WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccrboh gene encoding

  1. Two Genes Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase Are Present in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Glaser, Philippe; Andersen, Paal S.;

    1995-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase) catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. Surprisingly, two genes encoding UPRTase activity were cloned from Bacillus subtilis by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The genes were sequenced, and the putative...

  2. Isolation and nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding human rhodopsin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nathans, J; Hogness, D S

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated and completely sequenced the gene encoding human rhodopsin. The coding region of the human rhodopsin gene is interrupted by four introns, which are located at positions analogous to those found in the previously characterized bovine rhodopsin gene. The amino acid sequence of human rhodopsin, deduced from the nucleotide sequence of its gene, is 348 residues long and is 93.4% homologous to that of bovine rhodopsin. Interestingly, those portions of the polypeptide chain predicte...

  3. Multiple genes encode the major surface glycoprotein of Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Powell, F; Edman, J C;

    1993-01-01

    hydrophobic region at the carboxyl terminus. The presence of multiple related msg genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of P. carinii suggests that antigenic variation is a possible mechanism for evading host defenses. Further characterization of this family of genes should allow the development of...... antigen is a good candidate for development as a vaccine to prevent or control P. carinii infection. We have cloned and sequenced seven related but unique genes encoding the major surface glycoprotein of rat P. carinii. Partial amino acid sequencing confirmed the identity of these genes. Based on Southern......The major surface antigen of Pneumocystis carinii, a life-threatening opportunistic pathogen in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, is an abundant glycoprotein that functions in host-organism interactions. A monoclonal antibody to this antigen is protective in animals, and thus this...

  4. Identification, Characterization, and Classification of Genes Encoding Perchlorate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bender, Kelly S.; Shang, Ching; Chakraborty, Romy; Belchik, Sara M.; Coates, John D.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of perchlorate to chlorite, the first enzymatic step in the bacterial reduction of perchlorate, is catalyzed by perchlorate reductase. The genes encoding perchlorate reductase (pcrABCD) in two Dechloromonas species were characterized. Sequence analysis of the pcrAB gene products revealed similarity to α- and β-subunits of microbial nitrate reductase, selenate reductase, dimethyl sulfide dehydrogenase, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, and chlorate reductase, all of which are type II m...

  5. Does biased gene conversion influence polymorphism in the circumsporozoite protein-encoding gene of Plasmodium vivax?

    OpenAIRE

    Arnot, D E; Barnwell, J W; Stewart, M. J.

    1988-01-01

    Variation between North Korean and Latin American isolates in the circumsporozoite (CS) protein encoding gene of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium vivax was studied. Polymorphic positions are confined to the central tandemly repeated sequences. Nucleotide substitutions in the tandem repeats produce variants; these substituted positions within the repeat array tend to be conserved between genes. The North Korean CS gene has a short insertion after the repeats encoding a 4-amino acid repeat...

  6. Bacteriophage-encoded shiga toxin gene in atypical bacterial host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casas Veronica

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Contamination from fecal bacteria in recreational waters is a major health concern since bacteria capable of causing human disease can be found in animal feces. The Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California is a beach prone to closures due to high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB. A potential source of these FIB could be the canine feces left behind by owners who do not clean up after their pets. We tested this hypothesis by screening the DNA isolated from canine feces for the bacteriophage-encoded stx gene normally found in the virulent strains of the fecal bacterium Escherichia coli. Results Twenty canine fecal samples were collected, processed for total and bacterial fraction DNA, and screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in the total and bacterial fraction DNA of one fecal sample. Bacterial isolates were then cultivated from the stx-positive fecal sample. Eighty nine of these canine fecal bacterial isolates were screened by PCR for the stx gene. The stx gene was detected in five of these isolates. Sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA gene PCR products from the canine fecal bacterial isolates indicated that they were Enterococcus and not E. coli. Conclusions The bacteriophage-encoded stx gene was found in multiple species of bacteria cultivated from canine fecal samples gathered at the shoreline of the Dog Beach area of Ocean Beach in San Diego, California. The canine fecal bacteria carrying the stx gene were not the typical E. coli host and were instead identified through phylogenetic analyses as Enterococcus. This suggests a large degree of horizontal gene transfer of exotoxin genes in recreational waters.

  7. Gene set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulators is enriched for common inherited variation in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Nadja; Jarick, Ivonne; Volckmar, Anna-Lena; Klingenspor, Martin; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Hebebrand, Johannes; Scherag, André; Hinney, Anke

    2013-01-01

    There are hints of an altered mitochondrial function in obesity. Nuclear-encoded genes are relevant for mitochondrial function (3 gene sets of known relevant pathways: (1) 16 nuclear regulators of mitochondrial genes, (2) 91 genes for oxidative phosphorylation and (3) 966 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes). Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed no association with type 2 diabetes mellitus in these gene sets. Here we performed a GSEA for the same gene sets for obesity. Genome wide assoc...

  8. New recombinant bacterium comprises a heterologous gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase and/or an up-regulated native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase, useful for producing ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOCUS - BIOTECHNOLOGY - Preparation (claimed): Producing recombinant bacterium having enhanced ethanol production characteristics when cultivated in growth medium comprising glycerol comprises: (a) transforming a parental bacterium by (i) the insertion of a heterologous gene encoding...... glycerol dehydrogenase; and/or (ii) up-regulating a native gene encoding glycerol dehydrogenase; and (b) obtaining the recombinant bacterium. Preferred Bacterium: In the recombinant bacterium above, the inserted heterologous gene and/or the up-regulated native gene is encoding a glycerol dehydrogenase...... dehydrogenase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into a phosphotransacetylase encoding region of the bacterium, or is inserted into an acetate kinase encoding region of the bacterium. It is operably linked to an inducible, a regulated or a constitutive promoter. The up-regulated glycerol...

  9. Co-transcriptional folding is encoded within RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós István

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the existing RNA structure prediction programs fold a completely synthesized RNA molecule. However, within the cell, RNA molecules emerge sequentially during the directed process of transcription. Dedicated experiments with individual RNA molecules have shown that RNA folds while it is being transcribed and that its correct folding can also depend on the proper speed of transcription. Methods The main aim of this work is to study if and how co-transcriptional folding is encoded within the primary and secondary structure of RNA genes. In order to achieve this, we study the known primary and secondary structures of a comprehensive data set of 361 RNA genes as well as a set of 48 RNA sequences that are known to differ from the originally transcribed sequence units. We detect co-transcriptional folding by defining two measures of directedness which quantify the extend of asymmetry between alternative helices that lie 5' and those that lie 3' of the known helices with which they compete. Results We show with statistical significance that co-transcriptional folding strongly influences RNA sequences in two ways: (1 alternative helices that would compete with the formation of the functional structure during co-transcriptional folding are suppressed and (2 the formation of transient structures which may serve as guidelines for the co-transcriptional folding pathway is encouraged. Conclusions These findings have a number of implications for RNA secondary structure prediction methods and the detection of RNA genes.

  10. Characterization of a plasmid-encoded urease gene cluster found in members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    OpenAIRE

    D'Orazio, S E; Collins, C M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded urease gene clusters found in uropathogenic isolates of Escherichia coli, Providencia stuartii, and Salmonella cubana demonstrated DNA homology, similar positions of restriction endonuclease cleavage sites, and manners of urease expression and therefore represent the same locus. DNA sequence analysis indicated that the plasmid-encoded urease genes are closely related to the Proteus mirabilis urease genes.

  11. Genome-wide identification of NBS-encoding resistance genes in Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Yu, Hee-Ju; Park, Soomin; Park, Beom-Seok

    2009-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-encoding resistance genes are key plant disease-resistance genes and are abundant in plant genomes, comprising up to 2% of all genes. The availability of genome sequences from several plant models enables the identification and cloning of NBS-encoding genes from closely related species based on a comparative genomics approach. In this study, we used the genome sequence of Brassica rapa to identify NBS-encoding genes in the Brassica genome. We identified 92 non-re...

  12. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  13. Species-specific duplications of NBS-encoding genes in Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yan; Li, Yingjun; Huang, Kaihui; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in protecting plants from infection by diverse pathogens in the environment. The nucleotide-binding site (NBS)-leucine-rich repeat (LRR) class of genes is one of the largest R gene families. Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) is resistant to Chestnut Blight Disease, but relatively little is known about the resistance mechanism. We identified 519 NBS-encoding genes, including 374 NBS-LRR genes and 145 NBS-only genes. The majority of Ka/Ks were less than 1, suggesting the purifying selection operated during the evolutionary history of NBS-encoding genes. A minority (4/34) of Ka/Ks in non-TIR gene families were greater than 1, showing that some genes were under positive selection pressure. Furthermore, Ks peaked at a range of 0.4 to 0.5, indicating that ancient duplications arose during the evolution. The relationship between Ka/Ks and Ks indicated greater selective pressure on the newer and older genes with the critical value of Ks = 0.4-0.5. Notably, species-specific duplications were detected in NBS-encoding genes. In addition, the group of RPW8-NBS-encoding genes clustered together as an independent clade located at a relatively basal position in the phylogenetic tree. Many cis-acting elements related to plant defense responses were detected in promoters of NBS-encoding genes. PMID:26559332

  14. Differences in dinucleotide frequencies of thermophilic genes encoding water soluble and membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Yuka

    2011-01-01

    The occurrence frequencies of the dinucleotides of genes of three thermophilic and three mesophilic species from both archaea and eubacteria were investigated in this study. The genes encoding water soluble proteins were rich in the dinucleotides of purine dimers, whereas the genes encoding membrane proteins were rich in pyrimidine dimers. The dinucleotides of purine dimers are the counterparts of pyrimidine dimers in a double-stranded DNA. The purine/pyrimidine dimers were favored in the the...

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 Carries Genes Encoding Two Classes of Vsr Endonucleases ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatek, Agnieszka; Łuczkiewicz, Maciej; Bandyra, Katarzyna; Stein, Daniel C.; Piekarowicz, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    A very short patch repair system prevents mutations resulting from deamination of 5-methylcytosine to thymine. The Vsr endonuclease is the key enzyme of this system, providing sequence specificity. We identified two genes encoding Vsr endonucleases V.NgoAXIII and V.NgoAXIV from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 based on DNA sequence similarity to genes encoding Vsr endonucleases from other bacteria. After expression of the gonococcal genes in Escherichia coli, the proteins were biochemically chara...

  16. A novel gene encoding xanthan lyase of Paenibacillus alginolyticus strain XL-1

    OpenAIRE

    Ruijssenaars, H.J.; Hartmans, S.; Verdoes, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Xanthan-modifying enzymes are powerful tools in studying structure-function relationships of this polysaccharide. One of these modifying enzymes is xanthan lyase, which removes the terminal side chain residue of xanthan. In this paper, the cloning and sequencing of the first xanthan lyase-encoding gene is described, i.e., the xalA gene, encoding pyruvated mannose-specific xanthan lyase of Paenibacillus alginolyticus XL-1. The xalA gene encoded a 100,823-Da protein, including a 36-amino-acid s...

  17. SurfaceomeDB: a cancer-orientated database for genes encoding cell surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Jorge Estefano Santana; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; de Almeida, Renan Valieris Bueno; da Cunha, Julia Pinheiro Chagas; Ohara, Daniel Takatori; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Old, Lloyd J; de Souza, Sandro José

    2012-01-01

    Cell surface proteins (CSPs) are excellent targets for the development of diagnostic and therapeutic reagents, and it is estimated that 10-20% of all genes in the human genome encode CSPs. In an effort to integrate all data publicly available for genes encoding cell surface proteins, a database (SurfaceomeDB) was developed. SurfaceomeDB is a gene-centered portal containing different types of information, including annotation for gene expression, protein domains, somatic mutations in cancer, and protein-protein interactions for all human genes encoding CSPs. SurfaceomeDB was implemented as an integrative and relational database in a user-friendly web interface, where users can search for gene name, gene annotation, or keywords. There is also a streamlined graphical representation of all data provided and links to the most important data repositories and databases, such as NCBI, UCSC Genome Browser, and EBI. PMID:23390370

  18. The Drosophila gene escargot encodes a zinc finger motif found in snail-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, M; Noguchi, P D; Sensabaugh, S M; Odenwald, W F; Kassis, J A

    1992-02-01

    Two independent P-element enhancer detection lines were obtained that express lacZ in a pattern of longitudinal stripes early in germband elongation. In this paper, molecular and genetic characterization of a gene located near these transposons is presented. Sequence analysis of a cDNA clone from the region reveals that this gene has a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila snail gene (Boulay et al., 1987). The sequence similarity extends over 400 nucleotides, and includes a region encoding five tandem zinc finger motifs (72% nucleotide identity; 76% amino acid identity). This region is also conserved in the snail homologue from Xenopus laevis (76% nucleotide identity; 83% amino acid identity) (Sargent and Bennett, 1990). We have named the Drosophila snail-related gene escargot (esg), and the region of sequence conservation common to all three genes the 'snailbox'. A number of Drosophila genomic DNA fragments cross-hybridize to a probe from the snailbox region suggesting that snail and escargot are members of a multigene family. The expression pattern of escargot is dynamic and complex. Early in germband elongation, escargot RNA is expressed in a pattern of longitudinal stripes identical to the one observed in the two enhancer detection lines. Later in development, escargot is expressed in cells that will form the larval imaginal tissues, escargot is allelic with l(2)35Ce, an essential gene located near snail in the genome. PMID:1571289

  19. The gusBC genes of Escherichia coli encode a glucuronide transport system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, WJ; Wilson, KJ; Xie, H; Knol, J; Suzuki, S; Rutherford, NG; Henderson, PJF; Jefferson, RA

    2005-01-01

    Two genes, gusB and gusC, from a natural fecal isolate of Escherichia coli are shown to encode proteins responsible for transport of beta-glucuronides with synthetic [C-14] phenyl-l-thio-beta-D-glucuronide as the substrate. These genes are located in the gus operon downstream of the gusA gene on the

  20. Rapid duplication and loss of nbs-encoding genes in eurosids II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eurosids basically evolved from the core Eudicots Rosids. The Rosids consist of two large assemblages, Eurosids I (Fabids) and Eurosids II (Malvids), which belong to the largest group of Angiosperms, comprising of >40,000 and ∼ 15,000 species, respectively. Although the evolutionary patterns of the largest class of disease resistance genes consisting of a nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) have been studied in many species, systemic research of NBS-encoding genes has not been performed in different orders of Eurosids II. Here, five Eurosids II species, Gossypium raimondii, Theobroma cacao, Carica papaya, Citrus clementina, and Arabidopsis thaliana, distributing in three orders, were used to gain insights into the evolutionary patterns of the NBS-encoding genes. Our data showed that frequent copy number variations of NBS-encoding genes were found among these species. Phylogenetic tree analysis and the numbers of the NBS-encoding genes in the common ancestor of these species showed that species-specific NBS clades, including multi-copy and single copy numbers are dominant among these genes. However, not a single clade was found with only five copies, which come from all of the five species, respectively, suggesting rapid turn-over with birth and death of the NBS-encoding genes among Eurosids II species. In addition, a strong positive correlation was observed between the Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR)) type NBS-encoding genes and species-specific genes, indicating rapid gene loss and duplication. Whereas, non- TIR type NBS-encoding genes in these five species showed two distinct evolutionary patterns. (author)

  1. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim was to...

  2. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V;

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...

  3. Enterotoxin-encoding genes in Staphylococcus spp. from bulk goat milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Daniele G; Sousa, Francisca G C; Borges, Maria F; Givisiez, Patrícia E N; Queiroga, Rita C R E; Souza, Evandro L; Gebreyes, Wondwossen A; Oliveira, Celso J B

    2013-02-01

    Although Staphylococcus aureus has been implicated as the main Staphylococcus species causing human food poisoning, recent studies have shown that coagulase-negative Staphylococcus could also harbor enterotoxin-encoding genes. Such organisms are often present in goat milk and are the most important mastitis-causing agents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the occurrence of enterotoxin-encoding genes among coagulase-positive (CoPS) and coagulase-negative (CoNS) staphylococci isolated from raw goat milk produced in the semi-arid region of Paraiba, the most important region for goat milk production in Brazil. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were screened in 74 staphylococci isolates (30 CoPS and 44 CoNS) by polymerase chain reaction targeting the genes sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei. Enterotoxin-encoding genes were found in nine (12.2%) isolates, and four different genes (sea, sec, seg, and sei) were identified amongst the isolates. The most frequent genes were seg and sei, which were often found simultaneously in 44.5% of the isolates. The gene sec was the most frequent among the classical genes, and sea was found only in one isolate. All CoPS isolates (n=7) harboring enterotoxigenic genes were identified as S. aureus. The two coagulase-negative isolates were S. haemolyticus and S. hominis subsp. hominis and they harbored sei and sec genes, respectively. A higher frequency of enterotoxin-encoding genes was observed amongst CoPS (23.3%) than CoNS (4.5%) isolates (pgoat milk should not be ignored because it has a higher occurrence in goat milk and enterotoxin-encoding genes were detected in some isolates. PMID:23441914

  4. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    OpenAIRE

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and derm...

  5. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    OpenAIRE

    Takasugi Masaki; Yagi Shintaro; Hirabayashi Keiji; Shiota Kunio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA), and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes) has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the...

  6. The 17-Gene Ethanolamine (eut) Operon of Salmonella typhimurium Encodes Five Homologues of Carboxysome Shell Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kofoid, Eric; Rappleye, Chad; Stojiljkovic, Igor; Roth, John

    1999-01-01

    The eut operon of Salmonella typhimurium encodes proteins involved in the cobalamin-dependent degradation of ethanolamine. Previous genetic analysis revealed six eut genes that are needed for aerobic use of ethanolamine; one (eutR), encodes a positive regulator which mediates induction of the operon by vitamin B12 plus ethanolamine. The DNA sequence of the eut operon included 17 genes, suggesting a more complex pathway than that revealed genetically. We have correlated an open reading frame i...

  7. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    St Clair Dina A; Morgante Michele; West Marilyn AL; Kozik Alexander; Meyers Blake C; Tan Xiaoping; Bent Andrew F; Michelmore Richard W

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of...

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Homologous Proteins Encoded by UL2 and UL23 genes of Herpesviridae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long-ding LIU; Wen-juan WU; Min HONG; Hai-jing SHI; Shao-hui MA; Jing-jing WANG; Hong-ling ZHAO; Yun LIAO; Qi-han LI

    2007-01-01

    The proteins encoded by the Herpesviridae β-gene play a critical role in the replication stage of the virus. In this paper, phylogenetic analyses provided evidence that someβ-gene products, such as UL2 and UL23 from HSV1, have their homologous genes in its family, and also exist in prokaryotic organisms, indicating that these viruses appear to have been assembled over evolutionary time by numerous independent events of horizontal gene transfer.

  9. Genetic Variants in Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes Influence AIDS Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrickson, Sher L.; Lautenberger, James A; Chinn, Leslie Wei; Malasky, Michael; Sezgin, Efe; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Gomperts, Edward D.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Troyer, Jennifer L.; O'Brien, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within 9...

  10. Escherichia coli rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Maigaard, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    The rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A was cloned from phage 1A2(471) of the Kohara gene library. Subcloning, restriction, and complementation analyses revealed an 1,800-bp SspI-generated DNA fragment that contained the entire control and coding sequences. This DNA fragment was seque...

  11. Bacillus caldolyticus prs gene encoding phosphoribosyldiphosphate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krath, Britta N.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    The prs gene, encoding phosphoribosyl-diphosphate (PRPP) synthase, as well as the flanking DNA sequences were cloned and sequenced from the Gram-positive thermophile, Bacillus caldolyticus. Comparison with the homologous sequences from the mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, revealed a gene (gca...

  12. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe mam1 gene encodes an ABC transporter mediating secretion of M-factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P U; Davey, William John; Nielsen, O;

    1997-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cells of opposite mating type communicate via diffusible peptide pheromones prior to mating. We have cloned the S. pombe mam1 gene, which encodes a 1336-amino acid protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. The mam1 gene is onl...

  13. NBS-LRR-Encoding genes in sorghum and their role in plant defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR) proteins are encoded by a large class of plant genes and many of them play an important role in plant defense against pest attack. Identification and characterization of the whole set of NBS-LRR genes in a plant genome will provide insights int...

  14. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Shan M.; Swanson, Johanna; Eric U Selker

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged ...

  15. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwen; Sun, Xiuqin; Zhang, Jinxing; Zan, Jindong

    2008-02-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned. It was not interrupted by an intron. This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream, indicating that its transcription may be intensive, and should have an important function. It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested, demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene. Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  16. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    OpenAIRE

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R.

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytoc...

  17. Comparative differential gene expression analysis of nucleus-encoded proteins for Rafflesia cantleyi against Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Siuk-Mun; Lee, Xin-Wei; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd

    2015-09-01

    Regulation of functional nucleus-encoded proteins targeting the plastidial functions was comparatively studied for a plant parasite, Rafflesia cantleyi versus a photosynthetic plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. This study involved two species of different feeding modes and different developmental stages. A total of 30 nucleus-encoded proteins were found to be differentially-regulated during two stages in the parasite; whereas 17 nucleus-encoded proteins were differentially-expressed during two developmental stages in Arabidopsis thaliana. One notable finding observed for the two plants was the identification of genes involved in the regulation of photosynthesis-related processes where these processes, as expected, seem to be present only in the autotroph.

  18. Characterization of the pyruvate kinase-encoding gene (pki1) of Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, M; Mach, R L; Vollenhofer, S K; Hodits, R; Gruber, F; Visser, J; De Graaff, L; Kubicek, C P

    1993-08-25

    The pyruvate kinase-encoding gene (pki1) from Trichoderma reesei was isolated by hybridization to the corresponding Aspergillus nidulans pkiA gene. The 1614-bp nucleotide (nt) sequence of the cloned gene codes for a 538-amino-acid protein. The coding sequence contains a single intron of 246 nt at a position identical to that of intron E in the A. nidulans gene. The PKI protein shows extensive homology to the PKIs of A. nidulans and A. niger (67%) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (59%). The 5' non-coding sequence contains a number of motifs typical for yeast glycolytic genes, but so far only rarely found in filamentous fungi. PMID:8359694

  19. Cloning, sequence analysis, and hyperexpression of the genes encoding phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase from Methanosarcina thermophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Latimer, M T; Ferry, J G

    1993-01-01

    The genes for the acetate-activating enzymes, acetate kinase and phosphotransacetylase (ack and pta), from Methanosarcina thermophila TM-1 were cloned and sequenced. Both genes are present in only one copy per genome, with the pta gene adjacent to and upstream of the ack gene. Consensus archaeal promoter sequences are found upstream of the pta coding region. The pta and ack genes encode predicted polypeptides with molecular masses of 35,198 and 44,482 Da, respectively. A hydropathy plot of th...

  20. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Jia-Xing; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-06-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluorescence were similar between Asymmetron and Branchiostoma. Lineage-specific expansion of GFP-encoding genes in the genus Branchiostoma was observed, largely driven by tandem duplications. Despite such expansion, purifying selection has strongly shaped the evolution of GFP-encoding genes in cephalochordates, with apparent relaxation for highly duplicated clades. All cephalochordate GFP-encoding genes are quite different from those of copepods and cnidarians. Thus, the ancestral cephalochordates probably had GFP, but since GFP appears to be lacking in more early-diverged deuterostomes (echinoderms, hemichordates), it is uncertain whether the ancestral cephalochordates (i.e. the common ancestor of Asymmetron and Branchiostoma) acquired GFP by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from copepods or cnidarians or inherited it from the common ancestor of copepods and deuterostomes, i.e. the ancestral bilaterians.

  1. Characterization of genes encoding poly(A polymerases in plants: evidence for duplication and functional specialization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa R Meeks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poly(A polymerase is a key enzyme in the machinery that mediates mRNA 3' end formation in eukaryotes. In plants, poly(A polymerases are encoded by modest gene families. To better understand this multiplicity of genes, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes from several other plants, as well as from Selaginella, Physcomitrella, and Chlamydomonas, were studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using bioinformatics tools, poly(A polymerase-encoding genes were identified in the genomes of eight species in the plant lineage. Whereas Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to possess a single poly(A polymerase gene, other species possessed between two and six possible poly(A polymerase genes. With the exception of four intron-lacking genes, all of the plant poly(A polymerase genes (but not the C. reinhardtii gene possessed almost identical intron positions within the poly(A polymerase coding sequences, suggesting that all plant poly(A polymerase genes derive from a single ancestral gene. The four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerase genes were found to be essential, based on genetic analysis of T-DNA insertion mutants. GFP fusion proteins containing three of the four Arabidopsis poly(A polymerases localized to the nucleus, while one such fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm. The fact that this latter protein is largely pollen-specific suggests that it has important roles in male gametogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that poly(A polymerase genes have expanded from a single ancestral gene by a series of duplication events during the evolution of higher plants, and that individual members have undergone sorts of functional specialization so as to render them essential for plant growth and development. Perhaps the most interesting of the plant poly(A polymerases is a novel cytoplasmic poly(A polymerase that is expressed in pollen in Arabidopsis; this is reminiscent of spermatocyte-specific cytoplasmic poly(A polymerases in

  2. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1) and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1) Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaffari Novin M.; Allahveisi Azra; Noruzinia M; Farhadifar F.; Yousefian E.; Dehghani Fard A.; Salimi M.

    2015-01-01

    In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII) stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1) and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear ...

  3. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  4. Ovine herpesvirus-2 encoded microRNAs target virus genes involved in virus latency

    OpenAIRE

    Riaz, Aayesha; Dry, Inga; Levy, C; Hopkins, John; Grey, Finn; Shaw, Darren; Dalziel, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Herpesviruses encode miRNAs that target both virus and host genes; however their role in herpesvirus biology is poorly understood. We previously identified eight miRNAs encoded by OvHV-2; the causative agent of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) and have now investigated the role of these miRNAs in regulating expression of OvHV-2 genes that play important roles in virus biology. ORF 20 (cell cycle inhibition), ORF 50 (reactivation) and ORF 73 (latency maintenance) each contain predicted targets ...

  5. Characterization of the FKBP12-Encoding Genes in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Falloon

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis, largely caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, is responsible for a growing number of deaths among immunosuppressed patients. Immunosuppressants such as FK506 (tacrolimus that target calcineurin have shown promise for antifungal drug development. FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs form a complex with calcineurin in the presence of FK506 (FKBP12-FK506 and inhibit calcineurin activity. Research on FKBPs in fungi is limited, and none of the FKBPs have been previously characterized in A. fumigatus. We identified four orthologous genes of FKBP12, the human FK506 binding partner, in A. fumigatus and designated them fkbp12-1, fkbp12-2, fkbp12-3, and fkbp12-4. Deletional analysis of the four genes revealed that the Δfkbp12-1 strain was resistant to FK506, indicating FKBP12-1 as the key mediator of FK506-binding to calcineurin. The endogenously expressed FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein localized to the cytoplasm and nuclei under normal growth conditions but also to the hyphal septa following FK506 treatment, revealing its interaction with calcineurin. The FKBP12-1-EGFP fusion protein didn't localize at the septa in the presence of FK506 in the cnaA deletion background, confirming its interaction with calcineurin. Testing of all deletion strains in the Galleria mellonella model of aspergillosis suggested that these proteins don't play an important role in virulence. While the Δfkbp12-2 and Δfkbp12-3 strains didn't show any discernable phenotype, the Δfkbp12-4 strain displayed slight growth defect under normal growth conditions and inhibition of the caspofungin-mediated "paradoxical growth effect" at higher concentrations of the antifungal caspofungin. Together, these results indicate that while only FKBP12-1 is the bona fide binding partner of FK506, leading to the inhibition of calcineurin in A. fumigatus, FKBP12-4 may play a role in basal growth and the caspofungin-mediated paradoxical growth response. Exploitation of differences between A

  6. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hincha Dirk K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE and/or low temperature response (LTRE elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for

  7. Genetic variants in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes influence AIDS progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sher L Hendrickson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human mitochondrial genome includes only 13 coding genes while nuclear-encoded genes account for 99% of proteins responsible for mitochondrial morphology, redox regulation, and energetics. Mitochondrial pathogenesis occurs in HIV patients and genetically, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups with presumed functional differences have been associated with differential AIDS progression. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we explore whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within 904 of the estimated 1,500 genes that specify nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins (NEMPs influence AIDS progression among HIV-1 infected patients. We examined NEMPs for association with the rate of AIDS progression using genotypes generated by an Affymetrix 6.0 genotyping array of 1,455 European American patients from five US AIDS cohorts. Successfully genotyped SNPs gave 50% or better haplotype coverage for 679 of known NEMP genes. With a Bonferroni adjustment for the number of genes and tests examined, multiple SNPs within two NEMP genes showed significant association with AIDS progression: acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 4 (ACSM4 on chromosome 12 and peroxisomal D3,D2-enoyl-CoA isomerase (PECI on chromosome 6. CONCLUSIONS: Our previous studies on mitochondrial DNA showed that European haplogroups with presumed functional differences were associated with AIDS progression and HAART mediated adverse events. The modest influences of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes found in the current study add support to the idea that mitochondrial function plays a role in AIDS pathogenesis.

  8. DNA methylation status of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes underlies the tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takasugi Masaki

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are semi-autonomous, semi-self-replicating organelles harboring their own DNA (mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, and their dysregulation is involved in the development of various diseases. While mtDNA does not generally undergo epigenetic modifications, almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear DNA. However, the epigenetic regulation of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes (nuclear mt genes has not been comprehensively analyzed. Results We analyzed the DNA methylation status of 899 nuclear mt genes in the liver, brain, and heart tissues of mouse, and identified 636 nuclear mt genes carrying tissue-dependent and differentially methylated regions (T-DMRs. These nuclar mt genes are involved in various mitochondrial functions and they also include genes related to human diseases. T-DMRs regulate the expression of nuclear mt genes. Nuclear mt genes with tissue-specific hypomethylated T-DMRs were characterized by enrichment of the target genes of specific transcription factors such as FOXA2 in the liver, and CEBPA and STAT1 in the brain. Conclusions A substantial proportion of nuclear mt genes contained T-DMRs, and the DNA methylation status of numerous T-DMRs should underlie tissue-dependent mitochondrial functions.

  9. The yeast SNF3 gene encodes a glucose transporter homologous to the mammalian protein.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The SNF3 gene is required for high-affinity glucose transport in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has also been implicated in control of gene expression by glucose repression. We report here the nucleotide sequence of the cloned SNF3 gene. The predicted amino acid sequence shows that SNF3 encodes a 97-kilodalton protein that is homologous to mammalian glucose transporters and has 12 putative membrane-spanning regions. We also show that a functional SNF3-lacZ gene-fusion product cofracti...

  10. Biovar diversity is reflected by variations of genes encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruifu, Y; Minli, Z; Guo, Z; Wang, X

    1997-01-01

    Five oligonucleotide primers derived from the gene encoding urease of Ureaplasma urealyticum were designed to evaluate the relationship between the urease gene and biovar diversity of this organism. Five combinations of these primers were tested by PCR and the result revealed that there were variations in urease genes among different serovars of U. urealyticum. This result, in agreement with other PCRs based on other functionally unrelated (rRNA and MB antigen) genes, may reflect the phylogenetic relationship among organisms taxonomically classified as U. urealyticum. PMID:9310943

  11. Myxococcus xanthus sasS encodes a sensor histidine kinase required for early developmental gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, C.; Kaplan, H B

    1997-01-01

    Initiation of Myxococcus xanthus multicellular development requires integration of information concerning the cells' nutrient status and density. A gain-of-function mutation, sasB7, that bypasses both the starvation and high cell density requirements for developmental expression of the 4521 reporter gene, maps to the sasS gene. The wild-type sasS gene was cloned and sequenced. This gene is predicted to encode a sensor histidine protein kinase that appears to be a key element in the transducti...

  12. Allotopic Expression of a Gene Encoding FLAG Tagged-subunit 8 of Yeast Mitochondrial ATP Synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I MADE ARTIKA

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Subunit 8 of yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase is a polypeptide of 48 amino acids encoded by the mitochondrial ATP8 gene. A nuclear version of subunit 8 gene has been designed to encode FLAG tagged-subunit 8 fused with a mitochondrial signal peptide. The gene has been cloned into a yeast expression vector and then expressed in a yeast strain lacking endogenous subunit 8. Results showed that the gene was successfully expressed and the synthesized FLAG tagged-subunit 8 protein was imported into mitochondria. Following import, the FLAG tagged-subunit 8 protein assembled into functional mitochondrial ATP synthase complex. Furthermore, the subunit 8 protein could be detected using anti-FLAG tag monoclonal antibody.

  13. Isolation of osRACD gene encoding a small GTP-binding protein from rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Using an improved version of mRNA differential display technology, we have obtained a differentially displayed fragment RDP-8. Homologous comparison indicated that the fragment RDP-8 has high homology with the gene encoding maize small GTP-binding protein. By screening cDNA library of the rice Nongken 58N pan icle using the newly obtained fragment RDP-8 as probe, we further found the full-length cDNA of osRACD gene that encodes a rice small GTP-binding protein. Asco mpared with maize RACD gene, the osRACD of rice shows remarkable homology in both nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence, 88% and 97% respectively. Evidence from RT-PCR study indicates that osRACD gene is related to photoperiod fertility conversion of photoperiod sensitive genic male sterility (PSGMS) rice.

  14. Global expression analysis of nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Clair Dina A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleotide binding site-leucine rich repeat (NBS-LRR-encoding genes comprise the largest class of plant disease resistance genes. The 149 NBS-LRR-encoding genes and the 58 related genes that do not encode LRRs represent approximately 0.8% of all ORFs so far annotated in Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0. Despite their prevalence in the genome and functional importance, there was little information regarding expression of these genes. Results We analyzed the expression patterns of ~170 NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes in Arabidopsis Col-0 using multiple analytical approaches: expressed sequenced tag (EST representation, massively parallel signature sequencing (MPSS, microarray analysis, rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE PCR, and gene trap lines. Most of these genes were expressed at low levels with a variety of tissue specificities. Expression was detected by at least one approach for all but 10 of these genes. The expression of some but not the majority of NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes was affected by salicylic acid (SA treatment; the response to SA varied among different accessions. An analysis of previously published microarray data indicated that ten NBS-LRR-encoding and related genes exhibited increased expression in wild-type Landsberg erecta (Ler after flagellin treatment. Several of these ten genes also showed altered expression after SA treatment, consistent with the regulation of R gene expression during defense responses and overlap between the basal defense response and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Enhancer trap analysis indicated that neither jasmonic acid nor benzothiadiazole (BTH, a salicylic acid analog, induced detectable expression of the five NBS-LRR-encoding genes and one TIR-NBS-encoding gene tested; however, BTH did induce detectable expression of the other TIR-NBS-encoding gene analyzed. Evidence for alternative mRNA polyadenylation sites was observed for many of the tested genes. Evidence for

  15. Characterization of the BMR1 gene encoding a transcription factor for melanin biosynthesis genes in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Junichi; Moriwaki, Akihiro; Tanaka, Nozomi; Tanaka, Chihiro; Ueno, Makoto; Arase, Sakae

    2008-04-01

    We isolated and characterized Bipolaris melanin regulation 1 gene (BMR1) encoding a transcription factor for melanin biosynthesis genes in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae. Sequence analysis showed that the BMR1 gene encodes a putative protein of 1012 amino acids that has 99% sequence similarity to transcription factor Cmr1 of Cochliobolus heterostrophus. The predicted B. oryzae Bmr1 protein has two DNA-binding motifs, two Cys2His2 zinc finger domains, and a Zn(II)2Cys6 binuclear cluster domain at the N-terminal region of Bmr1. Targeted disruption of the BMR1 gene showed that BMR1 is essential for melanin biosynthesis in B. oryzae. The overexpression of the BMR1 gene led to more dark colonies than in the wild-type strain under dark conditions. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the BMR1 expression of the overexpression transformant was about 10-fold that of the wild type under dark conditions and of the expression of three melanin biosynthesis genes. These results indicated that BMR1 encodes the transcription factor of melanin biosynthesis genes in B. oryzae. PMID:18312572

  16. TMC and EVER genes belong to a larger novel family, the TMC gene family encoding transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutai Hideki

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the transmembrane cochlear expressed gene 1 (TMC1 cause deafness in human and mouse. Mutations in two homologous genes, EVER1 and EVER2 increase the susceptibility to infection with certain human papillomaviruses resulting in high risk of skin carcinoma. Here we report that TMC1, EVER1 and EVER2 (now TMC6 and TMC8 belong to a larger novel gene family, which is named TMC for trans membrane channel-like gene family. Results Using a combination of iterative database searches and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR experiments we assembled contigs for cDNA encoding human, murine, puffer fish, and invertebrate TMC proteins. TMC proteins of individual species can be grouped into three subfamilies A, B, and C. Vertebrates have eight TMC genes. The majority of murine TMC transcripts are expressed in most organs; some transcripts, however, in particular the three subfamily A members are rare and more restrictively expressed. Conclusion The eight vertebrate TMC genes are evolutionary conserved and encode proteins that form three subfamilies. Invertebrate TMC proteins can also be categorized into these three subfamilies. All TMC genes encode transmembrane proteins with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini and at least eight membrane-spanning domains. We speculate that the TMC proteins constitute a novel group of ion channels, transporters, or modifiers of such.

  17. Genome-wide comparative analysis of NBS-encoding genes between Brassica species and Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jingyin; Tehrim, Sadia; Zhang, Fengqi; Tong, Chaobo; Huang, Junyan; Cheng, Xiaohui; Dong, Caihua; Zhou, Yanqiu; Qin, Rui; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi

    2014-01-01

    Background Plant disease resistance (R) genes with the nucleotide binding site (NBS) play an important role in offering resistance to pathogens. The availability of complete genome sequences of Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa provides an important opportunity for researchers to identify and characterize NBS-encoding R genes in Brassica species and to compare with analogues in Arabidopsis thaliana based on a comparative genomics approach. However, little is known about the evolutionary fat...

  18. Expression of genes encoding the calcium signalosome in cellular and transgenic models of Huntington's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Teresa Schacht; Jacek Kuznicki

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine stretch in the huntingtin (HTT) protein and characterized by dysregulated calcium homeostasis. We investigated whether these disturbances are correlated with changes in the mRNA level of the genes that encode proteins involved in calcium homeostasis and signaling (i.e., the calciosome). Using custom-made TaqMan low-density arrays containing probes for 96 genes, we quantified mRNA in ...

  19. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, Chang Ying; Dang, Yunkun; Danne, Jillian C.; Waller, Ross F.; Green, Beverley R.

    2013-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm) ...

  20. The human gene encoding acetylcholinesterase is located on the long arm of chromosome 7.

    OpenAIRE

    Getman, D K; Eubanks, J H; Camp, S; Evans, G.A.; Taylor, P

    1992-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a secreted enzyme essential for regulating cholinergic neurotransmission at neuronal and neuromuscular synapses. In view of the altered expression of AChE in some central neurological and neuromuscular disorders with a probable genetic basis, we have identified the chromosomal location of the gene encoding AChE. Chromosomal in situ suppression hybridization analysis revealed a single gene to be at 7q22, a result which was confirmed by PCR analysis of genomic DNA...

  1. The evolution of genes encoding for green fluorescent proteins: insights from cephalochordates (amphioxus)

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Xing Yue; Holland, Nicholas D.; Holland, Linda Z.; Deheyn, Dimitri D.

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was originally found in cnidarians, and later in copepods and cephalochordates (amphioxus) (Branchiostoma spp). Here, we looked for GFP-encoding genes in Asymmetron, an early-diverged cephalochordate lineage, and found two such genes closely related to some of the Branchiostoma GFPs. Dim fluorescence was found throughout the body in adults of Asymmetron lucayanum, and, as in Branchiostoma floridae, was especially intense in the ripe ovaries. Spectra of the fluo...

  2. Cloning and Characterization of upp, a Gene Encoding Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1994-01-01

    Uracil phosphoribosyltransferase catalyzes the key reaction in the salvage of uracil in many microorganisms. The gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (upp) was cloned from Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris MG1363 by complementation of an Escherichia coli mutant. The gene was sequenced......-negative bacterial strains. The phenotype of the uracil phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient strain was established. Surprisingly, the upp strain is resistant only to very low concentrations of 5-fluorouracil. Secondary mutants in thymidine phosphorylase and thymidine kinase were isolated by selection for resistance...

  3. Identification and analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper homeostasis gene encoding a homeodomain protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, S A; Tamai, K T; Kosman, D J; Thiele, D J

    1994-01-01

    Yeast metallothionein, encoded by the CUP1 gene, and its copper-dependent transcriptional activator ACE1 play a key role in mediating copper resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant of a yeast strain in which CUP1 and ACE1 were deleted, we isolated a gene, designated CUP9, which permits yeast cells to grow at high concentrations of environmental copper, most notably when lactate is the sole carbon source. Disruption of CUP9, which is located on chromosome...

  4. Structural genes encoding the thermophilic alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and Bacillus licheniformis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, G L; Mainzer, S E; Rey, M W; Lamsa, M H; Kindle, K L; Carmona, C; Requadt, C

    1986-01-01

    The genes encoding the thermostable alpha-amylases of Bacillus stearothermophilus and B. licheniformis were cloned in Escherichia coli, and their DNA sequences were determined. The coding and deduced polypeptide sequences are 59 and 62% homologous to each other, respectively. The B. stearothermophilus protein differs most significantly from that of B. licheniformis in that it possesses a 32-residue COOH-terminal tail. Transformation of E. coli with vectors containing either gene resulted in t...

  5. Regulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in plant cell wall deconstruction in Trichoderma reesei

    OpenAIRE

    Ries, Laure Nicolas Annick

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the regulation of genes encoding plant cell wall-degrading enzymes in the presence of different carbon sources from the biotechnologically important fungus Trichoderma reesei. It was shown that different carbon sources influence fungal growth rate, biomass production and subsequent enzyme secretion. Several genes were identified and suggested to play a role in the development of conidia and in maintaining polarised growth. RNA-sequencing studies showed an increase in t...

  6. Phenotypical Manifestations of Mutations in the Genes Encoding Subunits of the Cardiac Sodium Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Brugada, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Variations in the gene encoding for the major sodium channel (Na(v)1.5) in the heart, SCN5A, has been shown to cause a number of arrhythmia syndromes (with or without structural changes in the myocardium), including the long-QT syndrome (type 3), Brugada syndrome, (progressive) cardiac conduction di

  7. Haploinsufficiency of the genes encoding the tumor suppressor Pten predisposes zebrafish to hemangiosarcoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choorapoikayil, Suma; Kuiper, Raoul V.; de Bruin, Alain; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    PTEN is an essential tumor suppressor that antagonizes Akt/PKB signaling. The zebrafish genome encodes two Pten genes, ptena and ptenb. Here, we report that zebrafish mutants that retain a single wild-type copy of ptena or ptenb (ptena(+/)-ptenb(-/-) or ptena(-/-)ptenb(+/-)) are viable and fertile.

  8. The cloning and expression of a gene encoding haemolytic activity from the fish pathogen Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Munn, C B

    1990-09-01

    A gene encoding haemolytic activity from Renibacterium salmoninarum (strain PPD) was cloned into Escherichia coli using the cosmid vector pHC79, and subsequently subcloned on a 1.6 kbp SAlI fragment into pBR328. Southern blot hybridisation revealed that a homologous sequence is found in other strains of R. salmoninarum. PMID:2276613

  9. WD- Repeat Protein Encoding Genes among Prokaryotes of the Streptomyces Genus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stoytcheva, Zoia; Joshi, B.; Spížek, Jaroslav; Tichý, Pavel

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 5 (2000), s. 407-413. ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/96/1262 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : protein * encoding * genes Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2000

  10. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae ADR1 gene is a positive regulator of transcription of genes encoding peroxisomal proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Simon; Adam, G.; Rapatz, W; Spevak, W; Ruis, H

    1991-01-01

    Expression of the CTA1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding catalase A, the peroxisomal catalase of this yeast, is sensitive to glucose repression. A DNA fragment cloned as a multicopy plasmid suppressing the glucose repression of CTA1 transcription was demonstrated to contain the ADR1 gene. Multiple copies of ADR1 increased catalase A formation not only on 10% glucose, but also on ethanol medium and in the presence of oleic acid, an inducer of peroxisome proliferation. Compared with wi...

  11. Systematic Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Skin-Associated Genes Encoding Membrane and Secreted Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Martinez, Cynthia; Schrumpf, Holger; Gasis, Marcia; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Krutmann, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115), and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7). Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics. PMID:23840300

  12. Systematic identification and characterization of novel human skin-associated genes encoding membrane and secreted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arne Gerber

    Full Text Available Through bioinformatics analyses of a human gene expression database representing 105 different tissues and cell types, we identified 687 skin-associated genes that are selectively and highly expressed in human skin. Over 50 of these represent uncharacterized genes not previously associated with skin and include a subset that encode novel secreted and plasma membrane proteins. The high levels of skin-associated expression for eight of these novel therapeutic target genes were confirmed by semi-quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical analyses of normal skin and skin-derived cell lines. Four of these are expressed specifically by epidermal keratinocytes; two that encode G-protein-coupled receptors (GPR87 and GPR115, and two that encode secreted proteins (WFDC5 and SERPINB7. Further analyses using cytokine-activated and terminally differentiated human primary keratinocytes or a panel of common inflammatory, autoimmune or malignant skin diseases revealed distinct patterns of regulation as well as disease associations that point to important roles in cutaneous homeostasis and disease. Some of these novel uncharacterized skin genes may represent potential biomarkers or drug targets for the development of future diagnostics or therapeutics.

  13. The Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog of a purported maize cholinesterase gene encodes a GDSL-lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muralidharan, Mrinalini; Buss, Kristina; Larrimore, Katherine E; Segerson, Nicholas A; Kannan, Latha; Mor, Tsafrir S

    2013-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase is an enzyme that is intimately associated with regulation of synaptic transmission in the cholinergic nervous system and in neuromuscular junctions of animals. However the presence of cholinesterase activity has been described also in non-metazoan organisms such as slime molds, fungi and plants. More recently, a gene purportedly encoding for acetylcholinesterase was cloned from maize. We have cloned the Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of the Zea mays gene, At3g26430, and studied its biochemical properties. Our results indicate that the protein encoded by the gene exhibited lipase activity with preference to long chain substrates but did not hydrolyze choline esters. The At3g26430 protein belongs to the SGNH clan of serine hydrolases, and more specifically to the GDS(L) lipase family. PMID:23430565

  14. Variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins in atopic dermatitis patients from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Jörg T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atopic dermatitis (AD is believed to result from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. A main feature of AD as well as other allergic disorders is serum and tissue eosinophilia. Human eosinophils contain high amounts of cationic granule proteins, including eosinophil cationic protein (ECP, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO and major basic protein (MBP. Recently, variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We therefore genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms within the ECP, EDN, EPO and MBP genes in a cohort of 361 German AD patients and 325 healthy controls. Results Genotype and allele frequencies did not differ between patients and controls for all polymorphisms investigated in this study. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any additional information. Conclusion We did not find evidence to support an influence of variation in genes encoding eosinophil granule proteins for AD pathogenesis in this German cohort.

  15. Cloning and expression of prion protein encoding gene of flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhiwen; SUN Xiuqin; ZHANG Jinxing; ZAN Jindong

    2008-01-01

    The prion protein (PrP) encoding gene of flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) was cloned.It was not interrupted by an intron.This gene has two promoters in its 5' upstream,indicating that its transcription may be intensive,and should have an important function.It was expressed in all 14 tissues tested,demonstrating that it is a house-keeping gene.Its expression in digestion and reproduction systems implies that the possible prions of fish may transfer horizontally.

  16. Cloning and characterization of the genes encoding the MspI restriction modification system.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, P M; Lee, C. H.; Roberts, R J

    1989-01-01

    The genes encoding the MspI restriction modification system, which recognizes the sequence 5' CCGG, have been cloned into pUC9. Selection was based on expression of the cloned methylase gene which renders plasmid DNA insensitive to MspI cleavage in vitro. Initially, an insert of 15 kb was obtained which, upon subcloning, yielded a 3 kb EcoRI to HindIII insert, carrying the genes for both the methylase and the restriction enzyme. This insert has been sequenced. Based upon the sequence, togethe...

  17. Molecular cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickinson, D P; Kubiniec, M A; Yoshimura, F; Genco, R J

    1988-01-01

    The gene encoding the fimbrial subunit protein of Bacteroides gingivalis 381, fimbrilin, has been cloned and sequenced. The gene was present as a single copy on the bacterial chromosome, and the codon usage in the gene conformed closely to that expected for an abundant protein. The predicted size of the mature protein was 35,924 daltons, and the secretory form may have had a 10-amino-acid, hydrophilic leader sequence similar to the leader sequences of the MePhe fimbriae family. The protein se...

  18. Conservation of the gene encoding streptococcal antigen I/II in oral streptococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, J K; Kelly, C G; Munro, G; Whiley, R A; Lehner, T.

    1991-01-01

    The spaP gene of Streptococcus mutans serotype c encodes a major cell surface protein, streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II, with an Mr of 185,000, that is thought to be involved in bacterial adhesion to teeth. Proteins with significant amino acid sequence homology to SA I/II have also been found in S. sobrinus and S. sanguis. The objectives of this study were to investigate the conservation of the spaP gene in the mutans groups of streptococci and to determine whether homologous genes were presen...

  19. Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encodes a serine peptidase essential for colonisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Karlyshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to MEROPS peptidase database, Campylobacter species encode 64 predicted peptidases. However, proteolytic properties of only a few of these proteins have been confirmed experimentally. In this study we identified and characterised a Campylobacter jejuni gene cj0511 encoding a novel peptidase. The proteolytic activity associated with this enzyme was demonstrated in cell lysates. Moreover, enzymatic studies conducted with a purified protein confirmed a prediction of it being a serine peptidase. Furthermore, cj0511 mutant was found to be severely attenuated in chicken colonisation model, suggesting a role of the Cj0511 protein in infection.

  20. Nucleotide Sequence of a Chicken Vitellogenin Gene and Derived Amino Acid Sequence of the Encoded Yolk Precursor Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schip, Fred D. van het; Samallo, John; Broos, Jaap; Ophuis, Jan; Mojet, Mart; Gruber, Max; AB, Geert

    1987-01-01

    The gene encoding the major vitellogenin from chicken has been completely sequenced and its exon-intron organization has been established. The gene is 20,342 base-pairs long and contains 35 exons with a combined length of 5787 base-pairs. They encode the 1850-amino acid pre-peptide of vitellogenin,

  1. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalysed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase). The genes encoding the two subunits in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, whereas in Lactococcus lactis, the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) is shown to b...

  2. A gene encoding a new cold-active lipase from an Antarctic isolate of Penicillium expansum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Suja; Te'o, Junior; Nevalainen, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Cold-active lipases are of significant interest as biocatalysts in industrial processes. We have identified a lipase that displayed activity towards long carbon-chain-p-nitrophenyl substrates (C12-C18) at 25 °C from the culture supernatant of an Antarctic Penicillium expansum strain assigned P. expansum SM3. Zymography revealed a protein band of around 30 kDa with activity towards olive oil. DNA fragments of a lipase gene designated as lipPE were isolated from the genomic DNA of P. expansum SM3 by genomic walking PCR. Subsequently, the complete genomic lipPE gene was amplified using gene-specific primers designed from the 5'- and 3'-regions. Reverse transcription PCR was used to amplify the lipPE cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence consisted of 285 residues that included a predicted signal peptide. Three peptides identified by LC/MS/MS analysis of the proteins in the culture supernatant of P. expansum were also present in the deduced amino acid sequence of the lipPE gene suggesting that this gene encoded the lipase identified by initial zymogram activity analysis. Full analysis of the nucleotide and the deduced amino acid sequences indicated that the lipPE gene encodes a novel P. expansum lipase. The lipPE gene was expressed in E. coli for further characterization of the enzyme with a view of assessing its suitability for industrial applications. PMID:23779196

  3. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  4. Diversity of plasmids encoding histidine decarboxylase gene in Tetragenococcus spp. isolated from Japanese fish sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, Masataka; Furushita, Manabu; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Yano, Yutaka

    2011-07-15

    Nineteen isolates of histamine producing halophilic bacteria were isolated from four fish sauce mashes, each mash accumulating over 1000 ppm of histamine. The complete sequences of the plasmids encoding the pyruvoyl dependent histidine decarboxylase gene (hdcA), which is harbored in histamine producing bacteria, were determined. In conjunction, the sequence regions adjacent to hdcA were analyzed to provide information regarding its genetic origin. As reference strains, Tetragenococcus halophilus H and T. muriaticus JCM10006(T) were also studied. Phenotypic and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified all isolates as T. halophilus, a predominant histamine producing bacteria present during fish sauce fermentation. Genetic analyses (PCR, Southern blot, and complete plasmid sequencing) of the histamine producing isolates confirmed that all the isolates harbored approximately 21-37 kbp plasmids encoding a single copy of the hdc cluster consisting of four genes related to histamine production. Analysis of hdc clusters, including spacer regions, indicated >99% sequence similarity among the isolates. All of the plasmids sequenced encoded traA, however genes related to plasmid conjugation, namely mob genes and oriT, were not identified. Two putative mobile genetic elements, ISLP1-like and IS200-like, respectively, were identified in the up- and downstream region of the hdc cluster of all plasmids. Most of the sequences, except hdc cluster and two adjacent IS elements, were diverse among plasmids, suggesting that each histamine producers harbored a different histamine-related plasmid. These results suggested that the hdc cluster was not spread by clonal dissemination depending on the specific plasmid and that the hdc cluster in tetragenococcal plasmid was likely encoded on transformable elements. PMID:21616548

  5. Analysis of the Genes Encoding the Histones of Microsporidia Nosema bombycis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are essential components of eukaryotic chromosomes, the objective of the study is to provide some new insights into its evolution through analysis of N. bombycis Histone genes at genomic level. In the study, genes encoding core Histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 from Nosema bombycis were analyzed by multiple sequence alignments. Analysis showed that: each type of the core Histone genes, sharing high similarity with each other in both coding and non-coding regions, has low copy number. Multiple sequence alignments showed N. bombycis core Histones diverge obviously, relative-rate test revealed Histone proteins have accelerated in the evolutionary rate of amino acid substitution. The distance between the stop codon and consensus poly (A signal is compacted, no conserved hair-pin element was found in 3'-untranslated regions of Histone mRNAs and overlapping gene transcription was observed in the downstream region of Histone variant H3_3, that implies there maybe have only single class of core Histone genes encoding replication-independent Histones in N. bombycis. Surveying the upstream of the coding region of all core Histone genes, there were no canonical TATA or CAAT boxes except that a common Histone motif (TTTCCCTCC was discovered. Moreover, no similar Histone motif mentioned above existed in Encephalitozoon cuniculi, the closely related organisms. That means that similar Histone motif maybe exists in microsporidian last common ancestor, N. bombycis retained Histone motif, while E. cuniculi have lost Histone motif after the differentiation from the common ancestor with the change of the host. Therefore the analysis of the genes encoding the Histones ofN. bombycis revealed that there maybe have two evolution directions in microsporidia, that is, genome extreme compact and mild compact, during the course of evolution. It contributes us to have the knowledge of that there have different genome size in microsporidia and provide useful

  6. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  7. The cyclope gene of Drosophila encodes a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuplewski, S; Terracol, R

    2001-08-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase is the terminal enzyme of the mitochondrial electron transfer chain. In eukaryotes, the enzyme is composed of 3 mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits and 7-10 (in mammals) nuclear DNA-encoded subunits. This enzyme has been extensively studied in mammals and yeast but, in Drosophila, very little is known and no mutant has been described so far. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of mutations in cyclope (cype) and the cloning of the gene encoding a cytochrome c oxidase subunit VIc homolog. cype is an essential gene whose mutations are lethal and show pleiotropic phenotypes. The 77-amino acid peptide encoded by cype is 46% identical and 59% similar to the human subunit (75 amino acids). The transcripts are expressed maternally and throughout development in localized regions. They are found predominantly in the central nervous system of the embryo; in the central region of imaginal discs; in the germarium, follicular, and nurse cells of the ovary; and in testis. A search in the Genome Annotation Database of Drosophila revealed the absence of subunit VIIb and the presence of 9 putative nuclear cytochrome c oxidase subunits with high identity scores when compared to the 10 human subunits. PMID:11514451

  8. Mutational analysis of the nor gene cluster which encodes nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, A P; van der Oost, J; Reijnders, W N; Westerhoff, H V; Stouthamer, A H; van Spanning, R J

    1996-12-15

    The genes that encode the hc-type nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans have been identified. They are part of a cluster of six genes (norCBQDEF) and are found near the gene cluster that encodes the cd1-type nitrite reductase, which was identified earlier [de Boer, A. P. N., Reijnders, W. N. M., Kuenen, J. G., Stouthamer, A. H. & van Spanning, R. J. M. (1994) Isolation, sequencing and mutational analysis of a gene cluster involved in nitrite reduction in Paracoccus denitrificans, Antonie Leeu wenhoek 66, 111-127]. norC and norB encode the cytochrome-c-containing subunit II and cytochrome b-containing subunit I of nitric-oxide reductase (NO reductase), respectively. norQ encodes a protein with an ATP-binding motif and has high similarity to NirQ from Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and CbbQ from Pseudomonas hydrogenothermophila. norE encodes a protein with five putative transmembrane alpha-helices and has similarity to CoxIII, the third subunit of the aa3-type cytochrome-c oxidases. norF encodes a small protein with two putative transmembrane alpha-helices. Mutagenesis of norC, norB, norQ and norD resulted in cells unable to grow anaerobically. Nitrite reductase and NO reductase (with succinate or ascorbate as substrates) and nitrous oxide reductase (with succinate as substrate) activities were not detected in these mutant strains. Nitrite extrusion was detected in the medium, indicating that nitrate reductase was active. The norQ and norD mutant strains retained about 16% and 23% of the wild-type level of NorC, respectively. The norE and norF mutant strains had specific growth rates and NorC contents similar to those of the wild-type strain, but had reduced NOR and NIR activities, indicating that their gene products are involved in regulation of enzyme activity. Mutant strains containing the norCBQDEF region on the broad-host-range vector pEG400 were able to grow anaerobically, although at a lower specific growth rate and with lower

  9. A multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding exfoliative toxins from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    : A multiplex PCR employing specific primers for each of the genes encoding four different exfoliative toxins was developed and evaluated using a collection of Staph. hyicus with known toxin type and a number of other staphylococcal species. A total of 314 Staph. hyicus isolates from pigs with EE were......Aims: To develop a multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding the exfoliative toxins ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD from Staphylococcus hyicus and to estimate the prevalence of exfoliative toxins among Staph. hyicus isolates from Danish pig herds with exudative epidermitis (EE). Methods and Results...... screened by multiplex PCR and the combined results of the present and previous investigations showed that ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD was found in 20, 33, 18 and 22%, respectively, of 60 cases of EE investigated. Conclusions: This study has provided a new tool for detection of toxigenic Staph. hyicus and a...

  10. A multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding exfoliative toxins from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    : A multiplex PCR employing specific primers for each of the genes encoding four different exfoliative toxins was developed and evaluated using a collection of Staph. hyicus with known toxin type and a number of other staphylococcal species. A total of 314 Staph. hyicus isolates from pigs with EE were......Aims: To develop a multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding the exfoliative toxins ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD from Staphylococcus hyicus and to estimate the prevalence of exfoliative toxins among Staph. hyicus isolates from Danish pig herds with exudative epidermitis (EE). Methods and Results...... more comprehensive picture of the prevalence of the Staph. hyicus exfoliative toxins in Danish pig herds. Significance and Impact of the Study: The multiplex PCR can be used in studies on the prevalence of toxigenic Staph. hyicus elucidating the epidemiology of EE in pigs. The multiplex PCR is...

  11. Sca1, a previously undescribed paralog from autotransporter protein-encoding genes in Rickettsia species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoult Didier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the 17 genes encoding autotransporter proteins of the "surface cell antigen" (sca family in the currently sequenced Rickettsia genomes, ompA, sca5 (ompB and sca4 (gene D, have been extensively used for identification and phylogenetic purposes for Rickettsia species. However, none of these genes is present in all 20 currently validated Rickettsia species. Of the remaining 14 sca genes, sca1 is the only gene to be present in all nine sequenced Rickettsia genomes. To estimate whether the sca1 gene is present in all Rickettsia species and its usefulness as an identification and phylogenetic tool, we searched for sca1genes in the four published Rickettsia genomes and amplified and sequenced this gene in the remaining 16 validated Rickettsia species. Results Sca1 is the only one of the 17 rickettsial sca genes present in all 20 Rickettsia species. R. prowazekii and R. canadensis exhibit a split sca1 gene whereas the remaining species have a complete gene. Within the sca1 gene, we identified a 488-bp variable sequence fragment that can be amplified using a pair of conserved primers. Sequences of this fragment are specific for each Rickettsia species. The phylogenetic organization of Rickettsia species inferred from the comparison of sca1 sequences strengthens the classification based on the housekeeping gene gltA and is similar to those obtained from the analyses of ompA, sca5 and sca4, thus suggesting similar evolutionary constraints. We also observed that Sca1 protein sequences have evolved under a dual selection pressure: with the exception of typhus group rickettsiae, the amino-terminal part of the protein that encompasses the predicted passenger domain, has evolved under positive selection in rickettsiae. This suggests that the Sca1 protein interacts with the host. In contrast, the C-terminal portion containing the autotransporter domain has evolved under purifying selection. In addition, sca1 is transcribed in R. conorii

  12. Parkinson's Disease in Relation to Pesticide Exposure and Nuclear Encoded Mitochondrial Complex I Gene Variants

    OpenAIRE

    Corder, Elizabeth H.; Mellick, George D.

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common age-related neurodegenerative disorder thought to result from the integrated effects of genetic background and exposure to neuronal toxins. Certain individual nuclear-encoded mitochondrial complex I gene polymorphisms were found to be associated with ∼ 2-fold risk variation in an Australian case-control sample. We further characterized this sample of 306 cases and 321 controls to determine the mutual information contained in the 22 SNPs and, additionally, ...

  13. Two common genetic variants near nuclear encoded OXPHOS genes are associated with insulin secretion in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, Anders H.; Rönn, Tina; Ladenvall, Claes; Parikh, Hemang; Isomaa, Bo; Groop, Leif; Ling, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Context Mitochondrial ATP production is important in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Genetic factors may modulate the capacity of the β-cells to secrete insulin and thereby contribute to the risk of type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci in or adjacent to nuclear encoded genes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway that are associated with insulin secretion in vivo. DESIGN AND METHODS: To find polymorphisms associated ...

  14. An Efficient Genetic Screen in Drosophila to Identify Nuclear-Encoded Genes With Mitochondrial Function

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, T. S. Vivian; Gerald B. Call; Guptan, Preeta; Cespedes, Albert; Marshall, Jamie; Yackle, Kevin; Owusu-Ansah, Edward; Mandal, Sudip; Fang, Q. Angela; Goodstein, Gelsey L.; Kim, William; Banerjee, Utpal

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a screen for glossy-eye flies that fail to incorporate BrdU in the third larval instar eye disc but exhibit normal neuronal differentiation and isolated 23 complementation groups of mutants. These same phenotypes were previously seen in mutants for cytochrome c oxidase subunit Va. We have molecularly characterized six complementation groups and, surprisingly, each encodes a mitochondrial protein. Therefore, we believe our screen to be an efficient method for identifying genes wit...

  15. Triple subcellular targeting of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases encoded by a single gene

    OpenAIRE

    Guirimand, Grégory; Guihur, Anthony; Phillips, Michael A.; Oudin, Audrey; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Mahroug, Samira; Melin, Céline; Papon, Nicolas; Clastre, Marc; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Burlat, Vincent; Courdavault, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase (IDI) is a key enzyme of the isoprenoid pathway, catalyzing the interconversion of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, the universal precursors of all isoprenoids. In plants, several subcellular compartments, including cytosol/ER, peroxisomes, mitochondria and plastids, are involved in isoprenoid biosynthesis. Here, we report on the unique triple targeting of two Catharanthus roseus IDI isoforms encoded by a single gene (CrIDI1). The triple...

  16. Molecular evolution and expression profile of the chemerine encoding gene RARRES2 in baboon and chimpanzee

    OpenAIRE

    González-Alvarez, Rafael; Garza-Rodríguez, María d L; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Treviño Alvarado, Víctor M; Canales-Del-Castillo, Ricardo; Martínez-de-Villarreal, Laura E; Lugo-Trampe, Ángel; Tejero, María E; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E.; Rocha-Pizaña, María D R; Cole, Shelley A.; Reséndez-Pérez, Diana; Moises-Alvarez, Mario; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Hugo A. Barrera-Saldaña

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Chemerin, encoded by the retinoic acid receptor responder 2 (RARRES2) gene is an adipocytesecreted protein with autocrine/paracrine functions in adipose tissue, metabolism and inflammation with a recently described function in vascular tone regulation, liver, steatosis, etc. This molecule is believed to represent a critical endocrine signal linking obesity to diabetes. There are no data available regarding evolution of RARRES2 in non-human primates and great apes. Expressi...

  17. Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels Are Encoded by Duplicate slo1 Genes in Teleost Fishes

    OpenAIRE

    Rohmann, Kevin N.; Deitcher, David L.; Bass, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Calcium-activated, large conductance potassium (BK) channels in tetrapods are encoded by a single slo1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. Alternative splicing generates a high level of functional diversity in BK channels that contributes to the wide range of frequencies electrically tuned by the inner ear hair cells of many tetrapods. To date, the role of BK channels in hearing among teleost fishes has not been investigated at the molecular level, although teleosts account ...

  18. Salmonella typhimurium proP gene encodes a transport system for the osmoprotectant betaine.

    OpenAIRE

    Cairney, J; Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1985-01-01

    Betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) can be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations and serves an important osmoprotective function in enteric bacteria. We found that the proP gene of Salmonella typhimurium, originally identified as encoding a minor transport system for proline (permease PP-II), plays an important role in betaine uptake. Mutations in proP reduced the ability of betaine to serve as an osmoprotectant. Transport of betaine into the cells was also severely impaired in these ...

  19. Molecular Characterization of Soil Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria Based on the Genes Encoding Ammonia Monooxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    Alzerreca, Jose Javier

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are chemolithotrophs that oxidize ammonia/ammonium to nitrite in a two-step process to obtain energy for survival. AOB are difficult to isolate from the environment and iso lated strains may not represent the diversity in soil. A genetic database and molecular tools were developed based on the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) encoding genes that can be used to assess the diversity of AOB that exist in soil and aquatic environments without the isolation of pure cult...

  20. Differential expression of genes encoding proteins of the HGF/MET system in insulinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Murat, Cahuê De Bernardis; da Rosa, Paula Waki Lopes; Fortes, Maria Angela Henriques Zanella; Corrêa, Luciana; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira Cesar; Novak, Estela Maria; Siqueira, Sheila Aparecida Coelho; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Giorgi, Ricardo Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulinomas are the most common functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, whereas histopathological features do not predict their biological behaviour. In an attempt to better understand the molecular processes involved in the tumorigenesis of islet beta cells, the present study evaluated the expression of genes belonging to the hepatocyte growth factor and its receptor (HGF/MET) system, namely, MET, HGF; HGFAC and ST14 (encode HGF activator and matriptase, respectively, two ser...

  1. THE LACTOCOCCAL LMRP GENE ENCODES A PROTON MOTIVE FORCE-DEPENDENT DRUG TRANSPORTER

    OpenAIRE

    Bolhuis, H.; Poelarends, G. J.; van Veen, H W; Poolman, B; Driessen, A.J.M.; Konings, W N

    1995-01-01

    To genetically dissect the drug extrusion systems of Lactococcus lactis, a chromosomal. DNA library was made in Escherichia coli and recombinant strains were selected for resistance to high concentrations of ethidium bromide. Recombinant strains were found to be resistant not only to ethidium bromide but also to daunomycin and tetraphenylphosphonium. The drug resistance is conferred by the lmrP gene, which encodes a hydrophobic polypeptide of 408 amino acid residues with 12 putative membrane-...

  2. The 32-kilobase exp gene cluster of Rhizobium meliloti directing the biosynthesis of galactoglucan: genetic organization and properties of the encoded gene products.

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, A.; Rüberg, S; Küster, H.; Roxlau, A A; Keller, M; Ivashina, T; H.P. Cheng; Walker, G C; Pühler, A

    1997-01-01

    Proteins directing the biosynthesis of galactoglucan (exopolysaccharide II) in Rhizobium meliloti Rm2011 are encoded by the exp genes. Sequence analysis of a 32-kb DNA fragment of megaplasmid 2 containing the exp gene cluster identified previously (J. Glazebrook and G. C. Walker, Cell 56:661-672, 1989) revealed the presence of 25 open reading frames. Homologies of the deduced exp gene products to proteins of known function suggested that the exp genes encoded four proteins involved in the bio...

  3. Enterotoxin-Encoding Genes in Staphylococcus spp. from Food Handlers in a University Restaurant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sabina Dos Santos Paulino; Cidral, Thiago André; Soares, Maria José dos Santos; de Melo, Maria Celeste Nunes

    2015-11-01

    Food handlers carrying enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus are a potential source of food poisoning. The aim of this study was to analyze genes encoding enterotoxins in coagulase-positive Staphylococcus (CoPS) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) isolated from the anterior nostrils and hands of food handlers at a university restaurant in the city of Natal, Northeast Brazil. Thirty food handlers were screened for the study. The isolates were subjected to Gram staining, a bacitracin sensitivity test, mannitol fermentation, and catalase and coagulase tests. CoNS and CoPS strains were subsequently identified by a Vitek 2 System (BioMerieux, France) and various biochemical tests. Polymerase chain reaction was used to detect genes for enterotoxins A, B, C, D, E, G, H, and I (sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, and sei) and a disc-diffusion method was used to determine susceptibility to several classes of antimicrobials. All food handlers presented staphylococci on their hands and/or noses. The study found 58 Staphylococcus spp., of which 20.7% were CoPS and 79.3% were CoNS. S. epidermidis was the most prevalent species. Twenty-nine staphylococci (50%) were positive for one or more enterotoxin genes, and the most prevalent genes were seg and sei, each with a frequency of 29.3%. Indeed, CoNS encoded a high percentage of enterotoxin genes (43.5%). However, S. aureus encoded even more enterotoxin genes (75%). Most isolates showed sensitivity to the antibiotics used for testing, except for penicillin (only 35% sensitive). The results from this study reinforce that coagulase-negative as well as coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from food handlers are capable of genotypic enterotoxigenicity. PMID:26352253

  4. Molecular characterization of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase involved in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in apple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuepeng eHan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are the major component of phenolics in apple, but mechanisms involved in PA biosynthesis remain unclear. Here, the relationship between the PA biosynthesis and the expression of genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR was investigated in fruit skin of one apple cultivar and three crabapples. Transcript levels of LAR1 and ANR2 genes were significantly correlated with the contents of catechin and epicatechin, respectively, which suggests their active roles in PA synthesis. Surprisingly, transcript levels for both LAR1 and LAR2 genes were almost undetectable in two crabapples that accumulated both flavan-3-ols and PAs. This contradicts the previous finding that LAR1 gene is a strong candidate regulating the accumulation of metabolites such as epicatechin and PAs in apple. Ectopic expression of apple MdLAR1 gene in tobacco suppresses expression of the late genes in anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway, resulting in loss of anthocyanin in flowers. Interestingly, a decrease in PA biosynthesis was also observed in flowers of transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing the MdLAR1 gene, which could be attributed to decreased expression of both the NtANR1 and NtANR2 genes. Our study not only confirms the in vivo function of apple LAR1 gene, but it is also helpful for understanding the mechanism of PA biosynthesis.

  5. Characterization of two genes encoding distinct transferrin-binding proteins in different Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerlach, G F; Klashinsky, S; Anderson, C.; Potter, A A; Willson, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The gene encoding the Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 transferrin-binding protein (tfbA) was cloned, and the carboxy-terminal 70% of the protein was expressed as an aggregate protein in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequences of the tfbA genes from A. pleuropneumoniae serotypes 7 (G.-F. Gerlach, C. Anderson, A. A. Potter, S. Klashinsky, and P. J. Willson, Infect. Immun. 60:892-898, 1992) and 1 were determined, and a comparison revealed that they had 65% sequence identity. The de...

  6. Anaerobic regulation of the adhE gene, encoding the fermentative alcohol dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo, M R; Cunningham, P.R.; Clark, D P

    1993-01-01

    The regulation of the adhE gene, which encodes the trifunctional fermentative acetaldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli, was investigated by the construction of gene fusions and by two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis. Both operon and protein fusions of adhE to lacZ were induced 10- to 20-fold by anaerobic conditions, and both fusions were repressed by nitrate, demonstrating that regulation is at the level of transcription. Nitrate repression of phi (adhE-lacZ) expression,...

  7. Coordinated regulation of mitochondrial topoisomerase IB with mitochondrial nuclear encoded genes and MYC

    OpenAIRE

    Zoppoli, Gabriele; Douarre, Céline; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Liu, Hongfang; Reinhold, William; Pommier, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is entirely dependent on nuclear genes for its transcription and replication. One of these genes is TOP1MT, which encodes the mitochondrial DNA topoisomerase IB, involved in mtDNA relaxation. To elucidate TOP1MT regulation, we performed genome-wide profiling across the 60-cell line panel (the NCI-60) of the National Cancer Institute Developmental Therapeutics Program. We show that TOP1MT mRNA expression varies widely across these cell lines with the highest levels in...

  8. Isolation, sequencing and overexpression of the gene encoding the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Carter; Franden, M A; Aebersold, R.; Kim, D.R.; McHenry, C S

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the theta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, designated holE, was isolated using a strategy in which peptide sequence was used to derive a DNA hybridization probe. Sequencing of the gene, which maps to 41.43 centisomes of the chromosome, revealed a 76-codon open reading frame predicted to produce a protein of 8,846 Da. When placed in a tac promoter expression vector, the open reading frame directed expression of a protein, that comigrated with authentic theta subunit ...

  9. Identification and Functional Analysis of the Gene Encoding Methionine-γ-Lyase in Brevibacterium linens

    OpenAIRE

    Amarita, Felix; Yvon, Mireille; Nardi, Michele; Chambellon, Emilie; Delettre, Jerôme; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2004-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of l-methionine and subsequent formation of volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) is believed to be essential for flavor development in cheese. l-Methionine-γ-lyase (MGL) can convert l-methionine to methanethiol (MTL), α-ketobutyrate, and ammonia. The mgl gene encoding MGL was cloned from the type strain Brevibacterium linens ATCC 9175 known to produce copious amounts of MTL and related VSCs. The disruption of the mgl gene, achieved in strain ATCC 9175, resulted in a 62% ...

  10. Encoding four gene expression programs in the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anders S; O'Shea, Erin K

    2016-04-01

    Cellular signaling response pathways often exhibit a bow-tie topology [1,2]: multiple upstream stress signals converge on a single shared transcription factor, which is thought to induce different downstream gene expression programs (Figure 1A). However, if several different signals activate the same transcription factor, can each signal then induce a specific gene expression response? A growing body of literature supports a temporal coding theory where information about environmental signals can be encoded, at least partially, in the temporal dynamics of the shared transcription factor [1,2]. For example, in the case of the budding yeast transcription factor Msn2, different stresses induce distinct Msn2 activation dynamics: Msn2 shows pulsatile nuclear activation with dose-dependent frequency under glucose limitation, but sustained nuclear activation with dose-dependent amplitude under oxidative stress [3]. These dynamic patterns can then lead to differential gene expression responses [3-5], but it is not known how much specificity can be obtained. Thus, a major question of this temporal coding theory is how many gene response programs or cellular functions can be robustly encoded by dynamic control of a single transcription factor. Here we provide the first direct evidence that, simply by regulating the activation dynamics of a single transcription factor, it is possible to preferentially induce four distinct gene expression programs. PMID:27046808

  11. A putative gene cluster from a Lyngbya wollei bloom that encodes paralytic shellfish toxin biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troco K Mihali

    Full Text Available Saxitoxin and its analogs cause the paralytic shellfish-poisoning syndrome, adversely affecting human health and coastal shellfish industries worldwide. Here we report the isolation, sequencing, annotation, and predicted pathway of the saxitoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the cyanobacterium Lyngbya wollei. The gene cluster spans 36 kb and encodes enzymes for the biosynthesis and export of the toxins. The Lyngbya wollei saxitoxin gene cluster differs from previously identified saxitoxin clusters as it contains genes that are unique to this cluster, whereby the carbamoyltransferase is truncated and replaced by an acyltransferase, explaining the unique toxin profile presented by Lyngbya wollei. These findings will enable the creation of toxin probes, for water monitoring purposes, as well as proof-of-concept for the combinatorial biosynthesis of these natural occurring alkaloids for the production of novel, biologically active compounds.

  12. Escherichia coli rep gene: sequence of the gene, the encoded helicase, and its homology with uvrD.

    OpenAIRE

    Gilchrist, C A; Denhardt, D T

    1987-01-01

    The sequence of a 2.67-kilobase section of the Escherichia coli chromosome that contains the rep gene has been determined. This gene codes for a protein of predicted Mr 72,800, a DNA helicase, which is also a single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase. The sequenced region contains an open reading frame of the correct length and orientation to encode the Rep protein. A secondary structure for the protein can be formulated from the amino acid sequence. We have compared both the primary and the secon...

  13. Genes regulation encoding ADP/ATP carrier in yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genes encoding a mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida parapsilosis were investigated. AAC2 is coding for the major AAC isoform in S. cerevisiae. We suggest that AAC2 is a member of a syn-expression group of genes encoding oxidative phosphorylation proteins. Within our previous studies on the regulation of the AAC2 transcription an UAS (-393/-268) was identified that is essential for the expression of this gene. Two functional regulatory cis-elements are located within this UAS -binding sites for an ABFl factor and for HAP2/3/4/5 heteromeric complex. We examined relative contributions and mutual interactions of the ABFl and HAP2/3/4/5 factors in the activation of transcription from the UAS of the AAC2 gene. The whole UAS was dissected into smaller sub-fragments and tested for (i) the ability to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in vitro, (ii) the ability to confer heterologous expression using AAC3 gene lacking its own promoter, and (iii) the expression of AAC3-lacZ fusion instead of intact AAC3 gene. The obtained results demonstrated that: a) The whole UAS as well as sub-fragment containing only ABF1-binding site are able to form DNA-protein complexes with cellular proteins in oxygen- and heme- dependent manner. The experiments with antibody against the ABF1 showed that the ABF1 factor is one of the proteins binding to AAC2 promoter. We have been unsuccessful to prove the binding of cellular proteins to the HAP2/3/4/5-binding site. However, the presence of HAP2/3/4/5-binding site is necessary to drive a binding of cellular proteins to the ABF1-binding site in carbon source-dependent manner. b) The presence of both ABF1- and HAP2/3/4/5-binding sites and original spacing between them is necessary to confer the growth of Aaac2 mutant strain on non- fermentable carbon source when put in front of AAC3 gene introduced on centromeric vector to Aaac2 mutant strain. c) For the activation of AAC3-lacZ expression on

  14. Cloning and expression profiles of 15 genes encoding WRKY transcription factor in wheat (Triticum aestivem L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hualing Wu; Zhongfu Ni; Yingyin Yao; Ganggang Guo; Qixin Sun

    2008-01-01

    WRKY proteins are involved in various physiological processes, including biotic and abiotic stress responses, hormone responses and development. However, no systematic identification, expression and function analysis of WRKY genes in wheat were reported. In this study, we isolated 15 wheat cDNAs with complete open reading frame (ORF) encoding putative WRKY proteins using in silico cloning. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the 15 wheat WRKY genes belonged to three major WRKY groups. Expression analysis revealed that most genes expressed drastically in leaf, except TaWRKY10 which expressed in crown intensively. Four genes were strongly up-regulated with the senescence of leaves. Eight genes were responsive to low temperature, high temperature, NaCl or PEG treatment. Moreover, differential expression patterns were also observed between wheat hybrid and its parents, and some genes were more responsive to PEG treatment in the hybrid. These results demonstrated that wheat WRKY genes are involved in leaf senescing and abiotic stresses. And the changed expression of these WRKY genes in hybrid might contribute to the heterosis by improving the stress tolerance in hybrids.

  15. Cloning and sequence analysis of a gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIP) play important roles in plant defense of pathogen, especially fungi. A pair of degenerated primers is designed based on the conserved sequence of 20 other known pgip genes and used to amplify Gossypium barbadense cultivation 7124 cDNA library by touch-down PCR. A 561 bp internal fragment of the pgip gene is obtained and used to design the primers for rapid amplification of cDNA ends. A composite pgip gene sequence is constructed from the products of 5′ and 3′ RACE, which are 666 bp and 906 bp respectively. Analysis of nucleic acid sequence shows 69.2% and 68.7% similarity to Citrus and Poncirus pgip genes, respectively. Its open reading frame of the gene encodes a polypeptide of 330 amino acids, in which 10 leucine-rich repeats arrange tandemly. A new set of primers is designed to the 5′ and 3′ ends of the gene, which allows amplification of the full-length gene from the cotton cDNA library. Genomic DNA analysis reveals that this gene has no intron.

  16. Mutagenesis in sequence encoding of human factor VII for gene therapy of hemophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kazemi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Current treatment of hemophilia which is one of the most common bleeding disorders, involves replacement therapy using concentrates of FVIII and FIX .However, these concentrates have been associated with viral infections and thromboembolic complications and development of antibodies. "nThe use of recombinant human factor VII (rhFVII is effective  for the treatment of patients with  hemophilia A or B, who develop antibodies ( referred as inhibitors against  replacement therapy , because it induces coagulation independent of FVIII and FIX. However, its short half-life and high cost have limited its use. One potential solution to this problem may be the use of FVIIa gene transfer, which would attain continuing therapeutic levels of expression from a single injection. The aim of this study was to engineer a novel hFVII (human FVII gene containing a cleavage site for the intracellular protease and furin, by PCR mutagenesis "nMethods: The sequence encoding light and heavy chains of hFVII, were amplified by using hFVII/pTZ57R and specific primers, separately. The PCR products were cloned in pTZ57R vector. "nResults and discussion: Cloning was confirmed by restriction analysis or PCR amplification using specific primers and plasmid universal primers. Mutagenesis of sequence encoding light and heavy chain was confirmed by restriction enzyme. "nConclusion: In the present study, it was provided recombinant plasmids based on mutant form of DNA encoding light and heavy chains.  Joining mutant form of DNA encoding light chain with mutant heavy chain led to a new variant of hFVII. This variant can be activated by furin and an increase in the proportion of activated form of FVII. This mutant form of hFVII may be used for gene therapy of hemophilia.

  17. The immune gene repertoire encoded in the purple sea urchin genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Taku; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Messier, Cynthia; Majeske, Audrey J; Cohen, Avis H; Terwilliger, David P; Buckley, Katherine M; Brockton, Virginia; Nair, Sham V; Berney, Kevin; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Anderson, Michele K; Pancer, Zeev; Cameron, R Andrew; Smith, L Courtney; Rast, Jonathan P

    2006-12-01

    Echinoderms occupy a critical and largely unexplored phylogenetic vantage point from which to infer both the early evolution of bilaterian immunity and the underpinnings of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Here we present an initial survey of the purple sea urchin genome for genes associated with immunity. An elaborate repertoire of potential immune receptors, regulators and effectors is present, including unprecedented expansions of innate pathogen recognition genes. These include a diverse array of 222 Toll-like receptor (TLR) genes and a coordinate expansion of directly associated signaling adaptors. Notably, a subset of sea urchin TLR genes encodes receptors with structural characteristics previously identified only in protostomes. A similarly expanded set of 203 NOD/NALP-like cytoplasmic recognition proteins is present. These genes have previously been identified only in vertebrates where they are represented in much lower numbers. Genes that mediate the alternative and lectin complement pathways are described, while gene homologues of the terminal pathway are not present. We have also identified several homologues of genes that function in jawed vertebrate adaptive immunity. The most striking of these is a gene cluster with similarity to the jawed vertebrate Recombination Activating Genes 1 and 2 (RAG1/2). Sea urchins are long-lived, complex organisms and these findings reveal an innate immune system of unprecedented complexity. Whether the presumably intense selective processes that molded these gene families also gave rise to novel immune mechanisms akin to adaptive systems remains to be seen. The genome sequence provides immediate opportunities to apply the advantages of the sea urchin model toward problems in developmental and evolutionary immunobiology. PMID:17027739

  18. The chsA gene, encoding a class-I chitin synthase from Ampelomyces quisqualis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N; Sztejnberg, A; Yarden, O

    1996-02-01

    Degenerate oligodeoxyribonucleotide primers, designed on the basis of conserved regions of the chitin synthase gene family, were used to amplify a fragment of the Ampelomyces quisqualis (Aq) chsA gene. Subsequently, the PCR product was used as a probe in order to identify and isolate genomic clones harboring the entire chsA gene. Aq chsA is 2786-nt long, has one intron and encodes a 910-amino-acid polypeptide belonging to the class-I chitin synthases. Low-stringency Southern hybridizations to Aq genomic DNA provided evidence for the presence of additional DNA fragments resembling chsA in the fungal genome, suggesting the presence of a multigene family of chitin synthases in Aq. PMID:8626074

  19. Transgenic Rape with hrf2 Gene Encoding HarpinXooc Resistant to Sclerotinia sclerotinorium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ling-li; HUO Rong; GAO Xue-wen; HE Dan; SHAO Min; WANG Qi

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to increase the resistance of rape using the method of transformation. The gene hrf2 derived from Xathomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola encoding harpinXooc protein was constructed into transgenic vector pCAMBIA1301. The cotyledonal petiole segments from rapeseed variety Yangyou 4 were infected by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404/pCAMBIA1301-hrf2. Hygromycin-resistant green shoots were obtained. Successful integration of the foreign gene into the genome of the rapeseed variety Yangyou 4 was confirmed by PCR, RT-PCR, and β-glucuronidase analyses. Disease bioassays of transgenic plants revealed an improved resistance of transgenic plants to Rape sclerotiniose. In brief, the hrf2 gene can be transferred into rape using the method of Agrobacterium-medmted transformation, which increased the resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotinorium in the transgenic plant.

  20. Cloning an artificial gene encoding angiostatic anginex: From designed peptide to functional recombinant protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anginex, a designed peptide 33-mer, is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor and anti-tumor agent in vivo. Anginex functions by inhibiting endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and migration leading to detachment and apoptosis of activated EC's. To better understand tumor endothelium targeting properties of anginex and enable its use in gene therapy, we constructed an artificial gene encoding the biologically exogenous peptide and produced the protein recombinantly in Pichia pastoris. Mass spectrometry shows recombinant anginex to be a dimer and circular dichroism shows the recombinant protein folds with β-strand structure like the synthetic peptide. Moreover, like parent anginex, the recombinant protein is active at inhibiting EC growth and migration, as well as inhibiting angiogenesis in vivo in the chorioallantoic membrane of the chick embryo. This study demonstrated that it is possible to produce a functionally active protein version of a rationally designed peptide, using an artificial gene and the recombinant protein approach

  1. Screening and analysis of hepatocellular carcinomaassociated antigens and their encoding genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yongyu; WANG Hongcheng; LI Yan; PANG Xuewen; SUN Wensheng; CHEN Weifeng

    2003-01-01

    Identification of hepatocellular carcinoma- associated tumor antigens is necessary and pivotal for specific immunotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In the present study, HCC cDNAs are constructed into ZAP cDNA expression library and screened by sera of patients with HCC. The positive clones are DNA sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics. Thirty-one genes of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens are identified, of which 1 is unknown and 30 are known. The proteins encoded by these known genes can be classified into 8 categories: constitutive molecules of hepatocytes, RNA transcription and splicing-associated molecules, protein metabolism-associated molecules, energy synthesis-associated molecules, signal transduction molecules, cell adhesion molecules, immunosuppressive molecules, and proteins with unknown function. Among these genes, CAGE is a cancer-testis (CT) antigen. It is concluded that identification of hepatocellular carcinoma-associated tumor antigens provides potential targets for immunotherapy of HCC patients and facilitates explanation of carcinogenesis of HCC.

  2. The gene Sr33, an ortholog of barley Mla genes, encodes resistance to wheat stem rust race Ug99.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Sambasivam; Moore, John; Ayliffe, Michael; Bansal, Urmil; Wang, Xiaojing; Huang, Li; Deal, Karin; Luo, Mingcheng; Kong, Xiuying; Bariana, Harbans; Mago, Rohit; McIntosh, Robert; Dodds, Peter; Dvorak, Jan; Lagudah, Evans

    2013-08-16

    Wheat stem rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, afflicts bread wheat (Triticum aestivum). New virulent races collectively referred to as "Ug99" have emerged, which threaten global wheat production. The wheat gene Sr33, introgressed from the wild relative Aegilops tauschii into bread wheat, confers resistance to diverse stem rust races, including the Ug99 race group. We cloned Sr33, which encodes a coiled-coil, nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat protein. Sr33 is orthologous to the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Mla mildew resistance genes that confer resistance to Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. The wheat Sr33 gene functions independently of RAR1, SGT1, and HSP90 chaperones. Haplotype analysis from diverse collections of Ae. tauschii placed the origin of Sr33 resistance near the southern coast of the Caspian Sea. PMID:23811228

  3. Full-genome identification and characterization of NBS-encoding disease resistance genes in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouktila, Dhia; Khalfallah, Yosra; Habachi-Houimli, Yosra; Mezghani-Khemakhem, Maha; Makni, Mohamed; Makni, Hanem

    2015-02-01

    Host resistance is the most economical, effective and ecologically sustainable method of controlling diseases in crop plants. In bread wheat, despite the high number of resistance loci that have been cataloged to date, only few have been cloned, underlying the need for genomics-guided investigations capable of providing a prompt and acute knowledge on the identity of effective resistance genes that can be used in breeding programs. Proteins with a nucleotide-binding site (NBS) encoded by the major plant disease resistance (R) genes play an important role in the responses of plants to various pathogens. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of NBS-encoding genes within the whole wheat genome was performed, and the genome scale characterization of this gene family was established. From the recently published wheat genome sequence, we used a data mining and automatic prediction pipeline to identify 580 complete ORF candidate NBS-encoding genes and 1,099 partial-ORF ones. Among complete gene models, 464 were longer than 200 aa, among them 436 had less than 70 % of sequence identity to each other. This gene models set was deeply characterized. (1) First, we have analyzed domain architecture and identified, in addition to typical domain combinations, the presence of particular domains like signal peptides, zinc fingers, kinases, heavy-metal-associated and WRKY DNA-binding domains. (2) Functional and expression annotation via homology searches in protein and transcript databases, based on sufficient criteria, enabled identifying similar proteins for 60 % of the studied gene models and expression evidence for 13 % of them. (3) Shared orthologous groups were defined using NBS-domain proteins of rice and Brachypodium distachyon. (4) Finally, alignment of the 436 NBS-containing gene models to the full set of scaffolds from the IWGSC's wheat chromosome survey sequence enabled high-stringence anchoring to chromosome arms. The distribution of the R genes was found balanced

  4. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Bayne, M L; Cascieri, M A; Kelder, B; Applebaum, J; Chicchi, G; Shapiro, J A; Pasleau, F; Kopchick, J J

    1987-01-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fi...

  5. The carB Gene Encoding the Large Subunit of Carbamoylphosphate Synthetase from Lactococcus lactis Is Transcribed Monocistronically

    OpenAIRE

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalyzed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase. The genes encoding the two subunits of this enzyme in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, but the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) in Lactococcus lactis is shown to be transcribed as an isolated unit. Carbamoylphosphate is a precursor in the biosynthesis of both pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine. By mutant analysis, L. lactis is shown to possess only one carB g...

  6. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene encoding amylopullulanase from Pyrococcus furiosus and biochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, G.; Vieille, C; Zeikus, J G

    1997-01-01

    The gene encoding the Pyrococcus furiosus hyperthermophilic amylopullulanase (APU) was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a single 827-residue polypeptide with a 26-residue signal peptide. The protein sequence had very low homology (17 to 21% identity) with other APUs and enzymes of the alpha-amylase family. In particular, none of the consensus regions present in the alpha-amylase family could be identified. P. furiosus APU showed similarity to three protei...

  7. Self-mobilization and organization of the genes encoding the toluene metabolic pathway of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, A; Olsen, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The toluene metabolic pathway of Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 is chromosomally encoded, but the pathway could be transferred by conjugation from strain KR1 to the chromosome of P. aeruginosa or P. putida. Such transconjugants utilized toluene, p-cresol, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde. However, transconjugants were unable to further transfer toluene genes to other recipients unless Pseudomonas sex factor R68.45 was present in trans. Although the genes encoding the upper pathway for toluene metabolism ...

  8. Gene Electro Transfer of Plasmid Encoding Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor for Enhanced Expression and Perfusion in the Ischemic Swine Heart

    OpenAIRE

    Hargrave, Barbara; Strange, Robert; Navare, Sagar; Stratton, Michael; Burcus, Nina; Murray, Len; Lundberg, Cathryn; Bulysheva, Anna; Li, Fanying; Heller, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia can damage heart muscle and reduce the heart's pumping efficiency. This study used an ischemic swine heart model to investigate the potential for gene electro transfer of a plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor for improving perfusion and, thus, for reducing cardiomyopathy following acute coronary syndrome. Plasmid expression was significantly greater in gene electro transfer treated tissue compared to injection of plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth...

  9. Potential transfer of extended spectrum β-lactamase encoding gene, blashv18 gene, between Klebsiella pneumoniae in raw foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yangjin; Matthews, Karl R

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the transfer frequency of the extended-spectrum β-lactamase-encoding gene (blaSHV18) among Klebsiella pneumoniae in tryptic soy broth (TSB), pasteurized milk, unpasteurized milk, alfalfa sprouts and chopped lettuce at defined temperatures. All transconjugants were characterized phenotypically and genotypically. KP04(ΔKM) and KP08(ΔKM) isolated from seed sprouts and KP342 were used as recipients in mating experiments with K. pneumoniae ATCC 700603 serving as the donor. In mating experiments, no transconjugants were detected at 4 °C in liquid media or chopped lettuce, but detected in all media tested at 15 °C, 24 °C, and 37 °C. At 24 °C, the transfer of blaSHV18 gene occurred more frequently in alfalfa sprouts (5.15E-04 transconjugants per recipient) and chopped lettuce (3.85E-05) than liquid media (1.08E-05). On chopped lettuce, transconjugants were not detected at day 1 post-mating at 15 °C, but observed on day 2 (1.43E-05). Transconjugants carried the blaSHV18 gene transferred from the donor and the virulence gene harbored by recipient. More importantly, a class 1 integrase gene and resistance to tetracycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were co-transferred during mating. These quantitative results suggest that fresh produce exposed to temperature abuse may serve as a competent vehicle for the spread of gene encoding for antibiotic resistance, having a potential negative impact on human health. PMID:27554144

  10. Cloning and Characterization of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase Encoding Gene in Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xueying; SUI Zhenghong; ZHANG Xuecheng

    2006-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) plays important roles in various cellular processes. A cytosolic GAPDH encoding gene (gpd) of Gracilaria/Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis was cloned and characterized. Deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme of G. lemaneiformis had high homology with those of seven red algae. The 5'-untranslated regions of the GAPDHs encoding genes of these red algae varied greatly. GAPDHs of these red algae shared the highly conserved glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase active site ASCTTNCL. However, such active site of Cyanidium caldarium was different from those of the other six algae at the last two residues (CL to LF), thus the spatial structure of its GAPDH active center may be different from those of the other six. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that GAPDH of G. lemaneiformis might have undergone an evolution similar to those of Porphyra yezoensis, Chondrus crispus, and Gracilaria verrucosa. C. caldarium had a closer evolutionary relationship with Cyanidioschyzon merolae than with Cyanidium sp. Virtual Northern blot analysis revealed that gpd of G. lemaneiformis expressed constitutively, which suggested that it might be house-keeping and could be adapted as an inner control in gene expression analysis of G. lemaneiformis.

  11. A pin gene families encoding components of auxin efflux carriers in Brassica juncea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wei Min; Chen, Xiao Ya; Xu, Zhi Hong; Xue, Hong Wei

    2002-09-01

    Based on the sequence information of Arabidopsis PIN1, two cDNAs encoding PIN homologues from Brassica juncea, Bjpin2 and Bjpin3, were isolated through cDNA library screening. Bjpin2 and Bjpin3 encoded proteins containing 640 and 635 amino acid residues, respectively, which shared 97.5% identities with each other and were highly homologous to Arabidopsis PIN1, PIN2 and other putative PIN proteins. BjPIN2 and BjPIN3 had similar structures as AtPIN proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that Bjpin2 was expressed in stem, leaf and floral tissues, while Bjpin3 was expressed predominantly in stem and hypocotyls. Two promoter fragments of pin genes, Bjpin-X and Bjpin-Z, were isolated by 'genome walking' technique using primers at 5'-end of pin cDNA. Promoter-gus fusion studies revealed the GUS activities driven by Bjpin-X were at internal side of xylem and petal; while those driven by Bjpin-Z were detected at leaf vein, epidermal cell and cortex of stem, vascular tissues and anther. Results of the pin genes with different expression patterns in B. juncea suggested the presence of a gene family. PMID:12296384

  12. The lethal toxin from Australian funnel-web spiders is encoded by an intronless gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Steffany Pineda

    Full Text Available Australian funnel-web spiders are generally considered the most dangerous spiders in the world, with envenomations from the Sydney funnel-web spider Atrax robustus resulting in at least 14 human fatalities prior to the introduction of an effective anti-venom in 1980. The clinical envenomation syndrome resulting from bites by Australian funnel-web spiders is due to a single 42-residue peptide known as δ-hexatoxin. This peptide delays the inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels, which results in spontaneous repetitive firing and prolongation of action potentials, thereby causing massive neurotransmitter release from both somatic and autonomic nerve endings. Here we show that δ-hexatoxin from the Australian funnel-web spider Hadronyche versuta is produced from an intronless gene that encodes a prepropeptide that is post-translationally processed to yield the mature toxin. A limited sampling of genes encoding unrelated venom peptides from this spider indicated that they are all intronless. Thus, in distinct contrast to cone snails and scorpions, whose toxin genes contain introns, spiders may have developed a quite different genetic strategy for evolving their venom peptidome.

  13. RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein containing a tract of 13 consecutive aspartates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RAD6 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA, for induced mutagenesis, and for sporulation. The authors have mapped the transcripts and determined the nucleotide sequence of the cloned RAD6 gene. The RAD6 gene encodes two transcripts of 0.98 and 0.86 kilobases which differ only in their 3' termini. The transcribed region contains an open reading frame of 516 nucleotides. The rad6-1 and rad6-3 mutant alleles, which the authors have cloned and sequenced, introduce amber and ochre nonsense mutations, respectively into the open reading frame, proving that it encodes the RAD6 protein. The RAD6 protein predicted by the nucleotide sequence is 172 amino acids long, has a molecular weight of 19,704, and contains 23.3% acidic and 11.6% basic residues. Its most striking feature is the highly acidic carboxyl terminus: 20 of the 23 terminal amino acids are acidic, including 13 consecutive aspartates. RAD6 protein thus resembles high mobility group proteins HMG-1 and HMG-2, which each contain a carboxyl-proximal tract of acidic amino acids. 48 references, 6 figures

  14. The porcine lymphotropic herpesvirus 1 encodes functional regulators of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The porcine lymphotropic herpesviruses (PLHV) are discussed as possible risk factors in xenotransplantation because of the high prevalence of PLHV-1, PLHV-2 and PLHV-3 in pig populations world-wide and the fact that PLHV-1 has been found to be associated with porcine post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease. To provide structural and functional knowledge on the PLHV immediate-early (IE) transactivator genes, the central regions of the PLHV genomes were characterized by genome walking, sequence and splicing analysis. Three spliced genes were identified (ORF50, ORFA6/BZLF1h, ORF57) encoding putative IE transactivators, homologous to (i) ORF50 and BRLF1/Rta (ii) K8/K-bZIP and BZLF1/Zta and (iii) ORF57 and BMLF1 of HHV-8 and EBV, respectively. Expressed as myc-tag or HA-tag fusion proteins, they were located to the cellular nucleus. In reporter gene assays, several PLHV-promoters were mainly activated by PLHV-1 ORF50, to a lower level by PLHV-1 ORFA6/BZLF1h and not by PLHV-1 ORF57. However, the ORF57-encoded protein acted synergistically on ORF50-mediated activation

  15. A Pin gene families encoding components of auxin efflux carriers in Brassica juncea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the sequence information of Arabidopsis PIN1, two cDNAs encoding PIN homologues fromBrassica juncea, Bjpin2 and Bjpin3, were isolated through cDNA library screening. Bjpin2 and Bjpin3encoded proteins containing 640 and 635 amino acid residues, respectively, which shared 97.5% identities witheach other and were highly homologous to Arabidopsis PIN1, PIN2 and other putative PIN proteins. BjPIN2and BjPIN3 had similar structures as AtPIN proteins. Northern blot analysis indicated that Bjpin2 wasexpressed in stem, leaf and floral tissues, while Bjpin3 was expressed predominantly in stem and hypocotyls.Two promoter fragments of pin genes, Bjpin-X and Bjpin-Z, were isolated by 'genome walking' techniqueusing primers at 5'-end of pin cDNA. Promoter-gus fusion studies revealed the GUS activities driven byBjpin-X were at internal side of xylem and petal; while those driven by Bjpin-Z were detected at leaf vein,epidermal cell and cortex of stem, vascular tissues and anther. Results of the pin genes with differentexpression patterns in B. juncea suggested the presence of a gene family.

  16. Identification of the Gene Encoding Isoprimeverose-producing Oligoxyloglucan Hydrolase in Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Mitsuishi, Yasushi; Kameyama, Akihiko; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-03-01

    Aspergillus oryzae produces a unique β-glucosidase, isoprimeverose-producing oligoxyloglucan hydrolase (IPase), that recognizes and releases isoprimeverose (α-D-xylopyranose-(1 → 6)-D-glucopyranose) units from the non-reducing ends of oligoxyloglucans. A gene encoding A. oryzae IPase, termed ipeA, was identified and expressed in Pichia pastoris. With the exception of cellobiose, IpeA hydrolyzes a variety of oligoxyloglucans and is a member of the glycoside hydrolase family 3. Xylopyranosyl branching at the non-reducing ends was vital for IPase activity, and galactosylation at a α-1,6-linked xylopyranosyl side chain completely abolished IpeA activity. Hepta-oligoxyloglucan saccharide (Xyl3Glc4) substrate was preferred over tri- (Xyl1Glc2) and tetra- (Xyl2Glc2) oligoxyloglucan saccharides substrates. IpeA transferred isoprimeverose units to other saccharides, indicating transglycosylation activity. The ipeA gene was expressed in xylose and xyloglucan media and was strongly induced in the presence of xyloglucan endo-xyloglucanase-hydrolyzed products. This is the first study to report the identification of a gene encoding IPase in eukaryotes. PMID:26755723

  17. Disruption of the plr1+ gene encoding pyridoxal reductase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomotake; Takegawa, Kaoru; Yagi, Toshiharu

    2004-02-01

    Pyridoxal (PL) reductase encoded by the plr1(+) gene practically catalyzes the irreversible reduction of PL by NADPH to form pyridoxine (PN). The enzyme has been suggested to be involved in the salvage synthesis of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), a coenzyme form of vitamin B(6), or the excretion of PL as PN from yeast cells. In this study, a PL reductase-disrupted (plr1 Delta) strain was constructed and its phenotype was examined. The plr1 Delta cells showed almost the same growth curve as that of wild-type cells in YNB and EMM media. In EMM, the plr1 Delta strain became flocculent at the late stationary phase for an unknown reason. The plr1 Delta cells showed low but measurable PL reductase activity catalyzed by some other protein(s) than the enzyme encoded by the plr1(+) gene, which maintained the flow of "PL --> PN --> PNP --> PLP" in the salvage synthesis of PLP. The total vitamin B(6) and pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate contents in the plr1 Delta cells were significantly lower than those in the wild-type ones. The percentages of the PLP amount as to the other vitamin B(6) compounds were similar in the two cell types. The amount of PL in the culture medium of the disruptant was significantly higher than that in the wild-type. In contrast, PN was much higher in the latter than the former. The plr1 Delta cells accumulated a 6.1-fold higher amount of PL than the wild-type ones when they were incubated with PL. The results showed that PL reductase encoded by the plr1(+ )gene is involved in the excretion of PL after reducing it to PN, and may not participate in the salvage pathway for PLP synthesis. PMID:15047724

  18. The Novel Gene CRNDE Encodes a Nuclear Peptide (CRNDEP Which Is Overexpressed in Highly Proliferating Tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Michal Szafron

    Full Text Available CRNDE, recently described as the lncRNA-coding gene, is overexpressed at RNA level in human malignancies. Its role in gametogenesis, cellular differentiation and pluripotency has been suggested as well. Herein, we aimed to verify our hypothesis that the CRNDE gene may encode a protein product, CRNDEP. By using bioinformatics methods, we identified the 84-amino acid ORF encoded by one of two CRNDE transcripts, previously described by our research team. This ORF was cloned into two expression vectors, subsequently utilized in localization studies in HeLa cells. We also developed a polyclonal antibody against CRNDEP. Its specificity was confirmed in immunohistochemical, cellular localization, Western blot and immunoprecipitation experiments, as well as by showing a statistically significant decrease of endogenous CRNDEP expression in the cells with transient shRNA-mediated knockdown of CRNDE. Endogenous CRNDEP localizes predominantly to the nucleus and its expression seems to be elevated in highly proliferating tissues, like the parabasal layer of the squamous epithelium, intestinal crypts or spermatocytes. After its artificial overexpression in HeLa cells, in a fusion with either the EGFP or DsRed Monomer fluorescent tag, CRNDEP seems to stimulate the formation of stress granules and localize to them. Although the exact role of CRNDEP is unknown, our preliminary results suggest that it may be involved in the regulation of the cell proliferation. Possibly, CRNDEP also participates in oxygen metabolism, considering our in silico results, and the correlation between its enforced overexpression and the formation of stress granules. This is the first report showing the existence of a peptide encoded by the CRNDE gene.

  19. Diversity of beetle genes encoding novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, Yannick; Wilkinson, Paul; Chauhan, Ritika; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes was inferred to be able to digest, or even synthesize, cellulose using endogenous genes, all model insects whose complete genomes have been sequenced lack genes encoding such enzymes. To establish if the apparent "disappearance" of PCWDEs from insects is simply a sampling problem, we used 454 mediated pyrosequencing to scan the gut transcriptomes of beetles that feed on a variety of plant derived diets. By sequencing the transcriptome of five beetles, and surveying publicly available ESTs, we describe 167 new beetle PCWDEs belonging to eight different enzyme families. This survey proves that these enzymes are not only present in non-model insects but that the multigene families that encode them are apparently undergoing complex birth-death dynamics. This reinforces the observation that insects themselves, and not just their microbial symbionts, are a rich source of PCWDEs. Further it emphasises that the apparent absence of genes encoding PCWDEs from model organisms is indeed simply a sampling artefact. Given the huge diversity of beetles alive today, and the diversity of their lifestyles and diets, we predict that beetle guts will emerge as an important new source of enzymes for use in biotechnology. PMID:21179425

  20. Autoregulation of iclR, the gene encoding the repressor of the glyoxylate bypass operon.

    OpenAIRE

    Gui, L.; Sunnarborg, A; Pan, B.; LaPorte, D C

    1996-01-01

    The aceBAK operon was partially induced by a multicopy plasmid which carried the promoter region of the gene which encodes its repressor, iclR. Gel shift and DNase I analyses demonstrated that IclR binds to its own promoter. Disruption of iclR increased the expression of an iclR::lacZ operon fusion. Although aceBAK and iclR are both regulated by IclR, aceBAK expression responds to the carbon source, while expression of iclR does not.

  1. Promoter for the human ferritin heavy chain-encoding gene (FERH): structural and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, M A; Giordano, M; D'Agostino, P; Santoro, C; Cimino, F; Costanzo, F

    1992-02-15

    We conducted a functional analysis of the promoter for the human ferritin heavy chain-encoding gene (pFERH) in HepG2 and HeLa cells. The activity of pFERH is equivalent in both cell types, despite their different ferritin (Fer) isotypes. Transfections of a series of 5'-deletion mutants indicate that pFERH activity is essentially dependent on two motifs. One of them, accounting for about 50% of the total transcriptional activity, is recognized by the RNA polymerase II transcription factor, Sp1, and the other by a low-affinity factor present in both the cell types analyzed. PMID:1541403

  2. The fatty acid desaturase 3 gene encodes for different FADS3 protein isoforms in mammalian tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Pédrono, Frédérique; Blanchard, Hélène; Kloareg, Maëla; D'Andrea, S.; Daval, Stéphanie; Rioux, Vincent; Legrand, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    In 2000, Marquardt et al. (A. Marquardt, H. Stöhr, K. White, and B. H. F. Weber. 2000. cDNA cloning, genomic structure, and chromosomal localization of three members of the human fatty acid desaturase family. Genomics. 66: 176-183.) described the genomic structure of the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) cluster in humans. This cluster includes the FADS1 and FADS2 genes encoding, respectively, for the Delta 5- and Delta 6-desaturases involved in polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. A third gen...

  3. Isolation and Functional Characterisation of the Genes Encoding △8-Sphingolipid Desaturase from Brassica rapa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Li; Li-Ying Song; Wei-Bo Yin; Yu-Hong Chen; Liang Chen; Ji-Lin Li; Richard R.-C. Wang; Zan-Min Hu

    2012-01-01

    △8-Sphingolipid desaturase is the key enzyme that catalyses desaturation at the C8 position of the long-chain base of sphingolipids in higher plants.There have been no previous studies on the genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases in Brassica rapa.In this study,four genes encoding △8-sphingolipid desaturases from B.rapa were isolated and characterised.Phylogenetic analyses indicated that these genes could be divided into two groups:BrD8A,BrD8C and BrD8D in group Ⅰ,and BrD8B in group Ⅱ.The two groups of genes diverged before the separation of Arabidopsis and Brassica.Though the four genes shared a high sequence similarity,and their coding desaturases all located in endoplasmic reticulum,they exhibited distinct expression patterns.Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that BrD8A/B/C/D were functionally diverse △8-sphingolipid desaturases that catalyse different ratios of the two products 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine.The aluminium tolerance of transgenic yeasts expressing BrD8A/B/C/D was enhanced compared with that of control cells.Expression of BrD8A in A rabidopsis changed the ratio of 8(Z):8(E)-C 18-phytosphingenine in transgenic plants.The information reported here provides new insights into the biochemical functional diversity and evolutionary relationship of △8-sphingolipid desaturase in plants and lays a foundation for further investigation of the mechanism of 8(Z)- and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine biosynthesis.

  4. Effects of TCDD on the expression of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be perturbed following exposure to environmental chemicals such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Reports indicate that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates TCDD-induced sustained hepatic oxidative stress by decreasing hepatic ATP levels and through hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane. To further elucidate the effects of TCDD on the mitochondria, high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR (HTP-QRTPCR) was used to evaluate the expression of 90 nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, uncoupling, and associated chaperones. HTP-QRTPCR analysis of time course (30 μg/kg TCDD at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, 72, and 168 h) liver samples obtained from orally gavaged immature, ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice identified 54 differentially expressed genes (|fold change| > 1.5 and P-value < 0.1). Of these, 8 exhibited a sigmoidal or exponential dose-response profile (0.03 to 300 μg/kg TCDD) at 4, 24 or 72 h. Dose-responsive genes encoded proteins associated with electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I (NADH dehydrogenase), III (cytochrome c reductase), IV (cytochrome c oxidase), and V (ATP synthase) and could be generally categorized as having proton gradient, ATP synthesis, and chaperone activities. In contrast, transcript levels of ETC complex II, succinate dehydrogenase, remained unchanged. Putative dioxin response elements were computationally found in the promoter regions of all 8 dose-responsive genes. This high-throughput approach suggests that TCDD alters the expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function which may contribute to TCDD-elicited mitochondrial toxicity.

  5. Expression analysis of the Theileria parva subtelomere-encoded variable secreted protein gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Schmuckli-Maurer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intracellular protozoan parasite Theileria parva transforms bovine lymphocytes inducing uncontrolled proliferation. Proteins released from the parasite are assumed to contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell and parasite persistence. With 85 members, genes encoding subtelomeric variable secreted proteins (SVSPs form the largest gene family in T. parva. The majority of SVSPs contain predicted signal peptides, suggesting secretion into the host cell cytoplasm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed SVSP expression in T. parva-transformed cell lines established in vitro by infection of T or B lymphocytes with cloned T. parva parasites. Microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed mRNA expression for a wide range of SVSP genes. The pattern of mRNA expression was largely defined by the parasite genotype and not by host background or cell type, and found to be relatively stable in vitro over a period of two months. Interestingly, immunofluorescence analysis carried out on cell lines established from a cloned parasite showed that expression of a single SVSP encoded by TP03_0882 is limited to only a small percentage of parasites. Epitope-tagged TP03_0882 expressed in mammalian cells was found to translocate into the nucleus, a process that could be attributed to two different nuclear localisation signals. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis reveals a complex pattern of Theileria SVSP mRNA expression, which depends on the parasite genotype. Whereas in cell lines established from a cloned parasite transcripts can be found corresponding to a wide range of SVSP genes, only a minority of parasites appear to express a particular SVSP protein. The fact that a number of SVSPs contain functional nuclear localisation signals suggests that proteins released from the parasite could contribute to phenotypic changes of the host cell. This initial characterisation will facilitate future studies on the regulation of SVSP gene

  6. Structure of a gene encoding a murine thymus leukemia antigen, and organization of Tla genes in the BALB/c mouse

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    We have determined the DNA sequence of a gene encoding a thymus leukemia (TL) antigen in the BALB/c mouse, and have more definitively mapped the cloned BALB/c Tla-region class I gene clusters. Analysis of the sequence shows that the Tla gene is less closely related to the H-2 genes than H-2 genes are to one another or to a Qa-2,3-region genes. The Tla gene, 17.3A, contains an apparent gene conversion. Comparison of the BALB/c Tla genes with those from C57BL shows that BALB/c has more Tla-regi...

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of the genus Plasmodium based on the gene encoding adenylosuccinate lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierski, Lukasz; Escalante, Ananias A; Isea, Raul; Black, Casilda G; Barnwell, John W; Coppel, Ross L

    2002-07-01

    Phylogenetic studies of the genus Plasmodium have been performed using sequences of the nuclear, mitochondrial and plastid genes. Here we have analyzed the adenylosuccinate lyase (ASL) gene, which encodes an enzyme involved in the salvage of host purines needed by malaria parasites for DNA synthesis. The ASL gene is present in several eukaryotic as well as prokaryotic organisms and does not have repeat regions, which facilitates the accuracy of the alignment. Furthermore, it has been shown that ASL is not subject to positive natural selection. We have sequenced the ASL gene of several different Plasmodium species infecting humans, rodents, monkeys and birds and used the obtained sequences along with the previously known P. falciparum ASL sequence, for structural and phylogenetic analysis of the genus Plasmodium. The genetic divergence of ASL is comparable with that observed in other nuclear genes such as cysteine proteinase, although ASL cannot be considered conserved when compared to aldolase or superoxide dismutase, which exhibit a slower rate of evolution. Nevertheless, a protein like ASL has a rate of evolution that provides enough information for elucidating evolutionary relationships. We modeled 3D structures of the ASL protein based on sequences used in the phylogenetic analysis and obtained a consistent structure for four different species despite the divergence observed. Such models would facilitate alignment in further studies with a greater number of plasmodial species or other Apicomplexa. PMID:12798008

  8. Six git genes encode a glucose-induced adenylate cyclase activation pathway in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Susan M. Byrne; Hoffman, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    An important eukaryotic signal transduction pathway involves the regulation of the effector enzyme adenylate cyclase, which produces the second messenger, cAMP. Previous genetic analyses demonstrated that glucose repression of transcription of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene requires the function of adenylate cyclase, encoded by the git2 gene. As mutations in git2 and in six additional git genes are suppressed by exogenous cAMP, these ‘upstream’ git genes were proposed to act to produ...

  9. Characterization of the pelL gene encoding a novel pectate lyase of Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lojkowska, E; Masclaux, C; Boccara, M; Robert-Baudouy, J; Hugouvieux-Cotte-Pattat, N

    1995-06-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937 secretes five major isoenzymes of pectate lyases encoded by the pelA, pelB, pelC, pelD and pelE genes. Recently, a new set of pectate lyases was identified in E. chrysanthemi mutants deleted of those pel genes. We cloned the pelL gene, encoding one of these secondary pectate lyases of E. chrysanthemi 3937, from a genomic bank of a strain deleted of the five major pel genes. The nucleotide sequence of the region containing the pelL gene was determined. The pelL reading frame is 1275 bases long, corresponding to a protein of 425 amino acids including a typical amino-terminal signal sequence of 25 amino acids. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of PelL and the exo-pectate lyase PelX of E. chrysanthemi EC16 revealed a low homology, limited to 220 residues of the central part of the proteins. No homology was detected with other bacterial pectinolytic enzymes. Regulation of pelL transcription was analysed using gene fusion. As shown for the other pel genes, the transcription of pelL is dependent on various environmental conditions. It is induced by pectic catabolic products and affected by growth phase, temperature, iron starvation, osmolarity, anaerobiosis, nitrogen starvation and catabolite repression. Regulation of pelL expression appeared to be independent of the KdgR repressor, which controls all the steps of pectin catabolism. In contrast, the pecS gene, which is involved in regulation of the synthesis of the major pectate lyases and of cellulase, also appeared to be involved in pelL expression. The PelL protein is able to macerate plant tissue. This enzyme has a basic isoelectric point, presents an endo-cleaving activity on polygalacturonate or partially methylated pectin, with a basic pH optimum and an absolute requirement for Ca2+. The pelL mutant displayed a reduced virulence on potato tubers and Saintpaulia ionantha plants, demonstrating the important role of this enzyme in soft-rot disease. PMID:8577252

  10. Expression of genes encoding multi-transmembrane proteins in specific primate taste cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan D Moyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Using fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds isolated by laser capture microdissection and analyzed using gene arrays, we previously constructed a comprehensive database of gene expression in primates, which revealed over 2,300 taste bud-associated genes. Bioinformatics analyses identified hundreds of genes predicted to encode multi-transmembrane domain proteins with no previous association with taste function. A first step in elucidating the roles these gene products play in gustation is to identify the specific taste cell types in which they are expressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using double label in situ hybridization analyses, we identified seven new genes expressed in specific taste cell types, including sweet, bitter, and umami cells (TRPM5-positive, sour cells (PKD2L1-positive, as well as other taste cell populations. Transmembrane protein 44 (TMEM44, a protein with seven predicted transmembrane domains with no homology to GPCRs, is expressed in a TRPM5-negative and PKD2L1-negative population that is enriched in the bottom portion of taste buds and may represent developmentally immature taste cells. Calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, a component of a novel calcium channel, along with family members CALHM2 and CALHM3; multiple C2 domains; transmembrane 1 (MCTP1, a calcium-binding transmembrane protein; and anoctamin 7 (ANO7, a member of the recently identified calcium-gated chloride channel family, are all expressed in TRPM5 cells. These proteins may modulate and effect calcium signalling stemming from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation. Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B (SV2B, a regulator of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, is expressed in PKD2L1 cells, suggesting that this taste cell population transmits tastant information to gustatory afferent nerve fibers via exocytic neurotransmitter release. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Identification of genes encoding multi-transmembrane domain proteins

  11. Cloning and characterization of a delta-6 desaturase encoding gene from Nannochloropsis oculata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xiaolei; YU Jianzhong; ZHU Baohua; PAN Kehou; PAN Jin; YANG Guanpin

    2011-01-01

    A gene (NANOC-D6D) encoding a desaturase that removes two hydrogen atoms from fatty acids at delta 6 position was isolated from a eDNA library of Nannochloropsis oculata (Droop)D. J. Hibberd (Eustigmatophyceae). The unicellular marine microalga N. oculata synthesizes rich long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs), including eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA).The deduced protein contains 474 amino acids that fold into 4 trans-membrane domains. The neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree indicates that NANOC-D6D is phylogenetically close to the delta-6 fatty acid desaturase of marine microalgae such as Glossomastix chrysoplasta, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The gene was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae INVSc1 to verify the substrate specificity of NANOC-D6D. Our results suggest that the recombinant NANOC-D6D simultaneously desaturates linoleic acid (LA) and α-linolenic acid (ALA).

  12. The role of polymorphisms of genes encoding collagen IX and XI in lumbar disc disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeczko, Łukasz; Janeczko, Magdalena; Chrzanowski, Robert; Zieliński, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The intervertebral disc disease (IDD) is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders. A number of environment and anthropometric risk factors may contribute to it. The recent reports have suggested the importance of genetic factors, especially these which encode collagen types IX and XI. The allelic variants in the collagen IX genes - COL9A2 (Trp2) and COL9A3 (Trp3) have been identified as genetic risk factors for IDD, because they interfere the cross-linking between collagen types II, IX and XI and result in decreased stability of intervertebral discs. Type XI collagen is a minor component of cartilage collagen fibrils, but it is present in the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus of intervertebral discs. Some studies have shown the association between gene COL11A1 polymorphism c.4603C>T and IDD. The frequency of 4603T allele was significantly higher in the patients with IDD than in the healthy controls. PMID:24636772

  13. Nuclear scaffold attachment sites within ENCODE regions associate with actively transcribed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mignon A Keaton

    Full Text Available The human genome must be packaged and organized in a functional manner for the regulation of DNA replication and transcription. The nuclear scaffold/matrix, consisting of structural and functional nuclear proteins, remains after extraction of nuclei and anchors loops of DNA. In the search for cis-elements functioning as chromatin domain boundaries, we identified 453 nuclear scaffold attachment sites purified by lithium-3,5-iodosalicylate extraction of HeLa nuclei across 30 Mb of the human genome studied by the ENCODE pilot project. The scaffold attachment sites mapped predominately near expressed genes and localized near transcription start sites and the ends of genes but not to boundary elements. In addition, these regions were enriched for RNA polymerase II and transcription factor binding sites and were located in early replicating regions of the genome. We believe these sites correspond to genome-interactions mediated by transcription factors and transcriptional machinery immobilized on a nuclear substructure.

  14. Bioinformatic identification of genes encoding C1q-domain containing proteins in zebrafish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    C1q is the first subcomponent of classical pathway in the complement system and a major link between innate and acquired immunities. The globular (gC1q) domain similar with C1q was also found in many non-complement C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins which have similar crystal structure to that of the multifunctional tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family, and also have diverse functions. In this study, we identified a total of 52 independent gene sequences encoding C1q-domain-containing proteins through comprehensive searches of zebrafish genome, cDNA and EST databases. In comparison to 31 orthologous genes in human and different numbers in other species, a significant selective pressure was suggested during vertebrate evolution. Domain organization of C1q-domain-containing (C1qDC) proteins mainly includes a leading signal peptide, a collagen-like region of variable length, and a C-terminal C1q domain. There are 11 highly conserved residues within the C1q domain, among which 2 are invariant within the zebrafish gene set. A more extensive database searches also revealed homologous C1qDC proteins in other vertebrates, invertebrates and even bacterium, but no homologous sequences for encoding C1qDC proteins were found in many species that have a more recent evolutionary history with zebrafish. Therefore, further studies on C1q-domain-containing genes among different species will help us understand evolutionary mechanism of innate and acquired immunities.

  15. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding cysteine proteases from senescent leaves of Gossypium hirsutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Fafu; YU Shuxun; HAN Xiulan; FAN Shuli

    2004-01-01

    A gene encoding a cysteine proteinase was isolated from senescent leave of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) cv liaomian No. 9 by utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE-PCR), and a set of consensus oligonucleotide primers was designed to anneal the conserved sequences of plant cysteine protease genes. The cDNA, which designated Ghcysp gene, contained 1368 bp terminating in a poly(A)+ trail, and included a putative 5′(98 bp) and a 3′(235 bp) non-coding region. The opening reading frame (ORF) encodes polypeptide 344 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 37.88 kD and theoretical pI of 4.80. A comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence with the sequence in the GenBank database has shown considerable sequence similarity to a novel family of plant cysteine proteases. This putative cotton Ghcysp protein shows from 67% to 82% identity to the other plants. All of them share catalytic triad of residues, which are highly conserved in three regions. Hydropaths analysis of the amino acid sequence shows that the Ghcysp is a potential membrane protein and localizes to the vacuole, which has a transmembrane helix between resides 7-25. A characteristic feature of Ghcysp is the presence of a putative vacuole-targeting signal peptide of 19-amino acid residues at the N-terminal region. The expression of Ghcysp gene was determined using northern blot analysis. The Ghcysp mRNA levels are high in development senescent leaf but below the limit of detection in senescent root, hypocotyl, faded flower, 6 d post anthesis ovule, and young leaf.

  16. Demonstration by heterologous expression that the Leishmania SCA1 gene encodes an arabinopyranosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Mamta; Dobson, Deborah E; Beverley, Stephen M; Turco, Salvatore J

    2006-03-01

    In part of the life cycle within their sand fly vector, Leishmania major parasites first attach to the fly's midgut through their main surface adhesin lipophosphoglycan (LPG) and later resynthesize a structurally distinct LPG that results in detachment and eventual transmission. One of these structural modifications requires the addition of alpha1,2-D-arabinopyranose caps to beta1,3-galactose side chains in the phosphoglycan repeat unit domain of LPG. We had previously identified two side chain arabinose genes (SCA1/2) that were involved in the alpha1,2-D-Arap capping. SCA1/2 exhibit canonical glycosyltransferase motifs, and overexpression of either gene leads to elevated microsomal alpha1,2-D-ArapT activity, resulting in arabinopyranosylation of beta1,3-Gal side chains in LPG (hereafter called side chain D-arabinopyranosyltransferase [sc-D-ArapT]). Heterologous expression in a null arabinose background was used to determine whether the SCA1 gene encodes the actual sc-D-ArapT. SCA1 expression constructs introduced into both mammalian COS-7 cells and the baculovirus-sf9 cell system exhibited considerable expression of the protein. However, functional sc-D-ArapT activity was observed only in the latter. In in vitro assays incubated with guanidine 59-diphosphate (GDP)-D-[3H]Arap as the sugar donor and utilizing exogenous LPG as an acceptor, significant sc-D-ArapT activity was observed when microsomes from the baculovirus-sf9 cells were incubated in presence of the LPG acceptor. No activity was observed in the absence of LPG. These results demonstrate that SCA1 encodes a sc-D-ArapT and provide the first example of heterologous expression of a D-ArapT gene. PMID:16272216

  17. The Drosophila immunoglobulin gene turtle encodes guidance molecules involved in axon pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Anzi Bader

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuronal growth cones follow specific pathways over long distances in order to reach their appropriate targets. Research over the past 15 years has yielded a large body of information concerning the molecules that regulate this process. Some of these molecules, such as the evolutionarily conserved netrin and slit proteins, are expressed in the embryonic midline, an area of extreme importance for early axon pathfinding decisions. A general model has emerged in which netrin attracts commissural axons towards the midline while slit forces them out. However, a large number of commissural axons successfully cross the midline even in the complete absence of netrin signaling, indicating the presence of a yet unidentified midline attractant. Results The evolutionarily conserved Ig proteins encoded by the turtle/Dasm1 genes are found in Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, and mammals. In Drosophila the turtle gene encodes five proteins, two of which are diffusible, that are expressed in many areas, including the vicinity of the midline. Using both molecular null alleles and transgenic expression of the different isoforms, we show that the turtle encoded proteins function as non-cell autonomous axonal attractants that promote midline crossing via a netrin-independent mechanism. turtle mutants also have either stalled or missing axon projections, while overexpression of the different turtle isoforms produces invasive neurons and branching axons that do not respect the histological divisions of the nervous system. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the turtle proteins function as axon guidance cues that promote midline attraction, axon branching, and axonal invasiveness. The latter two capabilities are required by migrating axons to explore densely packed targets.

  18. OsHT, a Rice Gene Encoding for a Plasma-Membrane Localized Histidine Transporter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di LIU; Wei GONG; Yong BAI; Jing-Chu LUO; Yu-Xian ZHU

    2005-01-01

    Using a degenerative probe designed according to the most conservative region of a known Lys- and His-specific amino acid transporter (LHT1) from Arabidopsis, we isolated a full-length cDNA named OsHT (histidine transporter of Oryza sativa L.) by screening the rice cDNA library. The cDNA is 1.3kb in length and the open reading frame encodes for a 441 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 49 kDa. Multiple sequence alignments showed that OsHT shares a high degree of sequence conservation at the deduced amino acid level with the Arabidopsis LHT1 and six putative lysine and histidine transporters. Computational analysis indicated that OsHT is an integral membrane protein with 11 putative transmembrane helices. This was confirmed by the transient expression assay because the OsHT-GFP fusion protein was, indeed, localized mainly in the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells. Functional complementation experiments demonstrated that OsHT was able to work as a histidine transporter in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that OsHT is a gene that encodes for a histidine transporter from rice.This is the first time that an LHT-type amino acid transporter gene has been cloned from higher plants other than A rabidopsis.

  19. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  20. Characterization of the gene encoding pisatin demethylase (FoPDA1) in Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jeffrey J; Wasmann, Catherine C; Usami, Toshiyuki; White, Gerard J; Temporini, Esteban D; McCluskey, Kevin; VanEtten, Hans D

    2011-12-01

    The pea pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. pisi is able to detoxify pisatin produced as a defense response by pea, and the gene encoding this detoxification mechanism, FoPDA1, was 82% identical to the cytochrome P450 pisatin demethylase PDA1 gene in Nectria haematococca. A survey of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi isolates demonstrated that, as in N. haematococca, the PDA gene of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi is generally located on a small chromosome. In N. haematococca, PDA1 is in a cluster of pea pathogenicity (PEP) genes. Homologs of these PEP genes also were found in the F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi isolates, and PEP1 and PEP5 were sometimes located on the same small chromosomes as the FoPDA1 homologs. Transforming FoPDA1 into a pda(?) F. oxysporum f. sp. lini isolate conferred pda activity and promoted pathogenicity on pea to some transformants. Different hybridization patterns of FoPDA1 were found in F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi but these did not correlate with the races of the fungus, suggesting that races within this forma specialis arose independently of FoPDA1. FoPDA1 also was present in the formae speciales lini, glycines, and dianthi of F. oxysporum but they had mutations resulting in nonfunctional proteins. However, an active FoPDA1 was present in F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli and it was virulent on pea. Despite their evolutionary distance, the amino acid sequences of FoPDA1 of F. oxysporum f. sp. pisi and F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli revealed only six amino acid differences, consistent with a horizontal gene transfer event accounting for the origin of these genes. PMID:22066900

  1. The Relationship Between Transcript Expression Levels of Nuclear Encoded (TFAM, NRF1 and Mitochondrial Encoded (MT-CO1 Genes in Single Human Oocytes During Oocyte Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffari Novin M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1 and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21-35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial- related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV stage oocytes (p = 0.62. On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002. A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation.

  2. Isolation and characterization of the lacA gene encoding beta-galactosidase in Bacillus subtilis and a regulator gene, lacR.

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, R.A.; Haiech, J.; Denizot, F; Errington, J

    1997-01-01

    We have isolated transposon insertions in the lacA gene encoding an endogenous beta-galactosidase of Bacillus subtilis. Upstream of the putative operon containing lacA is a negative regulator, lacR, which encodes a product related to a family of regulators that includes the lactose repressor, lacI, of Escherichia coli. New strains with insertions in the lacA gene should be of use in studies using lacZ fusions in B. subtilis.

  3. Mitochondrial Genes of Dinoflagellates Are Transcribed by a Nuclear-Encoded Single-Subunit RNA Polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ying Teng

    Full Text Available Dinoflagellates are a large group of algae that contribute significantly to marine productivity and are essential photosynthetic symbionts of corals. Although these algae have fully-functioning mitochondria and chloroplasts, both their organelle genomes have been highly reduced and the genes fragmented and rearranged, with many aberrant transcripts. However, nothing is known about their RNA polymerases. We cloned and sequenced the gene for the nuclear-encoded mitochondrial polymerase (RpoTm of the dinoflagellate Heterocapsa triquetra and showed that the protein presequence targeted a GFP construct into yeast mitochondria. The gene belongs to a small gene family, which includes a variety of 3'-truncated copies that may have originated by retroposition. The catalytic C-terminal domain of the protein shares nine conserved sequence blocks with other single-subunit polymerases and is predicted to have the same fold as the human enzyme. However, the N-terminal (promoter binding/transcription initiation domain is not well-conserved. In conjunction with the degenerate nature of the mitochondrial genome, this suggests a requirement for novel accessory factors to ensure the accurate production of functional mRNAs.

  4. Unexpected Diversity of pepA Genes Encoding Leucine Aminopeptidases in Sediments from a Freshwater Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We herein designed novel PCR primers for universal detection of the pepA gene, which encodes the representative leucine aminopeptidase gene, and investigated the genetic characteristics and diversity of pepA genes in sediments of hypereutrophic Lake Kasumigaura, Japan. Most of the amino acid sequences deduced from the obtained clones (369 out of 370) were related to PepA-like protein sequences in the M17 family of proteins. The developed primers broadly detected pepA-like clones associated with diverse bacterial phyla—Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma-, and Deltaproteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Aquificae, Chlamydiae, Chloroflexi, Cyanobacteria, Firmicutes, Nitrospirae, Planctomycetes, and Spirochetes as well as the archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating that prokaryotes in aquatic environments possessing leucine aminopeptidase are more diverse than previously reported. Moreover, prokaryotes related to the obtained pepA-like clones appeared to be r- and K-strategists, which was in contrast to our previous findings showing that the neutral metalloprotease gene clones obtained were related to the r-strategist genus Bacillus. Our results suggest that an unprecedented diversity of prokaryotes with a combination of different proteases participate in sedimentary proteolysis. PMID:26936797

  5. Structure of the gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase (prsA) in Salmonella typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bower, Stanley G.; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Switzer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium gene prsA, which encodes phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase, has been cloned, and the nucleotide sequence has been determined. The amino acid sequence derived from the S. typhimurium gene is 99% identical to the derived Escherichia coli sequence and 47% identical to...

  6. Identification of the bchP gene, encoding geranylgeranyl reductase in Chlorobaculum tepidum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez Maqueo Chew, Aline; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2008-01-01

    The Chlorobaculum tepidum genome contains two paralogous genes, CT2256 and CT1232, whose products are members of the FixC dehydrogenase superfamily and have sequence similarity to geranylgeranyl reductases. Each gene was insertionally inactivated, and the resulting mutants were characterized. CT2......2256 encodes geranylgeranyl reductase (BchP); CT1232 is not involved in bacteriochlorophyll or chlorophyll biosynthesis....

  7. A gene from Renibacterium salmoninarum encoding a product which shows homology to bacterial zinc-metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, T H; Evenden, A J; Gilpin, M L; Martin, K L; Munn, C B

    1995-06-01

    A genomic library constructed from Renibacterium salmoninarum isolate MT444 DNA in the plasmid vector pBR328 was screened using Escherichia coli host strain DH1 for the expression of genes encoding putative virulence factors. A single haemolytic clone was isolated at 22 degrees C and found to contain a 3.1 kb HindIII fragment of inserted DNA. This fragment was present in seven isolates of R. salmoninarum which were examined. Western blots of extracts from clones exhibiting haemolytic activity were performed with antisera raised against either cellular or extracellular components of R. salmoninarum and failed to identify any additional proteins compared to control E. coli containing pBR328. However, minicell analysis revealed that a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 65 kDa was associated with a haemolytic activity distinct from that previously described for R. salmoninarum. The nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding this product was determined and the amino acid sequence deduced. The product was 548 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 66757 Da and a pl of 5.57. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene possessed strong similarities to those of a range of secreted bacterial zinc-metalloproteases and was tentatively designed hly. Neither protease nor lecithinase activities were detectable in E. coli recombinants expressing gene hly. Haemolytic activity was observed from 6 degrees C to 37 degrees C for erythrocytes from a number of mammalian species and also from fish. Gene hly was expressed in E. coli as a fusion protein consisting of maltose-binding protein at the N-terminus linked to all but the first 24 amino acids, largely constituting the putative signal peptide, of the N-terminus of Hly. The soluble fusion protein was produced and purified by affinity chromatography. Antiserum raised against the purified fusion protein was used to probe Western blots of cell lysates and extracellular products from seven isolates of R. salmoninarum

  8. Multiple horizontally acquired genes from fungal and prokaryotic donors encode cellulolytic enzymes in the bdelloid rotifer Adineta ricciae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szydlowski, L; Boschetti, C; Crisp, A; Barbosa, E G G; Tunnacliffe, A

    2015-07-25

    The bdelloid rotifer, Adineta ricciae, an anhydrobiotic microinvertebrate, exhibits a high rate of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), with as much as 10% of its transcriptome being of foreign origin. Approximately 80% of these foreign transcripts are involved in metabolic processes, and therefore bdelloids represent a useful model for assessing the contribution of HGT to biochemical diversity. To validate this concept, we focused on cellulose digestion, an unusual activity in animals, which is represented by at least 16 genes encoding cellulolytic enzymes in A. ricciae. These genes have been acquired from a variety of different donor organisms among the bacteria and fungi, demonstrating that bdelloids use diverse genetic resources to construct a novel biochemical pathway. A variable complement of the cellulolytic gene set was found in five other bdelloid species, indicating a dynamic process of gene acquisition, duplication and loss during bdelloid evolution. For example, in A. ricciae, gene duplications have led to the formation of three copies of a gene encoding a GH45 family glycoside hydrolase, at least one of which encodes a functional enzyme; all three of these gene copies are present in a close relative, Adineta vaga, but only one copy was found in each of four Rotaria species. Furthermore, analysis of expression levels of the cellulolytic genes suggests that a bacterial-origin cellobiase is upregulated upon desiccation. In summary, bdelloid rotifers have apparently developed cellulolytic functions by the acquisition and domestication of multiple foreign genes. PMID:25863176

  9. Medicago truncatula contains a second gene encoding a plastid located glutamine synthetase exclusively expressed in developing seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seabra Ana R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nitrogen is a crucial nutrient that is both essential and rate limiting for plant growth and seed production. Glutamine synthetase (GS, occupies a central position in nitrogen assimilation and recycling, justifying the extensive number of studies that have been dedicated to this enzyme from several plant sources. All plants species studied to date have been reported as containing a single, nuclear gene encoding a plastid located GS isoenzyme per haploid genome. This study reports the existence of a second nuclear gene encoding a plastid located GS in Medicago truncatula. Results This study characterizes a new, second gene encoding a plastid located glutamine synthetase (GS2 in M. truncatula. The gene encodes a functional GS isoenzyme with unique kinetic properties, which is exclusively expressed in developing seeds. Based on molecular data and the assumption of a molecular clock, it is estimated that the gene arose from a duplication event that occurred about 10 My ago, after legume speciation and that duplicated sequences are also present in closely related species of the Vicioide subclade. Expression analysis by RT-PCR and western blot indicate that the gene is exclusively expressed in developing seeds and its expression is related to seed filling, suggesting a specific function of the enzyme associated to legume seed metabolism. Interestingly, the gene was found to be subjected to alternative splicing over the first intron, leading to the formation of two transcripts with similar open reading frames but varying 5' UTR lengths, due to retention of the first intron. To our knowledge, this is the first report of alternative splicing on a plant GS gene. Conclusions This study shows that Medicago truncatula contains an additional GS gene encoding a plastid located isoenzyme, which is functional and exclusively expressed during seed development. Legumes produce protein-rich seeds requiring high amounts of nitrogen, we postulate

  10. The carB gene encoding the large subunit of carbamoylphosphate synthetase from Lactococcus lactis is transcribed monocistronically

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Hammer, Karin

    1998-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carbamoylphosphate is catalysed by the heterodimeric enzyme carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPSase). The genes encoding the two subunits in procaryotes are normally transcribed as an operon, whereas in Lactococcus lactis, the gene encoding the large subunit (carB) is shown to be...... an isolated transcriptional unit. Carbamoylphosphate is a precursor in the biosynthesis of both pyrimidine nucleotides and arginine. By mutant analysis L. lactis is shown to possess only one carB gene; the same gene product is thus required for both biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, arginine may...... satisfy the requirement for carbamoylphosphate in pyrimidine biosynthesis through degradation by the arginine deiminase pathway. The expression of the carB gene is subject to regulation at the level of transcription by pyrimidines most probably by an attenuator mechanism. Upstream of the carB gene, an...

  11. The gadd and MyD genes define a novel set of mammalian genes encoding acidic proteins that synergistically suppress cell growth.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Q.; Lord, K A; Alamo, I; Hollander, M C; Carrier, F.; Ron, D; KOHN, K. W.; Hoffman, B; Liebermann, D A; Fornace, A J

    1994-01-01

    A remarkable overlap was observed between the gadd genes, a group of often coordinately expressed genes that are induced by genotoxic stress and certain other growth arrest signals, and the MyD genes, a set of myeloid differentiation primary response genes. The MyD116 gene was found to be the murine homolog of the hamster gadd34 gene, whereas MyD118 and gadd45 were found to represent two separate but closely related genes. Furthermore, gadd34/MyD116, gadd45, MyD118, and gadd153 encode acidic ...

  12. Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the denitrification enzymes in two strains of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwintner, C; Sabaty, M; Berna, B; Cahors, S; Richaud, P

    1998-08-15

    Plasmid content and localization of the genes encoding the reductases of the denitrification pathway were determined in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides forma sp. denitrificans by transverse alternating-field electrophoresis (TAFE) and hybridization with digoxigenin-labeled homologous probes. Two large plasmids of 102 and 115 kb were found. The genes encoding the various reductases are not clustered on a single genetic unit. The nap locus (localized with a napA probe), the nirK gene and the norCB genes encoding the nitrate, nitrite and nitric oxide reductases, respectively, were found on different AseI and SnaBI digested chromosomal DNA fragments, whereas the nos locus (localized with a nosZ probe), encoding the nitrous oxide reductase, was identified on the 115-kb plasmid. Furthermore, the genes encoding two proteins of unknown function, one periplasmic and the other cytoplasmic, but whose synthesis is highly induced by nitrate, were found on a different chromosomal fragment. For comparison, the same experiments were carried out on the well-characterized strain Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1. PMID:9742704

  13. POS5 Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Encodes a Mitochondrial NADH Kinase Required for Stability of Mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, Micheline K.; Stuart, Gregory R.; Longley, Matthew J.; Graziewicz, Maria A.; Dominick, Olivia C.; Copeland, William C.

    2003-01-01

    In a search for nuclear genes that affect mutagenesis of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an ATP-NAD (NADH) kinase, encoded by POS5, that functions exclusively in mitochondria was identified. The POS5 gene product was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified without a mitochondrial targeting sequence. A direct biochemical assay demonstrated that the POS5 gene product utilizes ATP to phosphorylate both NADH and NAD+, with a twofold preference for NADH. Disruption of POS5 inc...

  14. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  15. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  16. Identification of genes encoding granule-bound starch synthase involved in amylose metabolism in banana fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Miao

    Full Text Available Granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS is responsible for amylose synthesis, but the role of GBSS genes and their encoded proteins remains poorly understood in banana. In this study, amylose content and GBSS activity gradually increased during development of the banana fruit, and decreased during storage of the mature fruit. GBSS protein in banana starch granules was approximately 55.0 kDa. The protein was up-regulated expression during development while it was down-regulated expression during storage. Six genes, designated as MaGBSSI-1, MaGBSSI-2, MaGBSSI-3, MaGBSSI-4, MaGBSSII-1, and MaGBSSII-2, were cloned and characterized from banana fruit. Among the six genes, the expression pattern of MaGBSSI-3 was the most consistent with the changes in amylose content, GBSS enzyme activity, GBSS protein levels, and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit. These results suggest that MaGBSSI-3 might regulate amylose metabolism by affecting the variation of GBSS levels and the quantity or size of starch granules in banana fruit during development or storage.

  17. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of complete gene encoding an alkaline lipase from Penicillium cyclopium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H M; Wu, M C; Guo, J; Li, J F

    2011-01-01

    The complete gene (PG37 lipI) encoding an alkaline lipase (PG37 LipI) was cloned from the genomic DNA of Penicillium cyclopium PG37. The cloned PG37 lipI is 2020 bp in length, consisting of 632 bp of the 5' flanking promoter region and 1388 bp of the downstream fragment that contains 6 exons and 5 short introns. The promoter region harbors putative TATA box, CAAT box and several transcription factor binding sites. The open reading frame (ORF) encodes a PG37 LipI of 285 amino acid residues, which was predicted to contain a 20-aa signal peptide, a 7-aa propeptide and a 258-aa mature peptide with a conserved motif Gly-X-Ser-X-Gly. However, PG37 LipI shows only 32%, 30%, 28% and 26% identity with lipases of Aspergillus parasiticus, Penicillium camembertii, Thermomyces lanuginosus and Rhizomucor miehei, respectively. It was predicted that the main secondary structures of PG37 LipI are alpha-helix and random coil. Three amino acid residues, Ser132-Asp188-His241, compose the enzymatic active center in the tertiary structure. PMID:22288192

  19. Genome-wide identification and evolutionary analysis of nucleotide-binding site-encoding resistance genes in Lotus japonicus (Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, H; Wang, P F; Li, T T; Xia, H; Zhao, S Z; Hou, L; Zhao, C Z

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease resistance genes play a crucial role in plant defense responses against pathogens and insect pests. Many NBS-encoding genes have been detected in Lotus japonicus, an important forage crop in many parts of the world. However, most NBS genes identified so far in L. japonicus were only partial sequences. We identified 45 full-length NBS-encoding genes in the L. japonicus genome, and analyzed gene duplications, motifs, and the molecular phylogeny to further understand the NBS gene family. We found that gene duplication events rarely occur in L. japonicus NBS-encoding (LjNBS) genes. In addition, LjNBS genes were subjected to selection pressure, and codon usage bias was evident. We tested for purifying selection (specifically in the CC-NBS-LRR and TIR-NBS-LRR groups), and found strong purifying selection in the TIR-domain-containing sequences, indicating that the CC-NBS-LRR group is more likely to undergo expansion than the TIR-NBS-LRR group. Moreover, our results showed that both selection and mutation contributed to LjNBS codon usage bias, but mutational bias was the major influence on codon usage. PMID:26662396

  20. Molecular manipulation and modification of the genes encoding the G2 and G4 glycinin subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda H. Sammour

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The genes encoding the glycinin subunits G2 and G4 were molecularly manipulated and modified to test the possibility of increasing the nutritional value of soybean seed proteins. The recombinant DNAs pSP65/G2HG4, pSP65/G4HG2, pSP65/248 Metl, pSP65/248 Met2,3 and pSP65/248 Metl.2,3 were used in in vitro translation to produce (i chimeric proteins consisting of reciprocally exchanged acidic and basic G2 and G4 domains and (ii Gy4 point mutants with an increased number of methionine residues. The ability of the recombinant proteins to assemble into proper quaternary structures was investigated using sucrose gradient fractionation. The data produced by this study could provide valuable clues for the potential improvement of genetically modified crops.

  1. Sequence and organization of 5S ribosomal RNA-encoding genes of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campell, B R; Song, Y; Posch, T E; Cullis, C A; Town, C D

    1992-03-15

    We have isolated a genomic clone containing Arabidopsis thaliana 5S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding genes (rDNA) by screening an A. thaliana library with a 5S rDNA probe from flax. The clone isolated contains seven repeat units of 497 bp, plus 11 kb of flanking genomic sequence at one border. Sequencing of individual subcloned repeat units shows that the sequence of the 5S rRNA coding region is very similar to that reported for other flowering plants. Four A. thaliana ecotypes were found to contain approx. 1000 copies of 5S rDNA per haploid genome. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA indicates that 5S rDNA occurs in long tandem arrays, and shows the presence of numerous restriction-site polymorphisms among the six ecotypes studied. PMID:1348233

  2. Identification and characterization of a gene encoding a putative lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase from Arachis hypogaea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Si-Long Chen; Jia-Quan Huang; Lei Yong; Yue-Ting Zhang; Xiao-Ping Ren; Yu-Ning Chen; Hui-Fang Jiang; Li-Ying Yan; Yu-Rong Li; Bo-Shou Liao

    2012-12-01

    Lysophosphatidyl acyltransferase (LPAT) is the important enzyme responsible for the acylation of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), leading to the generation of phosphatidic acid (PA) in plant. Its encoding gene is an essential candidate for oil crops to improve oil composition and increase seed oil content through genetic engineering. In this study, a full-length AhLPAT4 gene was isolated via cDNA library screening and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE); our data demonstrated that AhLPAT4 had 1631 nucleotides, encoding a putative 43.8 kDa protein with 383 amino acid residues. The deduced protein included a conserved acyltransferase domain and four motifs (I–IV) with putative LPA and acyl-CoA catalytic and binding sites. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that AhLPAT4 contained four transmembrane domains (TMDs), localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane; detailed analysis indicated that motif I and motifs II–III in AhLPAT4 were separated by the third TMD, which located on cytosolic and ER luminal side respectively, and hydrophobic residues on the surface of AhLPAT4 protein fold to form a hydrophobic tunnel to accommodate the acyl chain. Subcellular localization analysis confirmed that AhLPAT4 was a cytoplasm protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that AhLPAT4 had a high homology (63.7–78.3%) with putative LPAT4 proteins from Glycine max, Arabidopsis thaliana and Ricinus communis. AhLPAT4 was ubiquitously expressed in diverse tissues except in flower, which is almost undetectable. The expression analysis in different developmental stages in peanut seeds indicated that AhLPAT4 did not coincide with oil accumulation.

  3. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Hamada F; Dai, Guixiang; Huang, Weitao; Shellito, Judd E; Ramsay, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad) vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC). DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route. PMID:26844553

  4. Flagellin Encoded in Gene-Based Vector Vaccines Is a Route-Dependent Immune Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada F Rady

    Full Text Available Flagellin has been tested as a protein-based vaccine adjuvant, with the majority of studies focused on antibody responses. Here, we evaluated the adjuvant activity of flagellin for both cellular and humoral immune responses in BALB/c mice in the setting of gene-based immunization, and have made several novel observations. DNA vaccines and adenovirus (Ad vectors were engineered to encode mycobacterial protein Ag85B, with or without flagellin of Salmonella typhimurium (FliC. DNA-encoded flagellin given IM enhanced splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to co-expressed vaccine antigen, including memory responses. Boosting either IM or intranasally with Ad vectors expressing Ag85B without flagellin led to durable enhancement of Ag85B-specific antibody and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses in both spleen and pulmonary tissues, correlating with significantly improved protection against challenge with pathogenic aerosolized M. tuberculosis. However, inclusion of flagellin in both DNA prime and Ad booster vaccines induced localized pulmonary inflammation and transient weight loss, with route-dependent effects on vaccine-induced T cell immunity. The latter included marked reductions in levels of mucosal CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses following IM DNA/IN Ad mucosal prime-boosting, although antibody responses were not diminished. These findings indicate that flagellin has differential and route-dependent adjuvant activity when included as a component of systemic or mucosally-delivered gene-based prime-boost immunization. Clear adjuvant activity for both T and B cell responses was observed when flagellin was included in the DNA priming vaccine, but side effects occurred when given in an Ad boosting vector, particularly via the pulmonary route.

  5. Identification of antithrombin-modulating genes. Role of LARGE, a gene encoding a bifunctional glycosyltransferase, in the secretion of proteins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia de la Morena-Barrio

    Full Text Available The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families. Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02. Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins.

  6. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins. PMID:10940570

  7. Evolutionary genomics of plant genes encoding N-terminal-TM-C2 domain proteins and the similar FAM62 genes and synaptotagmin genes of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmin genes are found in animal genomes and are known to function in the nervous system. Genes with a similar domain architecture as well as sequence similarity to synaptotagmin C2 domains have also been found in plant genomes. The plant genes share an additional region of sequence similarity with a group of animal genes named FAM62. FAM62 genes also have a similar domain architecture. Little is known about the functions of the plant genes and animal FAM62 genes. Indeed, many members of the large and diverse Syt gene family await functional characterization. Understanding the evolutionary relationships among these genes will help to realize the full implications of functional studies and lead to improved genome annotation. Results I collected and compared plant Syt-like sequences from the primary nucleotide sequence databases at NCBI. The collection comprises six groups of plant genes conserved in embryophytes: NTMC2Type1 to NTMC2Type6. I collected and compared metazoan FAM62 sequences and identified some similar sequences from other eukaryotic lineages. I found evidence of RNA editing and alternative splicing. I compared the intron patterns of Syt genes. I also compared Rabphilin and Doc2 genes. Conclusion Genes encoding proteins with N-terminal-transmembrane-C2 domain architectures resembling synaptotagmins, are widespread in eukaryotes. A collection of these genes is presented here. The collection provides a resource for studies of intron evolution. I have classified the collection into homologous gene families according to distinctive patterns of sequence conservation and intron position. The evolutionary histories of these gene families are traceable through the appearance of family members in different eukaryotic lineages. Assuming an intron-rich eukaryotic ancestor, the conserved intron patterns distinctive of individual gene families, indicate independent origins of Syt, FAM62 and NTMC2 genes. Resemblances

  8. MitoRes: a resource of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes and their products in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grillo Giorgio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria are sub-cellular organelles that have a central role in energy production and in other metabolic pathways of all eukaryotic respiring cells. In the last few years, with more and more genomes being sequenced, a huge amount of data has been generated providing an unprecedented opportunity to use the comparative analysis approach in studies of evolution and functional genomics with the aim of shedding light on molecular mechanisms regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism. In this context, the problem of the optimal extraction of representative datasets of genomic and proteomic data assumes a crucial importance. Specialised resources for nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related proteins already exist; however, no mitochondrial database is currently available with the same features of MitoRes, which is an update of the MitoNuc database extensively modified in its structure, data sources and graphical interface. It contains data on nuclear-encoded mitochondria-related products for any metazoan species for which this type of data is available and also provides comprehensive sequence datasets (gene, transcript and protein as well as useful tools for their extraction and export. Description MitoRes http://www2.ba.itb.cnr.it/MitoRes/ consolidates information from publicly external sources and automatically annotates them into a relational database. Additionally, it also clusters proteins on the basis of their sequence similarity and interconnects them with genomic data. The search engine and sequence management tools allow the query/retrieval of the database content and the extraction and export of sequences (gene, transcript, protein and related sub-sequences (intron, exon, UTR, CDS, signal peptide and gene flanking regions ready to be used for in silico analysis. Conclusion The tool we describe here has been developed to support lab scientists and bioinformaticians alike in the characterization of molecular

  9. Analysis of genes encoding D-alanine-D-alanine ligase-related enzymes in Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus flavescens.

    OpenAIRE

    Navarro, F.; Courvalin, P

    1994-01-01

    Using degenerate oligonucleotides complementary to sequences encoding conserved amino acid motifs in D-alanine-D-alanine (Ddl) ligases, we have amplified ca. 600-bp fragments from Enterococcus casseliflavus ATCC 25788 and Enterococcus flavescens CCM439. Sequence analysis of the amplification products indicated that each strain possessed two genes, ddlE. cass. and vanC-2, and ddlE. flav. and vanC-3, respectively, encoding Ddl-related enzymes. The fragments internal to the vanC genes were 98.3%...

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Gene (mspA) Encoding the Major Sheath Protein of Treponema maltophilum ATCC 51939T

    OpenAIRE

    Heuner, Klaus; Choi, Bong-Kyu; Schade, Rüdiger; Moter, Annette; Otto, Albrecht; Göbel, Ulf B.

    1999-01-01

    The major sheath protein-encoding gene (mspA) of the oral spirochete Treponema maltophilum ATCC 51939T was cloned by screening a genomic library with an anti-outer membrane fraction antibody. The mspA gene encodes a precursor protein of 575 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 62.3 kDa, including a signal peptide of 19 amino acids. The native MspA formed a heat-modifiable, detergent- and trypsin-stable complex which is associated with the outer membrane. Hybridization with an mspA-s...

  11. Characterization of the gene encoding the largest subunit of Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W B; Bzik, D J; Tanaka, M; Gu, H M; Fox, B A; Inselburg, J

    1991-06-01

    We report here the isolation, sequence analysis, structure, and expression of the gene encoding the largest subunit of RNA polymerase III (RPIII) from Plasmodium falciparum. The P. falciparum RPIII gene consists of 5 exons and 4 introns, is expressed in all of the asexual erythrocytic stages of the parasite as a 8.5-kb mRNA, and is present in a single copy on chromosome 13. The predicted 2339 amino acid residue RPIII subunit contained 5 regions that were conserved between different eukaryotic RPIII subunits, and 4 variable regions that separated the conserved regions. Three of the variable regions were greatly enlarged in comparison to the corresponding variable regions in other RPIII subunits. Variable region C' represented nearly one-third of the P. falciparum RPIII subunit (750 amino acid residues), included a unique repeated decapeptide sequence, and had some homology with yeast DNA topoisomerase II. Noteworthy amino acid sequences and structures were identified in both the conserved regions and in the enlarged variable regions, and their possible role(s) as domains that regulate RPIII enzyme activity is discussed. PMID:1656254

  12. The you gene encodes an EGF-CUB protein essential for Hedgehog signaling in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G Woods

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  13. A family of related proteins is encoded by the major Drosophila heat shock gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At least four proteins of 70,000 to 75,000 molecular weight (70-75K) were synthesized from mRNA which hybridized with a cloned heat shock gene previously shown to be localized to the 87A and 87C heat shock puff sites. These in vitro-synthesized proteins were indistinguishable from in vivo-synthesized heat shock-induced proteins when analyzed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. A comparison of the pattern of this group of proteins synthesized in vivo during a 5-min pulse or during continuous labeling indicates that the 72-75K proteins are probably not kinetic precursors to the major 70K heat shock protein. Partial digestion products generated with V8 protease indicated that the 70-75K heat shock proteins are closely related, but that there are clear differences between them. The partial digestion patterns obtained from heat shock proteins from the Kc cell line and from the Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster are very similar. Genetic analysis of the patterns of 70-75K heat shock protein synthesis indicated that the genes encoding at least two of the three 72-75K heat shock proteins are located outside of the major 87A and 87C puff sites

  14. Toxic peptides and genes encoding toxin gamma of the Brazilian scorpions Tityus bahiensis and Tityus stigmurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, B; Corona, M; Coronas, F I; Zamudio, F; Calderon-Aranda, E S; Fletcher, P L; Martin, B M; Possani, L D

    1996-02-01

    Seven toxic peptides from the venom of Tityus bahiensis and Tityus stigmurus was isolated and sequenced, five of them to completion. The most abundant peptide from each of these two species of scorpion was 95% identical with that of toxin gamma from the venom of Tityus serrulatus. They were consequently named gamma-b and gamma-st respectively. The genes encoding these new gamma-like peptides were cloned and sequenced by utilizing oligonucleotides synthesized according to known cDNA sequences of toxin gamma, and amplified by PCR on templates of DNA purified from both T. bahiensis and T. stigmurus. They contain an intron of approx. 470 bp. Possible mechanisms of processing and expressing these peptides are discussed, in view of the fact that glycine is the first residue of the N-terminal sequence of T. stigmurus, whereas lysine is the residue at position 1 of toxin gamma from T. serrulatus and T. bahiensis. In addition, chemical characterization of the less abundant toxic peptides showed the presence of at least four distinct families of peptides in all three species of the genus Tityus studied. There is a large degree of similarity among peptides from different venoms of the same family. By using specific horse and rabbit antisera, the venoms of T. bahiensis, T. serrulatus and T. stigmurus were compared. They showed an extended degree of cross-reactivity. Thus these three species of scorpion have similar toxic components, the genes of which are similarly organized, processed and expressed. PMID:8611151

  15. Salmonella typhimurium proP gene encodes a transport system for the osmoprotectant betaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, J; Booth, I R; Higgins, C F

    1985-12-01

    Betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) can be accumulated to high intracellular concentrations and serves an important osmoprotective function in enteric bacteria. We found that the proP gene of Salmonella typhimurium, originally identified as encoding a minor transport system for proline (permease PP-II), plays an important role in betaine uptake. Mutations in proP reduced the ability of betaine to serve as an osmoprotectant. Transport of betaine into the cells was also severely impaired in these mutants. The kinetics of uptake via PP-II suggest that betaine, rather than proline, is the important physiological substrate for this transport system. Betaine uptake via PP-II was regulated by osmotic pressure at two different levels: transcription of the proP gene was increased by increasing osmolarity, and, in addition, activity of the transport system itself was dependent upon the osmotic pressure of the medium. The specificity of the transport system was also altered by increasing osmolarity which enhanced the affinity for betaine while reducing that for proline. PMID:3905767

  16. An inhibitor of viral RNA replication is encoded by a plant resistance gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Naito, Satoshi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2007-08-21

    The tomato Tm-1 gene confers resistance to tomato mosaic virus (ToMV). Here, we report that the extracts of Tm-1 tomato cells (GCR237) have properties that inhibit the in vitro RNA replication of WT ToMV more strongly than that of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking mutant of ToMV, LT1. We purified this inhibitory activity and identified a polypeptide of approximately 80 kDa (p80(GCR237)) using LC-tandem MS. The amino acid sequence of p80(GCR237) had no similarity to any characterized proteins. The p80(GCR237) gene cosegregated with Tm-1; transgenic expression of p80(GCR237) conferred resistance to ToMV within tomato plants; and the knockdown of p80(GCR237) sensitized Tm-1 tomato plants to ToMV, indicating that Tm-1 encodes p80(GCR237) itself. We further show that in vitro-synthesized Tm-1 (p80(GCR237)) protein binds to the replication proteins of WT ToMV and inhibits their function at a step before, but not after, the viral replication complex is formed on the membrane surfaces. Such binding was not observed for the replication proteins of LT1. These results suggest that Tm-1 (p80(GCR237)) inhibits the replication of WT ToMV RNA through binding to the replication proteins. PMID:17699618

  17. Little things make big things happen: A summary of micropeptide encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen Crappé

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Classical bioactive peptides are cleaved from larger precursor proteins and are targeted toward the secretory pathway by means of an N-terminal signaling sequence. In contrast, micropeptides encoded from small open reading frames, lack such signaling sequence and are immediately released in the cytoplasm after translation. Over the past few years many such non-canonical genes (including open reading frames, ORFs smaller than 100 AAs have been discovered and functionally characterized in different eukaryotic organisms. Furthermore, in silico approaches enabled the prediction of the existence of many more putatively coding small ORFs in the genomes of Sacharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster and Mus musculus. However, questions remain as to what the functional role of this new class of eukaryotic genes might be, and how widespread they are. In the future, approaches integrating in silico, conservation-based prediction and a combination of genomic, proteomic and functional validation methods will prove to be indispensable to answer these open questions.

  18. Isolation and functional analysis of a Brassica juncea gene encoding a component of auxin efflux carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; MIN; NI; XIAO; YA; CHEN; ZHI; HONG; XU; HONG; WEI; XUE

    2002-01-01

    Polar auxin transport plays a divergent role in plant growth and developmental processes including rootand embryo development, vascular pattern formation and cell elongation. Recently isolated Arabidopsispin gene family was believed to encode a component of auxin efflux carrier (Galweiler et al, 1998). Basedon the Arabidopsis pin1 sequence we have isolated a Brassica juncea cDNA (designated Bjpinl), whichencoded a 70-kDa putative auxin efflux carrier. Deduced BjPIN1 shared 65% identities at protein level withAtPIN1 and was highly homologous to other putative PIN proteins of Arabidopsis (with highest homologyto AtPIN3). Hydrophobic analysis showed similar structures between BjPIN1 and AtPIN proteins. Presenceof 6 exons (varying in size between 65 bp and 1229 bp) and 5 introns (sizes between 89 bp and 463 bp)in the genomic fragment was revealed by comparing the genomic and cDNA sequences. Northern blotanalysis indicated that Bjpinl was expressed in most of the tissues tested, with a relatively higher levelof transcript in flowers and a lower level in root tissues. Promoter-reporter gene fusion studies furtherrevealed the expression of Bjpinl in the mature pollen grains, young seeds, root tip, leaf vascular tissue andtrace bundle, stem epidermis, cortex and vascular cells. BjPIN1 was localized on the plasma membraneas demonstrated through fusion expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Auxin efflux carrier activitywas elevated in transgenic Arabidopsis expressing BjPIN1.

  19. Cloning of a down-regulated gene encoding small GTP binding protein in hybrid wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yingyin; NI Zhongfu; CHEN Rongmin; WU Limin; SUN Qixin

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that differential gene expression between wheat hybrids and their parents was responsible for the heterosis. To provide an insight into the molecular basis of wheat heterosis, one cDNA, designated TaRab, was identified from the cDNA library of wheat seedling leaves. The sequence comparison in GenBank revealed that TaRab is homologous to a group of genes encoding Rab-GTP binding protein. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that TaRab was expressed in all plant tissues examined,but at slightly higher level in leaves. Further analysis exhibited that TaRab displayed lower expression in hybrid than in its patents in both roots and leaves, which was in agreement with the original results of suppression subtractive hybridization. TaRab was located on chromosome 7B and C-7DS5-0.36 by in silico mapping. The relationship between differential expression of TaRab and the molecular basis of wheat heterosis was also discussed.

  20. The dyf-3 gene encodes a novel protein required for sensory cilium formation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Toh, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Yasumi; Koga, Makoto

    2005-02-25

    Ciliated neurons in animals are important for the reception of environmental stimuli. To understand the mechanism of cilium morphogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we analyzed dyf-3 mutants that are defective in uptake of a fluorescent dye and abnormal in sensory cilium structure. Expression of green fluorescent protein in sensory neurons of a dyf-3 mutant revealed that the mutant has stunted cilia and abnormal posterior projections in some sensory neurons. The dyf-3 gene encodes three proteins with different N-terminals. The largest DYF-3 protein has 404 amino acid residues that are 38% identical with those of a predicted human protein of unknown function. Expression of a functional dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp fusion gene is detected in 26 chemosensory neurons, including six IL2 neurons, eight pairs of amphid neurons (ASE, ADF, ASG, ASH, ASI, ASJ, ASK and ADL) and two pairs of phasmid neurons (PHA and PHB). Expression of a dyf-3 cDNA in specific neurons of dyf-3 animals indicated that dyf-3 acts cell-autonomously for fluorescent dye uptake. Reduction of dyf-3Colon, two colonsgfp expression in a daf-19 mutant suggests that dyf-3 expression is regulated by DAF-19 transcription factor, and DYF-3 may be involved in the intraflagellar transport system. PMID:15713455

  1. The you Gene Encodes an EGF-CUB Protein Essential for Hedgehog Signaling in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Ian G

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling is required for many aspects of development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Misregulation of the Hedgehog pathway causes developmental abnormalities and has been implicated in certain types of cancer. Large-scale genetic screens in zebrafish have identified a group of mutations, termed you-class mutations, that share common defects in somite shape and in most cases disrupt Hedgehog signaling. These mutant embryos exhibit U-shaped somites characteristic of defects in slow muscle development. In addition, Hedgehog pathway mutations disrupt spinal cord patterning. We report the positional cloning of you, one of the original you-class mutations, and show that it is required for Hedgehog signaling in the development of slow muscle and in the specification of ventral fates in the spinal cord. The you gene encodes a novel protein with conserved EGF and CUB domains and a secretory pathway signal sequence. Epistasis experiments support an extracellular role for You upstream of the Hedgehog response mechanism. Analysis of chimeras indicates that you mutant cells can appropriately respond to Hedgehog signaling in a wild-type environment. Additional chimera analysis indicates that wild-type you gene function is not required in axial Hedgehog-producing cells, suggesting that You is essential for transport or stability of Hedgehog signals in the extracellular environment. Our positional cloning and functional studies demonstrate that You is a novel extracellular component of the Hedgehog pathway in vertebrates.

  2. Isolation of cDNA from Jacaratia mexicana encoding a mexicain-like cysteine protease gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martínez, Erick M; Herrera-Ramírez, Alejandra C; Badillo-Corona, Jesús Agustín; Garibay-Orijel, Claudio; González-Rábade, Nuria; Oliver-Salvador, María Del Carmen

    2012-07-01

    Cysteine proteases (CPs) from the C1 family, which are similar to papain, can be found in animals and plants, as well as some viruses and prokaryotes. These enzymes have diverse physiological functions and are thus very attractive for science and industry. Jacaratia mexicana, a member of the Caricaceae plant family, contains several CPs, the principal being mexicain, found to favorably compete against papain for many industrial applications due to its high stability and specific activity. In this study, leaves of J. mexicana were used to isolate a CP-coding gene, similar to those that code for mexicain and chymomexicain. By using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) as well as oligonucleotide design from papain-like conserved amino acids (aa), a sequence of 1404 bp consisting of a 5' terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 153 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 131 bp, with a polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal sequence and a poly(A) tail, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1046 bp, was obtained by overlapping three partial sequences. Two full-length cDNA sequences that encode for mexicain-like proteases were cloned from mRNA (JmCP4 and JmCP5). JmCP4 is predicted to have an ORF of 1044 bp, which codifies for polypeptides that have a 26 aa signal peptide region, a 108 aa propeptide region and a mature enzyme of 214 aa. A 969 bp fragment (JmCP5) encodes for a partial sequence of a CP gene, without the signal peptide region but with a full-length propeptide region. The sequence analysis showed that this protease presented a high similarity to other plant CPs from J. mexicana, Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, Vasconcellea stipulata, and Carica papaya, among others, mainly at the conserved catalytic site. Obtaining the sequence of this CP gene from J. mexicana provides an alternative for production in a standard system and could be an initial step towards the commercialization of this enzyme. PMID:22543019

  3. Characterization of the BLR1 gene encoding a putative blue-light regulator in the phytopathogenic fungus Bipolaris oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Junichi; Moriwaki, Akihiro; Tanaka, Nozomi; Ueno, Makoto; Arase, Sakae

    2007-01-01

    Bipolaris oryzae is a filamentous ascomycetous fungus that causes brown leaf spot disease in rice. We isolated and characterized BLR1, a gene that encodes a putative blue-light regulator similar to Neurospora crassa white-collar 1 (WC-1). The deduced amino acid sequence of BLR1 showed high degrees of similarity to other fungal blue-light regulator protein. Disruption of the BLR1 gene demonstrated that this gene is essential for conidial development after conidiophore formation and for near-UV radiation-enhanced photolyase gene expression. PMID:17233721

  4. Genes encoding Δ(8)-sphingolipid desaturase from various plants: identification, biochemical functions, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Fen; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Jin; Yuan, Jin-Hong; Deng, Chuan-Liang; Hu, Zan-Min; Gao, Wu-Jun

    2016-09-01

    ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase catalyzes the C8 desaturation of a long chain base, which is the characteristic structure of various complex sphingolipids. The genes of 20 ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases from 12 plants were identified and functionally detected by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to elucidate the relationship between the biochemical function and evolution of this enzyme. Results showed that the 20 genes all can encode a functional ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase, which catalyzes different ratios of two products, namely, 8(Z) and 8(E)-C18-phytosphingenine. The coded enzymes could be divided into two groups on the basis of biochemical functions: ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for an E-isomer product and ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase with a preference for a Z-isomer product. The conversion rate of the latter was generally lower than that of the former. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the 20 desaturases could also be clustered into two groups, and this grouping is consistent with that of the biochemical functions. Thus, the biochemical function of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase is correlated with its evolution. The two groups of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases could arise from distinct ancestors in higher plants. However, they might have initially evolved from ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in lower organisms, such as yeasts, which can produce E-isomer products only. Furthermore, almost all of the transgenic yeasts harboring ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturase genes exhibit an improvement in aluminum tolerance. Our study provided new insights into the biochemical function and evolution of ∆(8)-sphingolipid desaturases in plants. PMID:27294968

  5. TOM1, an Arabidopsis gene required for efficient multiplication of a tobamovirus, encodes a putative transmembrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, T; Ohta, T; Takahashi, M; Meshi, T; Schmidt, R; Dean, C; Naito, S; Ishikawa, M

    2000-08-29

    Host-encoded factors play an important role in virus multiplication, acting in concert with virus-encoded factors. However, information regarding the host factors involved in this process is limited. Here we report the map-based cloning of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene, TOM1, which is necessary for the efficient multiplication of tobamoviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses infecting a wide variety of plants. The TOM1 mRNA is suggested to encode a 291-aa polypeptide that is predicted to be a multipass transmembrane protein. The Sos recruitment assay supported the hypothesis that TOM1 is associated with membranes, and in addition, that TOM1 interacts with the helicase domain of tobamovirus-encoded replication proteins. Taken into account that the tobamovirus replication complex is associated with membranes, we propose that TOM1 participates in the in vivo formation of the replication complex by serving as a membrane anchor. PMID:10944200

  6. Nuclear factor-κB regulates the expression of multiple genes encoding liver transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniyan, Natarajan; Ananthanarayanan, Meenakshisundaram; Suchy, Frederick J

    2016-04-15

    In this study we identified the mechanisms underlying the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on the expression of genes encoding multiple liver transport proteins. Well-conserved NF-κB binding sites were found in the promoters of farnesoid X receptor (FXR)-target genes. An electromobility shift assay (EMSA) demonstrated the specific interaction between the NF-κB p65 protein and a (32)P-labeled BSEP NF-κB response element (NF-κBE). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of NF-κB p65 to the BSEP locus but not the FXRE in vitro. NF-κB p65 overexpression in Huh-7 cells markedly repressed FXR/RXR transactivation of the BSEP, ABCG5/G8, MRP2, and FXR promoters, which was totally reversed by expression of the IκBα super-repressor. NF-κB interacted directly with FXR on coimmunoprecipitation, suggesting another level for the inhibitory effects of NF-κB on FXR-target genes. In vivo ChIP analysis with liver nuclei obtained from mice after 3 days of common bile duct ligation (BDL) or 6 h post-lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection showed a markedly increased recruitment of NF-κB p65 to the Bsep promoter compared with controls. There was also increased recruitment of the corepressor silencing mediator of retinoic acid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC)3 and HDAC2 to the NF-κB sites. We also found that NF-κB p65 was recruited to NF-κB binding sites in the promoters of organic solute transporter, OSTα and OSTβ, and unexpectedly activated rather than repressed gene expression. In mouse liver after BDL NF-κB recruitment to Ostα and Ostβ promoters was associated with increased binding of the potent coactivator cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300 to the NF-κBE and depletion of CBP/p300 at the FXR element. Overall, these studies demonstrate a novel role for NF-κB in adaptation to obstructive and LPS-induced cholestasis acting through recruitment to specific NF-κB binding sites in

  7. Identification of the Gene Encoding the Alternative Sigma Factor ςB from Listeria monocytogenes and Its Role in Osmotolerance†

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Lynne A.; Çetin, Mehmet Sevket; Hutkins, Robert W.; Benson, Andrew K.

    1998-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is well known for its robust physiology, which permits growth at low temperatures under conditions of high osmolarity and low pH. Although studies have provided insight into the mechanisms used by L. monocytogenes to allay the physiological consequences of these adverse environments, little is known about how these responses are coordinated. In the studies presented here, we have cloned the sigB gene and several rsb genes from L. monocytogenes, encoding homologs of the ...

  8. Sequence analysis and complementation studies of the argJ gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P R; Mulks, M H

    1992-01-01

    Clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae frequently are deficient in arginine biosynthesis. These auxotrophs often have defects in the fifth step of the arginine biosynthetic pathway, the conversion of acetylornithine to ornithine. This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme ornithine acetyltransferase, which is a product of the argJ gene. We have cloned and sequenced the gonococcal argJ gene and found that it contains an open reading frame of 1,218 nucleotides and encodes a peptide with a ded...

  9. The ATX1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a small metal homeostasis factor that protects cells against reactive oxygen toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, S J; Culotta, V C

    1995-01-01

    In aerobic organisms, protection against oxidative damage involves the combined action of highly specialized antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of another gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that plays a critical role in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. This gene, named ATX1, was originally isolated by its ability to suppress oxygen toxicity in yeast lacking SOD. ATX1 encodes a 8.2-kDa poly...

  10. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Padula, Audrey E.; Griffin, William C.; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S.; Elissa J Chesler; Miles, Michael F.; Robert W Williams; Randall, Patrick K.; Woodward, John J.; Howard C Becker; Patrick J Mulholland

    2015-01-01

    Small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kc...

  11. Thrombocytopenia and erythrocytosis in mice with a mutation in the gene encoding the hemoglobin β minor chain

    OpenAIRE

    Kauppi, Maria; Hilton, Adrienne A; Metcalf, Donald; Ng, Ashley P.; Hyland, Craig D.; Collinge, Janelle E.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hilton, Douglas J.; Alexander, Warren S.

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mutations in the genes encoding hemoglobin (Hb) have been characterized in human disease. We describe here a mutation in the mouse Hbb-b2 gene, denoted Plt12, that precisely mimics the human hemoglobin Hotel Dieu variant. The mutation results in increased affinity of Hb for oxygen and Plt12 mutant mice exhibited reduced partial pressure of O2 in the blood, accompanied by erythrocytosis characterized by elevated erythropoietin levels and splenomegaly with excess erythropoiesis. Most ho...

  12. Identification of the gene encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein of herpes simplex virus type 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybrid arrest of in vitro translation was used to localize the region of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome encoding the 65-kilodalton DNA-binding protein (65KDBP) to between genome coordinates 0.592 and 0.649. Knowledge of the DNA sequence of this region allowed us to identify three open reading frames as likely candidates for the gene encoding 65KDBP. Two independent approaches were used to determine which of these three open reading frames encoded the protein. For the first approach a monoclonal antibody, MAb 6898, which reacted specifically with 65KDBP, was isolated. This antibody was used, with the techniques of hybrid arrest of in vitro translation and in vitro translation of selected mRNA, to identify the gene encoding 65KDBP. The second approach involved preparation of antisera directed against oligopeptides corresponding to regions of the predicted amino acid sequence of this gene. These antisera reacted specifically with 65KDBP, thus confirming the gene assignment

  13. Aluminum-activated citrate and malate transporters encoded by distinct Al tolerance genes function independently in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluminum (Al) -activated malate and citrate exudation from roots plays an important role in conferring Al tolerance to many plant species. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of AtMATE, the gene encoding an Al-activated root citrate efflux transporter that functions in Arabid...

  14. Genes encoding major light-harvesting polypeptides are clustered on the genome of the cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon.

    OpenAIRE

    Conley, P. B.; Lemaux, P G; Lomax, T L; Grossman, A R

    1986-01-01

    The polypeptide composition of the phycobilisome, the major light-harvesting complex of prokaryotic cyanobacteria and certain eukaryotic algae, can be modulated by different light qualities in cyanobacteria exhibiting chromatic adaptation. We have identified genomic fragments encoding a cluster of phycobilisome polypeptides (phycobiliproteins) from the chromatically adapting cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon using previously characterized DNA fragments of phycobiliprotein genes from the eu...

  15. Mutations of the X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 are associated with autism.

    OpenAIRE

    Jamain, Stéphane; Quach, Hélène; Betancur, Catalina; Råstam, Maria; Colineaux, Catherine; Gillberg, I. Carina; Söderström, Henrik; Giros, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Gillberg, Christopher; Bourgeron, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Many studies have supported a genetic etiology for autism. Here we report mutations in two X-linked genes encoding neuroligins NLGN3 and NLGN4 in siblings with autism-spectrum disorders. These mutations affect cell-adhesion molecules localized at the synapse and suggest that a defect of synaptogenesis may predispose to autism.

  16. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus : the DAMAGE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; van't Riet, Esther; van Haeften, Timon W.; Arp, Pascal A.; Hansen, Torben; Kremer, Dennis; Groenewoud, Marlous J.; van Hove, Els C.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Nijpels, Giel; Heine, Robert J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Pedersen, Oluf; Slagboom, P. Eline; Maassen, Johannes A.; Hofker, Marten H.; 't Hart, Leen M.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes me

  17. Evolution-guided functional analyses reveal diverse antiviral specificities encoded by IFIT1 genes in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Matthew D; Schaller, Aaron M; Geballe, Adam P; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    IFIT (interferon-induced with tetratricopeptide repeats) proteins are critical mediators of mammalian innate antiviral immunity. Mouse IFIT1 selectively inhibits viruses that lack 2'O-methylation of their mRNA 5' caps. Surprisingly, human IFIT1 does not share this antiviral specificity. Here, we resolve this discrepancy by demonstrating that human and mouse IFIT1 have evolved distinct functions using a combination of evolutionary, genetic and virological analyses. First, we show that human IFIT1 and mouse IFIT1 (renamed IFIT1B) are not orthologs, but are paralogs that diverged >100 mya. Second, using a yeast genetic assay, we show that IFIT1 and IFIT1B proteins differ in their ability to be suppressed by a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. Finally, we demonstrate that IFIT1 and IFIT1B have divergent antiviral specificities, including the discovery that only IFIT1 proteins inhibit a virus encoding a cap 2'O-methyltransferase. These functional data, combined with widespread turnover of mammalian IFIT genes, reveal dramatic species-specific differences in IFIT-mediated antiviral repertoires. PMID:27240734

  18. A novel GDNF-inducible gene, BMZF3, encodes a transcriptional repressor associated with KAP-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Krueppel-associated box (KRAB)-containing zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) comprise the largest family of zinc finger transcription factors that function as transcriptional repressors. In the study of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)-RET signaling, we have identified bone marrow zinc finger 3 (BMZF3), encoding a KRAB-ZFP, as a GDNF-inducible gene by differential display analysis. The expression of BMZF3 transcripts in the human neuroblastoma cell line TGW increased 1 h after GDNF stimulation, as determined by Northern blotting and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The BMZF3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity in the KRAB domain. BMZF3 interacts with a co-repressor protein, KRAB-associated protein 1 (KAP-1), through the KRAB domain and siRNA-mediated knockdown of KAP-1 abolished the transcriptional repressor activity of BMZF3, indicating that KAP-1 is necessary for BMZF3 function. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated silencing of BMZF3 inhibited cell proliferation. These findings suggest that BMZF3 is a transcriptional repressor induced by GDNF that plays a role in cell proliferation

  19. Idiopathic neonatal necrotising fasciitis caused by community-acquired MSSA encoding Panton Valentine Leukocidin genes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunlop, Rebecca L E

    2012-02-01

    Neonatal necrotising fasciitis is very rare in comparison to the adult presentation of the disease and a Plastic Surgeon may only encounter one such case during his or her career. Often this is initially misdiagnosed and managed as simple cellulitis. It generally affects previously healthy babies, the site is often the lower back area and a history of minor skin trauma may be elicited. The causative organism is usually Streptococcus or polymicrobial, as is the case in the adult population. We present the case of a previously healthy 11-day-old infant with idiopathic, rapidly progressive necrotising fasciitis of the back, cause by Methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection. The strain was isolated and found to encode the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes, which have been associated with particularly severe necrotising infections in other sites, with high mortality. These strains are the subject of specific treatment and eradication guidance in the UK but awareness of this and the importance of obtaining detailed culture typing is likely to be low amongst Plastic Surgeons.

  20. Molecular cloning and expression analysis of the gene encoding proline dehydrogenase from Jatropha curcas L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Ao, Pingxing; Yang, Shuanglong; Zou, Zhurong; Wang, Shasha; Gong, Ming

    2015-03-01

    Proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) (EC 1.5.99.8) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of proline. The enzyme JcProDH and its complementary DNA (cDNA) were isolated from Jatropha curcas L., an important woody oil plant used as a raw material for biodiesels. It has been classified as a member of the Pro_dh superfamily based on multiple sequence alignment, phylogenetic characterization, and its role in proline catabolism. Its cDNA is 1674 bp in length with a complete open reading frame of 1485 bp, which encodes a polypeptide chain of 494 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 54 kD and a pI of 8.27. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that JcProDH showed high similarity with ProDH from other plants. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis revealed that JcProDH was especially abundant in the seeds and flowers but scarcely present in the stems, roots, and leaves. In addition, the expression of JcProDH increased in leaves experiencing environmental stress such as cold (5 °C), heat (42 °C), salt (300 mM), and drought (30 % PEG6000). The JcProDH protein was successfully expressed in the yeast strain INVSc1 and showed high enzyme activity in proline catabolism. This result confirmed that the JcProDH gene negatively participated in the stress response. PMID:25502926

  1. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, Jakob S; Wang, Christian W; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I; Minja, Daniel Tr; Petersen, Bent; Turner, Louise; Petersen, Jens Ev; Lusingu, John Pa; Theander, Thor G; Lavstsen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Most severe Plasmodium falciparum infections are experienced by young children. Severe symptoms are precipitated by vascular sequestration of parasites expressing a particular subset of the polymorphic P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) adhesion molecules. Parasites binding human endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support the hypothesis that the CIDRα1-EPCR interaction is key to the pathogenesis of severe malaria and strengthen the rationale for pursuing a vaccine or adjunctive treatment aiming at inhibiting or reducing the damaging effects of this interaction. PMID:27354391

  2. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding...... "adapter" proteins, which are involved in transducing signals from receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signal recipients such as ras, because adaptor protein genes could also, logically, serve as targets of mutation, rearrangement, or other aberration in disease. Therefore, DNAs from panels of rodent-human...... hybrids carrying defined complements of human chromosomes were assayed for the presence of the cognate genes for NCK, SHC, and GRB2, three SH2 or SH2/SH3 (Src homology 2 and 3) domain-containing adapter proteins. Additionally, NCK and SHC genes were more narrowly localized by chromosomal in situ...

  3. An apoptosis-inhibiting gene from a nuclear polyhedrosis virus encoding a polypeptide with Cys/His sequence motifs.

    OpenAIRE

    Birnbaum, M. J.; Clem, R J; Miller, L K

    1994-01-01

    Two different baculovirus genes are known to be able to block apoptosis triggered upon infection of Spodoptera frugiperda cells with p35 mutants of the insect baculovirus Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV):p35 (P35-encoding gene) of AcMNPV (R. J. Clem, M. Fechheimer, and L. K. Miller, Science 254:1388-1390, 1991) and iap (inhibitor of apoptosis gene) of Cydia pomonella granulosis virus (CpGV) (N. E. Crook, R. J. Clem, and L. K. Miller, J. Virol. 67:2168-2174, 1993). Us...

  4. Genes of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins: evidence for a variant of the 3' splice-site consensus sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Juretić, N; Jaussi, R; Mattes, U; Christen, P

    1987-01-01

    The introns of animal nuclear genes and of viral genes encoding protein possess at their 3' splice-site the consensus sequence (CT)11NTCAG (Mount, S.M. (1982) Nucl. Acids Res. 10, 459-472; Green, M.R. (1986) Ann. Rev. Genet. 20, 671-708). However, the total 39 introns of the 5 imported mitochondrial proteins of higher eucaryotes whose gene structure has been determined to date show a predominance of 44% for base T at position -4. Apparently, a variant consensus sequence, i.e. (CT)11TTCAG, cha...

  5. The divergently transcribed genes encoding yeast ribosomal proteins L46 and S24 are activated by shared RPG-boxes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kraakman, L.S.; Mager, W H; Maurer, K T; Nieuwint, R T; Planta, R J

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of the majority of the ribosomal protein (rp) genes in yeast is activated through common cis-acting elements, designated RPG-boxes. These elements have been shown to act as specific binding sites for the protein factor TUF/RAP1/GRF1 in vitro. Two such elements occur in the intergenic region separating the divergently transcribed genes encoding L46 and S24. To investigate whether the two RPG-boxes mediate transcription activation of both the L46 and S24 gene, two experimental str...

  6. Functional Characterization of PtaRHE1, a gene that encodes a RING-H2 type protein in poplar

    OpenAIRE

    Mukoko Bopopi, Johnny

    2011-01-01

    PtaRHE1 is a poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) gene encoding a REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) domain-containing protein. RING proteins are largely represented in plants and play important roles in the regulation of many developmental processes as well as in plant-environment interactions. In this thesis, we present a functional characterization of PtaRHE1. To gain further insight into the role of this gene, molecular and genetic alteration approaches were used. The results of in vitro ub...

  7. Identification, isolation, and characterization of the structural gene encoding the delta' subunit of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III holoenzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Carter; Franden, M A; Aebersold, R.; McHenry, C S

    1993-01-01

    The gene encoding the delta' subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, designated holB, was cloned by a strategy in which peptide sequence was used to derive a DNA hybridization probe. The gene maps to 24.95 centisomes of the chromosome. Sequencing of holB revealed a 1,002-bp open reading frame predicted to produce a 36,936-Da protein. The gene has a ribosome-binding site and promoter that are highly similar to the consensus sequences and is flanked by two potential open reading frames. Prote...

  8. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a glutamate and aspartate carrier of Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, B; Yang, Y. J.; Hong, J S; Lum, D

    1990-01-01

    A gene encoding a carrier protein for glutamate and aspartate was cloned into Escherichia coli K-12 strain BK9MDG by using the high-copy-number plasmid pBR322. The gene (designated gltP) is probably identical to a gene recently cloned from E. coli B (Y. Deguchi, I. Yamato, and Y. Anraku, J. Bacteriol. 171:1314-1319). A 1.6-kilobase DNA fragment containing gltP was subcloned into the expression plasmids pT7-5 and pT7-6, and its product was identified by a phage T7 RNA polymerase-T7 promoter co...

  9. Cloning of HBsAg-encoded genes in different vectors and their expression in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Qin; Hong Tang; Lian-San Zhao; Fang He; Yong Lin; Li Liu; Xiao-Mei He

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To compare the efficiency of different plasmids as DNA vectors by cloning three HBsAg-encoded genes into two eukaryotic expression vectors, pRc/CMV and pSG5UTPL/Flag, and to express HBsAg S, MS, and LS proteins in SP2/0 cells, and to establish monoclone SP2/0 cell strains that are capable of expressing S or S2S proteins stably.METHODS: Segments of S, preS2-S, preS1-preS2-S genes of Hepatitis B virus were amplified by routine PCR and preS1S fragment was amplified by Over-Lap Extension PCR. The amplified segments were cleaved with restricted endonuclease Hind Ⅲ/Not Ⅰ followed by ligation with pRc/CMV, or BamHI/EcoR Ⅰ followed by ligation with pSG5UTPL/Flag. After the plasmid vectors were cleaved with the correspond enzymes, the amplified segments were inserted into pRc/CMV or pSGSUTPL/Flag plasmid vectors with T4DNA ligase. KOZAK sequence was added before the initial ATG code of each fragment using specific primer. The inserted segments in the recombinant plasmids were sequenced after subcloning. BALB/c mice myeloma cells (SP2/0 cell line) were transfected with the recombinant plasmids. The expressions of the different recombinants were compared by Western-blot, using a monoclonal anti-HBs antibody as the primary antibody and peroxidase-labeled multi-linker as the secondary. Stable SP2/0-pRc/CMV-S or SP2/0- pRc/CMV-MS clones were established through clone screening with G418.RESULTS: Fragments with anticipated size were harvested after PCR. After recombination and screening, the sequences of the inserted segments in the recombinants were confirmed to be S, preS2S, preSl-preS2S and preSlS encoding genes,determined by sequencing. The results of Western-blot hybridization were positive for the anticipated proteins.Among them, pRc/CMV-S or pRc/CMV-MS demonstrated the highest expressing their respective antigen.CONCLUSION: Eight recombinant plasmids expressing S,M, L or preSlS proteins are obtained. For hepatitis surface antigen expression in eukaryotic cells

  10. Molecular ecology of tetracycline resistance: development and validation of primers for detection of tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R I; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N; Mackie, R I

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of tetracycline resistance genes encoding the ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) revealed the monophyletic origin of these genes. The most deeply branching class, exemplified by tet and otrA, consisted of genes from the antibiotic-producing organisms Streptomyces rimosus and Streptomyces lividans. With a high degree of confidence, the corresponding genes of the other seven classes (Tet M, Tet S, Tet O, Tet W, Tet Q, Tet T, and TetB P) formed phylogenetically distinct separate clusters. Based on this phylogenetic analysis, a set of PCR primers for detection, retrieval, and sequence analysis of the corresponding gene fragments from a variety of bacterial and environmental sources was developed and characterized. A pair of degenerate primers targeted all tetracycline resistance genes encoding RPPs except otrA and tet, and seven other primer pairs were designed to target the specific classes. The primers were used to detect the circulation of these genes in the rumina of cows, in swine feed and feces, and in swine fecal streptococci. Classes Tet O and Tet W were found in the intestinal contents of both animals, while Tet M was confined to pigs and Tet Q was confined to the rumen. The tet(O) and tet(W) genes circulating in the microbiota of the rumen and the gastrointestinal tract of pigs were identical despite the differences in animal hosts and antibiotic use regimens. Swine fecal streptococci uniformly possessed the tet(O) gene, and 22% of them also carried tet(M). This population could be considered one of the main reservoirs of these two resistance genes in the pig gastrointestinal tract. All classes of RPPs except Tet T and TetB P were found in the commercial components of swine feed. This is the first demonstration of the applicability of molecular ecology techniques to estimation of the gene pool and the flux of antibiotic resistance genes in production animals. PMID:11133424

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum gene clusters encoding putative cell-surface protein complexes for carbohydrate utilization are conserved in specific gram-positive bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Muscariello Lidia; Boekhorst Jos; Siezen Roland; Molenaar Douwe; Renckens Bernadet; Kleerebezem Michiel

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Genomes of gram-positive bacteria encode many putative cell-surface proteins, of which the majority has no known function. From the rapidly increasing number of available genome sequences it has become apparent that many cell-surface proteins are conserved, and frequently encoded in gene clusters or operons, suggesting common functions, and interactions of multiple components. Results A novel gene cluster encoding exclusively cell-surface proteins was identified, which is ...

  12. The genes encoding the biotin carboxyl carrier protein and biotin carboxylase subunits of Bacillus subtilis acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, the first enzyme of fatty acid synthesis.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Marini(GANIL); Li, S J; Gardiol, D; Cronan, J E; De Mendoza, D

    1995-01-01

    The genes encoding two subunits of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase, biotin carboxyl carrier protein, and biotin carboxylase have been cloned from Bacillus subtilis. DNA sequencing and RNA blot hybridization studies indicated that the B. subtilis accB homolog which encodes biotin carboxyl carrier protein, is part of an operon that includes accC, the gene encoding the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase.

  13. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-κB activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-κB in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: ► Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. ► mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear genes associated with tumorigenesis. ► MMP-9 is up-regulated and

  14. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  15. Genuine genetic redundancy in maleylacetate-reductase-encoding genes involved in degradation of haloaromatic compounds by Cupriavidus necator JMP134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; Donoso, Raúl A; Sánchez, Miguel A; González, Bernardo

    2009-11-01

    Maleylacetate reductases (MAR) are required for biodegradation of several substituted aromatic compounds. To date, the functionality of two MAR-encoding genes (tfdF(I) and tfdF(II)) has been reported in Cupriavidus necator JMP134(pJP4), a known degrader of aromatic compounds. These two genes are located in tfd gene clusters involved in the turnover of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D) and 3-chlorobenzoate (3-CB). The C. necator JMP134 genome comprises at least three other genes that putatively encode MAR (tcpD, hqoD and hxqD), but confirmation of their functionality and their role in the catabolism of haloaromatic compounds has not been assessed. RT-PCR expression analyses of C. necator JMP134 cells exposed to 2,4-D, 3-CB, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) or 4-fluorobenzoate (4-FB) showed that tfdF(I) and tfdF(II) are induced by haloaromatics channelled to halocatechols as intermediates. In contrast, 2,4,6-TCP only induces tcpD, and any haloaromatic compounds tested did not induce hxqD and hqoD. However, the tcpD, hxqD and hqoD gene products showed MAR activity in cell extracts and provided the MAR function for 2,4-D catabolism when heterologously expressed in MAR-lacking strains. Growth tests for mutants of the five MAR-encoding genes in strain JMP134 showed that none of these genes is essential for degradation of the tested compounds. However, the role of tfdF(I)/tfdF(II) and tcpD genes in the expression of MAR activity during catabolism of 2,4-D and 2,4,6-TCP, respectively, was confirmed by enzyme activity tests in mutants. These results reveal a striking example of genetic redundancy in the degradation of aromatic compounds. PMID:19684066

  16. scratch, a pan-neural gene encoding a zinc finger protein related to snail, promotes neuronal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, M; Sturtevant, M A; Emery, J; Vaessin, H; Grell, E; Bier, E

    1995-10-01

    The Drosophila scratch (scrt) gene is expressed in most or all neuronal precursor cells and encodes a predicted zinc finger transcription factor closely related to the product of the mesoderm determination gene snail (sna). Adult flies homozygous for scrt null alleles have a reduced number of photoreceptors in the eye, and embryos lacking the function of both scrt and the pan-neural gene deadpan (dpn), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, exhibit a significant loss of neurons. Conversely, ectopic expression of a scrt transgene during embryonic and adult development leads to the production of supernumerary neurons. Consistent with scrt functioning as a transcription factor, various genes are more broadly expressed than normal in scrt null mutants. Reciprocally, these same genes are expressed at reduced levels in response to ectopic scrt expression. We propose that scrt promotes neuronal cell fates by suppressing expression of genes promoting non-neuronal cell fates. We discuss the similarities between the roles of the ancestrally related scrt, sna, and escargot (esc) genes in regulating cell fate choices. PMID:7557390

  17. Genes encoding the alpha, gamma, delta, and four F0 subunits of ATP synthase constitute an operon in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    OpenAIRE

    McCarn, D F; R A Whitaker; Alam, J; Vrba, J M; Curtis, S E

    1988-01-01

    A cluster of genes encoding subunits of ATP synthase of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was cloned, and the nucleotide sequences of the genes were determined. This cluster, denoted atp1, consists of four F0 genes and three F1 genes encoding the subunits a (atpI), c (atpH), b' (atpG), b (atpF), delta (atpD), alpha (aptA), and gamma (atpC) in that order. Closely linked upstream of the ATP synthase subunit genes is an open reading frame denoted gene 1, which is equivalent to the uncI gene of Escher...

  18. Escherichia coli rpiA gene encoding ribose phosphate isomerase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Maigaard, Marianne

    1993-01-01

    was sequenced and shown to harbor an open reading frame of 219 codons, sufficient to encode a polypeptide with an Mr of 22,845. The synthesis of the rpiA-encoded polypeptide was detected by analysis of minicells, which established the subunit Mr as 27,000. The assignment of the correct reading frame...

  19. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  20. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Schaller, Kastli D.; Apel, William A.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Reed, David W.

    2011-04-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  1. Nucleotide sequence of the genes encoding the canine herpesvirus gB, gC and gD homologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbach, K J; Limbach, M P; Conte, D; Paoletti, E

    1994-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes encoding the canine herpesvirus (CHV) gB, gC and gD homologues was determined. These genes are predicted to encode polypeptides of 879, 459 and 345 amino acids, respectively. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences of CHV gB, gC and gD with the homologous sequences from other herpesviruses indicates that CHV is an alphaherpesvirus, a conclusion that is consistent with the previous classification of this virus according to biological properties. Alignment of the homologous gB, gC and gD amino acid sequences indicates that most of the cysteine residues are conserved, suggesting that these glycoproteins possess similar tertiary structures. The nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame downstream from the CHV gC gene was also determined. The predicted amino acid sequence of this putative polypeptide appears to be homologous to a family of proteins encoded downstream from the gC gene in most, although not all, alphaherpesviruses. PMID:7545942

  2. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Cloning and expression of a novel, moderately thermostable xylanase-encoding gene (Cflxyn11A) from Cellulomonas flavigena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Delgado, Lorena; Mejía-Castillo, Teresa; Santiago-Hernández, Alejandro; Vega-Estrada, Jesús; Amelia, Farrés-G-S; Xoconostle-Cázares, Beatriz; Ruiz-Medrano, Roberto; Montes-Horcasitas, María Del Carmen; Hidalgo-Lara, María Eugenia

    2010-07-01

    The Cfl xyn11A gene, encoding the endo-1,4-beta-xylanase Cfl Xyn11A from Cellulomonas flavigena, was isolated from a genomic DNA library. The open reading frame of the Cfl xyn11A gene was 999 base pairs long and encoded a polypeptide (Cfl Xyn11A) of 332 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 35,110Da. The Cfl xyn11A gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant enzyme, with an estimated molecular weight of 31kDa was purified and xylanase activity was measured. Cfl Xyn11A showed optimal activity at pH 6.5 and 55 degrees C. The enzyme demonstrated moderate thermal stability as Cfl Xyn11A maintained 50% of its activity when incubated at 55 degrees C for 1h or at 45 degrees C for 6h. This is the first report describing the cloning, expression and functional characterization of an endo-1,4-beta-xylanase-encoding gene from C. flavigena. Cfl Xyn11A may be suitable for industrial applications in the food and feed industries, or in the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass required to improve the yields of fermentable sugars for bioethanol production. PMID:20231092

  4. Prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes in Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from patients of intensive care units (ICU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Marzieh; Mozaffari Nejad, Amir Sasan; Bahador, Abas; Jafari, Rasool; Alikhani, Mohammad Yousef

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ESBL and MBL encoding genes among A. baumannii isolates. In this cross sectional study, 100 A. baumannii strains were isolated from ICU wards of 3 educational hospitals of Hamadan City, Iran in 2011. Phenotypic identification of the production of ESBLs and MBLs has been carried out by using E-test and DDST methods, respectively. PCR technique was used for amplification of the ESBL and MBL encoding genes, namely: CTX-M, SHV, TEM, OXA-51, VIM-Family, IMP-Family, SPM-1, SIM-1, and GIM-1. Eighty seven (87%), 95 (95%), 98 (98%) and 95 (95%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates were resistant to imipenem, meropenem, ceftazidime and cefotaxime, respectively. Also, 99% and 7% of the isolates were MBLs and ESBLs produced phenotypically. Thirty (30%), 20 (20%) and 58 (58%) out of 100 A. baumannii isolates have been confirmed to harbor the bla VIM-family, TEM and SHV genes, respectively. Our results show no significant relationship between the detected gens with production of MBLs and ESBLs in spite of high prevalence of MBL encoding and drug resistant A. baumannii. Probably some other genes rather than what we studied are involved in phenotypic production of MBLs and ESBLs and subsequent drug resistance in Hamadan area, Iran. PMID:26150748

  5. The Retrovirus pol Gene Encodes a Product Required for DNA Integration: Identification of a Retrovirus int Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganiban, Antonito T.; Temin, Howard M.

    1984-12-01

    We mutagenized cloned spleen necrosis virus DNA to identify a region of the retrovirus genome encoding a polypeptide required for integration of viral DNA. Five plasmids bearing different lesions in the 3' end of the pol gene were examined for the ability to integrate or replicate following transfection of chicken embryo fibroblasts. Transfection with one of these DNAs resulted in the generation of mutant virus incapable of integrating but able to replicate at low levels; this phenotype is identical to that of mutants bearing alterations in the cis-acting region, att. To determine whether the 3' end of the pol gene encodes a protein that interacts with att, we did a complementation experiment. Cells were first infected with an att- virus and then superinfected with the integration-deficient virus containing a lesion in the pol gene and a wild-type att site. The results showed that the att- virus provided a trans-acting function allowing integration of viral DNA derived from the mutant bearing a wild-type att site. Thus, the 3' end of the pol gene serves as an ``int'' locus and encodes a protein mediating integration of retrovirus DNA through interaction with att.

  6. A negative element involved in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF11 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Lei [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The ORF11 of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a lytic viral gene with delayed-early expression kinetics. How the ORF11 gene expression is regulated in the KSHV lytic cascade is largely unknown. Here we report that the deletion of the KSHV viral IL-6 gene from the viral genome leads to deregulated ORF11 gene expression. The KSHV-encoded viral IL-6 protein was found not to be essentially involved in the regulation of ORF11, suggesting a potential transcriptional cis-regulation. A negative element was identified downstream of the ORF11 gene, which suppresses the ORF11 basal promoter activity in a position-independent manner.

  7. Magnaporthe oryzae MTP1 gene encodes a type Ⅲ transmembrane protein involved in conidiation and conidial germination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin LU; Jian-ping LU; Xiao-dong LI; Xiao-hong LIU; Hang MIN; Fu-cheng LIN

    2008-01-01

    In this study the MTP1 gene, encoding a type Ⅲ integral transmembrane protein, was isolated fi'om the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The Mtpl protein is 520 amino acids long and is comparable to the Ytpl protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 46% sequence similarity. Prediction programs and MTP1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion expression results indicate that Mtpl is a protein located at several membranes in the cytoplasm. The functions of the MTP1 gene in the growth and development of the fungus were studied using an MTP1 gene knockout mutant. The MTP1 gene was primarily ex-pressed at the hyphal and conidial stages and is necessary for conidiation and conidial germination, but is not required for patho-genicity. The △mtpl mutant grew more efficiently than the wild type strain on non-fermentable carbon sources, implying that the MTP1 gene has a unique role in respiratory growth and carbon source use.

  8. Determination of ploidy level and isolation of genes encoding acetyl-CoA carboxylase in Japanese Foxtail (Alopecurus japonicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongle Xu

    Full Text Available Ploidy level is important in biodiversity studies and in developing strategies for isolating important plant genes. Many herbicide-resistant weed species are polyploids, but our understanding of these polyploid weeds is limited. Japanese foxtail, a noxious agricultural grass weed, has evolved herbicide resistance. However, most studies on this weed have ignored the fact that there are multiple copies of target genes. This may complicate the study of resistance mechanisms. Japanese foxtail was found to be a tetraploid by flow cytometer and chromosome counting, two commonly used methods in the determination of ploidy levels. We found that there are two copies of the gene encoding plastidic acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase in Japanese foxtail and all the homologous genes are expressed. Additionally, no difference in ploidy levels or ACCase gene copy numbers was observed between an ACCase-inhibiting herbicide-resistant and a herbicide-sensitive population in this study.

  9. Construction and expression of retroviruses encoding dual drug resistance genes in human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A series of retroviral vectors encoding human mdr1 gene alone as well as in combination with either human mgmt gene or human mutant Ser31-dhfr gene are engineered. The resultant retroviruses are used to transduce human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells. It has been shown that expression of dual drug resistance genes in transduced cells confers a broad range of resistance to both kinds of corresponding drugs. These data suggest a rationale for the use of such double chemoresistance gene constructs in an in vivo model in which transduced hematopoietic cells will acquire multiple protection against the cytotoxic side effects of combination chemotherapy and may have future application in chemoprotection of normal tissues, thus killing tumor cells more effectively.

  10. Regulation of the pT181 encoded tetracycline resistance gene in Straphylococcus aureus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    pT181 is a naturally-occurring 4437 basepair (bp) plasmid isolated from Staphylococcus aureus which encodes inducible resistance to tetracycline (Tc). The DNA sequence data has identified three open reading frames (ORFs). The largest ORF B, has been found to be responsible for the Tc resistance phenotype of pT181. Since most Tc resistance systems appear to be regulated by an effector protein and a repressor protein, several Bal 31 deletion mutants of pT181 were constructed and analyzed in an effort to identify the elements involved in Tc resistance. Two transcomplementing groups of mutants were identified within the tet gene. The mechanism of Tc resistance was studied by assaying the accumulation of [7-3H] Tc by Tc sensitive cells, and uninduced and induced pT181-containing cells. A sharp decrease in accumulation of the drug after an initial increase was observed in Tc induced pT181-containing cells. In vivo labeling of Bacillus subtilis minicells containing pT181 was performed with 35S-methionine to identify the polypeptide product of the tet gene. A Tc-inducible protein having a molecular weight of approximately 50,000 daltons was detected only in B. subtilis minicells carrying pT181. Cell fractionation studies of S. aureus cells with and without pT181 showed that an approximately 28,000 daltons Tc-inducible protein was present in membranes of pT181 containing cells. The amount of TET protein in Tc induced minicells was about fifteen-fold higher than that in uninduced minicells. RNA prepared from stationary phase cells analyzed by Northern blot hybridization showed that the steady-state level of the tet mRNA in induced pT181-containing cells was bout four-fold higher than that in uninduced pT181-containing cells. When RNA synthesis was blocked with rifampicin, tet mRAN was found to be much more stable in Tc induced cells as compared to that in uninduced cells over a 30 min period

  11. Identification and Partial Sequence of a PLD -like Gene Encoding for Phospholipase D in Peanut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Preharvest aflatoxin contamination has been identified by thepeanut industry as the most serious challenge facing the industry worldwide. Drought stress is the most important environmental factor exacerbat ing Aspergillus inection and aflatoxin contamination in peanut. Development of resistant peanut cultivars would represent a major advance for the U.S. Peanut industry. In this study, we identify a novel PLD - like gene, encoding a putative phospholipase D, a main enzyme responsible for the drought - induced degradation of membrane phospholipids in plants. This cloned PLDI fragment has 1069 bp nucleic acids and the deduced amino acid sequence shows high identity with known PLD genes, having similar conserved features, such as two HXKXXXXD motifs. Further study is needed to genetically and physiologically characterize the PLD in peanut and to gain a better understanding of its function and relationship with drought - tolerance.%花生工业界认为收获前花生黄曲霉毒素的污染是全世界花生工业界面临的最严峻的挑战.干旱胁迫是加重花生黄曲霉真菌侵染和毒素污染最重要的环境因素.选育花生抗性品种将使美国花生工业处于优势地位.在这一研究报告中,我们鉴定出了一个新的类PLD基因,它编码磷脂酶D.在植物体中,这个酶是负责干旱诱导降解细胞膜磷脂的主要酶.克隆的PLDI片段有1069个核甘酸对长.推导的氨基酸序列与已知的PLD基因有很高的同一性,包括相似的保守序列特征,比如两个HXKXXXXD基元.对花生PLD基因特性需要从遗传和生理上作进一步研究,以便更好地理解这个基因的功能及其与花生耐干旱性的关系.

  12. Composition and expression of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes in the straw-degrading mushroom Volvariella volvacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingzhi Chen

    Full Text Available Volvariella volvacea is one of a few commercial cultivated mushrooms mainly using straw as carbon source. In this study, the genome of V. volcacea was sequenced and assembled. A total of 285 genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes in V. volvacea were identified and annotated. Among 15 fungi with sequenced genomes, V. volvacea ranks seventh in the number of genes encoding CAZymes. In addition, the composition of glycoside hydrolases in V. volcacea is dramatically different from other basidiomycetes: it is particularly rich in members of the glycoside hydrolase families GH10 (hemicellulose degradation and GH43 (hemicellulose and pectin degradation, and the lyase families PL1, PL3 and PL4 (pectin degradation but lacks families GH5b, GH11, GH26, GH62, GH93, GH115, GH105, GH9, GH53, GH32, GH74 and CE12. Analysis of genome-wide gene expression profiles of 3 strains using 3'-tag digital gene expression (DGE reveals that 239 CAZyme genes were expressed even in potato destrose broth medium. Our data also showed that the formation of a heterokaryotic strain could dramatically increase the expression of a number of genes which were poorly expressed in its parental homokaryotic strains.

  13. Cloning and characterization of SmZF1, a gene encoding a Schistosoma mansoni zinc finger protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Paulo R Eleutério de

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The zinc finger motifs (Cys2His2 are found in several proteins playing a role in the regulation of transcripton. SmZF1, a Schistosoma mansoni gene encoding a zinc finger protein was initially isolated from an adult worm cDNA library, as a partial cDNA. The full sequence of the gene was obtained by subcloning and sequencing cDNA and genomic fragments. The collated gene sequence is 2181 nt and the complete cDNA sequence is 705 bp containing the full open reading frame of the gene. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of three introns interrupting the coding region. The open reading frame theoretically encodes a protein of 164 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 18,667Da. The predicted protein contains three zinc finger motifs, usually present in transcription regulatory proteins. PCR amplification with specific primers for the gene allowed for the detection of the target in egg, cercariae, schistosomulum and adult worm cDNA libraries indicating the expression of the mRNA in these life cycle stages of S. mansoni. This pattern of expression suggests the gene plays a role in vital functions of different life cycle stages of the parasite. Future research will be directed to elucidate the functional role of SmZF1.

  14. ICGA-PSO-ELM approach for accurate multiclass cancer classification resulting in reduced gene sets in which genes encoding secreted proteins are highly represented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, Saras; Sundaram, Suresh; Sundararajan, Narasimhan; Zimmermann, Michael; Nilsen-Hamilton, Marit

    2011-01-01

    A combination of Integer-Coded Genetic Algorithm (ICGA) and Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), coupled with the neural-network-based Extreme Learning Machine (ELM), is used for gene selection and cancer classification. ICGA is used with PSO-ELM to select an optimal set of genes, which is then used to build a classifier to develop an algorithm (ICGA_PSO_ELM) that can handle sparse data and sample imbalance. We evaluate the performance of ICGA-PSO-ELM and compare our results with existing methods in the literature. An investigation into the functions of the selected genes, using a systems biology approach, revealed that many of the identified genes are involved in cell signaling and proliferation. An analysis of these gene sets shows a larger representation of genes that encode secreted proteins than found in randomly selected gene sets. Secreted proteins constitute a major means by which cells interact with their surroundings. Mounting biological evidence has identified the tumor microenvironment as a critical factor that determines tumor survival and growth. Thus, the genes identified by this study that encode secreted proteins might provide important insights to the nature of the critical biological features in the microenvironment of each tumor type that allow these cells to thrive and proliferate. PMID:21233525

  15. Global gene expression during stringent response in Corynebacterium glutamicum in presence and absence of the rel gene encoding (pppGpp synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinowski Jörn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The stringent response is the initial reaction of microorganisms to nutritional stress. During stringent response the small nucleotides (pppGpp act as global regulators and reprogram bacterial transcription. In this work, the genetic network controlled by the stringent response was characterized in the amino acid-producing Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results The transcriptome of a C. glutamicum rel gene deletion mutant, unable to synthesize (pppGpp and to induce the stringent response, was compared with that of its rel-proficient parent strain by microarray analysis. A total of 357 genes were found to be transcribed differentially in the rel-deficient mutant strain. In a second experiment, the stringent response was induced by addition of DL-serine hydroxamate (SHX in early exponential growth phase. The time point of the maximal effect on transcription was determined by real-time RT-PCR using the histidine and serine biosynthetic genes. Transcription of all of these genes reached a maximum at 10 minutes after SHX addition. Microarray experiments were performed comparing the transcriptomes of SHX-induced cultures of the rel-proficient strain and the rel mutant. The differentially expressed genes were grouped into three classes. Class A comprises genes which are differentially regulated only in the presence of an intact rel gene. This class includes the non-essential sigma factor gene sigB which was upregulated and a large number of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism which were downregulated. Class B comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX in both strains, independent of the rel gene. A large number of genes encoding ribosomal proteins fall into this class, all being downregulated. Class C comprises genes which were differentially regulated in response to SHX only in the rel mutant. This class includes genes encoding putative stress proteins and global transcriptional regulators that might be

  16. Structural and transcriptional analysis of plant genes encoding the bifunctional lysine ketoglutarate reductase saccharopine dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    The analysis of a wheat lysine ketoglutarate reductase – saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH) gene and comparative structural and functional analyses among available plant genes provides new information on this important gene. Both the structure of the LKR/SDH gene and the immediately adjacent genes...

  17. Characterization of two dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin-encoding gene ninaE in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Amitavo; Chinchore, Yashodhan; Kinser, Ronald; Dolph, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In this study we investigated the biochemical and cell biologic characteristics of flies expressing two novel dominant alleles of the major rhodopsin encoding gene neither inactivation nor afterpotential E (ninaE) in a heterozygous background. Methods Presence of the deep pseudopupil in flies was assayed 5 days post eclosion. For structural analysis, 1-μm-retinal cross sections were obtained from fixed and resin-embedded Drosophila heads. Confocal microscopy was performed on dissected...

  18. Evidence against the structural gene encoding type II collagen (COL2A1) as the mutant locus in achondroplasia.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, D.; Wordsworth, P; Thompson, E.; Sykes, B

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the locus encoding the major cartilage collagen gene (COL2A1) was studied in a total of 19 cases of achondroplasia. No gross rearrangements were seen. The segregation of COL2A1 was examined in three affected kindreds using restriction site and length variants as genetic markers. In two kindreds discordant segregation between the achondroplasia and COL2A1 loci was demonstrated. Paternity/maternity was confirmed using a 'minisatellite' core sequence probe which reveals cross hy...

  19. Molecular and Functional Analyses of the metC Gene of Lactococcus lactis, Encoding Cystathionine β-Lyase

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, María; Doesburg, Wim van; Rutten, Ger A.M.; Marugg, Joey D.; Alting, Arno C.; van Kranenburg, Richard; Oscar P. Kuipers

    2000-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of amino acids in cheese is believed to generate aroma compounds and therefore to be essential for flavor development. Cystathionine β-lyase (CBL) can convert cystathionine to homocysteine but is also able to catalyze an α,γ elimination. With methionine as a substrate, it produces volatile sulfur compounds which are important for flavor formation in Gouda cheese. The metC gene, which encodes CBL, was cloned from the Lactococcus lactis model strain MG1363 and from str...

  20. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: the DAMAGE study

    OpenAIRE

    Reiling, Erwin; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; van't Riet, Esther; van Haeften, Timon W; Arp, Pascal A; Hansen, Torben; Kremer, Dennis; Groenewoud, Marlous J.; van Hove, Els C.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Jan W. A.; Nijpels, Giel; Heine, Robert J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Pedersen, Oluf

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using a two-stage design. In the first stage, we analyzed 62 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Hoorn study (n=999 participants) covering all common variation in 13...

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Escherichia coli S51, a Chicken Isolate Harboring a Chromosomally Encoded mcr-1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Tasara, Taurai; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice; Stephan, Roger

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of Escherichia coli S51, a colistin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing strain isolated in 2015 from raw chicken meat imported from Germany. Assembly and annotation of this draft genome resulted in a 4,994,918-bp chromosome and revealed a chromosomally encoded mcr-1 gene responsible for the colistin resistance of the strain. PMID:27491979

  2. Regulation by Blue Light of the fluffy Gene Encoding a Major Regulator of Conidiation in Neurospora crassa

    OpenAIRE

    Olmedo, María; Ruger-Herreros, Carmen; Corrochano, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of asexual spores, that is, the process of conidiation, in the fungus Neurospora crassa is increased by light. The fluffy (fl) gene, encoding a major regulator of conidiation, is activated by light. We describe here a detailed characterization of the regulation by blue light of fl in vegetative hyphae. This induction requires the white collar complex (WCC) while the FLD protein acts as a dark repressor of fl transcription. We show that the WCC directly regulates fl transcripti...

  3. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Royah Vaezi; Napier, Johnathan A.; Olga Sayanova

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4) from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of...

  4. Molecular cloning and expression of gene fragments from corynebacteriophage beta encoding enzymatically active peptides of diphtheria toxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Tweten, R K; Collier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two restriction fragments from corynebacteriophage beta vir tox+ that encode peptides similar to diphtheria toxin fragment A and the chain termination fragment, CRM45, have been cloned into Escherichia coli in plasmid pBR322. Clones containing the recombinant plasmids produced gene products that were active in catalyzing the ADP ribosylation of elongation factor 2 and were reactive with diphtheria toxin antiserum. Toxin-related peptides were found primarily in the periplasmic compartment and ...

  5. Temporal Expression of the Bacillus subtilis secA Gene, Encoding a Central Component of the Preprotein Translocase

    OpenAIRE

    Herbort, Markus; Klein, Michael; Manting, Erik H.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Freudl, Roland

    1999-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the secretion of extracellular proteins strongly increases upon transition from exponential growth to the stationary growth phase. It is not known whether the amounts of some or all components of the protein translocation apparatus are concomitantly increased in relation to the increased export activity. In this study, we analyzed the transcriptional organization and temporal expression of the secA gene, encoding a central component of the B. subtilis preprotein transloc...

  6. Cloning and characterization of a gene (msdA) encoding methylmalonic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase from Streptomyces coelicolor.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Y. X.; Tang, L.; Hutchinson, C R

    1996-01-01

    A homolog of the mmsA gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which encodes methylmalonic acid semialdehyde dehydrogenase (MSDH) and is involved in valine catabolism in pseudomonads and mammals, was cloned and sequenced from Streptomyces coelicolor. Of the two open reading frames (ORFs) found, which are convergently transcribed and separated by a 62-nucleotide noncoding region, the deduced amino acid sequence of the msdA ORF (homologous to mmsA) is similar to a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic a...

  7. Association of variation in the LAMA3 gene, encoding the alpha-chain of laminin 5, with atopic dermatitis in a German case-control cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Stemmler, Susanne; Parwez, Qumar; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Epplen, Jörg T; Hoffjan, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder caused by complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Besides mutations in the filaggrin gene, leading to impaired skin barrier function, variation in genes encoding additional skin proteins has been suggested to contribute to disease risk. Laminin 5, playing an important role in skin integrity, is composed of three subunits encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 genes in which biallelic mutations cause epi...

  8. Two Sets of Paralogous Genes Encode the Enzymes Involved in the Early Stages of Clavulanic Acid and Clavam Metabolite Biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus

    OpenAIRE

    Tahlan, Kapil; Park, Hyeon Ung; Wong, Annie; Beatty, Perrin H.; Jensen, Susan E.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a second copy of a gene encoding proclavaminate amidinohydrolase (pah1), an enzyme involved in the early stages of clavulanic acid and clavam metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces clavuligerus, was identified and isolated. Using Southern analysis, we have now isolated second copies of the genes encoding the carboxyethylarginine synthase (ceaS) and β-lactam synthetase (bls) enzymes. These new paralogues are given the gene designations ceaS1 and bls1 and are located immediately upst...

  9. Xylose-metabolizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressing the TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes transketolase and transaldolase.

    OpenAIRE

    Walfridsson, M; Hallborn, J; Penttilä, M.; Keränen, S; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was metabolically engineered for xylose utilization. The Pichia stipitis CBS 6054 genes XYL1 and XYL2 encoding xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase were cloned into S. cerevisiae. The gene products catalyze the two initial steps in xylose utilization which S. cerevisiae lacks. In order to increase the flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, the S. cerevisiae TKL1 and TAL1 genes encoding transketolase and transaldolase were overexpressed. A XYL1- and XYL2-con...

  10. PABPN1 overexpression leads to upregulation of genes encoding nuclear proteins that are sequestered in oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy nuclear inclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil-Girard, Louis-Philippe; Klein, Arnaud F; Sasseville, A Marie-Josée; Lavoie, Hugo; Dicaire, Marie-Josée; Saint-Denis, Anik; Pagé, Martin; Duranceau, André; Codère, François; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Karpati, George; Rouleau, Guy A; Massie, Bernard; Langelier, Yves; Brais, Bernard

    2005-04-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disease caused by expanded (GCN)12-17 stretches encoding the N-terminal polyalanine domain of the poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (PABPN1). OPMD is characterized by intranuclear inclusions (INIs) in skeletal muscle fibers, which contain PABPN1, molecular chaperones, ubiquitin, proteasome subunits, and poly(A)-mRNA. We describe an adenoviral model of PABPN1 expression that produces INIs in most cells. Microarray analysis revealed that PABPN1 overexpression reproducibly changed the expression of 202 genes. Sixty percent of upregulated genes encode nuclear proteins, including many RNA and DNA binding proteins. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that all tested nuclear proteins encoded by eight upregulated genes colocalize with PABPN1 within the INIs: CUGBP1, SFRS3, FKBP1A, HMG2, HNRPA1, PRC1, S100P, and HSP70. In addition, CUGBP1, SFRS3, and FKBP1A were also found in OPMD muscle INIs. This study demonstrates that a large number of nuclear proteins are sequestered in OPMD INIs, which may compromise cellular function. PMID:15755682

  11. Magnaporthe oryzae MTP1 gene encodes a type III transmembrane protein involved in conidiation and conidial germination*

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Qin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Li, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Min, Hang; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    In this study the MTP1 gene, encoding a type III integral transmembrane protein, was isolated from the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The Mtp1 protein is 520 amino acids long and is comparable to the Ytp1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with 46% sequence similarity. Prediction programs and MTP1-GFP (green fluorescent protein) fusion expression results indicate that Mtp1 is a protein located at several membranes in the cytoplasm. The functions of the MTP1 gene in the growth and deve...

  12. Identification of a cold shock transcriptional enhancer of the Escherichia coli gene encoding nucleoid protein H-NS.

    OpenAIRE

    La Teana, A; Brandi, A; M. Falconi; Spurio, R; Pon, C. L.; Gualerzi, C O

    1991-01-01

    The hns (27 min) gene encoding the 15.4-kDa nucleoid protein H-NS was shown to belong to the cold shock regulon of Escherichia coli, its expression being enhanced 3- to 4-fold during the growth lag that follows a shift from 37 degrees C to 10 degrees C. A 110-base-pair (bp) DNA fragment containing the promoter of hns fused to a promoterless cat gene (hns-cat fusion) conferred a similar cold shock response to the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) activity in vivo and in cou...

  13. Characterization and localization of Mox2, the gene encoding the murine homolog of the rat MRC OX-2 membrane glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, F; Tizard, R; Rue, E; Reeves, R

    1998-02-01

    MRC OX-2 is a rat type I membrane glycoprotein and a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily that has recently been shown to be able to costimulate murine T cell proliferation (Borriello et al. J. Immunol, 158, 4548, 1997). We now report the genomic organization for the gene encoding the murine homolog of MRC OX-2 (Mox2). The gene is composed of 6 exons and 5 introns spanning a minimum of 13.7 kb. Exon 1 encodes the amino terminal four amino acids and is located in the center of a 500-bp CpG island, suggestive of the presence of a promoter. Analysis of the sequences immediately upstream of exon 1, however, do not reveal a TATA or CAAT box. We also demonstrate that in addition to the canonical transcript, composed of exons 1 through 6, this gene gives rise to an additional nonproductive transcript resulting from the absence of exon 2, which leads to a frameshift and premature translation termination. The ratio of these alternative transcripts is not regulated by mitogenic stimulation with ConA or LPS. The Mox2 gene maps to Chr 16, telomeric to the clustered T cell costimulatory molecules Cd80 and Cd86 (Reeves et al. Genomics in press). PMID:9457671

  14. Detection of sequence variants in the gene encoding the beta 3 chain of laminin 5 (LAMB3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, L; McGrath, J A; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1995-01-01

    Laminin 5, a candidate gene/protein system for mutations in the junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), consists of three polypeptides encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 genes. In this study, primer pairs for the amplification of the complete cDNA as well as 22 exons of the LAMB3 gene encoding the entire beta 3 chain of laminin 5, were established. The primers for amplification of individual exons from genomic DNA were placed at least 50 bp away from the exon-intron borders in the flanking intronic sequences. For amplification of cDNA generated by RT-PCR, eight primer pairs covering overlapping segments of mRNA were used. The amplified sequences were used to study sequence variations of the LAMB3 gene in patients with JEB and unrelated individuals using heteroduplex analysis. Nine out of 13 JEB patients examined showed heteroduplexes in at least one of the PCR products, indicating the existence of two variable alleles in their DNA. Sequence analyses revealed putative pathogenetic mutations in seven of the JEB patients, while four of the heteroduplexes resulted from polymorphisms, reflecting a single basepair substitution. The results demonstrate that this method is useful in the detection of JEB mutations, as well as polymorphisms in the LAMB3 gene. PMID:7550237

  15. Metabolic gene clusters encoding the enzymes of two branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérecová, Gabriela; Neboháčová, Martina; Zeman, Igor; Pryszcz, Leszek P; Tomáška, Ľubomír; Gabaldón, Toni; Nosek, Jozef

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans utilizes hydroxyderivatives of benzene via the catechol and hydroxyhydroquinone branches of the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The genetic basis and evolutionary origin of this catabolic pathway in yeasts are unknown. In this study, we identified C. albicans genes encoding the enzymes involved in the degradation of hydroxybenzenes. We found that the genes coding for core components of the 3-oxoadipate pathway are arranged into two metabolic gene clusters. Our results demonstrate that C. albicans cells cultivated in media containing hydroxybenzene substrates highly induce the transcription of these genes as well as the corresponding enzymatic activities. We also found that C. albicans cells assimilating hydroxybenzenes cope with the oxidative stress by upregulation of cellular antioxidant systems such as alternative oxidase and catalase. Moreover, we investigated the evolution of the enzymes encoded by these clusters and found that most of them share a particularly sparse phylogenetic distribution among Saccharomycotina, which is likely to have been caused by extensive gene loss. We exploited this fact to find co-evolving proteins that are suitable candidates for the missing enzymes of the pathway. PMID:25743787

  16. Molecular characterization and mapping of murine genes encoding three members of the stefin family of cysteine proteinase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, F.W.L.; Hingwo Tsui; Mok, S. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Toronto Hospital, Ontario (Canada)); Mlinaric, I.; Siminovitch, K.A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada) Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. (NCI-Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, MD (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Stefins or Type 1 cystatins belong to a large, evolutionarily conserved protein superfamily, the members of which inhibit the papain-like cysteine proteinases. The authors report here on the molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of three newly identified members of the murine stefin gene family. These genes, designated herein as mouse stefins 1, 2, and 3, were isolated on the basis of their relatively increased expression in moth-eaten viable compared to normal congenic mouse bone marrow cells. The open reading frames of the stefin cDNAs encode proteins of approximately 11.5 kDa that show between 50 and 92% identity to sequences of stefins isolated from various other species. Data from Southern analysis suggest that the murine stefin gene family encompasses at least 6 and possible 10-20 membranes, all of which appear to be clustered in the genome. Analysis of interspecific backcross mice indicates that the genes encoding the three mouse stefins all map to mouse chromosome 16, a localization that is consistent with the recent assignment of the human stefin A gene to a region of conserved homology between human chromosome 3q and the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  17. aes, the gene encoding the esterase B in Escherichia coli, is a powerful phylogenetic marker of the species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuffery Pierre

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have established a correlation between electrophoretic polymorphism of esterase B, and virulence and phylogeny of Escherichia coli. Strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 are more frequently implicated in extraintestinal infections and include esterase B2 variants, whereas phylogenetic groups A, B1 and D contain less virulent strains and include esterase B1 variants. We investigated esterase B as a marker of phylogeny and/or virulence, in a thorough analysis of the esterase B-encoding gene. Results We identified the gene encoding esterase B as the acetyl-esterase gene (aes using gene disruption. The analysis of aes nucleotide sequences in a panel of 78 reference strains, including the E. coli reference (ECOR strains, demonstrated that the gene is under purifying selection. The phylogenetic tree reconstructed from aes sequences showed a strong correlation with the species phylogenetic history, based on multi-locus sequence typing using six housekeeping genes. The unambiguous distinction between variants B1 and B2 by electrophoresis was consistent with Aes amino-acid sequence analysis and protein modelling, which showed that substituted amino acids in the two esterase B variants occurred mostly at different sites on the protein surface. Studies in an experimental mouse model of septicaemia using mutant strains did not reveal a direct link between aes and extraintestinal virulence. Moreover, we did not find any genes in the chromosomal region of aes to be associated with virulence. Conclusion Our findings suggest that aes does not play a direct role in the virulence of E. coli extraintestinal infection. However, this gene acts as a powerful marker of phylogeny, illustrating the extensive divergence of B2 phylogenetic group strains from the rest of the species.

  18. A lepidopteran-specific gene family encoding valine-rich midgut proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jothini Odman-Naresh

    Full Text Available Many lepidopteran larvae are serious agricultural pests due to their feeding activity. Digestion of the plant diet occurs mainly in the midgut and is facilitated by the peritrophic matrix (PM, an extracellular sac-like structure, which lines the midgut epithelium and creates different digestive compartments. The PM is attracting increasing attention to control lepidopteran pests by interfering with this vital function. To identify novel PM components and thus potential targets for insecticides, we performed an immunoscreening with anti-PM antibodies using an expression library representing the larval midgut transcriptome of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. We identified three cDNAs encoding valine-rich midgut proteins of M. sexta (MsVmps, which appear to be loosely associated with the PM. They are members of a lepidopteran-specific family of nine VMP genes, which are exclusively expressed in larval stages in M. sexta. Most of the MsVMP transcripts are detected in the posterior midgut, with the highest levels observed for MsVMP1. To obtain further insight into Vmp function, we expressed MsVMP1 in insect cells and purified the recombinant protein. Lectin staining and glycosidase treatment indicated that MsVmp1 is highly O-glycosylated. In line with results from qPCR, immunoblots revealed that MsVmp1 amounts are highest in feeding larvae, while MsVmp1 is undetectable in starving and molting larvae. Finally using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that MsVmp1 localizes to the cytosol of columnar cells, which secrete MsVmp1 into the ectoperitrophic space in feeding larvae. In starving and molting larvae, MsVmp1 is found in the gut lumen, suggesting that the PM has increased its permeability. The present study demonstrates that lepidopteran species including many agricultural pests have evolved a set of unique proteins that are not found in any other taxon and thus may reflect an important adaptation in the highly specialized lepidopteran

  19. Effect of long-term actual spaceflight on the expression of key genes encoding serotonin and dopamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Nina; Shenkman, Boris; Naumenko, Vladimir; Kulikov, Alexander; Kondaurova, Elena; Tsybko, Anton; Kulikova, Elisabeth; Krasnov, I. B.; Bazhenova, Ekaterina; Sinyakova, Nadezhda

    The effect of long-term spaceflight on the central nervous system represents important but yet undeveloped problem. The aim of our work was to study the effect of 30-days spaceflight of mice on Russian biosatellite BION-M1 on the expression in the brain regions of key genes of a) serotonin (5-HT) system (main enzymes in 5-HT metabolism - tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (TPH-2), monoamine oxydase A (MAO A), 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A and 5-HT3 receptors); b) pivotal enzymes in DA metabolism (tyrosine hydroxylase, COMT, MAO A, MAO B) and D1, D2 receptors. Decreased expression of genes encoding the 5-HT catabolism (MAO A) and 5-HT2A receptor in some brain regions was shown. There were no differences between “spaceflight” and control mice in the expression of TPH-2 and 5-HT1A, 5-HT3 receptor genes. Significant changes were found in genetic control of DA system. Long-term spaceflight decreased the expression of genes encoding the enzyme in DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase in s.nigra), DA metabolism (MAO B in the midbrain and COMT in the striatum), and D1 receptor in hypothalamus. These data suggested that 1) microgravity affected genetic control of 5-HT and especially the nigrostriatal DA system implicated in the central regulation of muscular tonus and movement, 2) the decrease in the expression of genes encoding key enzyme in DA synthesis, DA degradation and D1 receptor contributes to the movement impairment and dyskinesia produced by the spaceflight. The study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research grant № 14-04-00173.

  20. The Cryptic dsdA Gene Encodes a Functional D-Serine Dehydratase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqing; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2016-06-01

    D-Serine, an important neurotransmitter, also contributes to bacterial adaptation and virulence in humans. It was reported that Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 can grow on D-serine as the sole nitrogen source, and growth was severely reduced in the dadA mutant devoid of the D-alanine dehydrogenase with broad substrate specificity. In this study, the dsdA gene (PA3357) encoding a putative D-serine dehydratase was subjected to further characterization. Growth on D-serine as the sole source of nitrogen was retained in the ∆dsdA mutant and was abolished completely in the ∆dadA and ∆dadA-∆dsdA mutants. However, when complemented by dsdA on a plasmid, the double mutant was able to grow on D-serine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen, supporting the proposed biochemical function of DsdA in the conversion of D-serine into pyruvate and ammonia. Among D- and L-amino acids tested, only D-serine and D-threonine could serve as the substrates of DsdA, and the Km of DsdA with D-serine was calculated to be 330 μM. Comparative genomics revealed that this cryptic dsdA gene was highly conserved in strains of P. aeruginosa, and that most strains of Pseudomonas putida possess putative dsdCAX genes encoding a transcriptional regulator DsdC and a D-serine transporter DsdX as in enteric bacteria. In conclusion, this study supports the presence of a cryptic dsdA gene encoding a functional D-serine dehydratase in P. aeruginosa, and the absence of dsdA expression in response to exogenous D-serine might be due to the loss of regulatory elements for gene activation during evolution. PMID:26957519

  1. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRAVEL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator. In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  2. Plasmodium falciparum associated with severe childhood malaria preferentially expresses PfEMP1 encoded by group A var genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anja T R; Magistrado, Pamela; Sharp, Sarah;

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-encoded variant surface antigens (VSAs) like the var gene-encoded Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family are responsible for antigenic variation and infected red blood cell (RBC) cytoadhesion in P. falciparum malaria. Parasites causing severe malaria in......(SM) to identify PfEMP1 responsible for the VSA(SM) phenotype. Expression of VSA(SM) was accompanied by up-regulation of Group A var genes. The most prominently up-regulated Group A gene (PFD1235w/MAL7P1.1) was translated into a protein expressed on the infected RBC surface. The proteins encoded by Group...

  3. Cloning of genes encoding nonhost hypersensitive response-inducing elicitors from Phytophthora boehmeriae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHANG HaiFeng; ZHANG ZhengGuang; WANG YuanChao; ZHENG XiaoBo

    2007-01-01

    We have devised a high-throughput functional cloning method to isolate cDNAs from Phytophthora boehmeriae of which the products elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in tobacco. The cDNAs were cloned into a binary potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector and transformed into Agrobacterium tumefeciens (Mog101). 4100 colonies were individually toothpick-inoculated onto leaflets of Nicotiana benthamiana. 12 cDNAs were identified whose expression induced formation of a necrotic lesion around the inoculation site. 7 of these clones have different sequences. One of these clones PBC43 encodes specific elicitin. Clone PBC163 encodes a protein highly homologous to Rab; PBC241 encodes a prohibitin protein; PBN62 encodes a Heat Shock Protein 60 (HSP60). The other five cDNAs reveal no homology to known protein and are thus considered novel. These observations suggest that this functional screening method is a versatile strategy to identify cDNAs of pathogens that encode elicitors and other HR-inducing proteins.

  4. Functional analysis of the Phycomyces carRA gene encoding the enzymes phytoene synthase and lycopene cyclase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Sanz

    Full Text Available Phycomyces carRA gene encodes a protein with two domains. Domain R is characterized by red carR mutants that accumulate lycopene. Domain A is characterized by white carA mutants that do not accumulate significant amounts of carotenoids. The carRA-encoded protein was identified as the lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase enzyme by sequence homology with other proteins. However, no direct data showing the function of this protein have been reported so far. Different Mucor circinelloides mutants altered at the phytoene synthase, the lycopene cyclase or both activities were transformed with the Phycomyces carRA gene. Fully transcribed carRA mRNA molecules were detected by Northern assays in the transformants and the correct processing of the carRA messenger was verified by RT-PCR. These results showed that Phycomyces carRA gene was correctly expressed in Mucor. Carotenoids analysis in these transformants showed the presence of ß-carotene, absent in the untransformed strains, providing functional evidence that the Phycomyces carRA gene complements the M. circinelloides mutations. Co-transformation of the carRA cDNA in E. coli with different combinations of the carotenoid structural genes from Erwinia uredovora was also performed. Newly formed carotenoids were accumulated showing that the Phycomyces CarRA protein does contain lycopene cyclase and phytoene synthase activities. The heterologous expression of the carRA gene and the functional complementation of the mentioned activities are not very efficient in E. coli. However, the simultaneous presence of both carRA and carB gene products from Phycomyces increases the efficiency of these enzymes, presumably due to an interaction mechanism.

  5. Cloning and Expressing of a Gene Encoding Cytosolic Copper/Zinc Superoxide Dismutase in the Upland Cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Gen-hai; YU Shu-xun; FAN Shu-li; SONG Mei-zhen

    2007-01-01

    In this study, a gene encoding a superoxide dismutase (SOD) was cloned from senescent leaves of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), and its expressing profile was analyzed. The gene was cloned by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)method. Northern blotting was used to show the profile of the gene expression, and the enzyme activity was mensurated by NBT deoxidization method in different growth periods. The full length of a gene of cytosolic copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) was isolated from cotton (GenBank Accession Number: DQ445093). The sequence of cDNA contained 682 bp, the opening reading frame 456 bp, and encoded polypeptide 152 amino acids with the predicted molecular mass of 15.03 kD and theoretical pI of 6.09. The amino acid sequence was similar with the other plants from 82 to 87%. Southern blotting showed that the gene had different number of copies in different cotton species. Northern blotting suggested that the gene had different expression in different tissues and development stages. The enzyme activity was the highest in peak flowering stage. The cotton cytosolic (Cu/Zn-SOD) had lower copies in the upland cotton. The copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing level showed regular changing in the whole development stages; it was lower in the former stages, higher in latter stages and the highest at the peak flowering stage. The curve of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing level was consistent with that of the Cu/Zn-SOD enzyme activity.The copper/zinc superoxide dismutase mRNA expressing levels of different organs showed that the gene was higher in the root, leaf, and lower in the flower.

  6. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of a new gene of Schistosoma japonicum encoding casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭寨玉; 余新炳; 吴忠道; 徐劲; 吴德; 李孜

    2004-01-01

    Background Nowadays it is now a focus topic in schistosomiasis research to find ideal vaccine candidates and new drug targets for developing anti-schistosomiasis vaccine. We cloned a new gene, casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit, of Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) and express it in Escherichia coli (E.coli).Methods The ESTs obtained in our laboratory were analyzed by homologous searching, and a new gene was recognized. The full-length cDNA of the new gene was obtained by joining the 3'RACE PCR fragment and the EST clone. To express the new gene, the cDNA was cloned into pGEX-4T-1 vector and then transformed into E.coli JM109. The recombinant protein was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western-blot. Results A 908 bp cDNA was isolated from S. japonicum and identified to be casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit gene by sequence analysis. The open reading frame of the gene encodes a protein of 217 amino acids exhibiting 75.8%, 75.8%, 73.9%, 68.2%, 51.6% identity to the amino acids sequence of the corresponding genes of Homo sapiens (H. sapiens), Xenopus laevi (X. laevi), Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster), Caenorhabditis elegan (C. elegan), and Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. promber) respectively. The predicted molecular weight of the protein was 24.921 kDa. The new cDNA sequence had been submitted to GenBank, and its accession number is AY241391. This cDNA was subcloned into the pGEX-4T-1 vector and expressed in E.coli JM109.The recombinant protein could be recognized by the S. japonicum infected rabbit serum. Conclusion The full-length cDNA sequences encoding S. japonicum casein kinase Ⅱ beta subunit were firstly sequenced, cloned, and expressed in E.coli.

  7. Heterologous expression and product identification of Colletotrichum lagenarium polyketide synthase encoded by the PKS1 gene involved in melanin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, I; Mori, Y; Watanabe, A; Kubo, Y; Tsuji, G; Ebizuka, Y

    1999-08-01

    The Colletotrichum lagenarium PKS1 gene was expressed in the heterologous fungal host, Aspergillus oryzae, under the starch-inducible alpha-amylase promoter to identify the direct product of polyketide synthase (PKS) encoded by the PKS1 gene. The main compound produced by an A. oryzae transformant was isolated and characterized to be 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (T4HN) as its tetraacetate. Since the PKS1 gene was cloned from C. lagenarium to complement the nonmelanizing albino mutant, T4HN was assumed to be an initial biosynthetic intermediate, and thus the product of the PKS reaction, but had not been isolated from the fungus. The production of T4HN by the PKS1 transformant unambiguously identified the gene to encode a PKS of pentaketide T4HN. In addition, tetraketide orsellinic acid and pentaketide isocoumarin were isolated, the latter being derived from a pentaketide monocyclic carboxylic acid, as by-products of the PKS1 PKS reaction. Production of the pentaketide carboxylic acid provided insights into the mechanism for the PKS1 polyketide synthase reaction to form T4HN. PMID:10501004

  8. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, Peter K; Lange, Mette; Pilgaard, Bo; Lange, Lene

    2014-01-01

    The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls. PMID:25461894

  9. Several genes encoding enzymes with the same activity are necessary for aerobic fungal degradation of cellulose in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter K Busk

    Full Text Available The cellulose-degrading fungal enzymes are glycoside hydrolases of the GH families and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. The entanglement of glycoside hydrolase families and functions makes it difficult to predict the enzymatic activity of glycoside hydrolases based on their sequence. In the present study we further developed the method Peptide Pattern Recognition to an automatic approach not only to find all genes encoding glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in fungal genomes but also to predict the function of the genes. The functional annotation is an important feature as it provides a direct route to predict function from primary sequence. Furthermore, we used Peptide Pattern Recognition to compare the cellulose-degrading enzyme activities encoded by 39 fungal genomes. The results indicated that cellobiohydrolases and AA9 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases are hallmarks of cellulose-degrading fungi except brown rot fungi. Furthermore, a high number of AA9, endocellulase and β-glucosidase genes were identified, not in what are known to be the strongest, specialized lignocellulose degraders but in saprophytic fungi that can use a wide variety of substrates whereas only few of these genes were found in fungi that have a limited number of natural, lignocellulotic substrates. This correlation suggests that enzymes with different properties are necessary for degradation of cellulose in different complex substrates. Interestingly, clustering of the fungi based on their predicted enzymes indicated that Ascomycota and Basidiomycota use the same enzymatic activities to degrade plant cell walls.

  10. Antibiotic resistance and OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from burn wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaonan; Bao, Ying; Ma, Ruihua; Zhou, Yufa; Li, Xinxian; Chai, Tongjie; Cai, Yumei

    2014-03-01

    The study was conducted to investigate drug resistance, OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and genetic diversity in airborne Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) in burn wards. Airborne A. baumannii were collected in burn wards and their corridors using Andersen 6-stage air sampler from January to June 2011. The isolates susceptibility to 13 commonly used antibiotics was examined according to the CLSI guidelines; OXA-type carbapenemases-encoding genes and molecular diversity of isolates were analyzed, respectively. A total of 16 non-repetitive A. baumannii were isolated, with 10 strains having a resistance rate of greater than 50% against the 13 antibiotics. The resistance rate against ceftriaxone, cyclophosvnamide, ciprofloxacin, and imipenem was 93.75% (15/16), but no isolate observed to be resistant to cefoperazone/sulbactam. Resistance gene analyses showed that all 16 isolates carried OXA-51, and 15 isolates carried OXA-23 except No.15; but OXA-24 and OXA-58 resistance genes not detected. The isolates were classified into 13 genotypes (A-M) according to repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (REP-PCR) results and only six isolates had a homology ≥90%. In conclusion, airborne A. baumannii in the burn wards had multidrug resistance and complex molecular diversity, and OXA-23 and OXA-51 were dominant mechanisms for resisting carbapenems. PMID:23886986

  11. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alene Kast

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl, Pichia acaciae (Pa and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr are extremely A/T-rich (>75% and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5 results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle.

  12. Autoselection of cytoplasmic yeast virus like elements encoding toxin/antitoxin systems involves a nuclear barrier for immunity gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Voges, Raphael; Schroth, Michael; Schaffrath, Raffael; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-05-01

    Cytoplasmic virus like elements (VLEs) from Kluyveromyces lactis (Kl), Pichia acaciae (Pa) and Debaryomyces robertsiae (Dr) are extremely A/T-rich (>75%) and encode toxic anticodon nucleases (ACNases) along with specific immunity proteins. Here we show that nuclear, not cytoplasmic expression of either immunity gene (PaORF4, KlORF3 or DrORF5) results in transcript fragmentation and is insufficient to establish immunity to the cognate ACNase. Since rapid amplification of 3' ends (RACE) as well as linker ligation of immunity transcripts expressed in the nucleus revealed polyadenylation to occur along with fragmentation, ORF-internal poly(A) site cleavage due to the high A/T content is likely to prevent functional expression of the immunity genes. Consistently, lowering the A/T content of PaORF4 to 55% and KlORF3 to 46% by gene synthesis entirely prevented transcript cleavage and permitted functional nuclear expression leading to full immunity against the respective ACNase toxin. Consistent with a specific adaptation of the immunity proteins to the cognate ACNases, cross-immunity to non-cognate ACNases is neither conferred by PaOrf4 nor KlOrf3. Thus, the high A/T content of cytoplasmic VLEs minimizes the potential of functional nuclear recruitment of VLE encoded genes, in particular those involved in autoselection of the VLEs via a toxin/antitoxin principle. PMID:25973601

  13. Expression profile of a Laccase2 encoding gene during the metamorphic molt in Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera,Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moysés Elias-Neto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Expression profile of a Laccase2 encoding gene during the metamorphic molt in Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Metamorphosis in holometabolous insects occurs through two subsequent molting cycles: pupation (metamorphic molt and adult differentiation (imaginal molt. The imaginal molt in Apis mellifera L. was recently investigated in both histological and physiological-molecular approaches. Although the metamorphic molt in this model bee is extremely important to development, it is not well-known yet. In the current study we used this stage as an ontogenetic scenario to investigate the transcriptional profile of the gene Amlac2, which encodes a laccase with an essential role in cuticle differentiation. Amlac2 expression in epidermis was contrasted with the hemolymph titer of ecdysteroid hormones and with the most evident morphological events occurring during cuticle renewal. RT-PCR semiquantitative analyses using integument samples revealed increased levels of Amlac2 transcripts right after apolysis and during the subsequent pharate period, and declining levels near pupal ecdysis. Compared with the expression of a cuticle protein gene, AmelCPR14, these results highlighted the importance of the ecdysteroid-induced apolysis as an ontogenetic marker of gene reactivation in epidermis for cuticle renewal. The obtained results strengthen the comprehension of metamorphosis in Apis mellifera. In addition, we reviewed the literature about the development of A. mellifera, and emphasize the importance of revising the terminology used to describe honey bee molting cycles.

  14. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  15. Fasciola hepatica mucin-encoding gene: expression, variability and its potential relevance in host-parasite relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancela, Martín; Santos, Guilherme B; Carmona, Carlos; Ferreira, Henrique B; Tort, José Francisco; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2015-12-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a zoonosis with significant impact both in human and animal health. Understanding the basic processes of parasite biology, especially those related to interactions with its host, will contribute to control F. hepatica infections and hence liver pathology. Mucins have been described as important mediators for parasite establishment within its host, due to their key roles in immune evasion. In F. hepatica, mucin expression is upregulated in the mammalian invasive newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage in comparison with the adult stage. Here, we performed sequencing of mucin cDNAs prepared from NEJ RNA, resulting in six different cDNAs clusters. The differences are due to the presence of a tandem repeated sequence of 66 bp encoded by different exons. Two groups of apomucins one with three and the other with four repeats, with 459 and 393 bp respectively, were identified. These cDNAs have open reading frames encoding Ser-Thr enriched proteins with an N-terminal signal peptide, characteristic of apomucin backbone. We cloned a 4470 bp gene comprising eight exons and seven introns that encodes all the cDNA variants identified in NEJs. By real time polymerase chain reaction and high-resolution melting approaches of individual flukes we infer that fhemuc-1 is a single-copy gene, with at least two different alleles. Our data suggest that both gene polymorphism and alternative splicing might account for apomucin variability in the fhemuc-1 gene that is upregulated in NEJ invasive stage. The relevance of this variation in host-parasite interplay is discussed. PMID:26440911

  16. Contrasting patterns of selective constraints in nuclear encoded genes of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway in holometabolous insects and their possible role in hybrid breakdown in Nasonia

    OpenAIRE

    Gibson, Joshua D.; Niehuis, Oliver; Verrelli, Brian C.; Gadau, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The principal energy generating system in animals is the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway, which depends on the tight interaction of nuclear and mitochondrial encoded genes to function properly. Mitochondrial genes accumulate substitutions more quickly than nuclear genes, yet the impact of selection on mitochondrial genes is significantly reduced relative to nuclear genes due to the non-recombining nature of the mitochondrial genome and its predicted smaller effective population siz...

  17. Cloning and Characterization of a Salt Tolerance-Associated Gene Encoding Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase in Sweetpotato

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Tao; ZHAI Hong; WANG Fei-bing; ZHOU Hua-nan; SI Zeng-zhi; HE Shao-zhen; LIU Qing-chang

    2014-01-01

    Trehalose plays an important role in metabolic regulation and abiotic stress tolerance in a variety of organisms. In plants, its biosynthesis is catalyzed by two key enzymes:trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS) and trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP). In the present study, a TPS gene, named IbTPS, was ifrst isolated from sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) cv. Lushu 3 by rapid ampliifcation of cDNA ends (RACE). The open reading frame (ORF) contained 2 580 nucleotides encoding 859 amino acids with a molecular weight of 97.433 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 5.7. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high identities with TPS of other plants. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of IbTPS gene was signiifcantly higher in stems of Lushu 3 than in its leaves and roots. Subcellular localization analysis in onion epidermal cells indicated that IbTPS gene was located in the nucleus. Transgenic tobacco (cv. Wisconsin 38) plants over-expressing IbTPS gene exhibited signiifcantly higher salt tolerance compared with the control plant. Trehalose and proline content was found to be signiifcantly more accumulated in transgenic tobacco plants than in the wild-type and several stress tolerance related genes were up-regulated. These results suggest that IbTPS gene may enhance salt tolerance of plants by increasing the amount of treahalose and proline and regulating the expression of stress tolerance related genes.

  18. Interferon-induced transcription of a gene encoding a 15-kDA protein depends on an upstream enhancer element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human gene encoding an interferon-induced 15-kDa protein has been isolated from a genomic library. The gene appears to be single-copy and is composed of two exons, the first of which contains the ATG translation initiation codon. In vitro nuclear run-on assays showed that the transcription rate of the gene is stimulated after interferon treatment. To analyze transcriptional regulatory sequences, the authors constructed recombinant plasmids for use in transient transfection assays of HeLa cells. Constructs containing 115 nucleotides 5' to the transcription initiation site were found to be fully inducible by interferon. Assays of deletion mutants identified a critical element for interferon induction located between -115 and -96, just upstream of the CCAAT box. Moreover, a DNA fragment including this region can confer interferon inducibility on a heterologous promoter (thymidine kinase) when cloned in either orientation upstream of the gene or downstream of the gene. These are properties characteristic of an enhancer element that is active only after treatment with interferon. This regulatory sequence may be shared by a group of interferon-induced genes, since a very similar sequence is present within the functional region near the RNA start site of another interferon-induced gene

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LysR PA4203 regulator NmoR acts as a repressor of the PA4202 nmoA gene, encoding a nitronate monooxygenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercammen, Ken; Wei, Qing; Charlier, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    The PA4203 gene encodes a LysR regulator and lies between the ppgL gene (PA4204), which encodes a periplasmic gluconolactonase, and, in the opposite orientation, the PA4202 (nmoA) gene, coding for a nitronate monooxygenase, and ddlA (PA4201), encoding a d-alanine alanine ligase. The intergenic re...

  20. Recombinant expression of rt-PA gene (encoding Reteplase) in gametophytes of the seaweed Laminaria japonica (Laminariales,Phaeophyta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The life cycle of seaweed Laminaria japonica involves a generation alternation between diploid sporophyte and haploid gametophte. The expression of foreign genes in sporophte has been proved. In this research, the recombinant expression in gametophyte was investigated by particle bombardment with the rt-PA gene encoding the recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (Reteplase), which is a thrombolytic agent for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Transgenic gametophytes were selected by their resistance to herbicide phosphiothricin (PPT), and proliferated in an established bubble column photo-bioreactor. According to the results from quantitative ELISA, Southern blotting, and fibrin agarose plate assay (FAPA) for bioactivity, it was showed that the rt-PA gene had been inte-grated into the genome of gametophytes of L. japonica, and the expression product showed the ex-pected bioactivity, implying the proper post-transcript modification in haploid gametophyte.

  1. Recombinant expression of rt-PA gene (encoding Reteplase) in gametophytes of the seaweed Laminaria japonica (Laminariales, Phaeophyta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG YiChen; JIANG Peng; GAO JiangTao; LIAO JianMin; SUN ShiJing; SHEN ZiLong; QIN Song

    2008-01-01

    The life cycle of seaweed Laminaria japonica involves a generation alternation between diploid sporophyte and haploid gametophte. The expression of foreign genes in sporophte has been proved. In this research, the recombinant expression in gametophyte was investigated by particle bombardment with the rt-PA gene encoding the recombinant human tissue-type plasminogen activator (Reteplase), which is a thrombolytic agent for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Transgenic gametophytes were selected by their resistance to herbicide phosphiothricin (PPT), and proliferated in an established bubble column photo-bioreactor. According to the results from quantitative ELISA, Southern blotting, and fibrin agarose plate assay (FAPA) for bioactivity, it was showed that the rt-PA gene had been integrated into the genome of gametophytes of L. japonica, and the expression product showed the expected bioactivity, implying the proper post-transcript modification in haploid gametophyte.

  2. Sequence variation in the alpha-toxin encoding plc gene of Clostridium perfringens strains isolated from diseased and healthy chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, L; Engberg, RM; Pedersen, Karl;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the genetic diversity of the alpha-toxin encoding plc gene and the variation in a-toxin production of Clostridium perfringens type A strains isolated from presumably healthy chickens and chickens suffering from either necrotic enteritis (NE) or cholangio...... different a-toxin sequence types among the 60 strains. Moreover, a type II intron of 834 non-coding nucleotides was identified in the pic gene of three of the investigated strains. The in vitro alpha-toxin production investigated in 45 of the strains, including the three harbouring the intron, revealed no...... correlation between PFGE type, alpha-toxin sequence type, health status of the host chickens and level of a-toxin production. It is therefore concluded that neither pic gene type nor alpha-toxin production level seems to correlate to origin (healthy or diseased chicken) of the C perfringens strains. (C) 2008...

  3. Genetic association analysis of 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial candidate genes with type II diabetes mellitus: The DAMAGE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, Erwin; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; van 't Riet, Esther;

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in many processes, like glucose metabolism, fatty acid oxidation and ATP synthesis. In this study, we aimed to identify association of common polymorphisms in nuclear-encoded genes involved in mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis with type II diabetes...... for correct mitochondrial protein synthesis and biogenesis: aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, translation initiation factors, tRNA modifying enzymes and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. SNPs showing evidence for association with T2DM were measured in second stage genotyping (n=10164......-wide association studies, this SNP was also not associated with T2DM (P=0.72). In conclusion, we did not find evidence for association of common variants in 13 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins with T2DM.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 11 February 2009; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2009.4....

  4. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbi, Florian; Bragalini, Claudia; Vallon, Laurent; Prudent, Elsa; Dubost, Audrey; Fraissinet-Tachet, Laurence; Marmeisse, Roland; Luis, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5) and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2), active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may lead to the

  5. PCR primers to study the diversity of expressed fungal genes encoding lignocellulolytic enzymes in soils using high-throughput sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Barbi

    Full Text Available Plant biomass degradation in soil is one of the key steps of carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Fungal saprotrophic communities play an essential role in this process by producing hydrolytic enzymes active on the main components of plant organic matter. Open questions in this field regard the diversity of the species involved, the major biochemical pathways implicated and how these are affected by external factors such as litter quality or climate changes. This can be tackled by environmental genomic approaches involving the systematic sequencing of key enzyme-coding gene families using soil-extracted RNA as material. Such an approach necessitates the design and evaluation of gene family-specific PCR primers producing sequence fragments compatible with high-throughput sequencing approaches. In the present study, we developed and evaluated PCR primers for the specific amplification of fungal CAZy Glycoside Hydrolase gene families GH5 (subfamily 5 and GH11 encoding endo-β-1,4-glucanases and endo-β-1,4-xylanases respectively as well as Basidiomycota class II peroxidases, corresponding to the CAZy Auxiliary Activity family 2 (AA2, active on lignin. These primers were experimentally validated using DNA extracted from a wide range of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota species including 27 with sequenced genomes. Along with the published primers for Glycoside Hydrolase GH7 encoding enzymes active on cellulose, the newly design primers were shown to be compatible with the Illumina MiSeq sequencing technology. Sequences obtained from RNA extracted from beech or spruce forest soils showed a high diversity and were uniformly distributed in gene trees featuring the global diversity of these gene families. This high-throughput sequencing approach using several degenerate primers constitutes a robust method, which allows the simultaneous characterization of the diversity of different fungal transcripts involved in plant organic matter degradation and may

  6. Analysis of a 30 kbp plasmid encoding histidine decarboxylase gene in Tetragenococcus halophilus isolated from fish sauce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomi, Masataka; Furushita, Manabu; Oikawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa-Takahashi, Miwako; Yano, Yutaka

    2008-08-15

    In order to analyze the genes related to the histamine production, a strain of histamine producing halophilic bacteria, referred to as strain H, was isolated using enrichment culture and dilution-to-extinction methods with histidine broth inoculated from the fish sauce mashes. The two Japanese fish sauce mashes used, accumulate over 1000 mg/l of histamine. Phenotypic and 16 S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified strain H as Tetragenococcus halophilus, the predominant histamine producing bacteria present during fish sauce fermentation. Genetic analyses (PCR and Southern blot) of the histamine producing strain confirmed that the strain harbored a 30 kbp plasmid (pHDC) encoding a single copy of the pyruvoyl dependent histidine decarboxylase gene (hdc). A comparison of hdcA that is a structural gene of histidine decarboxylase among strain H, Lactobacillus hilgardii 0006, L. sakei LTH2076, Oenococcus oeni 9204, T. halophilus and T. muriaticus JCM10006 (T) indicated >99% sequence similarity. The hdc gene cluster consisted of 4 ORFs, hdcP, hdcA, hdcB, and hdcRS, and were almost identical to that of L. hilgardii 0006 with 99% sequence similarity including the structural hdc spacer region. However, the approximately 500 bp regions upstream and downstream of the hdc gene were different between that of strain H and L. hilgardii 0006. The complete sequence of pHDC revealed 29,924 nucleotides including 28 ORFs, two pairs of IR (inverted repeat), similar sequence of plasmid conjugative elements, and a theta-type replicon. These results suggested that hdc could be encoded on transformable elements among lactic acid bacteria. PMID:18573560

  7. Construction and Expression of Bivalent Membrane-anchored DNA Vaccine Encoding Sj14FABP and Sj26GST Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ping; DAI Wuxing; LIU Shuojie; YANG Ping; CHENG Jizhong; LIANG Liang; CHEN Zhihao; GAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In order to construct a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid containing membrane-anchored Sjcl4FABP and Sjc26GST genes and identify their expression in vitro, Sj14 and Sj26 genes were obtained by RT-PCR with total RNA of Schistosoma japonicum adult worms as the template and cloned into eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAC to construct recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14 and pVAC-Sj26. Then a 23 amino-acid signal peptide of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) upstream Sj14 or Sj26 gene and a membrane-anchored sequence containing 32 amino-acids of carboxyl-terminal of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) downstream were amplified by PCR as the template of plasmid pVAC-Sjl4 or pVAC-Sj26 only to get two gene fragments including Sjl4 gene and Sj26 gene. The two modified genes were altogether cloned into a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pIRES,resulting in another new recombinant plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14. The expression of Sj14 and Sj26genes was detected by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescent assays (IFA) when the plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14 was transfected into eukaryotic Hela cells. Restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and sequencing results revealed that the recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14, pVAC-Sj26 and pIRES-Sj26-Sj14 were successfully constructed and the expression of modified Sj 14 and Sj26 genes could be detected by RT-PCR and IFA. A bivalent membrane-anchored DNA vaccine encoding Sj14 and Sj26 genes was acquired and expressed proteins were proved to be mostly anchored in cellular membranes.

  8. Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utut Widyastuti Suharsono

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and Cloning of cDNA Fragment of Gene Encoding for Multidrug Resistance Associated Protein from M. affine. M. affine can grow well in acid soil with high level of soluble aluminum. One of the important proteins in the detoxifying xenobiotic stress including acid and Al stresses is a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP encoded by mrp gene. The objective of this research is to isolate and clone the cDNA fragment of MaMrp encoding MRP from M. affine. By reverse transcription, total cDNA had been synthesized from the total RNA as template. The fragment of cDNA MaMrp had been successfully isolated by PCR by using total cDNA as template and mrp primer designed from A. thaliana, yeast, and human. This fragment was successfully inserted into pGEM-T Easy and the recombinant plasmid was successfully introduced into E. coli DH5α. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the lenght of MaMrp fragment is 633 bp encoding 208 amino acids. Local alignment analysis based on nucleotide of mRNA showed that MaMrp fragment is 69% identical to AtMrp1 and 63% to AtMrp from A. thaliana. Based on deduced amino acid sequence, MaMRP is 84% identical to part of AtMRP13, 77% to AtMRP12, and 73% to AtMRP1 from A. thaliana respectively. Alignment analysis with AtMRP1 showed that MaMRP fragment is located in TM1 and NBF1 domains and has a specific amino acid sequence QCKAQLQNMEEE.

  9. Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Characterization of the Genes Encoding the Two Essential Protein Components of Micrococcus luteus B-P 26 Hexaprenyl Diphosphate Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Naoto; Koyama, Tanetoshi; Ogura, Kyozo

    1998-01-01

    The structural genes encoding the two essential components A and B of hexaprenyl diphosphate synthase, which produce the precursor of the prenyl side chain of menaquinone-6, were cloned from Micrococcus luteus B-P 26.

  10. A ribosomal protein gene cluster is encoded in the mitochondrial DNA of Dictyostelium discoideum: UGA termination codons and similarity of gene order to Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, M; Pi, M; Kurihara, M; Morio, T; Tanaka, Y

    1998-04-01

    We sequenced a region of about 14.5 kb downstream from the ribosomal protein L11 gene (rpl11) in the mitochondrial DNA (54+/-2 kb) of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Sequence analysis revealed that eleven ribosomal protein genes and six open reading frames (ORFs) formed a cluster arranged in the order: rpl11-orf189-rps12-rps7-rpl2-rps19-+ ++orf425-orf1740-rpl16-rpl14-orf188- rps14-rps8-rpl6-rps13-orf127-orf796. This order was very similar to that of homologous genes in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondrial DNA. The N-terminal region of ORF425 and the C-terminal region of ORF1740 had partial similarities to the S3 ribosomal protein of other organisms. The termination codons of rpl16 and orf188 were UGA, which has not hitherto been found in genes encoded in D. discoideum mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9560439

  11. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The mouse protein kinase CK2 beta subunit gene (Csnk2b) is composed of seven exons contained within 7874 bp. The exon and intron lengths extend from 76 to 321 and 111 to 1272 bp, respectively. The lengths of the murine coding exons correspond exactly to the lengths of the exons in the human CK2...... beta gene. Both genes contain a first untranslated exon. Also, the promoter regions from the human and murine CK2 beta gene share some common features, e.g., they contain neither a TATA nor a CAAT box, exon 1 is flanked by a cluster of CpG dinucleotides and recognition sequences for the Hpa...... has no counterpart in the murine gene. Hence, regulation of transcription of the CK2 beta gene by the catalytic CK2 alpha subunit as was described by Robitzki et al. (J. Biol. Chem. 268: 5694-5703, 1993) for the human gene cannot be considered a general regulatory mechanism....

  12. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  13. Modulation of expression of genes encoding nuclear proteins following exposure to JANUS neutrons or γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work has shown that exposure of cells to ionizing radiations causes modulation of a variety of genes, including those encoding c-fos, interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, cytoskeletal elements, and many more. The experiments reported herein were designed to examine the effects of either JANUS neutron or γ-ray exposure on expression of genes encoding nucleus-associated proteins (H4-histone, c-jun, c-myc, Rb, and p53). Cycling Syrian hamster embryo cells were irradiated with varying doses and dose rates of either JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons or γ-rays; after incubation of the cell cultures for 1 h following radiation exposure, mRNA was harvested and analyzed by Northern blot. Results revealed induction of transcripts for c-jun, H4-histone, and Rb following γ-ray but not following neutron exposure. Interestingly, expression of c-myc was repressed following γ-ray but not following neutron exposure. Radiations at different doses and dose rates were compared for each of the genes studied

  14. Hypoxia Inducible Factors Modulate Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption and Transcriptional Regulation of Nuclear-Encoded Electron Transport Chain Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye Jin; Lynn, Scott G; Vengellur, Ajith; Saini, Yogesh; Grier, Elizabeth A; Ferguson-Miller, Shelagh M; LaPres, John J

    2015-06-23

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF1) is a stress-responsive nuclear transcription factor that is activated with a decrease in oxygen availability. HIF1 regulates the expression of genes involved in a cell's adaptation to hypoxic stress, including those with mitochondrial specific function. To gain a more comprehensive understanding of the role of HIF1 in mitochondrial homeostasis, we studied the link between hypoxia, HIF1 transactivation, and electron transport chain (ETC) function. We established immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) for HIF1α wild-type (WT) and null cells and tested whether HIF1α regulates mitochondrial respiration by modulating gene expressions of nuclear-encoded ETC components. High-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to screen nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes related to the ETC to identify those whose regulation was HIF1α-dependent. Our data suggest that HIF1α regulates transcription of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) heart/muscle isoform 7a1 (Cox7a1) under hypoxia, where it is induced 1.5-2.5-fold, whereas Cox4i2 hypoxic induction was HIF1α-independent. We propose that adaptation to hypoxic stress of CcO as the main cellular oxygen consumer is mediated by induction of hypoxia-sensitive tissue-specific isoforms. We suggest that HIF1 plays a central role in maintaining homeostasis in cellular respiration during hypoxic stress via regulation of CcO activity. PMID:26030260

  15. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurusamy Umamaheswaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual′s genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1 with Indian perspective.

  16. Rational design of glycerol dehydratase: Swapping the genes encoding the subunits of glycerol dehydratase to improve enzymatic properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Xianghui; SUN Liang; LUO Zhaofei; WU Jiequn; MENG Xiaolei; TANG Yue; WEI Yutuo; HUANG Ribo

    2006-01-01

    1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) is an important material for chemical industry, and there has been always much interest in the production of 1,3-PD using all possible routes. The genes encoding glycerol dehydratase (GDHt) from Citrobacter freundii,Klebsiella pneumoniae and metagenome were cloned and expressed in E. coli. All glycerol dehydratases but the one from metagenome could be detected to show enzyme activities. In order to improve the enzymatic properties of GDHts, the genes encoding α and β-γ subunits were cloned, and the enzyme characteristics were evolved by rational design based on their 3D structures which were constructed by homology modeling. Six heteroenzymes were obtained by swapping the α subunit genes of these three different-source-derived GDHts. The pH,thermal stability and Vmax of some heteroenzymes were dramatically improved by 2-5 times compared with the wild one (GDHtKP). The GDHt cloned from metagenome, originally proved to be with no enzyme activity, was converted into active enzyme by swapping its subunits with other different GDHts. In addition, the effect of subtle 3D structural changes on the properties of the enzyme was also observed.

  17. Identification of a novel sarcoglycan gene at 5q33 encoding a sarcolemmal 35 kDa glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, V; Piluso, G; Belsito, A; Politano, L; Puca, A A; Papparella, S; Rossi, E; Viglietto, G; Esposito, M G; Abbondanza, C; Medici, N; Molinari, A M; Nigro, G; Puca, G A

    1996-08-01

    Mutations in any of the genes encoding the alpha, beta or gamma-sarcoglycan components of dystrophin-associated glycoproteins result in both sporadic and familial cases of either limb-girdle muscular dystrophy or severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy. The collective name 'sarcoglycanopathies' has been proposed for these forms. We report the identification of a fourth member of the human sarcoglycan family. We named this novel cDNA delta-sarcoglycan. Its mRNA expression is abundant in striated and smooth muscles, with a main 8 kb transcript, encoding a predicted basic transmembrane glycoprotein of 290 amino acids. Antibodies specifically raised against this protein recognized a single band at 35 kDa on western blots of human and mouse muscle. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a unique sarcolemmal localization. FISH, radiation hybrid and YAC mapping concordantly linked the delta-sarcoglycan gene to 5q33, close to D5S487 and D5S1439. The gene spans at least 100 kb and is composed of eight exons. The identification of a novel sarcoglycan component modifies the current model of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. PMID:8842738

  18. Identification and functional characterization of genes encoding omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic activities from unicellular microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Royah; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2013-12-01

    In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative "front-end" desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4) from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs) in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15). These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in marine microalgae. PMID:24351909

  19. A conserved gene family encodes transmembrane proteins with fibronectin, immunoglobulin and leucine-rich repeat domains (FIGLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Christopher L

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mouse the cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7 is required for generation of B lymphocytes, but human IL-7 does not appear to have this function. A bioinformatics approach was therefore used to identify IL-7 receptor related genes in the hope of identifying the elusive human cytokine. Results Our database search identified a family of nine gene candidates, which we have provisionally named fibronectin immunoglobulin leucine-rich repeat (FIGLER. The FIGLER 1–9 genes are predicted to encode type I transmembrane glycoproteins with 6–12 leucine-rich repeats (LRR, a C2 type Ig domain, a fibronectin type III domain, a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic domain containing one to four tyrosine residues. Members of this multichromosomal gene family possess 20–47% overall amino acid identity and are differentially expressed in cell lines and primary hematopoietic lineage cells. Genes for FIGLER homologs were identified in macaque, orangutan, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, toad, and puffer fish databases. The non-human FIGLER homologs share 38–99% overall amino acid identity with their human counterpart. Conclusion The extracellular domain structure and absence of recognizable cytoplasmic signaling motifs in members of the highly conserved FIGLER gene family suggest a trophic or cell adhesion function for these molecules.

  20. Organization and alternate splice products of the gene encoding nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eynde, A; Pérez-Callejón, E; Schoenmakers, E; Jacquemin, M; Stalmans, W; Bollen, M

    1999-04-01

    Nuclear inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1 (NIPP-1) is one of two major regulatory subunits of protein phosphatase-1 in mammalian nuclei. We report here the cloning and structural characterization of the human NIPP-1 genes, designated PPP1R8P and PPP1R8 in human gene nomenclature. PPP1R8P (1.2 kb) is a processed pseudogene and was localized by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1p33-32. PPP1R8 is an authentic NIPP-1 gene and was localized to chromosome 1p35. PPP1R8 (25.2 kb) is composed of seven exons and encodes four different transcripts, as determined from cDNA library screening, reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) and/or EST (expressed sequence tag) database search analysis. NIPP-1alpha mRNA represents the major transcript in human tissues and various cell lines, and encodes a polypeptide of 351 residues that only differs from the previously cloned calf thymus NIPP-1 by a single residue. The other transcripts, termed NIPP-1beta, gamma and delta, are generated by alternative 5'-splice site usage, by exon skipping and/or by alternative polyadenylation. The NIPP-1beta/delta and NIPP-1gamma mRNAs are expected to encode fragments of NIPP-1alpha that differ from the latter by the absence of the first 142 and 224 residues, respectively. NIPP-1gamma corresponds to 'activator of RNA decay-1' (Ard-1) which, unlike NIPP-1alpha, displays in vitro and endoribonuclease activity and lacks an RVXF consensus motif for interaction with protein phosphatase-1. While the NIPP-1alpha/beta/delta-transcripts were found to be present in various human tissues, the NIPP-1gamma transcript could only be detected in human transformed B-lymphocytes. PMID:10103062

  1. Plasmid encoded antibiotic resistance: acquisition and transfer of antibiotic resistance genes in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, P M

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria have existed on Earth for three billion years or so and have become adept at protecting themselves against toxic chemicals. Antibiotics have been in clinical use for a little more than 6 decades. That antibiotic resistance is now a major clinical problem all over the world attests to the success and speed of bacterial adaptation. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in bacteria are varied and include target protection, target substitution, antibiotic detoxification and block of intracellular antibiotic accumulation. Acquisition of genes needed to elaborate the various mechanisms is greatly aided by a variety of promiscuous gene transfer systems, such as bacterial conjugative plasmids, transposable elements and integron systems, that move genes from one DNA system to another and from one bacterial cell to another, not necessarily one related to the gene donor. Bacterial plasmids serve as the scaffold on which are assembled arrays of antibiotic resistance genes, by transposition (transposable elements and ISCR mediated transposition) and site-specific recombination mechanisms (integron gene cassettes).The evidence suggests that antibiotic resistance genes in human bacterial pathogens originate from a multitude of bacterial sources, indicating that the genomes of all bacteria can be considered as a single global gene pool into which most, if not all, bacteria can dip for genes necessary for survival. In terms of antibiotic resistance, plasmids serve a central role, as the vehicles for resistance gene capture and their subsequent dissemination. These various aspects of bacterial resistance to antibiotics will be explored in this presentation. PMID:18193080

  2. Nucleotide sequence and genetic analysis of the Azotobacter chroococcum nifUSVWZM gene cluster, including a new gene (nifP) which encodes a serine acetyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D J; Jones, R; Woodley, P R; Wilborn, J R; Robson, R L

    1991-09-01

    Nucleotide sequence was obtained for a region of 7,099 bp spanning the nifU, nifS, nifV, nifW, nifZ, and nifM genes from Azotobacter chroococcum. Chromosomal mutations constructed at several sites within the locus confirmed a requirement for this region for expression of the molybdenum nitrogenase in this organism. The genes are tightly clustered and ordered as in Klebsiella pneumoniae except for two additional open reading frames (ORFs) between nifV and nifW. The arrangement of genes in A. chroococcum closely matches that described for Azotobacter vinelandii. The polypeptide encoded by ORF4 immediately downstream from nifV is 41% identical over 186 amino acids to the product of the cysE gene from Escherichia coli, which encodes serine acetyltransferase (SAT), a key enzyme in cysteine biosynthesis. Plasmids which potentially express ORF4 complemented E. coli JM39, a cysteine auxotroph which lacks SAT. SAT activity was detected in crude extracts of one such complemented strain. A strain of A. chroococcum carrying a chromosomal disruption of ORF4 grew normally with ammonium as the N source but more slowly than the parental strain when N2 was the sole N source. These data suggest that ORF4 encodes a nif-specific SAT required for optimizing expression of nitrogenase activity. ORF4 was assigned the name nifP. nifP may be required to boost rates of synthesis or intracellular concentrations of cysteine or methionine. Sequence identity between nifV and leuA gene products suggests that nifV may catalyze a condensation reaction analogous to that carried out by isopropylmalate synthase (LEUA) but in which acetyl coenzyme and alpha-ketoglutarate are substrates for the formation of homocitrate, the proposed product of NIFV activity. PMID:1885524

  3. The fission yeast git5 gene encodes a Gbeta subunit required for glucose-triggered adenylate cyclase activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, S; Pettit, M T; Apolinario, E; Hoffman, C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Fission yeast adenylate cyclase is activated by the gpa2 Galpha subunit of a heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide binding protein (G protein). We show that the git5 gene, also required for this activation, encodes a Gbeta subunit. In contrast to another study, we show that git5 is not a negative regulator of the gpa1 Galpha involved in the pheromone response pathway. While 43% identical to mammalian Gbeta's, the git5 protein lacks the amino-terminal coiled-coil found in other Gbeta subunits, yet...

  4. DNA repair deficiencies associated with mutations in genes encoding subunits of transcription initiation factor TFIIH in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Sweder, K S; Chun, R; Mori, T; Hanawalt, P C

    1996-01-01

    Several proteins, including Rad3 and Rad25(Ssl2), are essential for nucleotide excision repair (NER) and function in the RNA polymerase II transcription initiation complex TFIIH. Mutations in genes encoding two other subunits of TFIIH, TFB1 and SSL1, result in UV sensitivity and have been shown to take part in NER in an in vitro system. However, a deficiency in global NER does not exclude the possibility that such repair-deficient mutants can perform transcription-coupled repair (TCR), as sho...

  5. Tetracycline-Resistant Clinical Helicobacter pylori Isolates with and without Mutations in 16S rRNA-Encoding Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jeng Yih; Kim, Jae J.; Reddy, Rita; W.M. Wang; David Y Graham; Kwon, Dong H.

    2005-01-01

    Tetracycline-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains have been increasingly reported worldwide. However, only a small number of tetracycline-resistant strains have been studied with regard to possible mechanisms of resistance and those studies have focused on mutations in the tetracycline binding sites of 16S rRNA-encoding genes. We here report studies of 41 tetracycline-resistant H. pylori strains (tetracycline MICs, 4 to 32 μg/ml) from North America (n = 12) and from East Asia (n = 29). DNA s...

  6. The hmuQ and hmuD Genes from Bradyrhizobium japonicum Encode Heme-Degrading Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Puri, Sumant; O'Brian, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    Utilization of heme by bacteria as a nutritional iron source involves the transport of exogenous heme, followed by cleavage of the heme macrocycle to release iron. Bradyrhizobium japonicum can use heme as an iron source, but no heme-degrading oxygenase has been described. Here, bioinformatics analyses of the B. japonicum genome identified two paralogous genes renamed hmuQ (bll7075) and hmuD (bll7423) that encode proteins with weak similarity to the heme-degrading monooxygenase IsdG from Staph...

  7. Isolation, characterization, and expression of a second beta-tubulin-encoding gene from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene.

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, T L; Dickman, M B

    1994-01-01

    Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene is a fungal plant pathogen of Aeschynomene virginica. A beta-tubulin-encoding gene (TUB2) from this pathogen was cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of TUB2 had a high degree of homology to other fungal beta-tubulins. A portion of TUB2 from a benomyl-resistant C. gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene mutant was also cloned and sequenced. A point mutation resulting in a glutamic acid-to-lysine substitution at amino acid 198 lik...

  8. Cloning, sequencing, and overexpression of the genes encoding coenzyme B12-dependent glycerol dehydratase of Citrobacter freundii.

    OpenAIRE

    Seyfried, M.; Daniel, R.; Gottschalk, G

    1996-01-01

    The genes encoding coenzyme B12-dependent glycerol dehydratase of Citrobacter freundii were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The B12-free enzyme was purified to homogeneity. It consists of three types of subunits whose N-terminal sequences are in accordance with those deduced from the open reading frames dhaB, dhaC, and dhaE, coding for subunits of 60,433 (alpha), 21,487 (beta), and 16,121 (gamma) Da, respectively. The enzyme complex has the composition alpha2beta2gamma2. Amino a...

  9. Cloning of the Streptococcus gordonii PK488 gene, encoding an adhesin which mediates coaggregation with Actinomyces naeslundii PK606.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, R N; Ganeshkumar, N.; Kolenbrander, P. E.

    1993-01-01

    Coaggregation between Streptococcus gordonii PK488 and Actinomyces naeslundii PK606 is mediated by a 38-kDa streptococcal protein, designated ScaA. The gene, scaA, which encodes this protein has been cloned into Escherichia coli. A genomic S. gordonii PK488 library (in Lambda ZAP II) was screened with anti-S. gordonii immunoglobulin G absorbed with S. gordonii PK1804, an isogenic coaggregation-defective mutant of strain PK488. A positive recombinant phage was isolated, and a phagemid designat...

  10. Genome-wide analysis of the Zn(II)₂Cys₆ zinc cluster-encoding gene family in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Ehrlich, Kenneth C

    2013-05-01

    Proteins with a Zn(II)₂Cys₆ domain, Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆-Cys-X₅₋₁₂-Cys-X₂-Cys-X₆₋₉-Cys (hereafter, referred to as the C6 domain), form a subclass of zinc finger proteins found exclusively in fungi and yeast. Genome sequence databases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans have provided an overview of this family of genes. Annotation of this gene family in most fungal genomes is still far from perfect and refined bioinformatic algorithms are urgently needed. Aspergillus flavus is a saprophytic soil fungus that can produce the carcinogenic aflatoxin. It is the second leading causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. The 37-Mb genome of A. flavus is predicted to encode 12,000 proteins. Two and a half percent of the total proteins are estimated to contain the C6 domain, more than twofold greater than those estimated for yeast, which is about 1 %. The variability in the spacing between cysteines, C₃-C₄ and C₅-C₆, in the zinc cluster enables classification of the domains into distinct subgroups, which are also well conserved in Aspergillus nidulans. Sixty-six percent (202/306) of the A. flavus C6 proteins contain a specific transcription factor domain, and 7 % contain a domain of unknown function, DUF3468. Two A. nidulans C6 proteins containing the DUF3468 are involved in asexual conidiation and another two in sexual differentiation. In the anamorphic A. flavus, a homolog of the latter lacks the C6 domain. A. flavus being heterothallic and reproducing mainly through conidiation appears to have lost some components involved in homothallic sexual development. Of the 55 predicted gene clusters thought to be involved in production of secondary metabolites, only about half have a C6-encoding gene in or near the gene clusters. The features revealed by the A. flavus C6 proteins likely are common for other ascomycete fungi. PMID:23563886

  11. Abscisic acid enhances tolerance of wheat seedlings to drought and regulates transcript levels of genes encoding ascorbate-glutathione biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liting; Wang, Lina; Yang, Yang; Wang, Pengfei; Guo, Tiancai; Kang, Guozhang

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (ASA) are associated with the abscisic acid (ABA)-induced abiotic tolerance in higher plant, however, its molecular mechanism remains obscure. In this study, exogenous application (10 μM) of ABA significantly increased the tolerance of seedlings of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) suffering from 5 days of 15% polyethylene glycol (PEG)-stimulated drought stress, as demonstrated by increased shoot lengths and shoot and root dry weights, while showing decreased content of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Under drought stress conditions, ABA markedly increased content of GSH and ASA in both leaves and roots of ABA-treated plants. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of eight genes encoding ASA and GSH synthesis-related enzymes were measured using quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results showed that ABA temporally regulated the transcript levels of genes encoding ASA-GSH cycle enzymes. Moreover, these genes exhibited differential expression patterns between the root and leaf organs of ABA-treated wheat seedlings during drought stress. These results implied that exogenous ABA increased the levels of GSH and ASA in drought-stressed wheat seedlings in time- and organ-specific manners. Moreover, the transcriptional profiles of ASA-GSH synthesis-related enzyme genes in the leaf tissue were compared between ABA- and salicylic acid (SA)-treated wheat seedlings under PEG-stimulated drought stress, suggesting that they increased the content of ASA and GSH by differentially regulating expression levels of ASA-GSH synthesis enzyme genes. Our results increase our understanding of the molecular mechanism of ABA-induced drought tolerance in higher plants. PMID:26175737

  12. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CBR) Encoding Genes from the Carotenogenic Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, María Soledad; Rojas, María Cecilia; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor; Alcaíno, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic microsomal cytochrome P450 systems consist of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450) and a cytochrome P450 redox partner, which generally is a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) that supplies electrons from NADPH. However, alternative electron donors may exist such as cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 (CBR and CYB5, respectively) via, which is NADH-dependent and are also anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, three P450-encoding genes have been described: crtS is involved in carotenogenesis and the CYP51 and CYP61 genes are both implicated in ergosterol biosynthesis. This yeast has a single CPR (encoded by the crtR gene), and a crtR- mutant does not produce astaxanthin. Considering that this mutant is viable, the existence of alternative cytochrome P450 electron donors like CBR and CYB5 could operate in this yeast. The aim of this work was to characterize the X. dendrorhous CBR encoding gene and to study its involvement in P450 reactions in ergosterol and carotenoid biosynthesis. Two CBRs genes were identified (CBR.1 and CBR.2), and deletion mutants were constructed. The two mutants and the wild-type strain showed similar sterol production, with ergosterol being the main sterol produced. The crtR- mutant strain produced a lower proportion of ergosterol than did the parental strain. These results indicate that even though one of the two CBR genes could be involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, crtR complements their absence in the cbr- mutant strains, at least for ergosterol production. The higher NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activity together with the higher transcript levels of CBR.1 and CYB5 in the crtR- mutant as well as the lower NADH-dependent activity in CBS-cbr.1- strongly suggest that CBR.1-CYB5 via participates as an alternative electron donor pathway for P450 enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous. PMID:26466337

  13. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of Cytochrome b5 Reductase (CBR Encoding Genes from the Carotenogenic Yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Soledad Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic microsomal cytochrome P450 systems consist of a cytochrome P450 enzyme (P450 and a cytochrome P450 redox partner, which generally is a cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR that supplies electrons from NADPH. However, alternative electron donors may exist such as cytochrome b5 reductase and cytochrome b5 (CBR and CYB5, respectively via, which is NADH-dependent and are also anchored to the endoplasmic reticulum. In the carotenogenic yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous, three P450-encoding genes have been described: crtS is involved in carotenogenesis and the CYP51 and CYP61 genes are both implicated in ergosterol biosynthesis. This yeast has a single CPR (encoded by the crtR gene, and a crtR- mutant does not produce astaxanthin. Considering that this mutant is viable, the existence of alternative cytochrome P450 electron donors like CBR and CYB5 could operate in this yeast. The aim of this work was to characterize the X. dendrorhous CBR encoding gene and to study its involvement in P450 reactions in ergosterol and carotenoid biosynthesis. Two CBRs genes were identified (CBR.1 and CBR.2, and deletion mutants were constructed. The two mutants and the wild-type strain showed similar sterol production, with ergosterol being the main sterol produced. The crtR- mutant strain produced a lower proportion of ergosterol than did the parental strain. These results indicate that even though one of the two CBR genes could be involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, crtR complements their absence in the cbr- mutant strains, at least for ergosterol production. The higher NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase activity together with the higher transcript levels of CBR.1 and CYB5 in the crtR- mutant as well as the lower NADH-dependent activity in CBS-cbr.1- strongly suggest that CBR.1-CYB5 via participates as an alternative electron donor pathway for P450 enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous.

  14. Envelope Gene of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-W Encodes a Functional Retrovirus Envelope

    OpenAIRE

    An, Dong Sung; Xie, Yi-ming; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2001-01-01

    A member of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) family termed HERV-W encodes a highly fusogenic membrane glycoprotein that appears to be expressed specifically in the placenta. It is unclear whether the glycoproteins of the HERVs can serve as functional retrovirus envelope proteins to confer infectivity on retrovirus particles. We found that the HERV-W envelope glycoprotein can form pseudotypes with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions and confers tropism for CD4-negative cells. Thu...

  15. Virulence Plasmid of Rhodococcus equi Contains Inducible Gene Family Encoding Secreted Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, Barbara A.; Prescott, John F.; Palmer, Guy H.; Takai, Shinji; Nicholson, Vivian M.; Alperin, Debra C.; Hines, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi causes severe pyogranulomatous pneumonia in foals. This facultative intracellular pathogen produces similar lesions in immunocompromised humans, particularly in AIDS patients. Virulent strains of R. equi bear a large plasmid that is required for intracellular survival within macrophages and for virulence in foals and mice. Only two plasmid-encoded proteins have been described previously; a 15- to 17-kDa surface protein designated virulence-associated protein A (VapA) and an a...

  16. Redox modulation of the expression of bacterial genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins in plant protoplasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Piñeiro Galvin, Manuel; García Olmedo, Francisco; Diaz Rodriguez, Isabel

    1994-01-01

    Activity of neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII; gene, neo; five cysteines) in tobacco protoplasts transfected with fusions of the octopine TR2' or cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter and the neo gene, with or without a signal peptide, increased up to 8-fold in response to externally added dithiothreitol at concentrations that did not affect protoplast viability (up to 2.5 mM). Activity of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT; gene, bar; one cysteine) expressed under control of the TR1...

  17. Differential display identifies overexpression of the USP36 gene, encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme, in ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jianduan; Olson, Lisa M.; Zhang, Zhengyan; LI, LINA; Bidder, Miri; Nguyen, Loan; Pfeifer, John; Rader, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. To find potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets, we used differential display technique to identify genes that are over or under expressed in human ovarian cancer. Methods. Genes were initially identified by differential display between two human ovarian surface epithelium cultures and two ovarian cancer cell lines, A2780 and Caov-3. Genes were validated by relative quantitative RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization. Results. Twenty-eight non-redundant sequences were ex...

  18. Association of Three Plasmid-Encoded spv Genes Among Different Salmonella Serotypes Isolated from Different Origins

    OpenAIRE

    Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Firouzi, Roya; Khoshbakht, Rahem

    2012-01-01

    The virulence plasmid associated Salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) locus is strongly concomitant with strains that cause non typhoid bacteremia. The spv region contains three genes required for the virulence, the positive transcriptional regulator spvR and two structural genes spvB and spvC. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of these three genes among salmonella serotypes isolated from different sources. A collection of 60 salmonella serotypes from different sources w...

  19. The crtE gene in Erwinia herbicola encodes geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase.

    OpenAIRE

    Math, S K; Hearst, J E; Poulter, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A cluster of genes essential for the biosynthesis of carotenoids in Erwinia herbicola has been isolated and characterized [Armstrong, G.A., Alberti, M. & Hearst, J. E. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87, 9975-9979]. Related gene clusters are found in other carotenoid-producing bacteria. Two of these genes, crtB and crtE, have been assigned to enzymes responsible for conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) to prephytoene diphosphate and prephytoene diphosphate to phytoene, respective...

  20. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of the Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 gene encoding ampicillin resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Verreth, C; Cammue, B; Swinnen, P; Crombez, D; Michielsen, A; Michiels, K.; Gool, A. van; Vanderleyden, J.

    1989-01-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense ATCC 29145 gene coding for beta-lactamase was cloned in Escherichia coli. The gene was expressed in E. coli from its own promoter as a 30-kilodalton protein, conferring resistance to high levels of beta-lactam antibiotics. The DNA sequence containing the beta-lactamase gene was found to be highly amplified in the Azospirillum genome, scattered in the chromosomal as well as in the plasmidic DNA.

  1. Cyanobacterial ribosomal RNA genes with multiple, endonuclease-encoding group I introns

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    Turner Seán

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Group I introns are one of the four major classes of introns as defined by their distinct splicing mechanisms. Because they catalyze their own removal from precursor transcripts, group I introns are referred to as autocatalytic introns. Group I introns are common in fungal and protist nuclear ribosomal RNA genes and in organellar genomes. In contrast, they are rare in all other organisms and genomes, including bacteria. Results Here we report five group I introns, each containing a LAGLIDADG homing endonuclease gene (HEG, in large subunit (LSU rRNA genes of cyanobacteria. Three of the introns are located in the LSU gene of Synechococcus sp. C9, and the other two are in the LSU gene of Synechococcus lividus strain C1. Phylogenetic analyses show that these introns and their HEGs are closely related to introns and HEGs located at homologous insertion sites in organellar and bacterial rDNA genes. We also present a compilation of group I introns with homing endonuclease genes in bacteria. Conclusion We have discovered multiple HEG-containing group I introns in a single bacterial gene. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of multiple group I introns in the same bacterial gene (multiple group I introns have been reported in at least one phage gene and one prophage gene. The HEGs each contain one copy of the LAGLIDADG motif and presumably function as homodimers. Phylogenetic analysis, in conjunction with their patchy taxonomic distribution, suggests that these intron-HEG elements have been transferred horizontally among organelles and bacteria. However, the mode of transfer and the nature of the biological connections among the intron-containing organisms are unknown.

  2. Expression and functional analysis of genes encoding cytokinin receptor-like histidine kinase in maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Yanhong; Guo, Baojian; Kabir, Muhammad Rezaul; Yao, Yingyin; Peng, Huiru; Xie, Chaojie; Zhang, Yirong; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2014-08-01

    Cytokinin signaling is vital for plant growth and development which function via the two-component system (TCS). As one of the key component of TCS, transmembrane histidine kinases (HK) are encoded by a small gene family in plants. In this study, we focused on expression and functional analysis of cytokinin receptor-like HK genes (ZmHK) in maize. Firstly, bioinformatics analysis revealed that seven cloned ZmHK genes have different expression patterns during maize development. Secondly, ectopic expression by CaMV35S promoter in Arabidopsis further revealed that functional differentiation exists among these seven members. Among them, the ZmHK1a2-OX transgenic line has the lowest germination rate in the dark, ZmHK1-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX can delay leaf senescence, and seed size of ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX was obviously reduced as compared to wild type. Additionally, ZmHK genes play opposite roles in shoot and root development; all ZmHK-OX transgenic lines display obvious shorter root length and reduced number of lateral roots, but enhanced shoot development compared with the wild type. Most notably, Arabidopsis response regulator ARR5 gene was up-regulated in ZmHK1-OX, ZmHK1a2-OX, ZmHK2-OX, ZmHK3b-OX and ZmHK2a2-OX as compared to wild type. Although the causal link between ZmHK genes and cytokinin signaling pathway is still an area to be further elucidated, these findings reflected that the diversification of ZmHK genes expression patterns and functions occurred in the course of maize evolution, indicating that some ZmHK genes might play different roles during maize development. PMID:24585212

  3. Housekeeping gene on the X chromosome encodes a protein similar to ubiquitin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X chromosome gene located 40 kilobases downstream from the G6PD gene, at Xq28, was isolated and sequenced. This gene, which the authors named GdX, spans about 3.5 kilobases of genomic DNA. GdX is a single-copy gene, is conserved in evolution, and has the features of a housekeeping gene. At its 5' end, a cluster of CpG dinucleotides is methylated on the inactive X chromosome and unmethylated on the active X chromosome. The GdX gene can code for a 157 amino acid protein, GdX. Residues 1-74 of GdX show 43% identity to ubiquitin, a highly conserved 76 amino acid protein. The COOH-terminal moiety of GdX is characterized in its central part (residues 110-128) by a sequence homologous to the COOH-terminal hormonogenic site of thyroglobulin. The structural organization of the GdX protein suggests the existence of a family of genes, in addition to the ubiquitin gene, that could play specific roles in key cellular processes, possible through protein-protein recognition

  4. Polymorphism in the gene encoding the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) of Plasmodium falciparum. X. Asembo Bay Cohort Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, A A; Grebert, H M; Chaiyaroj, S C; Magris, M; Biswas, S; Nahlen, B L; Lal, A A

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the genetic diversity of the gene encoding the apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) in natural populations of Plasmodium falciparum from western Kenya and compared it with parasite populations from other geographic regions. A total of 28 complete sequences from Kenya, Thailand, India, and Venezuela field isolates were obtained. The genetic polymorphism is not evenly distributed across the gene, which is in agreement with the pattern reported in earlier studies. The alleles from Kenya exhibit 20 and 30% more polymorphism than that found in Southeast Asia and Venezuelan alleles, respectively. Based on the gene genealogies derived from sequencing data, no evidence for allele families was found. We have found evidence supporting limited gene flow between the parasite populations, specifically, between the Southeast Asian and Venezuelan isolates; however, no alleles could be linked to a specific geographic region. This study reveals that positive natural selection is an important factor in the maintenance of genetic diversity for AMA-1. We did not find conclusive evidence indicating intragenic recombination is important in the generation of the AMA-1 allelic diversity. The study provides information on the genetic diversity of the AMA-1 gene that would be useful in vaccine development and testing, as well as in assessing factors that are involved in the generation and maintenance of the genetic diversity in P. falciparum. PMID:11295182

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding a 13.1 kDa antigenic protein of Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, H J; Cho, M S; Jung, S U; Kim, H I; Park, S; Kim, H J; Im, K I

    2001-01-01

    An antigen-related gene was cloned from a cDNA expression library of Naegleria fowleri by immunoscreening with sera obtained from mice that were either immunized with an amoebic lysate or infected with trophozoites. The coding nucleotide sequence of the cloned gene consisted of 357 bases that were translated into 119 amino acids. This gene was designated as nfa1. The predicted amino acid sequence of Nfa1 protein has two potential glycosylation and three potential phosphorylation sites, and its predicted secondary structure consists of four helices and three corners. The deduced amino acid sequence of Nfa1 protein shares 43% identity with the myohemerythrin (myoHr) protein from a marine annelid, Nereis diversicolor, including 100% identity in conserved regions and iron-binding residues. A phylogenetic tree constructed from amino acid sequences placed the N. fowleri Nfa1 protein outside of a cluster of myoHr proteins from eight invertebrates. A purified recombinant protein that migrated as a 13.1 kDa species in SDS-PAGE was produced. This recombinant protein exhibited a strong immunoreactivity with infected, immune, and anti-Nfal sera. In addition, an anti-Nfa1 serum reacted with an amoeba lysate in immunoblotting analysis. The present nfal gene encoding the myoHr-like protein is the first myoHr gene cloned from protozoa, and the Nfal antigen may be useful in diagnostic studies PMID:11831780

  6. The stem rust resistance gene Rpg5 encodes a protein with nucleotide-binding-site, leucine-rich, and protein kinase domains

    OpenAIRE

    Brueggeman, R.; Druka, A.; Nirmala, J.; Cavileer, T.; Drader, T.; Rostoks, N.; Mirlohi, A.; Bennypaul, H.; Gill, U; Kudrna, D.; Whitelaw, C.; Kilian, A.; Han, F.; Sun, Y; Gill, K.

    2008-01-01

    We isolated the barley stem rust resistance genes Rpg5 and rpg4 by map-based cloning. These genes are colocalized on a 70-kb genomic region that was delimited by recombination. The Rpg5 gene consists of an unusual structure encoding three typical plant disease resistance protein domains: nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich repeat, and serine threonine protein kinase. The predicted RPG5 protein has two putative transmembrane sites possibly involved in membrane binding. The gene is expressed ...

  7. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  8. Organization of a large gene cluster encoding ribosomal proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 6301: comparison of gene clusters among cyanobacteria, eubacteria and chloroplast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, M; Sugishita, H; Fujishiro, T; Tsuboi, M; Sugita, C; Endo, T; Sugiura, M

    1997-08-11

    The structure of a large gene cluster containing 22 ribosomal protein (r-protein) genes of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC6301 is presented. Based on DNA and protein sequence analyses, genes encoding r-proteins L3, L4, L23, L2, S19, L22, S3, L16, L29, S17, L14, L24, L5, S8, L6, L18, S5, L15, L36, S13, S11, L17, SecY, adenylate kinase (AK) and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase were identified. The gene order is similar to that of the E. coli S10, spc and alpha operons. Unlike the corresponding E. coli operons, the genes for r-proteins S4, S10, S14 and L30 are not present in this cluster. The organization of Synechococcus r-protein genes also resembles that of chloroplast (cp) r-protein genes of red and brown algal species. This strongly supports the endosymbiotic theory that the cp genome evolved from an ancient photosynthetic bacterium. PMID:9300823

  9. Identification of human genes involved in cellular responses to ionizing radiation: molecular and cellular studies of gene encoding the p68 helicase in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells submitted to genotoxic factors -like IR- activate several and important mechanisms such as repair, cell cycle arrest or 'apoptosis' to maintain genetic integrity. So, the damaged cells will induce many and different genes. The human transcriptome analysis by 'SSH' method in a human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 γ-irradiated versus not irradiated, allowed to identify about one hundred genes. Among of these genes, we have focused our study on a radio-induced gene encoding the p68 helicase. In the conditions of irradiation used, our results show that the kinetic and the regulation of this gene expression differs between the nature of radiations used. Indeed, in γ-irradiated mammalian cells, ATM, a protein kinase activated by DSB and IR, is required to induce quickly P68 gene via the important transcription factor p53 stabilized by IR. In the case of UVC-irradiated cells, the P68 gene induction is late and the intracellular signalling pathway that lead to this induction is independent from the p53 protein. Finally, we show that the p68 protein under-expression is responsible for an increased radiosensitivity of MCF7 cells. Consequently, we can postulate that the p68 protein is involved in cellular responses to radiations to reduce the increased radiosensitivity of cells exposed to γ-rays. (author)

  10. Molecular Characterization and Sequencing of a Gene Encoding Mannose Binding Protein in an Iranian Isolate of Acanthamoeba castellanii as a Major Agent of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

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    SH Farnia

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acanthamoeba castellanii is the important cause of amoebic keratitis in Iran. The key molecule in pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba keratitis is Mannose Binding Protein (MBP led to adhesion of amoeba to corneal epithelium. Subsequent to adhesion other cytopathic effects occur. The goal of this study was to identify the molecular characterization of a gene encoding MBP in an Iranian isolate of A.castellanii in order to pave the way for further investigations such as new therapeutic advances or immunization. Methods: A.castellanii was cultured on non nutrient agar. Extraction of DNA was performed by phenol-chloroform method. After designing a pair of primer for the gene encoding MBP, PCR analysis was performed. Finally, the PCR product has been sequenced and the result submitted to the gene data banks. Results: An MBP gene of 1081 nucleotides was sequenced. This fragment contained three introns and encodes a protein with 194 amino acids. Homology search by Blast program showed a significant homology with the MBP gene in gene data banks (96%. Besides, the identity of amino acids with the other MBPs in gene data banks was about 86%. Conclusion: We isolated and sequenced a gene fragment encoding MBP in an Iranian isolate of A.castellanii. Molecular characterization of this important gene is the first step in pursuing researches such as developing better therapeutic agents, immunization of population at risk or even developing a diagnostic tool by PCR techniques.

  11. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human

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    Blatt, C.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Cohn, V.H.; Zollman, S.; Fournier, R.E.K.; Mohandas, L.T.; Nesbitt, M.; Lugo, T.; Jones, D.T.; Reed, R.R.; Weiner, L.P.; Sparkes, R.S.; Simon, M.I. (Weizmann Institute, Rehovoth (Israel))

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding {alpha}-subunit proteins, two different {beta} subunits, and one {gamma} subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The {beta} subunits were also assigned-GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extend of the G{alpha} gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases and with genes corresponding to G proteins.

  12. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  13. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

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    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  14. Dynein Heavy Chain, Encoded by Two Genes in Agaricomycetes, Is Required for Nuclear Migration in Schizophyllum commune.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Brunsch

    Full Text Available The white-rot fungus Schizophyllum commune (Agaricomycetes was used to study the cell biology of microtubular trafficking during mating interactions, when the two partners exchange nuclei, which are transported along microtubule tracks. For this transport activity, the motor protein dynein is required. In S. commune, the dynein heavy chain is encoded in two parts by two separate genes, dhc1 and dhc2. The N-terminal protein Dhc1 supplies the dimerization domain, while Dhc2 encodes the motor machinery and the microtubule binding domain. This split motor protein is unique to Basidiomycota, where three different sequence patterns suggest independent split events during evolution. To investigate the function of the dynein heavy chain, the gene dhc1 and the motor domain in dhc2 were deleted. Both resulting mutants were viable, but revealed phenotypes in hyphal growth morphology and mating behavior as well as in sexual development. Viability of strain Δdhc2 is due to the higher expression of kinesin-2 and kinesin-14, which was proven via RNA sequencing.

  15. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, M.L.; Cascieri, M.A.; Kelder, B.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.; Shapiro, J.A.; Pasleau, F.; Kopchick, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fibroblasts, directs synthesis of the fusion protein, subsequent proteolytic removal of the bovine growth hormone signal peptide, and secretion of hIGF-I into the culture medium. Conditioned medium from transfected cells inhibits binding of /sup 125/I-labeled IGF-I to type I IGF receptors on human placental membranes and to acid-stable human serum carrier proteins. The recombinant hIGF-I produced is biologically active, as monitored by the stimulation of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  16. Isolation and characterization of a gene encoding a polyethylene glycol-induced cysteine protease in common wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Qing-Wei Zang; Cai-Xiang Wang; Xu-Yan Li; Zhi-Ai Guo; Rui-Lian Jing; Jun Zhao; Xiao-Ping Chang

    2010-09-01

    Plant cysteine protease (CP) genes are induced by abiotic stresses such as drought, yet their functions remain largely unknown. We isolated the full-length cDNA encoding a Triticum aestivum CP gene, designated TaCP, from wheat by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. Sequence analysis revealed that TaCP contains an open reading frame encoding a protein of 362 amino acids, which is 96% identical to barley cysteine protease HvSF42. The TaCP transcript level in wheat seedlings was upregulated during polyethylene glycol (PEG) stress, with a peak appearing around 12 h after treatment. TaCP expression level increased rapidly with NaCl treatment at 48 h. TaCP responded strongly to low temperature (4°C) treatment from 1 h post-treatment and reached a peak of about 40-fold at 72 h. However, it showed only a very slight response to abscisic acid (ABA). More than one copy of TaCP was present in each of the three genomes of hexaploid wheat and its diploid donors. TaCP fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) was located in the plasma membrane of onion epidermis cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing TaCP showed stronger drought tolerance and higher CP activity under water-stressed conditions than wild-type Arabidopsis plants. The results suggest that TaCP plays a role in tolerance to water deficit.

  17. The maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 genome encodes 33 members of the purple acid phosphatase gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliécer eGonzález Muñoz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs play an important role in plant phosphorus nutrition, both by liberating phosphorus from organic sources in the soil and by modulating distribution within the plant throughout growth and development. Furthermore, members of the PAP protein family have been implicated in a broader role in plant mineral homeostasis, stress responses and development. We have identified 33 candidate PAP encoding gene models in the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays var. B73 reference genome. The maize Pap family includes a clear single-copy ortholog of the Arabidopsis gene AtPAP26, shown previously to encode both major intracellular and secreted acid phosphatase activities. Certain groups of PAPs present in Arabidopsis, however, are absent in maize, while the maize family contains a number of expansions, including a distinct radiation not present in Arabidopsis. Analysis of RNA-sequencing based transcriptome data revealed accumulation of maize Pap transcripts in multiple plant tissues at multiple stages of development, and increased accumulation of specific transcripts under low phosphorus availability. These data suggest the maize PAP family as a whole to have broad significance throughout the plant life cycle, while highlighting potential functional specialization of individual family members.

  18. Expression of a synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I in cultured mouse fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic gene encoding human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) was assembled and inserted into an expression vector containing the cytomegalovirus immediate early (CMV-IE) transcriptional regulatory region and portions of the bovine growth hormone gene. The recombinant plasmid encodes a 97 amino acid fusion protein containing the first 27 amino acids of the bovine growth hormone precursor and the 70 amino acids of hIGF-I. This plasmid, when transiently introduced into cultured mouse fibroblasts, directs synthesis of the fusion protein, subsequent proteolytic removal of the bovine growth hormone signal peptide, and secretion of hIGF-I into the culture medium. Conditioned medium from transfected cells inhibits binding of 125I-labeled IGF-I to type I IGF receptors on human placental membranes and to acid-stable human serum carrier proteins. The recombinant hIGF-I produced is biologically active, as monitored by the stimulation of DNA synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells

  19. Ochratoxin a lowers mRNA levels of genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundhausen, Christoph; Boesch-Saadatmandi, Christine; Matzner, Nicole; Lang, Florian; Blank, Ralf; Wolffram, Siegfried; Blaschek, Wolfgang; Rimbach, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a nephro- and hepatotoxic mycotoxin that frequently contaminates food and feedstuffs. Although recent studies have indicated that OTA modulates renal gene expression, little is known regarding its impact on differential gene expression in the liver. Therefore a microarray study of the HepG2 liver cell transcriptome in response to OTA exposure (0, 0.25, 2.5 micromol/l for 24 h) was performed using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. Selected microarray results were verified by real-time PCR and Western blotting as independent methods. Out of 14,500 genes present on the microarray, 13 and 250 genes were down-regulated by 0.25 and 2.5 micromol/l OTA, respectively. Reduced mRNA levels of calcineurin A beta (PPP3CB), which regulates inflammatory signalling pathways in immune cells, and of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), which has been suggested to control the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), were observed in response to 0.25 micromol/l OTA. A particularly strong down-regulation due to 2.5 micromol/l OTA was evident for the mRNA levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and tubulin beta 1 (TUBB1) which have been demonstrated to function as a pro-survival factor in hepatocytes and as an important cytoskeletal component, respectively. In addition, many genes involved in energy and xenobiotic metabolism, including phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1), stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD), and glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1), were down-regulated by OTA. Furthermore, OTA significantly inhibited the capacitative calcium entry into the HepG2 cells, indicating an alteration of calcium homeostasis. Overall, OTA dose-dependently affects multiple genes encoding for key proteins of liver cell metabolism. PMID:19287073

  20. Isolation and expression analysis of FTZ-F1 encoding gene of black rock fish ( Sebastes schlegelii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Muhammad; Wang, Yanan; Zhou, Xiaosu; Ma, Liman; Muhammad, Faiz; Qi, Jie; Zhang, Quanqi

    2013-03-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene. In this study, FTZ-F1 gene ( FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning. The full-length cDNA of S. schlegeli FTZ-F1 ( ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5' UTR, a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3' UTR. Sequence, tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F1 belonged to FTZ group, holding highly conserved regions including I, II and III FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer. Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages. In juveniles (105 days old), the transcript of ssFTZ-F1 can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis, ovary, spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues. In mature fish, the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis, ovary, spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount), and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues. The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish. In addition, the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts ( P<0.05).

  1. Isolation and Expression Analysis of FTZ-F1 Encoding Gene of Black Rock Fish (Sebastes schlegelii)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Shafi; WANG Yanan; ZHOU Xiaosu; MA Liman; Faiz Muhammad; QI Jie; ZHANG Quanqi

    2013-01-01

    Sex related FTZ-F1 is a transcriptional factor regulating the expression of fushi tarazu (a member of the orphan nuclear receptors) gene.In this study,FTZ-F1 gene (FTZ-F1) was isolated from the testis of black rockfish (Sebastes schlegeli) by homology cloning.The full-length cDNA of S.schlegeli FTZ-F1 (ssFTZ-F1) contained a 232bp 5'UTR,a 1449bp ORF encoding FTZ-F1 (482 amino acid residules in length) with an estimated molecular weight of 5.4kD and a 105bp 3'UTR.Sequence,tissue distribution and phylogenic analysis showed that ssFTZ-F 1 belonged to FTZ group,holding highly conserved regions including Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅲ FTZ-F1 boxes and an AF-2 hexamer.Relatively high expression was observed at different larva stages.In juveniles (105 days old),the transcript ofssFTZ-Fl can be detected in all tissues and the abuncance of the gene transcript in testis,ovary,spleen and brain was higher than that in other tissues.In mature fish,the abundance of gene transcript was higher in testis,ovary,spleen and brain than that in liver (trace amount),and the gene was not transcribed in other tissues.The highest abundance of gene transcript was always observed in gonads of both juvenile and mature fish.In addition,the abundance of gene transcript in male tissues were higher than that in female tissue counterparts (P<0.05).

  2. Cloning and expression of gene encoding P23 protein from Cryptosporidium parvum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Thi Bich Lan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We cloned the cp23 gene coding P23 (glycoprotein from Cryptosporidium parvum isolated from Thua Thien Hue province, Vietnam. The coding region of cp23 gene from C. parvum is 99% similar with cp23 gene deposited in NCBI (accession number: U34390. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis showed that the cp23 gene in E. coli BL21 StarTM (DE3 produced polypeptides with molecular weights of approximately 37, 40 and 49 kDa. These molecules may be non-glycosylated or glycosylated P23 fusion polypeptides. Recombinant P23 protein purified by GST (glutathione S-transferase affinity chromatography can be used as an antigen for C. parvum antibody production as well as to develop diagnostic kit for C. parvum.

  3. Transformation of Coat Protein Encoding Gene from Soil-Borne Mosaic Virus into Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Jun-lan; XU Hui-jun; DU Li-pu; YE Xing-guo; LI Lian-cheng; XIN Zhi-yong; MA You-zhi; DIAO Ai-po; Adams M J

    2003-01-01

    CWMV-CP1 target gene and bar selection gene were co-transferred into commercial wheat vari-ety of Yangmai158 by particle bombardment. In total, 145 resistant plants to 3 - 5 mg L-1 Bialaphos were ob-tained, 21 plants were identified to be positive in T0 generation by PCR-Southern test, and the transformationfrequency had 0. 99%. T1 plants were further tested by PCR and Southern hybridization. Results demonstra-ted that the alien resistance gene had been integrated into the wheat genome. The segregation ratio of CP1+ toCP1- in T1 generation was 1.0 to 1.3, and didn't agree with Mendelian rule. RT-PCR result from T2 plantsshowed that the alien gene CWMV-CP1 had stable expression in wheat genetic background.

  4. A eukaryotic gene encoding an endonuclease that specifically repairs DNA damaged by ultraviolet light.

    OpenAIRE

    Yajima, H; Takao, M; Yasuhira, S; Zhao, J. H.; Ishii, C.; Inoue, H; Yasui, A

    1995-01-01

    Many eukaryotic organisms, including humans, remove ultraviolet (UV) damage from their genomes by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, which requires more than 10 separate protein factors. However, no nucleotide excision repair pathway has been found in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have isolated a new eukaryotic DNA repair gene from N.crassa by its ability to complement UV-sensitive Escherichia coli cells. The gene is altered in a N.crassa mus-18 mutant and responsible for ...

  5. Aberrant chromatin at genes encoding stem cell regulators in human mixed-lineage leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Guenther, Matthew G.; Lawton, Lee N.; Rozovskaia, Tatiana; Frampton, Garrett M.; Levine, Stuart S.; Thomas L Volkert; Croce, Carlo M.; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Canaani, Eli; Young, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins are potent inducers of leukemia, but how these proteins generate aberrant gene expression programs is poorly understood. Here we show that the MLL-AF4 fusion protein occupies developmental regulatory genes important for hematopoietic stem cell identity and self-renewal in human leukemia cells. These MLL-AF4-bound regions have grossly altered chromatin structure, with histone modifications catalyzed by trithorax group proteins and DOT1 extending acr...

  6. Human subtelomeric WASH genes encode a new subclass of the WASP family.

    OpenAIRE

    Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Parghi, Sean S; Cynthia Friedman; Osborn, Gregory E; Parkhurst, Susan M.; Trask, Barbara J.

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Human subtelomeres are rearrangement-prone regions near chromosome ends. They are concentrations of large, recent interchromosomal duplications. Over half of subtelomeric sequences changed copy number or location since humans and chimpanzee diverged, and subtelomeric content varies greatly among humans. Despite this dynamic activity, subtelomeres contain genes. We report the discovery of genes defining a previously unrecognized third subclass of the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome pro...

  7. APUM5, encoding a Pumilio RNA binding protein, negatively regulates abiotic stress responsive gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Background A mutant screening was carried out previously to look for new genes related to the Cucumber mosaic virus infection response in Arabidopsis. A Pumilio RNA binding protein-coding gene, Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 (APUM5), was obtained from this screening. Results APUM5 transcriptional profiling was carried out using a bioinformatics tool. We found that APUM5 was associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, bacterial and fungal pathogen infection su...

  8. The immune gene repertoire encoded in the purple sea urchin genome

    OpenAIRE

    Hibino, Taku; Loza-Coll, Mariano; Messier, Cynthia; Majeske, Audrey J.; Cohen, Avis H.; Terwilliger, David P.; Buckley, Katherine M.; Brockton, Virginia; Nair, Sham V.; Berney, Kevin; Fugmann, Sebastian D.; Anderson, Michele K.; Pancer, Zeev; Cameron, R. Andrew; Smith, L Courtney

    2006-01-01

    Echinoderms occupy a critical and largely unexplored phylogenetic vantage point from which to infer both the early evolution of bilaterian immunity and the underpinnings of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Here we present an initial survey of the purple sea urchin genome for genes associated with immunity. An elaborate repertoire of potential immune receptors, regulators and effectors is present, including unprecedented expansions of innate pathogen recognition genes. These include a di...

  9. Cloning and sequencing of a gene encoding a 21-kilodalton outer membrane protein from Bordetella avium and expression of the gene in Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry-Weeks, C R; Hultsch, A L; Kelly, S M; Keith, J M; Curtiss, R

    1992-12-01

    Three gene libraries of Bordetella avium 197 DNA were prepared in Escherichia coli LE392 by using the cosmid vectors pCP13 and pYA2329, a derivative of pCP13 specifying spectinomycin resistance. The cosmid libraries were screened with convalescent-phase anti-B. avium turkey sera and polyclonal rabbit antisera against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. One E. coli recombinant clone produced a 56-kDa protein which reacted with convalescent-phase serum from a turkey infected with B. avium 197. In addition, five E. coli recombinant clones were identified which produced B. avium outer membrane proteins with molecular masses of 21, 38, 40, 43, and 48 kDa. At least one of these E. coli clones, which encoded the 21-kDa protein, reacted with both convalescent-phase turkey sera and antibody against B. avium 197 outer membrane proteins. The gene for the 21-kDa outer membrane protein was localized by Tn5seq1 mutagenesis, and the nucleotide sequence was determined by dideoxy sequencing. DNA sequence analysis of the 21-kDa protein revealed an open reading frame of 582 bases that resulted in a predicted protein of 194 amino acids. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequence of the gene encoding the 21-kDa outer membrane protein with protein sequences in the National Biomedical Research Foundation protein sequence data base indicated significant homology to the OmpA proteins of Shigella dysenteriae, Enterobacter aerogenes, E. coli, and Salmonella typhimurium and to Neisseria gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein III, Haemophilus influenzae protein P6, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa porin protein F. The gene (ompA) encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein hybridized with 4.1-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella bronchiseptica and with 6.0- and 3.2-kb DNA fragments from EcoRI-digested, chromosomal DNA of B. avium and B. avium-like DNA, respectively. A 6.75-kb DNA fragment encoding the B. avium 21-kDa protein was subcloned into the

  10. SPATULA, a gene that controls development of carpel margin tissues in Arabidopsis, encodes a bHLH protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisler, M G; Atkinson, A; Bylstra, Y H; Walsh, R; Smyth, D R

    2001-04-01

    Studies involving mutants of the gene SPATULA indicate that it promotes the growth of carpel margins and of pollen tract tissues derived from them. We show that it encodes a new member of the basic-helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. SPATULA is expressed in marginal and pollen tract tissues throughout their development confirming its role in regulating their growth. It is also expressed in many other tissues where it may act redundantly to control growth, including the peripheral zone of the shoot apical meristem, and specific tissues within leaves, petals, stamens and roots. Expression in the stomium, funiculus and valve dehiscence zone indicates an additional role in abscission. SPATULA expression does not require the function of the other carpel development genes CRABS CLAW and AGAMOUS, although its expression is repressed in first whorl organs by the A function gene APETALA2. Further, we have shown that disruptions to gynoecial pattern formation seen in ettin mutants can largely be attributed to ectopic SPATULA action. ETTIN's role seems to be to negatively regulate SPATULA expression in abaxial regions of the developing gynoecium. SPATULA is the first basic-helix-loop-helix gene in plants known to play a role in floral organogenesis. PMID:11245574

  11. Characterization of a novel anther-specific gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat protein in petunia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Y Z; Sun, J; Huang, X; Peng, H; Liu, G F; Hu, H R

    2014-01-01

    In Petunia x hybrida 'Fantasy Red', a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene referred to as PhLRR, was identified in a flower bud cDNA library. The open reading frame sequence of PhLRR was 1251 bp, encoding a putative 46.2-kDa protein of 416 amino acids. The PhLRR protein showed high similarity to members of polygalacturonase inhibitor proteins (PGIPs), contained 11 conserved LRR domains, and was an extracellular localization protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PhLRR belonged to the same PGIPs subfamily as SHY, indicating that PhLRR may be involved in the development of pollen-like SHY. Expression analysis revealed that PhLRR was abundantly expressed during early stages of flower bud and anther development, while it was not detected in any other examined organs, such as sepals, petals, pistils, roots, stems, leaves, or open flowers. Furthermore, many cis-acting elements (such as AGAAA and GTGA) related to anther-specific gene expression were identified in the PhLRR gene promoter region, indicating that the promoter is also anther-specific. These results suggested that PhLRR is a novel anther-specific gene that may be essential for the early development of anthers. PMID:25501199

  12. Isolation of DNA encoding sucrase genes from Streptococcus salivarius and partial characterization of the enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, C M; Pear, J R; Elliott, R; Perchorowicz, J T

    1987-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fragments containing two sucrase genes have been isolated from a cosmid library of Streptococcus salivarius DNA. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the properties of both enzymes were studied in partially purified protein extracts from E. coli. One gene encoding an invertase-type sucrase was subcloned on a 2.4-kilobase-pair fragment. The sucrase enzyme had a Km for sucrose of 48 mM and a pH optimum of 6.5. The S. salivarius sucrase clone showed no detectable hybridization to a yeast invertase clone. Two overlapping subclones which had 1 kilobase pair of DNA in common were used to localize a fructosyltransferase gene. The fructosyltransferase had a Km of 93 mM and a pH optimum of 7.0. The product of the fructosyltransferase was a levan. A fructosyltransferase clone from Bacillus subtilis did not hybridize to S. salivarius DNA. The properties of the enzymes were compared with those of previously characterized sucrases. Images PMID:3112128

  13. Chromosomal localization of a novel retinoic acid induced gene RA28 and the protein distribution of its encoded protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Gene RA28 is a retinoic acid induced novel gene isolated in our laboratory previously. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) was used to induce lung adenocarcinoma cell line GLC-82, and RA28 was obtained by subtractive hybridization. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has emerged as a unique tool for examining introcellular phenomena in living cells. GFP possesses an intrinsic fluorescence at 488 nm that does not require other co-factors. In this report, an eukaryotic expression plasmid pEGFP-C1-RA28 was constructed and transfected with parental cell line GLC-82 to analyze protein expression and its distribution in living cells. Moreover, radiation hybrid (RH) technique was used to localize RA28 to the chromosome. The results show that gene RA28 is mapped to the chromosome 19q13.1 region, its encoded protein is distributed on cell membrane. All the results further demonstrate that GFP and RH techniques are accurate, fast, repetitive, and will be powerful methods for investigating the gene and protein localization.

  14. Cloning, Sequencing and Characterization of 3-Hydroxybuty- rate Dehydrogenase Encoding Gene (bdh A) in Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Mei-xue; WU Bo; BAI Xue-liang; ZHANG Cheng-gang; MA Qing-sheng; Charles Trevor C

    2002-01-01

    The current study describes the molecular characterization of a clone which can restore the ability of bdhA mutant strains NGRPA2 and Rm11107 to utilize 3-hydroxybutyrate as a sole carbon source (Hbu+). This clone was screened out by complementation experiment from Bradyrhizobium japonicum USDA110 genomic library, and the presence of bdhA gene in the clone was verified by Bdh assay and Southern blot analysis. Furthermore, the entire sequence of bdhA gene was sequenced and the sequence was deposited in GenBank database under the accession number AY077581. bdhA gene comprises 789 base pairs and encodes Bdh with 262 amino acid of MW 27.59 kDa. Interposon ΩKm was inserted into the bdh A ORF at EcoR I site and the bdhA mutant was constructed in B .japonicum by homologous recombination. Plant assay result did not show obvious effects of mutation of bdhA gene on nodulation and nitrogen-fixation.

  15. Identification of an Amino Acid Domain Encoded by the Capsid Protein Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 that Modulates Viral Protein Distribution During Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous work showed that distinct amino acid motifs are encoded by the Rep, Cap and ORF3 genes of two subgroups of porcine circoviruses (PCV), PCV2a and PCV2b. At a specific location of the gene, a certain amino acid residue or sequence is preferred. Specifically, two amino acid domains located in ...

  16. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  17. COMPLEMENTATION OF THE AMYLOSE-FREE STARCH MUTANT OF POTATO (SOLANUM-TUBEROSUM) BY THE GENE ENCODING GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLEIJ, FR; VISSER, RGF; OOSTERHAVEN, K; VANDERKOP, DAM; JACOBSEN, E; FEENSTRA, WJ

    1991-01-01

    Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated introduction of the wild-type allele of the gene encoding granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) into the amylose-free starch mutant amf of potato leads to restoration of GBSS activity and amylose synthesis, which demonstrates that Amf is the structural gene for GBSS.

  18. Structures of genes nasA and nasB, encoding assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases in Klebsiella pneumoniae M5al.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J. T.; Goldman, B. S.; Stewart, V

    1993-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae can use nitrate and nitrite as sole nitrogen sources during aerobic growth. Assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductases convert nitrate through nitrite to ammonium. We report here the molecular cloning of the nasA and nasB genes, which encode assimilatory nitrate and nitrite reductase, respectively. These genes are tightly linked and probably form a nasBA operon. In vivo protein expression and DNA sequence analysis revealed that the nasA and nasB genes encode 92- and 104...

  19. The FER gene is evolutionarily conserved and encodes a widely expressed member of the FPS/FES protein-tyrosine kinase family.

    OpenAIRE

    Pawson, T; Letwin, K; T. Lee; Hao, Q L; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J

    1989-01-01

    We have recently isolated human and rat cDNAs (designated FER and flk, respectively) which encode nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinases which are very similar to one another and related in sequence and domain structure to the c-fps/fes gene product. We show that FER and flk are human and rat counterparts of an evolutionarily conserved gene, hereafter termed FER regardless of species. The human and rat FER genes encode a widely expressed 94-kilodalton protein-tyrosine kinase which is antigenica...

  20. The oil palm SHELL gene controls oil yield and encodes a homologue of SEEDSTICK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Ting, Ngoot-Chin; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Amiruddin, Mohd Din; Rosli, Rozana; Manaf, Mohamad Arif Abdul; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; Budiman, Muhammad A; Hogan, Michael; Bacher, Blaire; Van Brunt, Andrew; Wang, Chunyan; Ordway, Jared M; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Martienssen, Robert A

    2013-08-15

    A key event in the domestication and breeding of the oil palm Elaeis guineensis was loss of the thick coconut-like shell surrounding the kernel. Modern E. guineensis has three fruit forms, dura (thick-shelled), pisifera (shell-less) and tenera (thin-shelled), a hybrid between dura and pisifera. The pisifera palm is usually female-sterile. The tenera palm yields far more oil than dura, and is the basis for commercial palm oil production in all of southeast Asia. Here we describe the mapping and identification of the SHELL gene responsible for the different fruit forms. Using homozygosity mapping by sequencing, we found two independent mutations in the DNA-binding domain of a homologue of the MADS-box gene SEEDSTICK (STK, also known as AGAMOUS-LIKE 11), which controls ovule identity and seed development in Arabidopsis. The SHELL gene is responsible for the tenera phenotype in both cultivated and wild palms from sub-Saharan Africa, and our findings provide a genetic explanation for the single gene hybrid vigour (or heterosis) attributed to SHELL, via heterodimerization. This gene mutation explains the single most important economic trait in oil palm, and has implications for the competing interests of global edible oil production, biofuels and rainforest conservation. PMID:23883930

  1. Polymorphisms of genes encoding interleukin-4 and its receptor in Iranian patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaee, Vahid; Rezaei, Arezou; Harsini, Sara; Maddah, Marzieh; Zoghi, Samaneh; Sadr, Maryam; Moradinejad, Mohammad Hassan; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-08-01

    As cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), seem to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), this study is aimed at investigating of association of polymorphisms in IL-4 and IL-4 receptor α (IL-4RA) genes with susceptibility to JIA. A case-control study was conducted on 53 patients with JIA and 139 healthy unrelated controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of IL-4 gene at positions -1098, -590, and -33, as well as IL-4RA gene at position +1902 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers method and compared between patients and healthy individuals. At the allelic level, C allele at IL-4 -33 was found to be more frequent in patients compared to control (P value TCC haplotype at the same positions was found to be higher in patients (P value <0.01). Polymorphic site of +1902 IL-4RA gene did not differ between cases and controls. Polymorphisms in promoter region of IL-4 but not IL-4RA genes confer susceptibility to JIA and may predispose individuals to adaptive immune responses. PMID:26951255

  2. A Gene of the β3-Glycosyltransferase Family Encodes N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferase II Function in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damerow, Manuela; Graalfs, Frauke; Güther, M Lucia S; Mehlert, Angela; Izquierdo, Luis; Ferguson, Michael A J

    2016-06-24

    The bloodstream form of the human pathogen Trypanosoma brucei expresses oligomannose, paucimannose, and complex N-linked glycans, including some exceptionally large poly-N-acetyllactosamine-containing structures. Despite the presence of complex N-glycans in this organism, no homologues of the canonical N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I or II genes can be found in the T. brucei genome. These genes encode the activities that initiate the elaboration of the Manα1-3 and Manα1-6 arms, respectively, of the conserved trimannosyl-N-acetylchitobiosyl core of N-linked glycans. Previously, we identified a highly divergent T. brucei N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (TbGnTI) among a set of putative T. brucei glycosyltransferase genes belonging to the β3-glycosyltransferase superfamily (Damerow, M., Rodrigues, J. A., Wu, D., Güther, M. L., Mehlert, A., and Ferguson, M. A. (2014) J. Biol. Chem. 289, 9328-9339). Here, we demonstrate that TbGT15, another member of the same β3-glycosyltransferase family, encodes an equally divergent N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (TbGnTII) activity. In contrast to multicellular organisms, where GnTII activity is essential, TbGnTII null mutants of T. brucei grow in culture and are still infectious to animals. Characterization of the large poly-N-acetyllactosamine containing N-glycans of the TbGnTII null mutants by methylation linkage analysis suggests that, in wild-type parasites, the Manα1-6 arm of the conserved trimannosyl core may carry predominantly linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains, whereas the Manα1-3 arm may carry predominantly branched poly-N-acetyllactosamine chains. These results provide further detail on the structure and biosynthesis of complex N-glycans in an important human pathogen and provide a second example of the adaptation by trypanosomes of β3-glycosyltransferase family members to catalyze β1-2 glycosidic linkages. PMID:27189951

  3. Retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2 in mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yingang; Guo Xiong; Liu Zheng; Wang Shijie

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2 in mesenchymal stem cells. Methods Mesenchymal stem cells from New Zealand white rabbits were transduced with retroviral pLEGFP-BMP2 vector by the optimized retroviral transduction protocol. Fluorescent microscopy's examination was to evaluate the results of the transduction, flow cytometer's analysis was to evaluate the transduction efficiency and the Fluorescence-activated cell sorting method was to sort the transduced cells. Bioactivity test from C2C12K4 cells was to show the expression and bio-activity of the fusion gene. Results Fluorescent microscopy showed the success of the transduction. By flow cytometer's analysis, the mean efficiency of the transduction with EGFP was (42.8±6.1)% SD. Transduced cells were sorted efficiently by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting method and after sorting, almost of those showed the expression of BMP2. Fluorescently and strongly bioactivity test for C2C12K4 cells demonstrated that fluorescent materials were located the surface of cells and the activity of luciferase increased compared with the control. Analysis of long-term expression showed there was no difference between 2 week-time point and 3 month-time point of culture post-sorting. Conclusion Mesenchymal stem cells can be transduced efficiently by retrovirus-mediated transfer of the fusion gene encoding EGFP-BMP2, the highly pure transduced cells are obtained by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting technique, the expressed chimeric protein embraced the double bioactivity of EGFP and BMP2, and moreover, the expression had not attenuated over time.

  4. Cloning and expression of AtPLC6, a gene encoding a phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiaojing; CAO Zhixiang; LIU Guoqin; Madan K. Bhattacharrya; REN Dongtao

    2004-01-01

    A full-length eDNA clone corresponding to a putative phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PIPLC) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by screening a cDNA library and using RT-PCR strategy. The cDNA, designated AtPLC6, encodes a putative polypeptide of 578 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 66251.84 D and a pI of 7.24. The sequence analysis indicates that the polypeptide contains X, Y, EF-hand and C2 domains. The overall structure of putative AtPLC6 protein, like other plant PI-PLCs, is most similar to that of mammalian PLC& The recombinant AtPLC6 protein expressed in E. coli was able to hydrolyze phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biophosphate (PIP2) to generate inositol 1,4,5-trisphate (IP3) and 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG). The protein hydrolyzes PIP2 in a Ca2+-dependent manner and the optimum concentration of Ca2+ is 10 μmol/L.These results suggested that AtPLC6 gene encodes a genuine PI-PLC. Northern blot analysis showed that the AtPLC6 gene is expressed at low level in all examined tissues, such as roots,stems, leaves, flowers, siliques and seedlings under normal growth conditions. The gene is strongly induced under low temperature and weakly induced under various stresses,such as ABA, high-salt stress and heat. These results suggested that AtPLC6 might be involved in the signal-transduction pathways of cold responses of the plants.

  5. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3'-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix-hairpin-Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway. PMID:27026054

  6. Expansion Mechanisms and Evolutionary History on Genes Encoding DNA Glycosylases and Their Involvement in Stress and Hormone Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    DNA glycosylases catalyze the release of methylated bases. They play vital roles in the base excision repair pathway and might also function in DNA demethylation. At least three families of DNA glycosylases have been identified, which included 3′-methyladenine DNA glycosylase (MDG) I, MDG II, and HhH-GPD (Helix–hairpin–Helix and Glycine/Proline/aspartate (D)). However, little is known on their genome-wide identification, expansion, and evolutionary history as well as their expression profiling and biological functions. In this study, we have genome-widely identified and evolutionarily characterized these family members. Generally, a genome encodes only one MDG II gene in most of organisms. No MDG I or MDG II gene was detected in green algae. However, HhH-GPD genes were detectable in all available organisms. The ancestor species contain small size of MDG I and HhH-GPD families. These two families were mainly expanded through the whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication. They were evolutionarily conserved and were generally under purifying selection. However, we have detected recent positive selection among the Oryza genus, which might play roles in species divergence. Further investigation showed that expression divergence played important roles in gene survival after expansion. All of these family genes were expressed in most of developmental stages and tissues in rice plants. High ratios of family genes were downregulated by drought and fungus pathogen as well as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) treatments, suggesting a negative regulation in response to drought stress and pathogen infection through ABA- and/or JA-dependent hormone signaling pathway. PMID:27026054

  7. Multicentre evaluation of a real-time PCR assay to detect genes encoding clinically relevant carbapenemases in cultured bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Matthew J; Findlay, Jacqueline; Hopkins, Katie L; Meunier, Danièle; Alvarez-Buylla, Adela; Horner, Carolyne; McEwan, Ashley; Guiver, Malcolm; McCrae, Li-Xu; Woodford, Neil; Hawkey, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The performance and portability of a multiplex real-time PCR assay to detect KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like and VIM carbapenemase gene families from bacterial isolates was assessed using Rotor-Gene Q and ABI 7500 instruments. Gram-negative bacterial isolates (n=502) were comprised of 100 isolates each with KPC, NDM, VIM or OXA-48-like carbapenemases (including 17 with OXA-181) and 2 isolates with NDM+OXA-48-like enzymes (including 1 with OXA-181) as well as 100 assay-negative isolates comprised of 24 IMP-producers, 24 carbapenem-resistant isolates with no known carbapenemase gene and 52 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing carbapenem-susceptible isolates. A multicentre evaluation was carried out in five laboratories using a subset of 100 isolates comprised of 22 isolates each with KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like or VIM alleles and 12 isolates that were negative for the assay targets. Initial validation of the assay on both the Rotor-Gene Q and ABI 7500 instruments demonstrated 100% sensitivity amongst the 402 isolates that were positive for KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like (including OXA-181) and VIM carbapenemase genes, whilst the 100 assay-negative samples were correctly identified indicating 100% specificity. During the multicentre evaluation the same 100% level of sensitivity and specificity was observed in each of the five centres that participated. Neither invalid nor false-positive results were observed. In conclusion, the assay offers a portable and reliable option for the detection of bacteria carrying clinically significant carbapenemases encoded by KPC, NDM, VIM and OXA-48-like carbapenemase genes using either of the two most common real-time PCR instrument platforms. PMID:26795023

  8. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at...... involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins....

  9. Differential expression of genes encoding subthreshold-operating voltage-gated K+ channels in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saganich, M J; Machado, E; Rudy, B

    2001-07-01

    The members of the three subfamilies (eag, erg, and elk) of the ether-a-go-go (EAG) family of potassium channel pore-forming subunits express currents that, like the M-current (I(M)), could have considerable influence on the subthreshold properties of neuronal membranes, and hence the control of excitability. A nonradioactive in situ hybridization (NR-ISH) study of the distribution of the transcripts encoding the eight known EAG family subunits in rat brain was performed to identify neuronal populations in which the physiological roles of EAG channels could be studied. These distributions were compared with those of the mRNAs encoding the components of the classical M-current (Kcnq2 and Kcnq3). NR-ISH was combined with immunohistochemistry to specific neuronal markers to help identify expressing neurons. The results show that each EAG subunit has a specific pattern of expression in rat brain. EAG and Kcnq transcripts are prominent in several types of excitatory neurons in the cortex and hippocampus; however, only one of these channel components (erg1) was consistently expressed in inhibitory interneurons in these areas. Some neuronal populations express more than one product of the same subfamily, suggesting that the subunits may form heteromeric channels in these neurons. Many neurons expressed multiple EAG family and Kcnq transcripts, such as CA1 pyramidal neurons, which contained Kcnq2, Kcnq3, eag1, erg1, erg3, elk2, and elk3. This indicates that the subthreshold current in many neurons may be complex, containing different components mediated by a number of channels with distinct properties and neuromodulatory responses. PMID:11425889

  10. Structure and expression of genes encoding murine Qa-2 class I antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Mellor, A L; Antoniou, J; Robinson, P J

    1985-01-01

    DNA structural analysis of the Qa region in two BALB/c mouse substrains with different Qa-2 phenotypes reveals that a deletion of DNA has occurred in BALB/cBy (Qa-2-) mice relative to BALB/c (Qa-2+) mice. We propose that this deletion arises from unequal crossing-over and recombination between adjacent BALB/c class I genes and results in the generation of a hybrid class I gene in BALB/cBy mice. Furthermore, we suggest that this is a direct cause of the change in Qa-2 phenotype. Further suppor...

  11. Characterization of the gene encoding the hemocyanin subunit e from the tarantula Eurypelma californicum.

    OpenAIRE

    Voll, W; Voit, R

    1990-01-01

    The gene for the hemocyanin subunit e of the tarantula Eurypelma californicum has been isolated from a genomic phage library by using a corresponding cDNA clone as a probe. The transcriptional unit spans a chromosomal region of about 55 kilobase pairs (kbp). The gene consists of nine exons that are separated by large introns. The intron/exon boundaries were determined by direct comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences. A putative promoter region ("TATA" box, reversed "CAAT" box) 100 bp 5' to ...

  12. Identifying the viral genes encoding envelope glycoproteins for differentiation of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Se Chang Park; Sang Phil Shin; Casiano Choresca Jr.; Ji Hyung Kim; Tristan Renault; Jee Eun Han; Jin Woo Jun

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) diseases have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of koi (Cyprinus carpio). Although little work has been conducted on the molecular analysis of this virus, glycoprotein genes identified in the present study seem to be valuable targets for genetic comparison of this virus. Three envelope glycoprotein genes (ORF25, 65 and 116) of the CyHV-3 isolates from the USA, Israel, Japan and Korea were compared, and interestingly, seque...

  13. Conservation of plasmid-encoded dibenzothiophene desulfurization genes in several rhodococci.

    OpenAIRE

    Denis-Larose, C; Labbé, D.; Bergeron, H.; Jones, A M; Greer, C. W.; al-Hawari, J; Grossman, M. J.; Sankey, B M; Lau, P C

    1997-01-01

    The cloned sulfur oxidation (desulfurization) genes (sox) for dibenzothiophene (DBT) from the prototype Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 were used in Southern hybridization and PCR experiments to establish the DNA relatedness in six new rhodococcal isolates which are capable of utilizing DBT as a sole sulfur source for growth. The ability of these strains to desulfurize appears to be an exclusive property of a 4-kb gene locus on a large plasmid of ca. 150 kb in IGTS8 and ca. 100 kb in the other s...

  14. Investigation of 16 genes encoding adhesin in Staphylococcus spp%葡萄球菌属16种黏附素编码基因研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董筱莉; 韩兰秀; 周剑波; 金花; 张丽君; 王敏霞

    2014-01-01

    目的:调查一组凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因携带状况,分析黏附素编码基因及荚膜抗原编码基因检出率。方法收集2013年3-9月江苏省江阴市人民医院住院患者标本中分离的凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌共20株,用spa基因PCR检测作金黄色葡萄球菌的分子鉴定,再采用聚合酶链反应(PCR)的方法分析16种黏附素编码基因和荚膜抗原的型别编码基因(cap5、cap8)。结果20株凝固酶阳性葡萄球菌中13株为金黄色葡萄球菌,其余7株为非金黄色葡萄球菌;13株金黄色葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因每一株均有阳性检出,除 s as X基因阳性率低外,其余均较高;荚膜抗原编码基因12株有阳性检出;7株非金黄色葡萄球菌无任何黏附素与荚膜抗原编码基因检出。结论对金黄色葡萄球菌进行16种黏附素编码基因及2种荚膜抗原编码基因联合检测研究尚为国内外首次,13株金黄色葡萄球菌黏附素编码基因及荚膜抗原编码基因高检出率可能与菌株定植及感染相关。%OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution of the genes encoding adhesin in a group of Staphylococcus spp and analyze the detection rate of the genes encoding adhesin and the genes encoding capsular antigen . METHODS A total of 20 strains of coagulase‐negative Staphylococcus were isolated from the specimens that were obtained from the hospitalized patients who were treated in the Jiangyin People's Hospital from Mar 2013 to Sep 2013 ,then the molecular identification of Staphylococcus aureus was performed by using spa PCR ,and the 16 genes encoding adhesion and the genes encoding capsular antigen (cap5、cap8) were analyzed by means of polymer‐ase‐chain‐reaction (PCR) .RESULTS Of the 20 strains of coagulase‐negative Staphylococcus ,13 strains were the S .aureus ,and the rest of 7 strains were non‐S .aureus;each of the 13 strains of S .aureus was tested positive for the gene

  15. Chromosomal instability selects gene copy number variants encoding core regulators of proliferation in ER+ breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endesfelder, David; McGranahan, Nicholas; Howell, Mike; Parker, Peter J.; Downward, Julian; Swanton, Charles; Kschischo, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is associated with poor outcome in epithelial malignancies including breast carcinomas. Evidence suggests that prognostic signatures in estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer define tumors with CIN and high proliferative potential. Intriguingly, CIN induction in lower eukaryotic cells and human cells is context-dependent, typically resulting in a proliferation disadvantage but conferring a fitness benefit under strong selection pressures. We hypothesised that CIN permits accelerated genomic evolution through the generation of diverse DNA copy number events that may be selected during disease development. In support of this hypothesis, we found evidence for selection of gene amplification of core regulators of proliferation in CIN-associated cancer genomes. Stable DNA copy number amplifications of the core regulators TPX2 and UBE2C were associated with expression of a gene module involved in proliferation. The module genes were enriched within prognostic signature gene sets for ER+ breast cancer, providing a logical connection between CIN and prognostic signature expression. Our results provide a framework to decipher the impact of intratumor heterogeneity on key cancer phenotypes, and they suggest that CIN provides a permissive landscape for selection of copy number alterations which drive cancer proliferation. PMID:24970479

  16. Increases in the abundance of microbial genes encoding halotolerance and photosynthesis along a sediment salinity gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Jeffries

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogeochemical cycles are driven by the metabolic activity of microbial communities, yet the environmental parameters that underpin shifts in the functional potential coded within microbial community genomes are still poorly understood. Salinity is one of the primary determinants of microbial community structure and can vary strongly along gradients within a variety of habitats. To test the hypothesis that shifts in salinity will also alter the bulk biogeochemical potential of aquatic microbial assemblages, we generated four metagenomic DNA sequence libraries from sediment samples taken along a continuous, natural salinity gradient in the Coorong lagoon, Australia, and compared them to physical and chemical parameters. A total of 392483 DNA sequences obtained from four sediment samples were generated and used to compare genomic characteristics along the gradient. The most significant shifts along the salinity gradient were in the genetic potential for halotolerance and photosynthesis, which were more highly represented in hypersaline samples. At these sites, halotolerance was achieved by an increase in genes responsible for the acquisition of compatible solutes – organic chemicals which influence the carbon, nitrogen and methane cycles of sediment. Photosynthesis gene increases were coupled to an increase in genes matching Cyanobacteria, which are responsible for mediating CO2 and nitrogen cycles. These salinity driven shifts in gene abundance will influence nutrient cycles along the gradient, controlling the ecology and biogeochemistry of the entire ecosystem.

  17. Molecular cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the gene encoding human eosinophil differentiation factor (interleukin 5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF) gene was cloned from a genomic library in λ phage EMBL3A by using a murine EDF cDNA clone as a probe. The DNA sequence of a 3.2-kilobase BamHI fragment spanning the gene was determined. The gene contains three introns. The predicted amino acid sequence of 134 amino acids is identical with that recently reported for human interleukin 5 but shows no significant homology with other known hemopoietic growth regulators. The amino acid sequence shows strong homology (∼ 70% identity) with that of murine EDF. Recombinant human EDF, expressed from the human EDF gene after transfection into monkey COS cells, stimulated the production of eosinophils and eosinophil colonies from normal human bone marrow but had no effect on the production of neutrophils or mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphoid cells). The apparent specificity of human EDF for the eosinophil lineage in myeloid hemopoiesis contrasts with the properties of human interleukin 3 and granulocyte/macrophage and granulocyte colony-stimulating factors but is directly analogous to the biological properties of murine EDF. Human EDF therefore represents a distinct hemopoietic growth factor that could play a central role in the regulation of eosinophilia

  18. The complete nucleotide sequence and structure of the gene encoding bovine phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batter, D K; D'Mello, S R; Turzai, L M; Hughes, H B; Gioio, A E; Kaplan, B B

    1988-03-01

    A cDNA clone for bovine adrenal phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) was used to screen a Charon 28 genomic library. One phage was identified, designated lambda P1, which included the entire PNMT gene. Construction of a restriction map, with subsequent Southern blot analysis, allowed the identification of exon-containing fragments. Dideoxy sequence analysis of these fragments, and several more further upstream, indicates that the bovine PNMT gene is 1,594 base pairs in length, consisting of three exons and two introns. The transcription initiation site was identified by two independent methods and is located approximately 12 base pairs upstream from the ATG translation start site. The 3' untranslated region is 88 base pairs in length and contains the expected polyadenylation signal (AATAAA). A putative promoter sequence (TATA box) is located about 25 base pairs upstream from the transcription initiation site. Computer comparison of the nucleotide sequence data with the consensus sequences of known regulatory elements revealed potential binding sites for glucocorticoid receptors and the Sp1 regulatory protein in the 5' flanking region of the gene. Additionally, comparison of the sequence of the exons of the PNMT gene with cDNA sequences for other enzymes involved in biogenic amine synthesis revealed no significant homology, indicating that PNMT is not a member of a multigene family of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes. PMID:3379652

  19. Common variants of the genes encoding erythropoietin and its receptor modulate cognitive performance in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästner, Anne; Grube, Sabrina; El-Kordi, Ahmed;

    2012-01-01

    ) genotypes with cognitive functions. To prove this hypothesis, schizophrenic patients (N > 1000) were genotyped for 5' upstream-located gene variants, EPO SNP rs1617640 (T/G) and EPORSTR(GA)(n). Associations of these variants were obtained for cognitive processing speed, fine motor skills and short...

  20. Characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARG7 gene encoding ornithine acetyltransferase, an enzyme also endowed with acetylglutamate synthase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabeel, M; Abadjieva, A; Hilven, P; Desimpelaere, J; Soetens, O

    1997-12-01

    We have cloned by functional complementation and characterized the yeast ARG7 gene encoding mitochondrial ornithine acetyltransferase, the enzyme catalyzing the fifth step in arginine biosynthesis. While forming ornithine, this enzyme regenerates acetylglutamate, also produced in the first step by the ARG2-encoded acetylglutamate synthase. Interestingly, total deletion of the genomic ARG7 ORF resulted in an arginine-leaky phenotype, indicating that yeast cells possess an alternative route for generating ornithine from acetylornithine. Yeast ornithine acetyltransferase has been purified and characterized previously as a heterodimer of two subunits proposed to derive from a single precursor protein [Liu, Y-S., Van Heeswijck R., Hoj, P. & Hoogenraad, N. (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 228, 291-296]; those authors further suggested that the internal processing of Arg7p, which is a mitochondrial enzyme, might occur in the matrix, while the leader peptide would be of the non-cleavable-type. The characterization of the gene (a) establishes that Arg7p is indeed encoded by a single gene, (b) demonstrates the existence of a cleaved mitochondrial prepeptide of eight residues, and (c) shows that the predicted internal processing site is unlike the mitochondrial proteolytic peptidase target sequence. Yeast Arg7p shares between 32-43% identity in pairwise comparisons with the ten analogous bacterial ArgJ enzymes characterized. Among these evolutionarily related enzymes, some but not all appear bifunctional, being able to produce acetylglutamate not only from acetylornithine but also from acetyl-CoA, thus catalyzing the same reaction as the apparently unrelated acetylglutamate synthase. We have addressed the question of the bifunctionality of the eucaryotic enzyme, showing that overexpressed ARG7 can complement yeast arg2 and Escherichia coli argA mutations (affecting acetylglutamate synthase). Furthermore, Arg7p-linked acetylglutamate synthase activity was measurable in an assay. The

  1. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Malcolm S.; Hill, April L.; Lopez, Jose; Peterson, Kevin J.; Pomponi, Shirley; Diaz, Maria C.; Thacker, Robert W.; Adamska, Maja; Boury-Esnault, Nicole; Cárdenas, Paco; Chaves-Fonnegra, Andia; Danka, Elizabeth; De Laine, Bre-Onna; Formica, Dawn; Hajdu, Eduardo; Lobo-Hajdu, Gisele; Klontz, Sarah; Morrow, Christine C.; Patel, Jignasa; Picton, Bernard; Pisani, Davide; Pohlmann, Deborah; Redmond, Niamh E.; Reed, John; Richey, Stacy; Riesgo, Ana; Rubin, Ewelina; Russell, Zach; Rützler, Klaus; Sperling, Erik A.; di Stefano, Michael; Tarver, James E.; Collins, Allen G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha), but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosap, Myxospongiaep, Spongillidap, Haploscleromorphap (the marine haplosclerids) and Democlaviap. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosap and Myxospongiaep to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorphap+Spongillidap+Democlaviap. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillidap) are sister to Haploscleromorphap rather than part of Democlaviap. Within Keratosap, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiaep, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlaviap, Tetractinellidap, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis), was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlaviap. Within Tetractinellidap, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae), and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. Conclusions/Significance These results, using an

  2. Expression of modified gene encoding functional human alpha-1-antitrypsin protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Saurabh; Singh, Rahul; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2008-10-01

    Transgenic plants offer promising alternative for large scale, sustainable production of safe, functional, recombinant proteins of therapeutic and industrial importance. Here, we report the expression of biologically active human alpha-1-antitrypsin in transgenic tomato plants. The 1,182 bp cDNA sequence of human AAT was strategically designed, modified and synthesized to adopt codon usage pattern of dicot plants, elimination of mRNA destabilizing sequences and modifications around 5' and 3' flanking regions of the gene to achieve high-level regulated expression in dicot plants. The native signal peptide sequence was substituted with modified signal peptide sequence of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) pathogenesis related protein PR1a, sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) sporamineA and with dicot-preferred native signal peptide sequence of AAT gene. A dicot preferred translation initiation context sequence, 38 bp alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated region were incorporated at 5' while an endoplasmic reticulum retention signal (KDEL) was incorporated at 3' end of the gene. The modified gene was synthesized by PCR based method using overlapping oligonucleotides. Tomato plants were genetically engineered by nuclear transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring three different constructs pPAK, pSAK and pNAK having modified AAT gene with different signal peptide sequences under the control of CaMV35S duplicated enhancer promoter. Promising transgenic plants expressing recombinant AAT protein upto 1.55% of total soluble leaf protein has been developed and characterized. Plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein with molecular mass of around approximately 50 kDa was biologically active, showing high specific activity and efficient inhibition of elastase activity. The enzymatic deglycosylation established proper glycosylation of the plant-expressed recombinant AAT protein in contrast to unglycosylated rAAT expressed in E. coli ( approximately 45 kDa). Our results demonstrate

  3. A Bacitracin-Resistant Bacillus subtilis Gene Encodes a Homologue of the Membrane-Spanning Subunit of the Bacillus licheniformis ABC Transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Ohki, Reiko; Tateno, Kozue; Okada, Youji; Okajima, Haruo; Asai, Kei; Sadaie, Yoshito; Murata, Makiko; Aiso, Toshiko

    2003-01-01

    Bacitracin is a peptide antibiotic nonribosomally produced by Bacillus licheniformis. The bcrABC genes which confer bacitracin resistance to the bacitracin producer encode ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins, which are hypothesized to pump out bacitracin from the cells. Bacillus subtilis 168, which has no bacitracin synthesizing operon, has several genes homologous to bcrABC. It was found that the disruption of ywoA, a gene homologous to bcrC, resulted in hypersensitivity to bacit...

  4. Use of the espZ Gene Encoded in the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement for Molecular Typing of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gilmour, Matthew W.; Tracz, Dobryan M.; Andrysiak, Ashleigh K.; Clark, Clifford G.; Tyson, Shari; Severini, Alberto; Ng, Lai-King

    2006-01-01

    Infections with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) result in frequent cases of sporadic and outbreak-associated enteric bacterial disease in humans. Classification of STEC is by stx genotype (encoding the Shiga toxins), O and H antigen serotype, and seropathotype (subgroupings based upon the clinical relevance and virulence-related genotypes of individual serotypes). The espZ gene is encoded in the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island responsible for the attach...

  5. Cloning and characterization of a gene encoding phage-related tail protein (PrTP) of endosymbiont Wolbachia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Wolbachia is an obligatory, maternally inherited intracellular bacterium, known to infect a wide range of arthropods. It has been implicated in causing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI), parthenogenesis, the feminization of genetic males and male-killing in different hosts. However, the molecular mechanisms by which this fastidious bacterium causes these reproductive abnormalities have not yet been determined. In this study, we report on the cloning and characterization of the gene encoding phage-related tail protein (PrTP) from Wolbachia in Drosophila melanogaster CantonS (wMelCS) and from Wolbachia in Drosophila melanogaster yw67c23 (wMel) by representational difference analysis (RDA) and ligation-mediated PCR (LM-PCR). The functionality of a bipartite nuclear localization signal sequence (NLS) of the gene was also successfully tested in Drosophila S2 cells. PrTP expression in various strains of Wolbachia was investigated. Our results suggest that PrTP may not induce CI directly. However, the existence of prtp provided direct evidence of phage-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT) that might play an important role in a variety of reproductive abnormalities of Wolbachia.

  6. Cloning and characterization of the gene encoding β-amyrin synthase in the glycyrrhizic acid biosynthetic pathway in Glycyrrhiza uralensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhiza uralensis is considered to be one of the most important herbs in traditional Chinese medicine due to its numerous pharmacological effects particularly its ability to relieve cough and act as a mucolytic. Based on previous research, these effects are mediated by a number of active ingredients, especially glycyrrhizic acid (GA. In the present study, a gene encoding β-amyrin synthase (β-AS involved in GA biosynthesis in G. uralensis has been cloned and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The cloned enzyme showed similar activity to native enzymes isolated from other Glycyrrhiza species to catalyze the conversion of 2,3-oxidosqualene into β-amyrin. In fact the β-AS gene is particularly important in the GA biosynthetic pathway in G. uralensis. The complete sequence of the enzyme was determined and a phylogenetic tree based on the β-AS gene of G. uralensis and 20 other species was created. This showed that Glycyrrhiza glabra had the closest kinship with G. uralensis. The results of this work will be useful in determining how to improve the efficacy of G. uralensis by improving its GA content and in exploring the biosynthesis of GA in vitro.

  7. The arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 gene encodes a component of the polar-auxin-transport efflux carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R.; Hilson, P.; Sedbrook, J.; Rosen, E.; Caspar, T.; Masson, P. H.

    1998-01-01

    Auxins are plant hormones that mediate many aspects of plant growth and development. In higher plants, auxins are polarly transported from sites of synthesis in the shoot apex to their sites of action in the basal regions of shoots and in roots. Polar auxin transport is an important aspect of auxin functions and is mediated by cellular influx and efflux carriers. Little is known about the molecular identity of its regulatory component, the efflux carrier [Estelle, M. (1996) Current Biol. 6, 1589-1591]. Here we show that mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana AGRAVITROPIC 1 (AGR1) gene involved in root gravitropism confer increased root-growth sensitivity to auxin and decreased sensitivity to ethylene and an auxin transport inhibitor, and cause retention of exogenously added auxin in root tip cells. We used positional cloning to show that AGR1 encodes a putative transmembrane protein whose amino acid sequence shares homologies with bacterial transporters. When expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AGR1 promotes an increased efflux of radiolabeled IAA from the cells and confers increased resistance to fluoro-IAA, a toxic IAA-derived compound. AGR1 transcripts were localized to the root distal elongation zone, a region undergoing a curvature response upon gravistimulation. We have identified several AGR1-related genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting a global role of this gene family in the control of auxin-regulated growth and developmental processes.

  8. KCNN Genes that Encode Small-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels Influence Alcohol and Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Audrey E; Griffin, William C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Nimitvilai, Sudarat; Cannady, Reginald; McGuier, Natalie S; Chesler, Elissa J; Miles, Michael F; Williams, Robert W; Randall, Patrick K; Woodward, John J; Becker, Howard C; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2015-07-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (KCa2) channels control neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity, and have been implicated in substance abuse. However, it is unknown if genes that encode KCa2 channels (KCNN1-3) influence alcohol and drug addiction. In the present study, an integrative functional genomics approach shows that genetic datasets for alcohol, nicotine, and illicit drugs contain the family of KCNN genes. Alcohol preference and dependence QTLs contain KCNN2 and KCNN3, and Kcnn3 transcript levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of genetically diverse BXD strains of mice predicted voluntary alcohol consumption. Transcript levels of Kcnn3 in the NAc negatively correlated with alcohol intake levels in BXD strains, and alcohol dependence enhanced the strength of this association. Microinjections of the KCa2 channel inhibitor apamin into the NAc increased alcohol intake in control C57BL/6J mice, while spontaneous seizures developed in alcohol-dependent mice following apamin injection. Consistent with this finding, alcohol dependence enhanced the intrinsic excitability of medium spiny neurons in the NAc core and reduced the function and protein expression of KCa2 channels in the NAc. Altogether, these data implicate the family of KCNN genes in alcohol, nicotine, and drug addiction, and identify KCNN3 as a mediator of voluntary and excessive alcohol consumption. KCa2.3 channels represent a promising novel target in the pharmacogenetic treatment of alcohol and drug addiction. PMID:25662840

  9. Sorghum Dw1, an agronomically important gene for lodging resistance, encodes a novel protein involved in cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Miki; Fujimoto, Haruka; Hirano, Ko; Araki-Nakamura, Satoko; Ohmae-Shinohara, Kozue; Fujii, Akihiro; Tsunashima, Masako; Song, Xian Jun; Ito, Yusuke; Nagae, Rie; Wu, Jianzhong; Mizuno, Hiroshi; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kitano, Hidemi; Matsuoka, Makoto; Kasuga, Shigemitsu; Sazuka, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Semi-dwarfing genes have contributed to enhanced lodging resistance, resulting in increased crop productivity. In the history of grain sorghum breeding, the spontaneous mutation, dw1 found in Memphis in 1905, was the first widely used semi-dwarfing gene. Here, we report the identification and characterization of Dw1. We performed quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and cloning, and revealed that Dw1 encodes a novel uncharacterized protein. Knockdown or T-DNA insertion lines of orthologous genes in rice and Arabidopsis also showed semi-dwarfism similar to that of a nearly isogenic line (NIL) carrying dw1 (NIL-dw1) of sorghum. A histological analysis of the NIL-dw1 revealed that the longitudinal parenchymal cell lengths of the internode were almost the same between NIL-dw1 and wildtype, while the number of cells per internode was significantly reduced in NIL-dw1. NIL-dw1dw3, carrying both dw1 and dw3 (involved in auxin transport), showed a synergistic phenotype. These observations demonstrate that the dw1 reduced the cell proliferation activity in the internodes, and the synergistic effect of dw1 and dw3 contributes to improved lodging resistance and mechanical harvesting. PMID:27329702

  10. Cloning and Characterisation of the Gene Encoding 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-CoA Synthase in Tripterygium wilfordii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jia Liu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Tripterygium wilfordii is a traditional Chinese medical plant used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The main bioactive compounds of the plant are diterpenoids and triterpenoids. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase (HMGS catalyses the reaction of acetoacetyl-CoA to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA, which is the first committed enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA pathway. The sequence information of HMGS in Tripterygium wilfordii is a basic resource necessary for studying the terpenoids in the plant. In this paper, full-length cDNA encoding HMGS was isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii (abbreviated TwHMGS, GenBank accession number: KM978213. The full length of TwHMGS is 1814 bp, and the gene encodes a protein with 465 amino acids. Sequence comparison revealed that TwHMGS exhibits high similarity to HMGSs of other plants. The tissue expression patterns revealed that the expression level of TwHMGS is highest in the stems and lowest in the roots. Induced expression of TwHMGS can be induced by MeJA, and the expression level is highest 4 h after induction. The functional complement assays in the YML126C knockout yeast demonstrated that TwHMGS participates in yeast terpenoid biosynthesis.

  11. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the genes encoding lytic functions of Bacteriophage phi g1e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, M; Kakikawa, M; Yamada, K; Taketo, A; Kodaira, K I

    1996-10-17

    The lysis genes of a Lactobacillus phage phi g1e were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 3813-bp phi g1e DNA revealed five successive open reading frames (ORF), Rorf50, Rorf118, hol, and lys and Rorf175, in the same DNA strand. By comparative analysis of the DNA sequence, the putative hol product (holin) has an estimated molecular weight is 14.2 kDa, and contains two potential transmembrane helices and highly charged N- and C-termini, resembling predicted holins (which are thought to be a cytoplasmic membrane-disrupting protein) encoded by other phages such as mv1 from Lactobacillus bulgaricus, phi adh from Lactobacillus gasseri, as well as monocins from Listeria. On the other hand, the putative phi g1e lys product (lysin) of 48.4 kDa shows significant similarity with presumed muramidase, known as a cell wall peptidoglycandegrading enzyme, encoded by the Lactobacillus phage mv1 and phi adh, the Lactococcus lactis phage phi LC3, and the Streptococcus pneumoniae phages Cp-1, Cp-7 and Cp-9. When expressed in E. coli, the phi g1e lysin and/or holin decreased the cell turbidity significantly, suggesting that the phi g1e hol-lys system is involved in cytolytic process. PMID:8918256

  12. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding catalytic subunit of thermostable glucose dehydrogenase from Burkholderia cepacia in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inose, Ken; Fujikawa, Masako; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2003-02-21

    We have cloned a 1620-nucleotide gene encoding the catalytic subunit (alpha subunit) of a thermostable glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Burkholderia cepacia. The FAD binding motif was found in the N-terminal region of the alpha subunit. The deduced primary structure of the alpha subunit showed about 48% identity to the catalytic subunits of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) from Gluconobacter oxydans and 2-keto-D-gluconate dehydrogenases (2KGDH) from Erwinia herbicola and Pantoea citrea. The alpha subunit of B. cepacia was expressed in Escherichia coli in its active water-soluble form, showing maximum dye-mediated GDH activity at 70 degrees C, retaining high thermal stability. A putative open reading frame (ORF) of 507 nucleotides was also found upstream of the alpha subunit encoding an 18-kDa peptide, designated as gamma subunit. The deduced primary structure of gamma subunit showed about 30% identity to the small subunits of the SDH from G. oxydans and 2KGDHs from E. herbicola and P. citrea. PMID:12573242

  13. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of cDNA encoding cattle Smad4 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui ZHANG; Shangzhong XU; Xue GAO; Hongyan REN; Jinbao CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The cDNA of cattle Smad4 gene was cloned by RT-PCR, 3' RACE and 5' RACE and got a 3503-bp full-long cDNA sequence. The cloned cattle Smad4 cDNA sequence had been send to GenBank and got an accession number: DQ494856. Cattle Smad4 gene consists of 12 exons and codes 553 amino acids. Cattle Smad4 cDNA shares 99%, 96%, 95%, 91% and 91% similarity in nucleic acid sequences, and 99%, 98%, 98%, 99% and 98% sim-ilarity in amino acid sequences with sheep, pig, human, rat and mouse, respectively. Smad4 cDNA was found in the testes, pancreas, liver, small intestine, ovary, lymph, car-diac muscle, skeleton muscle and thymus gland, which indicated that Smad4 was broadly expressed in cattle.

  14. Cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding thermophilic beta-amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kitamoto, N; Yamagata, H; Kato, T; Tsukagoshi, N; Udaka, S

    1988-01-01

    A gene coding for thermophilic beta-amylase of Clostridium thermosulfurogenes was cloned into Bacillus subtilis, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The nucleotide sequence suggested that the thermophilic beta-amylase is translated from monocistronic mRNA as a secretory precursor with a signal peptide of 32 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mature beta-amylase contained 519 residues with a molecular weight of 57,167. The amino acid sequence of the C. thermosu...

  15. funRNA: a fungi-centered genomics platform for genes encoding key components of RNAi

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Jeon, Jongbum; Wu, Jiayao; Song, Hyeunjeong; Asiegbu, Fred O; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi) is involved in genome defense as well as diverse cellular, developmental, and physiological processes. Key components of RNAi are Argonaute, Dicer, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP), which have been functionally characterized mainly in model organisms. The key components are believed to exist throughout eukaryotes; however, there is no systematic platform for archiving and dissecting these important gene families. In addition, few fungi ...

  16. Reconstruction of Family-Level Phylogenetic Relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera) Using Nuclear Encoded Housekeeping Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Malcolm S.; April L Hill; Jose Lopez; Peterson, Kevin J.; Shirley Pomponi; Maria C Diaz; Thacker, Robert W; Maja Adamska; Nicole Boury-Esnault; Paco Cárdenas; Andia Chaves-Fonnegra; Elizabeth Danka; Bre-Onna De Laine; Dawn Formica; Eduardo Hajdu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, ...

  17. The Glycosyltransferase Gene Encoding the Enzyme Catalyzing the First Step of Mycothiol Biosynthesis (mshA)

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Gerald L.; Koledin, Teresa; Gorovitz, Batia; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C.; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2003-01-01

    Mycothiol is the major thiol present in most actinomycetes and is produced from the pseudodisaccharide 1d-myo-inosityl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-d-glucopyranoside (GlcNAc-Ins). A transposon mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis shown to be GlcNAc-Ins and mycothiol deficient was sequenced to identify a putative glycosyltransferase gene designated mshA. The ortholog in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rv0486, was used to complement the mutant phenotype.

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans Gene mfap-1 Encodes a Nuclear Protein That Affects Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Long Ma; Xiaoyang Gao; Jintao Luo; Liange Huang; Yanling Teng; H Robert Horvitz

    2012-01-01

    RNA splicing is a major regulatory mechanism for controlling eukaryotic gene expression. By generating various splice isoforms from a single pre-mRNA, alternative splicing plays a key role in promoting the evolving complexity of metazoans. Numerous splicing factors have been identified. However, the in vivo functions of many splicing factors remain to be understood. In vivo studies are essential for understanding the molecular mechanisms of RNA splicing and the biology of numerous RNA splicin...

  19. Characterization of two trpE genes encoding anthranilate synthase α-subunit in Azospirillum brasilense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The previous report from our laboratory has recently identified a new trpE gene (termed trpE 2) which exists independently in Azospirillum brasilense Yu62. In this study, amplification of trpE(G) (termed trpE 1(G) here) confirmed that there are two copies of trpE gene, one trpE being fused into trpG while the other trpE existed independently. This is First report to suggest that two copies of the trpE gene exist in this bacterium. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence demonstrated that putative leader peptide, terminator, and anti-terminator were found upstream of trpE 1(G) while these sequence features did not exist in front of trpE 2. The β-galactosidase activity of an A. brasilense strain carrying a trpE 2-lacZ fusion remained constant at different tryptophan concentrations, but the β-galactosidase activity of the same strain carrying a trpE 1(G)-lacZ fusion decreased as the tryptophan concentration increased. These data suggest that the expression of trpE 1(G) is regulated at the transcriptional level by attenuation while trpE 2 is constantly expressed. The anthranilate synthase assays with trpE 1(G)- and trpE 2- mutants demonstrated that TrpE1(G) fusion protein is feedback inhibited by tryptophan while TrpE2 protein is not. We also found that both trpE 1(G) and trpE 2 gene products were involved in IAA synthesis

  20. The zebrafish fleer gene encodes an essential regulator of cilia tubulin polyglutamylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Narendra; Obara, Tomoko; Mangos, Steve; Liu, Yan; Drummond, Iain A

    2007-11-01

    Cilia and basal bodies are essential organelles for a broad spectrum of functions, including the development of left-right asymmetry, kidney function, cerebrospinal fluid transport, generation of photoreceptor outer segments, and hedgehog signaling. Zebrafish fleer (flr) mutants exhibit kidney cysts, randomized left-right asymmetry, hydrocephalus, and rod outer segment defects, suggesting a pleiotropic defect in ciliogenesis. Positional cloning flr identified a tetratricopeptide repeat protein homologous to the Caenorhabditis elegans protein DYF1 that was highly expressed in ciliated cells. flr pronephric cilia were shortened and showed a reduced beat amplitude, and olfactory cilia were absent in mutants. flr cilia exhibited ultrastructural defects in microtubule B-tubules, similar to axonemes that lack tubulin posttranslational modifications (polyglutamylation or polyglycylation). flr cilia showed a dramatic reduction in cilia polyglutamylated tubulin, indicating that flr encodes a novel modulator of tubulin polyglutamylation. We also found that the C. elegans flr homologue, dyf-1, is also required for tubulin polyglutamylation in sensory neuron cilia. Knockdown of zebrafish Ttll6, a tubulin polyglutamylase, specifically eliminated tubulin polyglutamylation and cilia formation in olfactory placodes, similar to flr mutants. These results are the first in vivo evidence that tubulin polyglutamylation is required for vertebrate cilia motility and structure, and, when compromised, results in failed ciliogenesis. PMID:17761526

  1. Genes encoding chavicol/eugenol synthase from the creosote bush Larrea tridentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Kim, Sung -Jin; Vassao, Daniel Giddings; Patten, Ann M.; Eichinger, Dietmar

    2015-09-15

    Particular aspects provide novel methods for redirecting carbon allocation in plants or cell culture from lignification to inherently more useful and tractable materials, and to facilitate the generation of, e.g., biofuels from the remaining plant ro culture biomass. Particular aspects provided novel methods for converting monolignols into allyl/propenyl phenols, and for chavicol/eugenol formation or production. Additional aspects relate to the discovery of novel chavicol/eugenol synthases that convert p-coumaryl/coniferyl alcohol esters into chavicol/eugenol, and to novel compositions (e.g., novel proteins and nucleic acids encoding same), and novel methods using same for producing or forming chavicol/eugenol and other derivatives in cell culture and/or genetically modified plants, and for re-engineering the composition of plant biomass. Particular aspects provide novel methods for generation in culture or in planta of liquid/combustible allyl/propenyl phenols, and these phenolic products are utilized for (non-ethanol) biofuel/bioenergy purposes, while the remaining plant biomass facilitates the generation of other biofuels.

  2. MitoDrome: a database of Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes encoding proteins targeted to the mitochondrion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardiello, Marco; Licciulli, Flavio; Catalano, Domenico; Attimonelli, Marcella; Caggese, Corrado

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondria are organelles present in the cytoplasm of most eukaryotic cells; although they have their own DNA, the majority of the proteins necessary for a functional mitochondrion are coded by the nuclear DNA and only after transcription and translation they are imported in the mitochondrion as proteins. The primary role of the mitochondrion is electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation. Although it has been studied for a long time, the interest of researchers in mitochondria is still alive thanks to the discovery of mitochondrial role in apoptosis, aging and cancer. Aim of the MitoDrome database is to annotate the Drosophila melanogaster nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins in order to contribute to the functional characterization of nuclear genes coding for mitochondrial proteins and to knowledge of gene diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunctions. Indeed D. melanogaster is one of the most studied organisms and a model for the Human genome. Data are derived from the comparison of Human mitochondrial proteins versus the Drosophila genome, ESTs and cDNA sequence data available in the FlyBase database. Links from the MitoDrome entries to the related homologous entries available in MitoNuC will be soon imple-mented. The MitoDrome database is available at http://bighost.area.ba.cnr.it/BIG/MitoDrome. Data are organised in a flat-file format and can be retrieved using the SRS system. PMID:12520013

  3. Differential display identifies overexpression of the USP36 gene, encoding a deubiquitinating enzyme, in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianduan Li, Lisa M. Olson, Zhengyan Zhang, Lina Li, Miri Bidder, Loan Nguyen, John Pfeifer, Janet S. Rader

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To find potential diagnostic markers or therapeutic targets, we used differential display technique to identify genes that are over or under expressed in human ovarian cancer. Methods. Genes were initially identified by differential display between two human ovarian surface epithelium cultures and two ovarian cancer cell lines, A2780 and Caov-3. Genes were validated by relative quantitative RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization. Results. Twenty-eight non-redundant sequences were expressed differentially in the normal ovarian epithelium and ovarian cancer cell lines. Seven of the 28 sequences showed differential expression between normal ovary and ovarian cancer tissue by RT-PCR. USP36 was over-expressed in ovarian cancer cell lines and tissues by RT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization. Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR revealed two transcripts for USP36 in ovarian tissue. The major transcript was more specific for ovarian cancer and was detected by RT-PCR in 9/9 ovarian cancer tissues, 3/3 cancerous ascites, 5/14 (36% sera from patients with ovarian cancer, and 0/7 sera from women without ovarian cancer. Conclusion. USP36 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared to normal ovary and its transcripts were identified in ascites and serum of ovarian cancer patients.

  4. Functional analysis of seven genes encoding eight translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) isoforms in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, G; Altmann, M; J. Sierra; Urlaub, H.; Diez del Corral, R; Schwartz, P.; Rivera-Pomar, R

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila genome-sequencing project has revealed a total of seven genes encoding eight eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) isoforms. Four of them (eIF4E-1,2, eIF4E-3, eIF4E-4 and eIF4E-5) share exon/intron structure in their carboxy-terminal part and form a cluster in the genome. All eIF4E isoforms bind to the cap (m⁷GpppN) structure. All of them, except eIF4E-6 and eIF4E-8 were able to interact with Drosophila eIF4G or eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP). eIF4E-1, eIF4E-2, eIF4E-3, eIF4E-...

  5. Plasmodium falciparum var genes expressed in children with severe malaria encode CIDRα1 domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob S.; Wang, Christian W.; Mkumbaye, Sixbert I.;

    2016-01-01

    endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) through the CIDRα1 domain of certain PfEMP1 were recently associated with severe malaria in children. However, it has remained unclear to which extend the EPCR-binding CIDRα1 domains epitomize PfEMP1 expressed in severe malaria. Here, we characterized the near full......-length transcripts dominating the var transcriptome in children with severe malaria and found that the only common feature of the encoded PfEMP1 was CIDRα1 domains. Such genes were highly and dominantly expressed in both children with severe malarial anaemia and cerebral malaria. These observations support the...... hypothesis that the CIDRα1-EPCR interaction is key to the pathogenesis of severe malaria and strengthen the rationale for pursuing a vaccine or adjunctive treatment aiming at inhibiting or reducing the damaging effects of this interaction....

  6. Reconstruction of family-level phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae (Porifera using nuclear encoded housekeeping genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm S Hill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Demosponges are challenging for phylogenetic systematics because of their plastic and relatively simple morphologies and many deep divergences between major clades. To improve understanding of the phylogenetic relationships within Demospongiae, we sequenced and analyzed seven nuclear housekeeping genes involved in a variety of cellular functions from a diverse group of sponges. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated data from each of the four sponge classes (i.e., Calcarea, Demospongiae, Hexactinellida, and Homoscleromorpha, but focused on family-level relationships within demosponges. With data for 21 newly sampled families, our Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian-based approaches recovered previously phylogenetically defined taxa: Keratosa(p, Myxospongiae(p, Spongillida(p, Haploscleromorpha(p (the marine haplosclerids and Democlavia(p. We found conflicting results concerning the relationships of Keratosa(p and Myxospongiae(p to the remaining demosponges, but our results strongly supported a clade of Haploscleromorpha(p+Spongillida(p+Democlavia(p. In contrast to hypotheses based on mitochondrial genome and ribosomal data, nuclear housekeeping gene data suggested that freshwater sponges (Spongillida(p are sister to Haploscleromorpha(p rather than part of Democlavia(p. Within Keratosa(p, we found equivocal results as to the monophyly of Dictyoceratida. Within Myxospongiae(p, Chondrosida and Verongida were monophyletic. A well-supported clade within Democlavia(p, Tetractinellida(p, composed of all sampled members of Astrophorina and Spirophorina (including the only lithistid in our analysis, was consistently revealed as the sister group to all other members of Democlavia(p. Within Tetractinellida(p, we did not recover monophyletic Astrophorina or Spirophorina. Our results also reaffirmed the monophyly of order Poecilosclerida (excluding Desmacellidae and Raspailiidae, and polyphyly of Hadromerida and Halichondrida. CONCLUSIONS

  7. Preparation of a recombinant adenoviral encoding human NIS gene and its specific expression in cardiomyocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To construct a recombinant adenovirus vector containing the human NIS gene with the myosin light chain-2(MLC-2v) gene as the promoter and evaluate its specific expression and feasibility as a reporter gene in cardiomyocytes. Methods: MLC-2v promoter and NIS were subcloned into an adenovirus shuttle vector, and forwarded by homologous recombination in the bacteria BJ5183 containing AdEasy-1 plasmid. Positive recombinant adenovirus vector was selected, packaged and amplified in the HEK293 cells to obtain recombinant adenovirus Ad-MLC-NIS. Ad-cytomegalovirus (CMV)-NIS with cytomegalovirus as the promoter, Ad-MLC without NIS and Ad-NIS without promoter were constructed as the controls. Cardiomyocytes and non-cardiomyocytes were then infected by the adenovirus. The protein expression was tested by Western blot analysis. The function and features of NIS protein were evaluated by dynamic iodide uptake and NaClO4 iodine uptake inhibition test in vitro. The viability and proliferation of cardiomyocytes after adenovirus transfection and radioiodine incubation were checked by trypan blue staining. Results: Recombinant NIS adenovirus was successfully constructed. Western blot analysis showed that the NIS protein was highly expressed in cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, and all cells transfected with Ad-CMV-NIS. However, in non-cardiomyocytes transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS, little NIS protein was detected. Dynamic iodine uptake tests showed that the peaks of iodide uptake of the three different cell lines (H9C2, A549, U87 cell) transfected with Ad-MLC-NIS were 5844.0, 833.6 and 846.0 counts · min-1, respectively. The iodide uptake function of H9C2 was inhibited by NaClO4. There was almost no change in cell viability and proliferation when the MOI was 100. Conclusions: Ad-MLC-NIS allows myocardial specific expression of an external gene, and the cardiomyocytes with NIS expression are capable of iodine uptake. Further research of NIS as a reporter gene in

  8. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1, the gene encoding the glucocorticoid receptor, in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emadali, Anouk; Hoghoughi, Neda; Duley, Samuel; Hajmirza, Azadeh; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, Francois-Loic; Bertrand, Philippe; Roumier, Christophe; Roggy, Anne; Suchaud-Martin, Céline; Chauvet, Martine; Bertrand, Sarah; Hamaidia, Sieme; Rousseaux, Sophie; Josserand, Véronique; Charles, Julie; Templier, Isabelle; Maeda, Takahiro; Bruder-Costa, Juliana; Chaperot, Laurence; Plumas, Joel; Jacob, Marie-Christine; Bonnefoix, Thierry; Park, Sophie; Gressin, Remy; Tensen, Cornelis P; Mecucci, Cristina; Macintyre, Elizabeth; Leroux, Dominique; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Luquet, Isabelle; Penther, Dominique; Bastard, Christian; Jardin, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Christine; Garnache, Francine; Callanan, Mary B

    2016-06-16

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare and highly aggressive leukemia for which knowledge on disease mechanisms and effective therapies are currently lacking. Only a handful of recurring genetic mutations have been identified and none is specific to BPDCN. In this study, through molecular cloning in an index case that presented a balanced t(3;5)(q21;q31) and molecular cytogenetic analyses in a further 46 cases, we identify monoallelic deletion of NR3C1 (5q31), encoding the glucocorticoid receptor (GCR), in 13 of 47 (28%) BPDCN patients. Targeted deep sequencing in 36 BPDCN cases, including 10 with NR3C1 deletion, did not reveal NR3C1 point mutations or indels. Haploinsufficiency for NR3C1 defined a subset of BPDCN with lowered GCR expression and extremely poor overall survival (P = .0006). Consistent with a role for GCR in tumor suppression, functional analyses coupled with gene expression profiling identified corticoresistance and loss-of-EZH2 function as major downstream consequences of NR3C1 deletion in BPDCN. Subsequently, more detailed analyses of the t(3;5)(q21;q31) revealed fusion of NR3C1 to a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) gene (lincRNA-3q) that encodes a novel, nuclear, noncoding RNA involved in the regulation of leukemia stem cell programs and G1/S transition, via E2F. Overexpression of lincRNA-3q was a consistent feature of malignant cells and could be abrogated by bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein inhibition. Taken together, this work points to NR3C1 as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in a subset of BPDCN and identifies BET inhibition, acting at least partially via lncRNA blockade, as a novel treatment option in BPDCN. PMID:27060168

  9. Cloning, expression and characterization of a gene from earthworm Eisenia fetida encoding a blood-clot dissolving protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, GangQiang; Wang, Kevin Yueju; Li, DaHui; Wang, Nan; Liu, DeHu

    2012-01-01

    A lumbrokinase gene encoding a blood-clot dissolving protein was cloned from earthworm (Eisenia fetida) by RT-PCR amplification. The gene designated as CST1 (GenBank No. AY840996) was sequence analyzed. The cDNA consists of 888 bp with an open reading frame of 729 bp, which encodes 242 amino acid residues. Multiple sequence alignments revealed that CST1 shares similarities and conserved amino acids with other reported lumbrokinases. The amino acid sequence of CST1 exhibits structural features similar to those found in other serine proteases, including human tissue-type (tPA), urokinase (uPA), and vampire bat (DSPAα1) plasminogen activators. CST1 has a conserved catalytic triad, found in the active sites of protease enzymes, which are important residues involved in polypeptide catalysis. CST1 was expressed as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The molecular mass of recombinant CST1 (rCST) was 25 kDa as estimated by SDS-PAGE, and further confirmed by Western Blot analysis. His-tagged rCST1 was purified and renatured using nickel-chelating resin with a recovery rate of 50% and a purity of 95%. The purified, renatured rCST1 showed fibrinolytic activity evaluated by both a fibrin plate and a blood clot lysis assay. rCST1 degraded fibrin on the fibrin plate. A significant percentage (65.7%) of blood clot lysis was observed when blood clot was treated with 80 mg/mL of rCST1 in vitro. The antithrombotic activity of rCST1 was 912 units/mg calculated by comparison with the activity of a lumbrokinase standard. These findings indicate that rCST1 has potential as a potent blood-clot treatment. Therefore, the expression and purification of a single lumbrokinase represents an important improvement in the use of lumbrokinases. PMID:23300872

  10. Partitioning of genetic variation between regulatory and coding gene segments: the predominance of software variation in genes encoding introvert proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchison, A

    1997-01-01

    In considering genetic variation in eukaryotes, a fundamental distinction can be made between variation in regulatory (software) and coding (hardware) gene segments. For quantitative traits the bulk of variation, particularly that near the population mean, appears to reside in regulatory segments. The main exceptions to this rule concern proteins which handle extrinsic substances, here termed extrovert proteins. The immune system includes an unusually large proportion of this exceptional category, but even so its chief source of variation may well be polymorphism in regulatory gene segments. The main evidence for this view emerges from genome scanning for quantitative trait loci (QTL), which in the case of the immune system points to a major contribution of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes. Further support comes from sequencing of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) class II promoters, where a high level of polymorphism has been detected. These Mhc promoters appear to act, in part at least, by gating the back-signal from T cells into antigen-presenting cells. Both these forms of polymorphism are likely to be sustained by the need for flexibility in the immune response. Future work on promoter polymorphism is likely to benefit from the input from genome informatics. PMID:9148788

  11. Expression pattern of a nuclear encoded mitochondrial arginine-ornithine translocator gene from Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Anja

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine and citrulline serve as nitrogen storage forms, but are also involved in biosynthetic and catabolic pathways. Metabolism of arginine, citrulline and ornithine is distributed between mitochondria and cytosol. For the shuttle of intermediates between cytosol and mitochondria transporters present on the inner mitochondrial membrane are required. Yeast contains a mitochondrial translocator for ornithine and arginine, Ort1p/Arg11p. Ort1p/Arg11p is a member of the mitochondrial carrier family (MCF essential for ornithine export from mitochondria. The yeast arg11 mutant, which is deficient in Ort1p/Arg11p grows poorly on media lacking arginine. Results High-level expression of a nuclear encoded Arabidopsis thaliana homolog (AtmBAC2 of Ort1p/Arg11p was able to suppress the growth deficiency of arg11. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated expression of AtmBAC2 in all tissues with highest levels in flowers. Promoter-GUS fusions showed preferential expression in flowers, i.e. pollen, in the vasculature of siliques and in aborted seeds. Variable expression was observed in leaf vasculature. Induction of the promoter was not observed during the first two weeks in seedlings grown on media containing NH4NO3, arginine or ornithine as sole nitrogen sources. Conclusion AtmBAC2 was isolated as a mitochondrial transporter for arginine in Arabidopsis. The absence of expression in developing seeds and in cotyledons of seedlings indicates that other transporters are responsible for storage and mobilization of arginine in seeds.

  12. A Causal Gene for Seed Dormancy on Wheat Chromosome 4A Encodes a MAP Kinase Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torada, Atsushi; Koike, Michiya; Ogawa, Taiichi; Takenouchi, Yu; Tadamura, Kazuki; Wu, Jianzhong; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kawaura, Kanako; Ogihara, Yasunari

    2016-03-21

    Seed germination under the appropriate environmental conditions is important both for plant species survival and for successful agriculture. Seed dormancy, which controls germination time, is one of the adaptation mechanisms and domestication traits [1]. Seed dormancy is generally defined as the absence of germination of a viable seed under conditions that are favorable for germination [2]. The seed dormancy of cultivated plants has generally been reduced during domestication [3]. Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most widely grown crops in the world. Weak dormancy may be an advantage for the productivity due to uniform emergence and a disadvantage for the risks of pre-harvest sprouting (PHS), which decreases grain quality and yield [4]. A number of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling natural variation of seed dormancy have been identified on various chromosomes [5]. A major QTL for seed dormancy has been consistently detected on chromosome 4A [6-13]. The QTL was designated as a major gene, Phs1, which could be precisely mapped within a 2.6 cM region [14]. Here, we identified a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) gene (designated TaMKK3-A) by a map-based approach as a candidate gene for the seed dormancy locus Phs1 on chromosome 4A in bread wheat. Complementation analysis showed that transformation of a dormant wheat cultivar with the TaMKK3-A allele from a nondormant cultivar clearly reduced seed dormancy. Cultivars differing in dormancy had a single nonsynonymous amino acid substitution in the kinase domain of the predicted MKK3 protein sequence, which may be associated with the length of seed dormancy. PMID:26948878

  13. Cloning, sequence analysis, and expression of the genes encoding lytic functions of Bacteriophage Fg1e

    OpenAIRE

    OKI, Masaya; Kakikawa, Makiko; Yamada, Kazuyo; Taketo, Akira; KODAIRA, Ken-Ichi

    1996-01-01

    The lysis genes of a Lactobacillus phage Fgle were cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide sequencing of a 3813-bp Fgle DNA revealed five successive open reading frames (ORF), Rorf50, Rorf118, hol, and lys and Rorf175, in the same DNA strand. By comparative analysis of the DNA sequence, the putative hol product (holin) has an estimated molecular weight is 14.2 kDa, and contains two potential transmembrane helices and highly charged N- and C-termini, resembling predict...

  14. Eliminated chromatin of Ascaris contains a gene that encodes a putative ribosomal protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Etter, A; Aboutanos, M; Tobler, H; Müller, F.

    1991-01-01

    Chromatin diminution in the nematodes Parascaris equorum and Ascaris lumbricoides leads to the formation of somatic cells that contain less DNA than the germ-line cells. We present molecular evidence for the coding potential of germ-line-specific DNA. We report on a cDNA clone that codes for a putative ribosomal protein (ALEP-1, for A. lumbricoides eliminated protein 1). That the corresponding gene is located in the eliminated portion of the genome indicates a difference in germ-line and soma...

  15. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Salmonella typhimurium dcp gene encoding dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, S.; Miller, C G

    1992-01-01

    Plasmids carrying the Salmonella typhimurium dcp gene were isolated from a pBR328 library of Salmonella chromosomal DNA by screening for complementation of a peptide utilization defect conferred by a dcp mutation. Strains carrying these plasmids overproduced dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase approximately 50-fold. The nucleotide sequence of a 2.8-kb region of one of these plasmids contained an open reading frame coding for a protein of 77,269 Da, in agreement with the 80-kDa size for dipeptidyl car...

  16. Preparation of a recombinant adeno-associated virus vector encoding the human NIS gene and its expression in thyroid cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of thyroid gene therapy by using a adeno-associated virus vector to deliver the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) gene into the thyroid tumor cells. Methods: The recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the human NIS gene (rAAV-NIS, the immunofluorescence and iodide uptake studies as well as inhibited iodide uptake tests were carried out. Results: A rAAV encoding the human NIS gene was successfully prepared. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the expression of the NIS protein in the tumor cells, and it was localized at the cell surface and possessed a function of iodine uptake as well as suppression by perchlorates similar to the function and character with normal thyroid cell. Conclusion: rAAV-NIS is very efficient in triggering iodide uptake by infected tumor cells, and it outline the potential of this novel cancer gene therapy approach for a targted radiotherapy. (authors)

  17. The ken and barbie gene encoding a putative transcription factor with a BTB domain and three zinc finger motifs functions in terminalia development of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukacsovich, Tamas; Yuge, Kazuya; Awano, Wakae; Asztalos, Zoltan; Kondo, Shunzo; Juni, Naoto; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2003-10-01

    Mutations in the ken and barbie locus are accompanied by the malformation of terminalia in adult Drosophila. Male and female genitalia often remain inside the body, and the same portions of genitalia and analia are missing in a fraction of homozygous flies. Rotated and/or duplicated terminalia are also observed. Terminalia phenotypes are enhanced by mutations in the gap gene tailless, the homeobox gene caudal, and the decapentaplegic gene that encodes a TGFbeta-like morphogen. The ken and barbie gene encodes a protein with three CCHH-type zinc finger motifs that are conserved in several transcription factors such as Krüppel and BCL-6. All defects in ken and barbie mutants are fully rescued by the expression of a wild-type genomic construct, which establishes the causality between phenotypes and the gene. PMID:14518006

  18. Cloning and characterization of the prs gene encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1985-01-01

    The gene, prs, encoding phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase of Escherichia coli was isolated from a library of E. coli genes cloned in the bacteriophage λD69 vector. A strain with a temperature-lethal defect in PRPP synthetase, (prs-2), was used as the host and cloning was performed by...... lysogenic complementation. The prs gene resided on a 5.6 kilobase-pair (kbp) DNA fragment generated by hydrolysis with restriction endonuclease BamHI. The nearby gene pth, encoding peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, was also on this fragment. Subcloning of the fragment in the multi-copy plasmid pBR322 and subsequent...... deletion of parts of the insert resulted in a 1.7 kbp DNA fragment containing the entire prs gene. Bacterial strains harbouring prs-bearing plasmids showed up to 50-fold increased PRPP synthetase activity. The PRPP synthetase subunit was identified by analysis of plasmid-harbouring minicells and the...

  19. Interactions Between Fatty Acid Transport Proteins, Genes That Encode for Them, and Exercise: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayewardene, Avindra F; Mavros, Yorgi; Reeves, Anneliese; Hancock, Dale P; Gwinn, Tom; Rooney, Kieron B

    2016-08-01

    Long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) movement into skeletal muscle involves a highly mediated process in which lipid rafts are utilized in the cellular membrane, involving numerous putative plasma membrane-associated LCFA transport proteins. The process of LCFA uptake and oxidation is of particular metabolic significance both at rest and during light to moderate exercise. A comprehensive systematic search of electronic databases was conducted to investigate whether exercise alters protein and/or gene expression of putative LCFA transport proteins. There were 31 studies meeting all eligibility criteria, of these 13 utilized an acute exercise protocol and 18 examined chronic exercise adaptations. Seventeen involved a study design incorporating an exercise stimulus, while the remaining 14 incorporated a combined exercise and diet stimulus. Divergent data relating to acute exercise, as well as prolonged exercise training (≥3 weeks), on protein content (PC) response was identified for proteins CD36, FABPpm and CAV1. Messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) data did not always correspond to functional PC, supporting previous suggestions of a disconnect due to potentially limiting factors post gene expression. The large array of study designs, cohorts, and primary dependent variables within the studies included in the present review elucidate the complexity of the interaction between exercise and LCFA transport proteins. Summary of the results in the present review validate the need for further targeted investigation within this topic, and provide an important information base for such research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1671-1687, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638980

  20. The gene encoding the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin is regulated by anemia, hypoxia, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Gaël; Chauvet, Caroline; Viatte, Lydie; Danan, Jean Louis; Bigard, Xavier; Devaux, Isabelle; Beaumont, Carole; Kahn, Axel; Vaulont, Sophie

    2002-10-01

    The present study was aimed at determining whether hepcidin, a recently identified peptide involved in iron metabolism, plays a role in conditions associated with both iron overload and iron deficiency. Hepcidin mRNA levels were assessed in two models of anemia, acute hemolysis provoked by phenylhydrazine and bleeding provoked by repeated phlebotomies. Hepcidin response to hypoxia was also studied, both ex vivo, in human hepatoma cells, and in vivo. Anemia and hypoxia were associated with a dramatic decrease in liver hepcidin gene expression, which may account for the increase in iron release from reticuloendothelial cells and increase in iron absorption frequently observed in these situations. A single injection of turpentine for 16 hours induced a sixfold increase in liver hepcidin mRNA levels and a twofold decrease in serum iron. The hyposideremic effect of turpentine was completely blunted in hepcidin-deficient mice, revealing hepcidin participation in anemia of inflammatory states. These modifications of hepcidin gene expression further suggest a key role for hepcidin in iron homeostasis under various pathophysiological conditions, which may support the pharmaceutical use of hepcidin agonists and antagonists in various iron homeostasis disorders. PMID:12370282

  1. Bcmimp1, a Botrytis cinerea Gene Transiently Expressed in planta, Encodes a Mitochondrial Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Pescador, David; Santander, Daniela; Arranz, M; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Eslava, Arturo P; van Kan, Jan A L; Benito, Ernesto P

    2016-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea is a widespread necrotrophic fungus which infects more than 200 plant species. In an attempt to characterize the physiological status of the fungus in planta and to identify genetic factors contributing to its ability to infect the host cells, a differential gene expression analysis during the interaction B. cinerea-tomato was carried out. Gene Bcmimp1 codes for a mRNA detected by differential display in the course of this analysis. During the interaction with the host, it shows a transient expression pattern with maximal expression levels during the colonization and maceration of the infected tissues. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that BCMIMP1 is an integral membrane protein located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Co-localization experiments with a BCMIMP1-GFP fusion protein confirmed that the protein is targeted to the mitochondria. ΔBcmimp1 mutants do not show obvious phenotypic differences during saprophytic growth and their infection ability was unaltered as compared to the wild-type. Interestingly, the mutants produced increased levels of reactive oxygen species, likely as a consequence of disturbed mitochondrial function. Although Bcmimp1 expression is enhanced in planta it cannot be considered a pathogenicity factor. PMID:26952144

  2. Brain transcriptional stability upon prion protein-encoding gene invalidation in zygotic or adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béringue Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological function of the prion protein remains largely elusive while its key role in prion infection has been expansively documented. To potentially assess this conundrum, we performed a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the brain of wild-type mice with that of transgenic mice invalidated at this locus either at the zygotic or at the adult stages. Results Only subtle transcriptomic differences resulting from the Prnp knockout could be evidenced, beside Prnp itself, in the analyzed adult brains following microarray analysis of 24 109 mouse genes and QPCR assessment of some of the putatively marginally modulated loci. When performed at the adult stage, neuronal Prnp disruption appeared to sequentially induce a response to an oxidative stress and a remodeling of the nervous system. However, these events involved only a limited number of genes, expression levels of which were only slightly modified and not always confirmed by RT-qPCR. If not, the qPCR obtained data suggested even less pronounced differences. Conclusions These results suggest that the physiological function of PrP is redundant at the adult stage or important for only a small subset of the brain cell population under classical breeding conditions. Following its early reported embryonic developmental regulation, this lack of response could also imply that PrP has a more detrimental role during mouse embryogenesis and that potential transient compensatory mechanisms have to be searched for at the time this locus becomes transcriptionally activated.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of the gene encoding the nitrogenase iron protein of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA sequence was determined for the cloned Thiobacillus ferrooxidans nifH and part of the nifD genes. The DNA chains were radiolabeled with [α-32P]dCTP (3000 Ci/mmol) or [α-35S]dCTP (400 Ci/mmol). A putative T. ferrooxidans nifH promoter was identified whose sequences showed perfect consensus with those of the Klebsiella pneumoniae nif promoter. Two putative consensus upstream activator sequences were also identified. The amino acid sequence was deduced from the DNA sequence. In a comparison of nifH DNA sequences from T. ferrooxidans and eight other nitrogen-fixing microbes, a Rhizobium sp. isolated from Parasponia andersonii showed the greatest homology (74%) and Clostridium pasteurianum (nifH1) showed the least homology (54%). In the comparison of the amino acid sequences of the Fe proteins, the Rhizobium sp. and Rhizobium japonicum showed the greatest homology (both 86%) and C. pasteurianum (nifH1 gene product) demonstrated the least homology (56%) to the T. ferrooxidans Fe protein

  4. Identification and Phylogenetic Analysis of a CC-NBS-LRR Encoding Gene Assigned on Chromosome 7B of Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangqi Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hexaploid wheat displays limited genetic variation. As a direct A and B genome donor of hexaploid wheat, tetraploid wheat represents an important gene pool for cultivated bread wheat. Many disease resistant genes express conserved domains of the nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeats (NBS-LRR. In this study, we isolated a CC-NBS-LRR gene locating on chromosome 7B from durum wheat variety Italy 363, and designated it TdRGA-7Ba. Its open reading frame was 4014 bp, encoding a 1337 amino acid protein with a complete NBS domain and 18 LRR repeats, sharing 44.7% identity with the PM3B protein. TdRGA-7Ba expression was continuously seen at low levels and was highest in leaves. TdRGA-7Ba has another allele TdRGA-7Bb with a 4 bp deletion at position +1892 in other cultivars of tetraploid wheat. In Ae. speltoides, as a B genome progenitor, both TdRGA-7Ba and TdRGA-7Bb were detected. In all six species of hexaploid wheats (AABBDD, only TdRGA-7Bb existed. Phylogenic analysis showed that all TdRGA-7Bb type genes were grouped in one sub-branch. We speculate that TdRGA-7Bb was derived from a TdRGA-7Ba mutation, and it happened in Ae. speltoides. Both types of TdRGA-7B participated in tetraploid wheat formation. However, only the TdRGA-7Bb was retained in hexaploid wheat.

  5. The effects of differential polyadenylation on expression of the dihydrofolate reductase-encoding gene in Chinese hamster lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Hussain, A; Melera, P W

    1995-10-01

    Three differently sized mRNAs are expressed from each of two DHFR (encoding dihydrofolate reductase) alleles present in the Chinese hamster lung (CHL) cell line, DC-3F. The relative abundancy of the transcripts produced from each allele differs dramatically as a result of differential utilization of the multiple poly(A) sites present in the DHFR DHFR gene and a genetic polymorphism located within the third poly(A) signal of one allele. We sought to determine whether such differences in polyadenylation affect the steady-state levels of DHFR and mRNAs expressed from either allele and, in a more general sense, to ask whether differences in 3' end RNA processing in a gene containing multiple poly(A) sites affects the final level of gene expression. An SV40 promoter-based transient expression system producing chimeric cat::DHFR transcripts was developed to regenerate the in vivo mRNA polyadenylation patterns associated with each of the two DHFR alleles. The results demonstrate that the total amount of polyadenylated RNA expressed from each of these constructs in vitro is the same regardless of the differential utilization of the poly(A) signals that occurs between them. Moreover, measurement of the individual turnover rates of the DHFR mRNAs expressed in vivo from each allele, as determined by pulse-chase labeling and actinomycin D inhibition studies, revealed no significant allele-specific differences in transcript half-lives. Finally, measuring the steady-state levels of DHFR poly(A)+ mRNA in parental DC-3F cells demonstrated that both alleles are expressed to the same extent during normal growth. Thus, even though dramatic allele-specific differences in 3' end processing of DHFR transcripts occur in vivo, such differences do not appear to influence the steady-state levels of DHFR gene expression. PMID:7590264

  6. cvhA Gene of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 10-22 Encodes a Negative Regulator for Mycelia Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng-An WANG; Lei QIN; Ping LU; Zhi-Xuan PANG; Zi-Xin DENG; Guo-Ping ZHAO

    2006-01-01

    A five-gene cluster cvhABCDE was identified from Streptomyces hygroscopicus 10-22. As the first gene of this cluster, cvhA encoded a putative sensor histidine kinase with a predicted sensor domain consisting of two trans-membrane segments at the N-terminus and a conserved HATPase_c domain at the Cterminus. The C-terminus polypeptide of CvhA expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and shown to be autophosphorylated with [γ-32p]ATP in vitro. The phosphoryl group was acid-labile and basic-stable, which supported histidine as the phosphorylation residue. No obvious difference of mycelia development was observed between the null mutant of cvhA generated by targeted gene replacement and the wild-type parental strain 10-22 grown on solid soya flour medium with 2%-8% glucose or sucrose, but the cvhA mutant could form much more abundant aerial mycelia and spores than the wild-type strain on solid soya flour medium supplemented with 6%-8% mannitol, 6%-8% sorbitol, 4%-6% mannose, or 4%-6% fructose. This phenotype was complemented by the cloned wild-type cvhA gene, and no difference was observed for growth curves of the cvhA mutant and the wild strain in liquid minimal medium with the tested sugars at a concentration of 4%, 6% and 8%. We thus propose that CvhA is likely a sensor histidine kinase and negatively regulates the morphological differentiation in a sugar-dependent manner in S. hygroscopicus 10-22.

  7. Marek disease virus encodes a basic-leucine zipper gene resembling the fos/jun oncogenes that is highly expressed in lymphoblastoid tumors.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, D; Lee, L.(Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA); Liu, J. L.; Kung, H J; Tillotson, J K

    1992-01-01

    Marek disease virus (MDV) is a herpesvirus of chickens that induces T lymphomas within 3 weeks of infection. The short latency and polyclonal nature of MDV-induced tumors have suggested that the virus may encode one or more direct-acting oncogenes. To date, however, no MDV-specific tumor antigens or candidate transforming genes have been demonstrated. In this paper, we report the identification of a MDV gene encoding a protein with homology to the leucine-zipper class of nuclear oncogenes. It...

  8. Identification and characterization of phoN-Sf, a gene on the large plasmid of Shigella flexneri 2a encoding a nonspecific phosphatase.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchiya, K I; Tohsuji, M; Nikai, T.; Sugihara, H.; Sasakawa, C

    1996-01-01

    A gene encoding a nonspecific phosphatase, named PhoN-Sf, was identified on the large virulence plasmid (pMYSH6000) of Shigella flexneri 2a YSH6000. The phosphatase activity in YSH6000 was observed under high-phosphate conditions. However, it was found that low-phosphate conditions induced a slightly higher level of activity. The nucleotide sequence of the phoN-Sf region cloned from pMYSH6000 possessing the phoN-Sf gene encoded 249 amino acids with a typical signal sequence at the N terminus....

  9. Structure and expression of a tandem gene pair in Leishmania donovani that encodes a protein structurally homologous to eucaryotic cation-transporting ATPases.

    OpenAIRE

    Meade, J C; Shaw, J; Lemaster, S; Gallagher, G.; Stringer, J R

    1987-01-01

    An oligonucleotide probe was used to clone a cation-transporting ATPase gene from the genome of Leishmania donovani. The nucleotide sequence of the gene contained a 2,922-base-pair open reading frame that was predicted to encode a 107,406-dalton protein composed of 974 amino acids. The predicted L. donovani protein contained all the structural and functional domains expected to be present in a cation-transporting ATPase of the aspartyl phosphate class. The nucleotide sequence encoding the ATP...

  10. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes encode enzymes with contrasting substrate specificity and show divergent gene expression profiles in Fragaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miosic, Silvija; Thill, Jana; Milosevic, Malvina; Gosch, Christian; Pober, Sabrina; Molitor, Christian; Ejaz, Shaghef; Rompel, Annette; Stich, Karl; Halbwirth, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    During fruit ripening, strawberries show distinct changes in the flavonoid classes that accumulate, switching from the formation of flavan 3-ols and flavonols in unripe fruits to the accumulation of anthocyanins in the ripe fruits. In the common garden strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) this is accompanied by a distinct switch in the pattern of hydroxylation demonstrated by the almost exclusive accumulation of pelargonidin based pigments. In Fragaria vesca the proportion of anthocyanins showing one (pelargonidin) and two (cyanidin) hydroxyl groups within the B-ring is almost equal. We isolated two dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) cDNA clones from strawberry fruits, which show 82% sequence similarity. The encoded enzymes revealed a high variability in substrate specificity. One enzyme variant did not accept DHK (with one hydroxyl group present in the B-ring), whereas the other strongly preferred DHK as a substrate. This appears to be an uncharacterized DFR variant with novel substrate specificity. Both DFRs were expressed in the receptacle and the achenes of both Fragaria species and the DFR2 expression profile showed a pronounced dependence on fruit development, whereas DFR1 expression remained relatively stable. There were, however, significant differences in their relative rates of expression. The DFR1/DFR2 expression ratio was much higher in the Fragaria×ananassa and enzyme preparations from F.×ananassa receptacles showed higher capability to convert DHK than preparations from F. vesca. Anthocyanin concentrations in the F.×ananassa cultivar were more than twofold higher and the cyanidin:pelargonidin ratio was only 0.05 compared to 0.51 in the F. vesca cultivar. The differences in the fruit colour of the two Fragaria species can be explained by the higher expression of DFR1 in F.×ananassa as compared to F. vesca, a higher enzyme efficiency (Kcat/Km values) of DFR1 combined with the loss of F3'H activity late in fruit development of F.×ananassa. PMID:25393679

  11. Variations in host genes encoding adhesion molecules and susceptibility to falciparum malaria in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Prajesh K

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host adhesion molecules play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria and changes in their structure or levels in individuals can influence the outcome of infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of SNPs of three adhesion molecule genes, ICAM1, PECAM1 and CD36, with severity of falciparum malaria in a malaria-endemic and a non-endemic region of India. Methods The frequency distribution of seven selected SNPs of ICAM1, PECAM1 and CD36 was determined in 552 individuals drawn from 24 populations across India. SNP-disease association was analysed in a case-control study format. Genotyping of the population panel was performed by Sequenom mass spectroscopy and patient/control samples were genotyped by SNaPshot method. Haplotypes and linkage disequilibrium (LD plots were generated using PHASE and Haploview, respectively. Odds-ratio (OR for risk assessment was estimated using EpiInfo™ version 3.4. Results Association of the ICAM1 rs5498 (exon 6 G allele and the CD36 exon 1a A allele with increased risk of severe malaria was observed (severe versus control, OR = 1.91 and 2.66, P = 0.02 and 0.0012, respectively. The CD36 rs1334512 (-53 T allele as well as the TT genotype associated with protection from severe disease (severe versus control, TT versus GG, OR = 0.37, P = 0.004. Interestingly, a SNP of the PECAM1 gene (rs668, exon 3, C/G with low minor allele frequency in populations of the endemic region compared to the non-endemic region exhibited differential association with disease in these regions; the G allele was a risk factor for malaria in the endemic region, but exhibited significant association with protection from disease in the non-endemic region. Conclusion The data highlights the significance of variations in the ICAM1, PECAM1 and CD36 genes in the manifestation of falciparum malaria in India. The PECAM1 exon 3 SNP exhibits altered association with disease in the

  12. Food and human gut as reservoirs of transferable antibiotic resistance encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-MarcRolain

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR over the past decade in human pathogens has become a worldwide health concern. Recent genomic and metagenomic studies in humans, animals, in food and in the environment have led to the discovery of a huge reservoir of AR genes called the resistome that could be mobilized and transferred from these sources to human pathogens. AR is a natural phenomenon developed by bacteria to protect antibiotic-producing bacteria from their own products and also to increase their survival in highly competitive microbial environments. Although antibiotics are used extensively in humans and animals, there is also considerable usage of antibiotics in agriculture, especially in animal feeds and aquaculture. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the sources of AR and the use of antibiotics in these reservoirs as selectors for emergence of AR bacteria in humans via the food chain.

  13. Detection of Amp C genes encoding for beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shanthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Amp C beta-lactamase are Ambler class C enzymes that confer resistance to extended spectrum cephalosporins and are not inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors. Their detection is crucial, since the phenotypic tests are not standardised leading to ambiguity in interpretation of results. This study was done to detect the types of Amp C prevalent in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods : Seventy-seven consecutive cefoxitin resistant clinical isolates of E. coli (n = 25 and K. pneumoniae (n = 52 were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing to various classes of antibiotics was performed by disc diffusion using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC to cefoxitin, imipenem and meropenem were determined by broth microdilution method. Isolates were screened for production of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of Amp C genes after phenotypic testing (Hodge test and inhibitor based test. Results : Cefoxitin Hodge test was positive in 40 isolates which included 20 E. coli and 20 K. pneumoniae. There was zone enhancement with boronic acid in 55 isolates, of which 36 were K. pneumoniae and 19 were E. coli. Multiplex PCR detected Amp C in 11/25 E. coli and 12/52 K. pneumoniae isolates. The Amp C genes detected were CIT (Amp C origin - Citrobacter freundii, DHA (Dhahran Hospital, Saudi Arabia, ACC (Ambler class C, EBC (Amp C origin - Enterobacter cloacae groups. ESBL was co-produced in 54 isolates. Conclusions : Amp C was detected in 29.87% of the study isolates. Majority of them co-produced ESBL. The most common Amp C was the CIT family. Screen tests for cefoxitin resistance may be falsely positive due to production of carbapenamases.

  14. Imprinting in the schizophrenia candidate gene GABRB2 encoding GABA(A) receptor β(2) subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, F W; Zhao, C; Lo, W-S; Ng, S-K; Tsang, S-Y; Nimgaonkar, V; Chung, W S; Ungvari, G S; Xue, H

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex genetic disorder, the inheritance pattern of which is likely complicated by epigenetic factors yet to be elucidated. In this study, transmission disequilibrium tests with family trios yielded significant differences between paternal and maternal transmissions of the disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs6556547 and its haplotypes. The minor allele (T) of rs6556547 was paternally undertransmitted to male schizophrenic offsprings, and this parent-of-origin effect strongly suggested that GABRB2 is imprinted. 'Flipping' of allelic expression in heterozygotes of SNP rs2229944 (C/T) in GABRB2 or rs2290732 (G/A) in the neighboring GABRA1 was compatible with imprinting effects on gene expression. Clustering analysis of GABRB2 mRNA expressions suggested that imprinting brought about the observed two-tiered distribution of expression levels in controls with heterozygous genotype at the disease-associated SNP rs1816071 (A/G). The deficit of upper-tiered expressions accounted for the lowered expression levels in the schizophrenic heterozygotes. The occurrence of a two-tiered distribution furnished support for imprinting, and also pointed to the necessity of differentiating between two kinds of heterozygotes of different parental origins in disease association studies on GABRB2. Bisulfite sequencing revealed hypermethylation in the neighborhood of SNP rs1816071, and methylation differences between controls and schizophrenia patients. Notably, the two schizophrenia-associated SNPs rs6556547 and rs1816071 overlapped with a CpG dinucleotide, thereby opening the possibility that CpG methylation status of these sites could have an impact on the risk of schizophrenia. Thus multiple lines of evidence pointed to the occurrence of imprinting in the GABRB2 gene and its possible role in the development of schizophrenia. PMID:20404824

  15. Cj1411c GENE OF CAMPYLOBACTER JEJUNI 11168 ENCODES FOR A CYTOCHROME P450 INVOLVED IN BACTERIAL CAPSULE SUGAR METABOLISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORCIONIVOSCHI N.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available After isolation in 1970s, Campylobacter jejuni become the most commonlyrecognized cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in man. In animals is frequently foundin bovines on ovines. Publishing of the genome sequence of Campylobacter jejuni11168 (Parkhill, 2000 revealed the presence of only one cytochrome P450 in anoperon involved in sugar and cell surface biosynthesis. The gene name is Cj1411c, is1359 bp long and encodes 453 aa. The sequence is strictly conserved inCampylobacter jejuni RM221. Similarities with two cytochrome P450s, one formSilicobacter sp. and one form Poloromonas sp., were identified. These two enzymesare known to be involved in ascorbate and aldarate metabolism. The recombinantconstruct allowed the expression of active P450 enzyme with a 450 nm peak whenbinds CO. The protein was purified in proportion of ~ 70 %. By deleting the P450gene from the Campylobacter jejuni 11168 genome clear changes in cellmorphology were identified cells becoming wider and shorter. The capsular sugarprofile of the NCI strain reveals the presence of arabinose which was not found inthe wild type strain. The arabinose was identified by both High Performance LiquidChromatography (HPLC and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR.

  16. Cloning and molecular characterization of a gene encoding MAP kinase from maize and its expression in E. coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new MAPK gene, ZmSIMK1 (Zea mays L. salt-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase 1), is isolated from a maize cDNA library. The full-length ZmSIMK1 gene contains 1636 bp and an open reading frame of 1122 nucleotides capable of encoding 373 amino acid polypeptides with a predicted molecular mass of 42.3 kda and pI of 6.01. The putative ZmSIMK1 protein contains all 11 conserved subdomains that are characteristics of serine/threonine protein kinases and the TEY motif, which is the putative phosphorylation site. Northern blot analysis shows that ZmSIMK1 is ubiquitously expressed in roots, stems, and leaves of maize seedlings and its mRNA accumulation is observed in maize seedlings treated with 30 mmol/L PEG-6000 and 137 mmol/L NaCl, but the expression of ZmSIMK1 is not significantly affected by 4℃ treatment. The expression vector pET-ZmSIMK1 is constructed by inserting the coding region of ZmSIMK1 cDNA into pET-42a(+), and transformed into E. coli strain BL21(DE3). A 77kda fusion protein is induced by the further culture at 37℃ after addition of 1mmol/L IPTG.

  17. A split and rearranged nuclear gene encoding the iron-sulfur subunit of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase in Euglenozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Michael W

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analyses based on phylogenetic and ultrastructural data have suggested that euglenids (such as Euglena gracilis, trypanosomatids and diplonemids are members of a monophyletic lineage termed Euglenozoa. However, many uncertainties are associated with phylogenetic reconstructions for ancient and rapidly evolving groups; thus, rare genomic characters become increasingly important in reinforcing inferred phylogenetic relationships. Findings We discovered that the iron-sulfur subunit (SdhB of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase is encoded by a split and rearranged nuclear gene in Euglena gracilis and trypanosomatids, an example of a rare genomic character. The two subgenic modules are transcribed independently and the resulting mRNAs appear to be independently translated, with the two protein products imported into mitochondria, based on the presence of predicted mitochondrial targeting peptides. Although the inferred protein sequences are in general very divergent from those of other organisms, all of the required iron-sulfur cluster-coordinating residues are present. Moreover, the discontinuity in the euglenozoan SdhB sequence occurs between the two domains of a typical, covalently continuous SdhB, consistent with the inference that the euglenozoan 'half' proteins are functional. Conclusion The discovery of this unique molecular marker provides evidence for the monophyly of Euglenozoa that is independent of evolutionary models. Our results pose questions about the origin and timing of this novel gene arrangement and the structure and function of euglenozoan SdhB.

  18. Temperature Stress at Grain Filling Stage Mediates Expression of Three Isoform Genes Encoding Starch Branching Enzymes in Rice Endosperm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Ke-su; CHENG Fang-min; ZHANG Qi-fang; LIU Kui-gang

    2009-01-01

    An early-maturity indica rice variety Zhefu 49, whose grain quality and starch structure are sensitive to environmental temperature, was subjected to different temperatures (32oC for high temperature and 22oC for optimum temperature) at the grain filling stage in plant growth chambers, and the different expressions of three isoform genes (SBEI, SBEIII and SBEIV) encoding starch branching enzyme (SBE) in the endosperms were studied by the real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (FQ-PCR) method. Effects of high temperature on the SBE expression in developing rice endosperms were isoform-dependent. High temperature significantly down-regulated the expressions of SBEI and SBEIII, while up-regulated the expression of SBEIV. Compared with SBEIV and SBEIII, the expression of SBEI gene in Zhefu 49 rice endosperms was more sensitive to temperature variation at the grain filling stage. This study indicates that changes in weather/climate conditions especially temperature stress influence rice grain formation and its quality as evidenced by isoform expression.

  19. Copy number variation of a gene cluster encoding endopolygalacturonase mediates flesh texture and stone adhesion in peach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Hui; Ma, Baiquan; Zheng, Hongyu; Fang, Ting; Ogutu, Collins; Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-04-01

    Texture is an important attribute affecting consumer perception of fruit quality. Peach melting flesh and flesh adhesion to stone (endocarp) are simply inherited and controlled by the F-M locus on linkage group (LG) 4. Here, we report that two genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) in the F-M locus, designated PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM, are associated with the melting flesh and stone adhesion traits. PpendoPGM controls melting flesh while PpendoPGF has pleiotropic effects on both melting flesh and stone adhesion. The F-M locus has three allelic copy number variants of endoPG, H1 (PpendoPGF and PpendoPGM), H2 (PpendoPGM), and H3 (null). The H2 haplotype represents the ancestral one while the H1 and H3 haplotypes are two variants due to duplication and deletion of PpendoPGM, respectively. Accessions with H1H1, H1H2, or H1H3 genotypes show the freestone or semi-freestone and melting flesh phenotype, while both H2H2 and H2H3 accessions have the clingstone and melting flesh phenotype. The H3H3 accessions have the clingstone and non-melting flesh phenotype. Our study not only demonstrates a driving role of gene copy number variations in flesh texture diversification in fruit trees, but also provides a useful diagnostic tool for early seedling selection in peach breeding programmes. PMID:26850878

  20. Identification and classification of all potential hemolysin encoding genes and their products from Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-xuan ZHANG; Yan GENG; Bo BI; Jian-yong HE; Chun-fu WU; Xiao-kui GUO; Guo-ping ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To identify and classify all potential hemolysin candidates of Leptospira interrogans serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae serovar Lai. Methods: All of thepotential hemolysin encoding genes were characterized in silico. These genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The hemolytic activities of the expressed proteins were assayed observing the hemolysis on sheep blood agar plates. Sphingomyelinase activities of the hemolysin candidates were measured by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and HPLC for sphingomyelin-hydrolysis. Expression and secretion of the hemolysins in L interrogans were studied by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results and Conclusion: The hemolytic activities of hemolysin candidates (LA0327, LA0378, LA1027, LA1029, LA1650, LA3050,LA3937, LA4004) from L interrogans strain Lai were confirmed. They were further divided into two groups, sphingomyelinase hemolysins and non-sphingomyelinase hemolysins, based on their ability to hydrolyze sphingomyelin. Most of these hemolysins were actually expressed in living L interrogans and some of them were secreted into the environment. This study establishes an essential and complete basis for further studying the contribution of hemolysins to the pathogenesis of L interrogans.

  1. Maintenance of phenotypic diversity within a set of virulence encoding genes of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, Thomas; Recker, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Infection by the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum results in a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from severe and potentially life-threatening malaria to asymptomatic carriage. In a process of naturally acquired immunity, individuals living in malaria-endemic regions build up a level of clinical protection, which attenuates infection severity in an exposure-dependent manner. Underlying this shift in the immunoepidemiology as well as the observed range in malaria pathogenesis is the var multigene family and the phenotypic diversity embedded within. The var gene-encoded surface proteins Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 mediate variant-specific binding of infected red blood cells to a diverse set of host receptors that has been linked to specific disease manifestations, including cerebral and pregnancy-associated malaria. Here, we show that cross-reactive immune responses, which minimize the within-host benefit of each additionally expressed gene during infection, can cause selection for maximum phenotypic diversity at the genome level. We further show that differential functional constraints on protein diversification stably maintain uneven ratios between phenotypic groups, in line with empirical observation. Our results thus suggest that the maintenance of phenotypic diversity within P. falciparum is driven by an evolutionary trade-off that optimizes between within-host parasite fitness and between-host selection pressure. PMID:26674193

  2. Molecular adaptation within the coat protein-encoding gene of Tunisian almond isolates of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Moncef Boulila; Sawssen Ben Tiba; Saoussen Jilani

    2013-04-01

    The sequence alignments of five Tunisian isolates of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) were searched for evidence of recombination and diversifying selection. Since failing to account for recombination can elevate the false positive error rate in positive selection inference, a genetic algorithm (GARD) was used first and led to the detection of potential recombination events in the coat protein-encoding gene of that virus. The Recco algorithm confirmed these results by identifying, additionally, the potential recombinants. For neutrality testing and evaluation of nucleotide polymorphism in PNRSV CP gene, Tajima’s , and Fu and Li’s and statistical tests were used. About selection inference, eight algorithms (SLAC, FEL, IFEL, REL, FUBAR, MEME, PARRIS, and GA branch) incorporated in HyPhy package were utilized to assess the selection pressure exerted on the expression of PNRSV capsid. Inferred phylogenies pointed out, in addition to the three classical groups (PE-5, PV-32, and PV-96), the delineation of a fourth cluster having the new proposed designation SW6, and a fifth clade comprising four Tunisian PNRSV isolates which underwent recombination and selective pressure and to which the name Tunisian outgroup was allocated.

  3. A candidate gene for developmental dyslexia encodes a nuclear tetratricopeptide repeat domain protein dynamically regulated in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Mikko; Kaminen, Nina; Nopola-Hemmi, Jaana; Haltia, Tuomas; Myllyluoma, Birgitta; Lyytinen, Heikki; Muller, Kurt; Kaaranen, Minna; Lindsberg, Perttu J; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Kere, Juha

    2003-09-30

    Approximately 3-10% of people have specific difficulties in reading, despite adequate intelligence, education, and social environment. We report here the characterization of a gene, DYX1C1 near the DYX1 locus in chromosome 15q21, that is disrupted by a translocation t(2;15)(q11;q21) segregating coincidentally with dyslexia. Two sequence changes in DYX1C1, one involving the translation initiation sequence and an Elk-1 transcription factor binding site (-3G --> A) and a codon (1249G --> T), introducing a premature stop codon and truncating the predicted protein by 4 aa, associate alone and in combination with dyslexia. DYX1C1 encodes a 420-aa protein with three tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains, thought to be protein interaction modules, but otherwise with no homology to known proteins. The mouse Dyx1c1 protein is 78% identical to the human protein, and the nonhuman primates differ at 0.5-1.4% of residues. DYX1C1 is expressed in several tissues, including the brain, and the protein resides in the nucleus. In human brain, DYX1C1 protein localizes to a fraction of cortical neurons and white matter glial cells. We conclude that DYX1C1 should be regarded as a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia. Detailed study of its function may open a path to understanding a complex process of development and maturation of the human brain. PMID:12954984

  4. Methanol:coenzyme M methyltransferase from Methanosarcina barkeri. Purification, properties and encoding genes of the corrinoid protein MT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, K; Harms, U; Thauer, R K

    1997-02-01

    In Methanosarcina barkeri, methanogenesis from methanol is initiated by the formation of methylcoenzyme M from methanol and coenzyme M. This methyl transfer reaction is catalyzed by two enzymes, designated MT1 and MT2. Transferase MT1 is a corrinoid protein. The purification, catalytic properties and encoding genes of MT2 (MtaA) have been described previously [Harms, U. and Thauer, R.K. (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 235, 653-659]. We report here on the corresponding analysis of MT1. The corrinoid protein MT1 was purified to apparent homogeneity and showed a specific activity of 750 mumol min-1 mg-1. The enzyme catalyzed the methylation of its bound corrinoid in the cob(I)amide oxidation state by methanol. In addition to this automethylation, the purified enzyme was found to catalyze the methylation of free cob(I)alamin to methylcob(III)alamin. It was composed of two different subunits designated MtaB and MtaC, with apparent molecular masses of 49 kDa and 24 kDa, respectively. The subunit MtaC was shown to harbour the corrinoid prosthetic group. The genes mtaB and mtaC were cloned and sequenced. They were found to be juxtapositioned and to form a transcription unit mtaCB. The corrinoid-harbouring subunit MtaC exhibits 35% sequence similarity to the cobalamin-binding domain of methionine synthase from Escherichia coli. PMID:9057830

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding RING zinc finger ankyrin protein from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiuhong Yang; Chao Sun; Yuanlei Hun; Zhongping Lin

    2008-03-01

    A RING zinc finger ankyrin protein gene, designated AdZFP1, was isolated from drought-tolerant Artemisia desertorum Spreng by mRNA differential display and RACE. Its cDNA was 1723 bp and encoded a putative protein of 445 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 47.9 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 7.49. A typical C3HC4-type RING finger domain was found at the C-terminal region of the AdZFP1 protein, and several groups of ankyrin repeats were found at the N-terminal region. Alignments of amino acid sequence showed that AdZFP1 was 66% identical to the Arabidopsis thaliana putative RING zinc finger ankyrin protein AAN31869. Transcriptional analysis showed that AdZFP1 was inducible under drought stress in root, stem and leaf of the plant. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the transcript of AdZFP1 was strongly induced by exogenous abscisic acid (ABA) and also by salinity, cold and heat to some extent. Overexpression of the AdZFP1 gene in transgenic tobacco enhanced their tolerance to drought stress.

  6. Transcripts for genes encoding soluble acid invertase and sucrose synthase accumulate in root tip and cortical cells containing mycorrhizal arbuscules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blee, Kristopher A; Anderson, Anne J

    2002-09-01

    Arbuscule formation by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices (Schenck & Smith) was limited to cortical cells immediately adjacent to the endodermis. Because these cortical cells are the first to intercept photosynthate exiting the vascular cylinder, transcript levels for sucrose metabolizing-enzymes were compared between mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal roots. The probes corresponded to genes encoding a soluble acid invertase with potential vacuolar targeting, which we generated from Phaseolus vulgaris roots, a Rhizobium-responsive sucrose synthase of soybean and a cell wall acid invertase of carrot. Transcripts in non-mycorrhizal roots were developmentally regulated and abundant in the root tips for all three probes but in differentiated roots of P. vulgaris they were predominantly located in phloem tissues for sucrose synthase or the endodermis and phloem for soluble acid invertase. In mycorrhizal roots increased accumulations of transcripts for sucrose synthase and vacuolar invertase were both observed in the same cortical cells bearing arbuscules that fluoresce. There was no effect on the expression of the cell wall invertase gene in fluorescent carrot cells containing arbuscules. Thus, it appears that presence of the fungal hyphae in the fluorescent arbusculated cell stimulates discrete alterations in expression of sucrose metabolizing enzymes to increase the sink potential of the cell. PMID:12175013

  7. Involvement of preprotachykinin A gene-encoded peptides and the neurokinin 1 receptor in endotoxin-induced murine airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Elekes, Krisztián; Sándor, Katalin; Szitter, István; Kereskai, László; Pintér, Erika; Kemény, Agnes; Szolcsányi, János; McLaughlin, Lynn; Vasiliou, Sylvia; Kipar, Anja; Zimmer, Andreas; Hunt, Stephen P; Stewart, James P; Quinn, John P

    2010-10-01

    Tachykinins encoded by the preprotachykinin A (TAC1) gene such as substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are involved in neurogenic inflammatory processes via predominantly neurokinins 1 and 2 (NK1 and NK2) receptor activation, respectively. Endokinins and hemokinins encoded by the TAC4 gene also have remarkable selectivity and potency for the NK1 receptors and might participate in inflammatory cell functions. The aim of the present study was to investigate endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyper-reactivity in TAC1(-/-), NK1(-/-) and also in double knockout (TAC1(-/-)/NK1(-/-)) mice. Sub-acute interstitial lung inflammation was evoked by intranasal Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the knockout mice and their wildtype C57BL/6 counterparts 24 h before measurement. Respiratory parameters were measured with unrestrained whole body plethysmography. Bronchoconstriction was induced by inhalation of the muscarinic receptor agonist carbachol and Penh (enhanced pause) correlating with airway resistance was calculated. Lung interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations were measured with ELISA. Histological evaluation was performed and a composite morphological score was determined. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung was measured with spectrophotometry to quantify the number of infiltrating neutrophils/macrophages. Airway hyper-reactivity was significantly reduced in the TAC1(-/-) as well as the TAC1(-/-)/NK1(-/-) groups. However, LPS-induced histological inflammatory changes (perivascular/peribronchial oedema, neutrophil infiltration and goblet cell hyperplasia), MPO activity and TNF-alpha concentration were markedly diminished only in TAC1(-/-) mice. Interestingly, the concentrations of both cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha, were significantly greater in the NK1(-/-) group. These data clearly demonstrated on the basis of histology, MPO and cytokine measurements that TAC1 gene

  8. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  9. A complementary bioinformatics approach to identify potential plant cell wall glycosyltransferase-encoding genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelund, Jack; Skjøt, Michael; Geshi, Naomi; Ulvskov, Peter; Petersen, Bent Larsen

    2004-09-01

    Plant cell wall (CW) synthesizing enzymes can be divided into the glycan (i.e. cellulose and callose) synthases, which are multimembrane spanning proteins located at the plasma membrane, and the glycosyltransferases (GTs), which are Golgi localized single membrane spanning proteins, believed to participate in the synthesis of hemicellulose, pectin, mannans, and various glycoproteins. At the Carbohydrate-Active enZYmes (CAZy) database where e.g. glucoside hydrolases and GTs are classified into gene families primarily based on amino acid sequence similarities, 415 Arabidopsis GTs have been classified. Although much is known with regard to composition and fine structures of the plant CW, only a handful of CW biosynthetic GT genes-all classified in the CAZy system-have been characterized. In an effort to identify CW GTs that have not yet been classified in the CAZy database, a simple bioinformatics approach was adopted. First, the entire Arabidopsis proteome was run through the Transmembrane Hidden Markov Model 2.0 server and proteins containing one or, more rarely, two transmembrane domains within the N-terminal 150 amino acids were collected. Second, these sequences were submitted to the SUPERFAMILY prediction server, and sequences that were predicted to belong to the superfamilies NDP-sugartransferase, UDP-glycosyltransferase/glucogen-phosphorylase, carbohydrate-binding domain, Gal-binding domain, or Rossman fold were collected, yielding a total of 191 sequences. Fifty-two accessions already classified in CAZy were discarded. The resulting 139 sequences were then analyzed using the Three-Dimensional-Position-Specific Scoring Matrix and mGenTHREADER servers, and 27 sequences with similarity to either the GT-A or the GT-B fold were obtained. Proof of concept of the present approach has to some extent been provided by our recent demonstration that two members of this pool of 27 non-CAZy-classified putative GTs are xylosyltransferases involved in synthesis of pectin

  10. The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac110 gene encodes a new per os infectivity factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiantao Liu; Zhu, Leyuan; Zhang, Shan; Deng, Zihao; Huang, Zhihong; Yuan, Meijin; Wu, Wenbi; Yang, Kai

    2016-08-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac110 gene is especially conserved in lepidopteran-specific baculoviruses and is uncharacterized. To investigate the role of ac110 in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac110-knockout (vAc110KO) and a repair (vAc110:HA) viruses were constructed in this study. Budded virion production and occlusion body formation were unaffected in vAc110KO-transfected or infected Sf9 cells. Intrahemocoelic injection of budded virions of vAc110KO killed Trichoplusia ni larvae as efficiently as the repair or the wild-type viruses. However, per os inoculation of occlusion bodies of vAc110KO failed to establish infection in T. ni larvae, while the repair virus was as efficient as the wild-type virus. Treatment with calcofluor white, a reagent that damages the peritrophic membrane, did not rescue the oral infectivity of vAc110KO. These results suggested that Ac110 is a new per os infectivity factor that may play a role after occlusion-derived virions pass through the peritrophic membrane during oral infection. PMID:27212681

  11. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of a possible transcription factor encoded by the mimivirus L544 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mimivirus L544 gene product was expressed in E. coli and crystallized; preliminary phasing of a MAD data set was performed using the selenium signal present in a crystal of recombinant selenomethionine-substituted protein. Mimivirus is the prototype of a new family (the Mimiviridae) of nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs), which already include the Poxviridae, Iridoviridae, Phycodnaviridae and Asfarviridae. Mimivirus specifically replicates in cells from the genus Acanthamoeba. Proteomic analysis of purified mimivirus particles revealed the presence of many subunits of the DNA-directed RNA polymerase II complex. A fully functional pre-transcriptional complex appears to be loaded in the virions, allowing mimivirus to initiate transcription within the host cytoplasm immediately upon infection independently of the host nuclear apparatus. To fully understand this process, a systematic study of mimivirus proteins that are predicted (by bioinformatics) or suspected (by proteomic analysis) to be involved in transcription was initiated by cloning and expressing them in Escherichia coli in order to determine their three-dimensional structures. Here, preliminary crystallographic analysis of the recombinant L544 protein is reported. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221 with one monomer per asymmetric unit. A MAD data set was used for preliminary phasing using the selenium signal present in a selenomethionine-substituted protein crystal

  12. Functional Identification of Proteus mirabilis eptC Gene Encoding a Core Lipopolysaccharide Phosphoethanolamine Transferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Aquilini

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available By comparison of the Proteus mirabilis HI4320 genome with known lipopolysaccharide (LPS phosphoethanolamine transferases, three putative candidates (PMI3040, PMI3576, and PMI3104 were identified. One of them, eptC (PMI3104 was able to modify the LPS of two defined non-polar core LPS mutants of Klebsiella pneumoniae that we use as surrogate substrates. Mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance showed that eptC directs the incorporation of phosphoethanolamine to the O-6 of l-glycero-d-mano-heptose II. The eptC gene is found in all the P. mirabilis strains analyzed in this study. Putative eptC homologues were found for only two additional genera of the Enterobacteriaceae family, Photobacterium and Providencia. The data obtained in this work supports the role of the eptC (PMI3104 product in the transfer of PEtN to the O-6 of l,d-HepII in P. mirabilis strains.

  13. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halaban, R.; Moellmann, G. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (B{sup lt}/B{sup lt}) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the B{sup lt} mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation.

  14. Murine and human b locus pigmentation genes encode a glycoprotein (gp75) with catalase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melanogenesis is regulated in large part by tyrosinase, and defective tyrosinase leads to albinism. The mechanisms for other pigmentation determinants (e.g., those operative in tyrosinase-positive albinism and in murine coat-color mutants) are not yet known. One murine pigmentation gene, the brown (b) locus, when mutated leads to a brown (b/b) or hypopigmentated (Blt/Blt) coat versus the wild-type black (B/B). The authors show that the b locus codes for a glycoprotein with the activity of a catalase (catalase B). Only the c locus protein is a tyrosinase. Because peroxides may be by-products of melanogenic activity and hydrogen peroxide in particular is known to destroy melanin precursors and melanin, they conclude that pigmentation is controlled not only by tyrosinase but also by a hydroperoxidase. The studies indicate that catalase B is identical with gp75, a known human melanosomal glycoprotein; that the b mutation is in a heme-associated domain; and that the Blt mutation renders the protein susceptible to rapid proteolytic degradation

  15. The Uncharacterized Transcription Factor YdhM Is the Regulator of the nemA Gene, Encoding N-Ethylmaleimide Reductase▿

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Yoshimasa; Shimada, Tomohiro; Kori, Ayako; Yamada, Kayoko; Ishihama, Akira

    2008-01-01

    N-Ethylmaleimide (NEM) has been used as a specific reagent of Cys modification in proteins and thus is toxic for cell growth. On the Escherichia coli genome, the nemA gene coding for NEM reductase is located downstream of the gene encoding an as-yet-uncharacterized transcription factor, YdhM. Disruption of the ydhM gene results in reduction of nemA expression even in the induced state, indicating that the two genes form a single operon. After in vitro genomic SELEX screening, one of the targe...

  16. Multicistronic lentiviral vectors containing the FMDV 2A cleavage factor demonstrate robust expression of encoded genes at limiting MOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margison Geoffrey P

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of gene therapy applications would benefit from vectors capable of expressing multiple genes. In this study we explored the feasibility and efficiency of expressing two or three transgenes in HIV-1 based lentiviral vector. Bicistronic and tricistronic self-inactivating lentiviral vectors were constructed employing the internal ribosomal entry site (IRES sequence of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV and/or foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV cleavage factor 2A. We employed enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP, O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT, and homeobox transcription factor HOXB4 as model genes and their expression was detected by appropriate methods including fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, biochemical assay, and western blotting. Results All the multigene vectors produced high titer virus and were able to simultaneously express two or three transgenes in transduced cells. However, the level of expression of individual transgenes varied depending on: the transgene itself; its position within the construct; the total number of transgenes expressed; the strategy used for multigene expression and the average copy number of pro-viral insertions. Notably, at limiting MOI, the expression of eGFP in a bicistronic vector based on 2A was ~4 times greater than that of an IRES based vector. Conclusion The small and efficient 2A sequence can be used alone or in combination with an IRES for the construction of multicistronic lentiviral vectors which can express encoded transgenes at functionally relevant levels in cells containing an average of one pro-viral insert.

  17. Identification and functional analysis of the erh1(+ gene encoding enhancer of rudimentary homolog from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek K Krzyzanowski

    Full Text Available The ERH gene encodes a highly conserved small nuclear protein with a unique amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure but unknown function. The gene is present in animals, plants, and protists but to date has only been found in few fungi. Here we report that ERH homologs are also present in all four species from the genus Schizosaccharomyces, S. pombe, S. octosporus, S. cryophilus, and S. japonicus, which, however, are an exception in this respect among Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The ERH protein sequence is moderately conserved within the genus (58% identity between S. pombe and S.japonicus, but the intron-rich genes have almost identical intron-exon organizations in all four species. In S. pombe, erh1(+ is expressed at a roughly constant level during vegetative growth and adaptation to unfavorable conditions such as nutrient limitation and hyperosmotic stress caused by sorbitol. Erh1p localizes preferentially to the nucleus with the exception of the nucleolus, but is also present in the cytoplasm. Cells lacking erh1(+ have an aberrant cell morphology and a comma-like shape when cultured to the stationary phase, and exhibit a delayed recovery from this phase followed by slower growth. Loss of erh1(+ in an auxotrophic background results in enhanced arrest in the G1 phase following nutritional stress, and also leads to hypersensitivity to agents inducing hyperosmotic stress (sorbitol, inhibiting DNA replication (hydroxyurea, and destabilizing the plasma membrane (SDS; this hypersensitivity can be abolished by expression of S. pombe erh1(+ and, to a lesser extent, S. japonicus erh1(+ or human ERH. Erh1p fails to interact with the human Ciz1 and PDIP46/SKAR proteins, known molecular partners of human ERH. Our data suggest that in Schizosaccharomyces sp. erh1(+ is non-essential for normal growth and Erh1p could play a role in response to adverse environmental conditions and in cell cycle regulation.

  18. The Drosophila pumilio gene encodes two functional protein isoforms that play multiple roles in germline development, gonadogenesis, oogenesis and embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M; Lin, H

    1999-01-01

    The pumilio (pum) gene plays an essential role in embryonic patterning and germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance during oogenesis in Drosophila. Here we report on a phenotypic analysis using pum(ovarette) mutations, which reveals multiple functions of pum in primordial germ cell proliferation, larval ovary formation, GSC division, and subsequent oogenic processes, as well as in oviposition. Specifically, by inducing pum(-) GSC clones at the onset of oogenesis, we show that pum is directly involved in GSC division, a function that is distinct from its requirement in primordial germ cells. Furthermore, we show that pum encodes 156- and 130-kD proteins, both of which are functional isoforms. Among pum(ovarette) mutations, pum(1688) specifically eliminates the 156-kD isoform but not the 130-kD isoform, while pum(2003) and pum(4277) specifically affect the 130-kD isoform but not the 156-kD isoform. Normal doses of both isoforms are required for the zygotic function of pum, yet either isoform alone at a normal dose is sufficient for the maternal effect function of pum. A pum cDNA transgene that contains the known open reading frame encodes only the 156-kD isoform and rescues the phenotype of both pum(1688) and pum(2003) mutants. These observations suggest that the 156- and 130-kD isoforms can compensate for each other's function in a dosage-dependent manner. Finally, we present molecular evidence suggesting that the two PUM isoforms share some of their primary structures. PMID:10471709

  19. Deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARO8 gene, encoding an aromatic amino acid transaminase, enhances phenylethanol production from glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Liti, Gianni; Louis, Edward J; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Phenylethanol has a characteristic rose-like aroma that makes it a popular ingredient in foods, beverages and cosmetics. Microbial production of phenylethanol currently relies on whole-cell bioconversion of phenylalanine with yeasts that harbour an Ehrlich pathway for phenylalanine catabolism. Complete biosynthesis of phenylethanol from a cheap carbon source, such as glucose, provides an economically attractive alternative for phenylalanine bioconversion. In this study, synthetic genetic array (SGA) screening was applied to identify genes involved in regulation of phenylethanol synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screen focused on transcriptional regulation of ARO10, which encodes the major decarboxylase involved in conversion of phenylpyruvate to phenylethanol. A deletion in ARO8, which encodes an aromatic amino acid transaminase, was found to underlie the transcriptional upregulation of ARO10 during growth, with ammonium sulphate as the sole nitrogen source. Physiological characterization revealed that the aro8Δ mutation led to substantial changes in the absolute and relative intracellular concentrations of amino acids. Moreover, deletion of ARO8 led to de novo production of phenylethanol during growth on a glucose synthetic medium with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. The aro8Δ mutation also stimulated phenylethanol production when combined with other, previously documented, mutations that deregulate aromatic amino acid biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae. The resulting engineered S. cerevisiae strain produced >3 mm phenylethanol from glucose during growth on a simple synthetic medium. The strong impact of a transaminase deletion on intracellular amino acid concentrations opens new possibilities for yeast-based production of amino acid-derived products. PMID:24733517

  20. Cytokinins modulate the expression of genes encoding the protein of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Serve, B T; Axelos, M; Péaud-Lenoël, C

    1985-05-01

    Tobacco cell suspension cultures responded to cytokinins (for instance kinetin) by full chloroplast differentiation. The hormone had the effect of stimulating the appearance of a few prominent plastid proteins. Synthesis of the light-harvesting chlorophyl a/b-binding protein (LHCP) in response to kinetin was noteworthy (Axelos M. et al.: Plant Sci Lett 33:201-212, 1984).Poly(A)(+)RNAs were prepared from cells grown in the presence of or without added kinetin. Poly(A)(+)RNA recovery and translation activity were not quantitatively altered by the hormone treatment. In vitro translation of polyadenylated mRNA into precursor polypeptides of LHCP (pLHCP) was quantified by immunoprecipitation and SDS-PAGE fractionation of pLHCP immunoprecipitates: pLHCP-mRNA translating activity was found to be stimulated in parallel to mature LHCP accumulation by kinetin-induced cells.Dot-blot and northern-blot hybridizations of poly(A)(+)RNA were carried out, using as a probe a pea LHCP-cDNA clone (Broglie R. et al.: Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 78: 7304-7308, 1981). A ten-fold increase of the level of pLHCP-encoding sequences was observed in poly(A)(+)RNA prepared from 9-d kinetin-stimulated cells, compared to control cells. Oligo(dT)-cellulose-excluded RNA fractions exhibited very low hybridization levels, in the same ratios as those obtained with poly(A)(+)RNA.Thus, the expression of LHCP-gene activity, in response to kinetin addition to tobacco cell suspension cultures, is regulated by the level of pLHCP-encoding mRNA rather than by translational or post-translational controls. re]19850218 rv]19850605 ac]19850613. PMID:24306651

  1. The expression of the human steroid sulfatase-encoding gene is driven by alternative first exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Toffolo, Vania; Nardi, Alessia; Fiore, Cristina; Armanini, Decio; Belvedere, Paola; Colombo, Lorenzo

    2007-10-01

    We have analyzed steroid sulfatase (STS) gene transcription in 10 human tissues: ovary, adrenal cortex, uterus, thyroid, liver, pancreas, colon, mammary gland, dermal papilla of the hair follicle, and peripheral mononuclear leukocytes. Overall, six different promoters were found to drive STS expression, giving rise to transcripts with unique first exons that were labeled 0a, 0b, 0c, 1a, 1c, and 1d, of which the last two and 0c are newly reported. All of them, except exon 1d, vary in length owing to the occurrence of multiple transcriptional start sites. While placental exon 1a is partially coding, the other five first exons are all untranslated. Three of these (0a, 0b, and 0c) are spliced to the common partially coding exon 1b, whereas the other two (1c and 1d) are spliced to the coding exon 2, which occurs in all transcripts. Whatever the ATG actually used, the differences are restricted to the signal peptide which is post-transcriptionally cleaved. Transcripts with exons 0a and 0b have the broadest tissue distribution, occurring, in 6 out of the 12 tissues so far investigated, while the other first exons are restricted to one or two tissues. The proximal promoter of each first exon was devoid of TATA box or initiator element and lacked consensus elements for transcription factors related to steroidogenesis, suggesting that regulatory sequences are probably placed at greater distance. In conclusion, the regulation of STS transcription appears to be more complex than previously thought, suggesting that this enzyme plays a substantial role in intercellular integration. PMID:17601726

  2. NIH 3T3 cells stably transfected with the gene encoding phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus acquire a transformed phenotype.

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, T.; Bjørkøy, G; Overvatn, A; Diaz-Meco, M T; Traavik, T; Moscat, J

    1994-01-01

    In order to determine whether chronic elevation of intracellular diacylglycerol levels generated by hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) by PC-hydrolyzing phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is oncogenic, we generated stable transfectants of NIH 3T3 cells expressing the gene encoding PC-PLC from Bacillus cereus. We found that constitutive expression of this gene (plc) led to transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, formation of transformed foci in tiss...

  3. Mapping and sequencing of a gene from myxoma virus that is related to those encoding epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha.

    OpenAIRE

    Upton, C; Macen, J L; McFadden, G

    1987-01-01

    Myxoma virus, a Leporipoxvirus and agent of myxomatosis, was shown to possess a gene with the potential to encode an epidermal growth factorlike factor. Its relationship to other members of this family, including the poxvirus growth factors from Shope fibroma virus and vaccinia virus, was analyzed. Alignment of DNA sequences and related open reading frames of myxoma virus and Shope fibroma virus indicated colinearity of genes between these poxviruses.

  4. Natural Variation in the Promoter of the Gene Encoding the Mga Regulator Alters Host-Pathogen Interactions in Group A Streptococcus Carrier Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Anthony R.; Olsen, Randall J.; Wunsche, Andrea; Kumaraswami, Muthiah; Shelburne, Samuel A.; Carroll, Ronan K; Musser, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Humans commonly carry pathogenic bacteria asymptomatically, but the molecular factors underlying microbial asymptomatic carriage are poorly understood. We previously reported that two epidemiologically unassociated serotype M3 group A Streptococcus (GAS) carrier strains had an identical 12-bp deletion in the promoter of the gene encoding Mga, a global positive gene regulator. Herein, we report on studies designed to test the hypothesis that the identified 12-bp deletion in the mga promoter al...

  5. Analysis of the wild-type and mutant genes encoding the enzyme kynurenine monooxygenase of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Q; Calvo, E.; Marinotti, O.; Fang, J; Rizzi, M; James, A A; Li, J.

    2003-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) catalyses the hydroxylation of kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. KMO has a key role in tryptophan catabolism and synthesis of ommochrome pigments in mosquitoes. The gene encoding this enzyme in the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is called kynurenine hydroxylase (kh) and a mutant allele that produces white eyes has been designated khw. A number of cDNA clones representative of wild-type and mutant genes were isolated. Sequence analyses of the wild-type ...

  6. The Gene CBO0515 from Clostridium botulinum Strain Hall A Encodes the Rare Enzyme N5-(Carboxyethyl) Ornithine Synthase, EC 1.5.1.24▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John; Hill, Karen K.; Smith, Theresa J.; Pikis, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Sequencing of the genome of Clostridium botulinum strain Hall A revealed a gene (CBO0515), whose putative amino acid sequence was suggestive of the rare enzyme N5-(1-carboxyethyl) ornithine synthase. To test this hypothesis, CBO0515 has been cloned, and the encoded polypeptide was purified and characterized. This unusual gene appears to be confined to proteolytic strains assigned to group 1 of C. botulinum. PMID:19933367

  7. Is the gene encoding Chibby implicated as a tumour suppressor in colorectal cancer ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel member of the Wnt signalling pathway, Chibby, was recently identified. This protein inhibits Wnt/β-catenin mediated transcriptional activation by competing with Lef-1 (the transcription factor and target of β-catenin) to bind to β-catenin. This suggests that Chibby could be a tumour suppressor protein. The C22orf2 gene coding Chibby is located on chromosome 22, a region recurrently lost in colorectal cancer. Activation of the Wnt pathway is a major feature of colorectal cancer and occurs through inactivation of APC or activation of β-catenin. All of this led us to analyse the possible implication of Chibby in colorectal carcinogenesis. First, 36 tumour and matched normal colonic mucosa DNA were genotyped with five microsatellite markers located on chromosome 22 to search for loss of heterozygosity. Then, mutation screening of the C22orf2 coding sequence and splice sites was performed in the 36 tumour DNA. Finally, expression of Chibby was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR on 10 patients, 4 with loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 22. Loss of heterozygosity involving the C22orf2 region was detected in 11 out of 36 patients (30%). Sequencing analysis revealed a known variant, rs3747174, in exon 5: T321C leading to a silent amino acid polymorphism A107A. Allelic frequencies were 0.69 and 0.31 for T and C variants respectively. No other mutation was detected. Among the 10 patients studied, expression analysis revealed that Chibby is overexpressed in 2 tumours and underexpressed in 1. No correlations were found with 22q LOH status. As no somatic mutation was detected in C22orf2 in 36 colorectal tumour DNA, our results do not support the implication of Chibby as a tumour suppressor in colorectal carcinogenesis. This was supported by the absence of underexpression of Chibby among the tumour samples with 22q LOH. The implication of other Wnt pathway members remains to be identified to explain the part of colorectal tumours without mutation in APC and β-catenin

  8. DNA binding sites recognised in vitro by a knotted class 1 homeodomain protein encoded by the hooded gene, k, in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krusell, L; Rasmussen, I; Gausing, K

    1997-01-01

    The homeodomain of the knotted classes of transcription factors from plants differs from the well characterized Antp/En type homeodomains from Drosophila at key amino acid residues contributing to the DNA binding. A cDNA, Hvh21, derived from the hooded gene and encoding a full length homolog of...

  9. Studying the organization of genes encoding plant cell wall degrading enzymes in Chrysomela tremula provides insights into a leaf beetle genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, Y; Saski, C A; Feltus, F A; Luyten, I; Quesneville, H; Heckel, D G

    2014-06-01

    The ability of herbivorous beetles from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides has only recently begun to be appreciated. The presence of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) in the beetle's digestive tract makes this degradation possible. Sequences encoding these beetle-derived PCWDEs were originally identified from transcriptomes and strikingly resemble those of saprophytic and phytopathogenic microorganisms, raising questions about their origin; e.g. are they insect- or microorganism-derived? To demonstrate unambiguously that the genes encoding PCWDEs found in beetle transcriptomes are indeed of insect origin, we generated a bacterial artificial chromosome library from the genome of the leaf beetle Chrysomela tremula, containing 18 432 clones with an average size of 143 kb. After hybridizing this library with probes derived from 12 C. tremula PCWDE-encoding genes and sequencing the positive clones, we demonstrated that the latter genes are encoded by the insect's genome and are surrounded by genes possessing orthologues in the genome of Tribolium castaneum as well as in three other beetle genomes. Our analyses showed that although the level of overall synteny between C. tremula and T. castaneum seems high, the degree of microsynteny between both species is relatively low, in contrast to the more closely related Colorado potato beetle. PMID:24456018

  10. Identification of two novel genes encoding 97- to 99-kilodalton outer membrane proteins of Chlamydia pneumoniae.Infect Immun. 1999 Jan;67(1):375-83

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, K; Madsen, AS; Mygind, P;

    1999-01-01

    of putative outer membrane proteins encoded by the Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis gene families. By use of a monospecific polyclonal antibody against purified recombinant Omp4, it was shown that without heating, the protein migrated at 65 to 75 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate...

  11. A rapid method for the discrimination of genes encoding classical Shiga toxin (Stx) 1 and its variants, Stx1c and Stx1d, in Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczius, Thorsten; Bielaszewska, Martina; Friedrich, Alexander W; Zhang, Wenlan

    2004-01-01

    Subtyping of Shiga toxin (Stx)-encoding genes by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is time-consuming. We developed a single step real-time fluorescence PCR with melting curve analysis to distinguish rapidly stx1 from its variants, stx1c and stx1d. Melting temperatures (Tm) of 206 Stx-prod

  12. Genetic and biochemical analyses of chromosome and plasmid gene homologues encoding ICL and ArCP domains in Vibrioanguillarum strain 775

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Lorenzo, M.; Stork, M.; Crosa, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Anguibactin, the siderophore produced by Vibrio anguillarum 775 is synthesized from 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), cysteine and hydroxyhistamine via a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) mechanism. Most of the genes encoding anguibactin biosynthetic proteins are harbored by the pJM1 plasmid. I

  13. Meta-analysis: a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding for activity of the serotonin transporter protein is not associated with the irritable bowel syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, L.A.S. van; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serotonin is associated with symptoms of the irritable bowel syndrome, its action is terminated by the serotonin transporter protein. AIM: To assess the association between a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding for activity of the serotonin transporter protein and the irritable

  14. A New Gene Family (ariel) Encodes Asparagine-Rich Entamoeba histolytica Antigens, Which Resemble the Amebic Vaccine Candidate Serine-Rich E. histolytica Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Zhiming; Samuelson, John

    1998-01-01

    A family of genes, called ariel, are named for and encode asparagine-rich Entamoeba histolytica antigens containing 2 to 16 octapeptide repeats. Ariel proteins, which are constitutively expressed by trophozoites, belong to a large antigen family that includes the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP), an amebic vaccine candidate.

  15. Construction of a genetically modified wine yeast strain expressing the Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene, encoding an -L-Rhamnosidase of enological interest

    OpenAIRE

    Manzanares, P.; Orejas, M; Vicente Gil, J.; Graaff, de, Laura Corina Geertruida; J. Visser; Ramon, D.

    2003-01-01

    The Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene encoding an alpha-L-rhamnosidase has been expressed in both laboratory and industrial wine yeast strains. Wines produced in microvinifications, conducted using a combination of the genetically modified industrial strain expressing rhaA and another strain expressing a beta-glucosidase, show. increased content mainly of the aromatic compound linalool.

  16. Construction of a Genetically Modified Wine Yeast Strain Expressing the Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA Gene, Encoding an α-l-Rhamnosidase of Enological Interest

    OpenAIRE

    Manzanares, Paloma; Orejas, Margarita; Gil, José Vicente; de Graaff, Leo H; Visser, Jaap; Ramón, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The Aspergillus aculeatus rhaA gene encoding an α-l-rhamnosidase has been expressed in both laboratory and industrial wine yeast strains. Wines produced in microvinifications, conducted using a combination of the genetically modified industrial strain expressing rhaA and another strain expressing a β-glucosidase, show increased content mainly of the aromatic compound linalool.

  17. Identification of UreR binding sites in the Enterobacteriaceae plasmid-encoded and Proteus mirabilis urease gene operons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V J; Collins, C M

    1999-03-01

    The closely related Proteus mirabilis and Enterobacterlaceae plasmid-encoded urease genes are positively regulated by the AraC-like transcriptional activator UreR. In the presence of the effector molecule urea, UreR promotes transcription of ureD, the initial gene in the urease operon, and increases transcription of the divergently transcribed ureR. Here, we identify UreR-specific binding sites in the ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. Recombinant UreR (rUreR) was expressed and purified, and gel shift and DNase I protection assays were performed with this protein. These analyses indicated that there are two distinct rUreR binding sites in both the plasmid-encoded and P. mirabilis ureRp-ureDp intergenic regions. A consensus binding site of TA/GT/CA/TT/GC/TTA/TT/AATTG was predicted from the DNase I protection assays. Although rUreR bound to the specific DNA binding site in both the presence and the absence of urea, the dissociation rate constant k-1 of the rUreR-DNA complex interaction was measurably different when urea was present. In the absence of urea, the dissociation of the protein-DNA complexes, for both ureRp and ureDp, was complete at the earliest time point, and it was not possible to determine a rate. In the presence of urea, dissociation was measurable with a k-1 for the rUreR-ureRp interaction of 1.2 +/- 0.2 x 10(-2) s-1 and a k-1 for the rUreR-ureDp interaction of 2.6 +/- 0.1 x 10(-3) s-1. This corresponds to a half-life of the ureRp-rUreR interaction of 58 s, and a half-life of the ureDp-rUreR interaction of 4 min 26 s. A model describing a potential role for urea in the activation of these promoters is proposed. PMID:10200962

  18. Identification of human microRNA-like sequences embedded within the protein-encoding genes of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are highly conserved, short (18-22 nts, non-coding RNA molecules that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs of mRNAs. While numerous cellular microRNAs have been associated with the progression of various diseases including cancer, miRNAs associated with retroviruses have not been well characterized. Herein we report identification of microRNA-like sequences in coding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. RESULTS: Based on our earlier proteomics and bioinformatics studies, we have identified 8 cellular miRNAs that are predicted to bind to the mRNAs of multiple proteins that are dysregulated during HIV-infection of CD4+ T-cells in vitro. In silico analysis of the full length and mature sequences of these 8 miRNAs and comparisons with all the genomic and subgenomic sequences of HIV-1 strains in global databases revealed that the first 18/18 sequences of the mature hsa-miR-195 sequence (including the short seed sequence, matched perfectly (100%, or with one nucleotide mismatch, within the envelope (env genes of five HIV-1 genomes from Africa. In addition, we have identified 4 other miRNA-like sequences (hsa-miR-30d, hsa-miR-30e, hsa-miR-374a and hsa-miR-424 within the env and the gag-pol encoding regions of several HIV-1 strains, albeit with reduced homology. Mapping of the miRNA-homologues of env within HIV-1 genomes localized these sequence to the functionally significant variable regions of the env glycoprotein gp120 designated V1, V2, V4 and V5. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that microRNA-like sequences are embedded within the protein-encoding regions of several HIV-1 genomes. Given that the V1 to V5 regions of HIV-1 envelopes contain specific, well-characterized domains that are critical for immune responses, virus neutralization and disease progression, we propose that the newly discovered miRNA-like sequences within the HIV-1 genomes may have evolved to self-regulate survival of the

  19. Spreading of genes encoding enterotoxins, haemolysins, adhesin and biofilm among methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IIIA isolated from burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motallebi, Mitra; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Asadollahi, Kheirollah; Taherikalani, Morovat; Emaneini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in particular methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is an important concern in burn medical centers either in Iran or worldwide. A total of 128 S. aureus isolates were collected from wound infection of burn patients during June 2013 to June 2014. Multiplex-polymerase chain reaction (MPCR) assay was performed for the characterization of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). Genes encoding virulence factors and biofilm were targeted by PCR. Of 128 S. aureus isolates, 77 (60.1%) isolates were MRSA. Fifty four (70.1%) isolates were identified as SCCmec type IIIA. The most frequently detected toxin genes among MRSA isolates with SCCmec type IIIA were sea (64.1%) and hla (51.8%). The rate of coexistence of sea with hla and sea with hla and hlb was 37% and12.9%, respectively. The sec, eta, tst, pvl, hla and hlb genes were not detected in any of the MRSA isolates. The most prevalent genes encoding biofilm was eno, found in 61.1% of isolates, followed by fib and icaA found in 48.1% and 38.8% of the isolates, respectively. The rate of coexistence of fib + eno + icaA + icaD and fib + eno was 20.3% and 9.2%, respectively. The ebps gene was not detected in any of the isolates. In conclusion, our study indicated that the sea, hla, fib and icaA were most frequent genes encoding virulence factors among MRSA with SCCmec type IIIA isolated from burn wound infection. Moreover, the results of this study shows that the rate of coexistence of genes encoding different virulence factor were high. PMID:27238459

  20. Sequence analysis of the structural nuclear encoded subunits and assembly genes of cytochrome c oxidase in a cohort of 10 isolated complex IV-deficient patients revealed five mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Smeitink, Jan A M; Pots, Jeanette M; van Kaauwen, Edwin; Trijbels, Frans J M; Hol, Frans A; van den Heuvel, Lambert P

    2006-06-01

    The mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system is composed of five multiprotein complexes. The fourth complex of this system, cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), consists of 13 subunits: 3 encoded by mitochondrial DNA and 10 encoded by the nuclear genome. Patients with an isolated complex IV deficiency frequently harbor mutations in nuclear genes encoding for proteins necessary for the assembly of the complex. Strikingly, until now, no mutations have been detected in the nuclear encoded structural subunits of complex IV in these patients. We report the results of a mutational analysis study in patients with isolated complex IV deficiency screened for mutations in all structural genes as well as assembly genes known to cause complex IV deficiency. Four patients carried mutations in the complex IV assembly gene SURF1. One patient harbored a mutation in the COX10 gene involved in heme A synthesis. Mutations in the 10 nuclear encoded structural genes were not present. PMID:16948936