids being consumed less. Farmed fish could serve as promising sources of EPA and DHA, but they need these fatty acids in their diets. Generation of fish strains that are capable of synthesizing enough amounts of EPA/DHA from the conversion of α-linolenic acid (LNA, 18:3n-3 rich oils can supply a new EPA/DHA source. This may be achieved by over-expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in HUFA biosynthesis. In aquaculture, the successful of this technique would open the possibility to reduce the enrichment of live food with fish oils for marine fish larvae, and to completely substitute fish oils with plant oils without reducing the quality of flesh in terms of EPA and DHA contents. Here, three genes, i.e. Δ6-desaturase-like (OmΔ6FAD, Δ5-desaturase-like (OmΔ5FAD and elongase-like (MELO encoding EPA/DHA metabolic enzymes derived from masu salmon (Oncorhynchus masou were individually transferred into zebrafish (Danio rerio as a model to increase its ability for synthesizing EPA and DHA. Fatty acid analysis showed that EPA content in whole body of the second transgenic fish generation over-expressing OmΔ6FAD gene was 1.4 fold and that of DHA was 2.1 fold higher (P<0.05 than those in non-transgenic fish. The EPA content in whole body of transgenic fish over-expressing OmΔ5FAD gene was 1.21-fold, and that of DHA was 1.24-fold higher (P<0.05 than those in nontransgenic fish. The same patterns were obtained in transgenic fish over-expressing MELO gene. EPA content was increased by 1.30-fold and DHA content by 1.33-fold higher (P<0.05 than those in non-transgenic fish. The results of studies demonstrated that fatty acid content of fish can be enhanced by over

  7. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a putative lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase from Arachis hypogaea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si-Long Chen; Jia-Quan Huang; Lei Yong; Yue-Ting Zhang; Xiao-Ping Ren; Yu-Ning Chen; Hui-Fang Jiang; Li-Ying Yan; Yu-Rong Li; Bo-Shou Liao

    2012-12-01

    Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAT) is the important enzyme responsible for the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), leading to the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) in plant. Its encoding gene is an essential candidate for oil crops to improve oil composition and increase seed oil content through genetic engineering. In this study, a full-length AhLPAT4 gene was isolated via cDNA library screening and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE); our data demonstrated that AhLPAT4 had 1631 nucleotides, encoding a putative 43.8 kDa protein with 383 amino acid residues. The deduced protein included a conserved acyltransferase domain and four motifs (I–IV) with putative LPA and acyl-CoA catalytic and binding sites. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that AhLPAT4 contained four transmembrane domains (TMDs), localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane; detailed analysis indicated that motif I and motifs II–III in AhLPAT4 were separated by the third TMD, which located on cytosolic and ER luminal side respectively, and hydrophobic residues on the surface of AhLPAT4 protein fold to form a hydrophobic tunnel to accommodate the acyl chain. Subcellular localization analysis confirmed that AhLPAT4 was a cytoplasm protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AhLPAT4 had a high homology (63.7–78.3%) with putative LPAT4 proteins from Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis. AhLPAT4 was ubiquitously expressed in diverse tissues except in flower, which is almost undetectable. The expression analysis in different developmental stages in peanut seeds indicated that AhLPAT4 did not coincide with oil accumulation.

  8. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  9. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  10. Isolation and Expression Analysis of Two Genes Encoding Cinnamate 4-Hydroxylase from Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Zhi-yong; LI Bo; Neumann MPeter; L Meng; FAN Ling

    2014-01-01

    Two genes (GhC4H1 and GhC4H2) that encode putative cotton cinnamate 4-hydroxylases that catalyze the second step in the phenylpropanoid pathway were isolated from developing cotton ifbers. GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 each contain open reading frames of 1 518 base pairs (bp) in length and both encode proteins consisting of 505 amino acid residues. They are 90.89%identical to each other at the amino acid sequence level and belong to class I of plant C4Hs. GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 genomic DNA are 2 247 and 2 161 bp long, respectively, and contain two introns located at conserved positions relative to the coding sequence. GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 promoters were isolated and found to contain many cis-elements (boxes P, L and AC-I element) previously identiifed in the promoters of other phenylpropanoid pathway genes. Histochemical staining showed GUS expression driven by the GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 promoters in ovules and ifbers tissues. GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 were also widely expressed in other cotton tissues. GhC4H2 expression reached its highest level during the elongation stage of ifber development, whereas GhC4H1 expression increased during the secondary wall development period in cotton ifbers. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the biochemical role of GhC4H1 and GhC4H2 in cotton ifber development.

  11. MitoRes: a resource of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes and their products in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillo Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are sub-cellular organelles that have a central role in energy production and in other metabolic pathways of all eukaryotic respiring cells. In the last few years, with more and more genomes being sequenced, a huge amount of data has been generated providing an unprecedented opportunity to use the comparative analysis approach in studies of evolution and functional genomics with the aim of shedding light on molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. In this context, the problem of the optimal extraction of representative datasets of genomic and proteomic data assumes a crucial importance. Specialised resources for nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related proteins already exist; however, no mitochondrial database is currently available with the same features of MitoRes, which is an update of the MitoNuc database extensively modified in its structure, data sources and graphical interface. It contains data on nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related products for any metazoan species for which this type of data is available and also provides comprehensive sequence datasets (gene, transcript and protein as well as useful tools for their extraction and export. Description MitoRes http://www2.ba.itb.cnr.it/MitoRes/ consolidates information from publicly external sources and automatically annotates them into a relational database. Additionally, it also clusters proteins on the basis of their sequence similarity and interconnects them with genomic data. The search engine and sequence management tools allow the query/retrieval of the database content and the extraction and export of sequences (gene, transcript, protein and related sub-sequences (intron, exon, UTR, CDS, signal peptide and gene flanking regions ready to be used for in silico analysis. Conclusion The tool we describe here has been developed to support lab scientists and bioinformaticians alike in the characterization of molecular

  12. An algorithm for network-based gene prioritization that encodes knowledge both in nodes and in links.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Kimmel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Candidate gene prioritization aims to identify promising new genes associated with a disease or a biological process from a larger set of candidate genes. In recent years, network-based methods - which utilize a knowledge network derived from biological knowledge - have been utilized for gene prioritization. Biological knowledge can be encoded either through the network's links or nodes. Current network-based methods can only encode knowledge through links. This paper describes a new network-based method that can encode knowledge in links as well as in nodes. RESULTS: We developed a new network inference algorithm called the Knowledge Network Gene Prioritization (KNGP algorithm which can incorporate both link and node knowledge. The performance of the KNGP algorithm was evaluated on both synthetic networks and on networks incorporating biological knowledge. The results showed that the combination of link knowledge and node knowledge provided a significant benefit across 19 experimental diseases over using link knowledge alone or node knowledge alone. CONCLUSIONS: The KNGP algorithm provides an advance over current network-based algorithms, because the algorithm can encode both link and node knowledge. We hope the algorithm will aid researchers with gene prioritization.

  13. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  14. Identification of antithrombin-modulating genes. Role of LARGE, a gene encoding a bifunctional glycosyltransferase, in the secretion of proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia de la Morena-Barrio

    Full Text Available The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families. Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02. Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins.

  15. Discovery of nuclear-encoded genes for the neurotoxin saxitoxin in dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüken, Anke; Orr, Russell J S; Kellmann, Ralf; Murray, Shauna A; Neilan, Brett A; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes required for saxitoxin synthesis are encoded in the nuclear genomes of dinoflagellates. We sequenced >1.2×10(6) mRNA transcripts from the two saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellate strains Alexandrium fundyense CCMP1719 and A. minutum CCMP113 using high-throughput sequencing technology. In addition, we used in silico transcriptome analyses, RACE, qPCR and conventional PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing. These approaches successfully identified genes required for saxitoxin-synthesis in the two transcriptomes. We focused on sxtA, the unique starting gene of saxitoxin synthesis, and show that the dinoflagellate transcripts of sxtA have the same domain structure as the cyanobacterial sxtA genes. But, in contrast to the bacterial homologs, the dinoflagellate transcripts are monocistronic, have a higher GC content, occur in multiple copies, contain typical dinoflagellate spliced-leader sequences and eukaryotic polyA-tails. Further, we investigated 28 saxitoxin-producing and non-producing dinoflagellate strains from six different genera for the presence of genomic sxtA homologs. Our results show very good agreement between the presence of sxtA and saxitoxin-synthesis, except in three strains of A. tamarense, for which we amplified sxtA, but did not detect the toxin. Our work opens for possibilities to develop molecular tools to detect saxitoxin-producing dinoflagellates in the environment.

  16. Expression of the Genes Encoding the Trk and Kdp Potassium Transport Systems of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during Growth In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloko C. Cholo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two potassium (K+-uptake systems, Trk and Kdp, are operative in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but the environmental factors triggering their expression have not been determined. The current study has evaluated the expression of these genes in the Mtb wild-type and a trk-gene knockout strain at various stages of logarithmic growth in relation to extracellular K+ concentrations and pH. In both strains, mRNA levels of the K+-uptake encoding genes were relatively low compared to those of the housekeeping gene, sigA, at the early- and mid-log phases, increasing during late-log. Increased gene expression coincided with decreased K+ uptake in the context of a drop in extracellular pH and sustained high extracellular K+ concentrations. In an additional series of experiments, the pH of the growth medium was manipulated by the addition of 1N HCl/NaOH. Decreasing the pH resulted in reductions in both membrane potential and K+ uptake in the setting of significant induction of genes encoding both K+ transporters. These observations are consistent with induction of the genes encoding the active K+ transporters of Mtb as a strategy to compensate for loss of membrane potential-driven uptake of K+ at low extracellular pH. Induction of these genes may promote survival in the acidic environments of the intracellular vacuole and granuloma.

  17. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo

    2014-01-01

    . In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important...... feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases...

  18. The yeast VAS1 gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatton, B; Walter, P; Ebel, J P; Lacroute, F; Fasiolo, F

    1988-01-05

    S1 mapping on the VAS1 structural gene indicates the existence of two classes of transcripts initiating at distinct in-frame translation start codons. The longer class of VAS1 transcripts initiates upstream of both ATG codons located 138 base pairs away and the shorter class downstream of the first ATG. A mutation that destroys the first AUG on the long message results in respiratory deficiency but does not affect viability. Mutation of the ATG at position 139 leads to lethality because the initiating methionine codon of the essential cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase has been destroyed. N-terminal protein sequence data further confirm translation initiation at ATG-139 for the cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetase. From these results, we conclude that the VAS1 single gene encodes both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic valyl-tRNA synthetases. The presequence of the mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase shows amino acid composition but not the amphiphilic character of imported mitochondrial proteins. From mutagenesis of the ATG-139 we conclude that the presequence specifically targets the cytoplasmically synthesized mitochondrial valyl-tRNA synthetase to the mitochondrial outer membrane and prevents binding of the enzyme core to cytoplasmic tRNAVal.

  19. The cmbT gene encodes a novel major facilitator multidrug resistance transporter in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipic, Brankica; Golic, Natasa; Jovcic, Branko; Tolinacki, Maja; Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J; Antic-Stankovic, Jelena; Kojic, Milan; Topisirovic, Ljubisa

    2013-01-01

    Functional characterization of the multidrug resistance CmbT transporter was performed in Lactococcus lactis. The cmbT gene is predicted to encode an efflux protein homologous to the multidrug resistance major facilitator superfamily. The cmbT gene (1377 bp) was cloned and overexpressed in L. lactis NZ9000. Results from cell growth studies revealed that the CmbT protein has an effect on host cell resistance to lincomycin, cholate, sulbactam, ethidium bromide, Hoechst 33342, sulfadiazine, streptomycin, rifampicin, puromycin and sulfametoxazole. Moreover, in vivo transport assays showed that overexpressed CmbT-mediated extrusion of ethidium bromide and Hoechst 33342 was higher than in the control L. lactis NZ9000 strain. CmbT-mediated extrusion of Hoechst 33342 was inhibited by the ionophores nigericin and valinomycin known to dissipate proton motive force. This indicates that CmbT-mediated extrusion is based on a drug-proton antiport mechanism. Taking together results obtained in this study, it can be concluded that CmbT is a novel major facilitator multidrug resistance transporter candidate in L. lactis, with a possible signaling role in sulfur metabolism.

  20. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frances J D; Irvine, Alan D; Terron-Kwiatkowski, Ana; Sandilands, Aileen; Campbell, Linda E; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Evans, Alan T; Goudie, David R; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Arseculeratne, Gehan; Munro, Colin S; Sergeant, Ann; O'Regan, Gráinne; Bale, Sherri J; Compton, John G; DiGiovanna, John J; Presland, Richard B; Fleckman, Philip; McLean, W H Irwin

    2006-03-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris (OMIM 146700) is the most common inherited disorder of keratinization and one of the most frequent single-gene disorders in humans. The most widely cited incidence figure is 1 in 250 based on a survey of 6,051 healthy English schoolchildren. We have identified homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations R501X and 2282del4 in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) as the cause of moderate or severe ichthyosis vulgaris in 15 kindreds. In addition, these mutations are semidominant; heterozygotes show a very mild phenotype with incomplete penetrance. The mutations show a combined allele frequency of approximately 4% in populations of European ancestry, explaining the high incidence of ichthyosis vulgaris. Profilaggrin is the major protein of keratohyalin granules in the epidermis. During terminal differentiation, it is cleaved into multiple filaggrin peptides that aggregate keratin filaments. The resultant matrix is cross-linked to form a major component of the cornified cell envelope. We find that loss or reduction of this major structural protein leads to varying degrees of impaired keratinization.

  1. The you gene encodes an EGF-CUB protein essential for Hedgehog signaling in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Woods

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  2. Differential expression of nuclear- and organelle-encoded genes during tomato fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechulla, B

    1988-12-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels of nuclear-and organelle-encoded genes were determined during fruit development and ripening. Transcripts specific for subunits of the mitochondrial and chloroplast ATPase complexes appear simultaneously and reach high levels two to three weeks after anthesis, but follow a different expression pattern during the ripening period. While the chloroplast-specific mRNA levels continuously decrease to low levels in ripe tomato fruits, the transcripts specific for two mitochondrial ATPase subunits continue to be present at relative high levels in red fruits. Transcript levels for the fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase increase significantly during ripening. Structural proteins such as the alpha-subunit of tubulin and the hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein extensin are expressed during maximal fruit growth. In addition, comparisons of mRNA levels of different genes in several plant organs (leaf, fruit, stem, and root) show characteristic differences. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that changes at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level during fruit development can be correlated with morphological and physiological alterations.

  3. Isolation and functional analysis of a Brassica juncea gene encoding a component of auxin efflux carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; MIN; NI; XIAO; YA; CHEN; ZHI; HONG; XU; HONG; WEI; XUE

    2002-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a divergent role in plant growth and developmental processes including rootand embryo development, vascular pattern formation and cell elongation. Recently isolated Arabidopsispin gene family was believed to encode a component of auxin efflux carrier (Galweiler et al, 1998). Basedon the Arabidopsis pin1 sequence we have isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA (designated Bjpinl), whichencoded a 70-kDa putative auxin efflux carrier. Deduced BjPIN1 shared 65% identities at protein level withAtPIN1 and was highly homologous to other putative PIN proteins of Arabidopsis (with highest homologyto AtPIN3). Hydrophobic analysis showed similar structures between BjPIN1 and AtPIN proteins. Presenceof 6 exons (varying in size between 65 bp and 1229 bp) and 5 introns (sizes between 89 bp and 463 bp)in the genomic fragment was revealed by comparing the genomic and cDNA sequences. Northern blotanalysis indicated that Bjpinl was expressed in most of the tissues tested, with a relatively higher levelof transcript in flowers and a lower level in root tissues. Promoter-reporter gene fusion studies furtherrevealed the expression of Bjpinl in the mature pollen grains, young seeds, root tip, leaf vascular tissue andtrace bundle, stem epidermis, cortex and vascular cells. BjPIN1 was localized on the plasma membraneas demonstrated through fusion expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Auxin efflux carrier activitywas elevated in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BjPIN1.

  4. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding a unique surface (S-) layer of Tannerella forsythia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seok-Woo; Sabet, Mojgan; Um, Heung-Sik; Yang, Jun; Kim, Hyeong C; Zhu, Weidong

    2006-04-12

    A newly emerged periodontopathic pathogen Tannerella forsythia (formerly Bacteroides forsythus), a Gram-negative, filament-shaped, strict anaerobic, non-pigmented oral bacterium, possesses a surface (S-) layer. In our previous studies, the S-layer has been isolated, and shown to mediate hemagglutination, adhesion/invasion of epithelial cell, and murine subcutaneous abscess formation. In the present study, biochemical and molecular genetic characterization of the S-layer are reported. Amino acid sequencing and mass spectrometry indicated that the S-layer is composed of two different proteins, termed 200 and 210 kDa proteins. It was also shown that these proteins are glycosylated. The genes encoding the core proteins of these glycoproteins, designated as tfsA and tfsB, have been identified in silico, cloned, and their sequences have been determined. The tfsA (3.5 kb) and tfsB (4.1 kb) genes are located in tandem, and encode for 135 and 152 kDa proteins, respectively. An apparent discrepancy in molecular weights, 135 vs. 200 kDa and 152 vs. 210 kDa, is accounted for carbohydrate residues attached to the core proteins. Amino acid sequence comparison exhibited a 24% similarity between the 200 and 210 kDa proteins. Further sequence analyses showed that TfsA and TfsB possess putative signal peptide sequences with cleavage sites at alanine residues, and transmembrane domains on the C-terminal region. Northern blot and RT-PCR analyses confirmed an operon structure of tfsAB, suggesting co-regulation of these genes in producing the S-layer. Putative promoter sequences and transcription termination sequences for this operon have also been identified. Comparison with database indicates that the S-layer of T. forsythia has a unique structure exhibiting no homology to other known S-layers of prokaryotic organisms. The present study shows that the T. forsythia S-layer is very unique, since it appears to be composed of two large glycoproteins, and it does not reveal any homology to

  5. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  6. Structural, functional and mutational analysis of the pfr gene encoding a ferritin from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereswill, S; Waidner, U; Odenbreit, S; Lichte, F; Fassbinder, F; Bode, G; Kist, M

    1998-09-01

    The function of the pfr gene encoding the ferritin from Helicobacter pylori was investigated using the Fur titration assay (FURTA) in Escherichia coli, and by characterization of a pfr-deficient mutant strain of H. pylori. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the pfr region is conserved among strains (> 95% nucleotide identity). Two transcriptional start sites, at least one of them preceded by a sigma 70-dependent promoter, were identified. Provision of the H. pylori pfr gene on a multicopy plasmid resulted in reversal of the Fur-mediated repression of the fhuF gene in E. coli, thus enabling the use of the FURTA for cloning of the ferritin gene. Inactivation of the pfr gene, either by insertion of a resistance cassette or by deletion of the up- and downstream segments, abolished this function. Immunoblot analysis with a Pfr-specific antiserum detected the Pfr protein in H. pylori and in E. coli carrying the pfr gene on a plasmid. Pfr-deficient mutants of H. pylori were generated by marker-exchange mutagenesis. These were more susceptible than the parental strain to killing by various metal ions including irons, copper and manganese, whereas conditions of oxidative stress or iron deprivation were not discriminative. Analysis by element-specific electron microscopy revealed that growth of H. pylori in the presence of iron induces the formation of two kinds of cytoplasmic aggregates: large vacuole-like bodies and smaller granules containing iron in association with oxygen or phosphorus. Neither of these structures was detected in the pfr-deficient mutant strain. Furthermore, the ferritin accumulated under iron overload and the pfr-deficient mutant strains lacked expression of a 12 kDa protein which was negatively regulated by iron in the parental strain. The results indicate that the nonhaem-iron ferritin is involved in the formation of iron-containing subcellular structures and contributes to metal resistance of H. pylori. Further evidence for an interaction of

  7. Differential expression of genes encoding neuronal ion-channel subunits in major depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia: implications for pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolin, Bella; Karry, Rachel; Gal-Ben-Ari, Shunit; Ben-Shachar, Dorit

    2012-08-01

    Evidence concerning ion-channel abnormalities in the pathophysiology of common psychiatric disorders is still limited. Given the significance of ion channels in neuronal activity, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity we hypothesized that the expression patterns of genes encoding different ion channels may be altered in schizophrenia, bipolar and unipolar disorders. Frozen samples of striatum including the nucleus accumbens (Str-NAc) and the lateral cerebellar hemisphere of 60 brains from depressed (MDD), bipolar (BD), schizophrenic and normal subjects, obtained from the Stanley Foundation Brain Collection, were assayed. mRNA of 72 different ion-channel subunits were determined by qRT-PCR and alteration in four genes were verified by immunoblotting. In the Str-NAc the prominent change was observed in the MDD group, in which there was a significant up-regulation in genes encoding voltage-gated potassium-channel subunits. However, in the lateral cerebellar hemisphere (cerebellum), the main change was observed in schizophrenia specimens, as multiple genes encoding various ion-channel subunits were significantly down-regulated. The impaired expression of genes encoding ion channels demonstrates a disease-related neuroanatomical pattern. The alterations observed in Str-NAc of MDD may imply electrical hypo-activity of this region that could be of relevance to MDD symptoms and treatment. The robust unidirectional alteration of both excitatory and inhibitory ion channels in the cerebellum may suggests cerebellar general hypo-transcriptional activity in schizophrenia.

  8. Effects of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding human tumstatin gene on endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ya-pei; XU Chun-xiao; HOU Guo-sheng; XIN Jia-xuan; WANG Wei; LIU Xian-xi

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumstatin is a novel endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor which is widely studied using purified protein.The current study evaluates the antiangiogenic effects of tumstatin-overexpression plasmid in vitro, reveals the mechanism underlying the vascular endothelial cell growth inhibition and searches for a novel method administering tumstatin persistently.Methods The eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA-tumstatin encoding tumstatin gene was constructed and transfected to human umbilical vein endothelial cell ECV304 and human renal carcinoma cell ACHN.Expression of tumstatin in the two cell lines was determined by RT-PCR and Western blotting.Vascular endothelial cell proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry.To investigate the mechanism by which pcDNA-tumstatin inhibited vascular endothelial cell proliferation in vitro, cyclin D1 protein was detected by Western blotting.Results DNA sequence confirmed that pcDNA-tumstatin was successfully constructed.RT-PCR and Western blotting indicated that tumstatin could express in the two cell lines effectively.After tumstatin gene transfer, ECV304 cell growth was significantly inhibited and the cell cycle was arrested in G1 phase.And Western blotting showed that pcDNA-tumstatin decreased the level of cyclin D1 protein.Conclusions Overexpression of tumstatin mediated by pcDNA 3.1 (+) specially inhibited vascular endothelial cells by arresting vascular endothelial cell in G1 phase resulting from downregulation of cyclin D1 and administration of tumstatin using a gene therapy might be a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

  9. The Novel Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis Gene MFSD8 Encodes a Putative Lysosomal Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siintola, Eija ; Topcu, Meral ; Aula, Nina ; Lohi, Hannes ; Minassian, Berge A. ; Paterson, Andrew D. ; Liu, Xiao-Qing ; Wilson, Callum ; Lahtinen, Ulla ; Anttonen, Anna-Kaisa ; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina 

    2007-01-01

    The late-infantile–onset forms are the most genetically heterogeneous group among the autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorders, the neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs). The Turkish variant was initially considered to be a distinct genetic entity, with clinical presentation similar to that of other forms of late-infantile–onset NCL (LINCL), including age at onset from 2 to 7 years, epileptic seizures, psychomotor deterioration, myoclonus, loss of vision, and premature death. However, Turkish variant LINCL was recently found to be genetically heterogeneous, because mutations in two genes, CLN6 and CLN8, were identified to underlie the disease phenotype in a subset of patients. After a genomewide scan with single-nucleotide–polymorphism markers and homozygosity mapping in nine Turkish families and one Indian family, not linked to any of the known NCL loci, we mapped a novel variant LINCL locus to chromosome 4q28.1-q28.2 in five families. We identified six different mutations in the MFSD8 gene (previously denoted “MGC33302”), which encodes a novel polytopic 518–amino acid membrane protein that belongs to the major facilitator superfamily of transporter proteins. MFSD8 is expressed ubiquitously, with several alternatively spliced variants. Like the majority of the previously identified NCL proteins, MFSD8 localizes mainly to the lysosomal compartment. However, the function of MFSD8 remains to be elucidated. Analysis of the genome-scan data suggests the existence of at least three more genes in the remaining five families, further corroborating the great genetic heterogeneity of LINCLs. PMID:17564970

  10. Non-hepatic tumors change the activity of genes encoding copper trafficking proteins in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, Polina S; Skvortsov, Alexey N; Rusconi, Paolo; Tsymbalenko, Nadezhda V; Mutanen, Marja; Puchkova, Ludmila V; Broggini, Massimo

    2013-07-01

    To assess the statistical relationship between tumor growth and copper metabolism, we performed a metaanalysis of studies in which patients with neoplasms were characterized according to any of the copper status indexes (atomic copper serum concentration, serum oxidase activity, ceruloplasmin protein content). Our metaanalysis shows that in the majority of cases (more than 3100 patients), tumor growth positively correlates with the copper status indexes. Nude athymic CD-1 nu/nu mice with subcutaneous tumors of human origin, C57Bl/6J mice with murine melanoma and Apc(Min) mice with spontaneously developing adenomas throughout the intestinal tract were studied to experimentally determine the relationship between tumor progression, liver copper metabolism, and copper status indexes. We showed that the copper status indexes increased significantly during tumor growth. In the liver tissue of tumor-bearing mice, ceruloplasmin gene expression, as well as the expression of genes related to ceruloplasmin metallation (CTR1 and ATP7B), increased significantly. Moreover, the presence of an mRNA splice variant encoding a form of ceruloplasmin anchored to the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidyl inositol, which is atypical for hepatocytes, was also detected. The ATP7A copper transporter gene, which is normally expressed in the liver only during embryonic copper metabolism, was also activated. Depletion of holo-ceruloplasmin resulted in retardation of human HCT116 colon carcinoma cell growth in nude mice and induced DNA fragmentation in tumor cells. In addition, the concentration of cytochrome c increased significantly in the cytosol, while decreasing in the mitochondria. We discuss a possible trans-effect of developing tumors on copper metabolism in the liver.

  11. Characterization of a Thioredoxin-1 Gene from Taenia solium and Its Encoding Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Lucía; Rodríguez-Lima, Oscar; Ochoa-Sánchez, Alicia; Landa, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium thioredoxin-1 gene (TsTrx-1) has a length of 771 bp with three exons and two introns. The core promoter gene presents two putative stress transcription factor binding sites, one putative TATA box, and a transcription start site (TSS). TsTrx-1 mRNA is expressed higher in larvae than in adult. This gene encodes a protein of 107 amino acids that presents the Trx active site (CGPC), the classical secondary structure of the thioredoxin fold, and the highest degree of identity with the Echinococcus granulosus Trx. A recombinant TsTrx-1 (rTsTrx-1) was produced in Escherichia coli with redox activity. Optimal activity for rTsTrx-1 was at pH 6.5 in the range of 15 to 25°C. The enzyme conserved activity for 3 h and lost it in 24 h at 37°C. rTsTrx-1 lost 50% activity after 1 h and lost activity completely in 24 h at temperatures higher than 55°C. Best storage temperature for rTsTrx-1 was at -70°C. It was inhibited by high concentrations of H₂O₂ and methylglyoxal (MG), but it was inhibited neither by NaCl nor by anti-rTsTrx-1 rabbit antibodies that strongly recognized a ~12 kDa band in extracts from several parasites. These TsTrx-1 properties open the opportunity to study its role in relationship T. solium-hosts.

  12. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S.F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K+ acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but it did not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K+ transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K+ transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions. PMID:23848378

  13. Identification and functional characterization of K(+) transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Juliana I; Pereira, Marcelo S F; Roy, Craig R; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S

    2013-12-01

    Legionnaires' disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the Escherichia coli K(+) transporters. These three genes were expressed by L. pneumophila and have been designated kupA, kupB and kupC. Investigation using the L. pneumophila kup mutants revealed that kupA is involved in K(+) acquisition during axenic growth. The kupA mutants replicated efficiently in rich axenic media, but poorly in a chemically defined medium. The kupA mutants were defective in the recruitment of polyubiquitinated proteins to the Legionella-containing vacuole that is formed in macrophages and displayed an intracellular multiplication defect during the replication in Acanthamoeba castellanii and in mouse macrophages. We found that bafilomycin treatment of macrophages was able to rescue the growth defects of kupA mutants, but itdid not influence the replication of wild-type bacteria. The defects identified in kupA mutants of L. pneumophila were complemented by the expression E. coli trkD/Kup gene in trans, a bona fide K(+) transporter encoded by E. coli. Collectively, our data indicate that KupA is a functional K(+) transporter expressed by L. pneumophila that facilitates the bacterial replication intracellularly and in nutrient-limited conditions.

  14. The occurrence of subtilase-cytotoxin-encoding genes in environmental Escherichia coli isolated from a Northern California estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Maria das Graças C; Byrne, Barbara A; Nguyen, Trân B H; Lewis, David J; Atwill, E Robert

    2013-06-01

    The presence of subtilase-cytotoxin-encoding genes was determined in 397 environmental Escherichia coli strains isolated from water, suspended solids, and sediments sampled from different hydrological and environmental conditions in a California estuary. A total of 7 strains (1.76%) were found to harbor subtilase-cytotoxin-encoding genes. Using primers targeting subA only, we generated PCR amplicons from 2 strains; while using primers targeting the 3' end of SubA downstream to the 5' end of SubB, amplicons of 232 bp were generated from 5 additional strains. The 556 bp subA sequences were almost identical to that in the subtilase-cytotoxin-positive strain ED 591 (98%), while subAB sequences of 2 non-Shiga-toxigenic strains revealed 100% similarity with the Shiga-toxigenic E. coli O113:H21 strain 98NK2 that was isolated from an outbreak of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Additionally, the serogroup O113:H21 was present in this collection of environmental E. coli, and it was found to harbor stx2d, hra1 that encodes the heat resistant agglutinin 1, and a subAB sequence similar to that in the non-Shiga-toxigenic E. coli subtilase cytotoxin strain ED 591. To further understand potential health risks posed by strains encoding SubAB, future epidemiological studies should consider screening isolates for subAB regardless of the presence of Shiga-toxin-encoding genes.

  15. Nuclear factor-κB regulates the expression of multiple genes encoding liver transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Suchy, Frederick J

    2016-04-15

    In this study we identified the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on the expression of genes encoding multiple liver transport proteins. Well-conserved NF-κB binding sites were found in the promoters of farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-target genes. An electromobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated the specific interaction between the NF-κB p65 protein and a (32)P-labeled BSEP NF-κB response element (NF-κBE). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of NF-κB p65 to the BSEP locus but not the FXRE in vitro. NF-κB p65 overexpression in Huh-7 cells markedly repressed FXR/RXR transactivation of the BSEP, ABCG5/G8, MRP2, and FXR promoters, which was totally reversed by expression of the IκBα super-repressor. NF-κB interacted directly with FXR on coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting another level for the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on FXR-target genes. In vivo ChIP analysis with liver nuclei obtained from mice after 3 days of common bile duct ligation (BDL) or 6 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection showed a markedly increased recruitment of NF-κB p65 to the Bsep promoter compared with controls. There was also increased recruitment of the corepressor silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC2 to the NF-κB sites. We also found that NF-κB p65 was recruited to NF-κB binding sites in the promoters of organic solute transporter, OSTα and OSTβ, and unexpectedly activated rather than repressed gene expression. In mouse liver after BDL NF-κB recruitment to Ostα and Ostβ promoters was associated with increased binding of the potent coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 to the NF-κBE and depletion of CBP/p300 at the FXR element. Overall, these studies demonstrate a novel role for NF-κB in adaptation to obstructive and LPS-induced cholestasis acting through recruitment to specific NF-κB binding sites in

  16. Cloning and functional characterization of the SUR2/SYR2 gene encoding sphinganine hydroxylase in Pichia ciferrii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung-Hoon; Sohn, Jung-Hoon; Park, Chang-Seo; Rhee, Joon-Shick; Choi, Eui-Sung

    2004-04-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae sphinganine C4-hydroxylase encoded by the SUR2 gene catalyses the conversion of sphinganine to phytosphingosine. We isolated the SUR2 gene from Pichia ciferrii using nucleotide sequence homology to S. cerevisiae SUR2 to study hydroxylation of sphinganine in the sphingoid base overproducing yeast P. ciferrii. A positive clone was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing. A syringomycin-E resistance phenotype of a S. cerevisiae sur2-null mutant was complemented by expression of the cloned P. ciferrii SUR2 gene. Restoration of phytosphingosine production in the complemented strain was also confirmed, indicating that the cloned gene is a functional homologue of S. cerevisiae SUR2. .

  17. Residual plastids of bleached mutants of Euglena gracilis and their effects on the expression of nucleus-encoded genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiangxin; SHI Zhixin; XU Xudong

    2004-01-01

    Bleached mutants of Euglena gracilis were obtained by treatment with ofloxacin (Ofl)and streptomycin (Sm) respectively. As shown by electron microscopy, the residual plastids contain prothylakoids in an Ofl mutant, and the highly developed and tightly stacked membranous structure found in cells of two Sm mutants. Nine genes of the plastid genome were examined with PCR, showing that ribosomal protein genes and most other plastid genes were lost in all but one Sm mutant. Using differential display and RT-PCR, it was shown that chloroplast degeneration could cause changes in transcription of certain nucleus-encoded genes during heterotrophic growth in darkness.

  18. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding (R)-specific carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC M203011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene which encodes (R)-specific carbonyl reductase (rCR) from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC M203011 was cloned, sequenced and compared with genes from the GenBank. The results indicated that rCR gene was 1011 bp, encoding a protein of 336 amino acids with a molecular weight of 35.9 kDa, and its nucleotide sequence showed 99% similarity to those of other members of the alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The rCR gene could express in recombinant strain Escherichia coli JM 109, and the expression plasmid could produce (R)-1-pheny-1,2-ethanediol (100% e.e., 80.14% yield) fromβ-hydroxyacetophenone without any additive to regenerate NAD+ from NADH.

  19. Investigation of the fatty acid transporter-encoding genes SLC27A3 and SLC27A4 in autism

    OpenAIRE

    Motoko Maekawa; Yoshimi Iwayama; Tetsuo Ohnishi; Manabu Toyoshima; Chie Shimamoto; Yasuko Hisano; Tomoko Toyota; Shabeesh Balan; Hideo Matsuzaki; Yasuhide Iwata; Shu Takagai; Kohei Yamada; Motonori Ota; Satoshi Fukuchi; Yohei Okada

    2015-01-01

    The solute carrier 27A (SLC27A) gene family encodes fatty acid transport proteins (FATPs) and includes 6 members. During fetal and postnatal periods of development, the growing brain requires a reliable supply of fatty acids. Because autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are now recognized as disorders caused by impaired early brain development, it is possible that functional abnormalities of SLC27A genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of ASD. Here, we confirmed the expression of SLC27A3 and SL...

  20. Cloning and structure of a yeast gene encoding a general transcription initiation factor TFIID that binds to the TATA box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, M; Wang, C K; Fujii, H; Cromlish, J A; Weil, P A; Roeder, R G

    1989-09-28

    The TATA sequence-binding factor TFIID plays a central role both in promoter activation by RNA polymerase II and other common initiation factors, and in promoter regulation by gene-specific factors. The sequence of yeast TFIID, which seems to be encoded by a single gene, contains interesting structural motifs that are possibly involved in these functions, and is similar to sequences of bacterial sigma factors.

  1. Expression of the Immediate-Early Gene-Encoded Protein Egr-1 ("zif268") during in Vitro Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink…

  2. Cloning and functional expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding the di- and tripeptide transport protein of Lactobacillus helveticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nakajima, H.; Hagting, A; Kunji, E.R S; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the di- and tripeptide transport protein (DtpT) of Lactobacillus helveticus (DtpT(LH)) was cloned with the aid of the inverse PCR technique and used to complement the dipeptide transport-deficient and proline-auxotrophic Escherichia coil E1772. Functional expression of the peptide

  3. A Kunjin replicon vector encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor for intra-tumoral gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang-Le, D.; Smeenk, L.; Anraku, I.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wang, X.J.; Vrij, de J.; Liu, W.J.; Le, T.T.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently developed a non-cytopathic RNA replicon-based viral vector system based on the flavivirus Kunjin. Here, we illustrate the utility of the Kunjin replicon system for gene therapy. Intra-tumoral injections of Kunjin replicon virus-like particles encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating

  4. The UmGcn5 gene encoding histone acetyltransferase from Ustilago maydis is involved in dimorphism and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Prieto, Juan Manuel; Rosas-Quijano, Raymundo; Domínguez, Angel; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2014-10-01

    We isolated a gene encoding a histone acetyltransferase from Ustilago maydis (DC.) Cda., which is orthologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN5 gene. The gene was isolated from genomic clones identified by their specific hybridization to a gene fragment obtained by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This gene (Umgcn5; um05168) contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1421bp that encodes a putative protein of 473 amino acids with a Mr. of 52.6kDa. The protein exhibits a high degree of homology with histone acetyltransferases from different organisms. Null a2b2 ΔUmgcn5 mutants were constructed by substitution of the region encoding the catalytic site with a hygromycin B resistance cassette. Null a1b1 ΔUmgcn5 mutants were isolated from genetic crosses of a2b2 ΔUmgcn5 and a1b1 wild-type strains in maize. Mutants displayed a slight reduction in growth rate under different conditions, and were more sensitive than the wild type to stress conditions, but more important, they grew as long mycelial cells, and formed fuzz-like colonies under all conditions where wild-type strains grew in the yeast-like morphology and formed smooth colonies. This phenotype was not reverted by cAMP addition. Mutants were not virulent to maize plants, and were unable to form teliospores. These phenotypic alterations of the mutants were reverted by their transformation with the wild-type gene.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding chitin and β-1,3-glucan synthases from Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Briones, Mariana; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-07-01

    Transcriptional regulation of genes encoding chitin synthases (CHS) and β-1,3-glucan synthase (GLS) from Ustilago maydis was studied. Transcript levels were measured during the growth curve of yeast and mycelial forms, in response to ionic and osmotic stress, and during infection of maize plants. Expression of the single GLS gene was constitutive. In contrast, CHS genes expression showed differences depending on environmental conditions. Transcript levels were slightly higher in the mycelial forms, the highest levels occurring at the log phase. Ionic and osmotic stress induced alterations in the expression of CHS genes, but not following a defined pattern, some genes were induced and others repressed by the tested compounds. Changes in transcripts were more apparent during the pathogenic process. At early infection stages, only CHS6 gene showed significant transcript levels, whereas at the period of tumor formation CHS7 and CHS8 genes were also were induced.

  6. The pyrH gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris encoding UMP kinase is transcribed as part of an operon including the frr1 gene encoding ribosomal recycling factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadskov-Hansen, Steen Lüders; Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    2000-01-01

    establishing the ability of the encoded protein to synthesize UDP. The pyrH gene in L. lactis is flanked downstream by frr1 encoding ribosomal recycling factor 1 and upstream by an open reading frame, orfA, of unknown function. The three genes were shown to constitute an operon transcribed in the direction orf......A-pyrH-frr1 from a promoter immediately in front of orfA. This operon belongs to an evolutionary highly conserved gene cluster, since the organization of pyrH on the chromosomal level in L. lactis shows a high resemblance to that found in Bacillus subtilis as well as in Escherichia coli and several other...

  7. The life-extending gene Indy encodes an exchanger for Krebs-cycle intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Felix; Mohebbi, Nilufar; Teichert, Carsten; Herold, Diana; Rogina, Blanka; Helfand, Stephen; Gollasch, Maik; Luft, Friedrich C; Aronson, Peter S

    2006-07-01

    A longevity gene called Indy (for 'I'm not dead yet'), with similarity to mammalian genes encoding sodium-dicarboxylate cotransporters, was identified in Drosophila melanogaster. Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes showed that INDY mediates the flux of dicarboxylates and citrate across the plasma membrane, but the specific transport mechanism mediated by INDY was not identified. To test whether INDY functions as an anion exchanger, we examined whether substrate efflux is stimulated by transportable substrates added to the external medium. Efflux of [14C]citrate from INDY-expressing oocytes was greatly accelerated by the addition of succinate to the external medium, indicating citrate-succinate exchange. The succinate-stimulated [14C]citrate efflux was sensitive to inhibition by DIDS (4,4'-di-isothiocyano-2,2'-disulphonic stilbene), as demonstrated previously for INDY-mediated succinate uptake. INDY-mediated efflux of [14C]citrate was also stimulated by external citrate and oxaloacetate, indicating citrate-citrate and citrate-oxaloacetate exchange. Similarly, efflux of [14C]succinate from INDY-expressing oocytes was stimulated by external citrate, alpha-oxoglutarate and fumarate, indicating succinate-citrate, succinate-alpha-oxoglutarate and succinate-fumarate exchange respectively. Conversely, when INDY-expressing Xenopus oocytes were loaded with succinate and citrate, [14C]succinate uptake was markedly stimulated, confirming succinate-succinate and succinate-citrate exchange. Exchange of internal anion for external citrate was markedly pH(o)-dependent, consistent with the concept that citrate is co-transported with a proton. Anion exchange was sodium-independent. We conclude that INDY functions as an exchanger of dicarboxylate and tricarboxylate Krebs-cycle intermediates. The effect of decreasing INDY activity, as in the long-lived Indy mutants, may be to alter energy metabolism in a manner that favours lifespan extension.

  8. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA; Jiahui; (夏家辉); ZHENG; Duo; (郑多),; TANG; Dongsheng; (唐冬生); DAI; Heping; (戴和平); PAN; Qian; (潘乾); LONG; Zhigao; (龙志高); LIAO; Xiaodong; (廖晓东)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  9. Cloning, mapping and mutation analysis of human gene GJB5 encoding gap junction protein b-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By homologous EST searching and nested PCR a new human gene GJB5encoding gap junction protein b-5 was identified. GJB5 was genetically mapped to human chromosome 1p33-p35 by FISH. RT-PCR revealed that it was expressed in skin, placenta and fetal skin. DNA sequencing of GJB5 was carried out in 142 patients with sensorineural hearing impairment and probands of 36 families with genetic diseases, including erythrokeratodermia (5 families), Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (13), ptosis (4), and retinitis pigmentosa and deafness (14). Two missense mutations (686A→G, H229R; 25C→T, L9F) were detected in two sensorineural hearing impairment families. A heterologous deletion of 18 bp within intron was found in 3 families with heredity hearing impairment, and in one of the 3 families, a missense mutation (R265P) was identified also. But the deletion and missense mutation seemed not segregating with hearing impairment in the family. No abnormal mRNA or mRNA expression was detected in deletion carriers by RT-PCR analysis in skin tissue. Mutation analysis in 199 unaffected individuals revealed that two of them were carriers with the same 18 bp deletion.

  10. Idiopathic neonatal necrotising fasciitis caused by community-acquired MSSA encoding Panton Valentine Leukocidin genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is very rare in comparison to the adult presentation of the disease and a Plastic Surgeon may only encounter one such case during his or her career. Often this is initially misdiagnosed and managed as simple cellulitis. It generally affects previously healthy babies, the site is often the lower back area and a history of minor skin trauma may be elicited. The causative organism is usually Streptococcus or polymicrobial, as is the case in the adult population. We present the case of a previously healthy 11-day-old infant with idiopathic, rapidly progressive necrotising fasciitis of the back, cause by Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. The strain was isolated and found to encode the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes, which have been associated with particularly severe necrotising infections in other sites, with high mortality. These strains are the subject of specific treatment and eradication guidance in the UK but awareness of this and the importance of obtaining detailed culture typing is likely to be low amongst Plastic Surgeons.

  11. Cloning of the Gene Encoding Urease Subunit A in Helicobacter Pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施理; 张宜俊; 陈劼; 候晓华

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The gene encoding urease subunit A (ureA) of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) was cloned from H. pylori isolate by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sterile distilled water instead of DNA served as negative control. The nucleotide sequence of the amplified product was determined.Homologous analysis of the ureA against that reported by Clayton CL and the GenBank and SwissProt databases were performed with the BLAST program at the Genome Net through the Internet.0.8 kb PCR product was amplified from all H. pylori clinical isolators. The nucleotide sequence of the ureA was determined. The nucleotide sequence of the ureA began with ATG as the initiation codon and terminated in TAA as stop codon. The coding regions had a 44 % G+ C content. The DNA sequence was 98 % homologous to that reported by Clayton CL (688 out of 702 residues were identical). The derived amino-acid sequences of the ureA were 99 % homologous to that reported by Clayton CL (232 out of 234 residues were identical). The nucleotide sequence and the predicted protein showed significant homology to ureA of H. pylori in the NCBI Entrez database.

  12. The rice FISH BONE gene encodes a tryptophan aminotransferase, which affects pleiotropic auxin-related processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Ito, Momoyo; Sumikura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Akira; Nishimura, Takeshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Auxin is a fundamental plant hormone and its localization within organs plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. Analysis of many Arabidopsis mutants that were defective in auxin biosynthesis revealed that the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway, catalyzed by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) families, is the major biosynthetic pathway of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In contrast, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms of auxin biosynthesis in rice. In this study, we identified a auxin-related rice mutant, fish bone (fib). FIB encodes an orthologue of TAA genes and loss of FIB function resulted in pleiotropic abnormal phenotypes, such as small leaves with large lamina joint angles, abnormal vascular development, small panicles, abnormal organ identity and defects in root development, together with a reduction in internal IAA levels. Moreover, we found that auxin sensitivity and polar transport activity were altered in the fib mutant. From these results, we suggest that FIB plays a pivotal role in IAA biosynthesis in rice and that auxin biosynthesis, transport and sensitivity are closely interrelated.

  13. Preparation and characterization of polyclonal antibody against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic gene encoding RTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Weifei; Tang, Qiao; Shen, Chenyou; Qin, Di; Lu, Chun; Yan, Qin

    2015-11-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) is a critical lytic protein encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). To prepare rabbit polyclonal antibody against RTA, three antigenic polypeptides of KSHV RTA were initially synthesized. The fragment of RTA was cloned into p3FlagBsd to construct the recombinant plasmid, pRTA-Flag. 293 T and EA.hy926 cells were transfected with pRTA-Flag to obtain RTA-Flag fusion protein, which was detected using anti-Flag antibody. Next, New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated peptides to generate polyclonal antibodies against RTA. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to characterize the polyclonal antibodies, and the titers of the polyclonal antibodies against RTA were greater than 1:11,000. Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the prepared antibody reacted specifically with the RTA-Flag fusion protein as well as the native viral protein in KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells. Collectively, our work successfully constructed the recombinant expression vector, pRTA-Flag, and prepared the polyclonal antibody against RTA, which was valuable for investigating the biochemical and biological functions of the critical KSHV lytic gene.

  14. Early transcription factor subunits are encoded by vaccinia virus late genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, P D; Moss, B

    1990-06-01

    The vaccinia virus early transcription factor (VETF) was shown to be a virus-encoded heterodimer. The gene for the 82-kDa subunit was identified as open reading frame (ORF) A8L, based on the N-terminal sequence of factor purified by using DNA-affinity magnetic beads. The 70-kDa subunit of VETF was refractory to N-terminal analysis, and so N-terminal sequences were obtained for three internal tryptic peptides. All three peptides matched sequences within ORF D6R. ORFs A8L and D6R are located within the central region of the vaccinia virus genome and are separated by about 13,600 base pairs. Proteins corresponding to the 3' ends of ORFs A8L and D6R were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and used to prepare antisera that bound to the larger and smaller subunits, respectively, of affinity-purified VETF. Immunoblot analysis of proteins from infected cells indicated that both subunits are expressed exclusively in the late phase of infection, just prior to their packaging in virus particles. The two subunits of VETF have no significant local or overall amino acid sequence homology to one another, to other entries in biological sequence data bases including bacterial sigma factors, or to recently determined sequences of some eukaryotic transcription factors. The 70-kDa subunit, however, has motifs in common with a super-family of established and putative DNA and RNA helicases.

  15. Localization of eight additional genes in the human major histocompatibility complex, including the gene encoding the casein kinase II {beta} subunit (CSNK2B)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertella, M.R.; Jones, H.; Thomson, W. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    A wide range of autoimmune and other diseases are known to be associated with the major histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility complex. Many of these diseases are linked to the genes encoding the polymorphic histocompatibility antigens in the class I and class II regions, but some appear to be more strongly associated with genes in the central 1100-kb class III region, making it important to characterize this region fully for the presence of novel genes. An {approximately}220-kb segment of DNA in the class III region separating the Hsp70 (HSPA1L) and BAT1 (D6S8IE) genes, which was previously known to contain 14 genes. Genomic DNA fragments spanning the gaps between the known genes were used as probes to isolate cDNAs corresponding to five new genes within this region. Evidence from Northern blot analysis and exon trapping experiments that suggested the presence of at least two more new genes was also obtained. Partial cDNA and complete exonic genomic sequencing of one of the new genes has identified it as the casein kinase II{beta} subunit (CSNK2B). Two of the other novel genes lie within a region syntenic to that implicated in susceptibility to experimental allergic orchitis in the mouse, an autoimmune disease of the testis, and represent additional candidates for the Orch-1 locus associated with this disease. In addition, characterization of the 13-kb intergenic gap separating the RD (D6545) and G11 (D6S60E) genes has revealed the presence of a gene encoding a 1246-amino-acid polypeptide that shows significant sequence similarity to the yeast anti-viral Ski2p gene product. 49 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Analysis of the structural genes encoding M-factor in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe: identification of a third gene, mfm3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, S; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O;

    1994-01-01

    We previously identified two genes, mfm1 and mfm2, with the potential to encode the M-factor mating pheromone of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (J. Davey, EMBO J. 11:951-960, 1992), but further analysis revealed that a mutant strain lacking both genes still produced active M-factor. ......We previously identified two genes, mfm1 and mfm2, with the potential to encode the M-factor mating pheromone of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (J. Davey, EMBO J. 11:951-960, 1992), but further analysis revealed that a mutant strain lacking both genes still produced active M...... induced by a pheromone signal. Additionally, the signal transduction machinery associated with the pheromone response is required for transcription of the mfm genes in both stimulated and unstimulated cells....

  17. AIB1 gene amplification and the instability of polyQ encoding sequence in breast cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Robert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poly Q polymorphism in AIB1 (amplified in breast cancer gene is usually assessed by fragment length analysis which does not reveal the actual sequence variation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the sequence variation of poly Q encoding region in breast cancer cell lines at single molecule level, and to determine if the sequence variation is related to AIB1 gene amplification. Methods The polymorphic poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene was investigated at the single molecule level by PCR cloning/sequencing. The amplification of AIB1 gene in various breast cancer cell lines were studied by real-time quantitative PCR. Results Significant amplifications (5–23 folds of AIB1 gene were found in 2 out of 9 (22% ER positive cell lines (in BT-474 and MCF-7 but not in BT-20, ZR-75-1, T47D, BT483, MDA-MB-361, MDA-MB-468 and MDA-MB-330. The AIB1 gene was not amplified in any of the ER negative cell lines. Different passages of MCF-7 cell lines and their derivatives maintained the feature of AIB1 amplification. When the cells were selected for hormone independence (LCC1 and resistance to 4-hydroxy tamoxifen (4-OH TAM (LCC2 and R27, ICI 182,780 (LCC9 or 4-OH TAM, KEO and LY 117018 (LY-2, AIB1 copy number decreased but still remained highly amplified. Sequencing analysis of poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene did not reveal specific patterns that could be correlated with AIB1 gene amplification. However, about 72% of the breast cancer cell lines had at least one under represented (3CAA(CAG9(CAACAG3(CAACAGCAG2CAA of the original cell line, a number of altered poly Q encoding sequences were found in the derivatives of MCF-7 cell lines. Conclusion These data suggest that poly Q encoding region of AIB1 gene is somatic unstable in breast cancer cell lines. The instability and the sequence characteristics, however, do not appear to be associated with the level of the gene amplification.

  18. Cloning of HBsAg-encoded genes in different vectors and their expression in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Qin; Hong Tang; Lian-San Zhao; Fang He; Yong Lin; Li Liu; Xiao-Mei He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficiency of different plasmids as DNA vectors by cloning three HBsAg-encoded genes into two eukaryotic expression vectors, pRc/CMV and pSG5UTPL/Flag, and to express HBsAg S, MS, and LS proteins in SP2/0 cells, and to establish monoclone SP2/0 cell strains that are capable of expressing S or S2S proteins stably.METHODS: Segments of S, preS2-S, preS1-preS2-S genes of Hepatitis B virus were amplified by routine PCR and preS1S fragment was amplified by Over-Lap Extension PCR. The amplified segments were cleaved with restricted endonuclease Hind Ⅲ/Not Ⅰ followed by ligation with pRc/CMV, or BamHI/EcoR Ⅰ followed by ligation with pSG5UTPL/Flag. After the plasmid vectors were cleaved with the correspond enzymes, the amplified segments were inserted into pRc/CMV or pSGSUTPL/Flag plasmid vectors with T4DNA ligase. KOZAK sequence was added before the initial ATG code of each fragment using specific primer. The inserted segments in the recombinant plasmids were sequenced after subcloning. BALB/c mice myeloma cells (SP2/0 cell line) were transfected with the recombinant plasmids. The expressions of the different recombinants were compared by Western-blot, using a monoclonal anti-HBs antibody as the primary antibody and peroxidase-labeled multi-linker as the secondary. Stable SP2/0-pRc/CMV-S or SP2/0- pRc/CMV-MS clones were established through clone screening with G418.RESULTS: Fragments with anticipated size were harvested after PCR. After recombination and screening, the sequences of the inserted segments in the recombinants were confirmed to be S, preS2S, preSl-preS2S and preSlS encoding genes,determined by sequencing. The results of Western-blot hybridization were positive for the anticipated proteins.Among them, pRc/CMV-S or pRc/CMV-MS demonstrated the highest expressing their respective antigen.CONCLUSION: Eight recombinant plasmids expressing S,M, L or preSlS proteins are obtained. For hepatitis surface antigen expression in eukaryotic cells

  19. The rgg0182 gene encodes a transcriptional regulator required for the full Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311 thermal adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertin Stéphane

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus thermophilus is an important starter strain for the production of yogurt and cheeses. The analysis of sequenced genomes of four strains of S. thermophilus indicates that they contain several genes of the rgg familly potentially encoding transcriptional regulators. Some of the Rgg proteins are known to be involved in bacterial stress adaptation. Results In this study, we demonstrated that Streptococcus thermophilus thermal stress adaptation required the rgg0182 gene which transcription depends on the culture medium and the growth temperature. This gene encoded a protein showing similarity with members of the Rgg family transcriptional regulator. Our data confirmed that Rgg0182 is a transcriptional regulator controlling the expression of its neighboring genes as well as chaperones and proteases encoding genes. Therefore, analysis of a Δrgg0182 mutant revealed that this protein played a role in the heat shock adaptation of Streptococcus thermophilus LMG18311. Conclusions These data showed the importance of the Rgg0182 transcriptional regulator on the survival of S. thermophilus during dairy processes and more specifically during changes in temperature.

  20. Transgenic tomatoes express an antigenic polypeptide containing epitopes of the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins, encoded by a synthetic gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Márquez-Mercado, Crisóforo; López-Revilla, Rubén; Castillo-Collazo, Rosalba; Alpuche-Solís, Angel Gabriel

    2007-07-01

    A current priority of vaccinology is the development of multicomponent vaccines that protect against several pathogens. The diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DPT) vaccine prevents the symptoms of three serious and often fatal diseases due to the exotoxins produced by Corynebacterium diphteriae, Bordetella pertussis and Clostridium tetani. We are attempting to develop an edible DPT multicomponent vaccine in plants, based on the fusion of protective exotoxin epitopes encoded by synthetic genes. By means of Agrobacterium mediated transformation we generated transgenic tomatoes with a plant-optimised synthetic gene encoding a novel polypeptide containing two adjuvant and six DPT immunoprotective exotoxin epitopes joined by peptide linkers. In transformed tomato plants, integration of the synthetic DPT (sDPT) gene detected by PCR was confirmed by Southern blot, and specific transcripts of the expected molecular size were detected by RT-PCR. Expression of the putative polypeptide encoded by the sDPT gene was detected by immunoassay with specific antibodies to the diphtheria, pertussis and tetanus exotoxins. The sDPT gene is therefore integrated, transcribed and translated as the expected recombinant sDPT multiepitope polypeptide in transgenic tomatoes that constitute a potential edible vaccine.

  1. Gene electro transfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for enhanced expression and perfusion in the ischemic swine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor alone. Higher gene expression was also seen in ischemic versus non-ischemic groups with parameters 20 Volts (ptransfer of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor had increased perfusion in the area at risk compared to control groups. Troponin and creatine kinase increased across all groups, suggesting equivalent ischemia in all groups prior to treatment. Echocardiography was used to assess ejection fraction, cardiac output, stroke volume, left ventricular end diastolic volume, and left ventricular end systolic volume. No statistically significant differences in these parameters were detected during a 2-week time period. However, directional trends of these variables were interesting and offer valuable information about the feasibility of gene electro transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor in the ischemic heart. The results demonstrate that gene electro transfer can be applied safely and can increase perfusion in an ischemic area. Additional study is needed to evaluate potential efficacy.

  2. Genes encoding a group of related small secreted proteins from the gut of Hessian fly larvae [Mayetiola destructor (Say)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING-SHUN CHEN; XIANG LIU; YU-CHENG ZHU; JOHN C. REESE; GERALD E. WILDE

    2006-01-01

    A group of related genes has been isolated and characterized from the gut of Hessian fly larvae [Mayetiola destructor (Say)]. Members in this group appear to encode proteins with secretary signal peptides at the N-terminals. The mature putative proteins are small, acidic proteins with calculated molecular masses of 14.5 to 15.3 kDa, and isoelectric points from 4.56 to 4.88. Northern blot analysis revealed that these genes are expressed predominantly in the gut of Hessian fly larvae and pupae. Two related genes, G10K1 and G10K2, were isolated as tandem repeats. Both genes contain three exons and two introns.The intron/exon boundaries were conserved in terms of amino acid encoding, suggesting that they arose by gene duplication. The fact that the frequency of this group of clones in a gut cDNA library higher than that of total cDNA clones encoding digestive enzymes suggested that this group of proteins may perform an important function in the gut physiology of this insect. However, the exact functions of these proteins are as yet known since no sequence similarity could be identified between these proteins and any known sequences in public databases using standard methods.

  3. Theoretical model of the three-dimensional structure of a disease resistance gene homolog encoding resistance protein in Vigna mungo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Bahadur, Ranjit P

    2006-10-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes, the key players of innate immunity system in plants encode 'R' proteins. 'R' protein recognizes product of avirulance gene from the pathogen and activate downstream signaling responses leading to disease resistance. No three dimensional (3D) structural information of any 'R' proteins is available as yet. We have reported a 'R' gene homolog, the 'VMYR1', encoding 'R' protein in Vigna mungo. Here, we describe the homology modeling of the 'VMYR1' protein. The model was created by using the 3D structure of an ATP-binding cassette transporter protein from Vibrio cholerae as a template. The strategy for homology modeling was based on the high structural conservation in the superfamily of P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolase in which target and template proteins belong. This is the first report of theoretical model structure of any 'R' proteins.

  4. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  5. Structure and heterologous expression of the gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein from Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakai, H; Takada, K; Nakamura, S; Horikoshi, K

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the cell surface glycoprotein (CSG) of Haloarcula japonica strain TR-1 was cloned and sequenced. The structural gene consisted from an open reading frame of 2,586 bp. A potential promoter sequence was found about 150 bp upstream of the ATG initiation codon. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the Ha. japonica CSG revealed that the mature CSG consisted of 828 amino acids. Five potential N-glycosylation sites were found in the mature sequence. The cloned CSG gene of Ha. japonica was expressed in closely-related halophilic archaea.

  6. Predominance of a versatile-peroxidase-encoding gene, mnp4, as demonstrated by gene replacement via a gene targeting system for Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Tal, Dana; Levinson, Dana; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2012-08-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus (the oyster mushroom) and other white rot filamentous basidiomycetes are key players in the global carbon cycle. P. ostreatus is also a commercially important edible fungus with medicinal properties and is important for biotechnological and environmental applications. Efficient gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental tool for facilitating comprehensive gene function studies. Since the natural HR frequency in Pleurotus transformations is low (2.3%), transformed DNA is predominantly integrated ectopically. To overcome this limitation, a general gene targeting system was developed by producing a P. ostreatus PC9 homokaryon Δku80 strain, using carboxin resistance complemented by the development of a protocol for hygromycin B resistance protoplast-based DNA transformation and homokaryon isolation. The Δku80 strain exhibited exclusive (100%) HR in the integration of transforming DNA, providing a high efficiency of gene targeting. Furthermore, the Δku80 strains produced showed a phenotype similar to that of the wild-type PC9 strain, with similar growth fitness, ligninolytic functionality, and capability of mating with the incompatible strain PC15 to produce a dikaryon which retained its resistance to the corresponding selection and was capable of producing typical fruiting bodies. The applicability of this system is demonstrated by inactivation of the versatile peroxidase (VP) encoded by mnp4. This enzyme is part of the ligninolytic system of P. ostreatus, being one of the nine members of the manganese-peroxidase (MnP) gene family, and is the predominantly expressed VP in Mn(2+)-deficient media. mnp4 inactivation provided a direct proof that mnp4 encodes a key VP responsible for the Mn(2+)-dependent and Mn(2+)-independent peroxidase activity under Mn(2+)-deficient culture conditions.

  7. Silencing of the major family of NBS-LRR-encoding genes in lettuce results in the loss of multiple resistance specificities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, T.; Piskurewicz, U.; Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.; Ochoa, O.; Michelmore, R.

    2007-01-01

    The RGC2 gene cluster in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is one of the largest known families of genes encoding nucleotide binding site¿leucine-rich repeat (NBS¿LRR) proteins. One of its members, RGC2B, encodes Dm3 which determines resistance to downy mildew caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae carrying

  8. Cloning, characterization, expression analysis and inhibition studies of a novel gene encoding Bowman-Birk type protease inhibitor from rice bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the first study describing the isolation, cloning and characterization of a full length gene encoding Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (RbTI) from rice bean (Vigna umbellata). A full-length protease inhibitor gene with complete open reading frame of 327bp encoding 109 amino acids w...

  9. Regulation of three genes encoding cell-wall-degrading enzymes of Trichoderma aggressivum during interaction with Agaricus bisporus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubaker, Kamal S; Sjaarda, Calvin; Castle, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Members of the genus Trichoderma are very effective competitors of a variety of fungi. Cell-wall-degrading enzymes, including proteinases, glucanases, and chitinases, are commonly secreted as part of the competitive process. Trichoderma aggressivum is the causative agent of green mould disease of the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. The structures of 3 T. aggressivum genes, prb1 encoding a proteinase, ech42 encoding an endochitinase, and a β-glucanase gene, were determined. Promoter elements in the prb1 and ech42 genes suggested that transcription is regulated by carbon and nitrogen levels and by stress. Both genes had mycoparasitism-related elements indicating potential roles for the protein products in competition. The promoter of the β-glucanase gene contained CreA and AreA binding sites indicative of catabolite regulation but contained no mycoparasitism elements. Transcription of the 3 genes was measured in mixed cultures of T. aggressivum and A. bisporus. Two A. bisporus strains, U1, which is sensitive to green mould disease, and SB65, which shows some resistance, were used in co-cultivation tests to assess possible roles of the genes in disease production and severity. prb1 and ech42 were coordinately upregulated after 5 days, whereas β-glucanase transcription was upregulated from day 0 with both Agaricus strains. Upregulation was much less pronounced in mixed cultures of T. aggressivum with the resistant strain, SB65, than with the sensitive strain, U1. These observations suggested that the proteins encoded by these genes have roles in both nutrition and in severity of green mould disease.

  10. MYB98 Positively Regulates a Battery of Synergid-Expressed Genes Encoding Filiform Apparatus–Localized Proteins[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punwani, Jayson A.; Rabiger, David S.; Drews, Gary N.

    2007-01-01

    The synergid cells within the female gametophyte are essential for reproduction in angiosperms. MYB98 encodes an R2R3-MYB protein required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation by the synergid cells. To test the predicted function of MYB98 as a transcriptional regulator, we determined its subcellular localization and examined its DNA binding properties. We show that MYB98 binds to a specific DNA sequence (TAAC) and that a MYB98–green fluorescent protein fusion protein localizes to the nucleus, consistent with a role in transcriptional regulation. To identify genes regulated by MYB98, we tested previously identified synergid-expressed genes for reduced expression in myb98 female gametophytes and identified 16 such genes. We dissected the promoter of one of the downstream genes, DD11, and show that it contains a MYB98 binding site required for synergid expression, suggesting that DD11 is regulated directly by MYB98. To gain insight into the functions of the downstream genes, we chose five genes and determined the subcellular localization of the encoded proteins. We show that these five proteins are secreted into the filiform apparatus, suggesting that they play a role in either the formation or the function of this unique structure. Together, these data suggest that MYB98 functions as a transcriptional regulator in the synergid cells and activates the expression of genes required for pollen tube guidance and filiform apparatus formation. PMID:17693534

  11. Improvement in efficacy of DNA vaccine encoding HIV-1 Vif by LIGHT gene adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiani; Wu, Xiaoyu; Long, Fengying; Wen, Jiejun; Hao, Wenli; Chen, Ran; Kong, Xiaobo; Qian, Min; Jiang, Wenzheng

    2013-02-01

    DNA vaccine can induce the prolonged immune responses against the encoded antigen with the appropriate adjuvant. To study the immunogenicity of the HIV-1 vif DNA vaccine in inducing the humoral and cellular immune responses and the immunoadjuvant effect of LIGHT, which is a member of TNF superfamily and can stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells as a co-stimulatory molecule, DNA vaccine plasmid pcDNA-Vif was constructed by inserting HIV-1 vif gene into the downstream of CMV promoter in eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). In vitro expression of HIV-1 Vif in pcDNA-Vif-transfected HeLa cells was confirmed in transcriptional and protein level by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. After BALB/c mice were injected muscularly with DNA vaccines for three times, the specific immune responses were analyzed. The data showed that anti-Vif antibody response, Vif-specific T cell proliferation, and CTL activities were induced in the mice that were inoculated with HIV-1 vif DNA vaccine plasmid. Interestingly, stronger humoral and cellular immune responses were detected in mice that were immunized with plasmid pcDNA-Vif and pcDNA-LIGHT together compared to the single immunization with plasmid pcDNA-Vif alone. Together, the results of the study suggest that candidate HIV-1 DNA vaccine can elicit HIV-1 Vif-specific immune responses in mice and that LIGHT plays the role of immunoadjuvant in co-immunization with DNA vaccine.

  12. Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Roach, Peter J., E-mail: proach@iupui.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2009-12-25

    Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  13. Characterization of a Chitin Synthase Encoding Gene and Effect of Diflubenzuron in Soybean Aphid, Aphis Glycines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Bansal, M. A. Rouf Mian, Omprakash Mittapalli, Andy P. Michel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitin synthases are critical enzymes for synthesis of chitin and thus for subsequent growth and development in insects. We identified the cDNA of chitin synthase gene (CHS in Aphis glycines, the soybean aphid, which is a serious pest of soybean. The full-length cDNA of CHS in A. glycines (AyCHS was 5802 bp long with an open reading frame of 4704 bp that encoded for a 1567 amino acid residues protein. The predicted AyCHS protein had a molecular mass of 180.05 kDa and its amino acid sequence contained all the signature motifs (EDR, QRRRW and TWGTR of chitin synthases. The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR analysis revealed that AyCHS was expressed in all major tissues (gut, fat body and integument; however, it had the highest expression in integument (~3.5 fold compared to gut. Interestingly, the expression of AyCHS in developing embryos was nearly 7 fold higher compared to adult integument, which probably is a reflection of embryonic molts in hemimetabolus insects. Expression analysis in different developmental stages of A. glycines revealed a consistent AyCHS expression in all stages. Further, through leaf dip bioassay, we tested the effect of diflubenzuron (DFB, Dimilin ®, a chitin-synthesis inhibitor, on A. glycines' survival, fecundity and body weight. When fed with soybean leaves previously dipped in 50 ppm DFB solution, A. glycines nymphs suffered significantly higher mortality compared to control. A. glycines nymphs feeding on diflubenzuron treated leaves showed a slightly enhanced expression (1.67 fold of AyCHS compared to nymphs on untreated leaves. We discussed the potential applications of the current study to develop novel management strategies using chitin-synthesis inhibitors and using RNAi by knocking down AyCHS expression.

  14. AMD-associated genes encoding stress-activated MAPK pathway constituents are identified by interval-based enrichment analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine whether common DNA sequence variants within groups of genes encoding elements of stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are, in aggregate, associated with advanced AMD (AAMD. METHODS: We used meta-regression and exact testing methods to identify AAMD-associated SNPs in 1177 people with AAMD and 1024 AMD-free elderly peers from 3 large-scale genotyping projects on the molecular genetics of AMD. SNPs spanning independent AAMD-associated genomic intervals were examined with a multi-locus-testing method (INRICH for enrichment within five sets of genes encoding constituents of stress-activated MAPK signaling cascades. RESULTS: Four-of-five pathway gene sets showed enrichment with AAMD-associated SNPs; findings persisted after adjustment for multiple testing in two. Strongest enrichment signals (P = 0.006 existed in a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/MAPK cascade (Science Signaling, STKE CMP_10827. In this pathway, seven independent AAMD-associated regions were resident in 6 of 25 genes examined. These included sequence variants in: 1 three MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K4, MAP3K5, MAP3K9 that phosphorylate and activate the MAP kinase kinases MAP2K4 and MAP2K7 (molecules that phosphorylate threonine and tyrosine residues within the activation loop of JNK; 2 a target of MAP2K7 (JNK3A1 that activates complexes involved in transcriptional regulation of stress related genes influencing cell proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metabolism and DNA repair; and 3 NR2C2, a transcription factor activated by JNK1A1 (a drugable molecule influencing retinal cell viability in model systems. We also observed AAMD-related sequence variants resident in genes encoding PPP3CA (a drugable molecule that inactivates MAP3K5, and two genes (TGFB2, TGFBR2 encoding factors involved in MAPK sensing of growth factors/cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: Linkage disequilibrium (LD-independent genomic enrichment analysis yielded

  15. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the alpha receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, D M; Rojas, E; Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Brannan, C I; McClain, J; Masiakowski, P; Ip, N Y; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor alpha (CNTFR alpha). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR alpha. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain is encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4.

  16. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  17. Identification and Partial Sequence of a PLD -like Gene Encoding for Phospholipase D in Peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Preharvest aflatoxin contamination has been identified by thepeanut industry as the most serious challenge facing the industry worldwide. Drought stress is the most important environmental factor exacerbat ing Aspergillus inection and aflatoxin contamination in peanut. Development of resistant peanut cultivars would represent a major advance for the U.S. Peanut industry. In this study, we identify a novel PLD - like gene, encoding a putative phospholipase D, a main enzyme responsible for the drought - induced degradation of membrane phospholipids in plants. This cloned PLDI fragment has 1069 bp nucleic acids and the deduced amino acid sequence shows high identity with known PLD genes, having similar conserved features, such as two HXKXXXXD motifs. Further study is needed to genetically and physiologically characterize the PLD in peanut and to gain a better understanding of its function and relationship with drought - tolerance.%花生工业界认为收获前花生黄曲霉毒素的污染是全世界花生工业界面临的最严峻的挑战.干旱胁迫是加重花生黄曲霉真菌侵染和毒素污染最重要的环境因素.选育花生抗性品种将使美国花生工业处于优势地位.在这一研究报告中,我们鉴定出了一个新的类PLD基因,它编码磷脂酶D.在植物体中,这个酶是负责干旱诱导降解细胞膜磷脂的主要酶.克隆的PLDI片段有1069个核甘酸对长.推导的氨基酸序列与已知的PLD基因有很高的同一性,包括相似的保守序列特征,比如两个HXKXXXXD基元.对花生PLD基因特性需要从遗传和生理上作进一步研究,以便更好地理解这个基因的功能及其与花生耐干旱性的关系.

  18. Construction and expression of retroviruses encoding dual drug resistance genes in human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of retroviral vectors encoding human mdr1 gene alone as well as in combination with either human mgmt gene or human mutant Ser31-dhfr gene are engineered. The resultant retroviruses are used to transduce human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells. It has been shown that expression of dual drug resistance genes in transduced cells confers a broad range of resistance to both kinds of corresponding drugs. These data suggest a rationale for the use of such double chemoresistance gene constructs in an in vivo model in which transduced hematopoietic cells will acquire multiple protection against the cytotoxic side effects of combination chemotherapy and may have future application in chemoprotection of normal tissues, thus killing tumor cells more effectively.

  19. Determination of ploidy level and isolation of genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Japanese Foxtail (Alopecurus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongle Xu

    Full Text Available Ploidy level is important in biodiversity studies and in developing strategies for isolating important plant genes. Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but our understanding of these polyploid weeds is limited. Japanese foxtail, a noxious agricultural grass weed, has evolved herbicide resistance. However, most studies on this weed have ignored the fact that there are multiple copies of target genes. This may complicate the study of resistance mechanisms. Japanese foxtail was found to be a tetraploid by flow cytometer and chromosome counting, two commonly used methods in the determination of ploidy levels. We found that there are two copies of the gene encoding plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase in Japanese foxtail and all the homologous genes are expressed. Additionally, no difference in ploidy levels or ACCase gene copy numbers was observed between an ACCase-inhibiting herbicide-resistant and a herbicide-sensitive population in this study.

  20. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  1. Magnaporthe oryzae MTP1 gene encodes a type Ⅲ transmembrane protein involved in conidiation and conidial germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin LU; Jian-ping LU; Xiao-dong LI; Xiao-hong LIU; Hang MIN; Fu-cheng LIN

    2008-01-01

    In this study the MTP1 gene, encoding a type Ⅲ integral transmembrane protein, was isolated fi'om the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The Mtpl protein is 520 amino acids long and is comparable to the Ytpl protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 46% sequence similarity. Prediction programs and MTP1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion expression results indicate that Mtpl is a protein located at several membranes in the cytoplasm. The functions of the MTP1 gene in the growth and development of the fungus were studied using an MTP1 gene knockout mutant. The MTP1 gene was primarily ex-pressed at the hyphal and conidial stages and is necessary for conidiation and conidial germination, but is not required for patho-genicity. The △mtpl mutant grew more efficiently than the wild type strain on non-fermentable carbon sources, implying that the MTP1 gene has a unique role in respiratory growth and carbon source use.

  2. Cloning and characterization of SmZF1, a gene encoding a Schistosoma mansoni zinc finger protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Paulo R Eleutério de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger motifs (Cys2His2 are found in several proteins playing a role in the regulation of transcripton. SmZF1, a Schistosoma mansoni gene encoding a zinc finger protein was initially isolated from an adult worm cDNA library, as a partial cDNA. The full sequence of the gene was obtained by subcloning and sequencing cDNA and genomic fragments. The collated gene sequence is 2181 nt and the complete cDNA sequence is 705 bp containing the full open reading frame of the gene. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of three introns interrupting the coding region. The open reading frame theoretically encodes a protein of 164 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 18,667Da. The predicted protein contains three zinc finger motifs, usually present in transcription regulatory proteins. PCR amplification with specific primers for the gene allowed for the detection of the target in egg, cercariae, schistosomulum and adult worm cDNA libraries indicating the expression of the mRNA in these life cycle stages of S. mansoni. This pattern of expression suggests the gene plays a role in vital functions of different life cycle stages of the parasite. Future research will be directed to elucidate the functional role of SmZF1.

  3. [Impact of benzo [a] pyrene the expression of mitochondrion-encoded genes in the earthworm Eisenia fetida].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sen-lin; Song, Yu-fang; Qiu, Xiao-yan; Sun, Tie-heng; Zhang, Wei; Ackland, M L

    2008-02-01

    The earthworm Eisenia fetida's benzo [a] pyrene (BaP) exposure experiments were carried out in artificial soil according to ISO 11268-1:1993. And then the upregulated and downregulated subtractive cDNA libraries were constructed by Clontech PCR-Select cDNA Subtration Kit. From the BaP exposure upregulated subtractive cDNA library, several cDNA segments matched mitochondrion-encoded genes were found, including cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (CO I), subunit II (CO II), subunit Ill (CO III), NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (NDH1), and ATP synthase subunit 6. The result indicated BaP and the subsequent oxidative stress disturbed the expression of mitochondrion-encoded genes, and this was potential biomarker for oxidative stress following xenobiotic exposure.

  4. Excretion of putrescine by the putrescine-ornithine antiporter encoded by the potE gene of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kashiwagi, K; Miyamoto, S.; Suzuki, F; Kobayashi, H.; Igarashi, K.

    1992-01-01

    Excretion of putrescine from Escherichia coli was assessed by measuring its uptake into inside-out membrane vesicles. The vesicles were prepared from wild-type E. coli or E. coli transformed with plasmids containing one of the three polyamine transport systems. The results indicate that excretion of putrescine is catalyzed by the putrescine transport protein, encoded by the potE gene located at 16 min on the E. coli chromosome. Loading of ornithine (or lysine) inside the vesicles was essentia...

  5. Toward understanding the functional role of Ss-RIOK-1, a RIO protein kinase-encoding gene of Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Some studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals have shown that RIO protein kinases (RIOKs are involved in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle progression and development. However, there is a paucity of information on their functions in parasitic nematodes. We aimed to investigate the function of RIOK-1 encoding gene from Strongyloides stercoralis, a nematode parasitizing humans and dogs.The RIOK-1 protein-encoding gene Ss-riok-1 was characterized from S. stercoralis. The full-length cDNA, gDNA and putative promoter region of Ss-riok-1 were isolated and sequenced. The cDNA comprises 1,828 bp, including a 377 bp 5'-UTR, a 17 bp 3'-UTR and a 1,434 bp ORF encoding a protein of 477 amino acids containing a RIOK-1 signature motif. The genomic sequence of the Ss-riok-1 coding region is 1,636 bp in length and has three exons and two introns. The putative promoter region comprises 4,280 bp and contains conserved promoter elements, including four CAAT boxes, 12 GATA boxes, eight E-boxes (CANNTG and 38 TATA boxes. The Ss-riok-1 gene is transcribed throughout all developmental stages with the highest transcript abundance in the infective third-stage larva (iL3. Recombinant Ss-RIOK-1 is an active kinase, capable of both phosphorylation and auto-phosphorylation. Patterns of transcriptional reporter expression in transgenic S. stercoralis larvae indicated that Ss-RIOK-1 is expressed in neurons of the head, body and tail as well as in pharynx and hypodermis.The characterization of the molecular and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the encoding gene provide first clues as to functions of RIOKs in the biological processes of parasitic nematodes.

  6. Identification and Molecular Characterization of a Gene Encoding a Protective Leishmania amazonensis Trp-Asp (WD) Protein

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Several Leishmania proteins have been identified and characterized in pursuit of understanding pathogenesis and protection in cutaneous leishmaniasis. In the present study, we utilized sera from infected BALB/c mice to screen a Leishmania amazonensis amastigote cDNA expression library and obtained the full-length gene that encodes a novel Trp-Asp (WD) protein designated LAWD (for Leishmania antigenic WD protein). The WD family of proteins mediates protein-protein interactions and coordinates ...

  7. A deletion in the gene encoding sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) results in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubin, Isabelle; Adams, Carolyn P; Opsahl, Sibylle; Septier, Dominique; Bishop, Colin E; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Goldberg, Michel; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Poirier, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    The mouse mutation fragilitas ossium (fro) leads to a syndrome of severe osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta with no detectable collagen defect. Positional cloning of the locus identified a deletion in the gene encoding neutral sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) that led to complete loss of enzymatic activity. Our knowledge of SMPD3 function is consistent with the pathology observed in mutant mice and provides new insight into human pathologies.

  8. Heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of an α1,2-mannosidase encoded by the Candida albicans MNS1 gene

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Protein glycosylation pathways, commonly found in fungal pathogens, offer an attractive new area of study for the discovery of antifungal targets. In particular, these post-translational modifications are required for virulence and proper cell wall assembly in Candida albicans, an opportunistic human pathogen. The C. albicans MNS1 gene is predicted to encode a member of the glycosyl hydrolase family 47, with 1,2-mannosidase activity. In order to characterise its activity, we first cloned the ...

  9. Digital encoding of cellular mRNAs enabling precise and absolute gene expression measurement by single-molecule counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Glenn K; Wilhelmy, Julie; Stern, David; Fan, H Christina; Fodor, Stephen P A

    2014-03-18

    We present a new approach for the sensitive detection and accurate quantitation of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) gene transcripts in single cells. First, the entire population of mRNAs is encoded with molecular barcodes during reverse transcription. After amplification of the gene targets of interest, molecular barcodes are counted by sequencing or scored on a simple hybridization detector to reveal the number of molecules in the starting sample. Since absolute quantities are measured, calibration to standards is unnecessary, and many of the relative quantitation challenges such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) bias are avoided. We apply the method to gene expression analysis of minute sample quantities and demonstrate precise measurements with sensitivity down to sub single-cell levels. The method is an easy, single-tube, end point assay utilizing standard thermal cyclers and PCR reagents. Accurate and precise measurements are obtained without any need for cycle-to-cycle intensity-based real-time monitoring or physical partitioning into multiple reactions (e.g., digital PCR). Further, since all mRNA molecules are encoded with molecular barcodes, amplification can be used to generate more material for multiple measurements and technical replicates can be carried out on limited samples. The method is particularly useful for small sample quantities, such as single-cell experiments. Digital encoding of cellular content preserves true abundance levels and overcomes distortions introduced by amplification.

  10. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function.

  11. Characterization of high-level expression and sequencing of the Escherichia coli K-12 cynS gene encoding cyanase.

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Y C; Anderson, P. M.; Fuchs, J A

    1987-01-01

    Restriction fragments containing the gene encoding cyanase, cynS, without its transcriptional regulatory sequences were placed downstream of lac and tac promoters in various pUC derivatives to maximize production of cyanase. Plasmid pSJ105, which contains the cynS gene and an upstream open reading frame, gave the highest expression of cyanase. Approximately 50% of the total soluble protein in stationary-phase cultures of a lac-deleted strain containing plasmid pSJ105 was cyanase. The inserted...

  12. Global gene expression during stringent response in Corynebacterium glutamicum in presence and absence of the rel gene encoding (pppGpp synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Jörn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The stringent response is the initial reaction of microorganisms to nutritional stress. During stringent response the small nucleotides (pppGpp act as global regulators and reprogram bacterial transcription. In this work, the genetic network controlled by the stringent response was characterized in the amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results The transcriptome of a C. glutamicum rel gene deletion mutant, unable to synthesize (pppGpp and to induce the stringent response, was compared with that of its rel-proficient parent strain by microarray analysis. A total of 357 genes were found to be transcribed differentially in the rel-deficient mutant strain. In a second experiment, the stringent response was induced by addition of DL-serine hydroxamate (SHX in early exponential growth phase. The time point of the maximal effect on transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR using the histidine and serine biosynthetic genes. Transcription of all of these genes reached a maximum at 10 minutes after SHX addition. Microarray experiments were performed comparing the transcriptomes of SHX-induced cultures of the rel-proficient strain and the rel mutant. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into three classes. Class A comprises genes which are differentially regulated only in the presence of an intact rel gene. This class includes the non-essential sigma factor gene sigB which was upregulated and a large number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism which were downregulated. Class B comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX in both strains, independent of the rel gene. A large number of genes encoding ribosomal proteins fall into this class, all being downregulated. Class C comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX only in the rel mutant. This class includes genes encoding putative stress proteins and global transcriptional regulators that might be

  13. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  14. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odman-Naresh, Jothini; Duevel, Margret; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM), an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps), which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran digestive tract facing

  15. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  16. The pkI gene encoding pyruvate kinase I links to the luxZ gene which enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J W; Lu, H C; Chen, H Y; Weng, S F

    1997-10-09

    Partial 3'-end nucleotide sequence of the pkI gene (GenBank accession No. AF019143) from Photobacterium leiognathi ATCC 25521 has been determined, and the encoded pyruvate kinase I is deduced. Pyruvate kinase I is the key enzyme of glycolysis, which converts phosphoenol pyruvate to pyruvate. Alignment and comparison of pyruvate kinase Is from P. leiognathi, E. coli and Salmonella typhimurium show that they are homologous. Nucleotide sequence reveals that the pkI gene is linked to the luxZ gene that enhances bioluminescence of the lux operon from P. leiognathi. The gene order of the pkI and luxZ genes is-pk1-ter-->-R&R"-luxZ-ter"-->, whereas ter is transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes, and R&R" is the regulatory region and ter" is transcriptional terminator for the luxZ gene. It clearly elicits that the pkI gene and luxZ gene are divided to two operons. Functional analysis confirms that the potential hairpin loop omega T is the transcriptional terminator for the pkI and related genes. It infers that the pkI and related genes are simply linked to the luxZ gene in P. leiognathi genome.

  17. Cloning of genes encoding nonhost hypersensitive response-inducing elicitors from Phytophthora boehmeriae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG HaiFeng; ZHANG ZhengGuang; WANG YuanChao; ZHENG XiaoBo

    2007-01-01

    We have devised a high-throughput functional cloning method to isolate cDNAs from Phytophthora boehmeriae of which the products elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. The cDNAs were cloned into a binary potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefeciens (Mog101). 4100 colonies were individually toothpick-inoculated onto leaflets of Nicotiana benthamiana. 12 cDNAs were identified whose expression induced formation of a necrotic lesion around the inoculation site. 7 of these clones have different sequences. One of these clones PBC43 encodes specific elicitin. Clone PBC163 encodes a protein highly homologous to Rab; PBC241 encodes a prohibitin protein; PBN62 encodes a Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60). The other five cDNAs reveal no homology to known protein and are thus considered novel. These observations suggest that this functional screening method is a versatile strategy to identify cDNAs of pathogens that encode elicitors and other HR-inducing proteins.

  18. Effect of long-term actual spaceflight on the expression of key genes encoding serotonin and dopamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Nina; Shenkman, Boris; Naumenko, Vladimir; Kulikov, Alexander; Kondaurova, Elena; Tsybko, Anton; Kulikova, Elisabeth; Krasnov, I. B.; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Sinyakova, Nadezhda

    The effect of long-term spaceflight on the central nervous system represents important but yet undeveloped problem. The aim of our work was to study the effect of 30-days spaceflight of mice on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 on the expression in the brain regions of key genes of a) serotonin (5-HT) system (main enzymes in 5-HT metabolism - tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), monoamine oxydase A (MAO A), 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors); b) pivotal enzymes in DA metabolism (tyrosine hydroxylase, COMT, MAO A, MAO B) and D1, D2 receptors. Decreased expression of genes encoding the 5-HT catabolism (MAO A) and 5-HT2A receptor in some brain regions was shown. There were no differences between “spaceflight” and control mice in the expression of TPH-2 and 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 receptor genes. Significant changes were found in genetic control of DA system. Long-term spaceflight decreased the expression of genes encoding the enzyme in DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase in s.nigra), DA metabolism (MAO B in the midbrain and COMT in the striatum), and D1 receptor in hypothalamus. These data suggested that 1) microgravity affected genetic control of 5-HT and especially the nigrostriatal DA system implicated in the central regulation of muscular tonus and movement, 2) the decrease in the expression of genes encoding key enzyme in DA synthesis, DA degradation and D1 receptor contributes to the movement impairment and dyskinesia produced by the spaceflight. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant № 14-04-00173.

  19. [Research on the gene structure of duck hepatitis B virus and its encoding proteins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Jia, Ren-Yong

    2012-11-01

    Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) belongs to the Avihepadnavirus genus of the Hepadnaviridae, and it not only has the same replication pattern, but also has the similar genomic and antigenic structures to Hepatitis B virus (HBV). The genome of DHBV is a partially double-stranded closed circular DNA. The genome consists of three distinct open reading frames (ORFs): ORF-PreS/S, ORF-PreC/C and ORF-P, which all locate on the negative DNA strand and encode four separate proteins. The ORF-PreS/S encodes envelope proteins L and S, and the ORF-PreC/C and ORF-P encode capsid proteins C and polymerase proteins P, respectively. The characteristics of genome structure,viral proteins features and functions were described in this review in order to provide useful information for the further study of DHBV and the duck model infected by DHBV.

  20. Cloning, structural characterization, and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human prostaglandin E(2) receptor EP2 subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, S L; Pan, L C; Castleberry, T A; Lu, B; Mather, R J; Owen, T A

    1999-09-17

    Northern blot analysis of human placental RNA using a probe to the 5' end of the human prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) EP2 receptor subtype coding region revealed the existence of a high abundance, low molecular weight transcript. To investigate the origin of this transcript, and its possible relationship to the human EP2 mRNA, we have cloned and characterized the gene encoding the human PGE(2) EP2 receptor subtype, identified transcriptional initiation and termination sites in two tissues (spleen and thymus), and determined its chromosomal localization. The human EP2 gene consists of two exons separated by a large intron, utilizes a common initiation site in both spleen and thymus at 1113 bp upstream of the translation initiation site, and has 3' transcript termini at 1140 bp and 1149 bp downstream of the translation stop site in spleen and thymus respectively. Southern and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated the human EP2 gene to be a single copy gene located in band 22 of the long arm of chromosome 14 (14q22). Though our initial interest in this gene was to investigate potential differential splicing of the human EP2 gene in placenta, this work demonstrates that the atypical transcript observed in placenta probably arises from a distinct, yet related, gene. Knowledge of the sequence, structure, and transcription events associated with the human EP2 gene will enable a broader understanding of its regulation and potential role in normal physiology and disease.

  1. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis DosR regulon gene Rv0079 encodes a putative, 'dormancy associated translation inhibitor (DATIN'.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a major human pathogen that has evolved survival mechanisms to persist in an immune-competent host under a dormant condition. The regulation of M. tuberculosis metabolism during latent infection is not clearly known. The dormancy survival regulon (DosR regulon is chiefly responsible for encoding dormancy related functions of M. tuberculosis. We describe functional characterization of an important gene of DosR regulon, Rv0079, which appears to be involved in the regulation of translation through the interaction of its product with bacterial ribosomal subunits. The protein encoded by Rv0079, possibly, has an inhibitory role with respect to protein synthesis, as revealed by our experiments. We performed computational modelling and docking simulation studies involving the protein encoded by Rv0079 followed by in vitro translation and growth curve analysis experiments, involving recombinant E. coli and Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG strains that overexpressed Rv0079. Our observations concerning the interaction of the protein with the ribosomes are supportive of its role in regulation/inhibition of translation. We propose that the protein encoded by locus Rv0079 is a 'dormancy associated translation inhibitor' or DATIN.

  3. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Benjamin P; Robertson, David L; Hentges, Kathryn E

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorized according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest additional genes that may contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  4. Multi-species sequence comparison reveals conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants encoding a truncated ghrelin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Jeffery, Penny L; Thomas, Patrick B; Walpole, Carina M; Maugham, Michelle; Fung, Jenny N T; Yap, Pei-Yi; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Lai, John; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2016-06-01

    The peptide hormone ghrelin is a potent orexigen produced predominantly in the stomach. It has a number of other biological actions, including roles in appetite stimulation, energy balance, the stimulation of growth hormone release and the regulation of cell proliferation. Recently, several ghrelin gene splice variants have been described. Here, we attempted to identify conserved alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene by cross-species sequence comparisons. We identified a novel human exon 2-deleted variant and provide preliminary evidence that this splice variant and in1-ghrelin encode a C-terminally truncated form of the ghrelin peptide, termed minighrelin. These variants are expressed in humans and mice, demonstrating conservation of alternative splicing spanning 90 million years. Minighrelin appears to have similar actions to full-length ghrelin, as treatment with exogenous minighrelin peptide stimulates appetite and feeding in mice. Forced expression of the exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant mirrors the effect of the canonical preproghrelin, stimulating cell proliferation and migration in the PC3 prostate cancer cell line. This is the first study to characterise an exon 2-deleted preproghrelin variant and to demonstrate sequence conservation of ghrelin gene-derived splice variants that encode a truncated ghrelin peptide. This adds further impetus for studies into the alternative splicing of the ghrelin gene and the function of novel ghrelin peptides in vertebrates.

  5. Integrase-mediated recombination of the veb1 gene cassette encoding an extended-spectrum β-lactamase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Aubert

    Full Text Available The veb1 gene cassette encodes the extended spectrum β-lactamase, VEB-1 that is increasingly isolated from worldwide Gram-negative rods. Veb1 is commonly inserted into the variable region of different class 1 integrons in which it is always associated with a downstream-located aadB gene cassette encoding an aminoglycoside adenylyltransferase. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the majority of veb1-containing integrons also carry an insertion sequence, IS1999 that is inserted upstream of the veb1 gene cassette and disrupts the integron specific recombination site, attI1. Investigation of the recombination properties of the sites surrounding veb1 revealed that insertion of IS1999 reduces significantly the recombination frequency of attI1 and that veb1 attC is not efficient for recombination in contrast to aadB attC. Subsequent sequence optimisation of veb1 attC by mutagenesis, into a more consensual attC site resembling aadB attC, successfully improved recombination efficiency. Overall, this work gives some insights into the organisation of veb1-containing integrons. We propose that IS1999 and the nature of veb1 attC stabilize the veb1 gene cassette environment likely by impairing recombination events upstream or downstream of veb1, respectively.

  6. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding the PepF endopeptidase from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braz Vânia S.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The metallopeptidases have a very important role in bacteria, being involved in several processes that rely on protein turnover, such as nutrition, degradation of signal peptides, protein localization and virulence. We have cloned and characterized the gene of the metalloendopeptidase PepF from the aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus. The gene upstream of pepF (orf1 encodes a conserved hypothetical protein found in Mycobacterium and Streptomyces. pepF is co-transcribed with the gene downstream (orf3, which encodes a protein that belongs to the ABC1 protein kinase family, suggesting that these two proteins may share a common function in the cell. The C. crescentus PepF protein possesses the conserved HEXGH motif present in zinc binding domains of PepF homologs. Disruption of the pepF gene by insertion of a vector sequence did not produced any growth defect, but the mutant strain possesses only 30% of the specific activity of endopeptidases present in the wild type strain. Deletions and point mutations in the regulatory region showed that there are two putative promoter regions, and the operon expression is independent of the transcription regulator CtrA. The results indicate that PepF is not essential for either growth or development of this bacterium using peptides as the sole carbon source, suggesting that other peptidases can be sharing this function.

  8. Antibiotic resistance and OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaonan; Bao, Ying; Ma, Ruihua; Zhou, Yufa; Li, Xinxian; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate drug resistance, OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and genetic diversity in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) in burn wards. Airborne A. baumannii were collected in burn wards and their corridors using Andersen 6-stage air sampler from January to June 2011. The isolates susceptibility to 13 commonly used antibiotics was examined according to the CLSI guidelines; OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and molecular diversity of isolates were analyzed, respectively. A total of 16 non-repetitive A. baumannii were isolated, with 10 strains having a resistance rate of greater than 50% against the 13 antibiotics. The resistance rate against ceftriaxone, cyclophosvnamide, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem was 93.75% (15/16), but no isolate observed to be resistant to cefoperazone/sulbactam. Resistance gene analyses showed that all 16 isolates carried OXA-51, and 15 isolates carried OXA-23 except No.15; but OXA-24 and OXA-58 resistance genes not detected. The isolates were classified into 13 genotypes (A-M) according to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) results and only six isolates had a homology ≥90%. In conclusion, airborne A. baumannii in the burn wards had multidrug resistance and complex molecular diversity, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were dominant mechanisms for resisting carbapenems.

  9. Cluster of genes that encode positive and negative elements influencing filament length in a heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Puerto, Victoria; Herrero, Antonia; Flores, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    The filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria perform oxygenic photosynthesis in vegetative cells and nitrogen fixation in heterocysts, and their filaments can be hundreds of cells long. In the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, the genes in the fraC-fraD-fraE operon are required for filament integrity mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. The fraC operon transcript partially overlaps gene all2395, which lies in the opposite DNA strand and ends 1 bp beyond fraE. Gene all2395 produces transcripts of 1.35 kb (major transcript) and 2.2 kb (minor transcript) that overlap fraE and whose expression is dependent on the N-control transcription factor NtcA. Insertion of a gene cassette containing transcriptional terminators between fraE and all2395 prevented production of the antisense RNAs and resulted in an increased length of the cyanobacterial filaments. Deletion of all2395 resulted in a larger increase of filament length and in impaired growth, mainly under N2-fixing conditions and specifically on solid medium. We denote all2395 the fraF gene, which encodes a protein restricting filament length. A FraF-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein accumulated significantly in heterocysts. Similar to some heterocyst differentiation-related proteins such as HglK, HetL, and PatL, FraF is a pentapeptide repeat protein. We conclude that the fraC-fraD-fraE←fraF gene cluster (where the arrow indicates a change in orientation), in which cis antisense RNAs are produced, regulates morphology by encoding proteins that influence positively (FraC, FraD, FraE) or negatively (FraF) the length of the filament mainly under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. This gene cluster is often conserved in heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria.

  10. Cloning and Expressing of a Gene Encoding Cytosolic Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase in the Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Gen-hai; YU Shu-xun; FAN Shu-li; SONG Mei-zhen

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a gene encoding a superoxide dismutase (SOD) was cloned from senescent leaves of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and its expressing profile was analyzed. The gene was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)method. Northern blotting was used to show the profile of the gene expression, and the enzyme activity was mensurated by NBT deoxidization method in different growth periods. The full length of a gene of cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) was isolated from cotton (GenBank Accession Number: DQ445093). The sequence of cDNA contained 682 bp, the opening reading frame 456 bp, and encoded polypeptide 152 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 15.03 kD and theoretical pI of 6.09. The amino acid sequence was similar with the other plants from 82 to 87%. Southern blotting showed that the gene had different number of copies in different cotton species. Northern blotting suggested that the gene had different expression in different tissues and development stages. The enzyme activity was the highest in peak flowering stage. The cotton cytosolic (Cu/Zn-SOD) had lower copies in the upland cotton. The copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing level showed regular changing in the whole development stages; it was lower in the former stages, higher in latter stages and the highest at the peak flowering stage. The curve of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing level was consistent with that of the Cu/Zn-SOD enzyme activity.The copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing levels of different organs showed that the gene was higher in the root, leaf, and lower in the flower.

  11. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

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    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  12. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a new gene of Schistosoma japonicum encoding casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭寨玉; 余新炳; 吴忠道; 徐劲; 吴德; 李孜

    2004-01-01

    Background Nowadays it is now a focus topic in schistosomiasis research to find ideal vaccine candidates and new drug targets for developing anti-schistosomiasis vaccine. We cloned a new gene, casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit, of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) and express it in Escherichia coli (E.coli).Methods The ESTs obtained in our laboratory were analyzed by homologous searching, and a new gene was recognized. The full-length cDNA of the new gene was obtained by joining the 3'RACE PCR fragment and the EST clone. To express the new gene, the cDNA was cloned into pGEX-4T-1 vector and then transformed into E.coli JM109. The recombinant protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. Results A 908 bp cDNA was isolated from S. japonicum and identified to be casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit gene by sequence analysis. The open reading frame of the gene encodes a protein of 217 amino acids exhibiting 75.8%, 75.8%, 73.9%, 68.2%, 51.6% identity to the amino acids sequence of the corresponding genes of Homo sapiens (H. sapiens), Xenopus laevi (X. laevi), Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), Caenorhabditis elegan (C. elegan), and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. promber) respectively. The predicted molecular weight of the protein was 24.921 kDa. The new cDNA sequence had been submitted to GenBank, and its accession number is AY241391. This cDNA was subcloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector and expressed in E.coli JM109.The recombinant protein could be recognized by the S. japonicum infected rabbit serum. Conclusion The full-length cDNA sequences encoding S. japonicum casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit were firstly sequenced, cloned, and expressed in E.coli.

  13. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

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    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  14. Comparative genomics of the family Vibrionaceae reveals the wide distribution of genes encoding virulence-associated proteins

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    Cai Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Species of the family Vibrionaceae are ubiquitous in marine environments. Several of these species are important pathogens of humans and marine species. Evidence indicates that genetic exchange plays an important role in the emergence of new pathogenic strains within this family. Data from the sequenced genomes of strains in this family could show how the genes encoded by all these strains, known as the pangenome, are distributed. Information about the core, accessory and panproteome of this family can show how, for example, genes encoding virulence-associated proteins are distributed and help us understand how virulence emerges. Results We deduced the complete set of orthologs for eleven strains from this family. The core proteome consists of 1,882 orthologous groups, which is 28% of the 6,629 orthologous groups in this family. There were 4,411 accessory orthologous groups (i.e., proteins that occurred in from 2 to 10 proteomes and 5,584 unique proteins (encoded once on only one of the eleven genomes. Proteins that have been associated with virulence in V. cholerae were widely distributed across the eleven genomes, but the majority was found only on the genomes of the two V. cholerae strains examined. Conclusions The proteomes are reflective of the differing evolutionary trajectories followed by different strains to similar phenotypes. The composition of the proteomes supports the notion that genetic exchange among species of the Vibrionaceae is widespread and that this exchange aids these species in adapting to their environments.

  15. The Escherichia coli Serogroup O1 and O2 Lipopolysaccharides Are Encoded by Multiple O-antigen Gene Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delannoy, Sabine; Beutin, Lothar; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Fleiss, Aubin; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Fach, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli strains belonging to serogroups O1 and O2 are frequently associated with human infections, especially extra-intestinal infections such as bloodstream infections or urinary tract infections. These strains can be associated with a large array of flagellar antigens. Because of their frequency and clinical importance, a reliable detection of E. coli O1 and O2 strains and also the frequently associated K1 capsule is important for diagnosis and source attribution of E. coli infections in humans and animals. By sequencing the O-antigen clusters of various O1 and O2 strains we showed that the serogroups O1 and O2 are encoded by different sets of O-antigen encoding genes and identified potentially new O-groups. We developed qPCR-assays to detect the various O1 and O2 variants and the K1-encoding gene. These qPCR assays proved to be 100% sensitive and 100% specific and could be valuable tools for the investigations of zoonotic and food-borne infection of humans with O1 and O2 extra-intestinal (ExPEC) or Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) strains.

  16. A novel gene encoding xanthan lyase of Paenibacillus alginolyticus strain XL-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijssenaars, H.J.; Hartmans, S.; Verdoes, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Xanthan-modifying enzymes are powerful tools in studying structure-function relationships of this polysaccharide. One of these modifying enzymes is xanthan lyase, which removes the terminal side chain residue of xanthan. In this paper, the cloning and sequencing of the first xanthan lyase-encoding g

  17. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed.

  18. Cloning and Characterization of a Salt Tolerance-Associated Gene Encoding Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase in Sweetpotato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tao; ZHAI Hong; WANG Fei-bing; ZHOU Hua-nan; SI Zeng-zhi; HE Shao-zhen; LIU Qing-chang

    2014-01-01

    Trehalose plays an important role in metabolic regulation and abiotic stress tolerance in a variety of organisms. In plants, its biosynthesis is catalyzed by two key enzymes:trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP). In the present study, a TPS gene, named IbTPS, was ifrst isolated from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) cv. Lushu 3 by rapid ampliifcation of cDNA ends (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) contained 2 580 nucleotides encoding 859 amino acids with a molecular weight of 97.433 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 5.7. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high identities with TPS of other plants. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of IbTPS gene was signiifcantly higher in stems of Lushu 3 than in its leaves and roots. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that IbTPS gene was located in the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco (cv. Wisconsin 38) plants over-expressing IbTPS gene exhibited signiifcantly higher salt tolerance compared with the control plant. Trehalose and proline content was found to be signiifcantly more accumulated in transgenic tobacco plants than in the wild-type and several stress tolerance related genes were up-regulated. These results suggest that IbTPS gene may enhance salt tolerance of plants by increasing the amount of treahalose and proline and regulating the expression of stress tolerance related genes.

  19. Ankyrin repeat domain-encoding genes in the wPip strain of Wolbachia from the Culex pipiens group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkhill Julian

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolbachia are obligate endosymbiotic bacteria maternally transmitted through the egg cytoplasm that are responsible for several reproductive disorders in their insect hosts, such as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI in infected mosquitoes. Species in the Culex pipiens complex display an unusually high number of Wolbachia-induced crossing types, and based on present data, only the wPip strain is present. Results The sequencing of the wPip strain of Wolbachia revealed the presence of 60 ankyrin repeat domain (ANK encoding genes and expression studies of these genes were carried out in adult mosquitoes. One of these ANK genes, pk2, is shown to be part of an operon of three prophage-associated genes with sex-specific expression, and is present in two identical copies in the genome. Another homolog of pk2 is also present that is differentially expressed in different Cx. pipiens group strains. A further two ANK genes showed sex-specific regulation in wPip-infected Cx. pipiens group adults. Conclusion The high number, variability and differential expression of ANK genes in wPip suggest an important role in Wolbachia biology, and the gene family provides both markers and promising candidates for the study of reproductive manipulation.

  20. Expression of the immediate-early gene-encoded protein Egr-1 (zif268) during in vitro classical conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokin, Maxim; Keifer, Joyce

    2005-01-01

    Expression of the immediate-early genes (IEGs) has been shown to be induced by activity-dependent synaptic plasticity or behavioral training and is thought to play an important role in long-term memory. In the present study, we examined the induction and expression of the IEG-encoded protein Egr-1 during an in vitro neural correlate of eyeblink classical conditioning. The results showed that Egr-1 protein expression as determined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis rapidly increased during the early stages of conditioning and remained elevated during the later stages. Further, expression of Egr-1 protein required NMDA receptor activation as it was blocked by bath application of AP-5. These findings suggest that the IEG-encoded proteins such as Egr-1 are activated during relatively simple forms of learning in vertebrates. In this case, Egr-1 may have a functional role in the acquisition phase of conditioning as well as in maintaining expression of conditioned responses.

  1. Zea mI, the maize homolog of the allergen-encoding Lol pI gene of rye grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadwater, A H; Rubinstein, A L; Chay, C H; Klapper, D G; Bedinger, P A

    1993-09-15

    Sequence analysis of a pollen-specific cDNA from maize has identified a homolog (Zea mI) of the gene (Lol pI) encoding the major allergen of rye-grass pollen. The protein encoded by the partial cDNA sequence is 59.3% identical and 72.7% similar to the comparable region of the reported amino acid sequence of Lol pIA. Southern analysis indicates that this cDNA represents a member of a small multigene family in maize. Northern analysis shows expression only in pollen, not in vegetative or female floral tissues. The timing of expression is developmentally regulated, occurring at a low level prior to the first pollen mitosis and at a high level after this postmeiotic division. Western analysis detects a protein in maize pollen lysates using polyclonal antiserum and monoclonal antibodies directed against purified Lolium perenne allergen.

  2. Regulatory elements in the promoter region of the rat gene encoding the acyl-CoA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Bjerking, G; Knudsen, J

    1996-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is an ubiquitously expressed 10-kDa protein which is present in high amounts in cells involved in solute transport or secretion. Rat ACBP is encoded by a gene containing the typical hallmarks of a housekeeping gene. Analysis of the promoter region of the rat ACBP...... gene by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed specific binding of proteins from rat liver nuclear extracts to potential recognition sequences of NF-1/CTF, Sp1, AP-1, C/EBP and HNF-3. In addition, specific binding to a DR-1 type element was observed. By using in vitro translated...... for the ACBP DR-1 element. Addition of peroxisome proliferators (PP) to H4IIEC3 rat hepatoma cells led to an increase in the ACBP mRNA level, indicating that the DR-1 element could be a functional peroxisome proliferator responsive element (PPRE). Analysis of the ACBP promoter by transient transfection showed...

  3. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of human genes encoding three closely related G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao-Hui Song; Bonner, T.I. [NIMH National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Modi, W. [Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, MD (United States)

    1995-07-20

    Cosmids containing human genes for orphan G protein-coupled receptors, GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3, were isolated using their rat homologs as probes. Previous studies of the mouse and rat cDNAs have shown the receptors to be expressed primarily in brain but have failed to identify their ligands. The three receptor proteins of 334, 363, and 330 amino acids, respectively, are encoded by a single exon in each gene. Excluding the divergent sequences preceding the first transmembrane domain, they have {approximately}60% amino acid identity with each other. Flurorescence in situ hybridization of GPR12, GPR6, and GPR3 localized these three genes to human chromosomal regions 13q12, 6q21, and 1p34.3-p36.1, respectively. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Seven different genes encode a diverse mixture of isoforms of Bet v 1, the major birch pollen allergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilissen Ludovicus JWJ

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen of the European white birch (Betula pendula, syn. B. verrucosa is an important cause of hay fever. The main allergen is Bet v 1, member of the pathogenesis-related class 10 (PR-10 multigene family. To establish the number of PR-10/Bet v 1 genes and the isoform diversity within a single tree, PCR amplification, cloning and sequencing of PR-10 genes was performed on two diploid B. pendula cultivars and one interspecific tetraploid Betula hybrid. Sequences were attributed to putative genes based on sequence identity and intron length. Information on transcription was derived by comparison with homologous cDNA sequences available in GenBank/EMBL/DDJB. PCR-cloning of multigene families is accompanied by a high risk for the occurrence of PCR recombination artifacts. We screened for and excluded these artifacts, and also detected putative artifact sequences among database sequences. Results Forty-four different PR-10 sequences were recovered from B. pendula and assigned to thirteen putative genes. Sequence homology suggests that three genes were transcribed in somatic tissue and seven genes in pollen. The transcription of three other genes remains unknown. In total, fourteen different Bet v 1-type isoforms were identified in the three cultivars, of which nine isoforms were entirely new. Isoforms with high and low IgE-reactivity are encoded by different genes and one birch pollen grain has the genetic background to produce a mixture of isoforms with varying IgE-reactivity. Allergen diversity is even higher in the interspecific tetraploid hybrid, consistent with the presence of two genomes. Conclusion Isoforms of the major birch allergen Bet v 1 are encoded by multiple genes, and we propose to name them accordingly. The present characterization of the Bet v 1 genes provides a framework for the screening of specific Bet v 1 genes among other B. pendula cultivars or Betula species, and for future breeding for trees with a reduced

  5. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  6. Methods for the isolation of genes encoding novel PHB cycle enzymes from complex microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordeste, Ricardo F; Trainer, Maria A; Charles, Trevor C

    2010-01-01

    Development of different PHAs as alternatives to petrochemically derived plastics can be facilitated by mining metagenomic libraries for diverse PHA cycle genes that might be useful for synthesis of bioplastics. The specific phenotypes associated with mutations of the PHA synthesis pathway genes in Sinorhizobium meliloti allows for the use of powerful selection and screening tools to identify complementing novel PHA synthesis genes. Identification of novel genes through their function rather than sequence facilitates finding functional proteins that may otherwise have been excluded through sequence-only screening methodology. We present here methods that we have developed for the isolation of clones expressing novel PHA metabolism genes from metagenomic libraries.

  7. Construction and Expression of Bivalent Membrane-anchored DNA Vaccine Encoding Sj14FABP and Sj26GST Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ping; DAI Wuxing; LIU Shuojie; YANG Ping; CHENG Jizhong; LIANG Liang; CHEN Zhihao; GAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In order to construct a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid containing membrane-anchored Sjcl4FABP and Sjc26GST genes and identify their expression in vitro, Sj14 and Sj26 genes were obtained by RT-PCR with total RNA of Schistosoma japonicum adult worms as the template and cloned into eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAC to construct recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14 and pVAC-Sj26. Then a 23 amino-acid signal peptide of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) upstream Sj14 or Sj26 gene and a membrane-anchored sequence containing 32 amino-acids of carboxyl-terminal of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) downstream were amplified by PCR as the template of plasmid pVAC-Sjl4 or pVAC-Sj26 only to get two gene fragments including Sjl4 gene and Sj26 gene. The two modified genes were altogether cloned into a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pIRES,resulting in another new recombinant plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14. The expression of Sj14 and Sj26genes was detected by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescent assays (IFA) when the plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14 was transfected into eukaryotic Hela cells. Restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and sequencing results revealed that the recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14, pVAC-Sj26 and pIRES-Sj26-Sj14 were successfully constructed and the expression of modified Sj 14 and Sj26 genes could be detected by RT-PCR and IFA. A bivalent membrane-anchored DNA vaccine encoding Sj14 and Sj26 genes was acquired and expressed proteins were proved to be mostly anchored in cellular membranes.

  8. Identification of three genes encoding P(II)-like proteins in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus: studies of their role(s) in the control of nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlova, Olena; Ureta, Alejandro; Nordlund, Stefan; Meletzus, Dietmar

    2003-10-01

    In our studies on the regulation of nitrogen metabolism in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, an endophytic diazotroph of sugarcane, three glnB-like genes were identified and their role(s) in the control of nitrogen fixation was studied. Sequence analysis revealed that one P(II) protein-encoding gene, glnB, was adjacent to a glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase) and that two other P(II) protein-encoding genes, identified as glnK1 and glnK2, were located upstream of amtB1 and amtB2, respectively, genes which in other organisms encode ammonium (or methylammonium) transporters. Single and double mutants and a triple mutant with respect to the three P(II) protein-encoding genes were constructed, and the effects of the mutations on nitrogenase expression and activity in the presence of either ammonium starvation or ammonium sufficiency were studied. Based on the results presented here, it is suggested that none of the three P(II) homologs is required for nif gene expression, that the GlnK2 protein acts primarily as an inhibitor of nif gene expression, and that GlnB and GlnK1 control the expression of nif genes in response to ammonium availability, both directly and by relieving the inhibition by GlnK2. This model includes novel regulatory features of P(II) proteins.

  9. The rice HGW gene encodes a ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain protein that regulates heading date and grain weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Heading date and grain weight are two determining agronomic traits of crop yield. To date, molecular factors controlling both heading date and grain weight have not been identified. Here we report the isolation of a hemizygous mutation, heading and grain weight (hgw, which delays heading and reduces grain weight in rice. Analysis of hgw mutant phenotypes indicate that the hemizygous hgw mutation decreases latitudinal cell number in the lemma and palea, both composing the spikelet hull that is known to determine the size and shape of brown grain. Molecular cloning and characterization of the HGW gene showed that it encodes a novel plant-specific ubiquitin-associated (UBA domain protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and functions as a key upstream regulator to promote expressions of heading date- and grain weight-related genes. Moreover, co-expression analysis in rice and Arabidopsis indicated that HGW and its Arabidopsis homolog are co-expressed with genes encoding various components of ubiquitination machinery, implying a fundamental role for the ubiquitination pathway in heading date and grain weight control.

  10. A Hereditary Enteropathy Caused by Mutations in the SLCO2A1 Gene, Encoding a Prostaglandin Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Umeno

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we proposed a rare autosomal recessive inherited enteropathy characterized by persistent blood and protein loss from the small intestine as chronic nonspecific multiple ulcers of the small intestine (CNSU. By whole-exome sequencing in five Japanese patients with CNSU and one unaffected individual, we found four candidate mutations in the SLCO2A1 gene, encoding a prostaglandin transporter. The pathogenicity of the mutations was supported by segregation analysis and genotyping data in controls. By Sanger sequencing of the coding regions, 11 of 12 other CNSU patients and 2 of 603 patients with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease were found to have homozygous or compound heterozygous SLCO2A1 mutations. In total, we identified recessive SLCO2A1 mutations located at seven sites. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that the identified splice-site mutations altered the RNA splicing, and introduced a premature stop codon. Tracer prostaglandin E2 uptake analysis showed that the mutant SLCO2A1 protein for each mutation exhibited impaired prostaglandin transport. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that SLCO2A1 protein was expressed on the cellular membrane of vascular endothelial cells in the small intestinal mucosa in control subjects, but was not detected in affected individuals. These findings indicate that loss-of-function mutations in the SLCO2A1 gene encoding a prostaglandin transporter cause the hereditary enteropathy CNSU. We suggest a more appropriate nomenclature of "chronic enteropathy associated with SLCO2A1 gene" (CEAS.

  11. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  12. Rational design of glycerol dehydratase: Swapping the genes encoding the subunits of glycerol dehydratase to improve enzymatic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xianghui; SUN Liang; LUO Zhaofei; WU Jiequn; MENG Xiaolei; TANG Yue; WEI Yutuo; HUANG Ribo

    2006-01-01

    1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) is an important material for chemical industry, and there has been always much interest in the production of 1,3-PD using all possible routes. The genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (GDHt) from Citrobacter freundii,Klebsiella pneumoniae and metagenome were cloned and expressed in E. coli. All glycerol dehydratases but the one from metagenome could be detected to show enzyme activities. In order to improve the enzymatic properties of GDHts, the genes encoding α and β-γ subunits were cloned, and the enzyme characteristics were evolved by rational design based on their 3D structures which were constructed by homology modeling. Six heteroenzymes were obtained by swapping the α subunit genes of these three different-source-derived GDHts. The pH,thermal stability and Vmax of some heteroenzymes were dramatically improved by 2-5 times compared with the wild one (GDHtKP). The GDHt cloned from metagenome, originally proved to be with no enzyme activity, was converted into active enzyme by swapping its subunits with other different GDHts. In addition, the effect of subtle 3D structural changes on the properties of the enzyme was also observed.

  13. Crosstalk between ABO and Forssman (FORS) blood group systems: FORS1 antigen synthesis by ABO gene-encoded glycosyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Miyako; Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2017-01-01

    A and B alleles at the ABO genetic locus specify A and B glycosyltransferases that catalyze the biosynthesis of A and B oligosaccharide antigens, respectively, of blood group ABO system which is important in transfusion and transplantation medicine. GBGT1 gene encodes Forssman glycolipid synthase (FS), another glycosyltransferase that produces Forssman antigen (FORS1). Humans are considered to be Forssman antigen-negative species without functional FS. However, rare individuals exhibiting Apae phenotype carry a dominant active GBGT1 gene and express Forssman antigen on RBCs. Accordingly, FORS system was recognized as the 31st blood group system. Mouse ABO gene encodes a cis-AB transferase capable of producing both A and B antigens. This murine enzyme contains the same GlyGlyAla tripeptide sequence as FSs at the position important for the determination of sugar specificity. We, therefore, transfected the expression construct into appropriate recipient cells and examined whether mouse cis-AB transferase may also exhibit FS activity. The result was positive, confirming the crosstalk between the ABO and FORS systems. Further experiments have revealed that the introduction of this tripeptide sequence to human A transferase conferred some, although weak, FS activity, suggesting that it is also involved in the recognition/binding of acceptor substrates, in addition to donor nucleotide-sugars. PMID:28134301

  14. Structural organization, sequence, and expression of the mouse HEXA gene encoding the alpha subunit of hexosaminidase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakamatsu, N; Benoit, G; Lamhonwah, A M; Zhang, Z X; Trasler, J M; Triggs-Raine, B L; Gravel, R A

    1994-11-01

    Genomic clones of the mouse HEXA gene encoding the alpha subunit of lysosomal beta-hexosaminidase A have been isolated, analyzed, and sequenced. The HEXA gene spans approximately 26 kb and consists of 14 exons and 13 introns. The 5' flanking region of the gene has three candidate GC boxes and a number of potential promoter and regulatory elements. Promoter analysis using deletion constructs of 5' flanking sequence fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene showed that 150 bp of 5' sequence was sufficient for expression in transfected monkey kidney COS cells. Determination of the sequence of the 5' end of the Hex alpha mRNA by an "anchor-ligation PCR" procedure showed that transcription is initiated from a cluster of sites centered -42, -32, and -21 bp from the first in-frame ATG. Northern blot analysis from 11 different tissues showed over five times the steady-state level of Hex alpha mRNA in testis as compared to that found in three different brain regions; the lowest level (about 1/3 of brain) was found in liver. Comparison of the 5' flanking sequence with that of the human HEXA gene revealed 78% identity within the first 100 bp. These data suggest that the mouse HEXA gene is controlled mainly by sequences located within 150 bp of the 5' flanking region, and we speculate that it may have a role, not only in brain and other tissues, but also in reproductive function in the adult male mouse.

  15. Identification, characterization and analysis of expression of gene encoding carboxypeptidase A in Anopheles culicifacies A (Diptera: culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashwani; Sharma, Arvind; Sharma, Richa; Gakhar, S K

    2014-11-01

    Carboxypeptidases are the digestive enzymes which cleave single amino acid residue from c-terminus of the protein. Digestive carboxypeptidase A gene regulatory elements in insects have shown their efficiency to drive midgut specific expression in transgenic mosquitoes. However no endogenous promoter has been reported for Indian malaria vector Anopheles culicifacies which is major vector in Indian subcontinent. Here we report cloning of carboxypeptidase A gene in the An. culicifacies A including its 5' upstream regions and named AcCP. In the upstream region of the gene an arthropod initiator sequence and two repeat sequences of the particular importance TTATC and GTTTT were also identified. The 1290 base pairs open reading frame encodes a protein of 48.5kDa. The coding region of the gene shares 82% and 72% similarity at nucleotide level with Anopheles gambiae and Ae. aegypti carboxypeptidase A gene, respectively. The peak expression of the gene was found to be at 3h after blood feeding and this is limited to midgut only. Based on the protein sequence, 3D structure of the AcCP was predicted and the active centre of the enzyme was predicted to consist of GLN 183, GLU 186, HIS 308 and Ser 309 amino acid residues. Comparison of the protein sequence among different genera revealed the conservation of zinc binding residues. Phylogenetically, AcCP was found most closely related to An. gambiae.

  16. Stress tolerances of nullmutants of function-unknown genes encoding menadione stress-responsive proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Éva; Bálint, Mihály; Miskei, Márton; Orosz, Erzsébet; Szabó, Zsuzsa; Pócsi, István

    2016-07-01

    A group of menadione stress-responsive function-unkown genes of Aspergillus nidulans (Locus IDs ANID_03987.1, ANID_06058.1, ANID_10219.1, and ANID_10260.1) was deleted and phenotypically characterized. Importantly, comparative and phylogenetic analyses of the tested A. nidulans genes and their orthologs shed light only on the presence of a TANGO2 domain with NRDE protein motif in the translated ANID_06058.1 gene but did not reveal any recognizable protein-encoding domains in other protein sequences. The gene deletion strains were subjected to oxidative, osmotic, and metal ion stress and, surprisingly, only the ΔANID_10219.1 mutant showed an increased sensitivity to 0.12 mmol l(-1) menadione sodium bisulfite. The gene deletions affected the stress sensitivities (tolerances) irregularly, for example, some strains grew more slowly when exposed to various oxidants and/or osmotic stress generating agents, meanwhile the ΔANID_10260.1 mutant possessed a wild-type tolerance to all stressors tested. Our results are in line with earlier studies demonstrating that the deletions of stress-responsive genes do not confer necessarily any stress-sensitivity phenotypes, which can be attributed to compensatory mechanisms based on other elements of the stress response system with overlapping functions.

  17. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria preferentially expresses PfEMP1 encoded by group A var genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Magistrado, Pamela; Sharp, Sarah;

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSAs) like the var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family are responsible for antigenic variation and infected red blood cell (RBC) cytoadhesion in P. falciparum malaria. Parasites causing severe malaria...... genes, such as PFD1235w/MAL7P1.1, appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of severe disease and are thus attractive candidates for a vaccine against life-threatening P. falciparum malaria....

  19. A SCN9A gene-encoded dorsal root ganglia sodium channel polymorphism associated with severe fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas-Alarcon Gilberto; Alvarez-Leon Edith; Fragoso Jose-Manuel; Vargas Angelica; Martinez Aline; Vallejo Maite; Martinez-Lavin Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background A consistent line of investigation suggests that autonomic nervous system dysfunction may explain the multi-system features of fibromyalgia (FM); and that FM is a sympathetically maintained neuropathic pain syndrome. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are key sympathetic-nociceptive short-circuit sites. Sodium channels located in DRG (particularly Nav1.7) act as molecular gatekeepers for pain detection. Nav1.7 is encoded in gene SCN9A of chromosome 2q24.3 and is predominantly expre...

  20. Expression of genes encoding F-1-ATPase results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass production in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Solem, Christian; Pedersen, M.B.

    2002-01-01

    of the genes encoding F-1-ATPase was found to decrease the intracellular energy level and resulted in a decrease in the growth rate. The yield of biomass also decreased, which showed that the incorporated F-1-ATPase activity caused glycolysis to be uncoupled from biomass production. The increase in ATPase...... threefold in nongrowing cells resuspended in buffer, but in steadily growing cells no increase in flux was observed. The latter result shows that glycolysis occurs close to its maximal capacity and indicates that control of the glycolytic flux under these conditions resides in the glycolytic reactions...

  1. Optimized codon usage enhances the expression and immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Taenia solium oncosphere TSOL18 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Chang, Xue-Lian; Tao, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Jiao, Yu-Meng; Chen, Yong; Qi, Wen-Juan; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Di; Sun, Xin; Shen, Ji-Long; Fang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Cysticercosis due to larval cysts of Taenia solium, is a serious public health problem affecting humans in numerous regions worldwide. The oncospheral stage-specific TSOL18 antigen is a promising candidate for an anti-cysticercosis vaccine. It has been reported that the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine may be enhanced through codon optimization of candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to further increase the efficacy of the cysticercosis DNA vaccine; therefore, a codon optimized recombinant expression plasmid pVAX1/TSOL18 was developed in order to enhance expression and immunogenicity of TSOL18. The gene encoding TSOL18 of Taenia solium was optimized, and the resulting opt-TSOL18 gene was amplified and expressed. The results of the present study showed that the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully expressed in CHO-K1 cells, and immunized mice vaccinated with opt-TSOL18 recombinant expression plasmids demonstrated opt‑TSOL18 expression in muscle fibers, as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene produced a significantly greater effect compared with that of TSOL18 and active spleen cells were markedly stimulated in vaccinated mice. 3H-thymidine incorporation was significantly greater in the opt-TSOL18 group compared with that of the TSOL18, pVAX and blank control groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, the eukaryotic expression vector containing the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully constructed and was confirmed to be expressed in vivo and in vitro. The expression and immunogenicity of the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene were markedly greater compared with that of the un-optimized gene. Therefore, these results may provide the basis for an optimized TSOL18 gene vaccine against cysticercosis.

  2. Ribosomal protein L7a is encoded by a gene (Surf-3) within the tightly clustered mouse surfeit locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giallongo, A; Yon, J; Fried, M

    1989-01-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus, which contains a cluster of at least four genes (Surf-1 to Surf-4), is unusual in that adjacent genes are separated by no more than 73 base pairs (bp). The heterogeneous 5' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-2 are separated by only 15 to 73 bp, the 3' ends of Surf-1 and Surf-3 are only 70 bp apart, and the 3' ends of Surf-2 and Surf-4 overlap by 133 bp. This very tight clustering suggests a cis interaction between adjacent Surfeit genes. The Surf-3 gene (which could code for a basic polypeptide of 266 amino acids) is a highly expressed member of a pseudogene-containing multigene family. By use of an anti-peptide serum (against the C-terminal nine amino acids of the putative Surf-3 protein) for immunofluorescence and immunoblotting of mouse cell components and by in vitro translation of Surf-3 cDNA hybrid-selected mRNA, the Surf-3 gene product was identified as a 32-kilodalton ribosomal protein located in the 60S ribosomal subunit. From its subunit location, gel migration, and homology with a limited rat ribosomal peptide sequence, the Surf-3 gene was shown to encode the mouse L7a ribosomal protein. The Surf-3 gene is highly conserved through evolution and was detected by nucleic acid hybridization as existing in multiple copies (multigene families) in other mammals and as one or a few copies in birds, Xenopus, Drosophila, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The Surf-3 C-terminal anti-peptide serum detects a 32-kilodalton protein in other mammals, birds, and Xenopus but not in Drosophila and S. pombe. The possible effect of interaction of the Surf-3 ribosomal protein gene with adjacent genes in the Surfeit locus at the transcriptional or posttranscriptional level or both levels is discussed. Images PMID:2648130

  3. Accelerated evolution of Trimeresurus okinavensis venom gland phospholipase A2 isozyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhisa, I; Nakashima, K; Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S; Kihara, H; Ohno, M

    1996-06-26

    Three Trimeresurus okinavensis (To; himehabu snake, Crotalinae) venom gland phospholipase A2 (PLA2) isozymeencoding genes, gPLA2-o1, gPLA2-o2 and gPLA2-o3, were isolated from its genomic DNA library. The nucleotide (nt) sequence analysis revealed that two of the three genes (gPLA2-o2 and gPLA2-o3) occasionally have been converted to inactivated genes by introduction of one base insertion or substitution. It was confirmed from Southern blot analysis that the To haploid genome contains only three venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes herein isolated. Comparison of these genes showed that nonsynonymous nt substitutions have occurred more frequently than synonymous nt substitutions in the protein-coding regions, except for the signal-peptide coding domain, implying that To venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes have evolved via accelerated evolution. Such an evolutionary feature of To venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes proves the general universality of accelerated evolution previously drawn for venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes of other crotalinae snakes. The variability in the mature protein-coding regions of three To venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes appears to have been brought about by natural selection for point mutations.

  4. Abscisic acid enhances tolerance of wheat seedlings to drought and regulates transcript levels of genes encoding ascorbate-glutathione biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eLiting

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH and ascorbate (ASA are associated with the abscisic acid (ABA-induced abiotic tolerance in higher plant, however, its molecular mechanism remains obscure. In this study, exogenous application (10 μM of ABA significantly increased the tolerance of seedlings of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. suffering from 5 days of 15% polyethylene glycol (PEG-stimulated drought stress, as demonstrated by increased shoot lengths and shoot and root dry weights, while showing decreased contents of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA. Under drought stress conditions, ABA markedly increased contents of GSH and ASA in both leaves and roots of ABA-treated plants. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of eight genes encoding ASA and GSH synthesis-related enzymes were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. The results showed that ABA temporally regulated the transcript levels of genes encoding ASA-GSH cycle enzymes. Moreover, these genes exhibited differential expression patterns between the root and leaf organs of ABA-treated wheat seedlings during drought stress. These results implied that exogenous ABA increased the levels of GSH and ASA in drought-stressed wheat seedlings in time- and organ-specific manners. Moreover, the transcriptional profiles of ASA-GSH synthesis-related enzyme genes in the leaf tissue were compared between ABA- and salicylic acid (SA-treated wheat seedlings under PEG-stimulated drought stress, suggesting that they increased the contents of ASA and GSH by differentially regulating expression levels of ASA-GSH synthesis enzyme genes. Our results increase our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ABA-induced drought tolerance in higher plants

  5. An antisense RNA in a lytic cyanophage links psbA to a gene encoding a homing endonuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Andrew D; Gierga, Gregor; Clokie, Martha R J; Evans, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Scanlan, David J

    2010-09-01

    Cyanophage genomes frequently possess the psbA gene, encoding the D1 polypeptide of photosystem II. This protein is believed to maintain host photosynthetic capacity during infection and enhance phage fitness under high-light conditions. Although the first documented cyanophage-encoded psbA gene contained a group I intron, this feature has not been widely reported since, despite a plethora of new sequences becoming available. In this study, we show that in cyanophage S-PM2, this intron is spliced during the entire infection cycle. Furthermore, we report the widespread occurrence of psbA introns in marine metagenomic libraries, and with psbA often adjacent to a homing endonuclease (HE). Bioinformatic analysis of the intergenic region between psbA and the adjacent HE gene F-CphI in S-PM2 showed the presence of an antisense RNA (asRNA) connecting these two separate genetic elements. The asRNA is co-regulated with psbA and F-CphI, suggesting its involvement with their expression. Analysis of scaffolds from global ocean survey datasets shows this asRNA to be commonly associated with the 3' end of cyanophage psbA genes, implying that this potential mechanism of regulating marine 'viral' photosynthesis is evolutionarily conserved. Although antisense transcription is commonly found in eukaryotic and increasingly also in prokaryotic organisms, there has been no indication for asRNAs in lytic phages so far. We propose that this asRNA also provides a means of preventing the formation of mobile group I introns within cyanophage psbA genes.

  6. Inhibition of LINE-1 retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase modulates the expression of cell differentiation genes in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnala, Radhika; Lee, Sung-Hun; Dahlstrom, Jane E; Ohms, Stephen; Chen, Long; Dheen, S Thameem; Rangasamy, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (L1 elements) are biologically active retrotransposons that are capable of autonomous replication using their own reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme. Expression of the normally repressed RT has been implicated in cancer cell growth. However, at present, little is known about the expression of L1-encoded RT activity or the molecular changes that are associated with RT activity in the development of breast cancer. Here, we report that RT activity is widespread in breast cancer cells. The expression of RT protein decreased markedly in breast cancer cells after treatment with the antiretroviral drug, efavirenz. While the majority of cells showed a significant reduction in proliferation, inhibition of RT was also accompanied by cell-specific differences in morphology. MCF7 cells displayed elongated microtubule extensions that adhered tightly to their substrate, while a large fraction of the T47D cells that we studied formed long filopodia projections. These morphological changes were reversible upon cessation of RT inhibition, confirming their dependence on RT activity. We also carried out gene expression profiling with microarrays and determined the genes that were differentially expressed during the process of cellular differentiation. Genes involved in proliferation, cell migration, and invasive activity were repressed in RT-inhibited cells. Concomitantly, genes involved in cell projection, formation of vacuolar membranes, and cell-to-cell junctions were significantly upregulated in RT-inhibited cells. qRT-PCR examination of the mRNA expression of these genes in additional cell lines yielded close correlation between their differential expression and the degree of cellular differentiation. Our study demonstrates that the inhibition of L1-encoded RT can reduce the rate of proliferation and promote differentiation of breast cancer cells. Together, these results provide a direct functional link between the expression of L1 retrotransposons and

  7. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CBR Encoding Genes from the Carotenogenic Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic microsomal cytochrome P450 systems consist of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450 and a cytochrome P450 redox partner, which generally is a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR that supplies electrons from NADPH. However, alternative electron donors may exist such as cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 (CBR and CYB5, respectively via, which is NADH-dependent and are also anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, three P450-encoding genes have been described: crtS is involved in carotenogenesis and the CYP51 and CYP61 genes are both implicated in ergosterol biosynthesis. This yeast has a single CPR (encoded by the crtR gene, and a crtR- mutant does not produce astaxanthin. Considering that this mutant is viable, the existence of alternative cytochrome P450 electron donors like CBR and CYB5 could operate in this yeast. The aim of this work was to characterize the X. dendrorhous CBR encoding gene and to study its involvement in P450 reactions in ergosterol and carotenoid biosynthesis. Two CBRs genes were identified (CBR.1 and CBR.2, and deletion mutants were constructed. The two mutants and the wild-type strain showed similar sterol production, with ergosterol being the main sterol produced. The crtR- mutant strain produced a lower proportion of ergosterol than did the parental strain. These results indicate that even though one of the two CBR genes could be involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, crtR complements their absence in the cbr- mutant strains, at least for ergosterol production. The higher NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activity together with the higher transcript levels of CBR.1 and CYB5 in the crtR- mutant as well as the lower NADH-dependent activity in CBS-cbr.1- strongly suggest that CBR.1-CYB5 via participates as an alternative electron donor pathway for P450 enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous.

  8. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CBR) Encoding Genes from the Carotenogenic Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, María Soledad; Rojas, María Cecilia; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor; Alcaíno, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic microsomal cytochrome P450 systems consist of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450) and a cytochrome P450 redox partner, which generally is a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) that supplies electrons from NADPH. However, alternative electron donors may exist such as cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 (CBR and CYB5, respectively) via, which is NADH-dependent and are also anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, three P450-encoding genes have been described: crtS is involved in carotenogenesis and the CYP51 and CYP61 genes are both implicated in ergosterol biosynthesis. This yeast has a single CPR (encoded by the crtR gene), and a crtR- mutant does not produce astaxanthin. Considering that this mutant is viable, the existence of alternative cytochrome P450 electron donors like CBR and CYB5 could operate in this yeast. The aim of this work was to characterize the X. dendrorhous CBR encoding gene and to study its involvement in P450 reactions in ergosterol and carotenoid biosynthesis. Two CBRs genes were identified (CBR.1 and CBR.2), and deletion mutants were constructed. The two mutants and the wild-type strain showed similar sterol production, with ergosterol being the main sterol produced. The crtR- mutant strain produced a lower proportion of ergosterol than did the parental strain. These results indicate that even though one of the two CBR genes could be involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, crtR complements their absence in the cbr- mutant strains, at least for ergosterol production. The higher NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activity together with the higher transcript levels of CBR.1 and CYB5 in the crtR- mutant as well as the lower NADH-dependent activity in CBS-cbr.1- strongly suggest that CBR.1-CYB5 via participates as an alternative electron donor pathway for P450 enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous.

  9. Tetrachloroethene Dehalogenase from Dehalospirillum multivorans: Cloning, Sequencing of the Encoding Genes, and Expression of the pceA Gene in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anke; Wohlfarth, Gert; Diekert, Gabriele

    1998-01-01

    The genes encoding tetrachloroethene reductive dehalogenase, a corrinoid-Fe/S protein, of Dehalospirillum multivorans were cloned and sequenced. The pceA gene is upstream of pceB and overlaps it by 4 bp. The presence of a ς70-like promoter sequence upstream of pceA and of a ρ-independent terminator downstream of pceB indicated that both genes are cotranscribed. This assumption is supported by reverse transcriptase PCR data. The pceA and pceB genes encode putative 501- and 74-amino-acid proteins, respectively, with calculated molecular masses of 55,887 and 8,354 Da, respectively. Four peptides obtained after trypsin treatment of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dehalogenase were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of pceA. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the PCE dehalogenase isolated from D. multivorans was found 30 amino acids downstream of the N terminus of the deduced pceA product. The pceA gene contained a nucleotide stretch highly similar to binding motifs for two Fe4S4 clusters or for one Fe4S4 cluster and one Fe3S4 cluster. A consensus sequence for the binding of a corrinoid was not found in pceA. No significant similarities to genes in the databases were detected in sequence comparisons. The pceB gene contained two membrane-spanning helices as indicated by two hydrophobic stretches in the hydropathic plot. Sequence comparisons of pceB revealed no sequence similarities to genes present in the databases. Only in the presence of pUBS 520 supplying the recombinant bacteria with high levels of the rare Escherichia coli tRNA4Arg was pceA expressed, albeit nonfunctionally, in recombinant E. coli BL21 (DE3). PMID:9696761

  10. Occurrence of blaNDM-1 & absence of blaKPC genes encoding carbapenem resistance in uropathogens from a tertiary care centre from north India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balvinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: The bla NDM-1 gene was absent in our isolates obtained during 2008 but was present amongst Enterobacteriaceae isolated in 2012. The bla KPC gene was also not found. Nine isolates obtained during the two years had multiple genes encoding carbapenemases confirming the previous reports of emergence of GNB containing genes encoding multiple carbapenemases. Typing using BOX-PCR indicated that this emergence was not because of clonal expansion of a single strain, and multiple strains were circulating at a single point of time.

  11. Identification and characterization of genes encoding polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenase and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dihydrodiol dehydrogenase in Pseudomonas putida OUS82.

    OpenAIRE

    Takizawa, N; Kaida, N; Torigoe, S; Moritani,T.; Sawada, T.; Satoh, S.; Kiyohara, H

    1994-01-01

    Naphthalene and phenanthrene are transformed by enzymes encoded by the pah gene cluster of Pseudomonas putida OUS82. The pahA and pahB genes, which encode the first and second enzymes, dioxygenase and cis-dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, respectively, were identified and sequenced. The DNA sequences showed that pahA and pahB were clustered and that pahA consisted of four cistrons, pahAa, pahAb, pahAc, and pahAd, which encode ferredoxin reductase, ferredoxin, and two subunits of the iron-sulfur prot...

  12. Isolation and cloning of the gene encoding high affinity phosphate transporter in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    High affinity phosphate transporter plays an important role in plant adapting to low phosphorus. Isolation of genes coding this kind of protein has attracted worldwide scholars to accomplish. We aimed to isolate the gene and transfer it to target plants for breeding.

  13. Isolation and characterization of the gene encoding the starch debranching enzyme limit dextrinase from germinating barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Michael; Lok, Finn; Planchot, Véronique;

    1999-01-01

    with a value of 105 kDa estimated by SDS;;PAGE, The coding sequence is interrupted by 26 introns varying in length from 93 bp to 825 bp. The 27 exons vary in length from 53 bp to 197 bp. Southern blot analysis shows that the limit dextrinase gene is present as a single copy in the barley genome. Gene...

  14. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Comparative structural and functional analysis of genes encoding pectin methylesterases in Phytophthora spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingora, Christina; Ewer, Jason; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel

    2014-03-15

    We have scanned the Phytophthora infestans, P. ramorum, and P. sojae genomes for the presence of putative pectin methylesterase genes and conducted a sequence analysis of all gene models found. We also searched for potential regulatory motifs in the promoter region of the proposed P. infestans models, and investigated the gene expression levels throughout the course of P. infestans infection on potato plants, using in planta and detached leaf assays. We found that genes located on contiguous chromosomal regions contain similar motifs in the promoter region, indicating the possibility of a shared regulatory mechanism. Results of our investigations also suggest that, during the pathogenicity process, the expression levels of some of the analyzed genes vary considerably when compared to basal expression observed in in vitro cultures of non-sporulating mycelium. These results were observed both in planta and in detached leaf assays.

  16. CODON OPTIMIZATION OF THE POTENTIAL ANTIGENS ENCODING GENES FROM MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Mani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Current approach for controlling of tuberculosis is going on by recommended doses of vaccines. Codon optimization and simulation techniques are used to improve the protein expression in living organism by increasing their translational efficiency of gene of interest. We have designed; optimized the codon and simulated in nineteen indigenous genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv in the Escherichia coli. We minimized the G+C content in optimized genes from 64.75% to 59.67% of the studied genes as the richness of G+C content is reflected in a strong bias. CAI and AT of optimized DNA were enhanced by 1.9 (47.8% and 1.1 (12.5% fold more with respect to its native type. Our finding indicates the optimized genes can be useful for over expression in host and the study provides a new insight for the emerging research in synthetic biology.

  17. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development.

  18. Identification and targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding ESG1 (PH34/ECAT2/DPPA5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichisaka Tomoko

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embryonic stem cell-specific gene (ESG 1, which encodes a KH-domain containing protein, is specifically expressed in early embryos, germ cells, and embryonic stem (ES cells. Previous studies identified genomic clones containing the mouse ESG1 gene and five pseudogenes. However, their chromosomal localizations or physiological functions have not been determined. Results A Blast search of mouse genomic databases failed to locate the ESG1 gene. We identified several bacterial artificial clones containing the mouse ESG1 gene and an additional ESG1-like sequence with a similar gene structure from chromosome 9. The ESG1-like sequence contained a multiple critical mutations, indicating that it was a duplicated pseudogene. The 5' flanking region of the ESG1 gene, but not that of the pseudogene, exhibited strong enhancer and promoter activity in undifferentiated ES cells by luciferase reporter assay. To study the physiological functions of the ESG1 gene, we replaced this sequence in ES cells with a β-geo cassette by homologous recombination. Despite specific expression in early embryos and germ cells, ESG1-/- mice developed normally and were fertile. We also generated ESG1-/- ES cells both by a second independent homologous recombination and directly from blastocysts derived from heterozygous intercrosses. Northern blot and western blot analyses confirmed the absence of ESG1 in these cells. These ES cells demonstrated normal morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. Conclusion The mouse ESG1 gene, together with a duplicated pseudogene, is located on chromosome 9. Despite its specific expression in pluripotent cells and germ cells, ESG1 is dispensable for self-renewal of ES cells and establishment of germcells.

  19. Regulation of Expression of GLT1, the Gene Encoding Glutamate Synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Ballario, Paola; Aranda, Cristina; Filetici, Patrizia; González, Alicia

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is an oligomeric enzyme composed of three 199-kDa identical subunits encoded by GLT1. In this work, we analyzed GLT1 transcriptional regulation. GLT1-lacZ fusions were prepared and GLT1 expression was determined in a GDH1 wild-type strain and in a gdh1 mutant derivative grown in the presence of various nitrogen sources. Null mutants impaired in GCN4, GLN3, GAT1/NIL1, or UGA43/DAL80 were transformed with a GLT1-lacZ fusion to determine whethe...

  20. Identification and expression analysis of castor bean (Ricinus communis) genes encoding enzymes from the triacylglycerol biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliari, Alexandro; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia; Loss, Guilherme; Mastroberti, Alexandra Antunes; de Araujo Mariath, Jorge Ernesto; Margis, Rogério

    2010-11-01

    Castor bean (Ricinus communis) oil contains ricinoleic acid-rich triacylglycerols (TAGs). As a result of its physical and chemical properties, castor oil and its derivatives are used for numerous bio-based products. In this study, we survey the Castor Bean Genome Database to report the identification of TAG biosynthesis genes. A set of 26 genes encoding six distinct classes of enzymes involved in TAGs biosynthesis were identified. In silico characterization and sequence analysis allowed the identification of plastidic isoforms of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase and lysophosphatidate acyltransferase enzyme families, involved in the prokaryotic lipid biosynthesis pathway, that form a cluster apart from the cytoplasmic isoforms, involved in the eukaryotic pathway. In addition, two distinct membrane bound diacylglycerol acyltransferase enzymes were identified. Quantitative expression pattern analyses demonstrated variations in gene expressions during castor seed development. A tendency of maximum expression level at the middle of seed development was observed. Our results represent snapshots of global transcriptional activities of genes encompassing six enzyme families involved in castor bean TAG biosynthesis that are present during seed development. These genes represent potential targets for biotechnological approaches to produce nutritionally and industrially desirable oils.

  1. Cloning and expression of two human genes encoding calcium-binding proteins that are regulated during myeloid differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, E.; Clerc, R.G.

    1988-06-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in chronic inflammatory processes are poorly understood. This is especially true for the role of macrophages, which figure prominently in the inflammatory response. Two proteins, MRP8 and MRP14, which are expressed in infiltrate macrophages during inflammatory reactions but not in normal tissue macrophages, which have been characterized. Here the authors report that MRP8 and MRP14 mRNAs are specially expressed in human cells of myeloid origin and that their expression is regulated during monocycle-macrophage and granulocyte differentiation. To initiate the analysis of cis-acting elements governing the tissue-specific expression of the MRP genes, the authors cloned the human genes encoding MRP8 and MRP14. Both genes contain three exons, are single copy, and have a strikingly similar organization. They belong to a novel subfamily of highly homologous calcium-binding proteins which includes S100..cap alpha.., S100BETA, intestinal calcium-binding protein, P11, and calcyclin (2A9). A transient expression assay was devised to investigate the tissue-specific regulatory elements responsible for MRP gene expression after differentiation in leukemia HL60 cells. The results of this investigation demonstrated that the cis-acting element responsible for MRP expression are present on the cloned DNA fragment containing the MRP gene loci.

  2. Dissemination of the gene encoding exfoliative toxin of Staphylococcus intermedius among strains isolated from dogs during routine microbiological diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautz, S; Kanbar, T; Alber, J; Lämmler, C; Weiss, R; Prenger-Berninghoff, E; Zschöck, M

    2006-11-01

    Phenotypic properties and species-specific PCR tests based on the nuc gene of Staphylococcus intermedius and S. aureus, and a conserved region of 16S rDNA were used to identify 45 S. intermedius and four S. aureus isolated from samples of dogs during routine diagnostics. Four S. pseudintermedius strains used for control purposes reacted positively with the S. intermedius nuc PCR showing the close relationship between both species. Investigating the 45 S. intermedius and four S. pseudintermedius strains for the prevalence of the exfoliative toxin SIET encoding gene yielded the presence of the gene for 21 of the S. intermedius and two of the S. pseudintermedius strains. Partial sequencing of the toxin gene of a single S. intermedius strain and comparing this sequence with that obtained from GenBank revealed an almost complete identity. The presence of the exfoliative toxin gene could mainly be found among S. intermedius isolated from skin and wound infections and from otitis externa possibly indicating a role of this toxin for the clinical symptoms.

  3. Expressed sequence tags and molecular cloning and characterization of gene encoding pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase from Podophyllum hexandrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Dhammaprakash Pandhari; Biswas, Dipul Kumar; Rajkumar, Subramani; Sinha, Alok Krishna

    2013-12-01

    Podophyllotoxin, an aryltetralin lignan, is the source of important anticancer drugs etoposide, teniposide, and etopophos. Roots/rhizome of Podophyllum hexandrum form one of the most important sources of podophyllotoxin. In order to understand genes involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, two suppression subtractive hybridization libraries were synthesized, one each from root/rhizome and leaves using high and low podophyllotoxin-producing plants of P. hexandrum. Sequencing of clones identified a total of 1,141 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) resulting in 354 unique ESTs. Several unique ESTs showed sequence similarity to the genes involved in metabolism, stress/defense responses, and signalling pathways. A few ESTs also showed high sequence similarity with genes which were shown to be involved in podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in other plant species such as pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. A full length coding sequence of pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase (PLR) has been cloned from P. hexandrum which was found to encode protein with 311 amino acids and show sequence similarity with PLR from Forsythia intermedia and Linum spp. Spatial and stress-inducible expression pattern of PhPLR and other known genes of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis, secoisolariciresinol dehydrogenase (PhSDH), and dirigent protein oxidase (PhDPO) have been studied. All the three genes showed wounding and methyl jasmonate-inducible expression pattern. The present work would form a basis for further studies to understand genomics of podophyllotoxin biosynthesis in P. hexandrum.

  4. Prolactin in the Afrotheria: characterization of genes encoding prolactin in elephant (Loxodonta africana), hyrax (Procavia capensis) and tenrec (Echinops telfairi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Pituitary prolactin shows an episodic pattern of molecular evolution, with occasional short bursts of rapid change imposed on a generally rather slow evolutionary rate. In mammals, episodes of rapid change occurred in the evolution of primates, cetartiodactyls, rodents and the elephant. The bursts of rapid evolution in cetartiodactyls and rodents were followed by duplications of the prolactin gene that gave rise to large families of prolactin-related proteins including placental lactogens, while in primates the burst was followed by corresponding duplications of the related GH gene. The position in elephant is less clear. Extensive data relating to the genomic sequences of elephant and two additional members of the group Afrotheria are now available, and have been used here to characterize the prolactin genes in these species and explore whether additional prolactin-related genes are present. The results confirm the rapid evolution of elephant (Loxodonta africana) prolactin - the sequence of elephant prolactin is substantially different from that predicted for the ancestral placental mammal. Hyrax (Procavia capensis) prolactin is even more divergent but tenrec (Echinops telfairi) prolactin is strongly conserved. No evidence was obtained from searches of public databases for additional genes encoding prolactin-like proteins in any of these species. Detailed analysis of evolutionary rates, and other factors, indicates that the episode of rapid change in hyrax, and probably elephant, was adaptive, though the nature of the associated biological change(s) is not clear.

  5. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hampel

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR, a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  6. Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) Regulator Cib1 Controls Expression of Genes Encoding Secreted Virulence Factors in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Martin; Jakobi, Mareike; Schmitz, Lara; Meyer, Ute; Finkernagel, Florian; Doehlemann, Gunther; Heimel, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved eukaryotic signaling pathway to ensure protein homeostasis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), coordinates biotrophic development in the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis. Exact timing of UPR activation is required for virulence and presumably connected to the elevated expression of secreted effector proteins during infection of the host plant Zea mays. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expression of UPR target genes is induced upon binding of the central regulator Hac1 to unfolded protein response elements (UPREs) in their promoters. While a role of the UPR in effector secretion has been described previously, we investigated a potential UPR-dependent regulation of genes encoding secreted effector proteins. In silico prediction of UPREs in promoter regions identified the previously characterized effector genes pit2 and tin1-1, as bona fide UPR target genes. Furthermore, direct binding of the Hac1-homolog Cib1 to the UPRE containing promoter fragments of both genes was confirmed by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (qChIP) analysis. Targeted deletion of the UPRE abolished Cib1-dependent expression of pit2 and significantly affected virulence. Furthermore, ER stress strongly increased Pit2 expression and secretion. This study expands the role of the UPR as a signal hub in fungal virulence and illustrates, how biotrophic fungi can coordinate cellular physiology, development and regulation of secreted virulence factors.

  7. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  8. Isolation of the GFA1 gene encoding glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase of Sporothrix schenckii and its expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, Juan Francisco; González-Ibarra, Joaquín; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Milewski, Slawomir; Villagómez-Castro, Julio César; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; López-Romero, Everardo

    2015-06-01

    Glucosamine-6-phosphate synthase (GlcN-6-P synthase) is an essential enzyme involved in cell wall biogenesis that has been proposed as a strategic target for antifungal chemotherapy. Here we describe the cloning and functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii GFA1 gene which was isolated from a genomic library of the fungus. The gene encodes a predicted protein of 708 amino acids that is homologous to GlcN-6-P synthases from other sources. The recombinant enzyme restored glucosamine prototrophy of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gfa1 null mutant. Purification and biochemical analysis of the recombinant enzyme revealed some differences from the wild type enzyme, such as improved stability and less sensitivity to UDP-GlcNAc. The sensitivity of the recombinant enzyme to the selective inhibitor FMDP [N(3)-(4-methoxyfumaroyl)-l-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid] and other properties were similar to those previously reported for the wild type enzyme.

  9. Peptides encoded by short ORFs control development and define a new eukaryotic gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Máximo Ibo Galindo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in developmental biology, and the sequencing and annotation of genomes, key questions regarding the organisation of cells into embryos remain. One possibility is that uncharacterised genes having nonstandard coding arrangements and functions could provide some of the answers. Here we present the characterisation of tarsal-less (tal, a new type of noncanonical gene that had been previously classified as a putative noncoding RNA. We show that tal controls gene expression and tissue folding in Drosophila, thus acting as a link between patterning and morphogenesis. tal function is mediated by several 33-nucleotide-long open reading frames (ORFs, which are translated into 11-amino-acid-long peptides. These are the shortest functional ORFs described to date, and therefore tal defines two novel paradigms in eukaryotic coding genes: the existence of short, unprocessed peptides with key biological functions, and their arrangement in polycistronic messengers. Our discovery of tal-related short ORFs in other species defines an ancient and noncanonical gene family in metazoans that represents a new class of eukaryotic genes. Our results open a new avenue for the annotation and functional analysis of genes and sequenced genomes, in which thousands of short ORFs are still uncharacterised.

  10. The RFC2 gene encoding a subunit of replication factor C of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Noskov, V; Maki, S.; Kawasaki, Y.; Leem, S H; Ono, B; Araki, H; Pavlov, Y; Sugino, A

    1994-01-01

    Replication Factor C (RF-C) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complex that consists of several different polypeptides ranging from 120- to 37 kDa (Yoder and Burgers, 1991; Fien and Stillman, 1992), similar to human RF-C. We have isolated a gene, RFC2, that appears to be a component of the yeast RF-C. The RFC2 gene is located on chromosome X of S. cerevisiae and is essential for cell growth. Disruption of the RFC2 gene led to a dumbbell-shaped terminal morphology, common to mutants having a def...

  11. Characterization of the lys2 gene of Acremonium chrysogenum encoding a functional alpha-aminoadipate activating and reducing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijarrubia, M J; Aparicio, J F; Casqueiro, J; Martín, J F

    2001-02-01

    A 5.2-kb NotI DNA fragment isolated from a genomic library of Acremonium chrysogenum by hybridization with a probe internal to the Penicillium chrysogenum lys2 gene, was able to complement an alpha-aminoadipate reductase-deficient mutant of P. chrysogenum (lysine auxotroph L-G-). Enzyme assays showed that the alpha-aminoadipate reductase activity was restored in all the transformants tested. The lys2-encoded enzyme catalyzed both the activation and reduction of alpha-aminoadipic acid to its semialdehyde, as shown by reaction of the product with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde. The reaction required NADPH, and was not observed in the presence of NADH. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a protein with relatively high similarity to members of the superfamily of acyladenylate-forming enzymes. The Lys2 protein contained all nine motifs that are conserved in the adenylating domain of this enzyme family, a peptidyl carrier domain, and a reduction domain. In addition, a new NADP-binding motif located at the N-terminus of the reduction domain that may form a Rossmann-like betaalphabeta-fold has been identified and found to be shared by all known Lys2 proteins. The lys2 gene was mapped to chromosome I (2.2 Mb, the smallest chromosome) of A. chrysogenum C10 (the chromosome that contains the "late" cephalosporin cluster) and is transcribed as a monocistronic 4.5-kb mRNA although at relatively low levels compared with the beta-actin gene.

  12. Expression cloning of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes by histochemical screening of genomic libraries onto an indicator medium containing phenolphthalein diphosphate and methyl green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, M L; Rossolini, G M; Lombardi, G; Chiesurin, A; Satta, G

    1997-02-01

    A system for expression cloning of bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes has been developed, and its potential has been investigated. The system is based on histochemical screening of bacterial genomic libraries, constructed in an Escherichia coli multicopy plasmid vector, for phosphatase-producing clones using an indicator medium (named TPMG) made of Tryptose-Phosphate agar supplemented with the phosphatase substrate phenolphthalein diphosphate and the stain methyl green. To test the performance of this system, three genomic libraries were constructed from bacterial strains of different species which showed different patterns of phosphatase activity, and were screened using the TPMG medium. Following a partial screening, three different phosphatase-encoding genes (respectively encoding a class A non-specific acid phosphatase, an acid-hexose phosphatase and a non-specific alkaline phosphatase) were shotgun-cloned from the above libraries, indicating that the TPMG-based expression cloning system can be useful for rapid isolation of different bacterial phosphatase-encoding genes.

  13. Endogenous microRNAs in human microvascular endothelial cells regulate mRNAs encoded by hypertension-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Alison J; Baker, Maria Angeles; Liu, Yong; Liu, Pengyuan; Cowley, Allen W; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    The goal of this study was to systematically identify endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells that regulate mRNAs encoded by genes relevant to hypertension. Small RNA deep sequencing was performed in cultured human microvascular endothelial cells. Of the 50 most abundant miRNAs identified, 30 had predicted target mRNAs encoded by genes with known involvement in hypertension or blood pressure regulation. The cells were transfected with anti-miR oligonucleotides to inhibit each of the 30 miRNAs and the mRNA abundance of predicted targets was examined. Of 95 miRNA-target pairs examined, the target mRNAs were significantly upregulated in 35 pairs and paradoxically downregulated in 8 pairs. The result indicated significant suppression of the abundance of mRNA encoded by ADM by endogenous miR-181a-5p, ATP2B1 by the miR-27 family, FURIN by miR-125a-5p, FGF5 by the let-7 family, GOSR2 by miR-27a-3p, JAG1 by miR-21-5p, SH2B3 by miR-30a-5p, miR-98, miR-181a-5p, and the miR-125 family, TBX3 by the miR-92 family, ADRA1B by miR-22-3p, ADRA2A by miR-30a-5p and miR-30e-5p, ADRA2B by miR-30e-5p, ADRB1 by the let-7 family and miR-98, EDNRB by the miR-92 family, and NOX4 by the miR-92 family, miR-100-5p, and miR-99b-5p (n=3-9; Phypertension.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a polyethylene glycol-induced cysteine protease in common wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qing-Wei Zang; Cai-Xiang Wang; Xu-Yan Li; Zhi-Ai Guo; Rui-Lian Jing; Jun Zhao; Xiao-Ping Chang

    2010-09-01

    Plant cysteine protease (CP) genes are induced by abiotic stresses such as drought, yet their functions remain largely unknown. We isolated the full-length cDNA encoding a Triticum aestivum CP gene, designated TaCP, from wheat by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. Sequence analysis revealed that TaCP contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids, which is 96% identical to barley cysteine protease HvSF42. The TaCP transcript level in wheat seedlings was upregulated during polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress, with a peak appearing around 12 h after treatment. TaCP expression level increased rapidly with NaCl treatment at 48 h. TaCP responded strongly to low temperature (4°C) treatment from 1 h post-treatment and reached a peak of about 40-fold at 72 h. However, it showed only a very slight response to abscisic acid (ABA). More than one copy of TaCP was present in each of the three genomes of hexaploid wheat and its diploid donors. TaCP fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was located in the plasma membrane of onion epidermis cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaCP showed stronger drought tolerance and higher CP activity under water-stressed conditions than wild-type Arabidopsis plants. The results suggest that TaCP plays a role in tolerance to water deficit.

  15. Inactivation of a Pleurotus ostreatus versatile peroxidase-encoding gene (mnp2) results in reduced lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salame, Tomer M; Knop, Doriv; Levinson, Dana; Mabjeesh, Sameer J; Yarden, Oded; Hadar, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Lignin biodegradation by white-rot fungi is pivotal to the earth's carbon cycle. Manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the most common extracellular ligninolytic peroxidases produced by white-rot fungi, are considered key in ligninolysis. Pleurotus ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a preferential lignin degrader occupying niches rich in lignocellulose such as decaying trees. Here, we provide direct, genetically based proof for the functional significance of MnP to P. ostreatus ligninolytic capacity under conditions mimicking its natural habitat. When grown on a natural lignocellulosic substrate of cotton stalks under solid-state culture conditions, gene and isoenzyme expression profiles of its short MnP and versatile peroxidase (VP)-encoding gene family revealed that mnp2 was predominately expressed. mnp2, encoding the versatile short MnP isoenzyme 2 was disrupted. Inactivation of mnp2 resulted in three interrelated phenotypes, relative to the wild-type strain: (i) reduction of 14% and 36% in lignin mineralization of stalks non-amended and amended with Mn(2+), respectively; (ii) marked reduction of the bioconverted lignocellulose sensitivity to subsequent bacterial hydrolyses; and (iii) decrease in fungal respiration rate. These results may serve as the basis to clarify the roles of the various types of fungal MnPs and VPs in their contribution to white-rot decay of wood and lignocellulose in various ecosystems.

  16. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliécer eGonzález Muñoz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members.

  17. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  18. The ArcD1 and ArcD2 arginine/ornithine exchangers encoded in the arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway gene cluster of Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noens, Elke E E; Kaczmarek, Michał B; Żygo, Monika; Lolkema, Juke S

    2015-01-01

    The arginine deiminase pathway (ADI) gene cluster in Lactococcus lactis contains two copies of a gene encoding an L-arginine/L-ornithine exchanger, the arcD1 and arcD2 genes. The physiological function of ArcD1 and ArcD2 was studied by deleting the two genes. Deletion of arcD1 resulted in loss of th

  19. Transformation of Coat Protein Encoding Gene from Soil-Borne Mosaic Virus into Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jun-lan; XU Hui-jun; DU Li-pu; YE Xing-guo; LI Lian-cheng; XIN Zhi-yong; MA You-zhi; DIAO Ai-po; Adams M J

    2003-01-01

    CWMV-CP1 target gene and bar selection gene were co-transferred into commercial wheat vari-ety of Yangmai158 by particle bombardment. In total, 145 resistant plants to 3 - 5 mg L-1 Bialaphos were ob-tained, 21 plants were identified to be positive in T0 generation by PCR-Southern test, and the transformationfrequency had 0. 99%. T1 plants were further tested by PCR and Southern hybridization. Results demonstra-ted that the alien resistance gene had been integrated into the wheat genome. The segregation ratio of CP1+ toCP1- in T1 generation was 1.0 to 1.3, and didn't agree with Mendelian rule. RT-PCR result from T2 plantsshowed that the alien gene CWMV-CP1 had stable expression in wheat genetic background.

  20. Cloning and expression of gene encoding P23 protein from Cryptosporidium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Thi Bich Lan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We cloned the cp23 gene coding P23 (glycoprotein from Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam. The coding region of cp23 gene from C. parvum is 99% similar with cp23 gene deposited in NCBI (accession number: U34390. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the cp23 gene in E. coli BL21 StarTM (DE3 produced polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 37, 40 and 49 kDa. These molecules may be non-glycosylated or glycosylated P23 fusion polypeptides. Recombinant P23 protein purified by GST (glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography can be used as an antigen for C. parvum antibody production as well as to develop diagnostic kit for C. parvum.

  1. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is caused by mutations in ETHE1, a gene encoding a mitochondrial matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiranti, Valeria; D'Adamo, Pio; Briem, Egill; Ferrari, Gianfrancesco; Mineri, Rossana; Lamantea, Eleonora; Mandel, Hanna; Balestri, Paolo; Garcia-Silva, Maria-Teresa; Vollmer, Brigitte; Rinaldo, Piero; Hahn, Si Houn; Leonard, James; Rahman, Shamima; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Gasparini, Paolo; Zeviani, Massimo

    2004-02-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a devastating infantile metabolic disorder affecting the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral vessels. High levels of ethylmalonic acid are detected in the body fluids, and cytochrome c oxidase activity is decreased in skeletal muscle. By use of a combination of homozygosity mapping, integration of physical and functional genomic data sets, and mutational screening, we identified GenBank D83198 as the gene responsible for EE. We also demonstrated that the D83198 protein product is targeted to mitochondria and internalized into the matrix after energy-dependent cleavage of a short leader peptide. The gene had previously been known as "HSCO" (for hepatoma subtracted clone one). However, given its role in EE, the name of the gene has been changed to "ETHE1." The severe consequences of its malfunctioning indicate an important role of the ETHE1 gene product in mitochondrial homeostasis and energy metabolism.

  2. The pink gene encodes the Drosophila orthologue of the human Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5 (HPS5) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrzycka, Monika; McEachern, Lori A; Kinneard, Jennifer; Prabhu, Kristel; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen; Schulze, Sandra; Rawls, John M; Lloyd, Vett K; Sinclair, Donald A R; Honda, Barry M

    2007-06-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) consists of a set of human autosomal recessive disorders, with symptoms resulting from defects in genes required for protein trafficking in lysosome-related organelles such as melanosomes and platelet dense granules. A number of human HPS genes and rodent orthologues have been identified whose protein products are key components of 1 of 4 different protein complexes (AP-3 or BLOC-1, -2, and -3) that are key participants in the process. Drosophila melanogaster has been a key model organism in demonstrating the in vivo significance of many genes involved in protein trafficking pathways; for example, mutations in the "granule group" genes lead to changes in eye colour arising from improper protein trafficking to pigment granules in the developing eye. An examination of the chromosomal positioning of Drosophila HPS gene orthologues suggested that CG9770, the Drosophila HPS5 orthologue, might correspond to the pink locus. Here we confirm this gene assignment, making pink the first eye colour gene in flies to be identified as a BLOC complex gene.

  3. New variants of lepidoptericidal toxin genes encoding Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3Aa proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauka, Diego H; Rodriguez, Sonia E; Benintende, Graciela B

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an entomopathogenic bacterium characterized by producing parasporal proteinaceous insecticidal crystal inclusions during sporulation. Many strains are capable of also expressing other insecticidal proteins called Vip during the vegetative growing phase. Particularly, Vip3A proteins have activity against certain Lepidoptera species through a unique mechanism of action which emphasized their possible use in resistance management strategies against resistant pests. The aim of the work was to develop a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method that can distinguish between vip3A genes from B. thuringiensis strains. In addition, 4 novel vip3Aa genes were cloned and sequenced. The method was originally based on amplification of a single PCR amplicon and the use of 2 restriction enzymes with recognition sites that facilitate simultaneous detection. Subsequently, a third restriction enzyme was used to distinguish between vip3A variants. Thirteen vip3Aa genes were identified in strains belonging to 10 different B. thuringiensis serovars. Three intra-subclass variants of vip3Aa genes could be differentiated. The presented method can serve as an invaluable tool for the investigation of known and novel vip3A genes in B. thuringiensis strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where variants of a same subclass of insecticidal genes could be distinguished following PCR-RFLP.

  4. Organization and control of genes encoding catabolic enzymes in Rhizobiaceae. Progress report, March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, D.; Ornston, L.N.

    1993-03-01

    Rhizobiaceae, a diverse bacterial group comprising rhizobia and agrobacteria, symbiotic partnership with plants form nitrogen-fixing nodules on plant roots or are plant pathogens. Phenolic compounds produced by plants serve as inducers of rhizobial nodulation genes and agrobacterial virulence genes reflect their capacity to utilize numerous aromatics, including phenolics, as a source of carbon and energy. In many microbes the aerobic degradation of numerous aromatic compounds to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is achieved by the {beta}-ketoadipate pathway. Our initial studies focused on the organization and regulation of the ketoadipate pathway in Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We have cloned, identified and characterized a novel regulatory gene that modulates expression of an adjacent pca (protocatechuate) structural gene, pcaD. Regulation of pcaD is mediated by the regulatory gene, termed pcaQ, in concert with the intermediate {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate. {beta}-carboxy-cis,cismuconate is an unstable chemical, not marketed commercially, and it is unlikely to permeate Escherichia coli cells if supplied in media. Because of these factors, characterization of pcaQ in E. coli required an in vivo delivery system for {beta}-carboxycis,cis-muconate. This was accomplished by designing an E. coli strain that expressed an Acinetobacter calcoaceticus pcaA gene for conversion of protocatechuate to {beta}-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate.

  5. Molecular Characterization and Sequencing of a Gene Encoding Mannose Binding Protein in an Iranian Isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii as a Major Agent of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Farnia

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii is the important cause of amoebic keratitis in Iran. The key molecule in pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is Mannose Binding Protein (MBP led to adhesion of amoeba to corneal epithelium. Subsequent to adhesion other cytopathic effects occur. The goal of this study was to identify the molecular characterization of a gene encoding MBP in an Iranian isolate of A.castellanii in order to pave the way for further investigations such as new therapeutic advances or immunization. Methods: A.castellanii was cultured on non nutrient agar. Extraction of DNA was performed by phenol-chloroform method. After designing a pair of primer for the gene encoding MBP, PCR analysis was performed. Finally, the PCR product has been sequenced and the result submitted to the gene data banks. Results: An MBP gene of 1081 nucleotides was sequenced. This fragment contained three introns and encodes a protein with 194 amino acids. Homology search by Blast program showed a significant homology with the MBP gene in gene data banks (96%. Besides, the identity of amino acids with the other MBPs in gene data banks was about 86%. Conclusion: We isolated and sequenced a gene fragment encoding MBP in an Iranian isolate of A.castellanii. Molecular characterization of this important gene is the first step in pursuing researches such as developing better therapeutic agents, immunization of population at risk or even developing a diagnostic tool by PCR techniques.

  6. Product-induced gene expression, a product-responsive reporter assay used to screen metagenomic libraries for enzyme-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2010-11-01

    A reporter assay-based screening method for enzymes, which we named product-induced gene expression (PIGEX), was developed and used to screen a metagenomic library for amidases. A benzoate-responsive transcriptional activator, BenR, was placed upstream of the gene encoding green fluorescent protein and used as a sensor. Escherichia coli sensor cells carrying the benR-gfp gene cassette fluoresced in response to benzoate concentrations as low as 10 μM but were completely unresponsive to the substrate benzamide. An E. coli metagenomic library consisting of 96,000 clones was grown in 96-well format in LB medium containing benzamide. The library cells were then cocultivated with sensor cells. Eleven amidase genes were recovered from 143 fluorescent wells; eight of these genes were homologous to known bacterial amidase genes while three were novel genes. In addition to their activity toward benzamide, the enzymes were active toward various substrates, including d- and l-amino acid amides, and displayed enantioselectivity. Thus, we demonstrated that PIGEX is an effective approach for screening novel enzymes based on product detection.

  7. Structural organization of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs U1 to U6 of Tetrahymena thermophila is very similar to that of plant small nuclear RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orum, H; Nielsen, Henrik; Engberg, J

    1992-01-01

    We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate that there ar......We report the sequences of the genes encoding the small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) U1 to U6 of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. The genes of the individual snRNAs exist in two to six slightly different copies per haploid genome. Sequence analyses of the gene-flanking regions indicate...

  8. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of Streptococcus mutans strains with the cnm gene encoding collagen-binding adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapirattanakul, Jinthana; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nomura, Ryota; Leelataweewud, Pattarawadee; Chalermsarp, Narumon; Klaophimai, Arthit; Srisatjaluk, Ratchapin; Hamada, Shigeyuki; Ooshima, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    Streptococcus mutans is one of the oral pathogens associated with infective endocarditis (IE). With respect to bacterial binding ability to the extracellular matrix, the Cnm protein, a cell surface collagen-binding adhesin of S. mutans, is known as one of the possible virulence factors with regard to IE. In this study, we aimed to determine the distribution of the cnm gene, which encodes Cnm, in a large number of clinical isolates of S. mutans from Thai subjects. Then, the cnm-positive strains were classified using a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme, which we constructed previously. In addition, the data were analysed together with our previous MLST data of cnm-positive strains from Japan and Finland in order to evaluate the clonal relationship among S. mutans strains harbouring the cnm gene. The cnm gene was detected in 12.4 % of all 750 Thai isolates, and serotype f showed the highest rate of detection (54.5 %). According to the MLST data, two clonal complex groups were revealed as the important clones related to cnm-positive S. mutans from various origins of isolation. Moreover, the collagen-binding properties of S. mutans strains with the cnm gene were significantly greater than those of strains without the gene, although four cnm-negative strains classified into two sequence types (STs), ST110 and ST136, showed extremely high collagen-binding rates suggesting the presence of additional genes involved with collagen binding in these STs. Taken together, these results provided information on both epidemiological as well as evolutional aspects of S. mutans possessing the cnm gene.

  9. Isolation and Expression Analysis of FTZ-F1 Encoding Gene of Black Rock Fish (Sebastes schlegelii)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Shafi; WANG Yanan; ZHOU Xiaosu; MA Liman; Faiz Muhammad; QI Jie; ZHANG Quanqi

    2013-01-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene.In this study,FTZ-F1 gene (FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning.The full-length cDNA of S.schlegeli FTZ-F1 (ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5'UTR,a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3'UTR.Sequence,tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F 1 belonged to FTZ group,holding highly conserved regions including Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer.Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages.In juveniles (105 days old),the transcript ofssFTZ-Fl can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis,ovary,spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues.In mature fish,the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis,ovary,spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount),and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues.The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish.In addition,the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts (P<0.05).

  10. Assignment of genes encoding metallothioneins I and II to Chinese hamster chromosomes 3. Evidence for the role of chromosome rearrangement in gene amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallings, R.L.; Munk, A.C.; Longmire, J.L.; Hildebrand, C.E.; Crawford, B.D.

    1984-12-01

    Cadmium resistant (Cd/sup r/) variants with coordinately amplified metallothionein I and II (MTI and MTII) genes have been derived from both Chinese hamster ovary and near-euploid Chinese hamster cell lines. Cytogenetic analyses of Cd/sup r/ variants consistently revealed breakage and rearrangement involving chromosome 3p. In situ hybridization with Chinese hamster MT-encoding cDNA probe localized amplified MT gene sequences near the translocation breakpoint involving chromosome 3p. These observations suggested that both functionally related, isometallothionein loci are linked on Chinese hamster chromosome 3. Southern blot analyses of DNAs isolated from a panel of Chinese hamster x mouse somatic cell hybrids which segregate hamster chromosomes confirmed that both MTI and MTII are located on chromosome 3. The authors speculate that rearrangement of chromosome 3p could be causally involved with the amplification of MT genes in Cd/sup r/ hamster cell lines. 34 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  11. Human mitochondrial DNA deletions associated with mutations in the gene encoding Twinkle, a phage T7 gene 4-like protein localized in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelbrink, J N; Li, F Y; Tiranti, V; Nikali, K; Yuan, Q P; Tariq, M; Wanrooij, S; Garrido, N; Comi, G; Morandi, L; Santoro, L; Toscano, A; Fabrizi, G M; Somer, H; Croxen, R; Beeson, D; Poulton, J; Suomalainen, A; Jacobs, H T; Zeviani, M; Larsson, C

    2001-07-01

    The gene products involved in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance and organization remain largely unknown. We report here a novel mitochondrial protein, Twinkle, with structural similarity to phage T7 gene 4 primase/helicase and other hexameric ring helicases. Twinkle colocalizes with mtDNA in mitochondrial nucleoids. Screening of the gene encoding Twinkle in individuals with autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO), associated with multiple mtDNA deletions, identified 11 different coding-region mutations co-segregating with the disorder in 12 adPEO pedigrees of various ethnic origins. The mutations cluster in a region of the protein proposed to be involved in subunit interactions. The function of Twinkle is inferred to be critical for lifetime maintenance of human mtDNA integrity.

  12. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  13. Outsourcing the Nucleus: Nuclear Pore Complex Genes are no Longer Encoded in Nucleomorph Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Neumann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex (NPC facilitates transport between nucleus and cytoplasm. The protein constituents of the NPC, termed nucleoporins (Nups, are conserved across a wide diversity of eukaryotes. In apparent exception to this, no nucleoporin genes have been identified in nucleomorph genomes. Nucleomorphs, nuclear remnants of once free-living eukaryotes, took up residence as secondary endosymbionts in cryptomonad and chlorarachniophyte algae. As these genomes are highly reduced, Nup genes may have been lost, or relocated to the host nucleus. However, Nup genes are often poorly conserved between species, so absence may be an artifact of low sequence similarity. We therefore constructed an evolutionary bioinformatic screen to establish whether the apparent absence of Nup genes in nucleomorph genomes is due to genuine absence or the inability of current methods to detect homologues. We searched green plant (Arabidopsis and rice, green alga (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and red alga (Cyanidioschyzon merolae genomes, plus two nucleomorph genomes (Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta with profile hidden Markov models (HMMs from curated alignments of known vertebrate/yeast Nups. Since the plant, algal and nucleomorph genomes all belong to the kingdom Plantae, and are evolutionarily distant from the outgroup (vertebrate/yeast training set, we use the plant and algal genomes as internal positive controls for the sensitivity of the searches in nucleomorph genomes. We fi nd numerous Nup homologues in all plant and free-living algal species, but none in either nucleomorph genome. BLAST searches using identified plant and algal Nups also failed to detect nucleomorph homologues. We conclude that nucleomorph Nup genes have either been lost, being replaced by host Nup genes, or, that nucleomorph Nup genes have been transferred to the host nucleus twice independently; once in the evolution of the red algal nucleomorph and once in the green algal nucleomorph.

  14. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Encodes a cAMP-Dependent Chloride Channel in Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Padraig; Warth, John D.; Levesque, Paul C.; Collier, Mei Lin; Geary, Yvonne; Horowitz, Burton; Hume, Joseph R.

    1996-06-01

    cAMP-dependent chloride channels in heart contribute to autonomic regulation of action potential duration and membrane potential and have been inferred to be due to cardiac expression of the epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel. In this report, a cDNA from rabbit ventricle was isolated and sequenced, which encodes an exon 5 splice variant (exon 5-) of CFTR, with >90% identity to human CFTR cDNA present in epithelial cells. Expression of this cDNA in Xenopus oocytes gave rise to robust cAMP-activated chloride currents that were absent in control water-injected oocytes. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides directed against CFTR significnatly reduced the density of cAMP-dependent chloride currents in acutely cultured myocytes, thereby establishing a direct functional link between cardiac expression of CFTR protein and an endogenous chloride channel in native cardiac myocytes.

  15. Chromosomal Organization and Sequence Diversity of Genes Encoding Lachrymatory Factor Synthase in Allium cepa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamura, Noriya; McCallum, John; Khrustaleva, Ludmila; Kenel, Fernand; Pither-Joyce, Meegham; Shono, Jinji; Suzuki, Go; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2012-06-01

    Lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) catalyzes the formation of lachrymatory factor, one of the most distinctive traits of bulb onion (Allium cepa L.). Therefore, we used LFS as a model for a functional gene in a huge genome, and we examined the chromosomal organization of LFS in A. cepa by multiple approaches. The first-level analysis completed the chromosomal assignment of LFS gene to chromosome 5 of A. cepa via the use of a complete set of A. fistulosum-shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group) monosomic addition lines. Subsequent use of an F(2) mapping population from the interspecific cross A. cepa × A. roylei confirmed the assignment of an LFS locus to this chromosome. Sequence comparison of two BAC clones bearing LFS genes, LFS amplicons from diverse germplasm, and expressed sequences from a doubled haploid line revealed variation consistent with duplicated LFS genes. Furthermore, the BAC-FISH study using the two BAC clones as a probe showed that LFS genes are localized in the proximal region of the long arm of the chromosome. These results suggested that LFS in A. cepa is transcribed from at least two loci and that they are localized on chromosome 5.

  16. Mutations affecting the expression of the MOX gene encoding peroxisomal methanol oxidase in Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallini, V; Berardi, E; Strabbioli, R

    2000-11-01

    In this study, aimed at identifying genetic factors acting positively upon the MOX gene, we report the isolation and characterisation of several methanol utilisation-defective (Mut-) mutants of Hansenula polymorpha. These fall into 12 complementation groups, eight of which show significant reductions in alcohol (methanol) oxidase activity in methanol. Three of these groups, identifying the MUT3, MUT5 and MUT10 loci, exhibit extremely low levels of MOX promoter activity, not only in methanol medium, but also during growth in glycerol or methylamine. We suggest that these loci play a significant role in the derepression of the MOX gene expression. One of these genes (MUT10) also seems to be involved in the utilisation of carbon sources other than methanol, and it is apparent that the same gene plays some role in the biogenesis or in the enlargement of the peroxisome. Three other genes (MUT7, MUT8 and MUT9) appear to be involved in peroxisome biogenesis, whereas most other mutants harbour lesions that leave the peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation unaffected.

  17. Cloning and Expression Analysis of MEP Pathway Enzyme-encoding Genes in Osmanthus fragrans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of many crucial secondary metabolites, such as carotenoids, monoterpenes, plastoquinone, and tocopherols. In this study, we isolated and identified 10 MEP pathway genes in the important aromatic plant sweet osmanthus (Osmanthus fragrans. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that 10 MEP pathway genes shared high identities with other reported proteins. The genes showed distinctive expression profiles in various tissues, or at different flower stages and diel time points. The qRT-PCR results demonstrated that these genes were highly expressed in inflorescences, which suggested a tissue-specific transcript pattern. Our results also showed that OfDXS1, OfDXS2, and OfHDR1 had a clear diurnal oscillation pattern. The isolation and expression analysis provides a strong foundation for further research on the MEP pathway involved in gene function and molecular evolution, and improves our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying this pathway in plants.

  18. Chromosomal localization of a novel retinoic acid induced gene RA28 and the protein distribution of its encoded protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Gene RA28 is a retinoic acid induced novel gene isolated in our laboratory previously. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was used to induce lung adenocarcinoma cell line GLC-82, and RA28 was obtained by subtractive hybridization. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a unique tool for examining introcellular phenomena in living cells. GFP possesses an intrinsic fluorescence at 488 nm that does not require other co-factors. In this report, an eukaryotic expression plasmid pEGFP-C1-RA28 was constructed and transfected with parental cell line GLC-82 to analyze protein expression and its distribution in living cells. Moreover, radiation hybrid (RH) technique was used to localize RA28 to the chromosome. The results show that gene RA28 is mapped to the chromosome 19q13.1 region, its encoded protein is distributed on cell membrane. All the results further demonstrate that GFP and RH techniques are accurate, fast, repetitive, and will be powerful methods for investigating the gene and protein localization.

  19. The saci_2123 gene of the hyperthermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius encodes an ATP-binding cassette multidrug transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Nuan; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) transporters are capable of secreting structurally and functionally unrelated toxic compounds from the cell. Among this group are ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These membrane proteins are typically arranged as either hetero- or homo-dimers of ABC half-transporters with each subunit consisting of a membrane domain fused at the C-terminus to an ATP-binding domain, or as full transporters in which the two subunits are fused into a single polypeptide. The saci_2123 gene of the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is the only gene in the genome that encodes an ATP-binding cassette half-transporter, while a homologous gene is present in the genomes of S. solfataricus, S. tokodaii and S islandicus. Saci_2123 shares homology with well-characterized bacterial and mammalian MDR transporters. The saci_2132 gene is up-regulated when cells are exposed to drugs. A deletion mutant of saci_2132 was found to be more vulnerable to a set of toxic compounds, including detergents, antibiotics and uncouplers as compared to the wild-type strain, while the drug resistance could be restored through the plasmid-based expression of saci_2132. These data demonstrate that Saci_2132 is an archaeal ABC-MDR transporter and therefore it was termed Smr1 (Sulfolobus multidrug resistance transporter 1).

  20. Transgenic Leucaena leucocephala expressing the Rhizobium gene pydA encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase shows reduced mimosine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jube, Sandro L R; Borthakur, Dulal

    2010-04-01

    The use of the tree-legume Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena), which contains high levels of proteins in its foliage, is limited due to the presence of the toxic free amino acid mimosine. The goal of this research was to develop transgenic leucaena with reduced mimosine content. Two genes, pydA and pydB, encoding a meta-cleavage dioxygenase (EC 1.13.11.2) and a pyruvate hydrolase (EC 3.7.1.6), respectively, from the mimosine-degrading leucaena symbiont Rhizobium sp. strain TAL1145, were used to transform leucaena. These bacterial genes were sequence-optimized for expression in leucaena and cloned into the plant binary vector pCAMBIA3201 for Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Using immature zygotic embryos as the start explant material, six pydA and three pydB transgenic lines were developed. The presence and expression of the bacterial genes in the transgenic lines were verified by PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR, and Southern analyses. HPLC analyses of the transgenic plants determined that the mimosine contents of the pydA-expressing lines were reduced up to 22.5% in comparison to the wild-type. No significant reduction in mimosine content was observed in the pydB-expressing lines. This is the first example of using a gene from a bacterial symbiont to reduce the toxicity of a tree-legume.

  1. Cloning, Sequencing and Characterization of 3-Hydroxybuty- rate Dehydrogenase Encoding Gene (bdh A) in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Mei-xue; WU Bo; BAI Xue-liang; ZHANG Cheng-gang; MA Qing-sheng; Charles Trevor C

    2002-01-01

    The current study describes the molecular characterization of a clone which can restore the ability of bdhA mutant strains NGRPA2 and Rm11107 to utilize 3-hydroxybutyrate as a sole carbon source (Hbu+). This clone was screened out by complementation experiment from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 genomic library, and the presence of bdhA gene in the clone was verified by Bdh assay and Southern blot analysis. Furthermore, the entire sequence of bdhA gene was sequenced and the sequence was deposited in GenBank database under the accession number AY077581. bdhA gene comprises 789 base pairs and encodes Bdh with 262 amino acid of MW 27.59 kDa. Interposon ΩKm was inserted into the bdh A ORF at EcoR I site and the bdhA mutant was constructed in B .japonicum by homologous recombination. Plant assay result did not show obvious effects of mutation of bdhA gene on nodulation and nitrogen-fixation.

  2. Cloning and Expression Pattern of a Gene Encoding a Putative Plastidic ATP/ADP Transporter from Helianthus tuberosus L.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun MENG; Tuan-Jie CHANG; Xiang LIU; Song-Biao CHEN; Yong-Qin WANG; Ai-Jun SUN; Hong-Lin XU; Xiao-Li WEI; Zhen ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Herein, we report the cloning and molecular characterization of a full cDNA encoding a putative plastidic ATP/ADP transporter, designated HtAATP, for Helianthus tuberosus L. The ATP/ADP translocator protein was isolated from the tuber-cDNA library of H. tuberosus for the first time. The predicted HtAATP protein was judged as a plastidic ATP/ADP translocator protein from its high homology at the amino acid sequence level to the two Arabidopsis thaliana plastidic ATP/ADP translocator proteins AATP1 and AATP2 (84.8% and 79.9% identity, respectively). Amino acid sequence analysis of the primary structure of HtAATP revealed that it belonged to the plastidic ATP/ADP transporter family. Hydropathy prediction indicated that HtAATP gene product is a highly hydrophobic membrane protein that contains 10 transmembrane domains to form a spanning topology. Southern blotting analysis showed that the HtAATP gene is a single-copy gene in the H. tuberosus genome. Tissue distribution analysis showed that the HtAATP gene is prominently expressed in sink tissues. A stable expression pattern in tubers at different developmental stages implies an active involvement of HtAATP during carbohydrate formation.

  3. Isolation and characterization of the glnD gene of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, encoding a putative uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlova, Olena; Nawroth, Roman; Zellermann, Eva-Maria; Meletzus, Dietmar

    2002-09-04

    The glnD gene of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus was isolated by complementation of the Azotobacter vinelandii glnD (nfrX) mutant strain MV17 using a pLAFR3 cosmid library. The 5 kb chromosomal DNA region encoding the glnD gene on cosmid pAD401 was identified by introduction of deletions as well as subcloning of restriction fragments followed by subsequent DNA sequencing. Three open reading frames were identified with the deduced amino acid sequence of ORF1 showing significant homologies to known GlnD proteins of other proteobacteria such as Sinorhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium tropici, Escherichia coli and Azotobacter vinelandii.A mutagenesis of the chromosomal glnD gene was carried out by insertion of an interposon carrying the kanamycin resistance gene of Tn5. Mutants carrying the cassette inserted into a central region of glnD could not be isolated, while an interposon mutation at the 3' end of glnD was successful. The resulting strain showed a prolonged generation time in complex growth medium and was unable to utilize ammonium as sole nitrogen source. This phenotype appears to be pleiotropic, since the addition of single amino acids to the minimal medium was not sufficient to allow growth. Furthermore, the glnD mutant was able to express nitrogenase under diazotrophic as well as repressing growth conditions.

  4. Expression cloning and characterization of a novel gene that encodes the RNA-binding protein FAU-1 from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Akio; Oida, Hanako; Matsuura, Nana; Doi, Hirofumi

    2003-05-15

    We systematically screened a genomic DNA library to identify proteins of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus using an expression cloning method. One gene product, which we named FAU-1 (P. furiosus AU-binding), demonstrated the strongest binding activity of all the genomic library-derived proteins tested against an AU-rich RNA sequence. The protein was purified to near homogeneity as a 54 kDa single polypeptide, and the gene locus corresponding to this FAU-1 activity was also sequenced. The FAU-1 gene encoded a 472-amino-acid protein that was characterized by highly charged domains consisting of both acidic and basic amino acids. The N-terminal half of the gene had a degree of similarity (25%) with RNase E from Escherichia coli. Five rounds of RNA-binding-site selection and footprinting analysis showed that the FAU-1 protein binds specifically to the AU-rich sequence in a loop region of a possible RNA ligand. Moreover, we demonstrated that the FAU-1 protein acts as an oligomer, and mainly as a trimer. These results showed that the FAU-1 protein is a novel heat-stable protein with an RNA loop-binding characteristic.

  5. Transformation of pickling cucumber with chitinase-encoding genes using Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raharjo, S H; Hernandez, M O; Zhang, Y Y; Punja, Z K

    1996-04-01

    Transformation of cucumber cv. Endeavor was attempted using three Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains (a supervirulent leucinopine type, an octopine type and a nopaline type), each harbouring one of three binary vectors which contained an acidic chitinase gene from petunia, and basic chitinase genes from tobacco and bean, respectively, driven by the CaMV 35S promoter. Petiole explants were inoculated with a bacterial suspension (10(8) cells·ml(-1)), cocultivated for 48-96 h and placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium with 5.0 μM each of 2,4-D and BA, 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin and 500 mg·l(-1) carbenicillin. The frequency of embryogenic callus formation ranged from 0 to 12%, depending on strains/vectors used and length of cocultivation, with the highest being obtained using the leucinopine strain with petunia acidic chitinase gene. The kanamycin-resistant embryogenic calli were used to initiate suspension cultures (in liquid MS medium with 1.0/1.0 μM 2,4-D/BA, 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin) for multiplication of embryogenic cell aggregates. Upon plating of cell aggregates onto solid MS medium with 1.0/1.0 μM NAA/BA and 50 mg·l(-1) kanamycin, calli continued to grow and later differentiated into plantlets. Transformation by the leucinopine strain and all three vectors was confirmed by PCR amplification of the NPT II gene in transgenic calli and plants, in addition to Southern analysis. Expression of the acidic chitinase gene (from petunia) and both basic chitinase genes (from tobacco and bean) in different transgenic cucumber lines was confirmed by Western analyses.

  6. Common variants of the genes encoding erythropoietin and its receptor modulate cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästner, Anne; Grube, Sabrina; El-Kordi, Ahmed;

    2012-01-01

    ) genotypes with cognitive functions. To prove this hypothesis, schizophrenic patients (N > 1000) were genotyped for 5' upstream-located gene variants, EPO SNP rs1617640 (T/G) and EPORSTR(GA)(n). Associations of these variants were obtained for cognitive processing speed, fine motor skills and short...... expression of constitutively active EPOR in pyramidal neurons of cortex and hippocampus. We thus predicted that the human genotypes associated with better cognition would reflect gain-of-function effects. Indeed, reporter gene assays and quantitative transcriptional analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear...

  7. Characterization of three genomic loci encoding Rhizobium sp. strain ORS571 N2 fixation genes.

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-five independent, N2 fixation-defective (Nif-) vector insertion (Vi) mutants were selected, cloned, and mapped to the ORS571 genome. The recombinant Nif::Vi plasmids obtained in this way were used as DNA hybridization probes to isolate homologous phages from a genomic library of ORS571 constructed in lambda EMBL3. Genomic maps were drawn for three ORS571 Nif gene loci. Forty-five Nif::Vi mutants in genomic Nif locus 1 defined two gene clusters separated by 8 kilobase pairs (kb) of DNA. ...

  8. Retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2 in mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yingang; Guo Xiong; Liu Zheng; Wang Shijie

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2 in mesenchymal stem cells. Methods Mesenchymal stem cells from New Zealand white rabbits were transduced with retroviral pLEGFP-BMP2 vector by the optimized retroviral transduction protocol. Fluorescent microscopy's examination was to evaluate the results of the transduction, flow cytometer's analysis was to evaluate the transduction efficiency and the Fluorescence-activated cell sorting method was to sort the transduced cells. Bioactivity test from C2C12K4 cells was to show the expression and bio-activity of the fusion gene. Results Fluorescent microscopy showed the success of the transduction. By flow cytometer's analysis, the mean efficiency of the transduction with EGFP was (42.8±6.1)% SD. Transduced cells were sorted efficiently by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting method and after sorting, almost of those showed the expression of BMP2. Fluorescently and strongly bioactivity test for C2C12K4 cells demonstrated that fluorescent materials were located the surface of cells and the activity of luciferase increased compared with the control. Analysis of long-term expression showed there was no difference between 2 week-time point and 3 month-time point of culture post-sorting. Conclusion Mesenchymal stem cells can be transduced efficiently by retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2, the highly pure transduced cells are obtained by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique, the expressed chimeric protein embraced the double bioactivity of EGFP and BMP2, and moreover, the expression had not attenuated over time.

  9. Cloning and expression of AtPLC6, a gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaojing; CAO Zhixiang; LIU Guoqin; Madan K. Bhattacharrya; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    A full-length eDNA clone corresponding to a putative phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by screening a cDNA library and using RT-PCR strategy. The cDNA, designated AtPLC6, encodes a putative polypeptide of 578 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 66251.84 D and a pI of 7.24. The sequence analysis indicates that the polypeptide contains X, Y, EF-hand and C2 domains. The overall structure of putative AtPLC6 protein, like other plant PI-PLCs, is most similar to that of mammalian PLC& The recombinant AtPLC6 protein expressed in E. coli was able to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biophosphate (PIP2) to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphate (IP3) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). The protein hydrolyzes PIP2 in a Ca2+-dependent manner and the optimum concentration of Ca2+ is 10 μmol/L.These results suggested that AtPLC6 gene encodes a genuine PI-PLC. Northern blot analysis showed that the AtPLC6 gene is expressed at low level in all examined tissues, such as roots,stems, leaves, flowers, siliques and seedlings under normal growth conditions. The gene is strongly induced under low temperature and weakly induced under various stresses,such as ABA, high-salt stress and heat. These results suggested that AtPLC6 might be involved in the signal-transduction pathways of cold responses of the plants.

  10. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups fo...

  11. CLONING, SEQUENCING AND EXPRESSION STUDIES OF THE GENES ENCODING AMICYANIN AND THE BETA-SUBUNIT OF METHYLAMINE DEHYDROGENASE FROM THIOBACILLUS-VERSUTUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    UBBINK, M; VANKLEEF, MAG; KLEINJAN, DJ; HOITINK, CWG; HUITEMA, F; BEINTEMA, JJ; DUINE, JA; CANTERS, GW

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding amicyanin and the beta-subunit of methylamine dehydrogenase (MADH) from Thiobacillus versutus have been cloned and sequenced. The organization of these genes makes it likely that they are coordinately expressed and it supports earlier findings that the blue copper protein amicyani

  12. Single-nucleotide variations in the genes encoding the mitochondrial Hsp60/Hsp10 chaperone system and their disease-causing potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bross, Peter; Li, Zhijie; Hansen, Jakob; Hansen, Jens Jacob; Nielsen, Marit Nyholm; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Georgopoulos, Costa; Ang, Debbie; Lundemose, Jytte Banner; Niezen-Koning, Klary; Eiberg, Hans; Yang, Huanming; Kolvraa, Steen; Bolund, Lars; Gregersen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Molecular chaperones assist protein folding, and variations in their encoding genes may be disease-causing in themselves or influence the phenotypic expression of disease-associated or susceptibility-conferring variations in many different genes. We have screened three candidate patient groups for v

  13. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of two novel genes from hexaploid wheat that encode double PR-1 domains coupled with a receptor-like protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) contains at least 23 TaPr-1 genes encoding the group 1 pathogenesis-related (PR-1) proteins as identified in our previous work. Here we report the cloning and characterization of TaPr-1-rk1 and TaPr-1-rk2, two novel genes closely related to the wheat PR-1 famil...

  15. Cloning of first abc transporter encoding gene from Trichoderma spp.and its expression during stress and mycoparasitism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanzuise S; Scala F; Del Sorbo G; Ruocco M; Scala V; Catapano L; Woo S; Ciliento R; Ferraioli S; Soriente I; Vinale F

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichoderma in its natural environment competes for nutrient uptake and is required to protect itself from adverse natural toxic compounds, such as those produced by plants and other microbes in the soil community, or synthetic toxic compounds released human activity. One of the most important metabolic pathways for drug resistance and substrate uptake, both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is ATP dependent. The role of ABC transporter proteins in the biology of Trichoderma is still not known. We present the cloning of the first four ABC transporter genes (TABC1 , TABC2, TABC3,TABC4) in Trichoderma, and in particular T. atroviride P1, and the characterization of TABC2The complete sequence of this gene is 6535 bp, which includes a promoter of 1624 bp, a terminator of 642 bp and a coding region of 4264 bp. The promoter contains many of the potential transcription factor binding sites found in the 5' upstream region of the ech42 gene of T. atroviride P1. These included: heat shock factors (HSF), a nitrogen-regulating factor (Nit-2), a stress-response element (STRE), a GCR1 elements, and a Cre BP1 motif. Northern analysis and RT-PCR demonstrated that TABC2 is highly expressed when Trichoderma is subjected to nitrogen starvation, grown in the presence of culture filtrates of Botrytis cinerea, Rhizoctonia solani, and Pythium ultimum, or when N-acetylglucosamine is added to the substrate. TABC2 appears to be co-regulated with some CWDEencoding genes, suggesting that this is the first ABC transporter encoding gene involved in mycoparasitic events. It's role in the interaction of Trichoderma with fungal hosts or plants is being investigated by targeted gene disruption and overexpression.

  16. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-04-25

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3'-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix-hairpin-Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway.

  17. Expression of the gene encoding the PR-like protein PRms in germinating maize embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casacuberta, J M; Raventós, D; Puigdoménech, P; San Segundo, B

    1992-07-01

    The PRms protein is a pathogenesis-related (PR)-like protein whose mRNA accumulates during germination of maize seeds. Expression of the PRms gene is induced after infection of maize seeds with the fungus Fusarium moniliforme. To further our investigations on the expression of the PRms gene we examined the accumulation of PRms mRNA in different tissues of maize seedlings infected with F. moniliforme and studied the effect of fungal elicitors, the mycotoxin moniliformin, the hormone gibberellic acid, and specific chemical agents. Our results indicate that fungal infection, and treatment either with fungal elicitors or with moniliformin, a mycotoxin produced by F. moniliforme, increase the steady-state level of PRms mRNA. PRms mRNA accumulation is also stimulated by the application of the hormone gibberellic acid or by treatment with silver nitrate, whereas acetylsalicylic acid has no effect. In situ RNA hybridization in isolated germinating embryo sections demonstrates that the PRms gene is expressed in the scutellum, particularly in a group of inner cells, and in the epithelium lying at the interface of the scutellum and the endosperm. The pattern of expression of the PRms gene closely resembles that found for hydrolytic enzymes, being confined to the scutellum and the aleurone layer of the germinating maize seed. Our results suggest that the PRms protein has a function during the normal process of seed germination that has become adapted to serve among the defence mechanisms induced in response to pathogens during maize seed germination.

  18. Three encochitinase-encoding genes identified in the biocontrol fungus Clonostachys rosea are differentially expressed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamarabadi, Mojtaba; Jensen, Birgit; Lübeck, Mette

    2008-01-01

    . rosea were made by disruption of the endochitinase genes via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and their biocontrol activity was evaluated. While in planta bioassays showed no significant difference in biocontrol efficacy between the disruptants and the wildtype, the real time RT-PCR analysis showed...

  19. Increases in the abundance of microbial genes encoding halotolerance and photosynthesis along a sediment salinity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, T. C.; Seymour, J. R.; Newton, K.; Smith, R. J.; Seuront, L.; Mitchell, J. G.

    2012-02-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are driven by the metabolic activity of microbial communities, yet the environmental parameters that underpin shifts in the functional potential coded within microbial community genomes are still poorly understood. Salinity is one of the primary determinants of microbial community structure and can vary strongly along gradients within a variety of habitats. To test the hypothesis that shifts in salinity will also alter the bulk biogeochemical potential of aquatic microbial assemblages, we generated four metagenomic DNA sequence libraries from sediment samples taken along a continuous, natural salinity gradient in the Coorong lagoon, Australia, and compared them to physical and chemical parameters. A total of 392483 DNA sequences obtained from four sediment samples were generated and used to compare genomic characteristics along the gradient. The most significant shifts along the salinity gradient were in the genetic potential for halotolerance and photosynthesis, which were more highly represented in hypersaline samples. At these sites, halotolerance was achieved by an increase in genes responsible for the acquisition of compatible solutes - organic chemicals which influence the carbon, nitrogen and methane cycles of sediment. Photosynthesis gene increases were coupled to an increase in genes matching Cyanobacteria, which are responsible for mediating CO2 and nitrogen cycles. These salinity driven shifts in gene abundance will influence nutrient cycles along the gradient, controlling the ecology and biogeochemistry of the entire ecosystem.

  20. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch...

  1. Structural characteristics of the variable regions of immunoglobulin genes encoding a pathogenic autoantibody in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, B P; Ebling, F M; Roman, C; Panosian-Sahakian, N; Calame, K; Hahn, B H

    1990-02-01

    We have studied several monoclonal anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies for their ability to accelerate lupus nephritis in young NZB X NZW F1 female mice and to induce it in BALB/c mice. Two identified as pathogens in both strains have characteristics previously associated with nephritogenicity: expression of IgG2a isotype and IdGN2 idiotype. Both pathogenic antibodies used the combination of genes from the VHJ558 and VK9 subfamilies. Two weak pathogens failed to accelerate nephritis in young BW mice, but induced lupus nephritis in BALB/c mice. They both express IdGN2; one is cationic and an IgG3, the other is an IgG2a. Additional MAbs (some IgG2a, one IdGN2-positive) did not accelerate or induce nephritis. We have cloned and sequenced the variable regions of the immunoglobulin genes of one pathogenic autoantibody. No unique V, D, or J gene segments and no evidence of unusual mechanisms in generating diversity were used to construct this antibody. These data argue against use of unique abnormal Ig genes by systemic lupus erythematosus individuals to construct pathogenic autoantibody subsets. Instead, the major abnormality may be immunoregulatory.

  2. Increases in the abundance of microbial genes encoding halotolerance and photosynthesis along a sediment salinity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Jeffries

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogeochemical cycles are driven by the metabolic activity of microbial communities, yet the environmental parameters that underpin shifts in the functional potential coded within microbial community genomes are still poorly understood. Salinity is one of the primary determinants of microbial community structure and can vary strongly along gradients within a variety of habitats. To test the hypothesis that shifts in salinity will also alter the bulk biogeochemical potential of aquatic microbial assemblages, we generated four metagenomic DNA sequence libraries from sediment samples taken along a continuous, natural salinity gradient in the Coorong lagoon, Australia, and compared them to physical and chemical parameters. A total of 392483 DNA sequences obtained from four sediment samples were generated and used to compare genomic characteristics along the gradient. The most significant shifts along the salinity gradient were in the genetic potential for halotolerance and photosynthesis, which were more highly represented in hypersaline samples. At these sites, halotolerance was achieved by an increase in genes responsible for the acquisition of compatible solutes – organic chemicals which influence the carbon, nitrogen and methane cycles of sediment. Photosynthesis gene increases were coupled to an increase in genes matching Cyanobacteria, which are responsible for mediating CO2 and nitrogen cycles. These salinity driven shifts in gene abundance will influence nutrient cycles along the gradient, controlling the ecology and biogeochemistry of the entire ecosystem.

  3. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The mouse protein kinase CK2 beta subunit gene (Csnk2b) is composed of seven exons contained within 7874 bp. The exon and intron lengths extend from 76 to 321 and 111 to 1272 bp, respectively. The lengths of the murine coding exons correspond exactly to the lengths of the exons in the human CK2...

  4. A complementary bioinformatics approach to identify potential plant cell wall glycosytransferase encoding genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Jack; Skjøt, Michael; Geshi, Naomi;

    2004-01-01

    . Although much is known with regard to composition and fine structures of the plant CW, only a handful of CW biosynthetic GT genes-all classified in the CAZy system-have been characterized. In an effort to identify CW GTs that have not yet been classified in the CAZy database, a simple bioinformatics...

  5. Database mining and transcriptional analysis of genes encoding inulin-modifying enzymes of Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, X.L.; Goosen, C.; Kools, H.J.; Maarel, van der M.J.; Hondel, van den C.A.M.J.J.; Dijkhuizen, L.; Ram, A.F.

    2006-01-01

    As a soil fungus, Aspergillus niger can metabolize a wide variety of carbon sources, employing sets of enzymes able to degrade plant-derived polysaccharides. In this study the genome sequence of A. niger strain CBS 513.88 was surveyed, to analyse the gene/enzyme network involved in utilization of th

  6. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Malcolm S.; Hill, April L.; Lopez, Jose; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pomponi, Shirley; Diaz, Maria C.; Thacker, Robert W.; Adamska, Maja; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Cárdenas, Paco; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Danka, Elizabeth; De Laine, Bre-Onna; Formica, Dawn; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Klontz, Sarah; Morrow, Christine C.; Patel, Jignasa; Picton, Bernard; Pisani, Davide; Pohlmann, Deborah; Redmond, Niamh E.; Reed, John; Richey, Stacy; Riesgo, Ana; Rubin, Ewelina; Russell, Zach; Rützler, Klaus; Sperling, Erik A.; di Stefano, Michael; Tarver, James E.; Collins, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha), but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosap, Myxospongiaep, Spongillidap, Haploscleromorphap (the marine haplosclerids) and Democlaviap. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosap and Myxospongiaep to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorphap+Spongillidap+Democlaviap. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillidap) are sister to Haploscleromorphap rather than part of Democlaviap. Within Keratosap, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiaep, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlaviap, Tetractinellidap, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis), was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlaviap. Within Tetractinellidap, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae), and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. Conclusions/Significance These results, using an

  7. Occurrence of motile Aeromonas in municipal drinking water and distribution of genes encoding virulence factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablos, Manuel; Rodríguez-Calleja, Jose M; Santos, Jesús A; Otero, Andrés; García-López, María-Luisa

    2009-10-31

    Aeromonas-associated cases of gastroenteritis are generally considered waterborne. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential microbiological risk associated with the presence of these bacteria in public drinking water. Over a period of one year, 132 drinking-water samples were monitored in León (NW of Spain, 137,000 inhabitants) for mandatory drinking-water standards and the occurrence of Aeromonas spp. Samples were taken at the municipal water treatment plant, one storage facility, and two public artesian drinking-water fountains. Because of low numbers of coliforms or Clostridium perfringens, the non-compliance rate with microbial standards was 3.8% whereas the percentage of positive samples for motile mesophilic Aeromonas was 26.5%. For all but two samples, Aeromonas was recovered between October and early March when the temperature was below 14 degrees C and the residual chlorine ranged from 0.21 to 0.72 mg/l. An apparent relationship was observed between rainfall and the incidence of Aeromonas. The 35 selected Aeromonas isolates were identified as A. caviae and A. media. The alt and laf genes were present in all isolates, the aerA gene was present in six isolates, and the four remaining genes investigated (hlyA, ast, stx1 and stx2) were absent. The combinations of putative virulence genes were: aerA(-)/hlyA(-)/alt(+)/ast(-)/laf(+)/stx1(-)/stx2(-) (82.9%) and aerA(+)/hlyA(-)/alt(+)/ast(-)/laf(+)/stx1(-)/stx2(-) (17.1%). None of the isolates bore plasmids. As Aeromonas strains harbouring two or more virulence-associated genes have the potential to cause disease by direct transmission via drinking water or by water use in food preparation, it would be advisable to control excessive numbers of these bacteria in drinking-water supplies.

  8. Sequence analysis of a Molluscum contagiosum virus DNA region which includes the gene encoding protein kinase 2 and other genes with unique organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gallardo, A; Moratilla, M; Funes, J M; Agromayor, M; Nuñez, A; Varas, A J; Collado, M; Valencia, A; Lopez-Estebaranz, J L; Esteban, M

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a near left-terminal region from the genome of Molluscum contagiosum virus subtype I (MCVI) was determined. This region was contained within three adjacent BamHI fragments, designated L (2.4 kilobases (kb)), M (1.8 kb), and N (1.6 kb). BamHI cleavage of MCVI DNA produced another 1.6-kb fragment (N'), which had been mapped 30-50 kb from the L,M region. The MCVI restriction fragments were cloned and end-sequenced. The N fragment that maps at the L,M region was identified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers devised from the sequence of each fragment. The results from this analysis led to establish the relative position of these fragments within the MCVI genome. The analysis of 3.6 kb of DNA sequence revealed the presence of ten open reading frames (ORFs). Comparison of the amino acid sequence of these ORFs to the amino acid sequence of vaccinia virus (VAC) proteins revealed that two complete MCVI ORFs, termed N1L and L1L, showed high degree of homology with VAC F9 and F10 genes, respectively. The F10 gene encodes a 52-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase (protein kinase 2), an essential protein involved in virus morphogenesis. The MCVI homologue (L1L) encoded a putative polypeptide of 443 aa, with a calculated molecular mass of 53 kDa, and 60.5/30.2% sequence identity/similarity to VAC F10. The MCV N1L (213 aa, 24 kDa) showed 42.6/40.6% amino acid sequence identity/similarity to VAC F9, a gene of unknown function encoding a 24-kDa protein with a hydrophobic C-terminal domain, which was conserved in MCVI. The genomic arrangement of MCVI N1L and L1L was equivalent to that of the vaccinia and variola virus homologues. However, the ORFs contained within MCVI fragment M (leftward) showed no homology, neither similarity in genetic organization, to the genes encoded by the corresponding regions of vaccinia and variola viruses.

  9. Mutations in the gene encoding IFT dynein complex component WDR34 cause Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Miriam; Vodopiutz, Julia; Christou-Savina, Sonia; Cortés, Claudio R; McInerney-Leo, Aideen M; Emes, Richard D; Arts, Heleen H; Tüysüz, Beyhan; D'Silva, Jason; Leo, Paul J; Giles, Tom C; Oud, Machteld M; Harris, Jessica A; Koopmans, Marije; Marshall, Mhairi; Elçioglu, Nursel; Kuechler, Alma; Bockenhauer, Detlef; Moore, Anthony T; Wilson, Louise C; Janecke, Andreas R; Hurles, Matthew E; Emmet, Warren; Gardiner, Brooke; Streubel, Berthold; Dopita, Belinda; Zankl, Andreas; Kayserili, Hülya; Scambler, Peter J; Brown, Matthew A; Beales, Philip L; Wicking, Carol; Duncan, Emma L; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-11-01

    Bidirectional (anterograde and retrograde) motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) governs cargo transport and delivery processes that are essential for primary cilia growth and maintenance and for hedgehog signaling functions. The IFT dynein-2 motor complex that regulates ciliary retrograde protein transport contains a heavy chain dynein ATPase/motor subunit, DYNC2H1, along with other less well functionally defined subunits. Deficiency of IFT proteins, including DYNC2H1, underlies a spectrum of skeletal ciliopathies. Here, by using exome sequencing and a targeted next-generation sequencing panel, we identified a total of 11 mutations in WDR34 in 9 families with the clinical diagnosis of Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy). WDR34 encodes a WD40 repeat-containing protein orthologous to Chlamydomonas FAP133, a dynein intermediate chain associated with the retrograde intraflagellar transport motor. Three-dimensional protein modeling suggests that the identified mutations all affect residues critical for WDR34 protein-protein interactions. We find that WDR34 concentrates around the centrioles and basal bodies in mammalian cells, also showing axonemal staining. WDR34 coimmunoprecipitates with the dynein-1 light chain DYNLL1 in vitro, and mining of proteomics data suggests that WDR34 could represent a previously unrecognized link between the cytoplasmic dynein-1 and IFT dynein-2 motors. Together, these data show that WDR34 is critical for ciliary functions essential to normal development and survival, most probably as a previously unrecognized component of the mammalian dynein-IFT machinery.

  10. Cytorhabdovirus P3 genes encode 30K-like cell-to-cell movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Krin S; Bejerman, Nicolas; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. In this study, using trans-complementation of a movement-defective turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) replicon, we show for the first time for cytorhabdoviruses (lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) and alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV)) that their P3 proteins function as MP similar to the TVCV P30 protein. All three MP localized to plasmodesmata when ectopically expressed. In addition, we show that these MP belong to the 30K superfamily since movement was inhibited by mutation of an aspartic acid residue in the critical 30K-specific LxD/N50-70G motif. We also report that Nicotiana benthamiana microtubule-associated VOZ1-like transcriptional activator interacts with LNYV P3 and TVCV P30 but not with ADV P3 or any of the MP point mutants. This host protein, which is known to interact with P3 of sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus, may be involved in aiding the cell-to-cell movement of LNYV and TVCV.

  11. Genes encoding chavicol/eugenol synthase from the creosote bush Larrea tridentata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kim, Sung -Jin; Vassao, Daniel Giddings; Patten, Ann M.; Eichinger, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Particular aspects provide novel methods for redirecting carbon allocation in plants or cell culture from lignification to inherently more useful and tractable materials, and to facilitate the generation of, e.g., biofuels from the remaining plant ro culture biomass. Particular aspects provided novel methods for converting monolignols into allyl/propenyl phenols, and for chavicol/eugenol formation or production. Additional aspects relate to the discovery of novel chavicol/eugenol synthases that convert p-coumaryl/coniferyl alcohol esters into chavicol/eugenol, and to novel compositions (e.g., novel proteins and nucleic acids encoding same), and novel methods using same for producing or forming chavicol/eugenol and other derivatives in cell culture and/or genetically modified plants, and for re-engineering the composition of plant biomass. Particular aspects provide novel methods for generation in culture or in planta of liquid/combustible allyl/propenyl phenols, and these phenolic products are utilized for (non-ethanol) biofuel/bioenergy purposes, while the remaining plant biomass facilitates the generation of other biofuels.

  12. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of cDNA encoding cattle Smad4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui ZHANG; Shangzhong XU; Xue GAO; Hongyan REN; Jinbao CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The cDNA of cattle Smad4 gene was cloned by RT-PCR, 3' RACE and 5' RACE and got a 3503-bp full-long cDNA sequence. The cloned cattle Smad4 cDNA sequence had been send to GenBank and got an accession number: DQ494856. Cattle Smad4 gene consists of 12 exons and codes 553 amino acids. Cattle Smad4 cDNA shares 99%, 96%, 95%, 91% and 91% similarity in nucleic acid sequences, and 99%, 98%, 98%, 99% and 98% sim-ilarity in amino acid sequences with sheep, pig, human, rat and mouse, respectively. Smad4 cDNA was found in the testes, pancreas, liver, small intestine, ovary, lymph, car-diac muscle, skeleton muscle and thymus gland, which indicated that Smad4 was broadly expressed in cattle.

  13. The cryptomonad histone H4-encoding gene: structure and chromosomal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S B; Rensing, S A; Maier, U G

    1994-12-15

    Cryptomonads are unicellular flagellates whose plastids are surrounded by four membranes. A periplastidal compartment, containing eukaryote-type ribosomes, starch grains and a so-called nucleomorph, is located between the inner and outer membrane pairs. The nucleomorph has been shown to be the vestigial nucleus of a eukaryotic endosymbiont. In order to obtain more information about the chromatin structure of the nucleomorph and the host nuclear chromosomes, we studied the distribution of the histone, H4. H4 was not detectable in the nucleomorph by immunolocalization, thus supporting earlier findings by Gibbs [In: Wiesner et al. (Eds.), Experimental Phycology 1, 1990, pp. 145-157]. Likewise, no H4 DNA was demonstrable in the nucleomorph by Southern hybridization. Sequence analysis, and Southern and Northern blot data of a cryptomonad gene, H4, indicate an intermediate position for these genes between animals and plants.

  14. Effects of disruption of xylanase-encoding genes on the xylanolytic system of Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhin, F F; Shareck, F; Kluepfel, D; Morosoli, R

    1994-01-01

    Wild-type Streptomyces lividans produced the three xylanases (XlnA, XlnB, and XlnC) when xylan, xylan hydrolysates obtained by the action of XlnA, XlnB, and XlnC, or purified small xylo-oligosaccharides (xylobiose [X2], xylotriose [X3], xylotetraose [X4], and xylopentaose [X5]) were used as the carbon source. The three xylanase genes of S. lividans (xlnA, xlnB, and xlnC) were disrupted by using vectors that integrate into the respective genes. Disruption of one or more of the xln genes resulted in reduced growth rates and reduced total xylanase activities when the strain was grown in xylan. The greatest effect was observed when xlnA was disrupted. In medium containing xylan, disruption of xlnA did not affect expression of xlnB and xlnC; disruption of xlnB did not affect expression of xlnA but affected expression of xlnC; and disruption of xlnC did not affect expression of xlnA but affected expression of xlnB. A fraction of XlnB or XlnC hydrolytic products (those with a degree of polymerization greater than 11 [X11]) was found to stimulate expression of xlnB and xlnC in strains disrupted in xlnC and xlnB, respectively, whereas lower-molecular-weight fractions as well as purified small xylo-oligosaccharides did not. The stimulating molecule(s) lost its effect when it was hydrolyzed further by XlnA. A mechanism of transglycosylation reactions by the S. lividans xylanases is postulated to be involved in the regulation of xln genes. Images PMID:8051006

  15. Human gene encoding prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS): Genomic organization, chromosomal localization, and promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Chieko; Yabuki, Tomoko; Inoue, Hiroyasu [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Osaka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    The prostacyclin synthase gene isolated from human genomic libraries (PTGIS) consists of 10 exons spanning approximately 60 kb. All the splice donor and acceptor sites conform to the GT/AG rule. Genomic Southern blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that the human prostacyclin synthase gene is present as a single copy per haploid genome and is localized on chromosome 20q13.11-q13.13. The 1.5-kb sequence of the 5{prime} of the translational initiation site contained both GC-rich and pyrimidine-rich regions and consensus sequences of the transcription factor recognition sites such as Sp1, AP-2, the interferon-{gamma} response element, GATA, NF-{kappa}B, the CACCC box, and the glucocorticoid response element. The core binding sequence (GAGACC) of the shear stress responsive element was also found in the 5{prime}-flanking region of the gene. The major product of the primer extension analysis suggested that the transcription of the gene started from the positions around 49 bp upstream of the translational initiation codon. Transient transfection experiments using human aortic and bovine arterial endothelial cells demonstrated that the GC-rich region (positions -145 to -10) possessed a significant promoter activity. The 6-kb downstream sequence of the translational termination codon contained multiple polyadenylation signals, Alu repeat sequences, and the consensus sequence of the primate-repetitive DNA element, MER1. Two sizes of the prostacyclin synthase mRNAs (approximately 6 and 3.3 kb) were detected with the human aorta and lung. RNA blot hybridization analysis using the 3{prime}-untranslated region as probe indicated that the sizes of the 3{prime}-flanking regions were different in the major 6-kb and minor 3.3-kb mRNAs. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Discovery of Nuclear-Encoded Genes for the Neurotoxin Saxitoxin in Dinoflagellates

    OpenAIRE

    Anke Stüken; Orr, Russell J. S.; Ralf Kellmann; Murray, Shauna A.; Neilan, Brett A.; Kjetill S Jakobsen

    2011-01-01

    Saxitoxin is a potent neurotoxin that occurs in aquatic environments worldwide. Ingestion of vector species can lead to paralytic shellfish poisoning, a severe human illness that may lead to paralysis and death. In freshwaters, the toxin is produced by prokaryotic cyanobacteria; in marine waters, it is associated with eukaryotic dinoflagellates. However, several studies suggest that saxitoxin is not produced by dinoflagellates themselves, but by co-cultured bacteria. Here, we show that genes ...

  17. Ethylmalonic Encephalopathy Is Caused by Mutations in ETHE1, a Gene Encoding a Mitochondrial Matrix Protein

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a devastating infantile metabolic disorder affecting the brain, gastrointestinal tract, and peripheral vessels. High levels of ethylmalonic acid are detected in the body fluids, and cytochrome c oxidase activity is decreased in skeletal muscle. By use of a combination of homozygosity mapping, integration of physical and functional genomic data sets, and mutational screening, we identified GenBank D83198 as the gene responsible for EE. We also demonstrated t...

  18. Human chondrocytes respond discordantly to the protein encoded by the osteoarthritis susceptibility gene GDF5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushika Ratnayake

    Full Text Available A genetic deficit mediated by SNP rs143383 that leads to reduced expression of GDF5 is strongly associated with large-joint osteoarthritis. We speculated that this deficit could be attenuated by the application of exogenous GDF5 protein and as a first step we have assessed what effect such application has on primary osteoarthritis chondrocyte gene expression. Chondrocytes harvested from cartilage of osteoarthritic patients who had undergone joint replacement were cultured with wildtype recombinant mouse and human GDF5 protein. We also studied variants of GDF5, one that has a higher affinity for the receptor BMPR-IA and one that is insensitive to the GDF5 antagonist noggin. As a positive control, chondrocytes were treated with TGF-β1. Chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer and micromass and the expression of genes coding for catabolic and anabolic proteins of cartilage were measured by quantitative PCR. The expression of the GDF5 receptor genes and the presence of their protein products was confirmed and the ability of GDF5 signal to translocate to the nucleus was demonstrated by the activation of a luciferase reporter construct. The capacity of GDF5 to elicit an intracellular signal in chondrocytes was demonstrated by the phosphorylation of intracellular Smads. Chondrocytes cultured with TGF-β1 demonstrated a consistent down regulation of MMP1, MMP13 and a consistent upregulation of TIMP1 and COL2A1 with both culture techniques. In contrast, chondrocytes cultured with wildtype GDF5, or its variants, did not show any consistent response, irrespective of the culture technique used. Our results show that osteoarthritis chondrocytes do not respond in a predictable manner to culture with exogenous GDF5. This may be a cause or a consequence of the osteoarthritis disease process and will need to be surmounted if treatment with exogenous GDF5 is to be advanced as a potential means to overcome the genetic deficit conferring osteoarthritis

  19. Mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene encodes two functional alternative transcripts by a surrogate promoter usage mechanism.

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    Mercedes Martín-Rufián

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA and long (GAB transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and

  20. Downregulation of nuclear-encoded genes of oxidative metabolism in dialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Gianluigi Zaza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria, essential eukaryotic cells organelles defined as the "powerhouse of the cell" because of their ability to produce the vast majority of energy necessary for cellular metabolism, may have a primary role in the oxidative stress-related intracellular machinery associated to chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: To better assess this research assumption, we decided to study the key factors regulating mitochondrial oxidative metabolism in CKD patients in peritoneal dialysis (PD, n = 15 using several bio-molecular methodologies. RESULTS: RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that the expression level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α and nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1, two genes primarily involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and functions, were significantly hypo-expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of PD patients compared to healthy subjects (HS, n = 15. Additionally, mRNA levels of several PGC1-α downstream target genes (TFAM, COX6C,COX7C, UQCRH and MCAD were profoundly down-regulated in PD cells. TFAM protein analysis confirmed gene-expression results. High plasmatic concentration of Malondialdehyde found in PD patients, confirmed the contribution of the oxidative stress to these biological effects. Finally, Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2 or NFE2L2, a transcription factor for numerous antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes and one of its target genes, superoxide dismutase-2 mitochondrial (SOD2 were up-regulated in PD compared to HS. CONCLUSIONS: Our results revealed, for the first time, that CKD-PD patients' PBMC, through a complex intracellular biochemical machinery, are able to modulate their mitochondrial functions probably in the attempt to reduce oxidative metabolic damage and to turn on a valuable defense cellular strategy against oxidative stress.

  1. Identification and functional characterization of K+ transporters encoded by Legionella pneumophila kup genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hori, Juliana I.; Pereira, Marcelo S. F.; Roy, Craig R.; Nagai, Hiroki; Zamboni, Dario S.

    2013-01-01

    Legionnaires’ disease is an emerging, severe, pneumonia-like illness caused by the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria Legionella pneumophila, which are able to infect and replicate intracellularly in macrophages. Little is known regarding the mechanisms used by intracellular L. pneumophila for the acquisition of specific nutrients that are essential for bacterial replication. Here, we investigate three L. pneumophila genes with high similarity to the E. coli K+ transporters. These three gen...

  2. Detection of bar gene encoding phosphinothricin herbicide resistance in plants by electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligaj, Marta; Tichoniuk, Mariusz; Filipiak, Marian

    2008-11-01

    An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of bar gene coding phosphinothricin herbicide resistance is presented. The detection was based on hybridization reaction between the specific to bar gene 19-mer probe immobilized on the electrode surface and complementary DNA in a sample. Single-stranded DNA probe specific to bar gene was covalently attached by 5'-phosphate end to the surface of carbon paste electrode. Outer layer of a conventional CPE was provided with carboxyl groups of stearic acid. ssDNA was coupled to the electrode through ethylenediamine with the use of water-soluble 1-ethyl-3(3'-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide as activating reagents. Hybridization reaction at the electrode surface was detected via Co(bpy)(3)(3+), which possess a much higher affinity to the resulting DNA duplex compared to ssDNA probe. Detection limit of the sensor was 0.1 microM of target DNA fragments and its response was linear from 5 to 20 microM. Hybridization event was also detected by measuring guanine peak but this approach presented distinctly higher detection limit (1 muM) and lower reproducibility. Complete time of one measurement with the use of the biosensor including covalent attachment of ethylenediamine (linker) and ssDNA probe to the electrode, hybridization with target and interaction with electroactive indicator was about 70 min.

  3. Overexpression of the plg1 gene encoding pectin lyase in Penicillium griseoroseum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Patrícia Gomes; Ribeiro, João Batista; Teixeira, Janaina Aparecida; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    The pectin lyase (PL) is an industrially important enzyme since it is used for maceration and clarification in the process of fruit juice production in food industries. In order to increase the yields of pectin lyase we cloned the plg1 (pectin lyase 1) from Penicillium griseoroseum gene under the control of the strong constitutive promoter of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) and the terminator region of the tryptophan synthetase (trpC) gene from Aspergillus nidulans (plasmid pAN52-Plg1) and transformed this construct into the P. griseoroseum strain PG63. One of the pAN52-Plg1 multi-copy transformants (strain 105) grown in culture medium containing glucose or sugar cane juice showed PL activities of 4,804 or 5,202 U ml(-1) respectively, which represented 57- and 132-fold increases. In addition, the apparent specific activity of PL produced by this strain was much higher than the one observed for a commercial pectinase preparation. Evaluation of the extracellular proteins in the culture supernatant of strain 105 by SDS-PAGE showed the presence of a clear and strong band of approximately 40 kDa that probably corresponds to PL. The enzyme yields reported here demonstrate that the system we developed is able to express pectin lyase at levels comparable to, or exceeding, previously reported data.

  4. Determination of the promoter region of an early vaccinia virus gene encoding thymidine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, J P; Moss, B

    1987-05-01

    Nine recombinant vaccinia viruses that contain overlapping segments of the putative promoter region of the vaccinia virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene linked to DNA coding for the prokaryotic enzyme chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were constructed. In each case, the RNA start site and 5 bp of DNA downstream were retained. No significant difference in CAT expression occurred as the deletion was extended from 352 to 32 bp before the RNA start site. Deletion of a further 10 bp, however, led to complete cessation of early promoter activity. Primer extension analysis of the 5' ends of the transcripts verified that the natural TK RNA start site was still used when only 32 bp of upstream DNA remained. Loss of early promoter activity was previously found when deletions were extended from 31 to 24 bp before the RNA start site of another vaccinia gene that is expressed constitutively throughout infection (M.A. Cochran, C. Puckett, and B. Moss, 1985, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 19-23). Sequence similarities in the promoter regions of these two genes were noted.

  5. Construction of adiponectin-encoding plasmid DNA and gene therapy of non-obese type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Mei Hua; Park, Jeong-Sook; Myung, Chang-Seon

    2010-01-01

    Adiponectin (ADN), an insulin-sensitizing adipokine, stimulates glucose uptake, inhibits gluconeogenesis, and plays an important role in improving insulin sensitivity. Since blood levels of ADN are low in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), this study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of increasing the ADN level through injection of plasmid DNA encoding ADN in type 2 DM. A non-obese type 2 DM mouse model was established via combined administration of streptozotocin with nicotinamide and exhibited significantly higher plasma glucose concentration and insulin resistance compared with normal controls according to oral glucose tolerance and insulin challenge tests. Plasmid DNA encoding mouse ADN from differentiated NIH3T3 adipocytes was constructed in pVAX1 (pVAX/ADN). Transfection of pVAX/ADN into various cell lines including HeLa, HT22, HEK293, HepG2, and SK-Hep1 cells, increased ADN mRNA expression levels in a dose-dependent manner. The administration of pVAX/ADN into non-obese type 2 DM mice via tail vein significantly increased the blood level of ADN and decreased the plasma glucose concentration. Moreover, the parameters related to insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and insulin sensitivity (QUICKI) were significantly improved. These results suggest that ADN gene therapy could be a clinically effective tool for the treatment of type 2 DM.

  6. Identification of genes encoding photoconvertible (Class I) water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins from Chenopodium ficifolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shigekazu; Abe, Eriko; Nakayama, Katsumi; Satoh, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Photoconvertible water-soluble chlorophyll-binding proteins, called Class I WSCPs, have been detected in Chenopodiaceae, Amaranthaceae and Polygonaceae plant species. To date, Chenopodium album WSCP (CaWSCP) is the only cloned gene encoding a Class I WSCP. In this study, we identified two cDNAs encoding Chenopodium ficifolium Class I WSCPs, CfWSCP1, and CfWSCP2. Sequence analyses revealed that the open reading frames of CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2 were 585 and 588 bp, respectively. Furthermore, both CfWSCPs contain cystein2 and cystein30, which are essential for the chlorophyll-binding ability of CaWSCP. Recombinant CfWSCP1 and CfWSCP2, expressed in Escherichia coli as hexa-histidine fusion proteins (CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His), formed inclusion bodies; however, we were able to solubilize these using a buffer containing 8 M urea and then refold them by dialysis. The refolded CfWSCP1-His and CfWSCP2-His could bind chlorophylls and exhibited photoconvertibility, confirming that the cloned CfWSCPs are further examples of Class I WSCPs.

  7. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products.

  8. Cloning and Characterisation of the Gene Encoding 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase in Tripterygium wilfordii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripterygium wilfordii is a traditional Chinese medical plant used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The main bioactive compounds of the plant are diterpenoids and triterpenoids. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS catalyses the reaction of acetoacetyl-CoA to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, which is the first committed enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA pathway. The sequence information of HMGS in Tripterygium wilfordii is a basic resource necessary for studying the terpenoids in the plant. In this paper, full-length cDNA encoding HMGS was isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii (abbreviated TwHMGS, GenBank accession number: KM978213. The full length of TwHMGS is 1814 bp, and the gene encodes a protein with 465 amino acids. Sequence comparison revealed that TwHMGS exhibits high similarity to HMGSs of other plants. The tissue expression patterns revealed that the expression level of TwHMGS is highest in the stems and lowest in the roots. Induced expression of TwHMGS can be induced by MeJA, and the expression level is highest 4 h after induction. The functional complement assays in the YML126C knockout yeast demonstrated that TwHMGS participates in yeast terpenoid biosynthesis.

  9. ngs (notochord granular surface) gene encodes a novel type of intermediate filament family protein essential for notochord maintenance in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiangjun; Xia, Zhidan; Zu, Yao; Telfer, Helena; Hu, Jing; Yu, Jingyi; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Quan; Sodmergen; Lin, Shuo; Zhang, Bo

    2013-01-25

    The notochord is an important organ involved in embryonic patterning and locomotion. In zebrafish, the mature notochord consists of a single stack of fully differentiated, large vacuolated cells called chordocytes, surrounded by a single layer of less differentiated notochordal epithelial cells called chordoblasts. Through genetic analysis of zebrafish lines carrying pseudo-typed retroviral insertions, a mutant exhibiting a defective notochord with a granular appearance was isolated, and the corresponding gene was identified as ngs (notochord granular surface), which was specifically expressed in the notochord. In the mutants, the notochord started to degenerate from 32 hours post-fertilization, and the chordocytes were then gradually replaced by smaller cells derived from chordoblasts. The granular notochord phenotype was alleviated by anesthetizing the mutant embryos with tricaine to prevent muscle contraction and locomotion. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ngs encodes a new type of intermediate filament (IF) family protein, which we named chordostatin based on its function. Under the transmission electron microcopy, bundles of 10-nm-thick IF-like filaments were enriched in the chordocytes of wild-type zebrafish embryos, whereas the chordocytes in ngs mutants lacked IF-like structures. Furthermore, chordostatin-enhanced GFP (EGFP) fusion protein assembled into a filamentous network specifically in chordocytes. Taken together, our work demonstrates that ngs encodes a novel type of IF protein and functions to maintain notochord integrity for larval development and locomotion. Our work sheds light on the mechanisms of notochord structural maintenance, as well as the evolution and biological function of IF family proteins.

  10. ISOLATION AND CLONING OF cDNA OF GENE ENCODING FOR METALLOTHIONEIN TYPE 2 FROM MELASTOMA AFFINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UTUT WIDYASTUT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Metallothionein is an important protein for detoxifying heavy metal ions. h is research was conducted to isolate and clone cDNA of gene encoding for metallothionein type 2 from Melastoma affi ne . Total RNA was isolated from young leaves. Total cDNA was synthesized from the total RNA by reverse transcription. h e MaMt2 cDNA was successfully isolated by PCR technique. h e MaMt2 cDNA was inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into Escherichia coli DH5 α . DNA sequencing analysis showed that this cDNA is full length consisting of 246 pb encoding 81 amino acid residues. h is cDNA is identical to mRNA of AtMt2 from Arabidopsis thaliana. It does not contain any restriction sites found in the cloning sites of pGEM-T Easy. h e deduced protein of MaMT2 contains 14 cysteine residues distributed in the Cys-Cys, Cys-X-Cys, and Cys-X-X-Cys motifs

  11. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding β-amyrin synthase in the glycyrrhizic acid biosynthetic pathway in Glycyrrhiza uralensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhiza uralensis is considered to be one of the most important herbs in traditional Chinese medicine due to its numerous pharmacological effects particularly its ability to relieve cough and act as a mucolytic. Based on previous research, these effects are mediated by a number of active ingredients, especially glycyrrhizic acid (GA. In the present study, a gene encoding β-amyrin synthase (β-AS involved in GA biosynthesis in G. uralensis has been cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cloned enzyme showed similar activity to native enzymes isolated from other Glycyrrhiza species to catalyze the conversion of 2,3-oxidosqualene into β-amyrin. In fact the β-AS gene is particularly important in the GA biosynthetic pathway in G. uralensis. The complete sequence of the enzyme was determined and a phylogenetic tree based on the β-AS gene of G. uralensis and 20 other species was created. This showed that Glycyrrhiza glabra had the closest kinship with G. uralensis. The results of this work will be useful in determining how to improve the efficacy of G. uralensis by improving its GA content and in exploring the biosynthesis of GA in vitro.

  12. Genetic variation in genes encoding airway epithelial potassium channels is associated with chronic rhinosinusitis in a pediatric population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Purkey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apical potassium channels regulate ion transport in airway epithelial cells and influence air surface liquid (ASL hydration and mucociliary clearance (MCC. We sought to identify whether genetic variation within genes encoding airway potassium channels is associated with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS. METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes for selected potassium channels were derived from data generated on the Illumnia HumanHap550 BeadChip or Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip for 828 unrelated individuals diagnosed with CRS and 5,083 unrelated healthy controls from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP. Statistical analysis was performed with set-based tests using PLINK, and corrected for multiple testing. RESULTS: Set-based case control analysis revealed the gene KCNMA1 was associated with CRS in our Caucasian subset of the cohort (598 CRS cases and 3,489 controls; p = 0.022, based on 10,000 permutations. In addition there was borderline evidence that the gene KCNQ5 (p = 0.0704 was associated with the trait in our African American subset of the cohort (230 CRS cases and 1,594 controls. In addition to the top significant SNPs rs2917454 and rs6907229, imputation analysis uncovered additional genetic variants in KCNMA1 and in KCNQ5 that were associated with CRS. CONCLUSIONS: We have implicated two airway epithelial potassium channels as novel susceptibility loci in contributing to the pathogenesis of CRS.

  13. Mushroom body defect, a gene involved in the control of neuroblast proliferation in Drosophila, encodes a coiled–coil protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhonghui; Prado, Antonio; Melzig, Jörg; Heisenberg, Martin; Nash, Howard A.; Raabe, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Neurogenesis relies on the establishment of the proper number and precisely controlled proliferation of neuroblasts, the neuronal precursor cells. A role for the mushroom body defect (mud) gene in both of these aspects of neuroblast behavior, as well as possible roles in other aspects of fruit fly biology, is implied by phenotypes associated with mud mutations. We have localized mud by determining the sequence change in one point mutant, identifying a predicted ORF affected by the mutation, and showing that an appropriate segment of the genome rescues mud mutant phenotypes. An analysis of mud cDNAs and a survey of mud transcripts by Northern blotting indicate that the gene is subject to differential splicing and is expressed primarily during embryogenesis but also, at lower levels, during subsequent developmental stages in a sexually dimorphic manner. The gene is predicted to encode a polypeptide without obvious homologs but with two prominent structural features, a long coiled coil that constitutes the central core of the protein and a carboxyl-terminal transmembrane domain. PMID:10884435

  14. Isolation and functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii ROT2, the encoding gene for the endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Ortiz, Claudia I; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Hernández-Cervantes, Arturo; Álvarez-Vargas, Aurelio; Lee, Keunsook K; Díaz-Jiménez, Diana F; Munro, Carol A; Cano-Canchola, Carmen; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2012-08-01

    The N-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in eukaryotic cells. During the N-linked glycan synthesis, the precursor Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) is processed by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidases I, II and α1,2-mannosidase, before transporting to the Golgi complex for further structure modifications. In fungi of medical relevance, as Candida albicans and Aspergillus, it is well known that ER glycosidases are important for cell fitness, cell wall organization, virulence, and interaction with the immune system. Despite this, little is known about these enzymes in Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of human sporotrichosis. This limited knowledge is due in part to the lack of a genome sequence of this organism. In this work we used degenerate primers and inverse PCR approaches to isolate the open reading frame of S. schenckii ROT2, the encoding gene for α subunit of ER glucosidase II. This S. schenckii gene complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae rot2Δ mutant; however, when expressed in a C. albicans rot2Δ mutant, S. schenckii Rot2 partially increased the levels of α-glucosidase activity, but failed to restore the N-linked glycosylation defect associated to the mutation. To our knowledge, this is the first report where a gene involved in protein N-linked glycosylation is isolated from S. schenckii.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding phage-related tail protein (PrTP) of endosymbiont Wolbachia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory, maternally inherited intracellular bacterium, known to infect a wide range of arthropods. It has been implicated in causing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), parthenogenesis, the feminization of genetic males and male-killing in different hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this fastidious bacterium causes these reproductive abnormalities have not yet been determined. In this study, we report on the cloning and characterization of the gene encoding phage-related tail protein (PrTP) from Wolbachia in Drosophila melanogaster CantonS (wMelCS) and from Wolbachia in Drosophila melanogaster yw67c23 (wMel) by representational difference analysis (RDA) and ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR). The functionality of a bipartite nuclear localization signal sequence (NLS) of the gene was also successfully tested in Drosophila S2 cells. PrTP expression in various strains of Wolbachia was investigated. Our results suggest that PrTP may not induce CI directly. However, the existence of prtp provided direct evidence of phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) that might play an important role in a variety of reproductive abnormalities of Wolbachia.

  16. Cloning, expression and evolution of the gene encoding the elongation factor 1alpha from a low thermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Mariorosario; Cantiello, Piergiuseppe; Lamberti, Annalisa; Longo, Olimpia; Fiengo, Antonio; Arcari, Paolo

    2003-01-28

    The gene encoding the elongation factor 1alpha (EF-1alpha) from the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus strain MT3 (optimum growth temperature 75 degrees C) was cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The structural and biochemical properties of the purified enzyme were compared to those of EF-1alpha isolated from S. solfataricus strain MT4 (optimum growth temperature 87 degrees C). Only one amino acid change (Val15-->Ile) was found. Interestingly, the difference was in the first guanine nucleotide binding consensus sequence G(13)HIDHGK and was responsible for a reduced efficiency in protein synthesis, which was accompanied by an increased affinity for both guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and guanosine triphosphate (GTP), and an increased efficiency in the intrinsic GTPase activity. Despite the different thermophilicities of the two microorganisms, only very marginal effects on the thermal properties of the enzyme were observed. Molecular evolution among EF-1alpha genes from Sulfolobus species showed that the average rate of nucleotide substitution per site per year (0.0312x10(-9)) is lower than that reported for other functional genes.

  17. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction.

  18. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eZhou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavour and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5 via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants.

  19. Characterization of cDNAs encoding human leukosialin and localization of the leukosialin gene to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallant, A.; Eskenazi, A.; Frelinger, J.G. (Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (USA)); Mattei, M.G. (Hopital d' Enfants de la Timone, Marseille (France)); Fournier, R.E.K. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Carlsson, S.R.; Fukuda, M. (La Jolla Center Research Foundation, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human leukosialin, a major sialoglycoprotein of human leukocytes. Leukosialin is very closely related or identical to the sialophorin molecule, which is involved in T-cell proliferation and whose expression is altered in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disease. Using a rabbit antiserum to leukosialin, a cDNA clone was isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from human peripheral blood cells. The {lambda}gt11 clone was used to isolate longer cDNA clones that correspond to the entire coding sequence of leukosialin. DNA sequence analysis reveals three domains in the predicted mature protein. The extracellular domain is enriched for Ser, Thr, and Pro and contains four contiguous 18-amino acid repeats. The transmembrane and intracellular domains of the human leukosialin molecule are highly homologous to the rat W3/13 molecule. RNA gel blot analysis reveals two polyadenylylated species of 2.3 and 8 kilobases. Southern blot analysis suggests that human leukosialin is a single-copy gene. Analysis of monochromosomal cell hybrids indicates that the leukosialin gene is not X chromosome linked and in situ hybridization shows leukosialin is located on chromosome 16. These findings demonstrate that the primary mutation in WAS is not a defect in the structural gene for leukosialin.

  20. sparse inflorescence1 encodes a monocot-specific YUCCA-like gene required for vegetative and reproductive development in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallavotti, Andrea; Barazesh, Solmaz; Malcomber, Simon; Hall, Darren; Jackson, David; Schmidt, Robert J; McSteen, Paula

    2008-09-30

    The plant growth hormone auxin plays a critical role in the initiation of lateral organs and meristems. Here, we identify and characterize a mutant, sparse inflorescence1 (spi1), which has defects in the initiation of axillary meristems and lateral organs during vegetative and inflorescence development in maize. Positional cloning shows that spi1 encodes a flavin monooxygenase similar to the YUCCA (YUC) genes of Arabidopsis, which are involved in local auxin biosynthesis in various plant tissues. In Arabidopsis, loss of function of single members of the YUC family has no obvious effect, but in maize the mutation of a single yuc locus causes severe developmental defects. Phylogenetic analysis of the different members of the YUC family in moss, monocot, and eudicot species shows that there have been independent expansions of the family in monocots and eudicots. spi1 belongs to a monocot-specific clade, within which the role of individual YUC genes has diversified. These observations, together with expression and functional data, suggest that spi1 has evolved a dominant role in auxin biosynthesis that is essential for normal maize inflorescence development. Analysis of the interaction between spi1 and genes regulating auxin transport indicate that auxin transport and biosynthesis function synergistically to regulate the formation of axillary meristems and lateral organs in maize.

  1. Involvement of the NADH oxidase-encoding noxA gene in oxidative stress responses in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Chul; Kim, Younhee; Lee, Heung-Shick

    2015-02-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum ORF NCgl0328, designated noxA, encodes an NADH oxidase enzyme. The noxA gene, which was preferentially expressed in the log growth phase, was found to be under the control of the whcA, whcB, and whcE genes, which play regulatory roles in cells under oxidative stress. While noxA transcription was minimal in whcE-deleted mutant cells (ΔwhcE) during growth, its transcription was maximal even in the stationary phase in ΔwhcA cells. The transcription levels of noxA in ΔwhcB and whcB-overexpressing cells were comparable to the levels only in the log growth phase in ΔwhcA and whcA-overexpressing cells, respectively. Direct binding of purified WhcA to the promoter region of noxA was observed in vitro. The DNA-protein interaction was only possible in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. A noxA-deleted mutant strain and a strain overexpressing the noxA gene (P180-noxA) were established, and these strains were found to exhibit defective cell growth. The ΔnoxA and P180-noxA strains were sensitive to the redox-cycling oxidant menadione, suggesting a role of noxA in redox balancing. Accordingly, the purified NoxA enzyme exhibited NADH-oxidizing activity. Taken together, these data show that noxA plays a role in oxidative stress responses and also that the gene is under direct control of the WhcA protein, which was shown to be a regulatory DNA-binding protein. Furthermore, the involvement and roles of the whcA, whcB, and whcE genes in regulating the expression of noxA were demonstrated.

  2. A semidwarf phenotype of barley uzu results from a nucleotide substitution in the gene encoding a putative brassinosteroid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chono, Makiko; Honda, Ichiro; Zeniya, Haruko; Yoneyama, Koichi; Saisho, Daisuke; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Takatsuto, Suguru; Hoshino, Tsuguhiro; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2003-11-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles throughout plant growth and development. Despite the importance of clarifying the mechanism of BR-related growth regulation in cereal crops, BR-related cereal mutants have been identified only in rice (Oryza sativa). We previously found that semidwarf barley (Hordeum vulgare) accessions carrying the "uzu" gene, called "uzu" barley in Japan, are non-responding for brassinolide (BL). We then performed chemical and molecular analyses to clarify the mechanisms of uzu dwarfism using isogenic line pairs of uzu gene. The response of the uzu line to BL was significantly lower than that of its corresponding normal line. Measurement of BRs showed that the uzu line accumulates BRs, similar to known BR-insensitive mutants. The marker synteny of rice and barley chromosomes suggests that the uzu gene may be homologous to rice D61, a rice homolog of Arabidopsis BR-insensitive 1 (BRI1), encoding a BR-receptor protein. A barley homolog of BRI1, HvBRI1, was isolated by using degenerate primers. A comparison of HvBRI1 sequences in uzu and normal barley varieties showed that the uzu phenotype is correlated with a single nucleotide substitution. This substitution results in an amino acid change at a highly conserved residue in the kinase domain of the BR-receptor protein. These results may indicate that uzu dwarfism is caused by the missense mutation in HvBRI1. The uzu gene is being introduced into all hull-less barley cultivars in Japan as an effective dwarf gene for practical use, and this is the first report about an agronomically important mutation related to BRs.

  3. Reconstruction of family-level phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera using nuclear encoded housekeeping genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm S Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha, but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosa(p, Myxospongiae(p, Spongillida(p, Haploscleromorpha(p (the marine haplosclerids and Democlavia(p. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosa(p and Myxospongiae(p to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorpha(p+Spongillida(p+Democlavia(p. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillida(p are sister to Haploscleromorpha(p rather than part of Democlavia(p. Within Keratosa(p, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiae(p, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlavia(p, Tetractinellida(p, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis, was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlavia(p. Within Tetractinellida(p, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae, and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. CONCLUSIONS

  4. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites: Implications for development of recombinant vaccines produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts.

  5. Prevalence of the lmo0036-0043 gene cluster encoding arginine deiminase and agmatine deiminase systems in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianshun; Chen, Fan; Cheng, Changyong; Fang, Weihuan

    2013-04-01

    Arginine deiminase and agmatine deiminase systems are involved in acid tolerance, and their encoding genes form the cluster lmo0036-0043 in Listeria monocytogenes. While lmo0042 and lmo0043 were conserved in all L. monocytogenes strains, the lmo0036-0041 region of this cluster was identified in all lineages I and II, and the majority of lineage IV (83.3%) strains, but absent in all lineage III and a small fraction of lineage IV (16.7%) strains, suggesting that the presence of the complete lmo0036-0043 cluster is dependent on lineages. lmo0036-0043-complete and -deficient lineage IV strains exhibit specific ascB-dapE profiles, which might represent two subpopulations with distinct genetic characteristics.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Wang, Christian W.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.;

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human...... endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full......-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support...

  7. Regulation of expression of GLT1, the gene encoding glutamate synthase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, L; Ballario, P; Aranda, C; Filetici, P; González, A

    1998-07-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate synthase (GOGAT) is an oligomeric enzyme composed of three 199-kDa identical subunits encoded by GLT1. In this work, we analyzed GLT1 transcriptional regulation. GLT1-lacZ fusions were prepared and GLT1 expression was determined in a GDH1 wild-type strain and in a gdh1 mutant derivative grown in the presence of various nitrogen sources. Null mutants impaired in GCN4, GLN3, GAT1/NIL1, or UGA43/DAL80 were transformed with a GLT1-lacZ fusion to determine whether the above-mentioned transcriptional factors had a role in GLT1 expression. A collection of increasingly larger 5' deletion derivatives of the GLT1 promoter was constructed to identify DNA sequences that could be involved in GLT1 transcriptional regulation. The effect of the lack of GCN4, GLN3, or GAT1/NIL1 was also tested in the pertinent 5' deletion derivatives. Our results indicate that (i) GLT1 expression is negatively modulated by glutamate-mediated repression and positively regulated by Gln3p- and Gcn4p-dependent transcriptional activation; (ii) two cis-acting elements, a CGGN15CCG palindrome and an imperfect poly(dA-dT), are present and could play a role in GLT1 transcriptional activation; and (iii) GLT1 expression is moderately regulated by GCN4 under amino acid deprivation. Our results suggest that in a wild-type strain grown on ammonium, GOGAT constitutes an ancillary pathway for glutamate biosynthesis.

  8. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Anja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF essential for ornithine export from mitochondria. The yeast arg11 mutant, which is deficient in Ort1p/Arg11p grows poorly on media lacking arginine. Results High-level expression of a nuclear encoded Arabidopsis thaliana homolog (AtmBAC2 of Ort1p/Arg11p was able to suppress the growth deficiency of arg11. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated expression of AtmBAC2 in all tissues with highest levels in flowers. Promoter-GUS fusions showed preferential expression in flowers, i.e. pollen, in the vasculature of siliques and in aborted seeds. Variable expression was observed in leaf vasculature. Induction of the promoter was not observed during the first two weeks in seedlings grown on media containing NH4NO3, arginine or ornithine as sole nitrogen sources. Conclusion AtmBAC2 was isolated as a mitochondrial transporter for arginine in Arabidopsis. The absence of expression in developing seeds and in cotyledons of seedlings indicates that other transporters are responsible for storage and mobilization of arginine in seeds.

  9. O-demethylase from Acetobacterium dehalogenans--cloning, sequencing, and active expression of the gene encoding the corrinoid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, F; Wohlfarth, G; Diekert, G

    1998-10-15

    The ether-cleaving O-demethylase from the strictly anaerobic homoacetogen Acetobacterium dehalogenans catalyses the methyltransfer from 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzoate (vanillate) to tetrahydrofolate. In the first step a vanillate :corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I) mediates the methylation of a 25-kDa corrinoid protein with the cofactor reduced to cob(I)alamin. The methyl group is then transferred to tetrahydrofolate by the action of a methylcorrinoid protein:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase (methyltransferase II). Using primers derived from the amino-terminal sequences of the corrinoid protein and the vanillate:corrinoid protein methyltransferase (methyltransferase I), a 723-bp fragment was amplified by PCR, which contained the gene odmA encoding the corrinoid protein of O-demethylase. Downstream of odmA, part of the odmB gene encoding methyltransferase I was identified. The amino acid sequence deduced from odmA showed about 60% similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli (MetH) and to corrinoid proteins of methyltransferase systems involved in methanogenesis from methanol and methylamines. The sequence contained the DXHXXG consensus sequence typical for displacement of the dimethylbenzimidazole base of the corrinoid cofactor by a histidine from the protein. Heterologous expression of odmA in E. coli yielded a colourless, oxygen-insensitive apoprotein, which was able to bind one mol cobalamin or methylcobalamin/mol protein. Both of these reconstituted forms of the protein were active in the overall O-demethylation reaction. OdmA reconstituted with hydroxocobalamin and reduced by titanium(III) citrate to the cob(I)alamin form was methylated with vanillate by methyltransferase I in an irreversible reaction. Methylcobalamin carrying OdmA served as methyl group donor for the methylation of tetrahydrofolate by methyltransferase II. This reaction was found to be reversible, since methyltranSferase II

  10. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1, the gene encoding the glucocorticoid receptor, in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadali, Anouk; Hoghoughi, Neda; Duley, Samuel; Hajmirza, Azadeh; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, Francois-Loic; Bertrand, Philippe; Roumier, Christophe; Roggy, Anne; Suchaud-Martin, Céline; Chauvet, Martine; Bertrand, Sarah; Hamaidia, Sieme; Rousseaux, Sophie; Josserand, Véronique; Charles, Julie; Templier, Isabelle; Maeda, Takahiro; Bruder-Costa, Juliana; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoix, Thierry; Park, Sophie; Gressin, Remy; Tensen, Cornelis P.; Mecucci, Cristina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Leroux, Dominique; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Luquet, Isabelle; Penther, Dominique; Bastard, Christian; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Christine; Garnache, Francine

    2016-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and highly aggressive leukemia for which knowledge on disease mechanisms and effective therapies are currently lacking. Only a handful of recurring genetic mutations have been identified and none is specific to BPDCN. In this study, through molecular cloning in an index case that presented a balanced t(3;5)(q21;q31) and molecular cytogenetic analyses in a further 46 cases, we identify monoallelic deletion of NR3C1 (5q31), encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR), in 13 of 47 (28%) BPDCN patients. Targeted deep sequencing in 36 BPDCN cases, including 10 with NR3C1 deletion, did not reveal NR3C1 point mutations or indels. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1 defined a subset of BPDCN with lowered GCR expression and extremely poor overall survival (P = .0006). Consistent with a role for GCR in tumor suppression, functional analyses coupled with gene expression profiling identified corticoresistance and loss-of-EZH2 function as major downstream consequences of NR3C1 deletion in BPDCN. Subsequently, more detailed analyses of the t(3;5)(q21;q31) revealed fusion of NR3C1 to a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) gene (lincRNA-3q) that encodes a novel, nuclear, noncoding RNA involved in the regulation of leukemia stem cell programs and G1/S transition, via E2F. Overexpression of lincRNA-3q was a consistent feature of malignant cells and could be abrogated by bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein inhibition. Taken together, this work points to NR3C1 as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in a subset of BPDCN and identifies BET inhibition, acting at least partially via lncRNA blockade, as a novel treatment option in BPDCN. PMID:27060168

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Novel Thermostable Chitinase from Thermomyces lanuginosus SY2 and Cloning of Its Encoding Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel thermostable extracellular chitinase was purified from the culture filtrate of Thermomyces lanuginosus SY2 by using diethylaminoethyl Sepharose chromatography and Phenyl-Sepharose chromatography. The molecular size of the purified chitinase was estimated to be 48 kDa by sodium dodeeyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The chitinase exhibited optimum catalytic activity at pH 4.5 and 55℃. The enzyme was stable at 50℃, and its half-life time at 65℃ was 25 min. The thermostable chitinase was obtained with 60% of the full activity, when it was incubated in the buffer (pH 2.5). The enzyme showed the unique properties for thermostability and pH stability since it was one of the most thermostable ehitinases so far isolated in fungi. Ca2+, Ba2+, Na2+, and K+ enhanced the enzyme activity, whereas Fe2+, Ag+, Hg2+, and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid caused obvious inhibition. The N-terminal amino acids were AQGYLSVQYFVNWAI. Degenerate primers based on the N-terminal sequences of purified chitinase and a cDNA fragment encoding the chitinase gene were obtained through reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction amplieation. The RACE was used to generate full-length cDNA clones. The cDNA of chit contained an open reading frame of 1 326 bp encoding 442 amino acids. The gene chit has been registered in GenBank with accession number DQ092332. The alignment results of putative amino acid sequence showed the lower similarity to other chitinases in family-18 except for the catalytic domain containing two conserved motifs related with catalytic activity of chitinase.

  12. Bacterial host and reporter gene optimization for genetically encoded whole cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutesco, Catherine; Prévéral, Sandra; Escoffier, Camille; Descamps, Elodie C T; Prudent, Elsa; Cayron, Julien; Dumas, Louis; Ricquebourg, Manon; Adryanczyk-Perrier, Géraldine; de Groot, Arjan; Garcia, Daniel; Rodrigue, Agnès; Pignol, David; Ginet, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Whole-cell biosensors based on reporter genes allow detection of toxic metals in water with high selectivity and sensitivity under laboratory conditions; nevertheless, their transfer to a commercial inline water analyzer requires specific adaptation and optimization to field conditions as well as economical considerations. We focused here on both the influence of the bacterial host and the choice of the reporter gene by following the responses of global toxicity biosensors based on constitutive bacterial promoters as well as arsenite biosensors based on the arsenite-inducible Pars promoter. We observed important variations of the bioluminescence emission levels in five different Escherichia coli strains harboring two different lux-based biosensors, suggesting that the best host strain has to be empirically selected for each new biosensor under construction. We also investigated the bioluminescence reporter gene system transferred into Deinococcus deserti, an environmental, desiccation- and radiation-tolerant bacterium that would reduce the manufacturing costs of bacterial biosensors for commercial water analyzers and open the field of biodetection in radioactive environments. We thus successfully obtained a cell survival biosensor and a metal biosensor able to detect a concentration as low as 100 nM of arsenite in D. deserti. We demonstrated that the arsenite biosensor resisted desiccation and remained functional after 7 days stored in air-dried D. deserti cells. We also report here the use of a new near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent reporter candidate, a bacteriophytochrome from the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, which showed a NIR fluorescent signal that remained optimal despite increasing sample turbidity, while in similar conditions, a drastic loss of the lux-based biosensors signal was observed.

  13. Differential regulation of genes encoding manganese peroxidase (MnP) in the basidiomycete Ceriporiopsis subvermispora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manubens, Augusto; Avila, Marcela; Canessa, Paulo; Vicuña, Rafael

    2003-09-01

    We previously identified and characterized three mnp genes coding for manganese peroxidase (MnP) in the white rot fungus Ceriporiopsis subvermispora. In this work, we assessed transcript levels of mnp genes in liquid cultures of this fungus grown under various conditions. In the absence of Mn(2+), mnp1 and mnp2 mRNA were detected by Northern hybridization, irrespective of the lack of extracellular MnP activity. Addition of Mn(2+) to the cultures led to a marked increase in both transcripts, the highest titers being observed at 10 micro M Mn(2+). mnp1 mRNA was not detected at Mn(2+ )concentrations above 80 micro M, whereas mnp2 mRNA was still observed at 320 micro M Mn(2+). Differential regulation of these genes was confirmed by the addition of Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Ag(+) and Cd(2+). These metal ions dramatically elevated both transcripts and also allowed the detection of the mnp3 transcript. In most cases, the increase in mRNA levels was partially abolished by the simultaneous presence of Mn(2+), although the latter was strictly required to detect extracellular MnP activity. However, the lignin-related compound syringic acid specifically increased the mnp1 transcript, although only in the absence of Mn(2+). These results indicate that there is no clear correlation between mnp mRNA levels and MnP activity. In addition, they strongly suggest that Mn(2+) plays a post-transcriptional role which is essential for the presence of active MnP in the extracellular fluid.

  14. Involvement of a Gene Encoding Putative Acetate Kinase in Magnetosome Synthesis in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARIS TRI WAHYUDI

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A nonmagnetic mutant of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1, designated NMA40, was constructed by mini-Tn5 transposon mutagenesis to identify genes involved in magnetosome synthesis. Transposon delivery was carried out through conjugation between M. magneticum AMB-1 as a recipient and Escherichia coli S17-1 (λ pir carrying pUTmini-Tn5Km1 as a donor strain. NAM40 did not respond to the magnetic fields and completely lacked of magnetosome in the cell. DNA sequence/gen interrupted by transposon (called flanking DNA was isolated by inverse PCR and cloned into pGEM-T Easy. Alignment of the DNA sequence of the flanking DNA allowed the isolation of an open reading frame (ORF2 within an operon consisting of three genes. The amino acid sequence deduced from ORF2 showed homology with acetate kinase from Sinorhizobium meliloti (50% identity and 67% similarity, which function for acetate metabolism. Further analysis revealed that upstream of ORF2 is ORF1, had homology with phosphotransacetylase of S. meliloti (67% identity, 77% similarity, and ORF3 located downstream of ORF2, had homology with hypothetical protein of Thermotoga maritima (30% identity, 60% similarity. ORF2 was subsequently isolated, cloned, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 pLysS as an ORF2-Histag fusion polypeptide.

  15. Prokaryotic Expression of Rice Ospgip1 Gene and Bioinformatic Analysis of Encoded Product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-jun; LIU Xiao-wei; Zuo Si-min; MA Yu-yin; TONG Yun-hui; PAN Xue-biao; XU Jing-you

    2011-01-01

    Using the reference sequences of pgip genes in GenBank,a fragment of 930 bp covering the open reading frame (ORF) of rice Ospgip1 (Oryza sativa polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 1) was amplified.The prokaryotic expression product of the gene inhibited the growth of Rhizoctonia solani,the causal agent of rice sheath blight,and reduced its polygalacturonase activity.Bioinformatic analysis showed that OsPGIP1 is a hydrophobic protein with a molecular weight of 32.8 kDa and an isoelectric point (pl) of 7.26.The protein is mainly located in the cell wall of rice,and its signal peptide cleavage site is located between the 17th and 18th amino acids.There are four cysteines in both the N-and C-termini of the deduced protein,which can form three disulfide bonds (between the 56th and 63rd,the 278th and 298th,and the 300th and308th amino acids).The protein has a typical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain,and its secondary structure comprises α-helices,β-sheets and irregular coils.Compared with polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) from other plants,the 7th LRR is absent in OsPGIP1.The nine LRRs could form a cleft that might associate with proteins from pathogenic fungi,such as polygalacturonase.

  16. PLASMID VACCINE ENCODING HN GENE FROM NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUS HAS MARKED ANTITUMORAL EFFECT IN VITRO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛立娟; 金宁一; 龚伟; 王宏伟; 李萍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To explore the antitumor effects of hemaagglutinin-neuraminase gene (HN gene) from Newcastle disease virus. Methods: Plasmid vaccine of pIRHN was constructed and transfected into HeLa cells. The expression of HN was analyzed by Western blot analysis, and the mode of cell death was detected by fluorescence microscope, gel electrophoresis and TUNEL assay and the expression of p53 and bcl-2 was also analyzed in transfected Hela cells. The effect of pIRHN on sialic acid contents in the Hela cell was examined. Results: pIRHN nucleic acid vaccines could be expressed in eukaryotic cell. pIRHN could induce apoptosis after HeLa cells were transfected. The effect of antitumor responses of pIRHN was correlated with the contents of sialic acid in tumor cells, and there was no prominent evidence for the relatedness of the antitumor effect with the expression of p53 and bcl-2. Conclusion: pIRHN may become a new antitumor biological agent.

  17. Genetic diversity and population structure of genes encoding vaccine candidate antigens of Plasmodium vivax

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    Chenet Stella M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major concern in malaria vaccine development is genetic polymorphisms typically observed among Plasmodium isolates in different geographical areas across the world. Highly polymorphic regions have been observed in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax antigenic surface proteins such as Circumsporozoite protein (CSP, Duffy-binding protein (DBP, Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, Apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1 and Thrombospondin related anonymous protein (TRAP. Methods Genetic variability was assessed in important polymorphic regions of various vaccine candidate antigens in P. vivax among 106 isolates from the Amazon Region of Loreto, Peru. In addition, genetic diversity determined in Peruvian isolates was compared to population studies from various geographical locations worldwide. Results The structured diversity found in P. vivax populations did not show a geographic pattern and haplotypes from all gene candidates were distributed worldwide. In addition, evidence of balancing selection was found in polymorphic regions of the trap, dbp and ama-1 genes. Conclusions It is important to have a good representation of the haplotypes circulating worldwide when implementing a vaccine, regardless of the geographic region of deployment since selective pressure plays an important role in structuring antigen diversity.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in genes encoding ND1, COI and CYTB in canine malignant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaska, Brygida; Grzybowska-Szatkowska, Ludmila; Nisztuk, Sylwia; Surdyka, Magdalena; Rozanska, Dorota

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to identify DNA changes in mitochondrial gene fragments: NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (ND1), cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome b (CYTB) in tumor tissue, normal tissue and blood, and to define their association with the tumor type in dogs. Molecular analysis included 144 tests in total. A functional effect of the non-synonymous protein coding SNP was predicted. The presence of polymorphisms in all tested gene fragments in individual tissues of dogs was observed. Heteroplasmic changes were found in ND1 and CYTB in epithelioma glandulae sebacei and in CYTB in lymphoma centroblasticum. The results of in silico analysis show the impact of these alleles (COI: 507, ND1: 450, 216, CYTB: 748) on the functioning of proteins and thus their potential role in carcinogenesis. The possible harmful effects of changes in polypeptides in positions T193N, V98M, V118M and H196P were evaluated. It seems that polymorphisms occurring in cells can have a negative impact on functioning of proteins. This promotes disorders of the energy level in cells.

  19. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

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    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  20. Regulation of the alpha-glucuronidase-encoding gene ( aguA) from Aspergillus niger.

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    de Vries, R P; van de Vondervoort, P J I; Hendriks, L; van de Belt, M; Visser, J

    2002-09-01

    The alpha-glucuronidase gene aguA from Aspergillus niger was cloned and characterised. Analysis of the promoter region of aguA revealed the presence of four putative binding sites for the major carbon catabolite repressor protein CREA and one putative binding site for the transcriptional activator XLNR. In addition, a sequence motif was detected which differed only in the last nucleotide from the XLNR consensus site. A construct in which part of the aguA coding region was deleted still resulted in production of a stable mRNA upon transformation of A. niger. The putative XLNR binding sites and two of the putative CREA binding sites were mutated individually in this construct and the effects on expression were examined in A. niger transformants. Northern analysis of the transformants revealed that the consensus XLNR site is not actually functional in the aguA promoter, whereas the sequence that diverges from the consensus at a single position is functional. This indicates that XLNR is also able to bind to the sequence GGCTAG, and the XLNR binding site consensus should therefore be changed to GGCTAR. Both CREA sites are functional, indicating that CREA has a strong influence on aguA expression. A detailed expression analysis of aguA in four genetic backgrounds revealed a second regulatory system involved in activation of aguA gene expression. This system responds to the presence of glucuronic and galacturonic acids, and is not dependent on XLNR.

  1. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and