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Sample records for ccr2 mediates hematopoietic

  1. CCR2 mediates Helicobacter pylori-induced immune tolerance and contributes to mucosal homeostasis.

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    Sun, Xia; Zhang, Min; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Huffnagle, Gray B; Kao, John Y

    2017-04-01

    We previously demonstrated that H. pylori infection leads to increased induction of regulatory T cells in local and systemic immune compartments. Here, we investigate the role of CCR2 in the tolerogenic programing of dendritic cells in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. CCR2 deficient (CCR2KO) mice and wild-type (Wt) mice infected with H. pylori SS1 strain were analyzed by qPCR and FACS analysis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived DC on day 6 from CCR2KO and Wt mice cocultured with or without H. pylori were examined to determine the impact of CCR2 signaling on dendritic cells function by qPCR, ELISA, and FACS analyses. Acute H. pylori infection was associated with a threefold increase in CCR2 mRNA expression in the gastric mucosa. H. pylori-infected CCR2KO mice exhibited a higher degree of mucosal inflammation, that is, increased gastritis scores and pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels, but lower degree of H. pylori gastric colonization compared to infected Wt mice. Peripheral H. pylori-specific immune response measured in the CCR2KO spleen was characterized by a higher Th17 response and a lower Treg response. In vitro, CCR2KO bone marrow-derived DC was less mature and shown a lower Treg/Th17 ratio. Moreover, blockade of CCR2 signaling by MCP-1 neutralizing antibody inhibited H. pylori-stimulated bone marrow-derived DC maturation. Our results indicate that CCR2 plays an essential role in H. pylori-induced immune tolerance and shed light on a novel mechanism of CCR2-dependent DC Treg induction, which appears to be important in maintaining mucosal homeostasis during H. pylori infection. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

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    Motley, Michael P; Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J

    2016-01-01

    cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished...... by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin...

  3. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

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    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  4. A Natural CCR2 Antagonist Relieves Tumor-associated Macrophage-mediated Immunosuppression to Produce a Therapeutic Effect for Liver Cancer

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    Wenbo Yao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a common malignant tumor in the digestive tract with limited therapeutic choices. Although sorafenib, an orally administered multikinase inhibitor, has produced survival benefits for patients with advanced HCC, favorable clinical outcomes are limited due to individual differences and resistance. The application of immunotherapy, a promising approach for HCC is urgently needed. Macrophage infiltration, mediated by the CCL2/CCR2 axis, is a potential immunotherapeutic target. Here, we report that a natural product from Abies georgei, named 747 and related in structure to kaempferol, exhibits sensitivity and selectivity as a CCR2 antagonist. The specificity of 747 on CCR2 was demonstrated via calcium flux, the binding domain of CCR2 was identified in an extracellular loop by chimera binding assay, and in vivo antagonistic activity of 747 was confirmed through a thioglycollate-induced peritonitis model. In animals, 747 elevated the number of CD8+ T cells in tumors via blocking tumor-infiltrating macrophage-mediated immunosuppression and inhibited orthotopic and subcutaneous tumor growth in a CD8+ T cell-dependent manner. Further, 747 enhanced the therapeutic efficacy of low-dose sorafenib without obvious toxicity, through elevating the numbers of intra-tumoral CD8+ T cells and increasing death of tumor cells. Thus, we have discovered a natural CCR2 antagonist and have provided a new perspective on development of this antagonist for treatment of HCC. In mouse models of HCC, 747 enhanced the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment and potentiated the therapeutic effect of sorafenib, indicating that the combination of an immunomodulator with a chemotherapeutic drug could be a new approach for treating HCC.

  5. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

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    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-introduced functional CCR2 potentiates in vivo anti-lung cancer functionality mediated by T cells double gene-modified to express WT1-specific T-cell receptor.

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    Hiroaki Asai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although gene-modification of T cells to express tumor-related antigen-specific T-cell receptor (TCR or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR has clinically proved promise, there still remains room to improve the clinical efficacy of re-directed T-cell based antitumor adoptive therapy. In order to achieve more objective clinical responses using ex vivo-expanded tumor-responsive T cells, the infused T cells need to show adequate localized infiltration into the tumor. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human lung cancer cells variously express a tumor antigen, Wilms' Tumor gene product 1 (WT1, and an inflammatory chemokine, CCL2. However, CCR2, the relevant receptor for CCL2, is rarely expressed on activated T-lymphocytes. A HLA-A2402(+ human lung cancer cell line, LK79, which expresses high amounts of both CCL2 and WT1 mRNA, was employed as a target. Normal CD8(+ T cells were retrovirally gene-modified to express both CCR2 and HLA-A*2402-restricted and WT1(235-243 nonapeptide-specific TCR as an effector. Anti-tumor functionality mediated by these effector cells against LK79 cells was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. Finally the impact of CCL2 on WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling mediated by the effector cells was studied. Introduced CCR2 was functionally validated using gene-modified Jurkat cells and human CD3(+ T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells successfully demonstrated both CCL2-tropic tumor trafficking and cytocidal reactivity against LK79 cells in vitro and in vivo. CCL2 augmented the WT1 epitope-responsive TCR signaling shown by relevant luciferase production in double gene-modified Jurkat/MA cells to express luciferase and WT1-specific TCR, and CCL2 also dose-dependently augmented WT1 epitope-responsive IFN-γ production and CD107a expression mediated by these double gene-modified CD3(+ T cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Introduction of the CCL2/CCR2 axis successfully potentiated in

  7. Novel process of intrathymic tumor-immune tolerance through CCR2-mediated recruitment of Sirpα+ dendritic cells: a murine model.

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    Tomohisa Baba

    Full Text Available Immune surveillance system can detect more efficiently secretory tumor-specific antigens, which are superior as a target for cancer immunotherapy. On the contrary, immune tolerance can be induced in the thymus when a tumor antigen is massively secreted into circulation. Thus, the secretion of tumor-specific antigen may have contradictory roles in tumor immunity in a context-dependent manner. However, it remains elusive on the precise cellular mechanism of intrathymic immune tolerance against tumor antigens. We previously demonstrated that a minor thymic conventional dendritic cell (cDC subset, CD8α(-Sirpα(+ cDCs, but not the major subset, CD8α(+Sirpα(- cDCs can selectively capture blood-borne antigens and crucially contribute to the self-tolerance. In the present study, we further demonstrated that Sirpα(+ cDCs can capture a blood-borne antigen leaking inside the interlobular vascular-rich regions (IVRs. Blood-borne antigen selectively captured by Sirpα(+ cDCs can induce antigen-specific Treg generation or negative selection, depending on the immunogenicity of the presented antigen. Furthermore, CCR2 expression by thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs and abundant expression of its ligands, particularly, CCL2 by tumor-bearing mice prompted us to examine the function of thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs in tumor-bearing mice. Interestingly, tumor-bearing mice deposited CCL2 inside IVRs in the thymus. Moreover, tumor formation induced the accumulation of Sirpα(+ cDCs in IVRs under the control of CCR2-CCL2 axis and enhanced their capacity to take up antigens, resulting in the shift from Treg differentiation to negative selection. Finally, intrathymic negative selection similarly ensued in CCR2-competent mice once the tumor-specific antigen was secreted into bloodstream. Thus, we demonstrated that thymic Sirpα(+ cDCs crucially contribute to this novel process of intrathymic tumor immune tolerance.

  8. CCR-2 neutralization augments murine fresh BMC activation by Staphylococcus aureus via two distinct mechanisms: at the level of ROS production and cytokine response.

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    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-05-01

    CCR-2 signaling regulates recruitment of monocytes from the bone marrow into the bloodstream and then to sites of infection. We sought to determine whether CCL-2/CCR-2 signaling is involved in the killing of Staphylococcus aureus by murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The intermittent link of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-NF-κB/p38-MAPK-mediated CCL-2 production in CCR-2 signaling prompted us to determine whether neutralization of CCR-2 augments the response of murine fresh BMCs (FBMCs) after S. aureus infection. It was observed that anti-CCR-2 Ab-treated FBMCs released fewer ROS on encountering S. aureus infection than CCR-2 non-neutralized FBMCs, also correlating with reduced killing of S. aureus in CCR-2 neutralized FBMCs. Staphylococcal catalase and SOD were also found to play a role in protecting S. aureus from the ROS-mediated killing of FBMC. S. aureus infection of CCR-2 intact FBMCs pre-treated with either NF-κB or p-38-MAPK blocker induced less CCL-2, suggesting that NF-κB or p-38-MAPK is required for CCL-2 production by FBMCs. Moreover, blocking of CCR-2 along with NF-κB or p-38-MAPK resulted in elevated CCL-2 production and reduced CCR-2 expression. Inhibition of CCR-2 impairs the response of murine BMCs to S. aureus infection by attenuation ROS production and modulating the cytokine response.

  9. Norepinephrine inhibits macrophage migration by decreasing CCR2 expression.

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    Fangming Xiu

    Full Text Available Increased incidences of infectious and septic complications during post-burn courses represent the main contributor to burn injury mortality. Sustained increases in catecholamine levels, especially norepinephrine (NE, contribute to immune disturbances in severely burned patients. The precise mechanisms underlying NE-mediated immunoregulation are not fully understood. Here we hypothesize that persistently elevated NE levels are associated with immunodysfunctions. We examined the effects of NE on the phenotype and functions of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs. Whole mouse bone marrow cells were treated in vitro with 40 ng/mL of M-CSF and with 1 x 10(-6 M or 1 x 10(-8 M of NE or without NE for 7 days; cells were collected and stained with antibodies for CD11b, F4/80, MHC II and the inflammatory CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2. We found 1 x 10(-6 M of NE inhibited MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM cells. It also inhibited BMM proliferation by inhibiting CSF-1R expression. On the contrary, 1 x 10(-8 M of NE slightly increased both MHC II and CCR2 expression on CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM cells but inhibited CD11b(+/F4/80(+ BMM proliferation. MCP-1 based migration assay showed that the migration of 1 x 10(-6 M of NE-treated BMM toward MCP-1 was significantly decreased compared to BMM without NE treatment. Both 1 x 10(-8 M and 1 x 10(-6 M of NE enhanced TNF-α production and phagocytosis of FITC-Dextran. Intracellular staining of transcriptional factor MafB showed that 1 x 10(-6 M of NE treatment enhanced its expression, whereas 1 x 10(-8 M of NE decreased expression. Stimulation with LPS in the last 24-hours of BMM culture further decreased CCR2 and MHC II expression of these BMM, suggesting the synergistic effect of LPS and NE on macrophage. Our results demonstrate that NE regulates macrophage differentiation, proliferation and function, and may play a critical role in the dysfunctional immune response post-burn.

  10. The ins and outs of ligand binding to CCR2

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    Zweemer, Annelien Jacomina Maria

    2014-01-01

    This thesis provides novel insights in the molecular mechanism of action of antagonists for the chemokine receptor CCR2. CCR2 belongs to the protein family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). It is involved in several inflammatory diseases and therefore many small molecule antagonists targeting

  11. Systemic MCP1/CCR2 blockade and leukocyte specific MCP1/CCR2 inhibition affect aortic aneurysm formation differently

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    de Waard, Vivian; Bot, Ilze; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Talib, Sara; Egashira, Kensuke; de Vries, Margreet R.; Quax, Paul H. A.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; van Berkel, Theo J. C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), is involved in atherosclerosis and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Here, we explored the potential beneficial blockade of the MCP1/CCR2 pathway. Methods: We applied an AAA model in aging apolipoprotein E deficient mice

  12. TLR-mediated albuminuria needs TNFα-mediated cooperativity between TLRs present in hematopoietic tissues and CD80 present on non-hematopoietic tissues in mice.

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    Jain, Nidhi; Khullar, Bhavya; Oswal, Neelam; Banoth, Balaji; Joshi, Prashant; Ravindran, Balachandran; Panda, Subrat; Basak, Soumen; George, Anna; Rath, Satyajit; Bal, Vineeta; Sopory, Shailaja

    2016-06-01

    Transient albuminuria induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) in mice through engagement of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is widely studied as a partial model for some forms of human nephrotic syndrome (NS). In addition to TLRs, CD80 has been shown to be essential for PAMP-mediated albuminuria. However, the mechanistic relationships between TLRs, CD80 and albuminuria remain unclear. Here, we show that albuminuria and CD80-uria induced in mice by many TLR ligands are dependent on the expression of TLRs and their downstream signalling intermediate MyD88 exclusively in hematopoietic cells and, conversely, on CD80 expression exclusively in non-hematopoietic cells. TNFα is crucial for TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria, and induces CD80 expression in cultured renal podocytes. IL-10 from hematopoietic cells ameliorates TNFα production, albuminuria and CD80-uria but does not prevent TNFα-mediated induction of podocyte CD80 expression. Chitohexaose, a small molecule originally of parasite origin, mediates TLR4-dependent anti-inflammatory responses, and blocks TLR-mediated albuminuria and CD80-uria through IL-10. Thus, TNFα is a prominent mediator of renal CD80 induction and resultant albuminuria in this model, and small molecules modulating TLR-mediated inflammatory activation might have contributory or adjunct therapeutic potential in some contexts of NS development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. The chemokine receptor CCR2 maintains plasmacytoid dendritic cell homeostasis

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    Cédile, Oriane; Østerby Jørgensen, Line; Frank, Ida

    2017-01-01

    Thymic dendritic cells (DC) play a role in central tolerance. Three thymic DC subtypes have been described: plasmacytoid DC (pDC) and two conventional DC (cDC), CD8α+ Sirpα- DC and Sirpα+ CD8α- cDC. Both pDC and Sirpα+ cDC can take up antigen in periphery and migrate into the thymus in response t...... by CCL2 or CCR2 deficiency. Although some thymic progenitors expressed CCR2, this did not include those that give rise to pDC. Based on these results, we propose that CCR2 is involved in pDC homeostasis but its ligand CCL2 does not play a major role....

  14. DNA damage: a sensible mediator of the differentiation decision in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia.

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    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2015-03-17

    In the adult, the source of functionally diverse, mature blood cells are hematopoietic stem cells, a rare population of quiescent cells that reside in the bone marrow niche. Like stem cells in other tissues, hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew, in order to maintain the stem cell population for the lifetime of the organism, and to differentiate, in order to give rise to the multiple lineages of the hematopoietic system. In recent years, increasing evidence has suggested a role for the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in the decision for hematopoietic stem cells to exit quiescence and to differentiate. In this review, we will examine recent work supporting the idea that detection of cell stressors, such as oxidative and genetic damage, is an important mediator of cell fate decisions in hematopoietic stem cells. We will explore the benefits of such a system in avoiding the development and progression of malignancies, and in avoiding tissue exhaustion and failure. Additionally, we will discuss new work that examines the accumulation of DNA damage and replication stress in aging hematopoietic stem cells and causes us to rethink ideas of genoprotection in the bone marrow niche.

  15. Gas6 Promotes Inflammatory (CCR2hiCX3CR1lo) Monocyte Recruitment in Venous Thrombosis.

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    Laurance, Sandrine; Bertin, François-René; Ebrahimian, Talin; Kassim, Yusra; Rys, Ryan N; Lehoux, Stéphanie; Lemarié, Catherine A; Blostein, Mark D

    2017-07-01

    Coagulation and inflammation are inter-related. Gas6 (growth arrest-specific 6) promotes venous thrombosis and participates to inflammation through endothelial-innate immune cell interactions. Innate immune cells can provide the initiating stimulus for venous thrombus development. We hypothesize that Gas6 promotes monocyte recruitment during venous thrombosis. Deep venous thrombosis was induced in wild-type and Gas6-deficient (-/-) mice using 5% FeCl 3 and flow reduction in the inferior vena cava. Total monocyte depletion was achieved by injection of clodronate before deep venous thrombosis. Inflammatory monocytes were depleted using an anti-C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2) antibody. Similarly, injection of an anti-chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) antibody induced CCL2 depletion. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence were used to characterize the monocytes recruited to the thrombus. In vivo, absence of Gas6 was associated with a reduction of monocyte recruitment in both deep venous thrombosis models. Global monocyte depletion by clodronate leads to smaller thrombi in wild-type mice. Compared with wild type, the thrombi from Gas6 -/- mice contain less inflammatory (CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo ) monocytes, consistent with a Gas6-dependent recruitment of this monocyte subset. Correspondingly, selective depletion of CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes reduced the formation of venous thrombi in wild-type mice demonstrating a predominant role of the inflammatory monocytes in thrombosis. In vitro, the expression of both CCR2 and CCL2 were Gas6 dependent in monocytes and endothelial cells, respectively, impacting monocyte migration. Moreover, Gas6-dependent CCL2 expression and monocyte migration were mediated via JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase). This study demonstrates that Gas6 specifically promotes the recruitment of inflammatory CCR2 hi CX 3 CR1 lo monocytes through the regulation of both CCR2 and CCL2 during deep venous thrombosis. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Effects of radiation combined injury on hippocampal function are modulated in mice deficient in chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2).

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    Allen, Antiño R; Eilertson, Kirsten; Sharma, Sourabh; Schneider, Danielle; Baure, Jennifer; Allen, Barrett; Rosi, Susanna; Raber, Jacob; Fike, John R

    2013-07-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play a crucial role in normal brain function as well as in pathological conditions such as injury and disease-associated neuroinflammation. Chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2), which mediates the recruitment of infiltrating and resident microglia to sites of central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, is upregulated by ionizing irradiation and traumatic brain injury. Our objective was to determine if a deficiency in CCR2 and subsequent effects on brain microglia affect neurogenesis and cognitive function after radiation combined injury (RCI). CCR2 knock-out ⁻/⁻ and wild-type (WT) mice received 4 Gy of whole body ¹³⁷Cs irradiation. Immediately after irradiation, unilateral traumatic brain injury was induced using a controlled cortical impact system. Forty-four days postirradiation, animals were tested for hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance in the Morris water-maze. After cognitive testing, animals were euthanized and their brains snap frozen for immunohistochemical assessment of neuroinflammation (activated microglia) and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. All animals were able to locate the visible and hidden platform locations in the water maze; however, treatment effects were seen when spatial memory retention was assessed in the probe trials (no platform). In WT animals that received combined injury, a significant impairment in spatial memory retention was observed in the probe trial after the first day of hidden platform training (first probe trial). This impairment was associated with increased neurogenesis in the ipsilateral hemisphere of the dentate gyrus. In contrast, CCR2⁻/⁻ mice, independent of insult showed significant memory retention in the first probe trial and there were no differences in the numbers of newly born neurons in the animals receiving irradiation, trauma or combined injury. Although the mechanisms involved are not clear, our data suggests that CCR2 deficiency can exert a protective

  17. De-novo Collateral Formation Following Acute Myocardial Infarction: Dependence on CCR2+ Bone Marrow Cells

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    Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E

    2015-01-01

    Wide variation exists in the extent (number and diameter) of native pre-existing collaterals in tissues of different strains of mice, with supportive indirect evidence recently appearing for humans. This variation is a major determinant of the wide variation in severity of tissue injury in occlusive vascular disease. Whether such genetic-dependent variation also exists in the heart is unknown because no model exists for study of mouse coronary collaterals. Also owing to methodological limitations, it is not known if ischemia can induce new coronary collaterals to form (“neo-collaterals”) versus remodeling of pre-existing ones. The present study sought to develop a model to study coronary collaterals in mice, determine whether neo-collateral formation occurs, and investigate the responsible mechanisms. Four strains with known rank-ordered differences in collateral extent in brain and skeletal muscle were studied: C57BLKS>C57BL/6>A/J>BALB/c. Unexpectedly, these and 5 additional strains lacked native coronary collaterals. However after ligation, neo-collaterals formed rapidly within 1-to-2 days, reaching their maximum extent in ≤ 7 days. Rank-order for neo-collateral formation differed from the above: C57BL/6>BALB/c>C57BLKS>A/J. Collateral network conductance, infarct volume−1, and contractile function followed this same rank-order. Neo-collateral formation and collateral conductance were reduced and infarct volume increased in MCP1−/− and CCR2−/− mice. Bone-marrow transplant rescued collateral formation in CCR2−/− mice. Involvement of fractalkine→CX3CR1 signaling and endothelial cell proliferation were also identified. This study introduces a model for investigating the coronary collateral circulation in mice, demonstrates that neocollaterals form rapidly after coronary occlusion, and finds that MCP→CCR2-mediated recruitment of myeloid cells is required for this process. PMID:26254180

  18. Development of experimental autoimmune uveitis: efficient recruitment of monocytes is independent of CCR2.

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    Dagkalis, Athanasios; Wallace, Carol; Xu, Heping; Liebau, Sebastian; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Stone, Michael A; Mack, Matthias; Liversidge, Janet; Crane, Isabel J

    2009-09-01

    Macrophages are major contributors to the damage occurring in the retina in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). CCR2 may be needed for efficient recruitment of monocytes to an inflammatory site, and the aim of this study was to determine whether this was the case in EAU. EAU was induced and graded in C57BL/6J and CCR2(-/-) mice. Macrophage infiltration and CCR2 expression were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Retinas were examined for MCP-1 expression using RT-PCR. Rolling and infiltration of labeled bone marrow monocytes at the inflamed retinal vasculature were examined by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy and confocal microscopy, respectively. Effect of CCR2 deletion or blockade by antibody and antagonist was determined. Expression of mRNA for MCP-1 increased as EAU developed and was localized to the retina. CCR2 was associated with infiltrating macrophages. However, EAU induced in CCR2(-/-) mice was not reduced in severity, and neither was the percentage of macrophages in the retina. CCR2(-/-) monocytes, 48 hours after adoptive transfer to mice with EAU, showed no significant difference in percentage rolling or infiltration into the retina compared to WT. CCR2-independent rolling of monocytes was confirmed by CCR2 neutralizing antibody and antagonist treatment. CCR2 does not have a primary role in the recruitment of monocytes to the inflammatory site across the blood-retina barrier in well-developed EAU. Therapeutics targeting CCR2 are unlikely to be of value in treating human posterior uveitis.

  19. Pre-Transplantation Blockade of TNF-α-Mediated Oxygen Species Accumulation Protects Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

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    Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Sachie; Lai, Chen-Yi; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Kakuta, Shigeru; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Nojima, Masanori; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Higashihara, Masaaki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Otsu, Makoto

    2017-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation (HSCT) for malignancy requires toxic pre-conditioning to maximize anti-tumor effects and donor-HSC engraftment. While this induces bone marrow (BM)-localized inflammation, how this BM environmental change affects transplanted HSCs in vivo remains largely unknown. We here report that, depending on interval between irradiation and HSCT, residence within lethally irradiated recipient BM compromises donor-HSC reconstitution ability. Both in vivo and in vitro we demonstrate that, among inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α plays a role in HSC damage: TNF-α stimulation leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in highly purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSCs/HSPCs). Transplantation of flow-cytometry-sorted murine HSCs reveals damaging effects of accumulated ROS on HSCs. Short-term incubation either with an specific inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling or an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) prevents TNF-α-mediated ROS accumulation in HSCs. Importantly, pre-transplantation exposure to NAC successfully demonstrats protective effects in inflammatory BM on graft-HSCs, exhibiting better reconstitution capability than that of nonprotected control grafts. We thus suggest that in vivo protection of graft-HSCs from BM inflammation is a feasible and attractive approach, which may lead to improved hematopoietic reconstitution kinetics in transplantation with myeloablative conditioning that inevitably causes inflammation in recipient BM. Stem Cells 2017;35:989-1002. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  20. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    calcium mobilization as efficiently as the endogenous chemokine ligand CCL2 through the CCR2 receptor, whereas the virally encoded chemokine did not affect any of the other 17 human chemokine receptors tested. Mutual cross-desensitization between CCL2 and vCCL4 was demonstrated in the CCR2-transfected...... cells. The affinity of vCCL4 for the CCR2 receptor was 79 nm as determined in competition binding against radioactively labeled CCL2. In the murine pre-B lymphocyte cell line L1.2 stably transfected with the CCR2 receptor, vCCL4 acted as a relatively low potency but highly efficacious chemoattractant...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  1. Structural refinement and prediction of potential CCR2 antagonists through validated multi-QSAR modeling studies.

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    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Baidya, Sandip Kumar; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2018-01-03

    Chemokines trigger numerous inflammatory responses and modulate the immune system. The interaction between monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) may be the cause of atherosclerosis, obesity, and insulin resistance. However, CCR2 is also implicated in other inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, and neuropathic pain. Therefore, there is a paramount importance of designing potent and selective CCR2 antagonists despite a number of drug candidates failed in clinical trials. In this article, 83 CCR2 antagonists by Jhonson and Jhonson Pharmaceuticals have been considered for robust validated multi-QSAR modeling studies to get an idea about the structural and pharmacophoric requirements for designing more potent CCR2 antagonists. All these QSAR models were validated and statistically reliable. Observations resulted from different modeling studies correlated and validated results of other ones. Finally, depending on these QSAR observations, some new molecules were proposed that may exhibit higher activity against CCR2.

  2. Pulmonary CCR2+CD4+T cells are immune regulatory and attenuate lung fibrosis development.

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    Milger, Katrin; Yu, Yingyan; Brudy, Eva; Irmler, Martin; Skapenko, Alla; Mayinger, Michael; Lehmann, Mareike; Beckers, Johannes; Reichenberger, Frank; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver; Königshoff, Melanie; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne

    2017-11-01

    Animal models have suggested that CCR2-dependent signalling contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis, but global blockade of CCL2 failed to improve the clinical course of patients with lung fibrosis. However, as levels of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in paediatric lung fibrosis had previously been found to be increased, correlating with clinical symptoms, we hypothesised that distinct CCR2 + cell populations might either increase or decrease disease pathogenesis depending on their subtype. To investigate the role of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells in experimental lung fibrosis and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other fibrosis. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were analysed using flow cytometry and mRNA profiling, followed by in silico pathway analysis, in vitro assays and adoptive transfer experiments. Frequencies of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells were increased in experimental fibrosis-specifically the CD62L - CD44 + effector memory T cell phenotype, displaying a distinct chemokine receptor profile. mRNA profiling of isolated CCR2 + CD4 + T cells from fibrotic lungs suggested immune regulatory functions, a finding that was confirmed in vitro using suppressor assays. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CCR2 + CD4 + T cells attenuated fibrosis development. The results were partly corroborated in patients with lung fibrosis, by showing higher percentages of Foxp3 + CD25 + cells within bronchoalveolar lavage fluid CCR2 + CD4 + T cells as compared with CCR2 - CD4 + T cells. Pulmonary CCR2 + CD4 + T cells are immunosuppressive, and could attenuate lung inflammation and fibrosis. Therapeutic strategies completely abrogating CCR2-dependent signalling will therefore also eliminate cell populations with protective roles in fibrotic lung disease. This emphasises the need for a detailed understanding of the functions of immune cell subsets in fibrotic lung disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights

  3. Chitin elicits CCL2 from airway epithelial cells and induces CCR2-dependent innate allergic inflammation in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, René M.; Wüthrich, Marcel; Klein, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Chitin exposure in the lung induces eosinophilia and alternative activation of macrophages, and is correlated with allergic airway disease. However, the mechanism underlying chitin-induced polarization of macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we show that chitin induces alternative activation of macrophages in vivo, but does not do so directly in vitro. We further show that airway epithelial cells bind chitin in vitro and produce CCL2 in response to chitin both in vitro and in vivo. Supernatants of chitin exposed epithelial cells promoted alternative activation of macrophages in vitro, whereas antibody neutralization of CCL2 in the supernate abolished the alternative activation of macrophages. CCL2 acted redundantly in vivo, but mice lacking the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, showed impaired alternative activation of macrophages in response to chitin, as measured by arginase I, CCL17 and CCL22 expression. Furthermore, CCR2KO mice exposed to chitin had diminished ROS products in the lung, blunted eosinophil and monocyte recruitment, and impaired eosinophil functions as measured by expression of CCL5, IL13 and CCL11. Thus, airway epithelial cells secrete CCL2 in response to chitin and CCR2 signaling mediates chitin-induced alternative activation of macrophages and allergic inflammation in vivo. PMID:22851704

  4. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  5. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...... be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...

  6. Expression pattern of Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 in inherited retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, Hideo; Koso, Hideto; Okano, Kiichiro; Sundermeier, Thomas R; Saito, Saburo; Watanabe, Sumiko; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Tsutomu

    2015-10-12

    Though accumulating evidence suggests that microglia, resident macrophages in the retina, and bone marrow-derived macrophages can cause retinal inflammation which accelerates photoreceptor cell death, the details of how these cells are activated during retinal degeneration (RD) remain uncertain. Therefore, it is important to clarify which cells play a dominant role in fueling retinal inflammation. However, distinguishing between microglia and macrophages is difficult using conventional techniques such as cell markers (e.g., Iba-1). Recently, two mouse models for visualizing chemokine receptors were established, Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. As Cx3cr1 is expressed in microglia and Ccr2 is reportedly expressed in activated macrophages, these mice have the potential to distinguish microglia and macrophages, yielding novel information about the activation of these inflammatory cells and their individual roles in retinal inflammation. In this study, c-mer proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (Mertk) (-/-) mice, which show photoreceptor cell death due to defective retinal pigment epithelium phagocytosis, were employed as an animal model of RD. Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were established by breeding Mertk (-/-) , Cx3cr1 (GFP/GFP) , and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) mice. The retinal morphology and pattern of inflammatory cell activation and invasion of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice were evaluated using retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) flat mounts, retinal sections, and flow cytometry. Four-week-old Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice showed Cx3cr1-GFP-positive microglia in the inner retina. Cx3cr1-GFP and Ccr2-RFP dual positive activated microglia were observed in the outer retina and subretinal space of 6- and 8-week-old animals. Ccr2-RFP single positive bone marrow-derived macrophages were observed to migrate into the retina of Mertk (-/-) Cx3cr1 (GFP/+) Ccr2 (RFP/+) mice. These invading cells were still observed in the

  7. Molekulare Klonierung, stabile Transfektion und funktionelle Expression der murinen Chemokinrezeptoren Ccr2 und Ccr5

    OpenAIRE

    Simonis, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    The two chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5 play important roles in the recruitment and activation of monocytes/macrophages and T-lymphocytes at sites of infection and inflammation. To further examine their function, I cloned the two murine chemokine receptors Ccr2 and Ccr5 from genomic mouse DNA by a PCR-based cloning strategy and functionally expressed them in stably transfected CHO-cells. These cells were used to generate the first monoclonal antibodies against Ccr2 and Ccr5.

  8. Lentiviral-mediated knockdown during ex vivo erythropoiesis of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palii, Carmen G; Pasha, Roya; Brand, Marjorie

    2011-07-16

    Erythropoiesis is a commonly used model system to study cell differentiation. During erythropoiesis, pluripotent adult human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differentiate into oligopotent progenitors, committed precursors and mature red blood cells. This process is regulated for a large part at the level of gene expression, whereby specific transcription factors activate lineage-specific genes while concomitantly repressing genes that are specific to other cell types. Studies on transcription factors regulating erythropoiesis are often performed using human and murine cell lines that represent, to some extent, erythroid cells at given stages of differentiation. However transformed cell lines can only partially mimic erythroid cells and most importantly they do not allow one to comprehensibly study the dynamic changes that occur as cells progress through many stages towards their final erythroid fate. Therefore, a current challenge remains the development of a protocol to obtain relatively homogenous populations of primary HSCs and erythroid cells at various stages of differentiation in quantities that are sufficient to perform genomics and proteomics experiments. Here we describe an ex vivo cell culture protocol to induce erythroid differentiation from human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells that have been isolated from either cord blood, bone marrow, or adult peripheral blood mobilized with G-CSF (leukapheresis). This culture system, initially developed by the Douay laboratory, uses cytokines and co-culture on mesenchymal cells to mimic the bone marrow microenvironment. Using this ex vivo differentiation protocol, we observe a strong amplification of erythroid progenitors, an induction of differentiation exclusively towards the erythroid lineage and a complete maturation to the stage of enucleated red blood cells. Thus, this system provides an opportunity to study the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation as hematopoietic stem cells progress along

  9. Influence of the CCR2-V64I Polymorphism on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Activity and on Chemokine Receptor Function of CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Benhur; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Rana, Shalini; Yi, Yanji; Mellado, Mario; Frade, Jose M. R.; Martinez-A., Carlos; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Dean, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are used by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in conjunction with CD4 to infect cells. In addition, some virus strains can use alternative chemokine receptors, including CCR2b and CCR3, for infection. A polymorphism in CCR2 (CCR2-V64I) is associated with a 2- to 4-year delay in the progression to AIDS. To investigate the mechanism of this protective effect, we studied the expression of CCR2b and CCR2b-V64I, their chemokine and HIV-1 coreceptor ...

  10. Chemokine CCL2 and chemokine receptor CCR2 in early active multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Strieter, R M

    2004-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 have been strongly implicated in disease pathogenesis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas data on the CCL2-CCR2 axis are scarce in MS. We studied...... the expression of CCR2 on leukocytes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis and MS, and the concentration of CCL2 in the CSF from these patients. Results were compared with the results in non-inflammatory neurological controls and were correlated with other...... parameters (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF data). Our findings suggest a limited role for CCL2/CCR2 in early active MS....

  11. De-novo collateral formation following acute myocardial infarction: Dependence on CCR2⁺ bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E

    2015-10-01

    Wide variation exists in the extent (number and diameter) of native pre-existing collaterals in tissues of different strains of mice, with supportive indirect evidence recently appearing for humans. This variation is a major determinant of the wide variation in severity of tissue injury in occlusive vascular disease. Whether such genetic-dependent variation also exists in the heart is unknown because no model exists for study of mouse coronary collaterals. Also owing to methodological limitations, it is not known if ischemia can induce new coronary collaterals to form ("neo-collaterals") versus remodeling of pre-existing ones. The present study sought to develop a model to study coronary collaterals in mice, determine whether neo-collateral formation occurs, and investigate the responsible mechanisms. Four strains with known rank-ordered differences in collateral extent in brain and skeletal muscle were studied: C57BLKS>C57BL/6>A/J>BALB/c. Unexpectedly, these and 5 additional strains lacked native coronary collaterals. However after ligation, neo-collaterals formed rapidly within 1-to-2 days, reaching their maximum extent in ≤7 days. Rank-order for neo-collateral formation differed from the above: C57BL/6>BALB/c>C57BLKS>A/J. Collateral network conductance, infarct volume(-1), and contractile function followed this same rank-order. Neo-collateral formation and collateral conductance were reduced and infarct volume increased in MCP1(-/-) and CCR2(-/-) mice. Bone-marrow transplant rescued collateral formation in CCR2(-/-) mice. Involvement of fractalkine➔CX3CR1 signaling and endothelial cell proliferation were also identified. This study introduces a model for investigating the coronary collateral circulation in mice, demonstrates that neo-collaterals form rapidly after coronary occlusion, and finds that MCP➔CCR2-mediated recruitment of myeloid cells is required for this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ccr2 deletion dissociates cavity size and tau pathology after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyoneva, Stefka; Kim, Daniel; Katsumoto, Atsuko; Kokiko-Cochran, O Nicole; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2015-12-03

    Millions of people experience traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a result of falls, car accidents, sports injury, and blast. TBI has been associated with the development of neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In the initial hours and days, the pathology of TBI comprises neuronal injury, breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, and inflammation. At the cellular level, the inflammatory reaction consists of responses by brain-resident microglia, astrocytes, and vascular elements as well as infiltration of peripheral cells. After TBI, signaling by chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) to the chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) is a key regulator of brain infiltration by monocytes. We utilized mice with one or both copies of Ccr2 disrupted by red fluorescent protein (RFP, Ccr2 (RFP/+) and Ccr2 (RFP/RFP) ). We subjected these mice to the mild lateral fluid percussion model of TBI and examined several pathological outcomes 3 days later in order to determine the effects of altered monocyte entry into the brain. Ccr2 deletion reduced monocyte infiltration, diminished lesion cavity volume, and lessened axonal damage after mild TBI, but the microglial reaction to the lesion was not affected. We further examined phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which aggregates in brains of people with TBI, AD, and CTE. Surprisingly, Ccr2 deletion was associated with increased tau mislocalization to the cell body in the cortex and hippocampus by tissue staining and increased levels of phosphorylated tau in the hippocampus by Western blot. Disruption of CCR2 enhanced tau pathology and reduced cavity volume in the context of TBI. The data reveal a complex role for CCR2(+) monocytes in TBI, as monitored by cavity volume, axonal damage, and tau phosphorylation.

  13. VEGF-production by CCR2-dependent macrophages contributes to laser-induced choroidal neovascularization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten A Krause

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most prevalent cause of blindness in the elderly, and its exsudative subtype critically depends on local production of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF. Mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages and microglia cells, can produce VEGF. Their precursors, for example monocytes, can be recruited to sites of inflammation by the chemokine receptor CCR2, and this has been proposed to be important in AMD. To investigate the role of macrophages and CCR2 in AMD, we studied intracellular VEGF content in a laser-induced murine model of choroidal neovascularisation. To this end, we established a technique to quantify the VEGF content in cell subsets from the laser-treated retina and choroid separately. 3 days after laser, macrophage numbers and their VEGF content were substantially elevated in the choroid. Macrophage accumulation was CCR2-dependent, indicating recruitment from the circulation. In the retina, microglia cells were the main VEGF+ phagocyte type. A greater proportion of microglia cells contained VEGF after laser, and this was CCR2-independent. On day 6, VEGF-expressing macrophage numbers had already declined, whereas numbers of VEGF+ microglia cells remained increased. Other sources of VEGF detectable by flow cytometry included in dendritic cells and endothelial cells in both retina and choroid, and Müller cells/astrocytes in the retina. However, their VEGF content was not increased after laser. When we analyzed flatmounts of laser-treated eyes, CCR2-deficient mice showed reduced neovascular areas after 2 weeks, but this difference was not evident 3 weeks after laser. In summary, CCR2-dependent influx of macrophages causes a transient VEGF increase in the choroid. However, macrophages augmented choroidal neovascularization only initially, presumably because VEGF production by CCR2-independent eye cells prevailed at later time points. These findings identify macrophages as a relevant source

  14. A role for MCP-1/CCR2 in interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhardt Dietrich

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interstitial lung diseases (ILD are chronic inflammatory disorders leading to pulmonary fibrosis. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1 promotes collagen synthesis and deletion of the MCP-1 receptor CCR2 protects from pulmonary fibrosis in ILD mouse models. We hypothesized that pulmonary MCP-1 and CCR2+ T cells accumulate in pediatric ILD and are related to disease severity. Methods Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from 25 children with ILD and 10 healthy children. Levels of pulmonary MCP-1 and Th1/Th2-associated cytokines were quantified at the protein and the mRNA levels. Pulmonary CCR2+, CCR4+, CCR3+, CCR5+ and CXCR3+ T cells were quantified by flow-cytometry. Results CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 levels were significantly elevated in children with ILD and correlated with forced vital capacity, total lung capacity and ILD disease severity scores. Children with lung fibrosis had significantly higher MCP-1 levels and CCR2+ T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid compared to non-fibrotic children. Conclusion The results indicate that pulmonary CCR2+ T cells and MCP-1 contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ILD and might provide a novel target for therapeutic strategies.

  15. DISTRIBUTION OF CCR2-64I GENE AMONG THE TRIBES AND CASTE POPULATION OF VIDARBHA, INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind B Chavhan

    2013-08-01

    Results: The genotyping for the CCR2-64I mutation among the selected tribe and a caste reveal that all of the tribes and a caste was found to be heterozygous for the CCR2-64I mutation. Among the tribes Gonds showed highest genotype frequency (29.28% and (11.76% for heterozygous (CCR2/64I and Homozygous (64I/64I respectively, having an allelic frequency (0.233. A pooled allelic frequencies of the wild-type allele CCR2 and CCR2 64I the variant were found to be 0.854 and 0.146, respectively. No significant deviations from the HWE were observed for tribes and a caste population for the CCR2- 64I mutant χ2=2.76. The study reports the presence of mutant CCR2- 64I gene in tribes and caste population from Vidarbha region.

  16. Common angiotensin receptor blockers may directly modulate the immune system via VDR, PPAR and CCR2b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Robert E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been indications that common Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (ARBs may be exerting anti-inflammatory actions by directly modulating the immune system. We decided to use molecular modelling to rapidly assess which of the potential targets might justify the expense of detailed laboratory validation. We first studied the VDR nuclear receptor, which is activated by the secosteroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. This receptor mediates the expression of regulators as ubiquitous as GnRH (Gonadatrophin hormone releasing hormone and the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH. Additionally we examined Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPARgamma, which affects the function of phagocytic cells, and the C-CChemokine Receptor, type 2b, (CCR2b, which recruits monocytes to the site of inflammatory immune challenge. Results Telmisartan was predicted to strongly antagonize (Ki≈0.04nmol the VDR. The ARBs Olmesartan, Irbesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈10 nmol are likely to be useful VDR antagonists at typical in-vivo concentrations. Candesartan (Ki≈30 nmol and Losartan (Ki≈70 nmol may also usefully inhibit the VDR. Telmisartan is a strong modulator of PPARgamma (Ki≈0.3 nmol, while Losartan (Ki≈3 nmol, Irbesartan (Ki≈6 nmol, Olmesartan and Valsartan (Ki≈12 nmol also seem likely to have significant PPAR modulatory activity. Olmesartan andIrbesartan (Ki≈9 nmol additionally act as antagonists of a theoretical modelof CCR2b. Initial validation of this CCR2b model was performed, and a proposed model for the AngiotensinII Type1 receptor (AT2R1 has been presented. Conclusion Molecular modeling has proven valuable to generate testable hypotheses concerning receptor/ligand binding and is an important tool in drug design. ARBs were designed to act as antagonists for AT2R1, and it was not surprising to discover their affinity for the structurally similar CCR2b. However, this study also found evidence that ARBs modulate the

  17. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen U Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  18. Selective chemokine receptor usage by central nervous system myeloid cells in CCR2-red fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Saederup

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents.We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6C(hi/CCR2(hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6C(lo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6C(hi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia.These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations.

  19. Temporal expression and cellular origin of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 in the central nervous system: insight into mechanisms of MOG-induced EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericsson-Dahlstrand Anders

    2007-05-01

    -EAE are associated with distinct expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 mRNA by cells of the macrophage/microglia lineage within the CNS lesions. These data support the notion that CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mediate recruitment of both infiltrating macrophages and resident microglia to sites of CNS inflammation. Detailed knowledge of expression patterns is crucial for the understanding of therapeutic modulation and the validation of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 as feasible targets for therapeutic intervention in MS.

  20. (CCR2) G190A polymorphism in chronic renal failure patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    End-stage renal disease is associated with the inflammatory state characterized by infiltrating macrophages/lymphocytes, a major source of chemokines. The aim of this study was to determine the association of CCR2 G190A polymorphism in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) requiring hemodialysis. Seventy CRF ...

  1. Targeting of Gr-1+,CCR2+ monocytes in collagen-induced arthritis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brühl, H.; Cihak, J.; Plachý, Jiří; Kunz-Schughart, L.; Niedermeier, M.; Denzel, A.; Gomez, M.R.; Talke, Y.; Luckow, B.; Stangassinger, M.; Mack, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 9 (2007), s. 2975-2985 ISSN 0004-3591 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemenschaft(DE) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : arthritis * CCR2 * monocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.677, year: 2007

  2. Pericarditis mediated by respiratory syncytial virus in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubach, M P; Pavlisko, E N; Perfect, J R

    2013-08-01

    We describe a case of pericarditis and large pericardial effusion in a 63-year-old African-American man undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma. Pericardial tissue biopsy demonstrated fibrinous pericarditis, and immunohistochemistry stains were positive for respiratory syncytial virus. The patient improved with oral ribavirin and intravenous immune globulin infusions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 variation and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlotra, Rajeev K; Hall, Noemi B; Bruse, Shannon E; John, Bangan; Zikursh, Melinda J Blood; Stein, Catherine M; Siba, Peter M; Zimmerman, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors, serving as HIV co-receptors, and their ligands are among the well-known host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to HIV infection and/or disease progression. Papua New Guinea (PNG) has one of the highest adult HIV prevalences in the Asia-Pacific region. However, information regarding the distribution of polymorphisms in chemokine receptor (CCR5, CCR2) and chemokine (CXCL12) genes in PNG is very limited. In this study, we genotyped a total of nine CCR2-CCR5 polymorphisms, including CCR2 190G >A, CCR5 -2459G >A and Δ32, and CXCL12 801G >A in PNG (n=258), North America (n=184), and five countries in West Africa (n=178). Using this data, we determined previously characterized CCR5 haplotypes. In addition, based on the previously reported associations of CCR2 190, CCR5 -2459, CCR5 open reading frame, and CXCL12 801 genotypes with HIV acquisition and/or disease progression, we calculated composite full risk scores, considering both protective as well as susceptibility effects of the CXCL12 801 AA genotype. We observed a very high frequency of the CCR5 -2459A allele (0.98) in the PNG population, which together with the absence of Δ32 resulted in a very high frequency of the HHE haplotype (0.92). These frequencies were significantly higher than in any other population (all P-valuesnew insights regarding CCR5 variation in the PNG population, and suggest that the collective variation in CCR2, CCR5, and CXCL12 may increase the risk of HIV/AIDS in a large majority of Papua New Guineans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Exploring a model of human chemokine receptor CCR2 in presence of TAK779: A membrane based molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balupuri, Anand; Sobhia, M. Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and a crucial target for various inflammation-driven diseases. In the present study, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations were performed on a CCR2 homology model. This work includes the comparative MD simulations of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models. These simulations yield insights into the binding mechanism of antagonist TAK779 and improve the understanding of various structural changes induced by the ligand in the CCR2 protein. Here, one 20 ns MD simulation was carried out on the uncomplexed CCR2 model in lipid bilayer to explore the effects of lipid membrane on the protein. Another 20 ns MD simulation was performed under the similar conditions on the docked CCR2-TAK779 complex. An alteration in the position and orientation of the ligand in binding site was observed after the simulation. Examination of protein-ligand complex suggested that TAK779 produced a greater structural change on the TM-III, TM-IV, TM-V and TM-VI than TM-I, TM-II and TM-VII. Interaction networks involving the conserved residues of uncomplexed and ‘antagonist-complexed’ CCR2 models were also examined. The major difference was observed to be the role of conserved residues of the DRY motif of TM-III and the NPxxY motif of TM-VII of CCR2.

  5. Antifibrotic Effects of the Dual CCR2/CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc in Animal Models of Liver and Kidney Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Lefebvre

    Full Text Available Interactions between C-C chemokine receptor types 2 (CCR2 and 5 (CCR5 and their ligands, including CCL2 and CCL5, mediate fibrogenesis by promoting monocyte/macrophage recruitment and tissue infiltration, as well as hepatic stellate cell activation. Cenicriviroc (CVC is an oral, dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist with nanomolar potency against both receptors. CVC's anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a range of preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis.Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis. CCL2-induced chemotaxis was evaluated ex vivo on mouse monocytes. CVC's antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a thioacetamide-induced rat model of liver fibrosis and mouse models of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and renal fibrosis. Study assessments included body and liver/kidney weight, liver function test, liver/kidney morphology and collagen deposition, fibrogenic gene and protein expression, and pharmacokinetic analyses.CVC significantly reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in vivo at doses ≥20 mg/kg/day (p < 0.05. At these doses, CVC showed antifibrotic effects, with significant reductions in collagen deposition (p < 0.05, and collagen type 1 protein and mRNA expression across the three animal models of fibrosis. In the NASH model, CVC significantly reduced the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (p < 0.05 vs. controls. CVC treatment had no notable effect on body or liver/kidney weight.CVC displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic activity in a range of animal fibrosis models, supporting human testing for fibrotic diseases. Further experimental studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms of CVC's antifibrotic effects. A Phase 2b study in adults with NASH and liver fibrosis is fully enrolled (CENTAUR Study 652-2-203; NCT02217475.

  6. Ly-6G+CCR2- myeloid cells rather than Ly-6ChighCCR2+ monocytes are required for the control of bacterial infection in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildner, Alexander; Djukic, Marija; Garbe, David; Wellmer, Andreas; Kuziel, William A; Mack, Matthias; Nau, Roland; Prinz, Marco

    2008-08-15

    Myeloid cell recruitment is a characteristic feature of bacterial meningitis. However, the cellular mechanisms important for the control of Streptococcus pneumoniae infection remain largely undefined. Previous pharmacological or genetic studies broadly depleted many myeloid cell types within the meninges, which did not allow defining the function of specific myeloid subsets. Herein we show that besides CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+)CCR2(-) granulocytes, also CD11b(+)Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) but not Ly-6C(low)CCR2(-) monocytes were recruited in high numbers to the brain as early as 12 h after bacterial challenge. Surprisingly, CD11b(+)Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes modulated local CXCL2 and IL-1beta production within the meninges but did not provide protection against bacterial infection. Consistent with these results, CCR2 deficiency strongly impaired monocyte recruitment to the infected brains but was redundant for disease pathogenesis. In contrast, specific depletion of polymorphonuclear granulocytes caused elevated local bacterial titer within the brains, led to an aggravated clinical course, and enhanced mortality. These findings demonstrate that Ly-6C(high)CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes play a redundant role for the host defense during bacterial meningitis and that predominantly CD11b(+)Ly-6G(+)CCR2(-) myeloid cells are involved in the restriction of the extracellular bacteria.

  7. Extracellular vesicle-mediated transfer of genetic information between the hematopoietic system and the brain in response to inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Ridder

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms behind how the immune system signals to the brain in response to systemic inflammation are not fully understood. Transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase specifically in the hematopoietic lineage in a Cre reporter background display recombination and marker gene expression in Purkinje neurons. Here we show that reportergene expression in neurons is caused by intercellular transfer of functional Cre recombinase messenger RNA from immune cells into neurons in the absence of cell fusion. In vitro purified secreted extracellular vesicles (EVs from blood cells contain Cre mRNA, which induces recombination in neurons when injected into the brain. Although Cre-mediated recombination events in the brain occur very rarely in healthy animals, their number increases considerably in different injury models, particularly under inflammatory conditions, and extend beyond Purkinje neurons to other neuronal populations in cortex, hippocampus, and substantia nigra. Recombined Purkinje neurons differ in their miRNA profile from their nonrecombined counterparts, indicating physiological significance. These observations reveal the existence of a previously unrecognized mechanism to communicate RNA-based signals between the hematopoietic system and various organs, including the brain, in response to inflammation.

  8. Impact of MCP-1 and CCR-2 gene polymorphisms on coronary artery disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Ling; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2012-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) was the second leading cause of death during the last 3 years in Taiwan. Smooth muscle cells, monocytes/macrophages, and endothelial cells produce monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) within atherosclerotic plaques following binding to the chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2). Previous studies have well-documented the association between MCP-1 expression and susceptibility to, or clinicopathological features, of CAD. This study investigated the relationships between MCP-1-2518A/G and CCR-2-V64I genetic polymorphisms and CAD in the Taiwanese population. A total of 608 subjects, including 392 non-CAD controls and 216 patients with CAD, were recruited and subjected to polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to evaluate the effects of these two polymorphic variants on CAD. Results indicated a significant association between MCP-1 -2548 gene polymorphism and susceptibility to CAD. GG genotypes (OR = 1.629; 95 % CI = 1.003-2.644), or individuals with at least one G allele (OR = 1.511; 95 % CI = 1.006-2.270), had a higher risk of CAD as compared with AA genotypes. Results also revealed that subjects with at least one A allele of the V64I CCR2 gene polymorphism had significantly increased risk of CAD. G allele in MCP-1-2518 might contribute to higher prevalence of atrial fibrillation in CAD patients (OR = 4.254; p CCR-2 64I gene polymorphisms represent important factors in determining susceptibility to CAD, and the contribution of MCP-1-2518G could be through effects on atrial fibrillation in CAD patients.

  9. CCL2 recruits T cells into the brain in a CCR2-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cédile, Oriane; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Owens, Trevor

    2017-01-01

    CCR2, a receptor for CCL2. Expression of another receptor for CCL2, CCR4, and CXCR3, a receptor for CXCL10, which was also induced, were both increased in CCL2-treated CNS. CCR4 was expressed by neurons and astrocytes as well as CD4 T cells, and CXCR3 was expressed by CD4 and CD8 T cells. Chemokine...

  10. Inflammatory monocytes promote progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and can be therapeutically targeted via CCR2

    OpenAIRE

    Mojumdar, Kamalika; Liang, Feng; Giordano, Christian; Lemaire, Christian; Danialou, Gawiyou; Okazaki, Tatsuma; Bourdon, Johanne; Rafei, Moutih; Galipeau, Jacques; Divangahi, Maziar; Petrof, Basil J

    2014-01-01

    Myofiber necrosis and fibrosis are hallmarks of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), leading to lethal weakness of the diaphragm. Macrophages (MPs) are required for successful muscle regeneration, but the role of inflammatory monocyte (MO)-derived MPs in either promoting or mitigating DMD is unclear. We show that DMD (mdx) mouse diaphragms exhibit greatly increased expression of CCR2 and its chemokine ligands, along with inflammatory (Ly6Chigh) MO recruitment and accumulation of CD11bhigh MO-de...

  11. Involvement of CCR-2 chemokine receptor activation in ischemic preconditioning and postconditioning of brain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Thakur Gurjeet

    2012-10-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the potential role of CCR-2 chemokine receptor in ischemic preconditioning as well as postconditioning induced reversal of ischemia-reperfusion injury in mouse brain. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion of 17 min followed by reperfusion for 24h was employed in present study to produce ischemia and reperfusion induced cerebral injury in mice. Cerebral infarct size was measured using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Memory was evaluated using elevated plus-maze test and Morris water maze test. Rota rod test was employed to assess motor incoordination. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produced cerebral infarction and impaired memory and motor co-ordination. Three preceding episodes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 1 min and reperfusion of 1 min were employed to elicit ischemic preconditioning of brain, while three episodes of bilateral carotid artery occlusion for 10s and reperfusion of 10s immediately after the completion of were employed to elicit ischemic postconditioning of brain. Both prior ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic postconditioning immediately after global cerebral ischemia prevented markedly ischemia-reperfusion-induced cerebral injury as measured in terms of infarct size, loss of memory and motor coordination. RS 102895, a selective CCR-2 chemokine receptor antagonist, attenuated the neuroprotective effect of both the ischemic preconditioning as well as postconditioning. It is concluded that the neuroprotective effect of both ischemic preconditioning as well as ischemic postconditioning may involve the activation of CCR-2 chemokine receptors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. ROBO4-Mediated Vascular Integrity Regulates the Directionality of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Trafficking

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    Stephanie Smith-Berdan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the use of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in clinical therapy for over half a century, the mechanisms that regulate HSC trafficking, engraftment, and life-long persistence after transplantation are unclear. Here, we show that the vascular endothelium regulates HSC trafficking into and out of bone marrow (BM niches. Surprisingly, we found that instead of acting as barriers to cellular entry, vascular endothelial cells, via the guidance molecule ROBO4, actively promote HSC translocation across vessel walls into the BM space. In contrast, we found that the vasculature inhibits the reverse process, as induced vascular permeability led to a rapid increase in HSCs in the blood stream. Thus, the vascular endothelium reinforces HSC localization to BM niches both by promoting HSC extravasation from blood-to-BM and by forming vascular barriers that prevent BM-to-blood escape. Our results uncouple the mechanisms that regulate the directionality of HSC trafficking and show that the vasculature can be targeted to improve hematopoietic transplantation therapies.

  13. A soluble CAR-SCF fusion protein improves adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer to c-Kit-positive hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Akira; Okada, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Kume, Akihiro; Takatoku, Masaaki; Komatsu, Norio; Hanazono, Yutaka; Ozawa, Keiya

    2003-11-01

    Although adenoviral vectors primarily derived from the adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) are widely used for many gene transfer applications, they cannot efficiently infect hematopoietic cells, since these cells do not express the coxsackie-adenoviral receptor (CAR). We have developed a soluble fusion protein that bridges adenoviral fibers and the c-Kit receptor to alter Ad5 tropism to immature hematopoietic cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein consists of the extracellular domains of CAR and stem cell factor (SCF). The human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell lines UT-7 and M07e, human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K-562, and erythroleukemia cell line TF-1 were used to assess CAR-SCF-assisted Ad5-mediated gene transfer. Hematopoietic cell lines were infected with an Ad5 vector (Ad5-eGFP) or a fiber-mutant Ad5/F35 (Ad5/F35-eGFP) expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene in the presence or absence of CAR-SCF. Twenty-four hours after infection, more than 80% of M07e cells infected in the presence of CAR-SCF were eGFP-positive, compared with very few eGFP-positive cells following Ad5-eGFP infection in the absence of CAR-SCF. The enhancement of Ad5-eGFP infection by CAR-SCF was greater than that caused by Ad5/F35-eGFP (50%). The ability of CAR-SCF to enhance Ad5-eGFP infectivity was highly dependent on cellular c-Kit expression levels. Furthermore, CAR-SCF also enhanced Ad5-mediated gene transfer into human primary CD34(+) cells. The CAR-SCF fusion protein assists Ad5-mediated transduction to c-Kit(+) CAR(-) hematopoietic cells. The use of this fusion protein would enhance a utility of Ad5-mediated hematopoietic cell transduction strategies. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. CCR2 and CD44 promote inflammatory cell recruitment during fatty liver formation in a lithogenic diet fed mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte E Egan

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common disease with a spectrum of presentations. The current study utilized a lithogenic diet model of NAFLD. The diet was fed to mice that are either resistant (AKR or susceptible (BALB/c and C57BL/6 to hepatitis followed by molecular and flow cytometric analysis. Following this, a similar approach was taken in congenic mice with specific mutations in immunological genes. The initial study identified a significant and profound increase in multiple ligands for the chemokine receptor CCR2 and an increase in CD44 expression in susceptible C57BL/6 (B6 but not resistant AKR mice. Ccr2(-/- mice were completely protected from hepatitis and Cd44(-/- mice were partially protected. Despite protection from inflammation, both strains displayed similar histological steatosis scores and significant increases in serum liver enzymes. CD45(+CD44(+ cells bound to hyaluronic acid (HA in diet fed B6 mice but not Cd44(-/- or Ccr2(-/- mice. Ccr2(-/- mice displayed a diminished HA binding phenotype most notably in monocytes, and CD8(+ T-cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that absence of CCR2 completely and CD44 partially reduces hepatic leukocyte recruitment. These data also provide evidence that there are multiple redundant CCR2 ligands produced during hepatic lipid accumulation and describes the induction of a strong HA binding phenotype in response to LD feeding in some subsets of leukocytes from susceptible strains.

  15. Antibiotic-mediated modification of the intestinal microbiome in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whangbo, J; Ritz, J; Bhatt, A

    2017-02-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many patients with severe benign and malignant hematologic disorders. The success of allogeneic HSCT is limited by the development of transplant-related complications such as acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Early pre-clinical studies suggested that intestinal microflora contribute to the pathogenesis of acute GvHD, and that growth suppression or eradication of intestinal bacteria prevented the development of acute GvHD even in MHC-mismatched transplants. These observations led to the practice of gut decontamination (GD) with oral non-absorbable antibiotics in patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT as a method of acute GvHD prophylaxis. Microbiome studies in the modern sequencing era are beginning to challenge the benefit of this practice. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the practice of GD and highlight findings from the limited number of clinical trials evaluating the use of GD for acute GvHD prevention in allogeneic HSCT patients. In addition, we examine the role of the gut microbiota in allogeneic HSCT in the context of recent studies linking the microflora to regulation of intestinal immune homeostasis. We discuss the implications of these findings for future strategies to reduce acute GvHD risk by selective manipulation of the microbiota.

  16. CCND1-CDK4-mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico; Waskow, Claudia

    2015-07-27

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1-CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1-CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1-CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. © 2015 Mende et al.

  17. Niche-mediated depletion of the normal hematopoietic stem cell reservoir by Flt3-ITD–induced myeloproliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Sahoko; Thongjuea, Supat; Jamieson, Lauren; Atkinson, Deborah; Kharazi, Shabnam; Suda, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Although previous studies suggested that the expression of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) initiates downstream of mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), FLT3 internal tandem duplications (FLT3 ITDs) have recently been suggested to intrinsically suppress HSCs. Herein, single-cell interrogation found Flt3 mRNA expression to be absent in the large majority of phenotypic HSCs, with a strong negative correlation between Flt3 and HSC-associated gene expression. Flt3-ITD knock-in mice showed reduced numbers of phenotypic HSCs, with an even more severe loss of long-term repopulating HSCs, likely reflecting the presence of non-HSCs within the phenotypic HSC compartment. Competitive transplantation experiments established that Flt3-ITD compromises HSCs through an extrinsically mediated mechanism of disrupting HSC-supporting bone marrow stromal cells, with reduced numbers of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells showing increased inflammation-associated gene expression. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cell-extrinsic potent negative regulator of HSCs, was overexpressed in bone marrow niche cells from FLT3-ITD mice, and anti-TNF treatment partially rescued the HSC phenotype. These findings, which establish that Flt3-ITD–driven myeloproliferation results in cell-extrinsic suppression of the normal HSC reservoir, are of relevance for several aspects of acute myeloid leukemia biology. PMID:28637883

  18. Investigation of Chemokine Receptor CCR2V64Il Gene Polymorphism and Migraine without Aura in the Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zandifar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Migraine is a multifactorial common neurovascular disease with a polygenic inheritance. Inflammation plays an important part in migraine pathophysiology. C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 is an important chemokine for monocyte aggregation and transendothelial monocyte migration. The aim of our study was to investigate the association of migraine with CCR2V64Il polymorphism in the Iranian population. Methods. We assessed 103 patients with newly diagnosed migraine and 100 healthy subjects. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from peripheral blood and genotypes of CCR2V64Il gene polymorphism were determined. For measuring the severity of headache, every patient filled out the MIGSEV questionnaire. Results. There were no significant differences in the distribution of both 64Il allele and heterozygote (GA genotype of CCR2 gene polymorphism (P=0.396; OR=0.92, 95% CI = 0.50–1.67 and P=0.388; OR=0.91, 95% CI = 0.47–1.73, resp. between case and control groups. There was no significant difference of alleles frequency between three grades of MIGSEV (P=0.922. Conclusions. In conclusion our results revealed no association between CCR2V64Il polymorphism and susceptibility to migraine and also headache severity in the Iranian population.

  19. Levo-Corydalmine Alleviates Neuropathic Cancer Pain Induced by Tumor Compression via the CCL2/CCR2 Pathway

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    Yahui Hu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor compression-induced pain (TCIP is a complex pathological cancer pain. Spinal glial cells play a critical role in maintenance of cancer pain by releasing proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. In this study, we verified the role of levo-corydalmine (l-CDL on TCIP. Methods: Spontaneous pain, paw withdrawal threshold and latency were assessed using TCIP mouse model. Immunofluorescence was used to identify the reactions of glia. RT-PCR and western blot or ELISA were used to determine mRNA or protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interlukin-1β (IL-1β, CC chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 and chemotactic cytokine receptor 2 (CCR2 in vivo and in vitro. Results: l-CDL significantly attenuated TCIP hypersensitivity, accompanying with downregulation of TNF-α and IL-1β expression levels and declined astrocytes and microglial activation. It also significantly decreased the expression of the mRNA and protein level for CCL2 and CCR2. Further, l-CDL could suppress TNF-α-induced astrocytes activation and IL-1β expression through downregulating the CCL2/CCR2. Besides, CCL2-induced BV-microglia activation and inflammatory factors secretion were suppressed by l-CDL via CCR2. Conclusions: Suppression of CCL2/CCR2 by l-CDL may contribute to alleviate TCIP, offering an alternative medication for TCIP.

  20. Chinese Herbal Formula, Modified Danggui Buxue Tang, Attenuates Apoptosis of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Immune-Mediated Aplastic Anemia Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwei Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A derivative formula, DGBX, which is composed of three herbs (Radix astragali, Radix Angelicae sinensis, and Coptis chinensis Franch, is derived from a famous Chinese herbal formula, Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT (Radix astragali and Radix Angelicae sinensis. We aimed to investigate the effects of DGBX on the regulation of the balance between proliferation and apoptosis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs due to the aberrant immune response in a mouse model of aplastic anemia (AA. Cyclosporine (CsA, an immunosuppressor, was used as the positive control. Our results indicated that DGBX could downregulate the production of IFNγ in bone marrow cells by interfering with the binding between SLAM and SAP and the expressions of Fyn and T-bet. This herbal formula can also inhibit the activation of Fas-mediated apoptosis, interferon regulatory factor-1-induced JAK/Stat, and eukaryotic initiation factor 2 signaling pathways and thereby induce proliferation and attenuate apoptosis of HSCs. In conclusion, DGBX can relieve the immune-mediated destruction of HSCs, repair hematopoietic failure, and recover the hematopoietic function of HSCs in hematogenesis. Therefore, DGBX can be used in traditional medicine against AA as a complementary and alternative immunosuppressive therapeutic formula.

  1. Inflammatory monocyte mobilization decreases patient survival in pancreatic cancer: a role for targeting the CCL2/CCR2 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Dominic E.; Belt, Brian A.; Panni, Roheena Z.; Mayer, Allese; Deshpande, Anjali D.; Carpenter, Danielle; Mitchem, Jonathan B.; Plambeck-Suess, Stacey M.; Worley, Lori A.; Goetz, Brian D.; Wang-Gillam, Andrea; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Denardo, David G.; Goedegebuure, S. Peter; Linehan, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role of the CCL2/CCR2 axis and inflammatory monocytes (IM; CCR2+/CD14+) as immunotherapeutic targets in the treatment of pancreatic cancer (PC). Experimental Design Survival analysis was performed to determine if the prevalence of pre-operative blood monocytes correlates with survival in PC patients following tumor resection. IM prevalence in the blood and bone marrow of PC patients and controls was compared. The immunosuppressive properties of IM and macrophages in the blood and tumors, respectively, of PC patients were assessed. CCL2 expression by human PC tumors was compared to normal pancreas. A novel CCR2 inhibitor (PF-04136309) was tested in an orthotopic model of murine PC. Results Monocyte prevalence in the peripheral blood correlates inversely with survival, and low monocyte prevalence is an independent predictor of increased survival in PC patients with resected tumors. IM are increased in the blood and decreased in the bone marrow of PC patients compared to controls. An increased ratio of IM in the blood versus the bone marrow is a novel predictor of decreased patient survival following tumor resection. Human PC produces CCL2, and immunosuppressive CCR2+ macrophages infiltrate these tumors. Patients with tumors that exhibit high CCL2 expression/low CD8 T cell infiltrate have significantly decreased survival. In mice, CCR2 blockade depletes IM and macrophages from the primary tumor and premetastatic liver resulting in enhanced anti-tumor immunity, decreased tumor growth, and reduced metastasis. Conclusions IM recruitment is critical to PC progression, and targeting CCR2 may be an effective immunotherapeutic strategy in this disease. PMID:23653148

  2. RP105 deficiency attenuates early atherosclerosis via decreased monocyte influx in a CCR2 dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wezel, Anouk; van der Velden, Daniël; Maassen, Johanna M; Lagraauw, H Maxime; de Vries, Margreet R; Karper, Jacco C; Kuiper, Johan; Bot, Ilze; Quax, Paul H A

    2015-01-01

    Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a key role in inflammation and previously it was established that TLR4 deficiency attenuates atherosclerosis. RadioProtective 105 (RP105) is a structural homolog of TLR4 and an important regulator of TLR4 signaling, suggesting that RP105 may also be an important effector in atherosclerosis. We thus aimed to determine the role of RP105 in atherosclerotic lesion development using RP105 deficient mice on an atherosclerotic background. Atherosclerosis was induced in Western-type diet fed low density lipoprotein receptor deficient (LDLr(-/-)) and LDLr/RP105 double knockout (LDLr(-/-)/RP105(-/-)) mice by means of perivascular carotid artery collar placement. Lesion size was significantly reduced by 58% in LDLr(-/-)/RP105(-/-) mice, and moreover, plaque macrophage content was markedly reduced by 40%. In a model of acute peritonitis, monocyte influx was almost 3-fold reduced in LDLr(-/-)/RP105(-/-) mice (P = 0.001), while neutrophil influx remained unaltered, suggestive of an altered migratory capacity of monocytes upon deletion of RP105. Interestingly, in vitro stimulation of monocytes with LPS induced a downregulation of CCR2, a chemokine receptor crucially involved in monocyte influx to atherosclerotic lesions, which was more pronounced in LDLr(-/-)/RP105(-/-) monocytes as compared to LDLr(-/-) monocytes. We here show that RP105 deficiency results in reduced early atherosclerotic plaque development with a marked decrease in lesional macrophage content, which may be due to disturbed migration of RP105 deficient monocytes resulting from CCR2 downregulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Association of TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 gene polymorphisms in type-2 diabetes and renal insufficiency among Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Arvind

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokines play an important role in the development of diabetic chronic renal insufficiency (CRI. Transforming growth factor β1 (TGF β1 induces renal hypertrophy and fibrosis, and cytokines like tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα, chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and regulated upon activation and normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES mediate macrophage infiltration into kidney. Over expression of these chemokines leads to glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The effect of MCP-1 and RANTES on kidney is conferred by their receptors i.e., chemokine receptor (CCR-2 and CCR-5 respectively. We tested association of nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 genes among individuals with type-2 diabetes with and without renal insufficiency. Methods Type-2 diabetes subjects with chronic renal insufficiency (serum creatinine ≥ 3.0 mg/dl constituted the cases, and matched individuals with diabetes of duration ≥ 10 years and normoalbuminuria were evaluated as controls from four centres in India. Allelic and genotypic contributions of nine SNPs from TGFβ1, TNFα, CCR2 and CCR5 genes to diabetic CRI were tested by computing odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Sub-analysis of CRI cases diabetic retinopathy status as dependent variable and SNP genotypes as independent variable in a univariate logistic regression was also performed. Results SNPs Tyr81His and Thr263Ile in TGF β1 gene were monomorphic, and Arg25Pro in TGF β1 gene and Δ32 polymorphism in CCR5 gene were minor variants (minor allele frequency A SNP of CCR5 gene has been observed and the allele 59029A seems to confer predisposition to development of diabetic CRI (OR 1.39; CI 1.04–1.84. In CRI subjects a compound group of genotypes "GA and AA" of SNP G>A -800 was found to confer predisposition for proliferative retinopathy (OR 3.03; CI 1.08–8.50, p = 0.035. Conclusion Of the various cytokine gene

  4. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated CCR5 Ablation in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Confers HIV-1 Resistance In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Yang, Huan; Gao, Yang; Chen, Zeyu; Xie, Liangfu; Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ying; Wang, Xiaobao; Li, Hanwei; Lai, Weifeng; He, Yuan; Yao, Anzhi; Ma, Liying; Shao, Yiming; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Chengyan; Chen, Hu; Deng, Hongkui

    2017-08-02

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with a naturally occurring CCR5 mutation confers a loss of detectable HIV-1 in the patient, making ablation of the CCR5 gene in HSCs an ideal therapy for an HIV-1 cure. Although CCR5 disruption has been attempted in CD4 + T cells and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), efficient gene editing with high specificity and long-term therapeutic potential remains a major challenge for clinical translation. Here, we established a CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system in human CD34 + HSPCs and achieved efficient CCR5 ablation evaluated in long-term reconstituted NOD/Prkdc scid /IL-2Rγ null mice. The CCR5 disruption efficiency in our system remained robust in secondary transplanted repopulating hematopoietic cells. More importantly, an HIV-1 resistance effect was observed as indicated by significant reduction of virus titration and enrichment of human CD4 + T cells. Hence, we successfully established a CRISPR/Cas9 mediated CCR5 ablating system in long-term HSCs, which confers HIV-1 resistance in vivo. Our study provides evidence for translating CCR5 gene-edited HSC transplantation for an HIV cure to the clinic. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

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    Michelle R. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor- (erythroid-derived 2 like 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2 is a key transcriptional activator of the antioxidant response pathway and is closely related to erythroid transcription factor NFE2. Under oxidative stress, NRF2 heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins and binds cis-acting enhancer sequences found near oxidative stress response genes. Using the dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN to activate NRF2, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq identified several hundred novel NRF2-mediated targets beyond its role in oxidative stress. Activated NRF2 bound the antioxidant response element (ARE in promoters of several known and novel target genes involved in iron homeostasis and heme metabolism, including known targets FTL and FTH1, as well as novel binding in the globin locus control region. Five novel NRF2 target genes were chosen for followup: AMBP, ABCB6, FECH, HRG-1 (SLC48A1, and TBXAS1. SFN-induced gene expression in erythroid K562 and lymphoid cells were compared for each target gene. NRF2 silencing showed reduced expression in lymphoid, lung, and hepatic cells. Furthermore, stable knockdown of NRF2 negative regulator KEAP1 in K562 cells resulted in increased NQO1, AMBP, and TBXAS1 expression. NFE2 binding sites in K562 cells revealed similar binding profiles as lymphoid NRF2 sites in all potential NRF2 candidates supporting a role for NRF2 in heme metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  6. OSCAR Is a Receptor for Surfactant Protein D That Activates TNF-α Release from Human CCR2+ Inflammatory Monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Alexander D; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Bugatti, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    of recombinant SP-D and captured native SP-D from human bronchoalveolar lavage. OSCAR localized in an intracellular compartment of alveolar macrophages together with SP-D. Moreover, we found OSCAR on the surface of interstitial lung and blood CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes, which secreted TNF-α when exposed...

  7. CCR2 elimination in mice results in larger and stronger tibial bones but bone loss is not attenuated following ovariectomy or muscle denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Tara L; Novotny, Susan A; Lin, Angela S; Guldberg, Robert E; Lowe, Dawn A; Warren, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss due to age and disuse contributes to osteoporosis and increases fracture risk. It has been hypothesized that such bone loss can be attenuated by modulation of the C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) and/or its ligands. The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of genetic elimination of CCR2 on cortical and trabecular bones in the mouse tibia and how bone loss was impacted following disuse and estrogen loss. Female CCR2 knockout (CCR2(-/-)) and wildtype mice underwent ovariectomy (OVX) or denervation of musculature adjacent to the tibia (DEN) to induce bone loss. Cortical and trabecular structural properties as well as mechanical properties (i.e., strength) of tibial bones were measured. Compared to wildtype mice, CCR2(-/-) mice had tibiae that were up to 9% larger and stronger; these differences could be explained mainly by the 17% greater body mass (P bone loss per se. These findings indicate that while CCR2(-/-) mice do have larger and stronger bones than do wildtype mice, there is minimal evidence that CCR2 elimination provides protection against bone loss during disuse and estrogen loss.

  8. Chemokine CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 in the dorsal root ganglion contribute to oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illias, A M; Gist, A C; Zhang, H; Kosturakis, A K; Dougherty, P M

    2018-03-15

    Activation of innate immune mechanisms within the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn has been shown to play a key role in the development of neuropathic pain including paclitaxel-related chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). Here we tested whether similar mechanisms are generalizable to oxaliplatin-induced CIPN. After a single intraperitoneal injection of 3mg/kg oxaliplatin, mechanical withdrawal threshold and the expression of C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor, CCR2 in the DRG were measured by behavioral testing and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, respectively. Mechanical responsiveness increased from the first day after oxaliplatin injection and persisted until day 15, the last day of this experiment. IHC showed that the expression of CCL2/CCR2 started to increase by 4hrs after oxaliplatin treatment, was significantly increased at day 4, and then both signals became normalized by day15. Co-treatment with intrathecal anti-CCL2 antibodies prevented the development of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hyper-responsiveness, and transiently reversed established hyperalgesia when given 1 week after chemotherapy. This is the first study to demonstrate CCL2/CCR2 signaling in a model of oxaliplatin-related CIPN; and it further shows that blocking of this signal can attenuate the development of oxaliplatin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Activation of innate immune mechanisms may therefore be a generalized basis for CIPN irrespective of the specific class of agent.

  9. MCP-1 Upregulates Amylin Expression in Murine Pancreatic β Cells through ERK/JNK-AP1 and NF-κB Related Signaling Pathways Independent of CCR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kun; Qi, Dongfei; Hou, Xinwei; Wang, Oumei; Chen, Juan; Deng, Bo; Qian, Lihua; Liu, Xiaolong; Le, Yingying

    2011-01-01

    Background Amylin is the most abundant component of islet amyloid implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Plasma amylin levels are elevated in individuals with obesity and insulin resistance. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, CCL2) is involved in insulin resistance of obesity and type 2 diabetes. We investigated the effect of MCP-1 on amylin expression and the underlying mechanisms with murine pancreatic β-cell line MIN6 and pancreatic islets. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that MCP-1 induced amylin expression at transcriptional level and increased proamylin and intermediate forms of amylin at protein level in MIN6 cells and islets. However, MCP-1 had no effect on the expressions of proinsulin 1 and 2, as well as prohormone convertase (PC) 1/3 and PC2, suggesting that MCP-1 specifically induces amylin expression in β-cells. Mechanistic studies showed that although there is no detectable CCR2 mRNA in MIN6 cells and islets, pretreatment of MIN6 cells with pertussis toxin inhibited MCP-1 induced amylin expression, suggesting that alternative Gi-coupled receptor(s) mediates the inductive effect of MCP-1. MCP-1 rapidly induced ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation. Inhibitors for MEK1/2 (PD98059), JNK (SP600125) or AP1 (curcumin) significantly inhibited MCP-1-induced amylin mRNA expression. MCP-1 failed to induce amylin expression in pancreatic islets isolated from Fos knockout mice. EMSA showed that JNK and ERK1/2 were involved in MCP-1-induced AP1 activation. These results suggest that MCP-1 induces murine amylin expression through AP1 activation mediated by ERK1/2 or JNK. Further studies showed that treatment of MIN6 cells with NF-κB inhibitor or overexpression of IκBα dominant-negative construct in MIN6 cells significantly inhibited MCP-1-induced amylin expression, suggesting that NF-κB related signaling also participates in MCP-1-induced murine amylin expression. Conclusions/Significance MCP-1 induces amylin expression through ERK1/2/JNK

  10. Hematopoietic stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Roi; Weissman, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2008-10-01

    The etiology of the age-associated pathophysiological changes of the hematopoietic system including the onset of anemia, diminished adaptive immune competence, and myelogenous disease development are underwritten by the loss of normal homeostatic control. As tissue and organ homeostasis in adults is primarily mediated by the activity of stem and progenitor cells, it has been suggested that the imbalances accompanying aging of the hematopoietic system may stem from alterations in the prevalence and/or functional capacity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors. In this review, we examine evidence implicating a role for stem cells in the aging of the hematopoietic system, and focus on the mechanisms suggested to contribute to stem cell aging.

  11. Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancini, Cesare; van den Berk, Paul C M; Vissers, Joseph H A; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Song, Ji-Ying; Hulsman, Danielle; Serresi, Michela; Tanger, Ellen; Blom, Marleen; Vens, Conchita; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Jacobs, Heinz; Citterio, Elisabetta

    2014-08-25

    Histone ubiquitination at DNA breaks is required for activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. How the dynamic removal of this modification by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) impacts genome maintenance in vivo is largely unknown. To address this question, we generated mice deficient for Ub-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ), a histone H2A DUB which negatively regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR signaling. Notably, USP3 deletion increased the levels of histone ubiquitination in adult tissues, reduced the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) reserves over time, and shortened animal life span. Mechanistically, our data show that USP3 is important in HSC homeostasis, preserving HSC self-renewal, and repopulation potential in vivo and proliferation in vitro. A defective DDR and unresolved spontaneous DNA damage contribute to cell cycle restriction of Usp3Δ/Δ HSCs. Beyond the hematopoietic system, Usp3Δ/Δ animals spontaneously developed tumors, and primary Usp3Δ/Δ cells failed to preserve chromosomal integrity. These findings broadly support the regulation of chromatin ubiquitination as a key pathway in preserving tissue function through modulation of the response to genotoxic stress. © 2014 Lancini et al.

  12. Preclinical development and qualification of ZFN-mediated CCR5 disruption in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L DiGiusto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for HIV-1 infection is a promising alternative to lifelong combination antiviral drug treatment. Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 is the coreceptor required for R5-tropic HIV-1 infection of human cells. Deletion of CCR5 renders cells resistant to R5-tropic HIV-1 infection, and the potential for cure has been shown through allogeneic stem cell transplantation with naturally occurring homozygous deletion of CCR5 in donor hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC. The requirement for HLA-matched HSPC bearing homozygous CCR5 deletions prohibits widespread application of this approach. Thus, a strategy to disrupt CCR5 genomic sequences in HSPC using zinc finger nucleases was developed. Following discussions with regulatory agencies, we conducted IND-enabling preclinical in vitro and in vivo testing to demonstrate the feasibility and (preclinical safety of zinc finger nucleases-based CCR5 disruption in HSPC. We report here the clinical-scale manufacturing process necessary to deliver CCR5-specific zinc finger nucleases mRNA to HSPC using electroporation and the preclinical safety data. Our results demonstrate effective biallelic CCR5 disruption in up to 72.9% of modified colony forming units from adult mobilized HSPC with maintenance of hematopoietic potential in vitro and in vivo. Tumorigenicity studies demonstrated initial product safety; further safety and feasibility studies are ongoing in subjects infected with HIV-1 (NCT02500849@clinicaltrials.gov.

  13. The Effect of Post-Resistance Exercise Amino Acids on Plasma MCP-1 and CCR2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J. Wells

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The recruitment and infiltration of classical monocytes into damaged muscle is critical for optimal tissue remodeling. This study examined the effects of an amino acid supplement on classical monocyte recruitment following an acute bout of lower body resistance exercise. Ten resistance-trained men (24.7 ± 3.4 years; 90.1 ± 11.3 kg; 176.0 ± 4.9 cm ingested supplement (SUPP or placebo (PL immediately post-exercise in a randomized, cross-over design. Blood samples were obtained at baseline (BL, immediately (IP, 30-min (30P, 1-h (1H, 2-h (2H, and 5-h (5H post-exercise to assess plasma concentrations of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1, myoglobin, cortisol and insulin concentrations; and expressions of C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR2, and macrophage-1 antigen (CD11b on classical monocytes. Magnitude-based inferences were used to provide inferences on the true effects of SUPP compared to PL. Changes in myoglobin, cortisol, and insulin concentrations were similar between treatments. Compared to PL, plasma MCP-1 was “very likely greater” (98.1% likelihood effect in SUPP at 2H. CCR2 expression was “likely greater” at IP (84.9% likelihood effect, “likely greater” at 1H (87.7% likelihood effect, “very likely greater” at 2H (97.0% likelihood effect, and “likely greater” at 5H (90.1% likelihood effect in SUPP, compared to PL. Ingestion of SUPP did not influence CD11b expression. Ingestion of an amino acid supplement immediately post-exercise appears to help maintain plasma MCP-1 concentrations and augment CCR2 expression in resistance trained men.

  14. MCP-1/CCR-2-double-deficiency severely impairs the migration of hematogenous inflammatory cells following transient cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Strecker, Jan-Kolja; Minnerup, Jens; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Schilling, Matthias

    2012-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and its receptor CCR-2 are known to play a major role in inflammatory responses after cerebral ischemia. Mice deficient in either MCP-1 or CCR-2 have been reported to develop smaller infarct sizes and show decreased numbers of infiltrating inflammatory cells. In the present study we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice to investigate the effect of MCP-1/CCR-2-double deficiency on the recruitment of inflammatory cells in a model of both, mild and severe cerebral ischemia. We show that MCP-1/CCR-2-double deficiency virtually entirely abrogates the recruitment of hematogenous macrophages and significantly reduces neutrophil migration to the ischemic brain 4 and 7 days following focal cerebral ischemia. This argues for a predominant role of the MCP-1/CCR-2 axis in chemotaxis of monocytes despite a wide redundancy in the chemokine-receptor-system. Chemokine analysis revealed that even candidates known to be involved in monocyte and neutrophil recruitment like MIP-1α, CXCL-1, C5a, G-CSF and GM-CSF showed a reduced and delayed or even a lack of relevant compensatory response in MCP-1(-/-)/CCR-2(-/-)-mice. Solely, chemokine receptor 5 (CCR-5) increased early in both, but rose above wildtype levels at day 7 in MCP-1(-/-)/CCR-2(-/-)-animals, which might explain the higher number of activated microglial cells compared to control mice. Our study was, however, not powered to investigate infarct volumes. Further studies are needed to clarify whether these mechanisms of inflammatory cell recruitment might be essential for early infarct development and final infarct size and to evaluate potential therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel CCR-2/TLR-2 triggered signaling in murine peritoneal macrophages intensifies bacterial (Staphylococcus aureus) killing by reactive oxygen species through TNF-R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-10-01

    Macrophages are remarkably versatile in their ability to recognize and respond to a wide range of stimuli by expressing a variety of surface and intracellular receptors and triggering multiple signal transduction pathways. The onset of microbial infection is primarily determined by the initial contacts made by the microbes with the host macrophages. Although there prevail a relationship between the chemokine receptor and Toll like receptors during disease, particularly TLR-2 and CCR-2 signaling interdependence on each other has not been yet investigated during acute staphylococcal infection. Thus, the present study was aimed to trace possible interaction between CCR-2 and TLR-2 in peritoneal macrophages during acute Staphylococcus aureus infection. We found that neutralization of CCR-2 attenuates TLR-2 expression and restricts S. aureus burden but TLR-2 neutralization augments CCR-2 expression in macrophages, along with compromised host-derived reactive oxygen species production. S. aureus infection to CCR-2 intact but TLR-2 neutralized macrophages triggered production of IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and expression of iNOS, TNFR-1 and GPx with concomitant decrease in IL-10 production. Further, study with NG-monomethyl-l-arginine (L-NMMA) [iNOS blocker] and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) [GPx blocker] revealed that S. aureus infection enhanced TLR-2 expression in CCR-2 intact and TLR-2 neutralized macrophages possibly via iNOS and TNFR-1 up regulation and GPx down regulation. Overall, our data indicate that targeting CCR-2 with neutralizing antibody in the early phase of S. aureus infection could restrict excessive inflammation with less compromised bacterial killing. It certainly would be a therapeutic strategy in S. aureus induced inflammatory and infective diseases. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. CCR2+Inflammatory Monocytes Are Recruited to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Pyogranulomas and Dictate Adaptive Responses at the Expense of Innate Immunity during Oral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Khairallah, Camille; Sheridan, Brian S; van der Velden, Adrianus W M; Bliska, James B

    2018-03-01

    Murine Ly6C hi inflammatory monocytes (IMs) require CCR2 to leave the bone marrow and enter mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and other organs in response to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis infection. We are investigating how IMs, which can differentiate into CD11c + dendritic cells (DCs), contribute to innate and adaptive immunity to Y. pseudotuberculosis Previously, we obtained evidence that IMs are important for a dominant CD8 + T cell response to the epitope YopE 69-77 and host survival using intravenous infections with attenuated Y. pseudotuberculosis Here we challenged CCR2 +/+ or CCR2 -/- mice orally with wild-type Y. pseudotuberculosis to investigate how IMs contribute to immune responses during intestinal infection. Unexpectedly, CCR2 -/- mice did not have reduced survival but retained body weight better and their MLNs cleared Y. pseudotuberculosis faster and with reduced lymphadenopathy compared to controls. Enhanced bacterial clearance in CCR2 -/- mice correlated with reduced numbers of IMs in spleens and increased numbers of neutrophils in livers. In situ imaging of MLNs and spleens from CCR2-GFP mice showed that green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP + ) IMs accumulated at the periphery of neutrophil-rich Yersinia- containing pyogranulomas. GFP + IMs colocalized with CD11c + cells and YopE 69-77 -specific CD8 + T cells in MLNs, suggesting that IM-derived DCs prime adaptive responses in Yersinia pyogranulomas. Consistently, CCR2 -/- mice had reduced numbers of splenic DCs, YopE 69-77 -specific CD8 + T cells, CD4 + T cells, and B cells in organs and lower levels of serum antibodies to Y. pseudotuberculosis antigens. Our data suggest that IMs differentiate into DCs in MLN pyogranulomas and direct adaptive responses in T cells at the expense of innate immunity during oral Y. pseudotuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Investigation of the Binding Site of CCR2 using 4-Azetidinyl-1-aryl-cyclohexane Derivatives: A Membrane Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothandan, Gugan; Gadhe, Changdev G.; Cho, Seung Joo [Chosun Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Chemokine receptor (CCR2) is a G protein-coupled receptor that contains seven transmembrane helices. Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on the antagonism of CCR2 and candidate drugs are currently undergoing clinical studies for the treatment of diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and type 2 diabetes. In this study, we analyzed the time dependent behavior of CCR2 docked with a potent 4-azetidinyl-1-aryl-cyclohexane (4AAC) derivative using molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) for 20 nanoseconds (ns). Homology modeling of CCR2 was performed and the 4AAC derivative was docked into this binding site. The docked model of selected conformations was then utilized to study the dynamic behavior of the 4AAC enzyme complexes inside lipid membrane. MDS of CCR2-16b of 4AAC complexes allowed us to refine the system since binding of an inhibitor to a receptor is a dynamic process and identify stable structures and better binding modes. Structure activity relationships (SAR) for 4AAC derivatives were investigated and reasons for the activities were determined. Probable binding pose for some CCR2 antagonists were determined from the perspectives of binding site. Initial modeling showed that Tyr49, Trp98, Ser101, Glu291, and additional residues are crucial for 4AAC binding, but MDS analysis showed that Ser101 may not be vital. 4AAC moved away from Ser101 and the hydrogen bonding between 4AAC and Ser101 vanished. The results of this study provide useful information regarding the structure-based drug design of CCR2 antagonists and additionally suggest key residues for further study by mutagenesis.

  18. CCR2+ and CCR5+ CD8+ T cells increase during viral infection and migrate to sites of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Marker, O; Bartholdy, C

    2000-01-01

    Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in the selective recruitment of various leukocyte subsets. In this study, we correlated the expression of multiple chemokine and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) genes during the course of intracerebral (i.c.) infection with lymphocytic choriomeningi......Chemokines and their receptors play a critical role in the selective recruitment of various leukocyte subsets. In this study, we correlated the expression of multiple chemokine and CC chemokine receptor (CCR) genes during the course of intracerebral (i.c.) infection with lymphocytic...... a rapidly lethal, T cell-independent encephalitis, and infection resulted in a dramatic early up-regulation of chemokine gene expression. Similar marked up-regulation of chemokine expression was not seen until late after LCMV infection and required the presence of activated T cells. Cerebral CCR gene...... expression was dominated by CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5. However, despite a stronger initial chemokine signal in VSV-infected mice, only LCMV-induced T cell-dependent inflammation was found to be associated with substantially increased expression of CCR genes. Virus-activated CD8+ T cells were found to express CCR2...

  19. Genotyping of CCR5 gene, CCR2b and SDF1 variants related to HIV-1 infection in Gabonese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombo, Landry Erik; Bisseye, Cyrille; Mickala, Patrick; Ossari, Simon; Makuwa, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Given the magnitude of the HIV epidemic infection, many viral and human factors were analyzed, and the most decisive was the variant CCR5-Δ32. The presence of a low HIV prevalence (1.8%) in Gabon in the 1990s, compared to neighboring countries, represents a paradox that led us to search for viral and human genetic variants in this country. In this study, only variants of coreceptors and chemokines were investigated. Variants of the coding region of the CCR5 gene were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and then variants of SDF1 and CCR2b were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Four rare variants of the CCR5 coreceptor were found, while CCR5-Δ32 and CCR5m303 variants were not found. No association with CCR2b-V64I (17%) and SDF1-3'A (2%) variants was determined in relation to HIV-1 infection in Gabonese patients. The paradox of HIV seroprevalence in Gabon, which ended in the 2000s, was not caused by human genetic variants but rather by environmental factors. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. CCR2-V64I polymorphism is associated with increased risk of cervical cancer but not with HPV infection or pre-cancerous lesions in African women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Anna-Lise

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical cancer, caused by specific oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV, is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. A large number of young sexually active women get infected by HPV but only a small fraction of them have persistent infection and develop cervical cancer pointing to co- factors including host genetics that might play a role in outcome of the HPV infection. This study investigated the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer, pre-cancers and HPV infection in South African women resident in Western Cape. CCR2-V64I polymorphism has been previously reported to influence the progression to cervical cancer in some populations and has also been associated with decreased progression from HIV infection to AIDS. Methods Genotyping for CCR2-V64I was done by PCR-SSP in a case-control study of 446 women (106 black African and 340 mixed-ancestry with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer and 1432 controls (322 black African and 1110 mixed-ancestry group-matched (1:3 by age, ethnicity and domicile status. In the control women HPV was detected using the Digene Hybrid Capture II test and cervical disease was detected by cervical cytology. Results The CCR2-64I variant was significantly associated with cervical cancer when cases were compared to the control group (P = 0.001. Further analysis comparing selected groups within the controls showed that individuals with abnormal cytology and high grade squamous intraepitleial neoplasia (HSIL did not have this association when compared to women with normal cytology. HPV infection also showed no association with CCR2-64I variant. Comparing SIL positive controls with the cases showed a significant association of CCR2-64I variant (P = 0.001 with cervical cancer. Conclusions This is the first study of the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer in an African population. Our results show that CCR2-64I variant is associated with the risk of

  1. CCR2-V64I polymorphism is associated with increased risk of cervical cancer but not with HPV infection or pre-cancerous lesions in African women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Koushik; Dandara, Collet; Hoffman, Margaret; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer, caused by specific oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV), is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. A large number of young sexually active women get infected by HPV but only a small fraction of them have persistent infection and develop cervical cancer pointing to co- factors including host genetics that might play a role in outcome of the HPV infection. This study investigated the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer, pre-cancers and HPV infection in South African women resident in Western Cape. CCR2-V64I polymorphism has been previously reported to influence the progression to cervical cancer in some populations and has also been associated with decreased progression from HIV infection to AIDS. Genotyping for CCR2-V64I was done by PCR-SSP in a case-control study of 446 women (106 black African and 340 mixed-ancestry) with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer and 1432 controls (322 black African and 1110 mixed-ancestry) group-matched (1:3) by age, ethnicity and domicile status. In the control women HPV was detected using the Digene Hybrid Capture II test and cervical disease was detected by cervical cytology. The CCR2-64I variant was significantly associated with cervical cancer when cases were compared to the control group (P = 0.001). Further analysis comparing selected groups within the controls showed that individuals with abnormal cytology and high grade squamous intraepitleial neoplasia (HSIL) did not have this association when compared to women with normal cytology. HPV infection also showed no association with CCR2-64I variant. Comparing SIL positive controls with the cases showed a significant association of CCR2-64I variant (P = 0.001) with cervical cancer. This is the first study of the role of CCR2-V64I polymorphism in cervical cancer in an African population. Our results show that CCR2-64I variant is associated with the risk of cervical cancer but does not affect the susceptibility to HPV

  2. Evidence of CCR2-independent transmigration of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into the brain after permanent cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hannah X; Kim, Hyun Ah; Lee, Seyoung; Broughton, Brad R S; Drummond, Grant R; Sobey, Christopher G

    2016-04-15

    Previously we showed that INCB3344, a CCR2 antagonist, inhibits transmigration of Ly6C(hi) monocytes into the brain after ischemia-reperfusion. Here we tested the effect of CCR2 inhibition during permanent cerebral ischemia. Mice were administered either vehicle (dimethyl sulfoxide/carboxymethylcellulose) or INCB3344 (30 or 100mg/kg IP) 1h before middle cerebral artery occlusion and at 2 and 6h after the initiation of ischemia. After 24h, we assessed functional outcome, infarct volume and quantified immune cells in blood and brain. The increase in circulating bone marrow-derived Ly6C(hi) monocytes, but not the infiltration of those cells into the brain, was blocked by the CCR2 antagonist. INCB3344 had no effect on either neurological deficit or infarct volume. Our data confirm that cerebral ischemia triggers a CCR2-dependent increase in circulating Ly6C(hi) monocytes, but suggest that in the absence of reperfusion these cells may transmigrate into the ischemic brain in a CCR2-independent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, J P; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    2001-01-01

    seroconversion. Data were combined with fixed-effects and random-effects models. RESULTS: Both the CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles were associated with a decreased risk for progression to AIDS (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.74 and 0.76, respectively; P = 0.01 for both), a decreased risk for death...... (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.64 and 0.74; P CCR5-Delta32 or CCR2-64I allele had no clear protective effect on the risk for death.......00), or death after development of AIDS (relative hazard, 0.81 and 0.97; P > 0.5 for all). CONCLUSIONS: The CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles had a strong protective effect on progression of HIV-1 infection, but SDF-1 3'A homozygosity carried no such protection....

  4. Adrenaline administration promotes the efficiency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor-mediated hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell mobilization in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Cao, Jiang; Song, Xuguang; Zeng, Lingyu; Li, Zhenyu; Li, Yong; Xu, Kailin

    2013-01-01

    A high dose of granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) is widely used to mobilize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), but G-CSF is relatively inefficient and may cause adverse effects. Recently, adrenaline has been found to play important roles in HSPC mobilization. In this study, we explored whether adrenaline combined with G-CSF could induce HSPC mobilization in a mouse model. Mice were treated with adrenaline and either a high or low dose of G-CSF alone or in combination. Peripheral blood HSPC counts were evaluated by flow cytometry. Levels of bone marrow SDF-1 were measured by ELISA, the transcription of CXCR4 and SDF-1 was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and CXCR4 protein was detected by Western blot. Our results showed that adrenaline alone fails to mobilize HSPCs into the peripheral blood; however, when G-CSF and adrenaline are combined, the WBC counts and percentages of HSPCs are significantly higher compared to those in mice that received G-CSF alone. The combined use of adrenaline and G-CSF not only accelerated HSPC mobilization, but also enabled the efficient mobilization of HSPCs into the peripheral blood at lower doses of G-CSF. Adrenaline/G-CSF treatment also extensively downregulated levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 in mouse bone marrow. These results demonstrated that adrenaline combined with G-CSF can induce HSPC mobilization by down-regulating the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis, indicating that the use of adrenaline may enable the use of reduced dosages or durations of G-CSF treatment, minimizing G-CSF-associated complications.

  5. Why CCR2 and CCR5 blockade failed and why CCR1 blockade might still be effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Lebre, M.C.; Vergunst, C.E.; Choi, I.Y.K.; Aarrass, S.; Oliveira, A.S.F.; Wyant, T.; Horuk, R.; Reedquist, K.A.; Tak, P.P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to provide more insight into the question as to why blockade of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 may have failed in clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, using an in vitro monocyte migration system model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocytes from healthy donors (HD; n = 8) or from RA patients (for CCR2 and CCR5 antibody n = 8; for CCR1 blockade n = 13) were isolated from peripheral blood and pre-incubated with different concentrations of either ...

  6. CCND1–CDK4–mediated cell cycle progression provides a competitive advantage for human hematopoietic stem cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, Nicole; Kuchen, Erika E.; Lesche, Mathias; Grinenko, Tatyana; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D.; Hanenberg, Helmut; Lindemann, Dirk; Dahl, Andreas; Platz, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of stem cell properties is associated with reduced proliferation. However, in mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), loss of quiescence results in a wide range of phenotypes, ranging from functional failure to extensive self-renewal. It remains unknown whether the function of human HSCs is controlled by the kinetics of cell cycle progression. Using human HSCs and human progenitor cells (HSPCs), we report here that elevated levels of CCND1–CDK4 complexes promoted the transit from G0 to G1 and shortened the G1 cell cycle phase, resulting in protection from differentiation-inducing signals in vitro and increasing human leukocyte engraftment in vivo. Further, CCND1–CDK4 overexpression conferred a competitive advantage without impacting HSPC numbers. In contrast, accelerated cell cycle progression mediated by elevated levels of CCNE1–CDK2 led to the loss of functional HSPCs in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest that the transition kinetics through the early cell cycle phases are key regulators of human HSPC function and important for lifelong hematopoiesis. PMID:26150472

  7. Suppression of HLA expression by lentivirus-mediated gene transfer of siRNA cassettes and in vivo chemoselection to enhance hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Falahati, Rustom; Flebbe-Rehwaldt, Linda; Kasahara, Noriyuki; Gaensler, Karin M L

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and organ transplantation are limited by donor and host-mediated immune responses to allo-antigens. Application of these therapies is limited by the toxicity of preparative and post-transplant immunosuppressive regimens and a shortage of appropriate HLA-matched donors. We have been exploring two complementary approaches for genetically modifying donor cells that achieve long-term suppression of cellular proteins that elicit host immune responses to mismatched donor antigens, and provide a selective advantage to genetically engineered donor cells after transplantation. The first approach is based on recent advances that make feasible targeted down-regulation of HLA expression. Suppression of HLA expression could help to overcome limitations imposed by extensive HLA polymorphisms that restrict the availability of suitable donors. Accordingly, we have recently investigated whether knockdown of HLA by RNA interference (RNAi) enables allogeneic cells to evade immune recognition. For efficient and stable delivery of short hairpin-type RNAi constructs (shRNA), we employed lentivirus-based gene transfer vectors that integrate into genomic DNA, thereby permanently modifying transduced donor cells. Lentivirus-mediated delivery of shRNA targeting pan-Class I and allele-specific HLA achieved efficient and dose-dependent reduction in surface expression of HLA in human cells, and enhanced resistance to allo-reactive T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity, while avoiding non-MHC restricted killing. Complementary strategies for genetic engineering of HSC that would provide a selective advantage for transplanted donor cells and enable successful engraftment with less toxic preparative and immunosuppressive regimens would increase the numbers of individuals to whom HLA suppression therapy could be offered. Our second strategy is to provide a mechanism for in vivo selection of genetically modified HSC and other donor cells. We have

  8. Spinal CCL2 Promotes Central Sensitization, Long-Term Potentiation, and Inflammatory Pain via CCR2: Further Insights into Molecular, Synaptic, and Cellular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rou-Gang; Gao, Yong-Jing; Park, Chul-Kyu; Lu, Ning; Luo, Ceng; Wang, Wen-Ting; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2018-02-01

    Mounting evidence supports an important role of chemokines, produced by spinal cord astrocytes, in promoting central sensitization and chronic pain. In particular, CCL2 (C-C motif chemokine ligand 2) has been shown to enhance N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents in spinal outer lamina II (IIo) neurons. However, the exact molecular, synaptic, and cellular mechanisms by which CCL2 modulates central sensitization are still unclear. We found that spinal injection of the CCR2 antagonist RS504393 attenuated CCL2- and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed CCR2 expression in excitatory vesicular glutamate transporter subtype 2-positive (VGLUT2 + ) neurons. CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents in CCR2 + /VGLUT2 + neurons in lamina IIo; it also enhanced the synaptic NMDA currents evoked by dorsal root stimulation; and furthermore, it increased the total and synaptic NMDA currents in somatostatin-expressing excitatory neurons. Finally, intrathecal RS504393 reversed the long-term potentiation evoked in the spinal cord by C-fiber stimulation. Our findings suggest that CCL2 directly modulates synaptic plasticity in CCR2-expressing excitatory neurons in spinal lamina IIo, and this underlies the generation of central sensitization in pathological pain.

  9. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques...... positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells...

  10. Effects of CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I alleles on HIV-1 disease progression: the protection varies with duration of infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulherin, Stephanie A.; O'Brien, Thomas R.; Ioannidis, John P.; Goedert, James J.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Jamieson, Beth D.; Meyer, Laurence; Michael, Nelson L.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Rizzardi, G. Paolo; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sheppard, Haynes W.; Theodorou, Ioannis D.; Vlahov, David; Rosenberg, Philip S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine temporal variation in the effects of CCR5-Delta32 and CCR2-64I chemokine receptor gene polymorphisms on HIV-1 disease progression. DESIGN: Pooled analysis of individual patient data from 10 cohorts of HIV-1 seroconverters from the United States, Europe, and Australia. METHODS:

  11. Causal pathways of the effects of age and the CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on AIDS development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geskus, Ronald B.; Meyer, Laurence; Hubert, Jean-Baptiste; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Berkhout, Ben; Rouzioux, Christine; Theodorou, Ioannis D.; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Prins, Maria; Coutinho, Roel A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the causal pathways by which age and the CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles influence progression to AIDS. DESIGN: Analysis of follow-up data from 2 cohort studies among homosexual men (n=400), having >10 years of follow-up. METHODS: The effects of the 4

  12. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  13. The innate immune response to lower respiratory tract E. Coli infection and the role of the CCL2-CCR2 axis in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath-Morrow, Sharon A; Ndeh, Roland; Collaco, Joseph M; Poupore, Amy K; Dikeman, Dustin; Zhong, Qiong; Singer, Benjamin D; D'Alessio, Franco; Scott, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Neonates have greater morbidity/mortality from lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) compared to older children. Lack of conditioning of the pulmonary immune system due to limited environmental exposures and/or infectious challenges likely contributes to the increase susceptibility in the neonate. In this study, we sought to gain insights into the nature and dynamics of the neonatal pulmonary immune response to LRTI using a murine model. Wildtype (WT) and Ccr2 -/- C57BL/6 neonatal and juvenile mice received E. coli or PBS by direct pharyngeal aspiration. Flow cytometry was used to measure immune cell dynamics and identify cytokine-producing cells. Real-time PCR and ELISA were used to measure cytokine/chemokine expression. Innate immune cell recruitment in response to E. coli-induced LRTI was delayed in the neonatal lung compared to juvenile lung. Lung clearance of bacteria was also significantly delayed in the neonate. Ccr2 -/- neonates, which lack an intact CCL2-CCR2 axis, had higher mortality after E. coli challenged than Ccr2 +/+ neonates. A greater percentage of CD8 + T cells and monocytes from WT neonates challenged with E. coli produced TNF compared to controls. The pulmonary immune response to E. coli-induced LRTI differed significantly between neonatal and juvenile mice. Neonates were more susceptible to increasing doses of E. coli and exhibited greater mortality than juveniles. In the absence of an intact CCL2-CCR2 axis, susceptibility to LRTI-induced mortality was further increased in neonatal mice. Taken together these findings underscore the importance of age-related differences in the innate immune response to LRTI during early stages of postnatal life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gene polymorphisms in CCR5, CCR2, SDF1 and RANTES among Chinese Han population with HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Ting-Jun; Hong, Ze-Hui

    2014-06-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are crucial for immune response in HIV-1 infection. Although many studies have been done to investigate the relationship between chemokines and chemokine receptor gene polymorphisms and host's susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, the conclusions are under debate. In the present study, a cohort of 287 HIV-1 seropositive patients, 388 ethnically age-matched healthy controls and 49 intravenous drug users (IDUs) HIV-1 exposed seronegative individuals (HESN) from Chinese Han population were enrolled in order to determine the influence of host genetic factors on HIV-1 infection. Seven polymorphisms on four known chemokines/chemokine receptor genes (CCR5Δ32, CCR5 m303, CCR5 59029A/G, CCR2 64I, RANTES -403A/G, RANTES -28C/G and SDF1 3'-A) were screened. CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 m303 were absent or infrequent in Chinese Han population, which may not be hosts' genetic protective factors for HIV-1 infection. Our results showed the CCR5 59029A/G, CCR2 64I and SDF1 3'-A were not associated with host's resistance to HIV-1 infection. The frequency of RANTES -403A allele was significantly lower in HIV-1 patients than in healthy blood donors (p=0.0005) and HESN group (p=0.035), which implied the association between A allele and reduced HIV-1 infection risk. Different genetic models were assessed to investigate this association (AA vs. GG+AG, OR=0.38 95% CI, 0.22-0.65 p=0.0004; A vs. G, OR=0.66 95% CI, 0.52-0.84 p=0.0006), which supported this association, either. The genotype and allele distribution of RANTES -28 between HIV-1 patients and healthy controls (genotype profile: p=0.072; allele profile: p=0.027) or HIV-1 seronegative group (genotype profile: p=0.036; allele profile: p=0.383) were both at the marginal level of significance, which were not observed after Bonferroni correction. All these results suggest the RANTES -403A may be associated with reduced susceptibility to HIV-1 infection, while the RANTES -28 locus not. By lack of the patients

  15. Differential effect of methotrexate on the increased CCR2 density on circulating CD4 T lymphocytes and monocytes in active chronic rheumatoid arthritis, with a down regulation only on monocytes in responders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellingsen, T; Hornung, N; Møller, B K

    2007-01-01

    and at week 12. RESULTS: 22 (65%) patients were non-responders, 12 (35%) patients responded to MTX by American College of Rheumatology (ACR)20% criteria, and 8 (24%) of these patients responded by ACR50%. In patients with active rheumatoid arthritis before starting MTX, CCR2 density on circulating monocytes......, CD4(+) CXCR3(+) and CD4(+) CXCR3(-) T lymphocytes was increased compared with controls. During 12 weeks of MTX treatment, the CCR2 density on monocytes decreased significantly in the ACR50% group but not in the ACR20% and non-responder groups. The increased CCR2 density on CD4(+) CXCR3(+) and CD4......: Active chronic rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by enhanced CCR2 density on circulating monocytes and CD4(+) CXCR3(+) and CD4(+) CXCR3(-) T lymphocytes. During MTX treatment, a decrease in CCR2 density on monocytes in the ACR50% responder group was associated with decreased disease activity...

  16. Hematopoietic cell crisis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (I) suppression, (II) recovery, (III) accommodation, and (IV) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistence by hematopoietic pregenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event 'sets the stage' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase I to II. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the 'immortalization' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictages governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. (author)

  17. Distinct CCR2(+) Gr1(+) cells control growth of the Yersinia pestis ΔyopM mutant in liver and spleen during systemic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhan; Uittenbogaard, Annette M; Cohen, Donald A; Kaplan, Alan M; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Straley, Susan C

    2011-02-01

    We are using a systemic plague model to identify the cells and pathways that are undermined by the virulence protein YopM of the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis. In this study, we pursued previous findings that Gr1(+) cells are required to selectively limit growth of ΔyopM Y. pestis and that CD11b(+) cells other than polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) are selectively lost in spleens infected with parent Y. pestis. When PMNs were ablated from mice, ΔyopM Y. pestis grew as well as the parent strain in liver but not in spleen, showing that these cells are critical for controlling growth of the mutant in liver but not spleen. In mice lacking expression of the chemokine receptor CCR2, wild-type growth was restored to ΔyopM Y. pestis in both organs. In spleen, the Gr1(+) cells differentially recruited by parent and ΔyopM Y. pestis infections were CCR2(+) Gr1(+) CD11b(+) CD11c(Lo-Int) MAC3(+) iNOS(+) (inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive) inflammatory dendritic cells (iDCs), and their recruitment to spleen from blood was blocked when YopM was present in the infecting strain. Consistent with influx of iDCs being affected by YopM in spleen, the growth defect of the ΔyopM mutant was relieved by the parent Y. pestis strain in a coinfection assay in which the parent strain could affect the fate of the mutant in trans. In a mouse model of bubonic plague, CCR2 also was shown to be required for ΔyopM Y. pestis to show wild-type growth in skin. The data imply that YopM's pathogenic effect indirectly undermines signaling through CCR2. We propose a model for how YopM exerts its different effects in liver and spleen.

  18. Frequency of polymorphisms of genes coding for HIV-1 co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2 in a Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munerato Patrícia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency type 1 virus (HIV-1 into target cells requires both CD4and one of the chemokine receptors. Viruses predominantly use one, or occasionally both, of the major co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, although other receptors, including CCR2B and CCR3, function as minor co-receptors. A 32-nucleotide deletion (delta32 within the beta-chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5 has been described in subjects who remain uninfected despite extensive exposition to HIV-1. The heterozygous genotype delays disease progression. This allele is common among Caucasians, but has not been found in people of African or Asian ancestry. A more common transition involving a valine to isoleucine switch in transmembrane domain I of CCR2B (64I, with unknown functional consequences, was found to delay disease progression but not to reduce infection risk. As the Brazilian population consists of a mixture of several ethnic groups, we decided to examine the genotype frequency of these polymorphisms in this country. There were 11.5% CCR5 heterozygotes among the HIV-1 infected population and 12.5% among uninfected individuals, similar to data from North America and Western Europe. The prevalence of CCR2-64I homozygotes and heterozygotes was 0.06 and 15.2%, respectively, also similar to what is known for North America and Western Europe.

  19. Retrovirus-Mediated Expression of E2A-PBX1 Blocks Lymphoid Fate but Permits Retention of Myeloid Potential in Early Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcroft, Mark W; Nanan, Kyster; Thompson, Patrick; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Smith, Steven P; Slany, Robert K; LeBrun, David P

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor E2A-PBX1 is expressed consequent to chromosomal translocation 1;19 and is an important oncogenic driver in cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Elucidating the mechanism by which E2A-PBX1 induces lymphoid leukemia would be expedited by the availability of a tractable experimental model in which enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces pre-B-cell ALL. However, hematopoietic reconstitution of irradiated mice with bone marrow infected with E2A-PBX1-expressing retroviruses consistently gives rise to myeloid, not lymphoid, leukemia. Here, we elucidate the hematopoietic consequences of forced E2A-PBX1 expression in primary murine hematopoietic progenitors. We show that introducing E2A-PBX1 into multipotent progenitors permits the retention of myeloid potential but imposes a dense barrier to lymphoid development prior to the common lymphoid progenitor stage, thus helping to explain the eventual development of myeloid, and not lymphoid, leukemia in transplanted mice. Our findings also indicate that E2A-PBX1 enforces the aberrant, persistent expression of some genes that would normally have been down-regulated in the subsequent course of hematopoietic maturation. We show that enforced expression of one such gene, Hoxa9, a proto-oncogene associated with myeloid leukemia, partially reproduces the phenotype produced by E2A-PBX1 itself. Existing evidence suggests that the 1;19 translocation event takes place in committed B-lymphoid progenitors. However, we find that retrovirus-enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in committed pro-B-cells results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that the neoplastic phenotype induced by E2A-PBX1 is determined by the developmental stage of the cell into which the oncoprotein is introduced.

  20. Retrovirus-Mediated Expression of E2A-PBX1 Blocks Lymphoid Fate but Permits Retention of Myeloid Potential in Early Hematopoietic Progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Woodcroft

    Full Text Available The oncogenic transcription factor E2A-PBX1 is expressed consequent to chromosomal translocation 1;19 and is an important oncogenic driver in cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Elucidating the mechanism by which E2A-PBX1 induces lymphoid leukemia would be expedited by the availability of a tractable experimental model in which enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces pre-B-cell ALL. However, hematopoietic reconstitution of irradiated mice with bone marrow infected with E2A-PBX1-expressing retroviruses consistently gives rise to myeloid, not lymphoid, leukemia. Here, we elucidate the hematopoietic consequences of forced E2A-PBX1 expression in primary murine hematopoietic progenitors. We show that introducing E2A-PBX1 into multipotent progenitors permits the retention of myeloid potential but imposes a dense barrier to lymphoid development prior to the common lymphoid progenitor stage, thus helping to explain the eventual development of myeloid, and not lymphoid, leukemia in transplanted mice. Our findings also indicate that E2A-PBX1 enforces the aberrant, persistent expression of some genes that would normally have been down-regulated in the subsequent course of hematopoietic maturation. We show that enforced expression of one such gene, Hoxa9, a proto-oncogene associated with myeloid leukemia, partially reproduces the phenotype produced by E2A-PBX1 itself. Existing evidence suggests that the 1;19 translocation event takes place in committed B-lymphoid progenitors. However, we find that retrovirus-enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in committed pro-B-cells results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that the neoplastic phenotype induced by E2A-PBX1 is determined by the developmental stage of the cell into which the oncoprotein is introduced.

  1. Inactivation of the forkhead transcription factor FoxO3 is essential for PKB-mediated survival of hematopoietic progenitor cells by kit ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Richard; Jönsson, Jan-Ingvar

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation of phosphatidylinos......OBJECTIVE: Kit ligand (KL) is a major survival factor for hematopoietic stem cells. Although anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members are expressed in these cells, the survival effects by KL appear to involve other mechanisms. Survival signals can also be elicited by the activation......, immunofluorescence, and subcellular fractionation, we analyzed the effects of KL on PKB and different forkhead family members in two factor-dependent cell lines, FDCP-mix and FDC-P1, as well as primary mouse bone marrow-derived Lin(-) progenitors. Forced overexpression of triple mutated form of FoxO3 by retroviral...

  2. Significance of CCL2, CCL5 and CCR2 polymorphisms for adverse prognosis of Japanese encephalitis from an endemic population of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Purvita; Khan, Siraj Ahmed

    2017-10-20

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a major contributor for viral encephalitis in Asia. Vaccination programme has limited success for largely populated JE endemic countries like India and disease exposure is unavoidable. Involvement of chemokines and its co-receptors for adverse prognosis of JE have been documented both in vitro and in vivo. Identification of the genetic predisposing factor for JE infection in humans is crucial but not yet established. Therefore, we investigated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5) and its co-receptors (CCR2 and CCR5) with their protein level for JE. The study enrolled 87 symptomatic JE cases (mild: severe = 24:63) and 94 asymptomatic controls. Our study demonstrated that CCL2 (rs1024611G), CCL5 (rs2280788G) and CCR2 (rs1799864A) significantly associated with JE (Odds ratio = 1.63, 2.95 and 2.62, respectively and P = 0.045, P = 0.05 and P = 0.0006, respectively). The study revealed that rs1024611G allele was associated with elevated level of CCL2. CCL5 elevation associated with JE mortality having a Cox proportional hazard of 1.004 (P = 0.033). In conclusion, SNPs of chemokine viz. CCL2 (rs1024611G) and its receptor CCR2 (rs1799864A) significantly associated with JE which may serve as possible genetic predisposing factor and CCL5 protein level may act as marker for disease survival.

  3. Haplotypes in CCR5-CCR2, CCL3 and CCL5 are associated with natural resistance to HIV-1 infection in a Colombian cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Jorge A; Villegas-Ospina, Simón; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Rugeles, María T; Bedoya, Gabriel; Zapata, Wildeman

    2017-06-01

    Variants in genes encoding for HIV-1 co-receptors and their natural ligands have been individually associated to natural resistance to HIV-1 infection. However, the simultaneous presence of these variants has been poorly studied. To evaluate the association of single and multilocus haplotypes in genes coding for the viral co-receptors CCR5 and CCR2, and their ligands CCL3 and CCL5, with resistance or susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Nine variants in CCR5-CCR2, two SNPs in CCL3 and two in CCL5 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP in 35 seropositive (cases) and 49 HIV-1-exposed seronegative Colombian individuals (controls). Haplotypes were inferred using the Arlequin software, and their frequency in individual or combined loci was compared between cases and controls by the chi-square test. A p' value ;0.05 after Bonferroni correction was considered significant. Homozygosis of the human haplogroup (HH) E was absent in controls and frequent in cases, showing a tendency to susceptibility. The haplotypes C-C and T-T in CCL3 were associated with susceptibility (p'=0.016) and resistance (p';0.0001) to HIV-1 infection, respectively. Finally, in multilocus analysis, the haplotype combinations formed by HHC in CCR5-CCR2, T-T in CCL3 and G-C in CCL5 were associated with resistance (p'=0.006). Our results suggest that specific combinations of variants in genes from the same signaling pathway can define an HIV-1 resistant phenotype. Despite our small sample size, our statistically significant associations suggest strong effects; however, these results should be further validated in larger cohorts.

  4. Grape seed extract proanthocyanidins downregulate HIV- 1 entry coreceptors, CCR2b, CCR3 and CCR5 gene expression by normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHAVAN P NAIR

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids and related polyphenols, in addition to their cardioprotective, anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and anti-allergic activities, also possess promising anti-HIV effects. Recent studies documented that the ß-chemokine receptors, CCR2b, CCR3 and CCR5, and the alpha-chemokine receptors, CXCR1, CXCR2 and CXCR4 serve as entry coreceptors for HIV-1. Although flavonoids and polyphenolic compounds elicit anti-HIV effects such as inhibition of HIV-1 expression and virus replication, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain to be clearly elucidated. We hypothesize that flavonoids exert their anti-HIV effects, possibly by interfering at the HIV co-receptor level. We investigated the effect of flavonoid constituents of a proprietary grape seed extract (GSE on the expression of HIV-1 coentry receptors by immunocompetent mononuclear leukocytes. Our results showed that GSE significantly downregulated the expression of the HIV-1 entry co-receptors, CCR2b , CCR3 and CCR5 in normal PBMC in a dose dependent manner. Further , GSE treated cultures showed significantly lower number of CCR3 positive cells as quantitated by flow cytometry analysis which supports RT-PCR gene expression data.Investigations of the mechanisms underlying the anti-HIV-1 effects of grape seed extracts may help to identify promising natural products useful in the prevention and /or amelioration of HIV-1 infection

  5. VAV1-Cre mediated hematopoietic deletion of CBL and CBL-B leads to JMML-like aggressive early-neonatal myeloproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Wei; Mohapatra, Bhopal C; Zutshi, Neha; Bielecki, Timothy A; Goez, Benjamin T; Luan, Haitao; Iseka, Fany; Mushtaq, Insha; Storck, Matthew D; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-09-13

    CBL and CBL-B ubiquitin ligases play key roles in hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and their aberrations are linked to leukemogenesis. Mutations of CBL, often genetically-inherited, are particularly common in Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia (JMML), a disease that manifests early in children. JMML is fatal unless corrected by bone marrow transplant, which is effective in only half of the recipients, stressing the need for animal models that recapitulate the key clinical features of this disease. However, mouse models established so far only develop hematological malignancy in adult animals. Here, using VAV1-Cre-induced conditional CBL/CBL-B double knockout (DKO) in mice, we established an animal model that exhibits a neonatal myeloproliferative disease (MPD). VAV1-Cre induced DKO mice developed a strong hematological phenotype at postnatal day 10, including severe leukocytosis and hepatomegaly, bone marrow cell hypersensitivity to cytokines including GM-CSF, and rapidly-progressive disease and invariable lethality. Interestingly, leukemic stem cells were most highly enriched in neonatal liver rather than bone marrow, which, along with the spleen and thymus, were hypo-cellular. Nonetheless, transplantation assays showed that both DKO bone marrow and liver cells can initiate leukemic disease in the recipient mice with seeding of both spleen and bone marrow. Together, our results support the usefulness of the new hematopoietic-specific CBL/CBL-B double KO animal model to study JMML-related pathogenesis and to further understand the function of CBL family proteins in regulating fetal and neonatal hematopoiesis. To our knowledge, this is the first mouse model that exhibits neonatal MPD in infancy, by day 10 of postnatal life.

  6. Possible Impact of 190G > A CCR2 and Δ32 CCR5 Mutations on Decrease of the HBV Vaccine Immunogenicity—A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ganczak

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokine genetic variations are involved in infectious diseases such as hepatitis B virus (HBV. Several allelic variants might, in theory, affect the outcome of vaccination. Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the associations of Δ32 CCR5 and 190G > A CCR2 polymorphisms with a response to a primary course of three HBV vaccinations. Methods: Between December 2014 and December 2016, patients from three randomly selected primary care clinics in the West Pomeranian region (Poland, 1 month after receiving the third dose of HBV vaccine, were enrolled. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA system version 3.0 was used to detect anti-HBs and anti-HBc totals. The identification of polymorphisms were performed by a polymerase chain reaction technique using a single primer extension assay. Genotype distributions of responders versus non-responders to HBV vaccination were compared on the basis of anti-HBs level. Results: In 149 patients (mean age 60 years the mean anti-HBs level was 652.2 ± 425.9 mIU/mL (range: 0–1111.0 mIU/mL. There were 14.1% (n = 21 non-responders to the HBV vaccine (anti-HBs < 10.0 mIU/mL. The wild type/Δ32 genotype of CCR5 gene was found in 18.1% participants, and 1.3% were Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes. The frequency of allele A of the CCR2 gene was 11.1%. Lower anti-HBs levels in Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes were observed (Me = 61 mIU/mL vs. Me = 660.2 mIU/mL; p = 0.048. As age was found to be a correlate to the anti-HBs titer (r = −0.218, p = 0.0075; 95% CI: −0.366–−0.059—an analysis of a co-variance was performed which found a statistically significant (p = 0.04 difference in anti-HBs titres between Δ32/Δ32 homozygotes and other CCR5 genotypes. The association between anti-HBs titres and CCR2 genotypes was not statistically significant. Conclusions: Our study—which is a preliminary report that suggest this topic deserves further observation with larger sample sizes, different ethnicities, and other

  7. Role of the chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in the pathogenesis of experimental dengue infection in mice.

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    Rodrigo Guabiraba

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a public health problem in many tropical countries. Recent clinical data have shown an association between levels of different chemokines in plasma and severity of dengue. We evaluated the role of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR4 in an experimental model of DENV-2 infection in mice. Infection of mice induced evident clinical disease and tissue damage, including thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration, lymphopenia, increased levels of transaminases and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and lethality in WT mice. Importantly, infected WT mice presented increased levels of chemokines CCL2/JE, CCL3/MIP-1α and CCL5/RANTES in spleen and liver. CCR1⁻/⁻ mice had a mild phenotype with disease presentation and lethality similar to those of WT mice. In CCR2⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, liver damage, levels of IL-6 and IFN-γ, and leukocyte activation were attenuated. However, thrombocytopenia, hemoconcentration and systemic TNF-α levels were similar to infected WT mice. Infection enhanced levels of CCL17/TARC, a CCR4 ligand. In CCR4⁻/⁻ mice, lethality, tissue injury and systemic inflammation were markedly decreased. Despite differences in disease presentation in CCR-deficient mice, there was no significant difference in viral load. In conclusion, activation of chemokine receptors has discrete roles in the pathogenesis of dengue infection. These studies suggest that the chemokine storm that follows severe primary dengue infection associates mostly to development of disease rather than protection.

  8. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms in MCP-1, CCR-2, and non-small-cell lung cancer in the Han nationality of Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Wang, J; Li, F-G; Han, M; Chang, X-J; Wang, Z-T

    2015-04-22

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor worldwide and is now the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and its receptor chemokine receptor 2 (CCR-2) are important chemokines. We examined the polymorphisms of 338 unrelated patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) and 200 unrelated healthy controls of Han nationality in Northern China using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We found a significant increase in the frequency of the MCP-1 AA genotype [0.293 vs 0.195, odds ratio (OR) = 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13-2.60] and a significant decrease in the frequency of the GG genotype (0.290 vs 0.41, OR = 0.64, 95%CI = 0.47-0.87) in NSCLC patients compared to controls. The frequencies of AA-ww (0.151 vs 0.090, P = 0.041, OR = 1.80, 95%CI = 1.33-2.43) and AA-wm (0.136 vs 0.080, P = 0.049, OR = 1.81, 95%CI = 1.01-3.27) were higher in lung cancer patients than in healthy controls; the frequency of GG-wm (0.121 vs 0.190, P = 0.030, OR = 0.60, 95%CI = 0.38-0.95) was lower in lung cancer patients than in healthy controls. Based on these results, the polymorphism in MCP-1 may be correlated with the development of NSCLC in the Han nationality of Northern China. However, the polymorphism in CCR-2 is not involved in NSCLC.

  9. Extracellular vesicles in the hematopoietic microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, John T.; Abdelhamed, Sherif; Kurre, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Self-renewal and differentiation are defining characteristics of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and their balanced regulation is central to lifelong function of both blood and immune systems. In addition to cell-intrinsic programs, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fate decisions are subject to extrinsic cues from within the bone marrow microenvironment and systemically. Yet, many of the paracrine and endocrine mediators that shape hematopoietic function remain to be discovered. Extracellular vesicles serve as evolutionarily conserved, constitutive regulators of cell and tissue homeostasis, with several recent reports supporting a role for extracellular vesicles in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We review the physiological and pathophysiological effects that extracellular vesicles have on bone marrow compartmental function while highlighting progress in understanding vesicle biogenesis, cargo incorporation, differential uptake, and downstream effects of vesicle internalization. This review also touches on the role of extracellular vesicles in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fate regulation and recent advances in therapeutic and diagnostic applications of extracellular vesicles in hematologic disorders. PMID:29439185

  10. No evidence for an effect of the CCR5 delta32/+ and CCR2b 64I/+ mutations on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression among HIV-1-infected injecting drug users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinkel, J.; Langendam, M. W.; Coutinho, R. A.; Krol, A.; Brouwer, M.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between CCR5 and CCR2b genotypes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 disease progression was studied among the 108 seroconverters of the Amsterdam cohort of injecting drug users (IDUs). In contrast to earlier studies among homosexual men, no effect on disease progression of the

  11. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic

  12. Frequencies of CCR5-D32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV seropositive subjects and seronegative individuals from the state of Pará in Brazilian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Andreza de Pinho Lott Carvalhaes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of genetic polymorphisms of chemokine receptors CCR5-delta32, CCR2-64I and chemokine (SDF1-3’A mutations were studied in 110 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 seropositive individuals (seropositive group and 139 seronegative individuals (seronegative group from the population of the northern Brazilian city of Belém which is the capital of the state of Pará in the Brazilian Amazon. The CCR5-delta32 mutation was found in the two groups at similar frequencies, i.e. 2.2% for the seronegative group and 2.7% for the seropositive group. The frequencies of the SDF1-3’A mutation were 21.0% for the seronegative group and 15.4% for the seropositive group, and the CCR2-64I allele was found at frequencies of 12.5% for the seronegative group and 5.4% for the seropositive group. Genotype distributions were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations in both groups, suggesting that none of the three mutations has a detectable selective effect. Difference in the allelic and genotypic frequencies was statistically significant for the CCR2 locus, the frequency in the seronegative group being twice that found in the seropositive group. This finding may indicate a protective effect of the CCR2-64I mutation in relation to HIV transmission. However, considering that the CCR2-64I mutation has been more strongly associated with a decreased risk for progression for AIDS than to the resistance to the HIV infection, this could reflect an aspect of population structure or a Type I error.

  13. TET2 deficiency inhibits mesoderm and hematopoietic differentiation in human embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlois, Thierry; da Costa Reis Monte Mor, Barbara; Lenglet, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    . Here, we show that TET2 expression is low in human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines and increases during hematopoietic differentiation. ShRNA-mediated TET2 knockdown had no effect on the pluripotency of various ES cells. However, it skewed their differentiation into neuroectoderm at the expense...... profile, including abnormal expression of neuronal genes. Intriguingly, when TET2 was knockdown in hematopoietic cells, it increased hematopoietic development. In conclusion, our work suggests that TET2 is involved in different stages of human embryonic development, including induction of the mesoderm...... and hematopoietic differentiation. Stem Cells 2014....

  14. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

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    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  15. Chemokines (RANTES and MCP-1) and chemokine-receptors (CCR2 and CCR5) gene polymorphisms in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Cecilia; Alvarez, Victoria; Mata, Ignacio F; Coto, Eliecer; Ribacoba, René; Martínez, Carmen; Blázquez, Marta; Guisasola, Luis M; Salvador, Carlos; Lahoz, Carlos H; Peña, Joaquín

    2004-11-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a complex disorder characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, affecting about 5% of the population older than 65 years. Several works have demonstrated the involvement of inflammation in the pathogenesis of both, PD and LOAD. Genetic susceptibility to develop PD and LOAD has also been widely recognised. Thus, functional polymorphisms at the genes encoding inflammatory proteins could influence the overall risk of developing these neurodegenerative disorders. We examined whether DNA-polymorphisms at the genes encoding chemokines MCP-1 (-2518 A/G) and RANTES (-403 A/G), and chemokine receptors 5 (CCR5, Delta32) and 2 (CCR2,V64I), were associated with the risk and/or the clinical outcome of LOAD and PD. A total of 200 PD, 326 LOAD, and 370 healthy controls were genotyped for the four polymorphisms, and genotype frequencies statistically compared. We did not find significant differences in the frequencies of the different genotypes between both groups of patients and controls. We conclude that the four DNA polymorphisms, which have been associated with several immuno-modulated diseases, did not contribute to the risk of PD or LOAD.

  16. Siderocalin/Lcn2/NGAL/24p3 does not drive apoptosis through gentisic acid mediated iron withdrawal in hematopoietic cell lines.

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    Colin Correnti

    Full Text Available Siderocalin (also lipocalin 2, NGAL or 24p3 binds iron as complexes with specific siderophores, which are low molecular weight, ferric ion-specific chelators. In innate immunity, siderocalin slows the growth of infecting bacteria by sequestering bacterial ferric siderophores. Siderocalin also binds simple catechols, which can serve as siderophores in the damaged urinary tract. Siderocalin has also been proposed to alter cellular iron trafficking, for instance, driving apoptosis through iron efflux via BOCT. An endogenous siderophore composed of gentisic acid (2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid substituents was proposed to mediate cellular efflux. However, binding studies reported herein contradict the proposal that gentisic acid forms high-affinity ternary complexes with siderocalin and iron, or that gentisic acid can serve as an endogenous siderophore at neutral pH. We also demonstrate that siderocalin does not induce cellular iron efflux or stimulate apoptosis, questioning the role siderocalin plays in modulating iron metabolism.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Eleftheria Hatzimichael

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eleftheria Hatzimichael1, Mark Tuthill21Department of Haematology, Medical School of Ioannina, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Department of Medical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College National Health Service Trust, London, UKAbstract: More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications.Keywords: hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, complications

  18. CCL2 Serum Levels and Adiposity Are Associated with the Polymorphic Phenotypes -2518A on CCL2 and 64ILE on CCR2 in a Mexican Population with Insulin Resistance

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    Milton-Omar Guzmán-Ornelas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility has been described in insulin resistance (IR. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand-2 (CCL2 is overexpressed in white adipose tissue and is the ligand of C-C motif receptor-2 (CCR2. The CCL2 G-2518A polymorphism is known to regulate gene expression, whereas the physiological effects of the CCR2Val64Ile polymorphism are unknown. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between these polymorphisms with soluble CCL2 levels (sCCL2, metabolic markers, and adiposity. In a cross-sectional study we included 380 Mexican-Mestizo individuals, classified with IR according to Stern criteria. Polymorphism was identified using PCR-RFLP/sequence-specific primers. Anthropometrics and metabolic markers were measured by routine methods and adipokines and sCCL2 by ELISA. The CCL2 polymorphism was associated with IR (polymorphic A+ phenotype frequencies were 70.9%, 82.6%, in individuals with and without IR, resp.. Phenotype carriers CCL2 (A+ displayed lower body mass and fat indexes, insulin and HOMA-IR, and higher adiponectin levels. Individuals with IR presented higher sCCL2 compared to individuals without IR and was associated with CCR2 (Ile+ phenotype. The double-polymorphic phenotype carriers (A+/Ile+ exhibited higher sCCL2 than double-wild-type phenotype carriers (A−/Ile−. The present findings suggest that sCCL2 production possibly will be associated with the adiposity and polymorphic phenotypes of CCL2 and CCR2, in Mexican-Mestizos with IR.

  19. Association of CCR2-CCR5 haplotypes and CCL3L1 copy number with Kawasaki Disease, coronary artery lesions, and IVIG responses in Japanese children.

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    Manju Mamtani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The etiology of Kawasaki Disease (KD is enigmatic, although an infectious cause is suspected. Polymorphisms in CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 and/or its potent ligand CCL3L1 influence KD susceptibility in US, European and Korean populations. However, the influence of these variations on KD susceptibility, coronary artery lesions (CAL and response to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG in Japanese children, who have the highest incidence of KD, is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used unconditional logistic regression analyses to determine the associations of the copy number of the CCL3L1 gene-containing duplication and CCR2-CCR5 haplotypes in 133 Japanese KD cases [33 with CAL and 25 with resistance to IVIG] and 312 Japanese controls without a history of KD. We observed that the deviation from the population average of four CCL3L1 copies (i.e., four copies was associated with an increased risk of KD and IVIG resistance (adjusted odds ratio (OR=2.25, p=0.004 and OR=6.26, p=0.089, respectively. Heterozygosity for the CCR5 HHF*2 haplotype was associated with a reduced risk of both IVIG resistance (OR=0.21, p=0.026 and CAL development (OR=0.44, p=0.071. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CCL3L1-CCR5 axis may play an important role in KD pathogenesis. In addition to clinical and laboratory parameters, genetic markers may also predict risk of CAL and resistance to IVIG.

  20. Cenicriviroc, a Novel CCR5 (R5) and CCR2 Antagonist, Shows In Vitro Activity against R5 Tropic HIV-2 Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visseaux, Benoit; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Bertine, Mélanie; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Matheron, Sophie; Lefebvre, Eric; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Maraviroc activity against HIV-2, a virus naturally resistant to different HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs, has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, a novel, once-daily, dual CCR5 and CCR2 antagonist that has completed Phase 2b development in HIV-1 infection. Cenicriviroc phenotypic activity has been tested using a PBMC phenotypic susceptibility assay against four R5-, one X4- and one dual-tropic HIV-2 clinical primary isolates. All isolates were obtained by co-cultivation of PHA-activated PBMC from distinct HIV-2-infected CCR5-antagonist-naïve patients included in the French HIV-2 cohort and were previously tested for maraviroc susceptibility using the same protocol. HIV-2 tropism was determined by phenotypic assay using Ghost(3) cell lines. Regarding the 4 R5 HIV-2 clinical isolates tested, effective concentration 50% EC50 for cenicriviroc were 0.03, 0.33, 0.45 and 0.98 nM, similar to those observed with maraviroc: 1.13, 0.58, 0.48 and 0.68 nM, respectively. Maximum percentages of inhibition (MPI) of cenicriviroc were 94, 94, 93 and 98%, similar to those observed with maraviroc (93, 90, 82, 100%, respectively). The dual- and X4-tropic HIV-2 strains were resistant to cenicriviroc with EC50 >1000 nM and MPI at 33% and 4%, respectively. In this first study assessing HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, we observed an in vitro activity against HIV-2 R5-tropic strains similar to that observed with maraviroc. Thus, cenicriviroc may offer a once-daily treatment opportunity in the limited therapeutic arsenal for HIV-2. Clinical studies are warranted.

  1. The dual CCR5 and CCR2 inhibitor cenicriviroc does not redistribute HIV into extracellular space: implications for plasma viral load and intracellular DNA decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Victor G; Hassounah, Said; Colby-Germinario, Susan P; Oliveira, Maureen; Lefebvre, Eric; Mesplède, Thibault; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-03-01

    Cenicriviroc is a potent antagonist of the chemokine coreceptors 5 and 2 (CCR5/CCR2) and blocks HIV-1 entry. The CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has been shown in tissue culture to be able to repel cell-free virions from the cell surface into extracellular space. We hypothesized that cenicriviroc might exhibit a similar effect, and tested this using clinical samples from the Phase IIb study 652-2-202, by measuring rates of intracellular DNA decline. We also monitored viral RNA levels in culture fluids. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL in the presence or absence of inhibitory concentrations of cenicriviroc (20 nM) or maraviroc (50 nM) or controls. Viral load levels and p24 were measured by ELISA, quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR at 4 h post-infection. Frozen PBMC DNA samples from 30 patients with virological success in the Phase IIb study were studied, as were early and late reverse transcript levels. Docking studies compared binding between cenicriviroc/CCR5 and maraviroc/CCR5. Unlike maraviroc, cenicriviroc did not cause an increase in the amount of virus present in culture fluids at 4 h compared with baseline. The use of cenicriviroc did, however, result in lower levels of intracellular viral DNA after 4 h. Structural modelling indicates that cenicriviroc binds more deeply than maraviroc to the hydrophobic pocket of CCR5, providing an explanation for the absence of viral rebound with cenicriviroc. In contrast to maraviroc, cenicriviroc does not repel virus back into extracellular space. Differences in results may be due to superior binding of cenicriviroc to CCR5 compared with maraviroc. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Prophylactic Subacute Administration of Zinc Increases CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 Expression and Prevents the Long-Term Memory Loss in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia

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    Victor Manuel Blanco-Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prophylactic subacute administration of zinc decreases lipoperoxidation and cell death following a transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, thus suggesting neuroprotective and preconditioning effects. Chemokines and growth factors are also involved in the neuroprotective effect in hypoxia-ischemia. We explored whether zinc prevents the cerebral cortex-hippocampus injury through regulation of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression following a 10 min of common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO. Male rats were grouped as follows: (1 Zn96h, rats injected with ZnCl2 (one dose every 24 h during four days; (2 Zn96h + CCAO, rats treated with ZnCl2 before CCAO; (3 CCAO, rats with CCAO only; (4 Sham group, rats with mock CCAO; and (5 untreated rats. The cerebral cortex-hippocampus was dissected at different times before and after CCAO. CCL2/CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Learning in Morris Water Maze was achieved by daily training during 5 days. Long-term memory was evaluated on day 7 after learning. Subacute administration of zinc increased expression of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 in the early and late phases of postreperfusion and prevented the CCAO-induced memory loss in the rat. These results might be explained by the induction of neural plasticity because of the expression of CCL2 and growth factors.

  3. Prophylactic Subacute Administration of Zinc Increases CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 Expression and Prevents the Long-Term Memory Loss in a Rat Model of Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Alvarez, Victor Manuel; Soto-Rodriguez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Barrios, Juan Antonio; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Brambila, Eduardo; Torres-Soto, Maricela; Aguilar-Peralta, Ana Karina; Gonzalez-Vazquez, Alejandro; Tomás-Sanchez, Constantino; Limón, I Daniel; Eguibar, Jose R; Ugarte, Araceli; Hernandez-Castillo, Jeanett; Leon-Chavez, Bertha Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Prophylactic subacute administration of zinc decreases lipoperoxidation and cell death following a transient cerebral hypoxia-ischemia, thus suggesting neuroprotective and preconditioning effects. Chemokines and growth factors are also involved in the neuroprotective effect in hypoxia-ischemia. We explored whether zinc prevents the cerebral cortex-hippocampus injury through regulation of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression following a 10 min of common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Male rats were grouped as follows: (1) Zn96h, rats injected with ZnCl2 (one dose every 24 h during four days); (2) Zn96h + CCAO, rats treated with ZnCl2 before CCAO; (3) CCAO, rats with CCAO only; (4) Sham group, rats with mock CCAO; and (5) untreated rats. The cerebral cortex-hippocampus was dissected at different times before and after CCAO. CCL2/CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 expression was assessed by RT-PCR and ELISA. Learning in Morris Water Maze was achieved by daily training during 5 days. Long-term memory was evaluated on day 7 after learning. Subacute administration of zinc increased expression of CCL2, CCR2, FGF2, and IGF-1 in the early and late phases of postreperfusion and prevented the CCAO-induced memory loss in the rat. These results might be explained by the induction of neural plasticity because of the expression of CCL2 and growth factors.

  4. Hematopoietic defects in response to reduced Arhgap21

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    Juliana Xavier-Ferrucio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Arhgap21 is a member of the Rho GTPase activating protein (RhoGAP family, which function as negative regulators of Rho GTPases. Arhgap21 has been implicated in adhesion and migration of cancer cells. However, the role of Arhgap21 has never been investigated in hematopoietic cells. Herein, we evaluated functional aspects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC using a haploinsufficient (Arhgap21+/− mouse. Our results show that Arhgap21+/− mice have an increased frequency of phenotypic HSC, impaired ability to form progenitor colonies in vitro and decreased hematopoietic engraftment in vivo, along with a decrease in LSK cell frequency during serial bone marrow transplantation. Arhgap21+/− hematopoietic progenitor cells have impaired adhesion and enhanced mobilization of immature LSK and myeloid progenitors. Arhgap21+/− mice also exhibit reduced erythroid commitment and differentiation, which was recapitulated in human primary cells, in which knockdown of ARHGAP21 in CMP and MEP resulted in decreased erythroid commitment. Finally, we observed enhanced RhoC activity in the bone marrow cells of Arhgap21+/− mice, indicating that Arhgap21 functions in hematopoiesis may be at least partially mediated by RhoC inactivation. Keywords: Arhgap21, Hematopoiesis, Erythroid cells, Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, Fate decision

  5. Hematopoietic stem cells under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganuza, Miguel; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors are tasked with maintaining hematopoietic homeostasis in the face of numerous insults and challenges, including infection, inflammation, and exsanguination. HSCs possess the remarkable ability to reconstitute the entire hematopoietic system of an organism whose own hematopoietic system has been ablated. This ability is exploited routinely in the clinic via HSC transplantation (HSCT). Here, we focus on the physiological and molecular bottlenecks overcome by HSCs during transplantation. During transplantation, HSCs encounter a damaged bone marrow niche, characterized molecularly by increases in oxygen concentrations and an altered cytokine milieu. New mechanisms and pathways have been recently implicated during HSCT, including transplanted HSC-dependent secretion of conditioning molecules that facilitate engraftment and pathways that protect HSCs from perturbed organelle homeostasis. Better understanding the molecular processes HSCs employ to withstand the stress of transplant will illuminate novel targets for further improving conditioning regimens and engraftment during HSCT.

  6. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Graaf, Carolyn A; Metcalf, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO s...

  7. Distribution of CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029 A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A genetic polymorphisms in HIV-1 infected and uninfected patients in the west region of Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenfou, Céline Nguefeu; Mekue, Linda Chapdeleine Mouafo; Nana, Christelle Tafou; Kuiate, Jules Roger

    2013-07-23

    Genetic variants of the genes encoding human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) co-receptors and their ligands, like CC-chemokine receptor 5 delta 32 mutation (CCR5-Delta32), CCR5 promoter A/G (Adenine/Guanine), CC-chemokine receptor 2 mutation 64 isoleucine (CCR2-64I) and the stromal cell-derived factor 3'A mutation (SDF1-3'A), are involved in the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression. The prevalence of these mutations varies by region. However, little is known about their distribution in the population of Dschang, located in the west region of Cameroon. The prevalence of HIV in the west region of Cameroon is lower than elsewhere in Cameroon. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of four AIDS Related Gene (ARG) variants in HIV-infected and non-infected population of Cameroon especially in the west region and to estimate the contribution of these variants to the susceptibility or resistance to HIV infection. We also aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of genotyping using dried blood spot (DBS) samples. A total of 179 participants were recruited from two hospitals in Dschang in the west region of Cameroon. Their genotypes for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. A total of 179 participants were enrolled in the study. Among them, 32 (17.9%) were HIV positive and 147 (82.1%) were HIV negative. The allelic frequencies of these genes were: 0%, 49.72%, 17.6% and 100% respectively for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3'A. No individual was found to carry the CCR5-Delta 32 mutation. All participants recruited were heterozygous for the SDF1-3'A allele. Our data suggest that the CCR5-Delta32 cannot account for the protection as it was completely absent in our population. SDF1-3'A variants, may be in association with other polymorphisms, may account for the overall protection from HIV-1 infection

  8. Ophthalmic Manifestations of Hematopoietic Malignancy

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    Natsuyo Yoshida-Hata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To report the ocular findings in patients with hematopoietic malignancy with optic nerve involvement and abducens nerve palsy. Methods. The medical records of all cases of hematopoietic cancer with ophthalmic involvements seen in the Department of Ophthalmology of the National Center for Global Health and Medicine between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed. Results. Eight patients with hematopoietic cancer with optic nerve invasion or abducens nerve palsy were studied. The primary diseases were 3 cases of multiple myeloma, 1 case of acute lymphocytic leukemia, 1 case of follicular lymphoma, and 3 cases of AIDS-related lymphoma. Six cases had optic nerve invasion, 2 cases had abducens nerve palsy, and 1 case had optic nerve invasion of both eyes. The median visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 0.885 logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR units. The final visual acuity of eyes with optic nerve invasion was 1.25 logMAR units, and that of those with sixth-nerve palsy was −0.1 logMAR units. Six cases died during the five-year follow-up period. An ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic cancer, especially AIDS-related lymphoma, was associated with poor prognosis. Conclusion. Because ophthalmic involvement in patients with hematopoietic malignancy has a poor prognosis, an early diagnosis of the cancers by the ophthalmologic findings by ophthalmologists could improve the prognosis.

  9. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction....... From the perspective of mediatization research, the most important effect of the media stems from their embeddedness in culture and society....

  10. Inflammatory signals regulate hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Megan T; King, Katherine Y; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the progenitors of all blood and immune cells, yet their role in immunity is not well understood. Most studies have focused on the ability of committed lymphoid and myeloid precursors to replenish immune cells during infection. Recent studies, however, have indicated that HSCs also proliferate in response to systemic infection and replenish effector immune cells. Inflammatory signaling molecules including interferons, tumor necrosis factor-α and Toll-like receptors are essential to the HSC response. Observing the biology of HSCs through the lens of infection and inflammation has led to the discovery of an array of immune-mediators that serve crucial roles in HSC regulation and function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitophagy in hematopoietic stem cells: the case for exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Aashish; Kundu, Mondira

    2013-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are inherently quiescent and self-renewing, yet can differentiate and commit to multiple blood cell types. Intracellular mitochondrial content is dynamic, and there is an increase in mitochondrial content during differentiation and lineage commitment in HSCs. HSCs reside in a hypoxic niche within the bone marrow and rely heavily on glycolysis, while differentiated and committed progenitors rely on oxidative phosphorylation. Increased oxidative phosphorylation during differentiation and commitment is not only due to increased mitochondrial content but also due to changes in mitochondrial cytosolic distribution and efficiency. These changes in the intracellular mitochondrial landscape contribute signals toward regulating differentiation and commitment. Thus, a functional relationship exists between the mitochondria in HSCs and the state of the HSCs (i.e., stemness vs. differentiated). This review focuses on how autophagy-mediated mitochondrial clearance (i.e., mitophagy) may affect HSC mitochondrial content, thereby influencing the fate of HSCs and maintenance of hematopoietic homeostasis.

  12. Mechanisms of HIV entry into the CNS: increased sensitivity of HIV infected CD14+CD16+ monocytes to CCL2 and key roles of CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM in diapedesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionna W Williams

    Full Text Available As HIV infected individuals live longer, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing, despite successful antiretroviral therapy. CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes are critical to the neuropathogenesis of HIV as they promote viral seeding of the brain and establish neuroinflammation. The mechanisms by which HIV infected and uninfected monocytes cross the blood brain barrier and enter the central nervous system are not fully understood. We determined that HIV infection of CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes resulted in their highly increased transmigration across the blood brain barrier in response to CCL2 as compared to uninfected cells, which did not occur in the absence of the chemokine. This exuberant transmigration of HIV infected monocytes was due, at least in part, to increased CCR2 and significantly heightened sensitivity to CCL2. The entry of HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes into the brain was facilitated by significantly increased surface JAM-A, ALCAM, CD99, and PECAM-1, as compared to CD14(+ cells that are CD16 negative. Upon HIV infection, there was an additional increase in surface JAM-A and ALCAM on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes isolated from some individuals. Antibodies to ALCAM and JAM-A inhibited the transmigration of both HIV infected and uninfected CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes across the BBB, demonstrating their importance in facilitating monocyte transmigration and entry into the brain parenchyma. Targeting CCR2, JAM-A, and ALCAM present on CD14(+CD16(+ monocytes that preferentially infiltrate the CNS represents a therapeutic strategy to reduce viral seeding of the brain as well as the ongoing neuroinflammation that occurs during HIV pathogenesis.

  13. A novel CBL-Bflox/flox mouse model allows tissue-selective fully conditional CBL/CBL-B double-knockout: CD4-Cre mediated CBL/CBL-B deletion occurs in both T-cells and hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Benjamin; An, Wei; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Zutshi, Neha; Iseka, Fany; Storck, Matthew D; Meza, Jane; Sheinin, Yuri; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2016-08-09

    CBL-family ubiquitin ligases are critical negative regulators of tyrosine kinase signaling, with a clear redundancy between CBL and CBL-B evident in the immune cell and hematopoietic stem cell studies. Since CBL and CBL-B are negative regulators of immune cell activation, elimination of their function to boost immune cell activities could be beneficial in tumor immunotherapy. However, mutations of CBL are associated with human leukemias, pointing to tumor suppressor roles of CBL proteins; hence, it is critical to assess the tumor-intrinsic roles of CBL and CBL-B in cancers. This has not been possible since the only available whole-body CBL-B knockout mice exhibit constitutive tumor rejection. We engineered a new CBL-Bflox/flox mouse, combined this with an existing CBLflox/flox mouse to generate CBLflox/flox; CBL-Bflox/flox mice, and tested the tissue-specific concurrent deletion of CBL and CBL-B using the widely-used CD4-Cre transgenic allele to produce a T-cell-specific double knockout. Altered T-cell development, constitutive peripheral T-cell activation, and a lethal multi-organ immune infiltration phenotype largely resembling the previous Lck-Cre driven floxed-CBL deletion on a CBL-B knockout background establish the usefulness of the new model for tissue-specific CBL/CBL-B deletion. Unexpectedly, CD4-Cre-induced deletion in a small fraction of hematopoietic stem cells led to expansion of certain non-T-cell lineages, suggesting caution in the use of CD4-Cre for T-cell-restricted gene deletion. The establishment of a new model of concurrent tissue-selective CBL/CBL-B deletion should allow a clear assessment of the tumor-intrinsic roles of CBL/CBL-B in non-myeloid malignancies and help test the potential for CBL/CBL-B inactivation in immunotherapy of tumors.

  14. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.; Kaspar, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    Hematopoietic patterns have been assessed in chronic 60 Co gamma irradiated dogs during preclinical phases of evolving aplastic anemia (AA) or myeloproliferative disease (MPD), principally myeloid leukemia. The results support the concept that acquired radioresistance of vital granulocyte/monocyte lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors is temporally, perhaps causally, linked to the processes mediating hematopoietic recovery and accommodation under chronic irradiation, and in turn to preclinical events of evolving MPD. In addition, the marked differential responses of progenitors to gamma and neutron irradiation in vitro might suggest differences in the nature of cellular lesions elicited by chronic gamma irradiation, in vivo. (author)

  15. Local Delivery Is Critical for Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 Mediated Site-Specific Murine Aneurysm Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Hourani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLocal delivery of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 via our drug-eluting coil has been shown to promote intrasaccular aneurysm healing via an inflammatory pathway.ObjectiveIn this study, we validate the importance of local MCP-1 in murine aneurysm healing. Whether systemic, rather than local, delivery of MCP-1 can direct site-specific aneurysm healing has significant translational implications. If systemic MCP-1 is effective, then MCP-1 could be administered as a pill rather than by endovascular procedure. Furthermore, we confirm that MCP-1 is the primary effector in our MCP-1 eluting coil-mediated murine aneurysm healing model.MethodsWe compare aneurysm healing with repeated intraperitoneal MCP-1 versus vehicle injection, in animals with control poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-coated coils. We demonstrate elimination of the MCP-1-associated tissue-healing response by knockout of MCP-1 or CCR2 (MCP-1 receptor and by selectively inhibiting MCP-1 or CCR2. Using immunofluorescent probing, we explore the cell populations found in healed aneurysm tissue following each intervention.ResultsSystemically administered MCP-1 with PLGA coil control does not produce comparable aneurysm healing, as seen with MCP-1 eluting coils. MCP-1-directed aneurysm healing is eliminated by selective inhibition of MCP-1 or CCR2 and in MCP-1-deficient or CCR2-deficient mice. No difference was detected in M2 macrophage and myofibroblast/smooth muscle cell staining with systemic MCP-1 versus vehicle in aneurysm wall, but a significant increase in these cell types was observed with MCP-1 eluting coil implant and attenuated by MCP-1/CCR2 blockade or deficiency.ConclusionWe show that systemic MCP-1 concurrent with PLGA-coated platinum coil implant is not sufficient to produce site-specific aneurysm healing. MCP-1 is a critical, not merely complementary, actor in the aneurysm healing pathway.

  16. Thrombopoietin and hematopoietic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the cytokine that is chiefly responsible for megakaryocyte production but increasingly attention has turned to its role in maintaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs are required to initiate the production of all mature hematopoietic cells, but this differentiation needs to be balanced against self-renewal and quiescence to maintain the stem cell pool throughout life. TPO has been shown to support HSC quiescence during adult hematopoiesis, with the loss of TPO signaling associated with bone marrow failure and thrombocytopenia. Recent studies have shown that constitutive activation mutations in Mpl contribute to myeloproliferative disease. In this review, we will discuss TPO signaling pathways, regulation of TPO levels and the role of TPO in normal hematopoiesis and during myeloproliferative disease. PMID:21478671

  17. Social Correlates of Distress Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Exploring the Role of Loneliness and Cognitive Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Mosher, Catherine E.; Lepore, Stephen J.; Wu, Lisa; Austin, Jane; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Rowley, Scott; Isola, Luis; Redd, William H.; Rini, Christine

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether loneliness and cognitive processing explain the influence of negative (social constraints) and positive (emotional support) relationship qualities on cancer survivors’ distress. Participants were 195 cancer survivors who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Path analysis supported the hypothesis that loneliness and cognitive processing would mediate the association between social constraints and distress. Only loneliness mediated the associati...

  18. [Interaction of polymorphisms of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 receptor CCR2 gene 190A/G, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunit p22phox gene C242T and cigarette smoking increases the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaoxian; Guo, Like

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the interaction of polymorphisms of monocyte chemoattractant protein-I (MCP-1) receptor CCR2 gene 190A/G, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunit p22phox gene C242T and cigarette smoking in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD ). The genetic polymorphisms of MCP-1 receptor CCR2 gene 190A/G and NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox gene C242T were analyzed by the technique of polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP) in peripheral blood leukocytes of 600 NAFLD cases and 600 healthy persons. The frequencies of 190A/G (GG) and C242T (TT) were 50. 17% and 50. 00% in NAFLD cases and 23. 83% and 24. 17% in healthy controls, respectively. There were significant differences in the frequencies between the two groups (χ2 = 88. 8462, P = 0. 0031, χ2 = 85. 8100, P = 0. 0039). The risk of NAFLD with 190A/G (GG) was significantly higher than those with 190A/G (AA + AG) (OR = 3. 2171, 95% CI 1. 9351 - 5. 2184). The individuals who carried with C242T (TT) had a high risk of NAFLD (OR = 3. 1379, 95% CI 1. 7973 - 5. 2362). Combined analysis of the polymorphisms showed that percentage of 190A/G (GG)/C242T (TT) in NAFLD and control groups was 39. 67% and 13. 00%, respectively (χ2 = 118. 3021, P =0. 0017). The people who carried with 190A/G (GG)/C242T (TT) had a high risk of NAFLD (OR =5. 0211, 95% CI 3. 1853 -7. 7926). The cigarette smoking rate of the case group was significantly higher than that in the control group (χ2 = 92. 2234, P = 0. 0025), smokers have a higher risk of lung cancer than non-smokers (OR = 3. 3032, 95% CI 1. 9147 -5. 7413 ), and statistic analysis suggested an interaction between cigarette smoking and 190A/G (GG) and C242T (TT) which increase risk of NAFLD (r = 3. 9983, r = 3. 8553 ). 190A/G (GG), C242T (TT) and cigarette smoking are the risk factors in NAFLD, and the significant interactions between genetic polymorphisms of 190A/G (GG), C242T (TT) and cigarette smoking added the risk

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion : challenges and opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walasek, Marta A.; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald; Kanz, L; Fibbe, WE; Lengerke, C; Dick, JE

    2012-01-01

    Attempts to improve hematopoietic reconstitution and engraftment potential of ex vivo-expanded hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful due to the inability to generate sufficient stem cell numbers and to excessive differentiation of the starting cell

  20. The biochemistry of hematopoietic stem cell development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kaimakis (Polynikis); M. Crisan (Mihaela); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The cornerstone of the adult hematopoietic system and clinical treatments for blood-related disease is the cohort of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that is harbored in the adult bone marrow microenvironment. Interestingly, this cohort of HSCs is generated only during a short

  1. Stem cells and the aging hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Weissmann, Irving L; Rossi, Derrick J

    2010-08-01

    Advancing age is accompanied by a number of clinically significant conditions arising in the hematopoietic system that include: diminution and decreased competence of the adaptive immune system, elevated incidence of certain autoimmune diseases, increased hematological malignancies, and elevated incidence of age-associated anemia. As with most tissues, the aged hematopoietic system also exhibits a reduced capacity to regenerate and return to normal homeostasis after injury or stress. Evidence suggests age-dependent functional alterations within the hematopoietic stem cell compartment significantly contribute to many of these pathophysiologies. Recent developments have shed light on how aging of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment contributes to hematopoietic decline through diverse mechanisms. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Benfield, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV......-term nonprogression could not be explained by CXCR4 polymorphism or other polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene than the CCR5delta32 allele. Furthermore, we were not able to detect any significant independent effect of the 64I allele on development to AIDS, overall survival, and annual CD4 T-cell decline in this cohort.......-infected long-term nonprogressors for possible mutations. In total, 215 Danish individuals were analyzed for 64I allele frequency; disease progression was followed in 105 HIV-1-positive homosexual Danish men from their first known positive HIV-1 test result and up to 11 years. In 87 individuals, the CD4 T...

  3. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Benfield, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV......-infected long-term nonprogressors for possible mutations. In total, 215 Danish individuals were analyzed for 64I allele frequency; disease progression was followed in 105 HIV-1-positive homosexual Danish men from their first known positive HIV-1 test result and up to 11 years. In 87 individuals, the CD4 T-cell...... count was monitored closely. We found no significant difference in 64I allele frequency between HIV-1-seropositive persons (0.08), high-risk HIV-1-seronegative persons (0.11), and blood donors (0.06). No significant difference was observed in annual CD4 T-cell decline, CD4 T-cell counts at the time...

  4. Chemokine receptor CCR2b 64I polymorphism and its relation to CD4 T-cell counts and disease progression in a Danish cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Copenhagen AIDS cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Iversen, Anton; Benfield, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the recently described mutation in CCR2b named 64I in relation to HIV resistance, CD4 T-cell counts, and disease progression in Danish individuals by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods as well as sequenced full-length CXCR4 and CCR5 genes from HIV...... of AIDS, in AIDS-free survival as well as survival with AIDS, between 64I allele carriers and wild-type individuals. Among 9 long-term nonprogressors, 2 carried the 64I allele, while none of 9 fast progressors carried the 64I allele. However, this was not significantly different (p=.47). Long......-term nonprogression could not be explained by CXCR4 polymorphism or other polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene than the CCR5delta32 allele. Furthermore, we were not able to detect any significant independent effect of the 64I allele on development to AIDS, overall survival, and annual CD4 T-cell decline in this cohort....

  5. Deficiency of GRP94 in the hematopoietic system alters proliferation regulators in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Biquan; Tseng, Chun-Chih; Adams, Gregor B; Lee, Amy S

    2013-12-01

    We have previously reported that acute inducible knockout of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP94 led to an expansion of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell pool. Here, we investigated the effectors and mechanisms for this phenomenon. We observed an increase in AKT activation in freshly isolated GRP94-null HSC-enriched Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells, corresponding with higher production of PI(3,4,5)P3, indicative of PI3K activation. Treatment of GRP94-null LSK cells with the AKT inhibitor MK2206 compromised cell expansion, suggesting a causal relationship between elevated AKT activation and increased proliferation in GRP94-null HSCs. Microarray analysis demonstrated a 97% reduction in the expression of the hematopoietic cell cycle regulator Ms4a3 in the GRP94-null LSK cells, and real-time quantitative PCR confirmed this down-regulation in the LSK cells but not in the total bone marrow (BM). A further examination comparing freshly isolated BM LSK cells with spleen LSK cells, as well as BM LSK cells cultured in vitro, revealed specific down-regulation of Ms4a3 in freshly isolated BM GRP94-null LSK cells. On examining cell surface proteins that are known to regulate stem cell proliferation, we observed a reduced expression of cell surface connexin 32 (Cx32) plaques in GRP94-null LSK cells. However, suppression of Cx32 hemichannel activity in wild-type LSK cells through mimetic peptides did not lead to increased LSK cell proliferation in vitro. Two other important cell surface proteins that mediate HSC-niche interactions, specifically Tie2 and CXCR4, were not impaired by Grp94 deletion. Collectively, our study uncovers novel and unique roles of GRP94 in regulating HSC proliferation.

  6. Mitigation of radiation induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of Nrf-2 and increasing hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patwardhan, R.S.; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Santosh Kumar, S.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic doses of ionizing radiation (IR) that can be delivered to tumors are restricted due to radiation induced damage to surrounding normal tissues thereby limiting the effectiveness of radiotherapy. Strategies to develop agents that selectively protect normal cells yielded limited success in the past. There is pressing need to develop safe, syndrome specific and effective radiation countermeasures to prevent or mitigate the harmful consequences of radiation exposure. Survival of bone marrow stem cells (HSCs) play a key role in protecting against IR induced hematopoietic injury. Many studies have shown manipulation of HSC frequency and/or survival as principal mechanism of radioprotection. It is known that, Nrf-2 plays crucial role in HSC survival and maintenance under oxidative stress conditions. In the present study, we have investigated the radioprotective ability of a flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone), extracted from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, a medicinal plant traditionally used in Oriental medicine. There are numerous reports showing anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-microbial, anti-mutagenic and neuroprotective properties of baicalein. Based on these reports, we have investigated the ability of baicalein to protect against radiation induced hematopoietic injury. Baicalein administration to mice protected against WBI induced mortality. Interestingly, the stem cell frequency increased in bone marrow cells obtained from baicalein administered mice as compared to vehicle treated mice. Baicalein treatment led to increased phospho-Nrf-2 levels in lineage negative BM-MNC. Administration of mice with Nrf-2 inhibitor prior to baicalein treatment led to significant abrogation of radioprotective ability of baicalein. This result suggests that, Nrf-2 may be playing a key role in baicalein mediated radioprotection. Here, we have shown that baicalein administration augments stem cell frequency, induces

  7. Secreted protein Del-1 regulates myelopoiesis in the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroulis, Ioannis; Chen, Lan-Sun; Singh, Rashim Pal; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Economopoulou, Matina; Kajikawa, Tetsuhiro; Troullinaki, Maria; Ziogas, Athanasios; Ruppova, Klara; Hosur, Kavita; Maekawa, Tomoki; Wang, Baomei; Subramanian, Pallavi; Tonn, Torsten; Verginis, Panayotis; von Bonin, Malte; Wobus, Manja; Bornhäuser, Martin; Grinenko, Tatyana; Di Scala, Marianna; Hidalgo, Andres; Wielockx, Ben; Hajishengallis, George; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2017-10-02

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remain mostly quiescent under steady-state conditions but switch to a proliferative state following hematopoietic stress, e.g., bone marrow (BM) injury, transplantation, or systemic infection and inflammation. The homeostatic balance between quiescence, self-renewal, and differentiation of HSCs is strongly dependent on their interactions with cells that constitute a specialized microanatomical environment in the BM known as the HSC niche. Here, we identified the secreted extracellular matrix protein Del-1 as a component and regulator of the HSC niche. Specifically, we found that Del-1 was expressed by several cellular components of the HSC niche, including arteriolar endothelial cells, CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, and cells of the osteoblastic lineage. Del-1 promoted critical functions of the HSC niche, as it regulated long-term HSC (LT-HSC) proliferation and differentiation toward the myeloid lineage. Del-1 deficiency in mice resulted in reduced LT-HSC proliferation and infringed preferentially upon myelopoiesis under both steady-state and stressful conditions, such as hematopoietic cell transplantation and G-CSF- or inflammation-induced stress myelopoiesis. Del-1-induced HSC proliferation and myeloid lineage commitment were mediated by β3 integrin on hematopoietic progenitors. This hitherto unknown Del-1 function in the HSC niche represents a juxtacrine homeostatic adaptation of the hematopoietic system in stress myelopoiesis.

  8. Mitigation of radiation-induced hematopoietic injury via regulation of cellular MAPK/phosphatase levels and increasing hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, R S; Sharma, Deepak; Checker, Rahul; Sandur, Santosh K

    2014-03-01

    Here we describe a novel strategy for mitigation of ionizing radiation-induced hematopoietic syndrome by suppressing the activity of MKP3, resulting in ERK activation and enhanced abundance of hematopoietic stem cells, using the antioxidant flavonoid baicalein (5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone). It offered complete protection to mouse splenic lymphocytes against radiation-induced cell death. Inhibitors of ERK and Nrf-2 could significantly abrogate baicalein-mediated radioprotection in lymphocytes. Baicalein inhibited phosphatase MKP3 and thereby enhanced phosphorylation of ERK and its downstream proteins such as Elk and Nrf-2. It also increased the nuclear levels of Nrf-2 and the mRNA levels of its dependent genes. Importantly, baicalein administration to mice before radiation exposure led to significant recovery of loss of bone marrow cellularity and also inhibited cell death. Administration of baicalein increased the hematopoietic stem cell frequency as measured by side-population assay and also by antibody staining. Further, baicalein offered significant protection against whole-body irradiation (WBI; 7.5Gy)-induced mortality in mice. Interestingly, we found that baicalein works by activating the same target molecules ERK and Nrf-2 both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, administration of all-trans-retinoic acid (inhibitor of Nrf-2) significantly abrogated baicalein-mediated protection against WBI-induced mortality in mice. Thus, in contrast to the generalized conception of antioxidants acting as radioprotectors, we provide a rationale that antioxidants exhibit pleiotropic effects through the activation of multiple cellular signaling pathways. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Pillozzi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs. These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl− channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking.

  10. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  11. Activated H-Ras regulates hematopoietic cell survival by modulating Survivin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Seiji; Pelus, Louis M.

    2004-01-01

    Survivin expression and Ras activation are regulated by hematopoietic growth factors. We investigated whether activated Ras could circumvent growth factor-regulated Survivin expression and if a Ras/Survivin axis mediates growth factor independent survival and proliferation in hematopoietic cells. Survivin expression is up-regulated by IL-3 in Ba/F3 and CD34 + cells and inhibited by the Ras inhibitor, farnesylthiosalicylic acid. Over-expression of constitutively activated H-Ras (CA-Ras) in Ba/F3 cells blocked down-modulation of Survivin expression, G 0 /G 1 arrest, and apoptosis induced by IL-3 withdrawal, while dominant-negative (DN) H-Ras down-regulated Survivin. Survivin disruption by DN T34A Survivin blocked CA-Ras-induced IL-3-independent cell survival and proliferation; however, it did not affect CA-Ras-mediated enhancement of S-phase, indicating that the anti-apoptotic activity of CA-Ras is Survivin dependent while its S-phase enhancing effect is not. These results indicate that CA-Ras modulates Survivin expression independent of hematopoietic growth factors and that a CA-Ras/Survivin axis regulates survival and proliferation of transformed hematopoietic cells

  12. Thrombopoietin expands hematopoietic stem cells after transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Norma; Priestley, Greg; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Kaushansky, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence indicate that thrombopoietin (TPO) contributes to the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), supporting their survival and proliferation in vitro. To determine whether TPO supports the impressive expansion of HSC observed following transplantation, we transplanted normal marrow cells into lethally irradiated Tpo–/– and Tpo+/+ mice and quantified HSC self-renewal and expansion and hematopoietic progenitor cell homing. Although essentially identical numbers of...

  13. Inflammatory Monocytes Promote Perineural Invasion via CCL2-Mediated Recruitment and Cathepsin B Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard L; Xiong, Huizhong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William; Lee, Sei-Young; Olson, Oakley C; Leiner, Ingrid M; Marcadis, Andrea R; Keith, James W; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Katabi, Nora; Gil, Ziv; Vakiani, Efsevia; Joyce, Johanna A; Pamer, Eric; Wong, Richard J

    2017-11-15

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is an ominous event strongly linked to poor clinical outcome. Cells residing within peripheral nerves collaborate with cancer cells to enable PNI, but the contributing conditions within the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we show that CCR2-expressing inflammatory monocytes (IM) are preferentially recruited to sites of PNI, where they differentiate into macrophages and potentiate nerve invasion through a cathepsin B-mediated process. A series of adoptive transfer experiments with genetically engineered donors and recipients demonstrated that IM recruitment to nerves was driven by CCL2 released from Schwann cells at the site of PNI, but not CCL7, an alternate ligand for CCR2. Interruption of either CCL2-CCR2 signaling or cathepsin B function significantly impaired PNI in vivo Correlative studies in human specimens demonstrated that cathepsin B-producing macrophages were enriched in invaded nerves, which was associated with increased local tumor recurrence. These findings deepen our understanding of PNI pathogenesis and illuminate how PNI is driven in part by corruption of a nerve repair program. Further, they support the exploration of inhibiting IM recruitment and function as a targeted therapy for PNI. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6400-14. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. ES-cell derived hematopoietic cells induce transplantation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Bonde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cells induce stable mixed chimerism under appropriate conditioning of the host, mediating the induction of transplantation tolerance. However, their strong immunogenicity precludes routine use in clinical transplantation due to the need for harsh preconditioning and the requirement for toxic immunosuppression to prevent rejection and graft-versus-host disease. Alternatively, embryonic stem (ES cells have emerged as a potential source of less immunogenic hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs. Up till now, however, it has been difficult to generate stable hematopoietic cells from ES cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we derived CD45(+ HPCs from HOXB4-transduced ES cells and showed that they poorly express MHC antigens. This property allowed their long-term engraftment in sublethally irradiated recipients across MHC barriers without the need for immunosuppressive agents. Although donor cells declined in peripheral blood over 2 months, low level chimerism was maintained in the bone marrow of these mice over 100 days. More importantly, chimeric animals were protected from rejection of donor-type cardiac allografts. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show, for the first time, the efficacy of ES-derived CD45(+ HPCs to engraft in allogenic recipients without the use of immunosuppressive agents, there by protecting cardiac allografts from rejection.

  15. The aging hematopoietic stem cell niche: Phenotypic and functional changes and mechanisms that contribute to hematopoietic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latchney, Sarah E; Calvi, Laura M

    2017-01-01

    The hematopoietic system has the remarkable ability to provide a lifelong supply of mature cells that make up the entire blood and immune system. However, similar to other adult stem cell niches, the hematopoietic system is vulnerable to the detrimental effects of aging. This is a substantial health concern as the trend for population aging continues to increase. Identifying mechanisms that underlie hematopoietic aging is vital for understanding hematopoietic-related diseases. In this review, we first discuss the cellular hierarchy of the hematopoietic system and the components that make up the surrounding hematopoietic niche. We then provide an overview of the major phenotypes associated with hematopoietic aging and discuss recent research investigating cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic mechanisms of hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) aging. We end by discussing the exciting new concept of possibly reversing the HSC aging process along with outstanding questions that remain to be answered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Approaches to Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer E; Kubek, Sara P; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2017-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are unique in their ability to self-renew and generate all blood lineages for the entire life. HSC modification affects red blood cells, platelets, lymphocytes, and myeloid cells. Chemotherapy can result in myelosuppression, limiting effective chemotherapy administration. For diseases like glioblastoma, high expression of methlylguanine methyltransferase can inactivate alkylating agent chemotherapy. Here we discuss how HSCs can be modified to overcome this resistance, permitting sensitization of tumors to chemotherapy while simultaneously protecting the hematopoietic system. We also discuss how HSCs can be harnessed to produce powerful tumor killing T cells, potentially benefitting and complementing T-cell-based immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In Utero Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tippi C. Mackenzie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application.

  18. Challenges in Consolidated Reporting of Hematopoietic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Robert S; Arber, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on the challenges of generating comprehensive diagnostic reports in hematopathology. In particular, two main challenges that diagnosticians face are (1) interpreting and understanding the rapid advances in molecular and genetic pathology, which have gained increasing importance in classifications of hematopoietic neoplasms, and (2) managing the logistics of reporting ancillary studies and incorporating them effectively into a final synthesized report. This article summarizes many important genetic findings in hematopoietic neoplasms, which are required for accurate diagnoses, and discusses practical issues to generating accurate and complete hematopathology reports. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pleiotrophin Regulates the Retention and Self-Renewal of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Vascular Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Himburg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which the bone marrow (BM microenvironment regulates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC fate remain incompletely understood. We examined the role of the heparin-binding growth factor pleiotrophin (PTN in regulating HSC function in the niche. PTN−/− mice displayed significantly decreased BM HSC content and impaired hematopoietic regeneration following myelosuppression. Conversely, mice lacking protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor zeta, which is inactivated by PTN, displayed significantly increased BM HSC content. Transplant studies revealed that PTN action was not HSC autonomous, but rather was mediated by the BM microenvironment. Interestingly, PTN was differentially expressed and secreted by BM sinusoidal endothelial cells within the vascular niche. Furthermore, systemic administration of anti-PTN antibody in mice substantially impaired both the homing of hematopoietic progenitor cells to the niche and the retention of BM HSCs in the niche. PTN is a secreted component of the BM vascular niche that regulates HSC self-renewal and retention in vivo.

  20. The Microtubule Plus-End Tracking Protein CLASP2 Is Required for Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Drabek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian CLASPs are microtubule plus-end tracking proteins whose essential function as regulators of microtubule behavior has been studied mainly in cultured cells. We show here that absence of murine CLASP2 in vivo results in thrombocytopenia, progressive anemia, and pancytopenia, due to defects in megakaryopoiesis, in erythropoiesis, and in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell activity. Furthermore, microtubule stability and organization are affected upon attachment of Clasp2 knockout hematopoietic stem-cell-enriched populations, and these cells do not home efficiently toward their bone marrow niche. Strikingly, CLASP2-deficient hematopoietic stem cells contain severely reduced mRNA levels of c-Mpl, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, an essential factor for megakaryopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell maintenance. Our data suggest that thrombopoietin signaling is impaired in Clasp2 knockout mice. We propose that the CLASP2-mediated stabilization of microtubules is required for proper attachment, homing, and maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells and that this is necessary to sustain c-Mpl transcription.

  1. RUNX1 regulates site specificity of DNA demethylation by recruitment of DNA demethylation machineries in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Shimizu, Yuri; Furuhata, Erina; Maeda, Shiori; Kishima, Mami; Nishimura, Hajime; Enomoto, Saaya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-09-12

    RUNX1 is an essential master transcription factor in hematopoietic development and plays important roles in immune functions. Although the gene regulatory mechanism of RUNX1 has been characterized extensively, the epigenetic role of RUNX1 remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that RUNX1 contributes DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner in human hematopoietic cells. Overexpression analysis of RUNX1 showed the RUNX1-binding site-directed DNA demethylation. The RUNX1-mediated DNA demethylation was also observed in DNA replication-arrested cells, suggesting an involvement of active demethylation mechanism. Coimmunoprecipitation in hematopoietic cells showed physical interactions between RUNX1 and DNA demethylation machinery enzymes TET2, TET3, TDG, and GADD45. Further chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed colocalization of RUNX1 and TET2 in the same genomic regions, indicating recruitment of DNA demethylation machinery by RUNX1. Finally, methylome analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of RUNX1-binding sites at demethylated regions during hematopoietic development. Collectively, the present data provide evidence that RUNX1 contributes site specificity of DNA demethylation by recruitment of TET and other demethylation-related enzymes to its binding sites in hematopoietic cells.

  2. [Hematopoietic reconstitution and prognosis of different types of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe aplastic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Wu, Depei; Hu, Shaoyan; Jin, Song; Wang, Xiuli; Miao, Miao; Chen, Jia; Han, Yue; Tang, Xiaowen; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Jin, Zhengming; Fu, Chengcheng; Ma, Xiao; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    To compare the differences between hematopoietic reconstitution and longterm prognosis of patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA) after HLA- matched sibling donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(MSD-HSCT), Haploidentical HSCT(Haplo-HSCT), unrelated donor allogeneic HSCT(UD-HSCT)and umbilical cord blood HSCT(UCB-HSCT). In this retrospective study, 63 patients with SAA who received HSCT in the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University between May 2008 and December 2013 were enrolled. The subjects were divided into 4 groups according to the transplantation types. The hematopoietic reconstitution, the incidence of acute graft-versushost disease(aGVHD)and 5- year survival rate after transplantation were compared. All 53 subjects who received MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT achieved hematopoietic reconstitution. Of them, the recovery of neutrophil and platelet were not significantly different(P0.05). MSD-HSCT, Haplo-HSCT and UD-HSCT had no statistically significance in terms of hematopoietic reconstitution or prognosis. Although hematopoietic reconstitution of UCB-HSCT was lower than other transplantation types, but no significant difference in overall prognosis. So if HLA-matched sibling donor is not available, SAA patients can choose Haplo- HSCT, UD - HSCT or UCB- HSCT with comparable efficacy to MSD- HSCT, as an alternative therapy.

  3. Bone marrow laminins influence hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cycling and homing to the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susek, Katharina Helene; Korpos, Eva; Huppert, Jula; Wu, Chuan; Savelyeva, Irina; Rosenbauer, Frank; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Koschmieder, Steffen; Sorokin, Lydia

    2018-01-31

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) functions are regulated by a specialized microenvironment in the bone marrow - the hematopoietic stem cell niche - of which the extracellular matrix (ECM) is an integral component. We describe here the localization of ECM molecules, in particular the laminin α4, α3 and α5 containing isoforms in the bone marrow. Laminin 421 (composed of laminin α4, β2, γ1 chains) is identified as a major component of the bone marrow ECM, occurring abundantly surrounding venous sinuses and in a specialized reticular fiber network of the intersinusoidal spaces of murine bone marrow (BM) in close association with HSPC. Bone marrow from Lama4 -/- mice is significantly less efficient in reconstituting the hematopoietic system of irradiated wildtype (WT) recipients in competitive bone marrow transplantation assays and shows reduced colony formation in vitro. This is partially due to retention of Lin - c-kit + Sca-1 + CD48 - long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC/ST-HSC) in the G0 phase of the cell cycle in Lama4 -/- bone marrow and hence a more quiescent phenotype. In addition, the extravasation of WT BM cells into Lama4 -/- bone marrow is impaired, influencing the recirculation of HSPC. Our data suggest that these effects are mediated by a compensatory expression of laminin α5 containing isoforms (laminin 521/522) in Lama4 -/- bone marrow. Collectively, these intrinsic and extrinsic effects lead to reduced HSPC numbers in Lama4 -/- bone marrow and reduced hematopoietic potential. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human hematopoietic cell culture, transduction, and analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Wirthlin, Louisa; Kohn, Donald B

    2008-01-01

    This unit provides methods for introducing genes into human hematopoietic progenitor cells. The Basic Protocol describes isolation of CD34(+) cells, transduction of these cells with a retroviral vector on fibronectin-coated plates, assaying the efficiency of transduction, and establishing long-te...

  5. Ex vivo Expansion of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Farahbakhshian (Elnaz)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a complex cellular differentiation process resulting in the formation of all blood cell types. In this process, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside at the top of the hematopoiesis hierarchy and have the capacity to differentiate into all blood cell lineages

  6. Cellular memory and, hematopoietic stem cell aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamminga, Leonie M.; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) balance self-renewal and differentiation in order to sustain lifelong blood production and simultaneously maintain the HSC pool. However, there is clear evidence that HSCs are subject to quantitative and qualitative exhaustion. In this review, we briefly discuss

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orchard, Paul J.; Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer L.; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; OBrien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from

  8. Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Organs in Arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells moving throughout the extracellular space and exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species. PMID:23319182

  9. Hematopoiesis and hematopoietic organs in arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-03-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells that move throughout the extracellular space and that exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and the body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self-renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review, we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species.

  10. Molecular regulation of human hematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, P.L.J.

    2014-01-01

    Peter van Galen focuses on understanding the determinants that maintain the stem cell state. Using human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as a model, processes that govern self-renewal and tissue regeneration were investigated. Specifically, a role for microRNAs in balancing the human HSC

  11. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function. Latexin (Lxn is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1 was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. : In this article, Liang and colleagues show that loss of latexin in vivo expands the HSC population and increases their survival and engraftment. Latexin regulates HSC function and hematopoiesis via the Thbs1 signaling pathway. Keywords: latexin, hematopoietic stem cell, repopulating advantage, expansion, survival, thrombospondin 1

  12. TIMP-3 recruits quiescent hematopoietic stem cells into active cell cycle and expands multipotent progenitor pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Ito, Miyuki; Smookler, David S; Shibata, Fumi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Morikawa, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Arai, Fumio; Suda, Toshio; Khokha, Rama; Kitamura, Toshio

    2010-11-25

    Regulating transition of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) between quiescent and cycling states is critical for maintaining homeostasis of blood cell production. The cycling states of HSCs are regulated by the extracellular factors such as cytokines and extracellular matrix; however, the molecular circuitry for such regulation remains elusive. Here we show that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP-3), an endogenous regulator of metalloproteinases, stimulates HSC proliferation by recruiting quiescent HSCs into the cell cycle. Myelosuppression induced TIMP-3 in the bone marrow before hematopoietic recovery. Interestingly, TIMP-3 enhanced proliferation of HSCs and promoted expansion of multipotent progenitors, which was achieved by stimulating cell-cycle entry of quiescent HSCs without compensating their long-term repopulating activity. Surprisingly, this effect did not require metalloproteinase inhibitory activity of TIMP-3 and was possibly mediated through a direct inhibition of angiopoietin-1 signaling, a critical mediator for HSC quiescence. Furthermore, bone marrow recovery from myelosuppression was accelerated by over-expression of TIMP-3, and in turn, impaired in TIMP-3-deficient animals. These results suggest that TIMP-3 may act as a molecular cue in response to myelosuppression for recruiting dormant HSCs into active cell cycle and may be clinically useful for facilitating hematopoietic recovery after chemotherapy or ex vivo expansion of HSCs.

  13. p53 Mediates Failure of Human Definitive Hematopoiesis in Dyskeratosis Congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Chun Fok

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DC is a bone marrow failure syndrome associated with telomere dysfunction. The progression and molecular determinants of hematopoietic failure in DC remain poorly understood. Here, we use the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells harboring clinically relevant mutations in telomerase to understand the consequences of DC-associated mutations on the primitive and definitive hematopoietic programs. Interestingly, telomere shortening does not broadly impair hematopoiesis, as primitive hematopoiesis is not impaired in DC cells. In contrast, while phenotypic definitive hemogenic endothelium is specified, the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition is impaired in cells with shortened telomeres. This failure is caused by DNA damage accrual and is mediated by p53 stabilization. These observations indicate that detrimental effects of telomere shortening in the hematopoietic system are specific to the definitive hematopoietic lineages. This work illustrates how telomere dysfunction impairs hematopoietic development and creates a robust platform for therapeutic discovery for treatment of DC patients.

  14. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Pel, M.; van Os, R.; Velders, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases...... are regulatory mediators in cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization, we considered a possible role for protease inhibitors in the induction of HSC/HPC mobilization. Bone marrow (BM) extracellular extracts that were obtained from murine femurs after 0.5 Gy of TBI contained an inhibitor of elastase. Also, after low...... of Serpina1 in HSC/HPC mobilization, we administered Serpina1 before IL-8 injection. This administration resulted in an almost complete inhibition of HSC/HPC mobilization, whereas heat-inactivated Serpina1 had no effect. These results indicate that low-dose TBI inhibits cytokine-induced HSC/HPC mobilization...

  15. Hematopoietic Niche - Exploring Biomimetic Cues to Improve the Functionality of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta H G; de Soure, António M; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo; da Silva, Cláudia L

    2018-02-01

    The adult bone marrow (BM) niche is a complex entity where a homeostatic hematopoietic system is maintained through a dynamic crosstalk between different cellular and non-cellular players. Signaling mechanisms triggered by cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix (ECM), cell-cytokine interactions, and local microenvironment parameters are involved in controlling quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, and migration of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC). A promising strategy to more efficiently expand HSPC numbers and tune their properties ex vivo is to mimic the hematopoietic niche through integration of adjuvant stromal cells, soluble cues, and/or biomaterial-based approaches in HSPC culture systems. Particularly, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), through their paracrine activity or direct contact with HSPC, are thought to be a relevant niche player, positioning HSPC-MSC co-culture as a valuable platform to support the ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic progenitors. To improve the clinical outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), namely when the available HSPC are present in a limited number such is the case of HSPC collected from umbilical cord blood (UCB), ex vivo expansion of HSPC is required without eliminating the long-term repopulating capacity of more primitive HSC. Here, we will focus on depicting the characteristics of co-culture systems, as well as other bioengineering approaches to improve the functionality of HSPC ex vivo. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizer J

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery.

  17. Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is recruited to CD22 following B cell antigen receptor ligation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lankester, A. C.; van Schijndel, G. M.; van Lier, R. A.

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell phosphatase is a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase that is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cell lineages. Motheaten mice, which are devoid of (functional) hematopoietic cell phosphatase, have severe disturbances in the regulation of B cell activation and

  18. File list: His.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.05.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  19. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.20.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  1. File list: His.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cell...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  2. Proteomic cornerstones of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors...... which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem....../progenitor cells (HSPCs, Lin(neg)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) or myeloid committed precursors (Lin(neg)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5,000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical...

  3. Recent advances in hematopoietic stem cell biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A; Nolta, Jan A

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Exciting advances have been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell biology during the past year. This review summarizes recent progress in the identification, culture, and in vivo tracking of hematopoietic stem cells. RECENT FINDINGS: The roles of Wnt and Notch proteins...... in the context of stem cell tracking in vivo. This review concludes with a section on the unexpected potential of bone marrow-derived stem cells to contribute to the repair of damaged tissues. The contribution of cell fusion to explain the latter phenomenon is discussed. SUMMARY: Because of exciting discoveries...... made recently in the field of stem cell biology, researchers now have improved tools to define novel populations of stem cells, examine them ex vivo using conditions that promote self-renewal, track them into recipients, and determine whether they can contribute to the repair of damaged tissues...

  4. Prostaglandin E2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingying; Zhou Daohong; Meng Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a bioactive lipid molecule produced by cyclooxygenase (COX), which plays an important role on hematopoiesis. While it can block differentiation of myeloid progenitors but enhance proliferation of erythroid progenitors. Recent research found that PGE2 have the effects on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function and these effects were independent from effects on progenitor cells. Exposure of HSC cells to PGE2 in vitro can increase homing efficiency of HSC to the murine bone marrow compartment and decrease HSC apoptosis, meanwhile increase long-term stem cell engraftment. In-vivo treatment with PGE2 expands short-term HSC and engraftment in murine bone marrow but not long-term HSC.In addition, PGE2 increases HSC survival after radiation injury and enhance hematopoietic recovery, resulting maintains hematopoietic homeostasis. PGE2 regulates HSC homeostasis by reactive oxygen species and Wnt pathway. Clinical beneficial of 16, 16-dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 treatment to enhance engraftment of umbilical cord blood suggest important improvements to therapeutic strategies. (authors)

  5. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  6. Hematopoietic specification from human pluripotent stem cells: current advances and challenges toward de novo generation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slukvin, Igor I

    2013-12-12

    Significant advances in cellular reprogramming technologies and hematopoietic differentiation from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have already enabled the routine production of multiple lineages of blood cells in vitro and opened novel opportunities to study hematopoietic development, model genetic blood diseases, and manufacture immunologically matched cells for transfusion and cancer immunotherapy. However, the generation of hematopoietic cells with robust and sustained multilineage engraftment has not been achieved. Here, we highlight the recent advances in understanding the molecular and cellular pathways leading to blood development from hPSCs and discuss potential approaches that can be taken to facilitate the development of technologies for de novo production of hematopoietic stem cells.

  7. Lipofectamine and related cationic lipids strongly improve adenoviral infection efficiency of primitive human hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, T; Haddada, H; Vainchenker, W; Louache, F

    1998-11-20

    Adenoviral vectors have the potential to infect a large number of cell types including quiescent cells. Their use in hematopoietic cells is limited by the episomal form of their DNA, leading to transgene loss in the progeny cells. However, the use of this vector may be interesting for short-term in vitro modifications of primitive human hematopoietic cells. Therefore, we have investigated the ability of adenovirus to transduce cord blood CD34+ cells. Several promoters were tested using the lacZ reporter gene. The PGK and CMV promoters induced transgene expression in 18-25% of the cells, whereas the HTLV-I and especially the RSV promoter were almost inactive. To improve infection efficiency, adenovirus was complexed with cationic lipids. Lipofectamine, Cellfectin, and RPR120535b, but not Lipofectin, Lipofectace, or DOTAP, markedly improved transgene expression in CD34+ cells (from 19 to 35%). Lipofectamine strongly enhanced infection efficiency of the poorly infectable primitive CD34+CD38low cells (from 11 to 28%) whereas the more mature CD34+CD38+ cells were only slightly affected (from 24 to 31%). Lipofectamine tripled the infection of CFU-GMs and LTC-ICs derived from the CD34+CD38low cell fraction (from 4 to 12% and from 5 to 16%, respectively) and doubled that of BFU-Es (from 13 to 26%). We conclude that cationic lipids can markedly increase the efficiency of adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into primitive hematopoietic cells.

  8. Regulation of the hematopoietic stem cell lifecycle by the endothelial niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Pradeep; Poulos, Michael G; Butler, Jason M

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) predominantly reside either in direct contact or in close proximity to the vascular endothelium throughout their lifespan. From the moment of HSC embryonic specification from hemogenic endothelium, endothelial cells (ECs) act as a critical cellular-hub that regulates a vast repertoire of biological processes crucial for HSC maintenance throughout its lifespan. In this review, we will discuss recent findings in endothelial niche-mediated regulation of HSC function during development, aging and regenerative conditions. Studies employing genetic vascular models have unequivocally confirmed that ECs provide the essential instructive cues for HSC emergence during embryonic development as well as adult HSC maintenance during homeostasis and regeneration. Aging of ECs may impair their ability to maintain HSC function contributing to the development of aging-associated hematopoietic deficiencies. These findings have opened up new avenues to explore the therapeutic application of ECs. ECs can be adapted to serve as an instructive platform to expand bona fide HSCs and also utilized as a cellular therapy to promote regeneration of the hematopoietic system following myelosuppressive and myeloablative injuries. ECs provide a fertile niche for maintenance of functional HSCs throughout their lifecycle. An improved understanding of the EC-HSC cross-talk will pave the way for development of EC-directed strategies for improving HSC function during aging.

  9. T11TS repress gliomagenic apoptosis of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Somnath; Hazra, Iman; Datta, Ankur; Sk Md, Omar Faruk; Moitra, Saibal; Tripathi, Santanu Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2018-01-01

    Combating gliomagenic global immunosuppression is one of the emerging key for improving prognosis in malignant glioma. Apoptosis plays a pivotal role within the adult hematopoietic system particularly in regulating the cells of immune system. Gliomagenic regulation of apoptotic mediators within bone marrow milieu has not been elucidated. We previously demonstrated that administration of membrane glycopeptides T11 target structure (T11TS) not only rejuvenate bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BMHSCs) from glioma mediated hibernation by inhibiting gliomagenic overexpression of Ang-1/Tie-2 but also stimulate glioma mediated diminution of expression CD34, c-kit, and Sca-1 markers. In the present study, we investigated the impact of glioma on apoptotic signaling cascades of BMHSCs and consequences following T11TS therapy. Bone marrow smear and Annexin V staining confirm gliomagenic acceleration of apoptotic fate of BMHSCs whereas T11TS treatment in glioma-bearing rats disrupted apoptosis of BMHSCs. Flowcytometry, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence imagining results revealed multi potent T11TS not only significantly downregulates gliomagenic overexpression of Fas, Fas L, Bid, and caspase-8, the pro-apoptotic extrinsic mediators but also strongly inhibits cytosolic release of cytochrome-c, Apf-1, and Bax to deactivate gliomagenic caspase-9, 3 the key intrinsic apoptotic mediators followed by up modulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 in glioma associated HSCs. T11TS is also able to diminish the perforin-granzyme B mediated apoptotic verdict of BMHSCs during gliomagenesis. The anti-apoptotic action of T11TS on glioma associated BMHSCs provide a crucial insight into how T11TS exerts its immunomodulatory action against glioma mediated immune devastation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cd44 Is a Major E-Selectin Ligand on Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitroff, Charles J.; Lee, Jack Y.; Rafii, Shahin; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C.; Sackstein, Robert

    2001-01-01

    E-selectin plays a critical role in mediating tissue-specific homing of T cells into skin, and of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into bone marrow (BM). Though it is known that a glycoform of PSGL-1 (CLA) functions as the principal E-selectin ligand on human T lymphocytes, the E-selectin ligand(s) of human HPCs has not been identified. We used a shear-based adherence assay to analyze and define the E-selectin ligand activity of membrane proteins from human HPCs. Our data show ...

  11. Coordinated and unique functions of the E-selectin ligand ESL-1 during inflammatory and hematopoietic recruitment in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Leiva, Magdalena; Stadtmann, Anika; Pitaval, Christophe; Ortega-Rodríguez, Inés; Wild, Martin K; Lee, Brendan; Zarbock, Alexander; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2013-12-05

    Beyond its well-established roles in mediating leukocyte rolling, E-selectin is emerging as a multifunctional receptor capable of inducing integrin activation in neutrophils, and of regulating various biological processes in hematopoietic precursors. Although these effects suggest important homeostatic contributions of this selectin in the immune and hematologic systems, the ligands responsible for transducing these effects in different leukocyte lineages are not well defined. We have characterized mice deficient in E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), or in both P-selectin glycoprotein-1 (PSGL-1) and ESL-1, to explore and compare the contributions of these glycoproteins in immune and hematopoietic cell trafficking. In the steady state, ESL-1 deficiency resulted in a moderate myeloid expansion that became more prominent when both glycoproteins were eliminated. During inflammation, PSGL-1 dominated E-selectin binding, rolling, integrin activation, and extravasation of mature neutrophils, but only the combined deficiency in PSGL-1 and ESL-1 completely abrogated leukocyte recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that the levels of ESL-1 were strongly elevated in hematopoietic progenitor cells. These elevations correlated with a prominent function of ESL-1 for E-selectin binding and for migration of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the bone marrow. Our results uncover dominant roles for ESL-1 in the immature compartment, and a functional shift toward PSGL-1 dependence in mature neutrophils.

  12. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1 F22-24/F22-24 ) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1 BRCA1/BRCA1 ) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1 F22-24/5382insC ) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Mgbemena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1F22–24/F22–24 developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1BRCA1/BRCA1 were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1F22–24/5382insC had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  14. Reexamination of the role of hematopoietic organs on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Larval hematopoietic organs (HPO) are thought as the only source of circulating hemocytes in most insects. In this paper, we re-checked the importance of hematopoietic organs to hematopoiesis in the silkworm through surgical operation to remove the organs from silkworm larvae at 12 h after 5th ecdysis.

  15. Distribution of CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029 A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A genetic polymorphisms in HIV-1 infected and uninfected patients in the West Region of Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic variants of the genes encoding Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1) co-receptors and their ligands, like CC-Chemokine Receptor 5 delta 32 mutation (CCR5-Delta32), CCR5 promoter A/G (Adenine/Guanine), CC-Chemokine Receptor 2 mutation 64 isoleucine (CCR2-64I) and the Stromal cell-derived Factor 3’A mutation (SDF1-3’A), are involved in the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression. The prevalence of these mutations varies by Region. However, little is known about their distribution in the population of Dschang, located in the West Region of Cameroon. The prevalence of HIV in the West Region of Cameroon is lower than elsewhere in Cameroon. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of four AIDS Related Gene (ARG) variants in HIV-infected and non-infected population of Cameroon especially in the West Region and to estimate the contribution of these variants to the susceptibility or resistance to HIV infection. We also aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of genotyping using dried blood spot (DBS) samples. Methods A total of 179 participants were recruited from two hospitals in Dschang in the West Region of Cameroon. Their genotypes for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Results A total of 179 participants were enrolled in the study. Among them, 32 (17.9%) were HIV positive and 147 (82.1%) were HIV negative. The allelic frequencies of these genes were: 0%, 49.72%, 17.6% and 100% respectively for CCR5-Delta32, CCR5 promoter 59029A/G, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A. No individual was found to carry the CCR5-Delta 32 mutation. All participants recruited were heterozygous for the SDF1-3’A allele. Conclusion Our data suggest that the CCR5-Delta32 cannot account for the protection as it was completely absent in our population. SDF1-3’A variants, may be in association with other polymorphisms, may account

  16. [Clinical roles of vitamins in hematopoietic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, M; Kanamaru, A

    1999-10-01

    Vitamins are essential organisms which promote various metabolisms and physiological systems. Several vitamins play important roles in hematopoietic system. Vitamin B12, C and folic acid are associated with DNA synthesis of erythroid nucleus, the deficiency of which causes the megaloblastic anemia. Some megaloblatic anemia and sideroblastic anemia might response to vitamin B1 and B6, respectively. Vitamin K participates in some coagulation factors in coagulation-fibrinogenolysis system. It has been reported that vitamins A, D and K potentially differentiate leukemic cells and then induce the apoptosis, suggesting that they would be new therapeutic agents in acute leukemia.

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogojan, C; Frederiksen, J L

    2009-01-01

    Intensive immunosuppresion followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been suggested as potential treatment in severe forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since 1995 ca. 400 patients have been treated with HSCT. Stabilization or improvement occurred in almost 70% of cases at least...... for 3 years post-transplant. Magnetic resonance revealed the capacity of autologous HSCT to suppress or markedly reduce gadolinium-enhancing lesions. The progression of brain atrophy declined after two years post-HSCT. The profound immunological changes following autologous HSCT may result...

  18. Complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaout, Karim; Patel, Nihar; Jain, Maneesh; El-Amm, Joelle; Amro, Farah; Tabbara, Imad A

    2014-08-01

    Infection, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and to a lesser extent sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) represent the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). During the last decade, progress in prevention and treatment of these complications led to improvement in the outcome of these patients. Despite the fact that nonmyeloablative regimens have been increasingly used in elderly patients and in patients with co-morbidities, the nonrelapse related mortality remains a challenge and long-term follow-up is required. The objective of this manuscript is to provide an updated concise review of the complications of AHSCT and of the available treatment interventions.

  19. Mechanism of hematopoietic stem cell homing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Fuquan

    2000-01-01

    The clinical transplantation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) originating from many sources such as bone marrow, peripheral blood and cord blood has been widely applied in recent years. At the same time, the development of the study on the mechanism of HSC homing which involves multi-procedures has been achieved. And a lot of molecular and cytokines on the surface or in the microenvironment of HSC are functioning in homing. The purpose of is to review those molecular and cytokines on which more studies have been focused in the past

  20. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  1. Lack of autophagy in the hematopoietic system leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell function and dysregulated myeloid proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Monika; Watson, Alexander Scarth; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2011-09-01

    The regulated lysosomal degradation pathway of autophagy prevents cellular damage and thus protects from malignant transformation. Autophagy is also required for the maturation of various hematopoietic lineages, namely the erythroid and lymphoid ones, yet its role in adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remained unexplored. While normal HSCs sustain life-long hematopoiesis, malignant transformation of HSCs or early progenitors leads to leukemia. Mechanisms protecting HSCs from cellular damage are therefore essential to prevent hematopoietic malignancies. By conditionally deleting the essential autophagy gene Atg7 in the hematopoietic system, we found that autophagy is required for the maintenance of true HSCs and therefore also of downstream hematopoietic progenitors. Loss of autophagy in HSCs leads to the expansion of a progenitor cell population in the bone marrow, giving rise to a severe, invasive myeloproliferation, which strongly resembles human acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  2. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-07-01

    targeting efficiency, due to the toxicity associated with the nucleofection of cells treated with these nanoparticles. In our next step, we moved from healthy donor HSCs to FA hematopoietic cells. Using a therapeutic donor vector carrying the FANCA gene, we demonstrated that gene targeting can correct the phenotype in a FA-A LCL. This was deduced from the restoration of FANCD2 foci formation and the reversion of the sensitivity of FA-A cells to interstrand cross linkers, such as mitomycin C (MMC). To improve the gene targeting efficiency in FA-A hematopoietic cells, we also investigated the effects mediated by the transient inhibition of anti-recombinase PARI. Although the inhibition of PARI increased RAD51 foci, no significant increase of homology directed repair efficiency was observed. In a final set of experiments we demonstrated that our gene targeting approach has also taken place in hematopoietic progenitor cells from FA-A patients, leading to a partial reversion in their hyper-sensitivity to MMC. Our study demonstrates for the first time that gene targeting in the AAVS1 safe harbor locus is feasible in hematopoietic cells from Fanconi anemia-A patients, opening up new perspectives for the future gene therapy of this and other monogenic diseases of the hematopoietic system.(Author)

  3. Gene editing in hematopoietic stem cells: a potential therapeutic approach for Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez Cabezas, B.

    2015-01-01

    targeting efficiency, due to the toxicity associated with the nucleofection of cells treated with these nanoparticles. In our next step, we moved from healthy donor HSCs to FA hematopoietic cells. Using a therapeutic donor vector carrying the FANCA gene, we demonstrated that gene targeting can correct the phenotype in a FA-A LCL. This was deduced from the restoration of FANCD2 foci formation and the reversion of the sensitivity of FA-A cells to interstrand cross linkers, such as mitomycin C (MMC). To improve the gene targeting efficiency in FA-A hematopoietic cells, we also investigated the effects mediated by the transient inhibition of anti-recombinase PARI. Although the inhibition of PARI increased RAD51 foci, no significant increase of homology directed repair efficiency was observed. In a final set of experiments we demonstrated that our gene targeting approach has also taken place in hematopoietic progenitor cells from FA-A patients, leading to a partial reversion in their hyper-sensitivity to MMC. Our study demonstrates for the first time that gene targeting in the AAVS1 safe harbor locus is feasible in hematopoietic cells from Fanconi anemia-A patients, opening up new perspectives for the future gene therapy of this and other monogenic diseases of the hematopoietic system.(Author)

  4. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerman, Isabel; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging

  5. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerman, Isabel, E-mail: isabel.beerman@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States); Rossi, Derrick J. [Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston Children' s Hospital, MA 02116 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  6. Social correlates of distress following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: exploring the role of loneliness and cognitive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosher, Catherine E; Lepore, Stephen J; Wu, Lisa; Austin, Jane; Valdimarsdottir, Heiddis; Rowley, Scott; Isola, Luis; Redd, William H; Rini, Christine

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated whether loneliness and cognitive processing explain the influence of negative (social constraints) and positive (emotional support) relationship qualities on cancer survivors' distress. Participants were 195 cancer survivors who had undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Path analysis supported the hypothesis that loneliness and cognitive processing would mediate the association between social constraints and distress. Only loneliness mediated the association between emotional support and distress - an indirect effect significant only when support came from family and friends rather than a partner. Findings suggest that addressing social constraints may enhance cancer survivors' adjustment.

  7. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development - how divergent are the roads taken?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauts, Mari-Liis; Vink, Chris S; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-11-01

    The development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final 'definitive' wave of hematopoietic cell generation. In contrast to HSCs in the adult, which differentiate via intermediate progenitor populations to produce functional blood cells, the generation of hematopoietic cells in the embryo prior to HSC generation occurs in the early waves by producing blood cells without intermediate progenitors (such as the 'primitive' hematopoietic cells). The lineage relationship between the early hematopoietic cells and the cells giving rise to HSCs, the genetic networks controlling their emergence, and the precise temporal determination of HSC fate remain topics of intense research and debate. This Review article discusses the current knowledge on the step-wise embryonic establishment of the adult hematopoietic system, examines the roles of pivotal intrinsic regulators in this process, and raises questions concerning the temporal onset of HSC fate determination. © 2016 The Authors. FEBS Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  8. Latexin Inactivation Enhances Survival and Long-Term Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Expands the Entire Hematopoietic System in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Cuiping; Li, Zhenyu; Wang, Chi; Jia, Jianhang; Gao, Tianyan; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Zhou, Daohong; Bondada, Subbarao; Ji, Peng; St Clair, Daret; Liu, Jinze; Zhan, Changguo; Geiger, Hartmut; Wang, Shuxia; Liang, Ying

    2017-04-11

    Natural genetic diversity offers an important yet largely untapped resource to decipher the molecular mechanisms regulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. Latexin (Lxn) is a negative stem cell regulatory gene identified on the basis of genetic diversity. By using an Lxn knockout mouse model, we found that Lxn inactivation in vivo led to the physiological expansion of the entire hematopoietic hierarchy. Loss of Lxn enhanced the competitive repopulation capacity and survival of HSCs in a cell-intrinsic manner. Gene profiling of Lxn-null HSCs showed altered expression of genes enriched in cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. Thrombospondin 1 (Thbs1) was a potential downstream target with a dramatic downregulation in Lxn-null HSCs. Enforced expression of Thbs1 restored the Lxn inactivation-mediated HSC phenotypes. This study reveals that Lxn plays an important role in the maintenance of homeostatic hematopoiesis, and it may lead to development of safe and effective approaches to manipulate HSCs for clinical benefit. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Hoxa9 transduction induces hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell activity through direct down-regulation of geminin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshinori; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Janmohamed, Salima; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Saeki, Keita; Kurogi, Toshiaki; Mihara, Keichiro; Iscove, Norman N; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Hoxb4, a 3'-located Hox gene, enhances hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, while a subset of 5'-located Hox genes is involved in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and some of them are common translocation partners for Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) in patients with leukemia. Although these Hox gene derivatives are believed to act as transcription regulators, the molecular involvement of the Hox gene derivatives in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis remains largely elusive. Since we previously showed that Hoxb4 forms a complex with a Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a ubiquitin ligase core component and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase activator for Geminin, we here examined the E3 ubiquitin ligase activities of the 5'-located Hox genes, Hoxa9 and Hoxc13, and Nup98-Hoxa9. Hoxa9 formed a similar complex with the Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a component to induce ubiquitination of Geminin, but the others did not. Retroviral transduction-mediated overexpression or siRNA-mediated knock-down of Hoxa9 respectively down-regulated or up-regulated Geminin in hematopoietic cells. And Hoxa9 transduction-induced repopulating and clonogenic activities were suppressed by Geminin supertransduction. These findings suggest that Hoxa9 and Hoxb4 differ from Hoxc13 and Nup98-Hoxa9 in their molecular role in hematopoiesis, and that Hoxa9 induces the activity of HSCs and hematopoietic progenitors at least in part through direct down-regulation of Geminin.

  10. Hoxa9 transduction induces hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell activity through direct down-regulation of geminin protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Ohno

    Full Text Available Hoxb4, a 3'-located Hox gene, enhances hematopoietic stem cell (HSC activity, while a subset of 5'-located Hox genes is involved in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and some of them are common translocation partners for Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98 in patients with leukemia. Although these Hox gene derivatives are believed to act as transcription regulators, the molecular involvement of the Hox gene derivatives in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis remains largely elusive. Since we previously showed that Hoxb4 forms a complex with a Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a ubiquitin ligase core component and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase activator for Geminin, we here examined the E3 ubiquitin ligase activities of the 5'-located Hox genes, Hoxa9 and Hoxc13, and Nup98-Hoxa9. Hoxa9 formed a similar complex with the Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a component to induce ubiquitination of Geminin, but the others did not. Retroviral transduction-mediated overexpression or siRNA-mediated knock-down of Hoxa9 respectively down-regulated or up-regulated Geminin in hematopoietic cells. And Hoxa9 transduction-induced repopulating and clonogenic activities were suppressed by Geminin supertransduction. These findings suggest that Hoxa9 and Hoxb4 differ from Hoxc13 and Nup98-Hoxa9 in their molecular role in hematopoiesis, and that Hoxa9 induces the activity of HSCs and hematopoietic progenitors at least in part through direct down-regulation of Geminin.

  11. Hoxa9 Transduction Induces Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Activity through Direct Down-Regulation of Geminin Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yoshinori; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Janmohamed, Salima; Ohtsubo, Motoaki; Saeki, Keita; Kurogi, Toshiaki; Mihara, Keichiro; Iscove, Norman N.; Takihara, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Hoxb4, a 3′-located Hox gene, enhances hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) activity, while a subset of 5′-located Hox genes is involved in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis, and some of them are common translocation partners for Nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) in patients with leukemia. Although these Hox gene derivatives are believed to act as transcription regulators, the molecular involvement of the Hox gene derivatives in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis remains largely elusive. Since we previously showed that Hoxb4 forms a complex with a Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a ubiquitin ligase core component and functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase activator for Geminin, we here examined the E3 ubiquitin ligase activities of the 5′-located Hox genes, Hoxa9 and Hoxc13, and Nup98-Hoxa9. Hoxa9 formed a similar complex with the Roc1-Ddb1-Cul4a component to induce ubiquitination of Geminin, but the others did not. Retroviral transduction-mediated overexpression or siRNA-mediated knock-down of Hoxa9 respectively down-regulated or up-regulated Geminin in hematopoietic cells. And Hoxa9 transduction-induced repopulating and clonogenic activities were suppressed by Geminin supertransduction. These findings suggest that Hoxa9 and Hoxb4 differ from Hoxc13 and Nup98-Hoxa9 in their molecular role in hematopoiesis, and that Hoxa9 induces the activity of HSCs and hematopoietic progenitors at least in part through direct down-regulation of Geminin. PMID:23326393

  12. Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    mouse hematopoietic stem cells ex vivo by reprogramming cellular metabolism. Blood. 2015;125(10):1562-1565. 54. Nath N, Khan M, Paintlia MK, Singh I...Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0297 TITLE: Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Raymond J...Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells Stem Cells ’ 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 W81XWH-14-1-0297 5b

  13. Plerixafor (a CXCR4 antagonist following myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation enhances hematopoietic recovery

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    Michael M. B. Green

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of CXCR4 with its ligand (stromal-derived factor-1 maintains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in a quiescent state. We hypothesized that blocking CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT promotes hematopoiesis by inducing HSC proliferation. Methods We conducted a phase I/II trial of plerixafor on hematopoietic cell recovery following myeloablative allogeneic HSCT. Patients with hematologic malignancies receiving myeloablative conditioning were enrolled. Plerixafor 240 μg/kg was administered subcutaneously every other day beginning day +2 until day +21 or until neutrophil recovery. The primary efficacy endpoints of the study were time to absolute neutrophil count >500/μl and platelet count >20,000/μl. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil and platelet engraftment of the study cohort was compared to that of a cohort of 95 allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant recipients treated during the same period of time and who received similar conditioning and graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Results Thirty patients received plerixafor following peripheral blood stem cell (n = 28 (PBSC or bone marrow (n = 2 transplantation. Adverse events attributable to plerixafor were mild and indistinguishable from effects of conditioning. The kinetics of neutrophil and platelet engraftment, as demonstrated by cumulative incidence, from the 28 study subjects receiving PBSC showed faster neutrophil (p = 0.04 and platelet recovery >20 K (p = 0.04 compared to the controls. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that plerixafor can be given safely following myeloablative HSCT. It provides proof of principle that blocking CXCR4 after HSCT enhances hematopoietic recovery. Larger, confirmatory studies in other settings are warranted. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280955

  14. Tritium contamination of hematopoietic stem cells alters long-term hematopoietic reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giacomo, F.; Barroca, V.; Laurent, D.; Lewandowski, D.; Saintigny, Y.; Romeo, P.H.; Granotier, Ch.; Boussin, F.D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In vivo effects of tritium contamination are poorly documented. Here, we study the effects of tritiated Thymidine ([ 3 H] Thymidine) or tritiated water (HTO) contamination on the biological properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Materials and methods: Mouse HSC were contaminated with concentrations of [ 3 H] Thymidine ranging from 0.37-37.03 kBq/ml or of HTO ranging from 5-50 kBq/ml. The biological properties of contaminated HSC were studied in vitro after HTO contamination and in vitro and in vivo after [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. Results: Proliferation, viability and double-strand breaks were dependent on [ 3 H] Thymidine or HTO concentrations used for contamination but in vitro myeloid differentiation of HSC was not affected by [ 3 H] Thymidine contamination. [ 3 H] Thymidine contaminated HSC showed a compromised long-term capacity of hematopoietic reconstitution and competition experiments showed an up to two-fold decreased capacity of contaminated HSC to reconstitute hematopoiesis. These defects were not due to impaired homing in bone marrow but to an initial decreased proliferation rate of HSC. Conclusion: These results indicate that contaminations of HSC with doses of tritium that do not result in cell death, induce short-term effects on proliferation and cell cycle and long-term effects on hematopoietic reconstitution capacity of contaminated HSC. (authors)

  15. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  16. Single-Cell Analysis Identifies Distinct Stages of Human Endothelial-to-Hematopoietic Transition

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    Carolina Guibentif

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available During development, hematopoietic cells originate from endothelium in a process known as endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition (EHT. To study human EHT, we coupled flow cytometry and single-cell transcriptional analyses of human pluripotent stem cell-derived CD34+ cells. The resulting transcriptional hierarchy showed a continuum of endothelial and hematopoietic signatures. At the interface of these two signatures, a unique group of cells displayed both an endothelial signature and high levels of key hematopoietic stem cell-associated genes. This interphase group was validated via sort and subculture as an immediate precursor to hematopoietic cells. Differential expression analyses further divided this population into subgroups, which, upon subculture, showed distinct hematopoietic lineage differentiation potentials. We therefore propose that immediate precursors to hematopoietic cells already have their hematopoietic lineage restrictions defined prior to complete downregulation of the endothelial signature. These findings increase our understanding of the processes of de novo hematopoietic cell generation in the human developmental context.

  17. The Role of Toll Like Receptors in Hematopoietic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene Monlish

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs are a family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS and host-derived damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPS. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies. Several hematopoietic disorders, including lymphoproliferative disorders and myelodysplastic syndromes, which possess a high risk of transformation to leukemia, have been linked to aberrant TLR signaling. Furthermore, activation of TLRs leads to the induction of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which can promote tumorigenesis by driving cell proliferation and migration and providing a favorable microenvironment for tumor cells. Beyond hematopoietic malignancies, the upregulation of a number of TLRs has been linked to promoting tumor cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis in a variety of cancers, including those of the colon, breast, and lung. This review focuses on the contribution of TLRs to hematopoietic malignancies, highlighting the known direct and indirect effects of TLR signaling on tumor cells and their microenvironment. In addition, the utility of TLR agonists and antagonists as potential therapeutics in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancies is discussed.

  18. Therapeutic approaches of hematopoietic syndrome after serious accidental global irradiation. Ex vivo expansion interest of hematopoietic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, D.

    1994-01-01

    Aplasia is one of the main syndrome, appearing after one global accidental irradiation by one ionizing radiation source. The hematopoietic syndrome is characterized by a peripheric blood cell number fall; the cell marrow is reduced too

  19. Angiotensin II Regulation of Proliferation, Differentiation, and Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungbum; Zingler, Michael; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Scott, Edward W; Cogle, Christopher R; Luo, Defang; Raizada, Mohan K

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that differentiation and mobilization of hematopoietic cell are critical in the development and establishment of hypertension and hypertension-linked vascular pathophysiology. This, coupled with the intimate involvement of the hyperactive renin-angiotensin system in hypertension, led us to investigate the hypothesis that chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion affects hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regulation at the level of the bone marrow. Ang II infusion resulted in increases in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (83%) and long-term HSC (207%) in the bone marrow. Interestingly, increases of HSCs and long-term HSCs were more pronounced in the spleen (228% and 1117%, respectively). Furthermore, we observed higher expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 in these HSCs, indicating there was increased myeloid differentiation in Ang II-infused mice. This was associated with accumulation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2(+) proinflammatory monocytes in the spleen. In contrast, decreased engraftment efficiency of GFP(+) HSC was observed after Ang II infusion. Time-lapse in vivo imaging and in vitro Ang II pretreatment demonstrated that Ang II induces untimely proliferation and differentiation of the donor HSC resulting in diminished HSC engraftment and bone marrow reconstitution. We conclude that (1) chronic Ang II infusion regulates HSC proliferation, mediated by angiotensin receptor type 1a, (2) Ang II accelerates HSC to myeloid differentiation resulting in accumulation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2(+) HSCs and inflammatory monocytes in the spleen, and (3) Ang II impairs homing and reconstitution potentials of the donor HSCs. These observations highlight the important regulatory roles of Ang II on HSC proliferation, differentiation, and engraftment. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Reduced Erg Dosage Impairs Survival of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ying; Koch, Mia Lee; Zhang, Xin; Hamblen, Melanie J; Godinho, Frank J; Fujiwara, Yuko; Xie, Huafeng; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Orkin, Stuart H; Li, Zhe

    2017-07-01

    ERG, an ETS family transcription factor frequently overexpressed in human leukemia, has been implicated as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cells. However, how ERG controls normal hematopoiesis, particularly at the stem and progenitor cell level, and how it contributes to leukemogenesis remain incompletely understood. Using homologous recombination, we generated an Erg knockdown allele (Erg kd ) in which Erg expression can be conditionally restored by Cre recombinase. Erg kd/kd animals die at E10.5-E11.5 due to defects in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, but can be completely rescued by Tie2-Cre-mediated restoration of Erg in these cells. In Erg kd/+ mice, ∼40% reduction in Erg dosage perturbs both fetal liver and bone marrow hematopoiesis by reducing the numbers of Lin - Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and megakaryocytic progenitors. By genetic mosaic analysis, we find that Erg-restored HSPCs outcompete Erg kd/+ HSPCs for contribution to adult hematopoiesis in vivo. This defect is in part due to increased apoptosis of HSPCs with reduced Erg dosage, a phenotype that becomes more drastic during 5-FU-induced stress hematopoiesis. Expression analysis reveals that reduced Erg expression leads to changes in expression of a subset of ERG target genes involved in regulating survival of HSPCs, including increased expression of a pro-apoptotic regulator Bcl2l11 (Bim) and reduced expression of Jun. Collectively, our data demonstrate that ERG controls survival of HSPCs, a property that may be used by leukemic cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:1773-1785. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  1. Human hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase inhibitor complex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado, Yuji; Aritake, Kosuke; Uodome, Nobuko; Okano, Yousuke; Okazaki, Nobuo; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2012-04-01

    In mast and Th2 cells, hematopoietic prostaglandin (PG) D synthase (H-PGDS) catalyses the isomerization of PGH(2) in the presence of glutathione (GSH) to produce the allergic and inflammatory mediator PGD(2). We determined the X-ray structures of human H-PGDS inhibitor complexes with 1-amino-4-{4-[4-chloro-6-(2-sulpho-phenylamino)-[1,3,5]triazin-2-ylmethyl]-3-sulpho-phenylamino}-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydro-anthracene-2-sulphonic acid (Cibacron Blue) and 1-amino-4-(4-aminosulphonyl) phenyl-anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid (APAS) at 2.0 Å resolution. When complexed with H-PGDS, Cibacron Blue had an IC(50) value of 40 nM and APAS 2.1 μM. The Cibacron Blue molecule was stabilized by four hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking between the anthraquinone ring and Trp104, the ceiling of the active site H-PGDS pocket. Among the four hydrogen bonds, the Cibacron Blue terminal sulphonic group directly interacted with conserved residues Lys112 and Lys198, which recognize the PGH(2) substrate α-chain. In contrast, the APAS anthraquinone ring was inverted to interact with Trp104, while its benzenesulphonic group penetrated the GSH-bound region at the bottom of the active site. Due to the lack of extended aromatic rings, APAS could not directly hydrogen bond with the two conserved lysine residues, thus decreasing the total number of hydrogen bond from four to one. These factors may contribute to the 50-fold difference in the IC(50) values obtained for the two inhibitors.

  2. Integrated analysis of hematopoietic differentiation outcomes and molecular characterization reveals unbiased differentiation capacity and minor transcriptional memory in HPC/HSC-iPSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Hou, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yonghua; Xu, Zijian; Cai, Tao; Chen, Jiajie; Chang, Gang

    2017-01-23

    Transcription factor-mediated reprogramming can reset the epigenetics of somatic cells into a pluripotency compatible state. Recent studies show that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) always inherit starting cell-specific characteristics, called epigenetic memory, which may be advantageous, as directed differentiation into specific cell types is still challenging; however, it also may be unpredictable when uncontrollable differentiation occurs. In consideration of biosafety in disease modeling and personalized medicine, the availability of high-quality iPSCs which lack a biased differentiation capacity and somatic memory could be indispensable. Herein, we evaluate the hematopoietic differentiation capacity and somatic memory state of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cell (HPC/HSC)-derived-iPSCs (HPC/HSC-iPSCs) using a previously established sequential reprogramming system. We found that HPC/HSCs are amenable to being reprogrammed into iPSCs with unbiased differentiation capacity to hematopoietic progenitors and mature hematopoietic cells. Genome-wide analyses revealed that no global epigenetic memory was detectable in HPC/HSC-iPSCs, but only a minor transcriptional memory of HPC/HSCs existed in a specific tetraploid complementation (4 N)-incompetent HPC/HSC-iPSC line. However, the observed minor transcriptional memory had no influence on the hematopoietic differentiation capacity, indicating the reprogramming of the HPC/HSCs was nearly complete. Further analysis revealed the correlation of minor transcriptional memory with the aberrant distribution of H3K27me3. This work provides a comprehensive framework for obtaining high-quality iPSCs from HPC/HSCs with unbiased hematopoietic differentiation capacity and minor transcriptional memory.

  3. Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Activation during the Granulopoietic Response to Systemic Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xin; Wei, Shengcai; Simms, Kevin J; Cumpston, Devan N; Ewing, Thomas J; Zhang, Ping

    2018-01-01

    Activation and reprogramming of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells play a critical role in the granulopoietic response to bacterial infection. Our current study determined the significance of Sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling in the regulation of hematopoietic precursor cell activity during the host defense response to systemic bacterial infection. Bacteremia was induced in male Balb/c mice via intravenous injection (i.v.) of Escherichia coli (5 × 10 7 CFUs/mouse). Control mice received i.v. saline. SHH protein level in bone marrow cell (BMC) lysates was markedly increased at both 24 and 48 h of bacteremia. By contrast, the amount of soluble SHH ligand in marrow elutes was significantly reduced. These contrasting alterations suggested that SHH ligand release from BMCs was reduced and/or binding of soluble SHH ligand to BMCs was enhanced. At both 12 and 24 h of bacteremia, SHH mRNA expression by BMCs was significantly upregulated. This upregulation of SHH mRNA expression was followed by a marked increase in SHH protein expression in BMCs. Activation of the ERK1/2-SP1 pathway was involved in mediating the upregulation of SHH gene expression. The major cell type showing the enhancement of SHH expression in the bone marrow was lineage positive cells. Gli1 positioned downstream of the SHH receptor activation serves as a key component of the hedgehog (HH) pathway. Primitive hematopoietic precursor cells exhibited the highest level of baseline Gli1 expression, suggesting that they were active cells responding to SHH ligand stimulation. Along with the increased expression of SHH in the bone marrow, expression of Gli1 by marrow cells was significantly upregulated at both mRNA and protein levels following bacteremia. This enhancement of Gli1 expression was correlated with activation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation. Mice with Gli1 gene deletion showed attenuation in activation of marrow hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell proliferation and inhibition

  4. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  5. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d -1 ). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 ampersand 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity

  6. Therapeutic role of hematopoietic stem cells in autism spectrum disorder-related inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario eSiniscalco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are heterogeneous, severe neurodevelopmental disorders with core symptoms of dysfunctions in social interactions and communication skills, restricted interests, repetitive - stereotypic verbal and non-verbal behaviours. Biomolecular evidence points to complex gene-environmental interactions in ASDs. Several biochemical processes are associated with ASDs: oxidative stress (including endoplasmic reticulum stress, decreased methylation capacity, limited production of glutathione; mitochondrial dysfunction, intestinal dysbiosis, increased toxic metal burden and various immune abnormalities. The known immunological disorders include: T-lymphocyte populations and function, gene expression changes in monocytes, several autoimmune-related findings, high levels of N-acetylgalactosaminidase (which precludes macrophage activation, and primary immune deficiencies. These immunological observations may result in minicolumn structural changes in the brain, as well as, abnormal immune mediation of synaptic functions. Equally, these immune dysregulations serve as the rationale for immune-directed interventions such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, which are pivotal in controlling chronic inflammation and in the restoration of immunological balance. These properties make them intriguing potential agents for ASD treatments. This prospective review will focus on the current state-of-the-art knowledge and challenges intrinsic in the application of hematopoietic stem cells for ASD-related immunological disorders.

  7. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)], E-mail: m.digioacchino@unich.it; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Medicine and Science of Ageing University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas [Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Martino, Simone [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Esposito, Diana L. [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria [Department of Experimental Medicine, University La Sapienza, Viale Regina Elena 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mariani-Costantini, Renato [Aging Research Center, ' G. d' Annunzio' University Foundation, Via Colle dell' Ara, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Oncology and Neurosciences University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 1, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 {mu}M Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure.

  9. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event ''sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the ''immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Bmi1 confers resistance to oxidative stress on hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nakamura

    Full Text Available The polycomb-group (PcG proteins function as general regulators of stem cells. We previously reported that retrovirus-mediated overexpression of Bmi1, a gene encoding a core component of polycomb repressive complex (PRC 1, maintained self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs during long-term culture. However, the effects of overexpression of Bmi1 on HSCs in vivo remained to be precisely addressed.In this study, we generated a mouse line where Bmi1 can be conditionally overexpressed under the control of the endogenous Rosa26 promoter in a hematopoietic cell-specific fashion (Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1. Although overexpression of Bmi1 did not significantly affect steady state hematopoiesis, it promoted expansion of functional HSCs during ex vivo culture and efficiently protected HSCs against loss of self-renewal capacity during serial transplantation. Overexpression of Bmi1 had no effect on DNA damage response triggered by ionizing radiation. In contrast, Tie2-Cre;R26Stop(FLBmi1 HSCs under oxidative stress maintained a multipotent state and generally tolerated oxidative stress better than the control. Unexpectedly, overexpression of Bmi1 had no impact on the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS.Our findings demonstrate that overexpression of Bmi1 confers resistance to stresses, particularly oxidative stress, onto HSCs. This thereby enhances their regenerative capacity and suggests that Bmi1 is located downstream of ROS signaling and negatively regulated by it.

  11. Autophagy as an ultrastructural marker of heavy metal toxicity in human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Gioacchino, Mario; Petrarca, Claudia; Perrone, Angela; Farina, Massimo; Sabbioni, Enrico; Hartung, Thomas; Martino, Simone; Esposito, Diana L.; Lotti, Lavinia Vittoria; Mariani-Costantini, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells are a key target of environmental toxicants, but little is known about their toxicological responses. We aimed at developing an in-vitro model based on adult human stem cells to identify biomarkers of heavy metal exposure. To this end we investigated the responses of human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells to hexavalent chromium (Cr[VI]) and cadmium (Cd). Parallel cultures of CD34+ cells isolated from umbilical cord blood were exposed for 48 h to 0.1 μM and 10 μM Cr(VI) or Cd. Cultures treated with 10 μM Cr(VI) or Cd showed marked cell loss. Ultrastructural analysis of surviving cells revealed prominent autophagosomes/autophagolysosomes, which is diagnostic of autophagy, associated with mitochondrial damage and replication, dilatation of the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, cytoplasmic lipid droplets and chromatin condensation. Treated cells did not show the morphologic hallmarks of apoptosis. Treatment with 0.1 μM Cr(VI) or Cd did not result in cell loss, but at the ultrastructural level cells showed dilated endoplasmic reticulum and evidence of mitochondrial damage. We conclude that autophagy is implicated in the response of human hematopoietic stem cells to toxic concentrations of Cr(VI) and Cd. Autophagy, which mediates cell survival and death under stress, deserves further evaluation to be established as biomarker of metal exposure

  12. Dendritic cells derived from HOXB4-immortalized hematopoietic bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baru, Abdul Mannan; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Rathinasamy, Anchana; Scherr, Michaela; Eder, Matthias; Behrens, Georg M N

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the generation and modulation of cell-mediated adaptive immunity against infections. DC-based vaccination involves transplantation of ex vivo-generated DCs loaded with antigen in vitro, but remains limited by the number of autologous or allogeneic cells. While in vitro expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) into DCs seems to be the most viable alternative to overcome this problem, the complexity of HSC expansion in vitro has posed significant limitations for clinical application. We immortalized lineage-depleted murine hematopoietic bone marrow (lin(-)BM) cells with HOXB4, and differentiated them into CD11c(+)MHCII(+) DCs. These cells showed the typical DC phenotype and upregulated surface expression of co-stimulatory molecules on stimulation with various toll-like receptor ligands. These DCs efficiently presented exogenous antigen to T-cells via major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I and II and viral antigen on infection. Finally, they showed migratory capacity and were able to generate antigen-specific primed T-cells in vivo. In summary, we provide evidence that HOXB4-transduced lin(-)BM cells can serve as a viable means of generating fully functional DCs for scientific and therapeutic applications.

  13. Dysfunctional Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biology: Underlying Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Geiselhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndrome. FA patients suffer to varying degrees from a heterogeneous range of developmental defects and, in addition, have an increased likelihood of developing cancer. Almost all FA patients develop a severe, progressive bone marrow failure syndrome, which impacts upon the production of all hematopoietic lineages and, hence, is thought to be driven by a defect at the level of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC. This hypothesis would also correlate with the very high incidence of MDS and AML that is observed in FA patients. In this paper, we discuss the evidence that supports the role of dysfunctional HSC biology in driving the etiology of the disease. Furthermore, we consider the different model systems currently available to study the biology of cells defective in the FA signaling pathway and how they are informative in terms of identifying the physiologic mediators of HSC depletion and dissecting their putative mechanism of action. Finally, we ask whether the insights gained using such disease models can be translated into potential novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of the hematologic disorders in FA patients.

  14. Cytokine-Regulated GADD45G Induces Differentiation and Lineage Selection in Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic B. Thalheimer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The balance of self-renewal and differentiation in long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC must be strictly controlled to maintain blood homeostasis and to prevent leukemogenesis. Hematopoietic cytokines can induce differentiation in LT-HSCs; however, the molecular mechanism orchestrating this delicate balance requires further elucidation. We identified the tumor suppressor GADD45G as an instructor of LT-HSC differentiation under the control of differentiation-promoting cytokine receptor signaling. GADD45G immediately induces and accelerates differentiation in LT-HSCs and overrides the self-renewal program by specifically activating MAP3K4-mediated MAPK p38. Conversely, the absence of GADD45G enhances the self-renewal potential of LT-HSCs. Videomicroscopy-based tracking of single LT-HSCs revealed that, once GADD45G is expressed, the development of LT-HSCs into lineage-committed progeny occurred within 36 hr and uncovered a selective lineage choice with a severe reduction in megakaryocytic-erythroid cells. Here, we report an unrecognized role of GADD45G as a central molecular linker of extrinsic cytokine differentiation and lineage choice control in hematopoiesis.

  15. Osteoblastic and Vascular Endothelial Niches, Their Control on Normal Hematopoietic Stem Cells, and Their Consequences on the Development of Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bella S. Guerrouahen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell self-renewal is regulated by intrinsic mechanisms and extrinsic signals mediated via specialized microenvironments called “niches.” The best-characterized stem cell is the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC. Self-renewal and differentiation ability of HSC are regulated by two major elements: endosteal and vascular regulatory elements. The osteoblastic niche localized at the inner surface of the bone cavity might serve as a reservoir for long-term HSC storage in a quiescent state. Whereas the vascular niche, which consists of sinusoidal endothelial cell lining blood vessel, provides an environment for short-term HSC proliferation and differentiation. Both niches act together to maintain hematopoietic homeostasis. In this paper, we provide some principles applying to the hematopoietic niches, which will be useful in the study and understanding of other stem cell niches. We will discuss altered microenvironment signaling leading to myeloid lineage disease. And finally, we will review some data on the development of acute myeloid leukemia from a subpopulation called leukemia-initiating cells (LIC, and we will discuss on the emerging evidences supporting the influence of the microenvironment on chemotherapy resistance.

  16. Mutual Interference between Cytomegalovirus and Reconstitution of Protective Immunity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddehase, Matthias J.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a therapy option for aggressive forms of hematopoietic malignancies that are resistant to standard antitumoral therapies. Hematoablative treatment preceding HCT, however, opens a “window of opportunity” for latent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) by releasing it from immune control with the consequence of reactivation of productive viral gene expression and recurrence of infectious virus. A “window of opportunity” for the virus represents a “window of risk” for the patient. In the interim between HCT and reconstitution of antiviral immunity, primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, initially low amounts of reactivated virus can expand exponentially, disseminate to essentially all organs, and cause multiple organ CMV disease, with interstitial pneumonia (CMV-IP) representing the most severe clinical manifestation. Here, I will review predictions originally made in the mouse model of experimental HCT and murine CMV infection, some of which have already paved the way to translational preclinical research and promising clinical trials of a preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease. Specifically, the mouse model has been pivotal in providing “proof of concept” for preventing CMV disease after HCT by adoptive transfer of preselected, virus epitope-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cells bridging the critical interim. However, CMV is not a “passive antigen” but is a pathogen that actively interferes with the reconstitution of protective immunity by infecting bone marrow (BM) stromal cells that otherwise form niches for hematopoiesis by providing the structural microenvironment and by producing hematopoietically active cytokines, the hemopoietins. Depending on the precise conditions of HCT, reduced homing of transplanted hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells to infected BM stroma and impaired colony growth and lineage differentiation can lead to “graft failure.” In consequence, uncontrolled virus spread

  17. Molecular functions of the LIM-homeobox transcription factor Lhx2 in hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Kenji; Kawaguchi, Manami; Iacovino, Michelina; Kyba, Michael; Hara, Takahiko

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cells are robustly expanded from mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by enforced expression of Lhx2, a LIM-homeobox domain (LIM-HD) transcription factor. In this study, we analyzed the functions of Lhx2 in that process using an ESC line harboring an inducible Lhx2 gene cassette. When ESCs are cultured on OP9 stromal cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are differentiated and these HPCs are prone to undergo rapid differentiation into mature hematopoietic cells. Lhx2 inhibited differentiation of HPCs into mature hematopoietic cells and this effect would lead to accumulation of HSC-like cells. LIM-HD factors interact with LIM domain binding (Ldb) protein and this interaction abrogates binding of LIM-only (Lmo) protein to Ldb. We found that one of Lmo protein, Lmo2, was unstable due to dissociation of Lmo2 from Ldb1 in the presence of Lhx2. This effect of Lhx2 on the amount of Lmo2 contributed into accumulation of HSC-like cells, since enforced expression of Lmo2 into HSC-like cells inhibited their self-renewal. Expression of Gata3 and Tal1/Scl was increased in HSC-like cells and enforced expression of Lmo2 reduced expression of Gata3 but not Tal1/Scl. Enforced expression of Gata3 into HPCs inhibited mature hematopoietic cell differentiation, whereas Gata3-knockdown abrogated the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HPCs. We propose that multiple transcription factors/cofactors are involved in the Lhx2-mediated expansion of HSC-like cells from ESCs. Lhx2 appears to fine-tune the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of HSC-like cells. © AlphaMed Press.

  18. The Role of Social and Cognitive Processes in the Relationship between Fear Network and Psychological Distress among Parents of Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Virtue, Shannon Myers; Manne, Sharon; Mee, Laura; Bartell, Abraham; Sands, Stephen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Gajda, Tina Marie

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined whether cognitive and social processing variables mediated the relationship between fear network and depression among parents of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Parents whose children were initiating HSCT (N = 179) completed survey measures including fear network, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), cognitive processing variables (positive reappraisal and self-blame) and social processing variables (emotional support and holding back from...

  19. Identification of the homing molecules that escort pluripotent stem cells-derived hematopoietic stem cells to their niches and human activated T-cells to inflammatory sites.

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Amal

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic cells exploit the multistep paradigm of cell migration to ultimately enable them to perform their function. This process is dictated by the ability of adhesion molecules on the circulating hematopoietic cells to find their counter-receptors on endothelial cells. Of those molecules, the selectin family and their respective ligands induce the initial transient interactions between circulating cells and the opposing endothelium. In this thesis, I focused on studying E-selectin mediated cellular migration in two hematopoietic cell types, namely human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human T-lymphocytes. HSPCs derived from pluripotent sources theoretically offers a novel, unlimited source for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. In vitro pluripotent stem cell derived- hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (ES/iPS-HSPCs) behave much like somatic HSPCs in that they exhibit clonal expansion and multilineage hematopoietic capacity. However, unlike somatic sources, ES/iPS-HSPCs do not give rise to effective hematopoietic repopulation, which may be due to insufficient HSPCs homing to the bone marrow. HSPCs exploit E- and P-selectin to home and engraft into bone marrow niches. Thus, one of my objectives in this thesis was to study the expression of E-selectin ligands associated with ES/iPS-HSPCs. I showed that ES/iPS-HSPCs lack functional E-selectin ligand(s). In an effort to enhance the interaction between Eselectin and ES/iPS-HSPCs, we decorated the cell surface with sialyl-Lewis x (sLex) using the ex-vivo glycan engineering technology. However, this decoration did not improve the engraftment capacity of ES/iPS-HSPCs, in vivo. Induction of E-selectin expression during inflammation is key to recruitment of immune cells and therefore I also focused on analyzing the expression of E-selectin ligands on activated human T-cells. I identified several novel glycoproteins that may function as E-selectin ligands. Specifically, I compared the

  20. Signaling via Smad2 and Smad3 is dispensable for adult murine hematopoietic stem cell function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, Matilda; Rörby, Emma; Dahl, Maria; Blank, Ulrika; Andradottír, Silja; Ehinger, Mats; Karlsson, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) is a member of a large family of polypeptide growth factors. TGFβ signals mainly through the intracellular proteins Smad2 and Smad3, which are highly similar in amino acid sequence identity. A number of studies have shown that these proteins, dependent on context, have distinct roles in the TGFβ signaling pathway. TGFβ is one of the most potent inhibitors of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation in vitro, but its role in hematopoiesis in vivo is still being determined. To circumvent possible redundancies at the receptor level and to address specifically the role of the Smad circuitry downstream of TGFβ and activin in hematopoiesis, we studied the effect of genetically deleting both Smad2 and Smad3 in adult murine hematopoietic cells. Indeed, TGFβ signaling is impaired in vitro in primitive bone marrow (BM) cells of Smad2 and Smad3 single knockout models. However, blood parameters appear normal under steady state and in the transplantation setting. Interestingly, upon deletion of both Smad2 and Smad3 in vivo, mice quickly develop a lethal inflammatory disease, suggesting that activin/TGFβ signaling is crucial for immune cell homeostasis in the adult context. Furthermore, concurrent deletion of Smad2 and Smad3 in BM cells in immune-deficient nude mice did not result in any significant alterations of the hematopoietic system. Our findings suggest that Smad2 and Smad3 function to mediate crucial aspects of the immunoregulatory properties of TGFβ, but are dispensable for any effect that TGFβ has on primitive hematopoietic cells in vivo. Copyright © 2017 ISEH – International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Kfoury, Youmna; Scadden, David T

    2016-05-23

    Regulation of stem cells in adult tissues is a key determinant of how well an organism can respond to the stresses of physiological challenge and disease. This is particularly true of the hematopoietic system, where demands on host defenses can call for an acute increase in cell production. Hematopoietic stem cells receive the regulatory signals for cell production in adult mammals in the bone marrow, a tissue with higher-order architectural and functional organization than previously appreciated. Here, we review the data defining particular structural components and heterologous cells in the bone marrow that participate in hematopoietic stem cell function. Further, we explore the case for stromal-hematopoietic cell interactions contributing to neoplastic myeloid disease. As the hematopoietic regulatory networks in the bone marrow are revealed, it is anticipated that strategies will emerge for how to enhance or inhibit production of specific blood cells. In that way, the control of hematopoiesis will enter the domain of therapies to modulate broad aspects of hematopoiesis, both normal and malignant.

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  1. File list: DNS.Bld.10.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. Hematopoietic (stem) cell development — how divergent are the roads taken?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.-L. Kauts (Mari-Liis); C.S. Vink (Chris); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe development of the hematopoietic system during early embryonic stages occurs in spatially and temporally distinct waves. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), the most potent and self-renewing cells of this system, are produced in the final ‘definitive’ wave of hematopoietic cell

  3. Repression of p53-target gene Bbc3/PUMA by MYSM1 is essential for the survival of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors and contributes to stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, J I; Petrov, J C; Langlais, D; Robert, F; Cencic, R; Shen, S; Pelletier, J; Gros, P; Nijnik, A

    2016-05-01

    p53 is a central mediator of cellular stress responses, and its precise regulation is essential for the normal progression of hematopoiesis. MYSM1 is an epigenetic regulator essential for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function, hematopoietic progenitor survival, and lymphocyte development. We recently demonstrated that all developmental and hematopoietic phenotypes of Mysm1 deficiency are p53-mediated and rescued in the Mysm1(-/-)p53(-/-) mouse model. However, the mechanisms triggering p53 activation in Mysm1(-/-) HSPCs, and the pathways downstream of p53 driving different aspects of the Mysm1(-/-) phenotype remain unknown. Here we show the transcriptional activation of p53 stress responses in Mysm1(-/-) HSPCs. Mechanistically, we find that the MYSM1 protein associates with p53 and colocalizes to promoters of classical p53-target genes Bbc3/PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) and Cdkn1a/p21. Furthermore, it antagonizes their p53-driven expression by modulating local histone modifications (H3K27ac and H3K4me3) and p53 recruitment. Using double-knockout mouse models, we establish that PUMA, but not p21, is an important mediator of p53-driven Mysm1(-/-) hematopoietic dysfunction. Specifically, Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) mice show full rescue of multipotent progenitor (MPP) viability, partial rescue of HSC quiescence and function, but persistent lymphopenia. Through transcriptome analysis of Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) MPPs, we demonstrate strong upregulation of other p53-induced mediators of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest. The full viability of Mysm1(-/-)Puma(-/-) MPPs, despite strong upregulation of many other pro-apoptotic mediators, establishes PUMA as the essential non-redundant effector of p53-induced MPP apoptosis. Furthermore, we identify potential mediators of p53-dependent but PUMA-independent Mysm1(-/-)hematopoietic deficiency phenotypes. Overall, our study provides novel insight into the cell-type-specific roles of p53 and its downstream

  4. Complexity of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Noboru; Takeishi, Shoichiro; Frenette, Paul S

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that produce a variety of hematopoietic lineage cells throughout the life reside in specialized microenvironment called "niche" in the bone marrow (BM) where they are tightly regulated. With the recent advances in experimental technologies enabling the selective deletion of molecules, various types of cells in the BM have been proposed to contribute to HSC niche activity. Among these are stromal cells closely associated with the vasculature. In this review, we provide an overview of recent advances in HSC niche research, and focus on the studies describing the functional roles of perivascular cells for HSC maintenance and mobilization. Not only for physiologic state, we also discuss the recent evidences suggesting the importance of microenvironment for emergence of malignant hematopoietic diseases.

  5. Proton MR spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Arai, Nobuyuki.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the findings of magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow with those of normal bone marrow. Twenty-four samples of normal marrow from eight control subjects and 19 samples of hyperplastic marrow in aplastic anemia were examined with a 1.5 T MR unit. The former showed low intensity on opposed-phase T1-weighted images, while the latter showed high intensity on both fast STIR and opposed-phase T1-weighted images. MR spectroscopy quantitatively confirmed that the water; fat ratio was increased and the transverse relaxation time of water was changed in hyperplastic bone marrow, compared with normal bone marrow. In summary, MR imaging is able to detect hematopoietic regions among a wide range of bone marrow of aplastic anemia, while MR spectroscopy allowed us to quantitatively analyze the cell population of hyperplastic hematopoietic marrow in aplastic anemia. (author)

  6. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ∼120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx. Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx−/− mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system.

  7. Oral Complications in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients: The Role of Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Haverman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT recipients remains high, despite advances in transplant medicine and in supportive care. Frequently encountered oral complications include mucositis, infections, oral dryness, taste changes, and graft versus host disease in allogeneic HSCT. Oral complications are associated with substantial morbidity and in some cases with increased mortality and may significantly affect quality of life, even many years after HSCT. Inflammatory processes are key in the pathobiology of most oral complications in HSCT recipients. This review article will discuss frequently encountered oral complications associated with HSCT focusing on the inflammatory pathways and inflammatory mediators involved in their pathogenesis.

  8. Precision monitoring of immunotherapies in solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Rose; Khush, Kiran; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2017-05-15

    Pharmacological immunotherapies are a key component of post-transplant therapy in solid-organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In current clinical practice, immunotherapies largely follow a one-size fits all approach, leaving a large portion of transplant recipients either over- or under-immunosuppressed, and consequently at risk of infections or immune-mediated complications. Our goal here is to review recent and rapid advances in precision and genomic medicine approaches to monitoring of post-transplant immunotherapies. We will discuss recent advances in precision measurements of pharmacological immunosuppression, measurements of the plasma and gut microbiome, strategies to monitor for allograft injury and post-transplant malignancies via circulating cell-free DNA, and comprehensive measurements of the B and T cell immune cell repertoire. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of various immune modulatory molecules in CD34(+) hematopoietic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umland, Oliver; Heine, Holger; Miehe, Michaela

    2004-01-01

    revealed that T cell proliferation can be induced by TNF-alpha-stimulated KG-1a cells, which is preventable by blocking anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibodies. Our results demonstrate that CD34(+) HCs have the potential to express a variety of immune-regulatory mediators upon stimulation by inflammatory......Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to induce proliferation of human T-lymphocytes only in the presence of monocytes and CD34(+) hematopoietic cells (HCs) from peripheral blood. This finding provided evidence of an active role of CD34(+) HCs during inflammation and immunological events....... To investigate mechanisms by which CD34(+) HCs become activated and exert their immune-modulatory function, we used the human CD34(+) acute myeloid leukemia cell line KG-1a and CD34(+) bone marrow cells (BMCs). We showed that culture supernatants of LPS-stimulated mononuclear cells (SUP(LPS)) as well as tumor...

  10. Proliferation Drives Aging-Related Functional Decline in a Subpopulation of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschner, Kristina; Chandra, Tamir; Kiselev, Vladimir; Flores-Santa Cruz, David; Macaulay, Iain C; Park, Hyun Jun; Li, Juan; Kent, David G; Kumar, Rupa; Pask, Dean C; Hamilton, Tina L; Hemberg, Martin; Reik, Wolf; Green, Anthony R

    2017-05-23

    Aging of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment is characterized by lineage bias and reduced stem cell function, the molecular basis of which is largely unknown. Using single-cell transcriptomics, we identified a distinct subpopulation of old HSCs carrying a p53 signature indicative of stem cell decline alongside pro-proliferative JAK/STAT signaling. To investigate the relationship between JAK/STAT and p53 signaling, we challenged HSCs with a constitutively active form of JAK2 (V617F) and observed an expansion of the p53-positive subpopulation in old mice. Our results reveal cellular heterogeneity in the onset of HSC aging and implicate a role for JAK2V617F-driven proliferation in the p53-mediated functional decline of old HSCs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proliferation Drives Aging-Related Functional Decline in a Subpopulation of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Kirschner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC compartment is characterized by lineage bias and reduced stem cell function, the molecular basis of which is largely unknown. Using single-cell transcriptomics, we identified a distinct subpopulation of old HSCs carrying a p53 signature indicative of stem cell decline alongside pro-proliferative JAK/STAT signaling. To investigate the relationship between JAK/STAT and p53 signaling, we challenged HSCs with a constitutively active form of JAK2 (V617F and observed an expansion of the p53-positive subpopulation in old mice. Our results reveal cellular heterogeneity in the onset of HSC aging and implicate a role for JAK2V617F-driven proliferation in the p53-mediated functional decline of old HSCs.

  12. Measuring Immune Response to Commonly Used Vaccinations in Adult Recipients of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Lucy Boyce; Li, Zhuoyan; Savani, Bipin N; Ljungman, Per

    2017-10-01

    Recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are at risk for potentially preventable infectious complications because of defects in humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Studies of vaccine immunogenicity in HCT recipients have shown that antibody response rates depend on age, type of vaccine, and presence or absence of graft-versus-host disease. However, few large-scale studies have assessed the immune response to vaccination in HCT recipients. Additionally, HCT recipients have much higher rates of potentially preventable infections compared with the general population even after vaccination. This review evaluates the available studies and our view on the measurement of specific antibody titers, definition of an immune response, and durability of response in HCT recipients in both inactivated and live attenuated vaccines. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Highly proliferative primitive fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells are fueled by oxidative metabolic pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed K. Manesia

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs in the fetal liver (FL unlike adult bone marrow (BM proliferate extensively, posing different metabolic demands. However, metabolic pathways responsible for the production of energy and cellular building blocks in FL HSCs have not been described. Here, we report that FL HSCs use oxygen dependent energy generating pathways significantly more than their BM counterparts. RNA-Seq analysis of E14.5 FL versus BM derived HSCs identified increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos and the citric acid cycle (TCA. We demonstrated that FL HSCs contain more mitochondria than BM HSCs, which resulted in increased levels of oxygen consumption and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Higher levels of DNA repair and antioxidant pathway gene expression may prevent ROS-mediated (genotoxicity in FL HSCs. Thus, we here for the first time highlight the underestimated importance of oxygen dependent pathways for generating energy and building blocks in FL HSCs.

  14. Microbial contamination of hematopoietic progenitor cell products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdaroğlu, Sinem; Tekgündüz, Emre; Bozdağ, Sinem Civriz; Durgun, Gamze; Sarıca, Abdurrahman; Demiriz, Itır Şirinoğlu; Koçubaba, Serife; Iskender, Gülşen; Kayıkçı, Omür; Altuntaş, Fevzi

    2013-06-01

    Microbial screening for contamination is a part of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) collection and infusion procedure. We aimed to find out our microbial contamination rates during collection, processing and infusion steps of HPC products. We also evaluated the clinical course of patients who received contaminated HPC products. We retrospectively analyzed microbial contamination records of HPC grafts between 2010 and 2012. HPC products of autologous donors were evaluated for contamination at three steps: at the end of mobilization, following processing with DMSO and just before stem cell infusion. Grafts of allogeneic donors were assessed only before HPC transplantation (HCT). Microbiological analysis of HPC samples were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert®). During the study period a total of 492 mobilization procedures were performed on 329 (214 autologous and 115 allogeneic) donors. Bacterial contamination has been detected in 103 of 1630 samples (6%). Ninety-seven out of 1162 blood samples (8%) from 265 patients who were treated with HCT were contaminated. Forty-six patients (41 autologous and 5 allogeneic) were transplanted with contaminated HPC products. During HCT 42 patients experienced febrile neutropenic attack and 34 of them had positive blood culture results. In none of these 34 patients the isolated pathogens were the same organisms with those found in the final contaminated stem cell product before stem cell infusion. None of the patients who received contaminated products died because of sepsis within the posttransplant 30days. There was no significant difference between patients who received contaminated and non-contaminated products in terms of the first day of fever, duration of fever, engraftment kinetics and duration of hospitalization. Our results suggest that microbial contamination of HPC products is an issue to be prevented, although it may not have a major impact on the general success of HCT. Copyright © 2013. Published by

  15. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  16. The Effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles on Hematopoietic Stem Cells Fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamze Timari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability as well as ability to generate all blood cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells, with self-renewal ability, and capable of differentiating into a variety of cell types. MSCs have supporting effects on hematopoiesis; through direct intercellular communications as well as secreting cytokines, chemokines, and extracellular vesicles (EVs. Recent investigations demonstrated that some biological functions and effects of MSCs are mediated by their EVs. MSC-EVs are the cell membrane and endosomal membrane compartments, which are important mediators in the intercellular communications. MSC-EVs contain some of the molecules such as proteins, mRNA, siRNA, and miRNA from their parental cells. MSC-EVs are able to inhibit tumor, repair damaged tissue, and modulate immune system responses. MSC-EVs compared to their parental cells, may have the specific safety advantages such as the lower potential to trigger immune system responses and limited side effects. Recently some studies demonstrated the effect of MSC-EVs on the expansion, differentiation, and clinical applications of HSCs such as improvement of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and inhibition of graft versus host disease (GVHD. HSCT may be the only therapeutic choice for patients who suffer from malignant and non-malignant hematological disorders. However, there are several severe side effects such GVHD that restricts the successfulness of HSCT. In this review, we will discuss the most important effects of MSCs and MSC-EVs on the improvement of HSCT, inhibition and treatment of GVHD, as well as, on the expansion of HSCs.

  17. Meis1 Is Required for Adult Mouse Erythropoiesis, Megakaryopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Erin Miller

    Full Text Available Meis1 is recognized as an important transcriptional regulator in hematopoietic development and is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of leukemia, both as a Hox transcription factor co-factor and independently. Despite the emerging recognition of Meis1's importance in the context of both normal and leukemic hematopoiesis, there is not yet a full understanding of Meis1's functions and the relevant pathways and genes mediating its functions. Recently, several conditional mouse models for Meis1 have been established. These models highlight a critical role for Meis1 in adult mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS as a mediator of Meis1 function in this compartment. There are, however, several reported differences between these studies in terms of downstream progenitor populations impacted and effectors of function. In this study, we describe further characterization of a conditional knockout model based on mice carrying a loxP-flanked exon 8 of Meis1 which we crossed onto the inducible Cre localization/expression strains, B6;129-Gt(ROSA26Sor(tm1(Cre/ERTNat/J or B6.Cg-Tg(Mx1-Cre1Cgn/J. Findings obtained from these two inducible Meis1 knockout models confirm and extend previous reports of the essential role of Meis1 in adult HSC maintenance and expansion and provide new evidence that highlights key roles of Meis1 in both megakaryopoiesis and erythropoiesis. Gene expression analyses point to a number of candidate genes involved in Meis1's role in hematopoiesis. Our data additionally support recent evidence of a role of Meis1 in ROS regulation.

  18. Hematopoietic Gene Therapies for Metabolic and Neurologic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Alessandra

    2017-10-01

    Increasingly, patients affected by metabolic diseases affecting the central nervous system and neuroinflammatory disorders receive hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in the attempt to slow the course of their disease, delay or attenuate symptoms, and improve pathologic findings. The possible replacement of brain-resident myeloid cells by the transplanted cell progeny contributes to clinical benefit. Genetic engineering of the cells to be transplanted (hematopoietic stem cell) may endow the brain myeloid progeny of these cells with enhanced or novel functions, contributing to therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant candidate and designated proxy distress levels prior to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Katharine E; Forti, Allison M; Russell, Gregory B; Naik, Seema; Hurd, David D; McQuellon, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is associated with a high risk of morbidity, making advance care planning (ACP) essential. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare proxy and HCT candidate distress levels (Distress Thermometer) before (T1) and after (T2) ACP question completion. 79 participants (40 HCT candidates, 39 proxies) rated their distress. The T1, T2 mean distress scores (SD) for HCT candidates were 3.13(2.27), 2.96(2.10); 43% and 38% endorsed clinically significant distress (≥4). Proxies reported 4.21(2.48), 4.33 (2.46); 62% endorsed significant distress at T1, T2. The majority of proxies endorsed distress levels that were clinically significant and comparatively higher (T1 (p = 0.047) and T2 (p = 0.009)) than their paired HCT recipients. Responding to questions about ACP did not increase overall distress ratings. © The Author(s) 2013.

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekadja, Mohamed Amine; Brahimi, Mohamed; Osmani, Soufi; Yafour, Nabil; Krim, Amina; Serradj, Faiza; Talhi, Souad; Amani, Kamila; Bouhass, Rachid Amar

    2017-12-01

    Algeria is a country of 40.4 million inhabitants and half of which is under 30years. In Algeria, Health-care insurance covered, 90% of the population. Health care is free and it is supported by the Ministry of Health. 16 university hospitals exist in Algeria and only two (Algiers and Oran) practicing bone marrow transplant. Adult hematologic malignancies account for 10% (about 4000 new cases/year) of the malignancy affecting in most cases young patients under 65years of age. In 2016, 270 transplants were performed in total (Algiers+Oran), including 149 allografts (related donor transplants: 99%) and 121 autografts. 98% of transplants are done in adults and only 2% in children with cord blood transplants. In summary for the two transplant centers, the predominant types of transplantation performed are allogeneic transplant in 55% and autologous transplant in 45%. The particularity of EHU1st November in Oran, is the use of non-cryopreserved stem cells. Stem cell was mobilized using G-CSF alone and the grafts were kept in a conventional blood bank refrigerator at +4°C until reinfusion on day 0. The outcome with non-cryopreserved stem cells are the same as those with cryopreserved stem cells and we conclude that autologous transplant with non cryopreserved hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is a simple, effective and safe method and the cryopreservation is not necessary in our work conditions in developing countries. The projects are achieving the autograft in all University Hospitals with non cryopreserved HSC, achieving a center allograft in the east of the country and the development of bone marrow transplantation in children. Currently in Algeria, the number of transplantation is insufficient and the development of new transplant centers is essential. In the future, we hope to implement the National Society of Bone Marrow transplant and also the National recipient registry and Donor registry in Algeria. Copyright © 2017 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research

  1. Instant conditional transgenesis in the mouse hematopoietic compartment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csikós, Tamás; Reijmers, Rogier M.; Uren, Anthony G.; Spaargaren, Marcel; Pals, Steven T.

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of retrovirally transduced stem cells has recently been described for instant transgenesis in the hematopoietic compartment of mice. This method circumvents the need to manipulate the germline. However, cell type specific gene expression in this 'retrogenic' mouse model has

  2. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-01-01

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  3. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm, E-mail: timm.schroeder@bsse.ethz.ch

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  5. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozkan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the only curative therapy for primary immunodeficiency diseases. Early diagnosis, including prenatally, and early transplantation improve HSCT outcomes. Survival rates improve with advances in the methods of preparing hosts and donor cells, and in supportive and conditioning regimes.

  6. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gratwohl, A.; Passweg, J.R.; Bocelli-Tyndall, C.; Fassas, A.; Laar, J.M. van; Farge, D.; Andolina, M.; Arnold, R.; Carreras, E.; Finke, J.; Kotter, I.; Kozak, T.; Lisukov, I.; Lowenberg, B.; Marmont, A.; Moore, J.; Saccardi, R.; Snowden, J.A.; Hoogen, F.H.J. van den; Wulffraat, N.M.; Zhao, X.; Tyndall, A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental data and early phase I/II studies suggest that high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can arrest progression of severe autoimmune diseases. We have evaluated the toxicity and disease response in 473 patients with severe autoimmune

  7. Longitudinal assessment of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and hyposalivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laaksonen, M.; Ramseier, A. M.; Rovó, A.; Jensen, S. B.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Zitzmann, N. U.; Waltimo, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hyposalivation is a common adverse effect of anti-neoplastic therapy of head and neck cancer, causing impaired quality of life and predisposition to oral infections. However, data on the effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) on salivary secretion are scarce. The present study

  8. Nephrotic Syndrome After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant: Outcomes in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddadi, Fereshteh; Alidadi, Ali; Hakemi, Monir; Bahar, Babak

    2017-02-01

    Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant have an elevated incidence of acute renal failure. However, the incidence of nephritic syndrome due to graft-versus-host disease is growing and is independently associated with chronic renal disease after this procedure. We conducted a prospective study to examine the risk of chronic kidney disease in glomerulopathy patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant with a follow-up of 10 years. In our follow-up of 14 patients (4 men and 10 women) who were diagnosed with nephrotic syndrome after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, in 10 patients (71%), biopsy showed membranous nephropathy associated with graft-versus-host disease. The remaining 4 patients had focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, or minimal change disease. All patients were treated with angiotensin receptor blockers, cyclosporine (Neoral), and prednisolone. During follow-up, 6 patients (43%) had heavy proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine, and 1 patient (7%) needed hemodialysis. Eleven patients (79%) achieved complete remission of nephrotic syndrome, 5 (36%) remained hypertensive, and 3 (21%) did not respond to therapy.. The early diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome should be considered after hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and therapeutic outcome measures should be in place in advance. If this is done, we found that patients' response to treatment can be optimal, and their renal function and overall survival can improve.

  9. Dynamic changes in mouse hematopoietic stem cell numbers during aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, G; Van Zant, G

    1999-01-01

    To address the fundamental question of whether or not stem cell populations age, we performed quantitative measurements of the cycling status and frequency of hematopoietic stem cells in long-lived C57BL/6 (B6) and short-lived DBA/2 (DBA) mice at different developmental and aging stages. The

  10. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornblit, Brian; Enevold, Christian; Wang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To assess the impact of the genetic variation in toll-like receptors (TLRs) on outcome after allogeneic myeloablative conditioning hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), we investigated 29 single nucleotide polymorphisms across 10 TLRs in 816 patients and donors. Only donor genotype of TLR8 rs...

  11. Mismatch repair deficient hematopoietic stem cells are preleukemic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulan Qing

    Full Text Available Whereas transformation events in hematopoietic malignancies may occur at different developmental stages, the initial mutation originates in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, creating a preleukemic stem cell (PLSC. Subsequent mutations at either stem cell or progenitor cell levels transform the PLSC into lymphoma/leukemia initiating cells (LIC. Thymic lymphomas have been thought to develop from developing thymocytes. T cell progenitors are generated from HSCs in the bone marrow (BM, but maturation and proliferation of T cells as well as T-lymphomagenesis depends on both regulatory mechanisms and microenvironment within the thymus. We studied PLSC linked to thymic lymphomas. In this study, we use MSH2-/- mice as a model to investigate the existence of PLSC and the evolution of PLSC to LIC. Following BM transplantation, we found that MSH2-/- BM cells from young mice are able to fully reconstitute multiple hematopoietic lineages of lethally irradiated wild-type recipients. However, all recipients developed thymic lymphomas within three and four months post transplantation. Transplantation of different fractions of BM cells or thymocytes from young health MSH2-/- mice showed that an HSC enriched fraction always reconstituted hematopoiesis followed by lymphoma development. In addition, lymphomas did not occur in thymectomized recipients of MSH2-/- BM. These results suggest that HSCs with DNA repair defects such as MSH2-/- are PLSCs because they retain hematopoietic function, but also carry an obligate lymphomagenic potential within their T-cell progeny that is dependent on the thymic microenvironment.

  12. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the

  13. Polycomb group proteins in hematopoietic stem cell aging and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klauke, Karin; de Haan, Gerald

    Protection of the transcriptional "stemness" network is important to maintain a healthy hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) compartment during the lifetime of the organism. Recent evidence shows that fundamental changes in the epigenetic status of HSCs might be one of the driving forces behind many

  14. Lifelong dietary intervention does not affect hematopoietic stem cell function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazare, Seka; Ausema, Albertina; Reijne, Aaffien C; van Dijk, Gertjan; van Os, Ronald; de Haan, Gerald

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a profound functional decline during normal aging. Because caloric or dietary restriction has been shown to delay multiple aspects of the aging process in many species, we explored the consequences of lifelong caloric restriction, or conversely, lifelong

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell aging and self-renewal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Brad; de Haan, Gerald

    A functional decline of the immune system occurs during organismal aging that is attributable, in large part, to changes in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. In the mouse, several hallmark age-dependent changes in the HSC compartment have been identified, including an increase in HSC

  16. Bone marrow transplantations to study gene function in hematopoietic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winther, Menno P. J.; Heeringa, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Immune cells are derived from hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow. Experimental replacement of bone marrow offers the unique possibility to replace immune cells, to study gene function in mouse models of disease. Over the past decades, this technique has been used extensively to study, for

  17. Symptoms after hospital discharge following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Oguz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The purposes of this study were to assess the symptoms of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after hospital discharge, and to determine the needs of transplant patients for symptom management. Materials and Methods: The study adopted a descriptive design. The study sample comprised of 66 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. The study was conducted in Istanbul. Data were collected using Patient Information Form and Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS. Results: The frequency of psychological symptoms in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients after discharge period (PSYCH subscale score 2.11 (standard deviation (SD = 0.69, range: 0.93-3.80 was higher in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients than frequency of physical symptoms (PHYS subscale score: 1.59 (SD = 0.49, range: 1.00-3.38. Symptom distress caused by psychological and physical symptoms were at moderate level (Mean = 1.91, SD = 0.60, range: 0.95-3.63 and most distressing symptoms were problems with sexual interest or activity, difficulty sleeping, and diarrhea. Patients who did not have an additional chronic disease obtained higher MSAS scores. University graduates obtained higher Global Distress Index (GDI subscale and total MSAS scores with comparison to primary school graduates. Total MSAS, MSAS-PHYS subscale, and MSAS-PSYCH subscale scores were higher in patients with low level of income (P < 0.05. The patients (98.5% reported to receive education about symptom management after hospital discharge. Conclusions: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients continue to experience many distressing physical or psychological symptoms after discharge and need to be supported and educated for the symptom management.

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (CD143) marks hematopoietic stem cells in human embryonic, fetal, and adult hematopoietic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jokubaitis, Vanta J.; Sinka, Lidia; Driessen, Rebecca; Whitty, Genevieve; Haylock, David N.; Bertoncello, Ivan; Smith, Ian; Peault, Bruno; Tavian, Manuela; Simmons, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that mAb BB9 reacts with a subset of CD34(+) human BM cells with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) characteristics. Here we map B89 expression throughout hernatopoietic development and show that the earliest definitive HSCs that arise at the ventral wall of the aorta and

  19. Effects of Developmental Activation of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor by 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on Long-term Self-renewal of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiosa, Michael D; Tate, Everett R; Ahrenhoerster, Lori S; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Demin

    2016-07-01

    Human epidemiological and animal studies suggest that developmental exposure to contaminants that activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) lead to suppression of immune system function throughout life. The persistence of immune deficiency throughout life suggests that the cellular target of AHR activation is a fetal hematopoietic progenitor or stem cell. The aim of this study was to identify the effects of transplacental exposure to an AHR agonist on long-term self-renewal of fetal hematopoietic stem cells. Pregnant C57BL/6 or AHR+/- mice were exposed to the AHR agonist, 2,3,7,8-tetra-​chlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). On day 14 of gestation, hematopoietic progenitors from wild-type or AHR-deficient fetuses were placed into in vitro T-lymphocyte differentiation cultures to identify the effects of transplacental TCDD on AHR activation in the fetus. We next analyzed the fetal hematopoietic progenitor cells for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Finally, hematopoietic progenitors from fetuses exposed transplacentally to TCDD were mixed 1:1 with cells from congenic controls and used to reconstitute lethally irradiated recipients for analysis of long-term self-renewal potential. Our findings suggested that the effects of TCDD on the developing hematopoietic system were mediated by direct AHR activation in the fetus. Furthermore, developmental AHR activation by TCDD increased ROS in the fetal hematopoietic stem cells, and the elevated ROS was associated with a reduced capacity of the TCDD-exposed fetal cells to compete with control cells in a mixed competitive irradiation/reconstitution assay. Our findings indicate that AHR activation by TCDD in the fetus during pregnancy leads to impairment of long-term self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells. Laiosa MD, Tate ER, Ahrenhoerster LS, Chen Y, Wang D. 2016. Effects of developmental activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin on long-term self-renewal of murine hematopoietic

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell-specific GFP-expressing transgenic mice generated by genetic excision of a pan-hematopoietic reporter gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cunningham, Jessica; Boyer, Scott W; Landon, Mark; Forsberg, E Camilla

    2016-08-01

    Selective labeling of specific cell types by expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) within the hematopoietic system would have great utility in identifying, localizing, and tracking different cell populations in flow cytometry, microscopy, lineage tracing, and transplantation assays. In this report, we describe the generation and characterization of a new transgenic mouse line with specific GFP labeling of all nucleated hematopoietic cells and platelets. This new "Vav-GFP" mouse line labels the vast majority of hematopoietic cells with GFP during both embryonic development and adulthood, with particularly high expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). With the exception of transient labeling of fetal endothelial cells, GFP expression is highly selective for hematopoietic cells and persists in donor-derived progeny after transplantation of HSPCs. Finally, we also demonstrate that the loxP-flanked reporter allows for specific GFP labeling of different hematopoietic cell subsets when crossed to various Cre reporter lines. By crossing Vav-GFP mice to Flk2-Cre mice, we obtained robust and highly selective GFP expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These data describe a new mouse model capable of directing GFP labeling exclusively of hematopoietic cells or exclusively of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Candidate genes for expansion and transformation of hematopoietic stem cells by NUP98-HOX fusion genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Palmqvist

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hox genes are implicated in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC regulation as well as in leukemia development through translocation with the nucleoporin gene NUP98. Interestingly, an engineered NUP98-HOXA10 (NA10 fusion can induce a several hundred-fold expansion of HSCs in vitro and NA10 and the AML-associated fusion gene NUP98-HOXD13 (ND13 have a virtually indistinguishable ability to transform myeloid progenitor cells in vitro and to induce leukemia in collaboration with MEIS1 in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: These findings provided a potentially powerful approach to identify key pathways mediating Hox-induced expansion and transformation of HSCs by identifying gene expression changes commonly induced by ND13 and NA10 but not by a NUP98-Hox fusion with a non-DNA binding homedomain mutation (N51S. The gene expression repertoire of purified murine bone marrow Sca-1+Lin- cells transduced with retroviral vectors encoding for these genes was established using the Affymetrix GeneChip MOE430A. Approximately seventy genes were differentially expressed in ND13 and NA10 cells that were significantly changed by both compared to the ND13(N51S mutant. Intriguingly, several of these potential Hox target genes have been implicated in HSC expansion and self-renewal, including the tyrosine kinase receptor Flt3, the prion protein, Prnp, hepatic leukemia factor, Hlf and Jagged-2, Jag2. Consistent with these results, FLT3, HLF and JAG2 expression correlated with HOX A cluster gene expression in human leukemia samples. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion this study has identified several novel Hox downstream target genes and provides important new leads to key regulators of the expansion and transformation of hematopoietic stem cells by Hox.

  2. The biology of NK cells and their receptors affects clinical outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bree; Felices, Martin; Cichocki, Frank; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were first identified for their capacity to reject bone marrow allografts in lethally irradiated mice without prior sensitization. Subsequently, human NK cells were detected and defined by their non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity toward transformed or virally infected target cells. Karre et al. later proposed 'the missing self hypothesis' to explain the mechanism by which self-tolerant cells could kill targets that had lost self MHC class I. Subsequently, the receptors that recognize MHC class I to mediate tolerance in the host were identified on NK cells. These class I-recognizing receptors contribute to the acquisition of function by a dynamic process known as NK cell education or licensing. In the past, NK cells were assumed to be short lived, but more recently NK cells have been shown to mediate immunologic memory to secondary exposures to cytomegalovirus infection. Because of their ability to lyse tumors with aberrant MHC class I expression and to produce cytokines and chemokines upon activation, NK cells may be primed by many stimuli, including viruses and inflammation, to contribute to a graft-versus-tumor effect. In addition, interactions with other immune cells support the therapeutic potential of NK cells to eradicate tumor and to enhance outcomes after hematopoietic cell transplantation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Emerging Roles of MTG16 in Cell-Fate Control of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolas Steinauer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available MTG16 (myeloid translocation gene on chromosome 16 and its related proteins, MTG8 and MTGR1, define a small family of transcriptional corepressors. These corepressors share highly conserved domain structures yet have distinct biological functions and tissue specificity. In vivo studies have shown that, of the three MTG corepressors, MTG16 is uniquely important for the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC proliferation and differentiation. Apart from this physiological function, MTG16 is also involved in carcinomas and leukemias, acting as the genetic target of loss of heterozygosity (LOH aberrations in breast cancer and recurrent translocations in leukemia. The frequent involvement of MTG16 in these disease etiologies implies an important developmental role for this transcriptional corepressor. Furthermore, mounting evidence suggests that MTG16 indirectly alters the disease course of several leukemias via its regulatory interactions with a variety of pathologic fusion proteins. For example, a recent study has shown that MTG16 can repress not only wild-type E2A-mediated transcription, but also leukemia fusion protein E2A-Pbx1-mediated transcription, suggesting that MTG16 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia expressing the E2A-Pbx1 fusion protein. Given that leukemia stem cells share similar regulatory pathways with normal HSPCs, studies to further understand how MTG16 regulates cell proliferation and differentiation could lead to novel therapeutic approaches for leukemia treatment.

  4. Emerging Roles of MTG16 in Cell-Fate Control of Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinauer, Nickolas; Guo, Chun; Zhang, Jinsong

    2017-01-01

    MTG16 (myeloid translocation gene on chromosome 16) and its related proteins, MTG8 and MTGR1, define a small family of transcriptional corepressors. These corepressors share highly conserved domain structures yet have distinct biological functions and tissue specificity. In vivo studies have shown that, of the three MTG corepressors, MTG16 is uniquely important for the regulation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation. Apart from this physiological function, MTG16 is also involved in carcinomas and leukemias, acting as the genetic target of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) aberrations in breast cancer and recurrent translocations in leukemia. The frequent involvement of MTG16 in these disease etiologies implies an important developmental role for this transcriptional corepressor. Furthermore, mounting evidence suggests that MTG16 indirectly alters the disease course of several leukemias via its regulatory interactions with a variety of pathologic fusion proteins. For example, a recent study has shown that MTG16 can repress not only wild-type E2A-mediated transcription, but also leukemia fusion protein E2A-Pbx1-mediated transcription, suggesting that MTG16 may serve as a potential therapeutic target in acute lymphoblastic leukemia expressing the E2A-Pbx1 fusion protein. Given that leukemia stem cells share similar regulatory pathways with normal HSPCs, studies to further understand how MTG16 regulates cell proliferation and differentiation could lead to novel therapeutic approaches for leukemia treatment.

  5. Clinical Relevance of Natural Killer Cells Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Palmer, Kamalakannan Rajasekaran, Monica S Thakar, Subramaniam Malarkannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are one of the first cells to recover following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and are believed to play an important role in facilitating engraftment or preventing post-transplant infection and tumor recurrence. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which NK cells mediate these highly clinically relevant immunological functions. In particular, the ability of NK cells to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD and increase the graft versus leukemia effect (GVL in the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical HSCT highlights their clinical potentials. NK cells also mediate anti-viral protection, in particular against cytomegalovirus (CMV, an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality following transplant. Another crucial function of NK cells is providing protection against bacterial infections at the mucosal barriers. NK cells achieve this by promoting anti-microbial defenses and regeneration of epithelial cells. These recent exciting findings provide a strong basis for the formulation of novel NK cell-based immunotherapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances related to the mechanisms, functions, and future clinical prospects of NK cells that can impact post-transplant outcomes.

  6. Polycomb Group Protein YY1 Is an Essential Regulator of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanping Lu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Yin yang 1 (YY1 is a ubiquitous transcription factor and mammalian polycomb group protein (PcG with important functions to regulate embryonic development, lineage differentiation, and cell proliferation. YY1 mediates stable PcG-dependent transcriptional repression via recruitment of PcG proteins that catalyze histone modifications. Many questions remain unanswered regarding how cell- and tissue-specificity is achieved by PcG proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a conditional knockout of Yy1 in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs decreases long-term repopulating activity and ectopic YY1 expression expands HSCs. Although the YY1 PcG domain is required for Igκ chain rearrangement in B cells, the YY1 mutant lacking the PcG domain retained the capacity to stimulate HSC self-renewal. YY1 deficiency deregulated the genetic network governing HSC cell proliferation and impaired stem cell factor/c-Kit signaling, disrupting mechanisms conferring HSC quiescence. These results reveal a mechanism for how a ubiquitously expressed transcriptional repressor mediates lineage-specific functions to control adult hematopoiesis.

  7. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  8. Imaging Macrophage and Hematopoietic Progenitor Proliferation in Atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Yu-Xiang; Calcagno, Claudia; Binderup, Tina

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Local plaque macrophage proliferation and monocyte production in hematopoietic organs promote progression of atherosclerosis. Therefore, noninvasive imaging of proliferation could serve as a biomarker and monitor therapeutic intervention. OBJECTIVE: To explore (18)F-FLT positron emission...... tomography-computed tomography imaging of cell proliferation in atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography-computed tomography was performed in mice, rabbits, and humans with atherosclerosis. In apolipoprotein E knock out mice, increased (18)F-FLT signal was observed...... with atherosclerosis, (18)F-FLT signal significantly increased in the inflamed carotid artery and in the aorta. CONCLUSIONS: (18)F-FLT positron emission tomography imaging may serve as an imaging biomarker for cell proliferation in plaque and hematopoietic activity in individuals with atherosclerosis....

  9. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Mihaela; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2016-12-15

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. FIFTY YEARS OF MELPHALAN USE IN HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; Bashir, Qaiser; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2015-01-01

    Melphalan remains the most widely used agent in preparative regimens for hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. From its initial discovery more than 50 years ago, it has been gradually incorporated in the conditioning regimens for both autologous and allogeneic transplantation due to its myeloablative properties and broad antitumor effects as a DNA alkylating agent. Melphalan remains the mainstay conditioning for multiple myeloma and lymphomas; and has been used successfully in preparative regimens of a variety of other hematological and non-hematological malignancies. The addition of newer agents to conditioning like bortezomib or lenalidomide for myeloma, or clofarabine for myeloid malignancies, may improve antitumor effects for transplantation, while in combination with alemtuzumab may represent a backbone for future cellular therapy due to reliable engraftment and low toxicity profile. This review summarizes the development and the current use of this remarkable drug in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. PMID:22922522

  11. Aging, Clonality and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and increased production of reactive oxygen species have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as clonal selection of HSCs upon aging provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  12. The many faces of hematopoietic stem cell heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Not all hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are alike. They differ in their physical characteristics such as cell cycle status and cell surface marker phenotype, they respond to different extrinsic signals, and they have different lineage outputs following transplantation. The growing body of evidence that supports heterogeneity within HSCs, which constitute the most robust cell fraction at the foundation of the adult hematopoietic system, is currently of great interest and raises questions as to why HSC subtypes exist, how they are generated and whether HSC heterogeneity affects leukemogenesis or treatment options. This Review provides a developmental overview of HSC subtypes during embryonic, fetal and adult stages of hematopoiesis and discusses the possible origins and consequences of HSC heterogeneity. PMID:27965438

  13. Transplantation Dose Alters the Differentiation Program of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Casey; Chu, Elizabeth; Chin, Mike; Lu, Rong

    2016-05-24

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the most prevalent stem cell therapy, but it remains a risky procedure. To improve this treatment, it is important to understand how transplanted stem cells rebuild the blood and immune systems and how this process is impacted by transplantation variables such as the HSC dose. Here, we find that, in the long term following transplantation, 70%-80% of donor-HSC-derived clones do not produce all measured blood cell types. High HSC doses lead to more clones that exhibit balanced lymphocyte production, whereas low doses produce more T-cell-specialized clones. High HSC doses also produce significantly higher proportions of early-differentiating clones compared to low doses. These complex differentiation behaviors uncover the clonal-level regeneration dynamics of hematopoietic regeneration and suggest that transplantation dose can be exploited to improve stem cell therapy. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Separation and Further Characterization of Hematopoietic Cell Populations Based on Phenotypic and Biophysical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Dykes, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are multipotent and possess self-renewal capacity. Thus, they can sustain a life-long hematopoiesis and are also capable of restoring the hematopoietic system when transplanted to a patient. In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), a potent graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect must be balanced against the concomitant risk of severe immunological response to non-malignant host cells; graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). In case of recipient-donor ...

  15. Reduced hematopoietic stem cell frequency predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Stiehl, Thomas; Raffel, Simon; Hoang, Van T.; Hoffmann, Isabel; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Saeed, Borhan R.; Blume, Rachel; Manta, Linda; Eckstein, Volker; Bochtler, Tilmann; Wuchter, Patrick; Essers, Marieke; Jauch, Anna; Trumpp, Andreas; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Ho, Anthony D.; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low percentages of aldehyde-dehydrogenase-positive cells, non-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells. By relating hematopoietic stem cell frequencies to outcome we detected poor overall- and disease-free survival of patients with low hematopoietic stem cell frequencies. Serial analysis of matched diagnostic and follow-up samples further demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells increased after chemotherapy in patients who achieved durable remissions. However, in patients who eventually relapsed, hematopoietic stem cell numbers decreased dramatically at the time of molecular relapse demonstrating that hematopoietic stem cell levels represent an indirect marker of minimal residual disease, which heralds leukemic relapse. Upon transplantation in immune-deficient mice cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells of our cohort gave rise to leukemic or no engraftment, whereas cases with normal hematopoietic stem cell levels mostly resulted in multi-lineage engraftment. Based on our experimental data, we propose that leukemic stem cells have increased niche affinity in cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells. To validate this hypothesis, we developed new mathematical models describing the dynamics of healthy and leukemic cells under different regulatory scenarios. These models suggest that the mechanism leading to decreases in hematopoietic stem cell frequencies before leukemic relapse must be based on expansion of leukemic stem cells with high niche affinity and the ability to dislodge hematopoietic stem cells. Thus, our data suggest that decreasing numbers of hematopoietic stem cells indicate leukemic stem cell persistence and the emergence of leukemic relapse. PMID:28550184

  16. Nursing care in a hematopoietic stem cells transplantation unit

    OpenAIRE

    Lima,Kaoana; Bernardino,Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation units, nursing care is different from other services. The objective in this descriptive study with a qualitative approach was to identify the care activities of nurses at a transplantation unit, classified according to the framework of nurses' functions. The data were collected through systematic observation and treated through content analysis. Three functions were identified for nurses: clinical nurse, management nurse and visit nurse, the first ha...

  17. Cardiovascular disease in survivors of hematopoietic cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Armenian, Saro H.; Chow, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is increasingly offered as a curative option for many patients with hematologic malignancies. Improvements in HCT strategies and supportive care have resulted in a growing number of long-term survivors. However, these survivors are at increased risk of developing long-term debilitating chronic health conditions, including premature cardiovascular disease. These complications are more common than in the general population, and there are well-described a...

  18. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2015-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several trans...

  19. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Age-associated changes in human hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L; Weissman, Irving L

    2017-01-01

    Aging has a broad impact on the function of the human hematopoietic system. This review will focus primarily on the effect of aging on the human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population. With age, even though human HSCs increase in number, they have decreased self-renewal capacity and reconstitution potential upon transplantation. As a population, human HSCs become more myeloid-biased in their differentiation potential. This is likely due to the human HSC population becoming more clonal with age, selecting for myeloid-biased HSC clones. The HSC clones that come to predominate with age may also contain disease-causing genetic and epigenetic changes that confer an increased risk of developing into an age-associated clonal hematopoietic disease, such as myelodysplastic syndrome, myeloproliferative disorders, or leukemia. The selection of these aged human HSC clones may be in part due to changes in the aging bone marrow microenvironment. While there have been significant advances in the understanding of the effect of aging on mouse hematopoiesis and mouse HSCs, we have comparatively less detailed analyses of the effect of aging on human HSCs. Continued evaluation of human HSCs in the context of aging will be important to determine how applicable the findings in mice and other model organisms are to the human clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ionizing radiation induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, A.; Zhou, D.; Geiger, H.; Zant, G.V.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study was to determine if ionizing radiation (IR) induces apoptosis in hematopoietic stem (HSC) and progenitor cells. Lin-cells were isolated from mouse bone marrow (BM) and pretreated with vehicle or 100 μM z-VAD 1 h prior to exposure to 4 Gy IR. The apoptotic and/or necrotic responses of these cells to IR were analyzed by measuring the annexin V and/or 7-AAD staining in HSC and progenitor populations using flow cytometry, and hematopoietic function of these cells was determined by CAFC assay. Exposure of Lin-cells to IR selectively decreased the numbers of HSC and progenitors in association with an increase in apoptosis in a time-dependent manner. Pretreatment of Lin- cells with z-VAD significantly inhibited IR-induced apoptosis and the decrease in the numbers of HSC and progenitors. However, IR alone or in combination with z-VAD did not lead to a significant increase in necrotic cell death in either HSC or progenitors. In addition, pretreatment of BM cells with z-VAD significantly attenuated IR-induced reduction in the frequencies of day-7, -28 and -35 CAFC. Exposure of HSC and progenitors to IR induces apoptosis. The induction of HSC and progenitor apoptosis contributes to IR-induced suppression of their hematopoietic function

  2. Mitochondrial metabolism in hematopoietic stem cells requires functional FOXO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Liang, Raymond; Bigarella, Carolina L; Kocabas, Fatih; Xie, Jingjing; Serasinghe, Madhavika N; Chipuk, Jerry; Sadek, Hesham; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are primarily dormant but have the potential to become highly active on demand to reconstitute blood. This requires a swift metabolic switch from glycolysis to mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Maintenance of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of mitochondrial metabolism, is also necessary for sustaining HSC dormancy. Little is known about mechanisms that integrate energy metabolism with hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis. Here, we identify the transcription factor FOXO3 as a new regulator of metabolic adaptation of HSC. ROS are elevated in Foxo3−/− HSC that are defective in their activity. We show that Foxo3−/− HSC are impaired in mitochondrial metabolism independent of ROS levels. These defects are associated with altered expression of mitochondrial/metabolic genes in Foxo3−/− hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC). We further show that defects of Foxo3−/− HSC long-term repopulation activity are independent of ROS or mTOR signaling. Our results point to FOXO3 as a potential node that couples mitochondrial metabolism with HSC homeostasis. These findings have critical implications for mechanisms that promote malignant transformation and aging of blood stem and progenitor cells. PMID:26209246

  3. Cell cycle regulation of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Sha; Chen, Chen; Cheng, Tao

    2016-05-01

    The highly regulated process of blood production is achieved through the hierarchical organization of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) subsets and their progenies, which differ in self-renewal and differentiation potential. Genetic studies in mice have demonstrated that cell cycle is tightly controlled by the complex interplay between extrinsic cues and intrinsic regulatory pathways involved in HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Deregulation of these cellular programs may transform HSCs or hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) into disease-initiating stem cells, and can result in hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemia. While previous studies have shown roles for some cell cycle regulators and related signaling pathways in HSCs and HPCs, a more complete picture regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying cell cycle regulation in HSCs or HPCs is lacking. Based on accumulated studies in this field, the present review introduces the basic components of the cell cycle machinery and discusses their major cellular networks that regulate the dormancy and cell cycle progression of HSCs. Knowledge on this topic would help researchers and clinicians to better understand the pathogenesis of relevant blood disorders and to develop new strategies for therapeutic manipulation of HSCs.

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for people with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oringanje, Chioma; Nemecek, Eneida; Oniyangi, Oluseyi

    2016-05-19

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder involving a defect in the red blood cells due to its sickled hemoglobin. The main therapeutic interventions include preventive and supportive measures. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantations are carried out with the aim of replacing the defective cells and their progenitors (hematopoietic (i.e. blood forming) stem cells) in order to correct the disorder. This is an update of a previously published review. To determine whether stem cell transplantation can improve survival and prevent symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell disease. To examine the risks of stem cell transplantation against the potential long-term gain for people with sickle cell disease. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register complied from electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (updated each new issue of The Cochrane Library) and quarterly searches of MEDLINE.Unpublished work was identified by searching the abstract books of major conference proceedings and we conducted a search of the website: www.ClinicalTrials.gov.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 06 October 2015. Randomized controlled and quasi-randomized studies that compared any method of stem cell transplantation with either each other or with any of the preventive or supportive interventions (e.g. periodic blood transfusion, use of hydroxyurea, antibiotics, pain relievers, supplemental oxygen) in people with sickle cell disease irrespective of the type of sickle cell disease, gender and setting. No relevant trials were identified. Ten trials were identified by the initial search and none for the update. None of these trials were suitable for inclusion in this review. Reports on the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improving survival and preventing symptoms and complications associated with sickle cell

  5. Preventive effect of ganoderma lucidum (Reishi) on the suppression of hematopoietic system by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Hiroko; Nakata, Fukuyoshi; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Ito, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Reishi has been used for a roborant or the elixir of life from ancient times. In the present study, the preventive effects of Reishi on hematopoietic suppression from X-ray irradiation in mice were investigated. 5.0 Gy-irradiated mice induced the decrease of red blood cell, platelet, white blood cell, granulocytes, the index of spleen and thymus, and the number of spleen cells. Oral administration of Reishi tended to decrease these damage on hematopoiesis, and reticuloendothelial system. Reishi enhanced the degree of spleen cells-mediated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) hemolysis (quantitative hemolysis of SRBC). Reishi augmented the level of erythroid burst-forming cell (BFU-E), and accelerated the recovery of the number of BFU-E in X-irradiated mice, although Reishi did not influence red blood cell counts and colony-forming unit-erythropoetin dependent (CFU-E) number. A significant elevation in the CFU-GM (granulocytes-macrophages) level was observed. Histological examinations revealed that Reishi accerelated the hematopoietic recovery and decrease on damage of spleen and thymus. (author)

  6. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) modulates murine hematopoietic stem cell maintenance through upregulation of p57

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Dolly D.; Sommer, Andreia Gianotti; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Beerman, Isabel; Murphy, George J.; Rossi, Derrick; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) rely on a highly regulated molecular network to balance self-renewal and lineage specification to sustain life-long hematopoiesis. Despite a plethora of studies aimed at identifying molecules governing HSC fate, our current knowledge of the genes responsible is limited. We have found Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) to be predominantly expressed within long-term HSC. This study examines IGF2 expression patterns and the effects of the gene in HSC. Through the overexpression and knockdown of IGF2 within purified HSC, we demonstrate that IGF2 expression increases HSC-derived multilineage colonies in vitro and enhances hematopoietic contribution in vivo upon competitive bone marrow transplantation. The effects of IGF2 are mediated by direct upregulation of the CDKi p57, exclusively within long-term HSC, via activation of the PI3K-Akt pathway. Increased expression of p57 resulted in a concomitant increase of HSC in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation revealed that HSC exhibited a hypomethylated state within the promoter region of the CDKN1C (p57) gene, providing a potential mechanism for the exclusive effects of IGF2 within HSC. Our studies demonstrate a novel role for IGF2 in regulating HSC cell cycle and illustrate potential novel therapeutic targets for hematological diseases. PMID:26872540

  7. Uhrf1 controls the self-renewal versus differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells by epigenetically regulating the cell-division modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingyao; Chen, Xufeng; Song, Guangrong; Zhang, Jiali; Liu, Haifeng; Liu, Xiaolong

    2017-01-10

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are able to both self-renew and differentiate. However, how individual HSC makes the decision between self-renewal and differentiation remains largely unknown. Here we report that ablation of the key epigenetic regulator Uhrf1 in the hematopoietic system depletes the HSC pool, leading to hematopoietic failure and lethality. Uhrf1-deficient HSCs display normal survival and proliferation, yet undergo erythroid-biased differentiation at the expense of self-renewal capacity. Notably, Uhrf1 is required for the establishment of DNA methylation patterns of erythroid-specific genes during HSC division. The expression of these genes is enhanced in the absence of Uhrf1, which disrupts the HSC-division modes by promoting the symmetric differentiation and suppressing the symmetric self-renewal. Moreover, overexpression of one of the up-regulated genes, Gata1, in HSCs is sufficient to phenocopy Uhrf1-deficient HSCs, which show impaired HSC symmetric self-renewal and increased differentiation commitment. Taken together, our findings suggest that Uhrf1 controls the self-renewal versus differentiation of HSC through epigenetically regulating the cell-division modes, thus providing unique insights into the relationship among Uhrf1-mediated DNA methylation, cell-division mode, and HSC fate decision.

  8. BUPRENORPHINE DECREASES THE CCL2-MEDIATED CHEMOTACTIC RESPONSE OF MONOCYTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvallo, Loreto; Lopez, Lillie; Che, Fa-Yun; Lim, Jihyeon; Eugenin, Eliseo; Williams, Dionna W.; Nieves, Edward; Calderon, Tina M.; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Fiser, Andras; Weiss, Louis; Angeletti, Ruth Hogue; Berman, Joan W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite successful cART, approximately 60% of HIV infected people exhibit HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). CCL2 is elevated in the CNS of infected people with HAND and mediates monocyte influx into the CNS, which is critical in neuroAIDS. Many HIV infected opiate abusers have increased neuroinflammation that may augment HAND. Buprenorphine is used to treat opiate addiction. However, there are few studies that examine its impact on HIV neuropathogenesis. We show that buprenorphine reduces the chemotactic phenotype of monocytes. Buprenorphine decreases the formation of membrane projections in response to CCL2. It also decreases CCL2-induced chemotaxis and mediates a delay in reinsertion of the CCL2 receptor, CCR2, into the cell membrane after CCL2-mediated receptor internalization, suggesting a mechanism of action of buprenorphine. Signaling pathways in CCL2-induced migration include increased phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and of the junctional protein JAM-A. We show that buprenorphine decreases these phosphorylations in CCL2-treated monocytes. Using DAMGO, CTAP, and Nor-BNI, we demonstrate that the effect of buprenorphine on CCL2 signaling is opioid receptor mediated. To identify additional potential mechanisms by which buprenorphine inhibits CCL2-induced monocyte migration, we performed proteomic analyses to characterize additional proteins in monocytes whose phosphorylation after CCL2 treatment was inhibited by buprenorphine. Leukosialin and S100A9, were identified and had not been shown previously be involved in monocyte migration. We propose that buprenorphine limits CCL2-mediated monocyte transmigration into the CNS, thereby reducing neuroinflammation characteristic of HAND. Our findings underscore the use of buprenorphine as a therapeutic for neuroinflammation as well as for addiction. PMID:25716997

  9. Activation of the canonical Wnt pathway leads to loss of hematopoietic stem cell repopulation and multilineage differentiation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Anderson, Kristina; Porse, Bo T

    2006-01-01

    Wnt signaling increases hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and is activated in both myeloid and lymphoid malignancies, indicating involvement in both normal and malignant hematopoiesis. We report here activated canonical Wnt signaling in the hematopoietic system through conditional expression...

  10. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Nagai, Mami [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Roeder, Robert G. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Asano, Shigetaka [Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Ito, Mitsuhiro, E-mail: itomi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Hematology, Division of Medical Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 7-10-2 Tomogaoka, Suma-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 159-8555 (Japan); Department of Family and Community Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-1 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  11. Single thrombopoietin dose alleviates hematopoietic stem cells intrinsic short- and long-term ionizing radiation damage. In vivo identification of anatomical cell expansion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronik-Le Roux, Diana; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Vaigot, Pierre; Nurden, Paquita

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are essential for maintaining the integrity of complex and long-lived organisms. HSC, which are self-renewing, reconstitute the hematopoietic system through out life and facilitate long-term repopulation of myeloablated recipients. We have previously demonstrated that when mice are exposed to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation, subsets of the stem/progenitor compartment are affected. In this study we examine the role of thrombopoietin (TPO) on the regenerative capacities of HSC after irradiation and report the first demonstration of efficacy of a single injection of TPO shortly after in vivo exposure to ionizing radiation for reducing HSC injury and improving their functional outcome. Our results demonstrate that TPO treatment not only reduced the number of apoptotic cells but also induced a significant modification of their intrinsic characteristics. These findings were supported by transplantation assays with long-term HSC that were irradiated or unirradiated, TPO treated or untreated, in CD45.1/CD45.2 systems and by using luciferase-labeled HSC for direct bioluminescence imaging in living animals. Of particular importance, our data demonstrate the skull to be a highly favorable site for the TPO-induced emergence of hematopoietic cells after irradiation, suggesting a TPO-mediated relationship of primitive hematopoietic cells to an anatomical component. Together, the data presented here: provide novel findings about aspects of TPO action on stem cells, open new areas of investigation for therapeutic options in patients who are treated with radiation therapy, and show that early administration of a clinically suitable TPO-agonist counteracts the previously observed adverse effects.

  12. Distinct roles of Rheb and Raptor in activating mTOR complex 1 for the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Kasada, Atsuo; Ueno, Masaya; Hoshii, Takayuki; Tadokoro, Yuko; Nomura, Naho; Ito, Chiaki; Takase, Yusuke; Vu, Ha Thi; Kobayashi, Masahiko; Xiao, Bo; Worley, Paul F; Hirao, Atsushi

    2018-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) senses a cell's energy status and environmental levels of nutrients and growth factors. In response, mTORC1 mediates signaling that controls protein translation and cellular metabolism. Although mTORC1 plays a critical role in hematopoiesis, it remains unclear which upstream stimuli regulate mTORC1 activity in the context of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) maintenance in vivo. In this study, we investigated the function of Rheb, a critical regulator of mTORC1 activity controlled by the PI3K-AKT-TSC axis, both in HSC maintenance in mice at steady-state and in HSC-derived hematopoiesis post-transplantation. In contrast to the severe hematopoietic dysfunction caused by Raptor deletion, which completely inactivates mTORC1, Rheb deficiency in adult mice did not show remarkable hematopoietic failure. Lack of Rheb caused abnormalities in myeloid cells but did not have impact on hematopoietic regeneration in mice subjected to injury by irradiation. As previously reported, Rheb deficiency resulted in defective HSC-derived hematopoiesis post-transplantation. However, while Raptor is essential for HSC competitiveness in vivo, Rheb is dispensable for HSC maintenance under physiological conditions, indicating that the PI3K-AKT-TSC pathway does not contribute to mTORC1 activity for sustaining HSC self-renewal activity at steady-state. Thus, the various regulatory elements that impinge upstream of mTORC1 activation pathways are differentially required for HSC homeostasis in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Autophagy and the hematopoietic niche: a regulatory role for the Forkhead-box transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Puerto, MC

    2016-01-01

    Two main components of the hematopoietic niche are hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). FOXO transcription factors play a fundamental role in the maintenance of these cells through the regulation of cell cycle and oxidative stress. Other gene expression programs

  14. SCA-1 Expression Level Identifies Quiescent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morcos, Mina N.F.; Schoedel, Kristina B.; Hoppe, Anja; Behrendt, Rayk; Basak, Onur; Clevers, Hans C.; Roers, Axel; Gerbaulet, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Blood cell generation depends on continuous cellular output by the sequential hierarchy of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor populations that all contain quiescent and actively cycling cells. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) express the surface molecule Stem cell antigen 1

  15. CD97 is differentially expressed on murine hematopoietic stem-and progenitor-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, Melissa; Hagoort, Henny; Hamann, Jörg; Fibbe, Willem E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD97 is a member of the epidermal growth factor-seven transmembrane (EGF-TM7) family of adhesion receptors and is broadly expressed on hematopoietic cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CD97 on hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells (HSC/HPC). DESIGN AND

  16. Three-dimensional cartography of hematopoietic clusters in the vasculature of whole mouse embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2010-11-01

    Hematopoietic cell clusters in the aorta of vertebrate embryos play a pivotal role in the formation of the adult blood system. Despite their importance, hematopoietic clusters have not been systematically quantitated or mapped because of technical limitations posed by the opaqueness of whole mouse embryos. Here, we combine an approach to make whole mouse embryos transparent, with multicolor marking, to allow observation of hematopoietic clusters using high-resolution 3-dimensional confocal microscopy. Our method provides the first complete map and temporal quantitation of all hematopoietic clusters in the mouse embryonic vasculature. We show that clusters peak in number at embryonic day 10.5, localize to specific vascular subregions and are heterogeneous, indicating a basal endothelial to non-basal (outer cluster) hematopoietic cell transition. Clusters enriched with the c-Kit(+)CD31(+)SSEA1(-) cell population contain functional hematopoietic progenitors and stem cells. Thus, three-dimensional cartography of transparent mouse embryos provides novel insight into the vascular subregions instrumental in hematopoietic progenitor/stem cell development, and represents an important technological advancement for comprehensive in situ hematopoietic cluster analysis.

  17. Analysis and manipulation of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells from murine embryonic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Medvinsky (Alexander); S. Taoudi (Samir); S.C. Mendes (Sandra); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHematopoietic development begins in several locations in the mammalian embryo: yolk sac, aorta-gonad-mesonephros region (AGM), and the chorio-allantoic placenta. Generation of the most potent cells, adult definitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), occurs within the body of the mouse

  18. Differentiation of embryonic stem cells towards hematopoietic cells: progress and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinghui; Kaufman, Dan S

    2008-07-01

    Hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells has been one of the most productive areas of stem cell biology. Recent studies have progressed from work with mouse to human embryonic stem cells. Strategies to produce defined blood cell populations can be used to better understand normal and abnormal hematopoiesis, as well as potentially improve the generation of hematopoietic cells with therapeutic potential. Molecular profiling, phenotypic and functional analyses have all been utilized to demonstrate that hematopoietic cells derived from embryonic stem cells most closely represent a stage of hematopoiesis that occurs at embryonic/fetal developmental stages. Generation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells comparable to hematopoietic stem cells found in the adult sources, such as bone marrow and cord blood, still remains challenging. However, genetic manipulation of intrinsic factors during hematopoietic differentiation has proven a suitable approach to induce adult definitive hematopoiesis from embryonic stem cells. Concrete evidence has shown that embryonic stem cells provide a powerful approach to study the early stage of hematopoiesis. Multiple hematopoietic lineages can be generated from embryonic stem cells, although most of the evidence suggests that hematopoietic development from embryonic stem cells mimics an embryonic/fetal stage of hematopoiesis.

  19. Definitive hematopoietic stem cells first develop within the major arterial regions of the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F.T.R. de Bruijn (Marella); N.A. Speck; M.C. Peeters (Marian); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region is a potent hematopoietic site within the mammalian embryo body, and the first place from which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) emerge. Within the complex embryonic vascular, excretory and reproductive tissues of the

  20. Serpina1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-8-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pel, M; van Os, R; Velders, GA; Hagoort, H; Heegaard, PMH; Lindley, IJD; Willemze, R; Fibbe, WE

    2006-01-01

    Here, we report that cytokine-induced (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and IL-8) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization is completely inhibited after low-dose (0.5 Gy) total-body irradiation (TBI). Because neutrophil granular proteases are regulatory

  1. Pharmacoeconomics of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization : An Overview of Current Evidence and Gaps in the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaughnessy, Paul; Chao, Nelson; Shapiro, Jamie; Walters, Kent; McCarty, John; Abhyankar, Sunil; Shayani, Sepideh; Helmons, Pieter; Leather, Helen; Pazzalia, Amy; Pickard, Simon

    Adequate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization and collection is required prior to proceeding with high dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Cytokines such as G-CSF, GM-CSF, and peg-filgrastim, alone or in combination with plerixafor, and after chemotherapy have

  2. File list: DNS.Bld.05.AllAg.CD34_Hematopoietic_stem_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: InP.Bld.50.AllAg.Hematopoietic_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Gene transfer to pre-hematopoietic and committed hematopoietic precursors in the early mouse Yolk Sac: a comparative study between in situ electroporation and retroviral transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lécluse Yann

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hematopoietic development in vertebrate embryos results from the sequential contribution of two pools of precursors independently generated. While intra-embryonic precursors harbour the features of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC, precursors formed earlier in the yolk sac (YS display limited differentiation and self-renewal potentials. The mechanisms leading to the generation of the precursors in both sites are still largely unknown, as are the molecular basis underlying their different potential. A possible approach to assess the role of candidate genes is to transfer or modulate their expression/activity in both sites. We thus designed and compared transduction protocols to target either native extra-embryonic precursors, or hematopoietic precursors. Results One transduction protocol involves transient modification of gene expression through in situ electroporation of the prospective blood islands, which allows the evolution of transfected mesodermal cells in their "normal" environment, upon organ culture. Following in situ electroporation of a GFP reporter construct into the YS cavity of embryos at post-streak (mesodermal/pre-hematopoietic precursors or early somite (hematopoietic precursors stages, high GFP expression levels as well as a good preservation of cell viability is observed in YS explants. Moreover, the erythro-myeloid progeny typical of the YS arises from GFP+ mesodermal cells or hematopoietic precursors, even if the number of targeted precursors is low. The second approach, based on retroviral transduction allows a very efficient transduction of large precursor numbers, but may only be used to target 8 dpc YS hematopoietic precursors. Again, transduced cells generate a progeny quantitatively and qualitatively similar to that of control YS. Conclusion We thus provide two protocols whose combination may allow a thorough study of both early and late events of hematopoietic development in the murine YS. In situ

  6. KIR genotypic diversity in Portuguese and analysis of KIR gene allocation after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeiro, D; Buhler, S; Abecasis, M; Abade, O; Sanchez-Mazas, A; da Silva, M Gomes; Trindade, H

    2016-05-01

    The diversity of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) genes was evaluated in Portuguese and the observed genotypic profiles were found related to the ones reported in European populations. The KIR repertoire after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is determined by these gene frequencies and the KIR group B motifs are the less common. We estimated donor-KIR/recipient-ligand interactions in transplants with related donors and unrelated donors found in a local registry or from abroad. A large fraction of transplants had all three ligands of inhibitory receptors, and therefore, in theory were not prone to natural killer cell (NK) mediated alloreactivity. Furthermore, the distribution of KIR alloreactive interactions was found independent of the donor-recipient genetic proximity, probably because of different gene segregation and comparable KIR frequencies in the donor pools. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Studies on hematopoietic cell apoptosis and the relative gene expression in irradiated mouse bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ruiyun; Wang Dewen; Xiong Chengqi; Gao Yabing; Yang Hong; Cui Yufang; Wang Baozhen

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study apoptosis and expressions bcl-2 and p53 in irradiated mouse bone marrow. Methods: LACA mice were irradiated with 60 Co γ-rays. By means of in situ terminal labelling, in situ hybridization and image analysis, the authors studied radiation-induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the expressions of bcl-2 and p53. Results: The characteristics of apoptosis appeared in hematopoietic cells at 6 hrs after irradiation. The expression of bcl-2 was obviously decreased when apoptosis of hematopoietic cells occurred, whereas it increased in the early recovery phase; p53 protein increased during both apoptosis of hematopoietic cells and the recovery phase, and mutant type p53 DNA was positive only in the recovery phase. Conclusion: Radiation may induced apoptosis of hematopoietic cells in a dose-dependent manner; Both bcl-2 and p53 genes play an important role in apoptosis and recovery phase

  8. Explanation of application standards of hematopoietic stimulating factors in the treatment of acute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhiwei; Jiang Enhai; Wang Guilin; Luo Qingliang

    2012-01-01

    Occupational standard of the Ministry of health-Application Standards of Hematopoietic Stimulating Factors in the Treatment of Acute Radiation Sickness has been completed as a draft standard. Based on the wide study and analysis of related animal experimental literature about hematopoietic stimulating factor in the treatment of acute radiation sickness and domestic and foreign clinical reports about application of hematopoietic stimulating factor in radiation accidents in the past decade, the standard was enacted according to the suggestions of International Atomic Energy Agency and the United States Strategic National Stockpile Radiation Working Group and European countries about the application of hematopoietic stimulating factor. It is mainly used for nuclear accident emergency and the treatment of the bone marrow form of acute radiation sickness caused by radiation accidents. It also applies to other hematopoietic failure diseases. In order to implement this standard correctly, the relevant contents of the standard were interpreted in this article. (authors)

  9. Mouse ES cell-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Mi; Manzar, Gohar; Zavazava, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Future stem cell-based therapies will benefit from the new discoveries being made on pluripotent stem cells such as embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (IPS) cells. Understanding the genes regulating pluripotency has opened new opportunities to generate patient-tailored therapies. However, protocols for deriving progenitor cells of therapeutic grade from these pluripotent stem cells are not yet worked out. In particular the potential of these cells in treating diseases when compared to their adult progenitor counterparts is unknown. This is crucial work that needs to be studied in detail because we will need to determine engraftment potential of these cells and their ability for multi-lineage engraftment in the in vivo setting before any clinical applications. The ability of these cells to engraft is dependent on their expression of cell surface markers which guide their homing patterns. In this review, I discuss murine hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from mouse ES cells. Stem cells in the bone marrow are found in the bone marrow niches. Our knowledge of the bone marrow niches is growing and will ultimately lead to improved clinical transplantation of bone marrow cells. We are, however, a long way in appreciating how hematopoietic progenitor cells migrate and populate lymphoid tissues. One of the variables in generating hematopoietic progenitor cells is that different labs use different approaches in generating progenitor cells. In some cases, the ES cell lines used show some variability as well. The cell culture media used by the different investigators highly influence the maturation level of the cells and their homing patterns. Here, mouse ES cell-derived progenitor cells are discussed.

  10. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonso José Pereira Cortez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hodgkin's lymphoma has high rates of cure, but in 15% to 20% of general patients and between 35% and 40% of those in advanced stages, the disease will progress or will relapse after initial treatment. For this group, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered one option of salvage therapy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate a group of 106 patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma, who suffered relapse or who were refractory to treatment, submitted to autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a single transplant center. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed with data collected from patient charts. The analysis involved 106 classical Hodgkin's lymphoma patients who were consecutively submitted to high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous transplants in a single institution from April 1993 to December 2006. RESULTS: The overall survival rates of this population at five and ten years were 86% and 70%, respectively. The disease-free survival was approximately 60% at five years. Four patients died of procedure-related causes but relapse of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after transplant was the most frequent cause of death. Univariate analysis shows that sensitivity to pre-transplant treatment and hemoglobin < 10 g/dL at diagnosis had an impact on patient survival. Unlike other studies, B-type symptoms did not seem to affect overall survival. Lactic dehydrogenase and serum albumin concentrations analyzed at diagnosis did not influence patient survival either. CONCLUSION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment strategy for early and late relapse in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma for cases that were responsive to pre-transplant chemotherapy. Refractory to treatment is a sign of worse prognosis. Additionally, a hemoglobin concentration below 10 g/dL at diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma has a negative impact on the survival of patients after transplant. As far as we know this relationship has not

  11. Functional evaluation indicates physical losses after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Vasconcellos de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a function evaluation of patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. METHODS: From November 2008 to November 2010, 29 female (58% and 21 male patients (42% with median age of 48 years (range: 24-67 were enrolled in this study. Data collection was performed before and after autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Evaluation instruments included the 2-minute walking test to evaluate gait performance with assessment of the oxygen saturation, heart rate and Borg Scale before and after the test; grip strength for strength evaluation, Schober Test for spine mobility testing and maximum and adapted activity scores of the Human Activity Profile questionnaire to test functionality in daily activities. RESULTS: Fifty patients were evaluated at baseline; six did not undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (three died, one refused and two were excluded. Thus 44/50 (88% - 21 allogeneic and 23 autologous transplantations were performed. Only 33 of the 44 patients (75% performed evaluations after transplantation (nine died and two were excluded. Of the patients who performed both evaluations, significantly lower values were found in the evaluation after transplantation for the 2-minute walking test (p-value = 0.004, grip strength of both right and left hands (p-value = 0.004 and p-value < 0.0001, respectively, the Schober Test, and maximum and adapted activity scores (p-value < 0.0001. The heart rate was higher (p-value = 0.01 before the 2-minute walking test and oxygen saturation was higher (p-value = 0.02 after. CONCLUSION: Statistical differences indicate functional impairment after transplantation showing physical losses in this population.

  12. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  13. Oxidative stress in normal hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Azin; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Lorestani, Marzieh Zeinvand; Shirzad, Reza; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-04-01

    Leukemia is developed following the abnormal proliferation of immature hematopoietic cells in the blood when hematopoietic stem cells lose the ability to turn into mature cells at different stages of maturation and differentiation. Leukemia initiating cells are specifically dependent upon the suppression of oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow (BM) environment to be able to start their activities. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search (2000-2017) of English-language literature using the terms 'oxidative stress,' 'reactive oxygen species,' 'hematopoietic stem cell,' and 'leukemia.' The generation and degradation of free radicals is a main component of the metabolism in aerobic organisms. A certain level of ROS is required for proper cellular function, but values outside this range will result in oxidative stress (OS). Long-term overactivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has harmful effects on the function of cells and their vital macromolecules, including the transformation of proteins into autoantigens and increased degradation of protein/DNA, which eventually leads to the change in pathways involved in the development of cancer and several other disorders. According to the metabolic disorders of cancer, the relationship between OS changes, the viability of cancer cells, and their response to chemotherapeutic agents affecting this pathway are undeniable. Recently, studies have been conducted to determine the effect of herbal agents and cancer chemotherapy drugs on oxidative stress pathways. By emphasizing the role of oxidative stress on stem cells in the incidence of leukemia, this paper attempts to state and summarize this subject. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Depression and anxiety following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuba, K; Esser, P; Mehnert, A

    2017-01-01

    In this prospective multicenter study, we investigated the course of depression and anxiety during hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) until 5 years after transplantation adjusting for medical information. Patients were consulted before HSCT (n=239), at 3 months (n=150), 12 months (n=102......) and 5 years (n=45) after HSCT. Depression and anxiety were assessed with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Detailed medical and demographic information was collected. Prevalence rates were compared with an age- and gender-matched control group drawn from a large representative sample (n...

  15. Lung function after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhlving, Hilde Hylland; Larsen Bang, Cæcilie; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2013-01-01

    Reduction in pulmonary function (PF) has been reported in up to 85% of pediatric patients during the first year after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our understanding of the etiology for this decrease in lung function is, however, sparse. The aim of this study was to describe PF......-versus-host disease (GvHD). Other factors associated with PF decline were malignant diagnosis, busulfan-based conditioning, patient and donor age, female donor to male recipient, as well as chronic GvHD. Mild to moderate decline in PF is frequent and appears associated with acute GvHD and other parameters...

  16. Hematopoietic growth factors for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P B; Penkowa, M; Johnsen, H E

    1998-01-01

    with milder forms of MDS combined with low prestudy endogenous S-Epo levels. The possible synergistic effect of combining rhEpo with rhG-CSF or rhGM-CSF has been studied with erythropoietic response rates of about 40%. The safety of the cytokine administration seems acceptable with no significant stimulation...... of leukemic myelopoiesis and subsequent progression into overt acute myeloid leukemia. In conclusion, combinations of hematopoietic growth factors may be of clinical benefit in some patients with MDS. However, due to the cost and unpredictable clinical outcome there is a need for extended laboratory research...

  17. High prevalence of metabolic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Majhail, NS; Flowers, ME; Ness, KK; Jagasia, M; Carpenter, PA; Arora, M; Arai, S; Johnston, L; Martin, PJ; Baker, KS; Lee, SJ; Burns, LJ

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, among 86 adults who had allogeneic hematopoietic-cell transplant (HCT) as compared with 258 age- and gender-matched US population controls selected from the 2005–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey database. The median age at study enrollment was 50 years (range, 21–71), and patients were at a median of 3 years (range, 1–...

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  19. Muscle cramps and neuropathies in patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and graft-versus-host disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Peter D; Wolff, Daniel; Grauer, Oliver; Angstwurm, Klemens; Jarius, Sven; Wandinger, Klaus P; Holler, Ernst; Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm; Kleiter, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is an immune-mediated multisystemic disorder and the leading cause of morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Peripheral nervous system manifestations of GVHD are rare but often disabling. Whereas immune-mediated neuropathies are an established feature of GVHD, muscle cramps are not well characterized. In a single-centre retrospective cohort we studied 27 patients (age 23 to 69 years) with GVHD (acute n = 6, chronic n = 21) who complained of symptoms suggestive of peripheral nervous system complications. Clinical, laboratory and neurophysiological findings were evaluated by descriptive statistics and regression analysis to detect factors associated with muscle cramps. Patient's sera were examined for anti-neuronal antibodies. Nine patients had polyneuropathy, 4 had muscle cramps, and 14 had both. Median onset of polyneuropathy and muscle cramps was 6 and 9 months after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, respectively. Neurophysiology revealed a predominantly axonal polyneuropathy in 20 of 26 patients. In 4 of 19 patients electromyography showed signs of myopathy or myositis. Muscle cramps were more frequent during chronic than acute GVHD and affected muscles other than calves in 15 of 18 patients. They typically occurred daily, lasted 1 to 10 minutes with medium to severe pain intensity, compromised daily activity or sleep in 12, and were refractory to therapy in 4 patients. Muscle cramps were less likely with tacrolimus treatment and signs of severe polyneuropathy, but more likely with myopathic changes in electromyography and with incipient demyelinating polyneuropathy, shown by increased high frequency attenuation of the tibial nerve. Serological studies revealed antinuclear or antimitochondrial antibodies in a subset of patients. Two of 16 patients had a serum reactivity against peripheral nervous tissue. Muscle cramps are associated with chronic GVHD, often compromise daily

  20. FK506 BINDING PROTEIN 12 DEFICIENCY IN ENDOTHELIAL AND HEMATOPOIETIC CELLS DECREASES REGULATORY T CELLS AND CAUSES HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, Valorie L.; Talreja, Deepa; Young, Kristina J.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Banes-Berceli, Amy K.; Mitchell, Brett M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients treated with the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506), which binds FK506 Binding Protein 12 (FKBP12) then inhibits the calcium-dependent phosphatase calcineurin, exhibit decreased regulatory T cells, endothelial dysfunction, and hypertension; however the mechanisms and whether altered T cell polarization play a role are unknown. Tacrolimus treatment of mice for 1 week dose-dependently decreased CD4+/FoxP3+ (regulatory T cells) and increased CD4+/IL-17+ (T helper 17) cells in the spleen, and caused endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. To determine the mechanisms, we crossed floxed FKBP12 mice with Tie2-Cre mice to generate offspring lacking FKBP12 in endothelial and hematopoietic cells only (FKBP12EC KO). Given FKBP12’s role in inhibiting TGF-β receptor activation, Tie2-Cre-mediated deletion of FKBP12 increased TGF-β receptor activation and SMAD2/3 signaling. FKBP12EC KO mice exhibited increased vascular expression of genes and proteins related to endothelial cell activation and inflammation. Serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-2, IL-6, IFNγ, IL-17a, IL-21, and IL-23 were increased significantly suggesting a Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory state. Flow cytometry studies confirmed this as splenocyte levels of CD4+/IL-17+ cells were increased significantly while CD4+/FoxP3+ cells were decreased in FKBP12EC KO mice. Furthermore, spleens from FKBP12EC KO mice showed increased STAT3 activation, involved in Th17 cell induction, and decreased STAT5 activation, involved in regulatory T cell induction. FKBP12EC KO mice also exhibited endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. These data suggest that tacrolimus, through its activation of TGF-β receptors in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, may cause endothelial dysfunction and hypertension by activating endothelial cells, reducing Tregs, and increasing Th17 cell polarization and inflammation. PMID:21518963

  1. The Paf oncogene is essential for hematopoietic stem cell function and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrani, Yacine M; Gill, Jonathan; Matevossian, Armine; Alonzo, Eric S; Yang, Chingwen; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; Park, Christopher Y; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2011-08-29

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) self-renew to maintain the lifelong production of all blood populations. Here, we show that the proliferating cell nuclear antigen-associated factor (Paf) is highly expressed in cycling bone marrow HSCs and plays a critical role in hematopoiesis. Mice lacking Paf exhibited reduced bone marrow cellularity; reduced numbers of HSCs and committed progenitors; and leukopenia. These phenotypes are caused by a cell-intrinsic blockage in the development of long-term (LT)-HSCs into multipotent progenitors and preferential loss of lymphoid progenitors caused by markedly increased p53-mediated apoptosis. In addition, LT-HSCs from Paf(-/-) mice had increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), failed to maintain quiescence, and were unable to support LT hematopoiesis. The loss of lymphoid progenitors was likely due the increased levels of ROS in LT-HSCs caused by treatment of Paf(-/-) mice with the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine restored lymphoid progenitor numbers to that of Paf(+/+) mice. Collectively, our studies identify Paf as a novel and essential regulator of early hematopoiesis. © 2011 Amrani et al.

  2. Engineered matrix coatings to modulate the adhesion of CD133+ human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

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    Franke, Katja; Pompe, Tilo; Bornhäuser, Martin; Werner, Carsten

    2007-02-01

    Interactions of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) with their local microenvironments in the bone marrow are thought to control homing, differentiation, and self-renewal of the cells. To dissect the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) components of the niche microenvironment, a set of well-defined ECM coatings including fibronectin, heparin, heparan sulphate, hyaluronic acid, tropocollagen I, and co-fibrils of collagen I with heparin or hyaluronic acid was prepared and analysed with respect to the attachment of human CD133+ HPC in vitro. The extension of the adhesion areas of individual cells as well as the fraction of adherent cells were assessed by reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM). Intense cell-matrix interactions were found on surfaces coated with fibronectin, heparin, heparan sulphate, and on the collagen I based co-fibrils. Insignificant adhesion was found for tropocollagen I and hyaluronic acid. The strongest adhesion of HPC was observed on fibronectin with contact areas of about 7 microm(2). Interaction of HPC with coatings consisting of heparin, heparan sulphate, and co-fibrils result in small circular shaped contact zones of 3 microm(2) pointing to another, less efficient, adhesion mechanism. Analysing the specificity of cell-matrix interaction by antibody blocking experiments suggests an integrin(alpha(5)beta(1))-specific adhesion on fibronectin, while adhesion on heparin was shown to be mediated by selectins (CD62L). Taken together, our data provide a basis for the design of advanced culture carriers supporting site-specific proliferation or differentiation of HPC.

  3. Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Tacrolimus and Fentanyl in Patients Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

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    Kitazawa, Fumiaki; Fuchida, Shin-Ichi; Kado, Yoko; Ueda, Kumi; Kokufu, Takatoshi; Okano, Akira; Hatsuse, Mayumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Nakayama, Yuko; Takara, Kohji; Shimazaki, Chihiro

    2017-09-26

    BACKGROUND Tacrolimus and fentanyl are well-known cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 substrates with a narrow therapeutic range. However, the pharmacokinetic interaction between tacrolimus and fentanyl is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether drug interaction exists between tacrolimus and fentanyl. MATERIAL AND METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 6 patients who had received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation between April 2010 and March 2015. The patients received continuous intravenous infusion of fentanyl with concomitant use of tacrolimus, and the blood concentrations of tacrolimus were evaluated using fluorescence polarization immunoassay. RESULTS The clearance (CL) of tacrolimus decreased significantly from 1.28 to 0.68 mL/min/kg with concomitant use of fentanyl. The CL changed with time and dose of fentanyl administration. In addition, the CL of tacrolimus was reverted by stopping fentanyl infusion. Horn's drug interaction probability scale indicated a probable category or possible category, suggesting a drug interaction between tacrolimus and fentanyl. No patient showed a difference in hepatic or renal function before and after fentanyl administration. No additional administration of other CYP3A4 inhibitors was observed, suggesting that the drug interaction was mediated by CYP3A4. CONCLUSIONS The influence of fentanyl on the pharmacokinetics of tacrolimus was demonstrated to be of clinical importance. It is proposed that the dose of tacrolimus be reduced by 40% when used in combination with fentanyl.

  4. Endogenous Formaldehyde Is a Hematopoietic Stem Cell Genotoxin and Metabolic Carcinogen

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    Pontel, Lucas B.; Rosado, Ivan V.; Burgos-Barragan, Guillermo; Garaycoechea, Juan I.; Yu, Rui; Arends, Mark J.; Chandrasekaran, Gayathri; Broecker, Verena; Wei, Wei; Liu, Limin; Swenberg, James A.; Crossan, Gerry P.; Patel, Ketan J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Endogenous formaldehyde is produced by numerous biochemical pathways fundamental to life, and it can crosslink both DNA and proteins. However, the consequences of its accumulation are unclear. Here we show that endogenous formaldehyde is removed by the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase 5 (ADH5/GSNOR), and Adh5−/− mice therefore accumulate formaldehyde adducts in DNA. The repair of this damage is mediated by FANCD2, a DNA crosslink repair protein. Adh5−/−Fancd2−/− mice reveal an essential requirement for these protection mechanisms in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), leading to their depletion and precipitating bone marrow failure. More widespread formaldehyde-induced DNA damage also causes karyomegaly and dysfunction of hepatocytes and nephrons. Bone marrow transplantation not only rescued hematopoiesis but, surprisingly, also preserved nephron function. Nevertheless, all of these animals eventually developed fatal malignancies. Formaldehyde is therefore an important source of endogenous DNA damage that is counteracted in mammals by a conserved protection mechanism. PMID:26412304

  5. A stable and reproducible human blood-brain barrier model derived from hematopoietic stem cells.

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    Romeo Cecchelli

    Full Text Available The human blood brain barrier (BBB is a selective barrier formed by human brain endothelial cells (hBECs, which is important to ensure adequate neuronal function and protect the central nervous system (CNS from disease. The development of human in vitro BBB models is thus of utmost importance for drug discovery programs related to CNS diseases. Here, we describe a method to generate a human BBB model using cord blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells. The cells were initially differentiated into ECs followed by the induction of BBB properties by co-culture with pericytes. The brain-like endothelial cells (BLECs express tight junctions and transporters typically observed in brain endothelium and maintain expression of most in vivo BBB properties for at least 20 days. The model is very reproducible since it can be generated from stem cells isolated from different donors and in different laboratories, and could be used to predict CNS distribution of compounds in human. Finally, we provide evidence that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway mediates in part the BBB inductive properties of pericytes.

  6. Extracellular vesicles of stromal origin target and support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

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    Stik, Gregoire; Crequit, Simon; Petit, Laurence; Durant, Jennifer; Charbord, Pierre; Jaffredo, Thierry; Durand, Charles

    2017-07-03

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been recently reported as crucial mediators in cell-to-cell communication in development and disease. In this study, we investigate whether mesenchymal stromal cells that constitute a supportive microenvironment for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) released EVs that could affect the gene expression and function of HSPCs. By taking advantage of two fetal liver-derived stromal lines with widely differing abilities to maintain HSPCs ex vivo, we demonstrate that stromal EVs play a critical role in the regulation of HSPCs. Both supportive and nonsupportive stromal lines secreted EVs, but only those delivered by the supportive line were taken up by HSPCs ex vivo and in vivo. These EVs harbored a specific molecular signature, modulated the gene expression in HSPCs after uptake, and maintained the survival and clonogenic potential of HSPCs, presumably by preventing apoptosis. In conclusion, our study reveals that EVs are an important component of the HSPC niche, which may have major applications in regenerative medicine. © 2017 Stik et al.

  7. Immunogenicity of synthetic peptides representing neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

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    Emmenegger, E.; Landolt, M.; LaPatra, S.; Winton, J.

    1997-01-01

    Three peptides, P76, P226, and P268 representing 3 putative antigen~c determinants on the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were synthesized and injected into rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to assess their immunogen~city. Antisera extracted from the immunized trout were analyzed uslng an enzyme linked imrnunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of antibodies that could bind to the peptides or to intact virions of IHNV. The antisera were also tested for neutralizing activity against IHNV by a complement-mediated neutralization assay. In general, recognition of the peptides and IHNV was low and only a few antibody binding patterns were demonstrated. Antisera from fish injected with P76 constructs recognized the homologous peptide more than the heterologous peptides, whereas antisera from fish inoculated with either P226 or P268 constructs recognized P76 equally, or better, than the homologous peptide; however, there was a high degree of individual variation within each treatment group. Neutralization actlvlty was demonstrated by serum from a single flsh lnlected with one of the pept~des (P268) and from 7 of 10 positive control f~sh Infected with an attenuated strain of IHNV Possible explanations for the dichotomous immune responses are discussed. These results indicate we need to improve our overall understanding of the

  8. Transfusion challenges in hematology oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplant - Literature review and local experience.

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    Elemary, Mohamed; Seghatchian, Jerard; Stakiw, Julie; Bosch, Mark; Sabry, Waleed; Goubran, Hadi

    2017-06-01

    Transfusion medicine plays a vital role in the supportive care of patients receiving therapy for hematology, oncology and hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCT). With advances in therapy with more intensive chemotherapy or radiotherapy, patients usually develop cytopenias and need frequent transfusion support with packed red blood cells, granulocyte transfusion or platelets to support them until they recover from the effect of therapy. HSCT poses unique challenges for transfusion medicine, since transplant recipients may require substantial transfusion support due to cytopenias associated with toxic medications, decreased marrow reserve, infection or their malignancy. Transfusion support has many complications, mainly immune mediated and infectious complications. Jehovah's Witness patients deny transfusions of blood products as a therapeutic option and, consequently, management of their disease with chemotherapy and stem cell transplant after myeloablative therapy is quite challenging. This review describes the challenges of transfusion support in managing hemato-oncology and stem cell transplant patients and highlights a local experience in transplanting two Jehovah's Witness patients. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Coordinate expansion of murine hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments by SHIPi.

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    Brooks, R; Iyer, S; Akada, H; Neelam, S; Russo, C M; Chisholm, J D; Kerr, W G

    2015-03-01

    Promoting the expansion of adult stem cell populations offers the potential to ameliorate radiation or chemotherapy-induced bone marrow failure and allows for expedited recovery for patients undergoing these therapies. Previous genetic studies suggested a pivotal role for SH2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) in limiting the size of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. The aim of this study was to determine whether our recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors offers the potential for pharmacological expansion of the HSC compartment in vivo. We show here that treatment of mice with aminosteroid inhibitors of SHIP1 (SHIPi) more than doubles the size of the adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) compartment while simultaneously expanding the HSC pool sixfold. Consistent with its ability to target SHIP1 function in vivo, SHIPi also significantly increases plasma granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) levels, a growth factor that supports proliferation of HSC. Here, we show that SHIPi-induced G-CSF production mediates HSC and MSC expansion, as in vivo neutralization of G-CSF abrogates the SHIPi-induced expansion of both the HSC and MSC compartments. Due to its expansionary effect on adult stem cell compartments, SHIPi represents a potential novel strategy to improve declining stem cell function in both therapy induced and genetically derived bone marrow failure syndromes. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Sepsis Induces Hematopoietic Stem Cell Exhaustion and Myelosuppression through Distinct Contributions of TRIF and MYD88

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    Huajia Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 plays a central role in host responses to bacterial infection, but the precise mechanism(s by which its downstream signaling components coordinate the bone marrow response to sepsis is poorly understood. Using mice deficient in TLR4 downstream adapters MYD88 or TRIF, we demonstrate that both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous MYD88 activation are major causes of myelosuppression during sepsis, while having a modest impact on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC functions. In contrast, cell-intrinsic TRIF activation severely compromises HSC self-renewal without directly affecting myeloid cells. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of MYD88 or TRIF contributes to cell-cycle activation of HSC and induces rapid and permanent changes in transcriptional programs, as indicated by persistent downregulation of Spi1 and CebpA expression after transplantation. Thus, distinct mechanisms downstream of TLR4 signaling mediate myelosuppression and HSC exhaustion during sepsis through unique effects of MyD88 and TRIF.

  11. Various forms of tissue damage and danger signals following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Abdulraouf eRamadan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the most potent curative therapy for many malignant and non-malignant disorders. Unfortunately, a major complication of HSCT is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD, which is mediated by tissue damage resulting from the conditioning regimens before the transplantation and the alloreaction of dual immune components (activated donor T cells and recipient’s antigen-presenting cells. This tissue damage leads to the release of alarmins and the triggering of pathogen-recognition receptors that activate the innate immune system and subsequently the adaptive immune system. Alarmins, which are of endogenous origin, together with the exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs elicit similar responses of danger signals and represent the group of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. Effector cells of innate and adaptive immunity that are activated by PAMPs or alarmins can secrete other alarmins and amplify the immune responses. These complex interactions and loops between alarmins and PAMPs are particularly potent at inducing and then aggravating the GVHD reaction. In this review, we highlight the role of these tissue damaging molecules and their signaling pathways. Interestingly, some DAMPs and PAMPs are organ specific and GVHD-induced and have been shown to be interesting biomarkers. Some of these molecules even represent potential targets for novel therapeutic approaches.

  12. IP3 3-kinase B controls hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis and prevents lethal hematopoietic failure in mice

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    Siegemund, Sabine; Rigaud, Stephanie; Conche, Claire; Broaten, Blake; Schaffer, Lana; Westernberg, Luise; Head, Steven Robert

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis ensures lifelong hematopoiesis and prevents blood cancers. The mechanisms balancing HSC quiescence with expansion and differentiation into hematopoietic progenitors are incompletely understood. Here, we identify Inositol-trisphosphate 3-kinase B (Itpkb) as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis. Young Itpkb−/− mice accumulated phenotypic HSC, which were less quiescent and proliferated more than wild-type (WT) controls. Itpkb−/− HSC downregulated quiescence and stemness associated, but upregulated activation, oxidative metabolism, protein synthesis, and lineage associated messenger RNAs. Although they had normal-to-elevated viability and no significant homing defects, Itpkb−/− HSC had a severely reduced competitive long-term repopulating potential. Aging Itpkb−/− mice lost hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and died with severe anemia. WT HSC normally repopulated Itpkb−/− hosts, indicating an HSC-intrinsic Itpkb requirement. Itpkb−/− HSC showed reduced colony-forming activity and increased stem-cell-factor activation of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) effectors Akt/mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR). This was reversed by treatment with the Itpkb product and PI3K/Akt antagonist IP4. Transcriptome changes and biochemistry support mTOR hyperactivity in Itpkb−/− HSC. Treatment with the mTOR-inhibitor rapamycin reversed the excessive mTOR signaling and hyperproliferation of Itpkb−/− HSC without rescuing colony forming activity. Thus, we propose that Itpkb ensures HSC quiescence and function through limiting cytokine-induced PI3K/mTOR signaling and other mechanisms. PMID:25788703

  13. Osteoblastic activation in the hematopoietic stem cell niche.

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    Calvi, Laura M

    2006-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are rare primitive cells capable of reconstituting all blood cell lineages throughout the life of an individual. The microenvironment in which stem cells reside is essential for their survival, self-renewal, and differentiation. This microenvironment, or HSC niche, has been difficult to define in bone and bone marrow, but recent studies from our laboratory and others have shown that osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, are an essential regulatory component of this complex cellular network. We established that parathyroid hormone (PTH), through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R) in osteoblastic cells, could alter the HSC niche resulting in HSC expansion in vivo and in vitro and improving dramatically the survival of mice receiving bone marrow transplants. These findings are of great clinical appeal, because they suggest that a strategy aimed at modifying supportive cells in a stem cell niche can expand HSC. While a number of molecules have been found to be important for hematopoietic/osteoblastic interactions, we have focused on the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway, which was necessary for the PTH-dependent HSC expansion. Since the Jagged1/Notch signaling pathway has been implicated in the microenvironmental control of stem cell self-renewal in several organ systems, definition of Jagged1 modulation, which is currently poorly understood, should provide additional molecular targets for stem cell regulation and advance the understanding of stem cell-microenvironmental interactions.

  14. Autologous hematopoietic stem cells for refractory Crohn's disease.

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    DiNicola, C A; Zand, A; Hommes, D W

    2017-05-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cells are gaining ground as an effective and safe treatment for treating severe refractory Crohn's disease (CD). Autologous hematopoietic stem cell therapy (AHSCT) induces resetting of the immune system by de novo regeneration of T-cell repertoire and repopulation of epithelial cells by bone-marrow derived cells to help patients achieve clinical and endoscopic remission. Areas covered: Herein, the authors discuss the use of AHSCT in treating patients with CD. Improvements in disease activity have been seen in patients with severe autoimmune disease and patients with severe CD who underwent AHSCT for a concomitant malignant hematological disease. Clinical and endoscopic remission has been achieved in patients treated with AHSCT for CD. The only randomized trial published to date, the ASTIC Trial, did not support further use of AHSCT to treat CD. Yet, critics of this trial have deemed AHSCT as a promising treatment for severe refractory CD. Expert opinion: Even with the promising evidence presented for HSCT for refractory CD, protocols need to be refined through the collaboration of GI and hemato-oncology professionals. The goal is to incorporate safe AHSCT and restore tolerance by delivering an effective immune 'cease fire' as a treatment option for severe refractory CD.

  15. Herpes zoster after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Kelli Borges dos Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: The autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedure involves immunosuppression of the patient. Thus, the patient has an elevated risk for several diseases, such as infections with the varicella-zoster virus. Prevention protocols have been proposed based on the use of acyclovir from the first day of conditioning, and maintaining this drug for 30-100 days after the procedure or for as much as one year. The objective of this work was to evaluate the incidence of herpes zoster after autologous transplantations related to the early suspension of acyclovir. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out based on the collection of data from 231 medical records of transplant patients in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the teaching hospital of the Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora in the period between 2004 and 2014. Results: Fourteen (6.1% patients had herpes zoster in the post-transplant period on average within six months of the procedure. Patients with multiple myeloma (64.3% were the most affected. There was a statistically significant difference in the age of the patients, with older individuals having a greater chance of developing the infection (p-value = 0.002. There were no significant differences for the other variables analyzed. Conclusion: The early suspension of acyclovir can be safe in patients who receive autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants. However some groups may benefit from extended prophylaxis with acyclovir, particularly older patients and patients with multiple myeloma.

  16. Generation of hematopoietic lineage cells from embryonic like cells

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    Gholam Reza Khamisipour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epigenetic reprogramming of somatic cells into embryonic stem cells has attracted much attention, because of the potential for stem cell transplantation and compatibility with recipient. However, the therapeutic application of either nuclear transfer or nuclear fusion of somatic cell has been hindered by technical complications as well as ethical objections. Recently, a new method is reported whereby ectopic expression of embryonic specific transcription factors was shown to induce fibroblasts to become embryonic like SCs (induced pluripotent stem cells. A major limitation of this method is the use of potentially harmful genome integrating viruses such as reto- or lentivirus. The main aim of this investigation was generation of human hematopoietic stem cells from induced fibroblasts by safe adenovectors carrying embryonically active genes. Material and Methods: Isolated fibroblasts from foreskin were expanded and recombinant adenoviruses carrying human Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, cMyc genes were added to culture. After formation of embryonic like colonies and cell expansion, they were transferred to embryonic media without bFGF, and embryoid bodies were cultured on stromal and non-stromal differentiation media for 14 days. Results: Expression of CD34 gene and antigenic markers, CD34, CD38 & CD133 in stromal culture showed significant difference with non-differentiation and non-stromal media. Conclusion: These findings show high hematopoietic differentiation rate of Adeno-iPS cells in stromal culture and no need to use growth factors. While, there was no difference between non-differentiation and non-stromal media.

  17. Oral changes in individuals undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Regina Haddad Barrach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation receive high doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which cause severe immunosuppression.OBJECTIVE: To report an oral disease management protocol before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.METHODS: A prospective study was carried out with 65 patients aged > 18 years, with hematological diseases, who were allocated into two groups: A (allogeneic transplant, 34 patients; B (autologous transplant, 31 patients. A total of three dental status assessments were performed: in the pre-transplantation period (moment 1, one week after stem cell infusion (moment 2, and 100 days after transplantation (moment 3. In each moment, oral changes were assigned scores and classified as mild, moderate, and severe risks.RESULTS: The most frequent pathological conditions were gingivitis, pericoronitis in the third molar region, and ulcers at the third moment assessments. However, at moments 2 and 3, the most common disease was mucositis associated with toxicity from the drugs used in the immunosuppression.CONCLUSION: Mucositis accounted for the increased score and potential risk of clinical complications. Gingivitis, ulcers, and pericoronitis were other changes identified as potential risk factors for clinical complications.

  18. KIR repertory in patients with hematopoietic diseases and healthy family members.

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    Sugioka, Daniele Kazue; Gonçalves, Carlos Eduardo Ibaldo; Bicalho, Maria da Graça

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of specific histocompatibility, literature has associated genes involved in the immune response, like the Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA), with a better prognosis in transplantation. However, other non-HLA genes may also influence the immune process, such as the genes encoding the immunoglobulin-like receptors of natural killer cells (KIRs). The discovery that NK cell KIR receptors interact with conservative epitopes (C1, C2, Bw4) presented in HLA class I molecules that are genetically polymorphic, also observed in KIR genes, led to the investigation of the relevance of the KIR system to hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The cure of patients with leukemias and other hematological malignancies after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has been attributed in part to the ability of the donor immune cells, present in the graft, to recognize and eliminate neoplastic cells of the patient. The cytotoxic activity of NK cells is mediated by the absence of HLA class I-specific ligands on the target cell surface to inhibitory KIR receptors (hypothesis of "missing-self"). We analyzed, by PCR typing-SSOP technique, the presence or absence of 16 KIR genes and haplotypes of 39 patients with hematopoietic disorders and 136 healthy individuals from Paraná State. The comparisons made between the patient and control group were performed using χ 2 test or Fisher exact test (bilateral p -value), as appropriated. Significance level was considered when p -value ≤ 0.05. Framework genes KIR3DL3, KIR3DP1, KIR2DL4 and KIR3DL2 were positive in all samples. The comparison between KIR repertoire of patients and healthy individuals revealed significant differences ( p KIR2DL2 ( p  = 0.0005) and KIR2DL5 ( p  = 0.0067) and activating genes KIR2DS1 ( p  = 0.0013), KIR2DS2 ( p  = 0.0038), KIR2DS3 ( p  = 0.0153) that are more frequent in controls than in patients. The KIR2DS3 was significantly more frequent ( p  = 0.0031) in patients with acute myeloid

  19. Mechanistic aspects of radioprotection by todralazine hydrochloride, a hematopoietic stem cell expanding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimri, Manali; Joshi, Jaidev; Jain, Sanjoli; Ghosh, Subhajit; Srivastva, Nitisha; Prem Kumar, Indracanti; Chakrabarti, Rina

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we have reported todralazine hydrochloride, an antihypertensive drug, as a radioprotector and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) expanding agent. The present study aims at unraveling mechanistic aspects of its radioprotective and HSC expanding potential. Zebrafish Tg (cmyb:GFP) embryos treated with 5 μM todralazine from 24-36 hours post fertilization (hpf), increased the number of HSCs (∼ 2 folds) at aorta gonad mesonephros (AGM) region. Similarly, the expression of HSC marker genes, runx1 (3.3 folds) and cMyb (1.4 folds) were also found to be increased. Further, todralazine also accelerated hematopoietic lineage production, erythropoiesis, as evaluated in chemical induced anemic model in zebrafish. Genome wide expression changes in todralazine treated embryos (from 24-36 hpf) using microarray, revealed up and down regulation of 645 and 429 genes respectively. Pathway analysis using DAVID database strongly suggested up regulation of wnt pathway (p<0.019253), which is known to involve in HSC expansion, in todralazine pre-treated embryos. NOS1, known to have its role in HSC expansion through wnt pathway, has been significantly upregulated (1.54 folds; q PCR) by todralazine treatment (from 24-36 hpf). Todralazine treatment (∼30 minutes; 20 Gy) led to a significant upregulation of antioxidant genes (SOD, catalase), DNA damage response genes (p53, p21, GADD45) and nucleotide excision repair genes (XPC, XPA, XPF, XPD) when compared to irradiated control. Immunohistochemical analysis of DNA damage marker (γH2AX) (30 minutes post irradiation), further supported radiation induced DNA damage and protection by todralazine pre-treatment. Corroborating these results, pre-irradiation treatment of todralazine reduced radiation induced apoptosis (caspase 3 assay). Overall, the results suggest that, todralazine protects zebrafish from radiation induced damages by upregulating antioxidant defense system, DNA damage recognition, DNA repair machinery and by reducing cell

  20. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mobilizes dormant hematopoietic stem cells without proliferation in mice.

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    Bernitz, Jeffrey M; Daniel, Michael G; Fstkchyan, Yesai S; Moore, Kateri

    2017-04-06

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used clinically to treat leukopenia and to enforce hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization to the peripheral blood (PB). However, G-CSF is also produced in response to infection, and excessive exposure reduces HSC repopulation capacity. Previous work has shown that dormant HSCs contain all the long-term repopulation potential in the bone marrow (BM), and that as HSCs accumulate a divisional history, they progressively lose regenerative potential. As G-CSF treatment also induces HSC proliferation, we sought to examine whether G-CSF-mediated repopulation defects are a result of increased proliferative history. To do so, we used an established H2BGFP label retaining system to track HSC divisions in response to G-CSF. Our results show that dormant HSCs are preferentially mobilized to the PB on G-CSF treatment. We find that this mobilization does not result in H2BGFP label dilution of dormant HSCs, suggesting that G-CSF does not stimulate dormant HSC proliferation. Instead, we find that proliferation within the HSC compartment is restricted to CD41-expressing cells that function with short-term, and primarily myeloid, regenerative potential. Finally, we show CD41 expression is up-regulated within the BM HSC compartment in response to G-CSF treatment. This emergent CD41 Hi HSC fraction demonstrates no observable engraftment potential, but directly matures into megakaryocytes when placed in culture. Together, our results demonstrate that dormant HSCs mobilize in response to G-CSF treatment without dividing, and that G-CSF-mediated proliferation is restricted to cells with limited regenerative potential found within the HSC compartment. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  1. The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein has a human-specific evolutionary nucleotide DNA change and acts as a regulator of cell viability in the hematopoietic system.

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    Venturini, Letizia; Stadler, Michael; Manukjan, Georgi; Scherr, Michaela; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Steinemann, Doris; Ganser, Arnold

    2016-04-01

    The stem cell zinc finger 1 (SZF1)/ZNF589 protein belongs to the large family of Krüppel-associated box domain-zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF) transcription factors, which are present only in higher vertebrates and epigenetically repress transcription by recruiting chromatin-modifying complexes to the promoter regions of their respective target genes. Although the distinct biological functions of most KRAB-ZNF proteins remain unknown, recent publications indicate their implication in fundamental processes, such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, development, and tumorigenesis. SZF1/ZNF589 was first identified as a gene with SZF1-1 isoform specifically expressed in CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, strongly suggesting a role in epigenetic control of gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, the function of SZF1/ZNF589 in hematopoiesis has not yet been elucidated. Our study reveals SZF1/ZNF589 as a gene with a human-specific nucleotide DNA-change, conferring potential species-specific functional properties. Through shRNA-mediated loss-of-function experiments, we found that changes in expression of fundamental apoptosis-controlling genes are induced on SZF1/ZNF589 knockdown, resulting in inhibited growth of hematopoietic cell lines and decreased progenitor potential of primary human bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Moreover, we found that the SZF1/ZNF589 gene is differentially regulated during hypoxia in CD34(+) HSPCs in a cytokine-dependent manner, implicating its possible involvement in the maintenance of the hypoxic physiologic status of hematopoietic stem cells. Our results establish the role of SZF1/ZNF589 as a new functional regulator of the hematopoietic system. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey.

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    Yıldıran, Alişan; Çeliksoy, Mehmet Halil; Borte, Stephan; Güner, Şükrü Nail; Elli, Murat; Fışgın, Tunç; Özyürek, Emel; Sancak, Recep; Oğur, Gönül

    2017-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years) with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11), Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2), leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2), MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2), chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2), hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1), Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1), and Omenn syndrome (n=1). Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Primary Immunodeficiency Patients in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alişan Yıldıran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a promising curative therapy for many combined primary immunodeficiencies and phagocytic disorders. We retrospectively reviewed pediatric cases of patients diagnosed with primary immunodeficiencies and scheduled for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 22 patients (median age, 6 months; age range, 1 month to 10 years with various diagnoses who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient diagnoses included severe combined immunodeficiency (n=11, Chediak-Higashi syndrome (n=2, leukocyte adhesion deficiency (n=2, MHC class 2 deficiency (n=2, chronic granulomatous syndrome (n=2, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (n=1, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (n=1, and Omenn syndrome (n=1. Of the 22 patients, 7 received human leukocyte antigen-matched related hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, 12 received haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and 2 received matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The results showed that 5 patients had graft failure. Fourteen patients survived, yielding an overall survival rate of 67%. Screening newborn infants for primary immunodeficiency diseases may result in timely administration of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Li, Zhiguo [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chao, Nelson J. [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Immunology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Benny J., E-mail: chen0032@mc.duke.edu [Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  5. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shijie; Kong, Xiaoyuan; Acosta, Sandra; Sava, Vasyl; Borlongan, Cesar V; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2017-07-02

    Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF) has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis) and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2) antagonist (RS504303) was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+) blood stem-progenitor cells. The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM). Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  6. Effects of an Inhibitor of Monocyte Recruitment on Recovery from Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice Treated with Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijie Song

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Administration of the hematopoietic growth factor granulocyte-colony stimulating Factor (G-CSF has been reported to enhance recovery from controlled cortical impact (CCI in rodent models. G-CSF exerts actions in both the periphery (stimulation of hematopoiesis and in the brain, where it serves as a neurotrophic factor, promoting neuronal survival and stimulating neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. In order to distinguish the direct CNS actions of G-CSF from its peripheral actions, experiments were designed to block the recruitment of peripheral monocytes to the site of the lesion produced by CCI. The selective C-C motif receptor 2 (CCR2 antagonist (RS504303 was co-administered with G-CSF for three days after CCI in a chimeric mouse previously transplanted with GFP-expressing (GFP+ blood stem-progenitor cells. Results: The drug significantly impaired infiltration of GFP+ bone marrow-derived cells to the frontal cortex and striatum without impeding recovery performance and hippocampal neurogenesis in the behavioral test, the Radial Arm Water Maze (RAWM. Administration of the CCR2 antagonist alone, without G-CSF, was effective in promoting recovery in RAWM. These results support the hypothesis that the direct action of G-CSF on neural cells, independent of its hematopoietic effects, is primarily responsible for enhanced recovery from CCI. In addition, this study confirms the importance of CCR2 and its ligand, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1, in mediating the inflammatory response following CCI.

  7. The human placenta is a hematopoietic organ during the embryonic and fetal periods of development

    OpenAIRE

    Bárcena, Alicia; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Muench, Marcus O.; Gormley, Matthew; Scott, Marvin A.; Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Fisher, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    We studied the potential role of the human placenta as a hematopoietic organ during embryonic and fetal development. Placental samples contained two cell populations—CD34++CD45low and CD34+CD45low—that were found in chorionic villi and in the chorioamniotic membrane. CD34++CD45low cells express many cell surface antigens found on multipotent primitive hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. CD34++CD45low cells contained colony-forming units culture (CFU-C) with myeloid and ery...

  8. Using Proteomics to 1) Identify the Bone Marrow Homing Receptors Expressed on Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells and 2) Elucidate Critical Signaling Pathways Responsible for the Blockage of Hematopoietic Differentiation in Leukemia

    KAUST Repository

    Chin, Chee J.

    2011-05-22

    Successful hematopoiesis requires the trafficking of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow (BM) niche, where they can differentiate to produce all blood lineages. Leukemia arises when there is a blockage of differentiation and uncontrolled proliferation in the hematopoietic cells during their development. To refine therapies for leukemia, this study sought to improve the homing of healthy donor HSPCs for better transplantation and to find new candidates for differentiating and blocking proliferation in leukemic cells. Characterizing the molecular effectors mediating cell migration forms the basis for improving clinical transplantation of HSPCs. E-selectin/ligand interactions play a critical role in the homing of HSPCs to the BM, however, the identity of E-selectin ligands remains elusive. We aimed to use mass spectrometry (MS) to fully analyze the E-selectin ligands expressed on HSPCs. Immunoprecipitation studies coupled with MS confirmed the expression of three known E-selectin ligands, the hematopoietic cell E-/L-selectin ligand (HCELL), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and CD43, and revealed the presence of many interesting candidates on HSPCs-like cell line and on primary human BM CD34+ cells. The MS dataset represents a rich resource for further characterization of E-selectin ligands, which will lead to improvement of HSPCs transplantation. 4 Understanding the critical pathways underlying the initiation and maintenance of leukemia plays a key role in treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Ligation of the glycoprotein, CD44, using monoclonal antibodies or its natural ligand, hyaluronic acid, drives the differentiation of immature leukemic cells towards mature terminally differentiated cells, inhibits their proliferation and in some case induces their apoptosis. The aim of this study is to characterize the phosphoproteome of AML cells in response to CD44-induced differentiation. This will afford novel insights into the

  9. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation to Prevent Antibody Mediated Rejection After Vascularized Composite Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    investigators successfully performed initial control experiments in unsensitized animals applying the proposed induction and maintenance immunosuppressive...transplantation was performed across a full SLA mismatch from a CC donor to an AD recipient animal . The animal was treated with non-myeloablative...reconstructive transplantation. The investigators will test their central hypothesis that that the impact and mechanisms, of AMR in reconstructive

  10. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Tarun; Maximin, Suresh; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT

  11. Imaging of complications from hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun Pandey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell transplant has been the focus of clinical research for a long time given its potential to treat several incurable diseases like hematological malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and neuro-degenerative disorders like Parkinson disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the oldest and most widely used technique of stem cell transplant. HSCT has not only been used to treat hematological disorders including hematological malignancies, but has also been found useful in treamtent of genetic, immunological, and solid tumors like neuroblastoma, lymphoma, and germ cell tumors. In spite of the rapid advances in stem cell technology, success rate with this technique has not been universal and many complications have also been seen with this form of therapy. The key to a successful HSCT therapy lies in early diagnosis and effective management of complications associated with this treatment. Our article aims to review the role of imaging in diagnosis and management of stem cell transplant complications associated with HSCT.

  12. COST OF HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN INDIA

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    Sanjeev Kumar Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is the definite cure for many hematological diseases. With the increasing indications for HSCT and its relatively low cost in Indian subcontinent, an increasing number of patients are opting for this procedure. We retrospectively analyzed the cost of one hundred sixty two HSCTs done at our center in the last three years. The median cost of autologous transplant was INR 7,52,294 (USD, $ 12,500 (range INR 6,19,850-14,17,212 and the median cost of allogenic transplant was INR 10,74,881 ($18,000 (range INR 6,49,944-23,82,227. The cost of HSCT is cheaper here compared to that in developed countries and success rates are nearly equivalent. The major factors contributing to the cost are related to the complications post-transplant mainly infections and graft versus host disease, which are also the reasons for the increased stay in the hospital.

  13. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells for autologous transportation: consensus recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Barroso Duarte

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Selected patients with certain hematological malignancies and solid tumors have the potential to achieve long-term survival with autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant. The collection of these cells in peripheral blood avoids multiple bone marrow aspirations, results in faster engraftment and allows treatment of patients with infection, fibrosis, or bone marrow hypocellularity. However, for the procedure to be successful, it is essential to mobilize a sufficient number of progenitor cells from the bone marrow into the blood circulation. Therefore, a group of Brazilian experts met in order to develop recommendations for mobilization strategies adapted to the reality of the Brazilian national health system, which could help minimize the risk of failure, reduce toxicity and improve the allocation of financial resources.

  14. Bone Marrow Vascular Niche: Home for Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningning He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though discovered later than osteoblastic niche, vascular niche has been regarded as an alternative indispensable niche operating regulation on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs. As significant progresses gained on this type niche, it is gradually clear that the main work of vascular niche is undertaking to support hematopoiesis. However, compared to what have been defined in the mechanisms through which the osteoblastic niche regulates hematopoiesis, we know less in vascular niche. In this review, based on research data hitherto we will focus on component foundation and various functions of vascular niche that guarantee the normal hematopoiesis process within bone marrow microenvironments. And the possible pathways raised by various research results through which this environment undergoes its function will be discussed as well.

  15. Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

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    Meerim Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT donors includes a rigorous assessment of the availability and human leukocyte antigen (HLA match status of donors. HLA plays a critical role in HSCT, but its involvement in HSCT is constantly in flux because of changing technologies and variations in clinical transplantation results. The increased availability of HSCT through the use of HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors is feasible with a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR genes in HSCT. The influence of nongenetic factors on the tolerability of HLA mismatching has recently become evident, demonstrating a need for the integration of both genetic and nongenetic variables in donor selection.

  16. Analysis of the motivation for hematopoietic stem cell donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurelio, M T; Aniasi, A; Haworth, S E; Colombo, M B; Dimonopoli, T; Mocellin, M C; Poli, F; Torelli, R; Crespiatico, L; Serafini, M; Scalamogna, M

    2011-05-01

    The Italian Bone Marrow Donor Register is the institutional organization for management of unrelated hematopoietic stem cell donors. The law requires only a donor's clinical history, but not a psychosocial profile for registration. We have studied the donor's motivation for enlistment on the donor registry and the medical staff's need for this information to interact correctly with the donor. For this purpose we distributed a questionnaire to new donors at the 20 centers in the Lombardy Region over a period of 1 year. The analysis of the responses revealed a prevalence of extrinsic motivations that would not ensure continued registration for donation. Therefore, it is necessary that the donor be well informed and better educated about all aspects of donation, in order to produce a shift to an intrinsic motivation. This objective can be facilitated via professional training of health workers in communication. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic Engineering and Manufacturing of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

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    Xiuyan Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The marketing approval of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs as the first-line therapy for the treatment of severe combined immunodeficiency due to adenosine deaminase deficiency (ADA-SCID is a tribute to the substantial progress that has been made regarding HSC engineering in the past decade. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade, genetically engineered HSCs is the foundation for broadening the application of this technology. Herein, the current state-of-the-art manufacturing platforms to genetically engineer HSCs as well as the challenges pertaining to production standardization and product characterization are addressed in the context of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs and other monogenic disorders.

  18. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogonek, Justyna; Kralj Juric, Mateja; Ghimire, Sakhila; Varanasi, Pavankumar Reddy; Holler, Ernst; Greinix, Hildegard; Weissinger, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The timely reconstitution and regain of function of a donor-derived immune system is of utmost importance for the recovery and long-term survival of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of note, new developments such as umbilical cord blood or haploidentical grafts were associated with prolonged immunodeficiency due to delayed immune reconstitution, raising the need for better understanding and enhancing the process of immune reconstitution and finding strategies to further optimize these transplant procedures. Immune reconstitution post-HSCT occurs in several phases, innate immunity being the first to regain function. The slow T cell reconstitution is regarded as primarily responsible for deleterious infections with latent viruses or fungi, occurrence of graft-versus-host disease, and relapse. Here we aim to summarize the major steps of the adaptive immune reconstitution and will discuss the importance of immune balance in patients after HSCT. PMID:27909435

  19. Twitter Use in the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sagar S; Majhail, Navneet S

    2018-02-01

    Social media has revolutionized the access and exchange of information in healthcare. The microblogging platform Twitter has been used by blood and marrow transplant physicians over the last several years with increasing enthusiasm. We review the adoption of Twitter in the transplant community and its implications on clinical care, education, and research. Twitter allows instantaneous access to the latest research publications, developments at national and international meetings, networking with colleagues, participation in advocacy, and promoting available clinical trials. Additionally, Twitter serves as a gateway for resources dedicated to education and support for patients undergoing transplantation. We demonstrate the utilization and various applications in using Twitter among hematopoietic cell transplant healthcare professionals, patients, and other affiliated stakeholders. Professionalism concerns with clinician use of such social media platforms, however, also exist. Overall, Twitter has enhanced and increased the opportunities for engagement in the transplant community.

  20. ABO blood group mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekgündüz, Sibel Akpınar; Özbek, Namık

    2016-02-01

    Apart from solid organ transplantations, use of ABO-blood group mismatched (ABO-mismatched) donors is acceptable in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients. About 20-40% of allogeneic HSCT recipients will receive grafts from ABO-mismatched donors. ABO incompatible HSCT procedures are associated with immediate and late consequences, including but not restricted to acute or delayed hemolytic reactions, delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and graft-versus-host disease. This review summarizes the current knowledge about consequences of ABO-mismatched HSCT in terms of associated complications and will evaluate its impact on important outcome parameters of HSCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A method to enrich mouse hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, J.E.; McFarland, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells form colonies in the spleens of lethally irradiated mice. The number of colonies is indicative of the number of stem cells present in the inoculum. In this article, a technique is presented for effecting a seven-fold enrichment of spleen colony-forming cells. Bone marrow cells are first segregated into ''red'' and ''white'' cell populations by centrifugation on Ficoll-Paque. Centrifugation of the ''white'' cell fraction in 75% Percoll concentrates the colony-forming cells in the top one-third of the gradient. The ability of these cells to repopulate and to cure the anemia of WBB6F1-W/Wv mice indicates that long-term functional pluripotent stem cells have not been destroyed or lost during the fractionation procedures. The segregation procedures enrich the colony-forming cell population from thalassemic as well as from normal mice

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  4. Changing patterns of radiosensitivity of hematopoietic progenitors from chronically irradiated dogs prone either to aplastic anemia or to myeloproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, T M; Kaspar, L V

    1990-01-01

    the AA-prone dog, in contrast, acquire little change in resistance to gamma rays, but, surprisingly, marked resistance to neutrons relative to progenitors from nonirradiated controls. These results support the concept that acquired radioresistance of vital granulocyte/monocyte lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors is temporally, perhaps causally, linked to the processes mediating hematopoietic recovery and accommodation under chronic irradiation, and in turn to preclinical events of evolving MPD. In addition, the marked differential responses of progenitors to gamma and neutron irradiation in vitro might suggest differences in the nature of cellular lesions elicited by chronic gamma irradiation, in vivo.

  5. A hematopoietic contribution to microhemorrhage formation during antiviral CD8 T cell-initiated blood-brain barrier disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Holly L

    2012-03-01

    gadolinium-enhanced, T1-weighted MRI, and became moribund in this model system. Conclusion C57BL/6 mice are highly susceptible to microhemorrhage formation, severe CNS vascular permeability and morbidity compared to the 129 SvIm mouse. This susceptibility is transferable with the bone marrow compartment, demonstrating that hematopoietic factors are responsible for the onset of brain microhemorrhage and vascular permeability in immune-mediated fatal BBB disruption.

  6. Hematopoietic differentiation: a coordinated dynamical process towards attractor stable states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Simona

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differentiation process, proceeding from stem cells towards the different committed cell types, can be considered as a trajectory towards an attractor of a dynamical process. This view, taking into consideration the transcriptome and miRNome dynamics considered as a whole, instead of looking at few 'master genes' driving the system, offers a novel perspective on this phenomenon. We investigated the 'differentiation trajectories' of the hematopoietic system considering a genome-wide scenario. Results We developed serum-free liquid suspension unilineage cultures of cord blood (CB CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells through erythroid (E, megakaryocytic (MK, granulocytic (G and monocytic (Mo pathways. These cultures recapitulate physiological hematopoiesis, allowing the analysis of almost pure unilineage precursors starting from initial differentiation of HPCs until terminal maturation. By analyzing the expression profile of protein coding genes and microRNAs in unilineage CB E, MK, G and Mo cultures, at sequential stages of differentiation and maturation, we observed a coordinated, fully interconnected and scalable character of cell population behaviour in both transcriptome and miRNome spaces reminiscent of an attractor-like dynamics. MiRNome and transcriptome space differed for a still not terminally committed behaviour of microRNAs. Conclusions Consistent with their roles, the transcriptome system can be considered as the state space of a cell population, while the continuously evolving miRNA space corresponds to the tuning system necessary to reach the attractor. The behaviour of miRNA machinery could be of great relevance not only for the promise of reversing the differentiated state but even for tumor biology.

  7. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  8. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  9. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced systemic mastocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Reiter, Andreas; Scott, Bart L; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Damaj, Gandhi; Kreil, Sebastian; Shanley, Ryan; Hogan, William J; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Shore, Tsiporah; Baurmann, Herrad; Stuart, Robert; Gruhn, Bernd; Doubek, Michael; Hsu, Jack W; Tholouli, Eleni; Gromke, Tanja; Godley, Lucy A; Pagano, Livio; Gilman, Andrew; Wagner, Eva Maria; Shwayder, Tor; Bornhäuser, Martin; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Böhm, Alexandra; Vercellotti, Gregory; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Schmid, Christoph; Rabitsch, Werner; Pullarkat, Vinod; Legrand, Faezeh; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Saber, Wael; Barrett, John; Hermine, Olivier; Hagglund, Hans; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Popat, Uday; Alyea, Edwin P; Devine, Steven; Deeg, H Joachim; Weisdorf, Daniel; Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter

    2014-10-10

    Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM), a fatal hematopoietic malignancy characterized by drug resistance, has no standard therapy. The effectiveness of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHCT) in SM remains unknown. In a global effort to define the value of HCT in SM, 57 patients with the following subtypes of SM were evaluated: SM associated with clonal hematologic non-mast cell disorders (SM-AHNMD; n = 38), mast cell leukemia (MCL; n = 12), and aggressive SM (ASM; n = 7). Median age of patients was 46 years (range, 11 to 67 years). Donors were HLA-identical (n = 34), unrelated (n = 17), umbilical cord blood (n = 2), HLA-haploidentical (n = 1), or unknown (n = 3). Thirty-six patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and 21 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Responses in SM were observed in 40 patients (70%), with complete remission in 16 patients (28%). Twelve patients (21%) had stable disease, and five patients (9%) had primary refractory disease. Overall survival (OS) at 3 years was 57% for all patients, 74% for patients with SM-AHNMD, 43% for those with ASM, and 17% for those with MCL. The strongest risk factor for poor OS was MCL. Survival was also lower in patients receiving RIC compared with MAC and in patients having progression compared with patients having stable disease or response. AlloHCT was associated with long-term survival in patients with advanced SM. Although alloHCT may be considered as a viable and potentially curative therapeutic option for advanced SM in the meantime, given that this is a retrospective analysis with no control group, the definitive role of alloHCT will need to be determined by a prospective trial. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Oral complications in hematopoietic stem cell recipients: the role of inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverman, T. M.; Raber-Durlacher, J. E.; Rademacher, W. M. H.; Vokurka, S.; Epstein, J. B.; Huisman, C.; Hazenberg, M. D.; de Soet, J. J.; de Lange, J.; Rozema, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is widely used as a potentially curative treatment for patients with various hematological malignancies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and congenital immune deficiencies. The prevalence of oral complications in both autologous and allogeneic HSCT

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine: Astray or on the Path?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Albrecht M; Huppertz, Sascha; Henschler, Reinhard

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the best characterized adult stem cells and the only stem cell type in routine clinical use. The concept of stem cell transplantation laid the foundations for the development of novel cell therapies within, and even outside, the hematopoietic system. Here, we report on the history of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and of HSC isolation, we briefly summarize the capabilities of HSCs to reconstitute the entire hemato/lymphoid cell system, and we assess current indications for HCT. We aim to draw the lines between areas where HCT has been firmly established, areas where HCT can in the future be expected to be of clinical benefit using their regenerative functions, and areas where doubts persist. We further review clinical trials for diverse approaches that are based on HCT. Finally, we highlight the advent of genome editing in HSCs and critically view the use of HSCs in non-hematopoietic tissue regeneration.

  12. Expression of human adenosine deaminase in mice reconstituted with retrovirus-transduced hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.M.; Danos, O.; Grossman, M.; Raulet, D.H.; Mulligan, R.C.

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant retroviruses encoding human adenosine deaminase have been used to infect murine hematopoietic stem cells. In bone marrow transplant recipients reconstituted with the genetically modified cells, human ADA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of the recipients for at least 6 months after transplantation. In animals analyzed in detail 4 months after transplantation, human ADA and proviral sequences were detected in all hematopoietic lineages; in several cases, human ADA activity exceeded the endogenous activity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a functional human ADA gene into hematopoietic stem cells and obtaining expression in multiple hematopoietic lineages long after transplantation. This approach should be helpful in designing effective gene therapies for severe combined immunodeficiency syndromes in humans

  13. Oral features and dental health in Hurler Syndrome following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGovern, Eleanor

    2010-09-01

    Hurler Syndrome is associated with a deficiency of a specific lysosomal enzyme involved in the degradation of glycosaminoglycans. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in early infancy is undertaken to help prevent the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans and improve organ function.

  14. Restricted intra-embryonic origin of bona fide hematopoietic stem cells in the chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yvernogeau, Laurent; Robin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which are responsible for blood cell production, are generated during embryonic development. Human and chicken embryos share features that position the chicken as a reliable and accessible alternative model to study developmental hematopoiesis. However, the existence

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibition regulates inflammation and enhances Tregs after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, S.W.; Gatza, E.; Hou, G.; Sun, Y; Whitfield, J.; Song, Y.; Oravecz-Wilson, K.; Tawara, I.; Dinarello, C.A.; Reddy, P.

    2015-01-01

    We examined immunological responses in patients receiving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition (vorinostat) for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Vorinostat treatment increased histone acetylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from

  16. Parametric Response Mapping as an Indicator of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galban, Craig J.; Boes, Jennifer L.; Bule, Maria; Kitko, Carrie L.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Lama, Vihba; Telenga, Eef D.; van den Berge, Maarten; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Kazerooni, Ella A.; Ponkowski, Michael J.; Ross, Brian D.; Yanik, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The management of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after hematopoietic cell transplantation presents many challenges, both diagnostically and therapeutically. We developed a computed tomography (CT) voxel-wise methodology termed parametric response mapping (PRM) that quantifies normal

  17. Effect of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and embryonic AGM stromal cells on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Si; Sun Hanying; Liu Wenli

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of cotransplantation of hematopoietic stem cells and stromal cells derived from aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region on hematopoietic reconstitution in mice after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Methods: The typical mice model of syngeneic BMT was established and the mice were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group, the BMT group, the group of cotransplantation of HSC with AGM stromal cells (the cotransplantation group) and the ligustrazine group (the LT group). On days 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 after BMT, the peripheral blood cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNC) were counted, and histology changes of bone marrow were detected. Results: The levels of peripheral WBC, RBC, platelet, and BMMNC in the contransplantation group were significantly higher than those in the single BMT group and the LT group (P<0.05). Conclusions: Cotransplantation with AGM stromal cells could significantly promote hematopoietic reconstruction in mice after BMT. (authors)

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Styczyński, Jan; Dębski, Robert; Krenska, Anna; Czyżewski, Krzysztof; Dembna, Ewa; Irga, Ninela; Szalewska, Magdalena; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Płonowski, Marcin; Leszczyńska, Elżbieta; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Żyromska, Agnieszka; Drzewiecka, Barbara; Majewska, Karolina; Windorbska, Wiesława

    2012-01-01

    Background. ALL is the most common indication for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo- HSCT) in children. Objective. The analysis of results of therapy in children and adolescents treated for ALL with allo-HSCT. Patients and methods. A total number of 41 patients undergoing allo-HSCT due to ALL between 2003 and 2012. In 17 patients HSCT was performed from related donor and in 24 from unrelated donor. A source of hematopoietic stem cells was peripheral blood in 21 patients...

  19. NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Gough, Sheryl M.; Slape, Christopher I.; Aplan, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically ...

  20. Improvement in the quality of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase crystals in a microgravity environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Aritake, Kosuke; Furubayashi, Naoki; Takahashi, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Mari; Hirota, Erika; Sano, Satoshi; Sato, Masaru; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuo; Inaka, Koji; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Crystals of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase grown in microgravity show improved quality. Human hematopoietic prostaglandin synthase, one of the better therapeutic target enzymes for allergy and inflammation, was crystallized with 22 inhibitors and in three inhibitor-free conditions in microgravity. Most of the space-grown crystals showed better X-ray diffraction patterns than the terrestrially grown ones, indicating the advantage of a microgravity environment on protein crystallization, especially in the case of this protein

  1. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Féraud

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process.

  2. In vivo single cell analysis reveals Gata2 dynamics in cells transitioning to hematopoietic fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, Christina; Arlt, Jochen; Vink, Chris S; Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Mariani, Samanta A; van der Linden, Reinier; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2018-01-02

    Cell fate is established through coordinated gene expression programs in individual cells. Regulatory networks that include the Gata2 transcription factor play central roles in hematopoietic fate establishment. Although Gata2 is essential to the embryonic development and function of hematopoietic stem cells that form the adult hierarchy, little is known about the in vivo expression dynamics of Gata2 in single cells. Here, we examine Gata2 expression in single aortic cells as they establish hematopoietic fate in Gata2Venus mouse embryos. Time-lapse imaging reveals rapid pulsatile level changes in Gata2 reporter expression in cells undergoing endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition. Moreover, Gata2 reporter pulsatile expression is dramatically altered in Gata2 +/- aortic cells, which undergo fewer transitions and are reduced in hematopoietic potential. Our novel finding of dynamic pulsatile expression of Gata2 suggests a highly unstable genetic state in single cells concomitant with their transition to hematopoietic fate. This reinforces the notion that threshold levels of Gata2 influence fate establishment and has implications for transcription factor-related hematologic dysfunctions. © 2018 Eich et al.

  3. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells regulate the regeneration of their niche by secreting Angiopoietin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo O; Ding, Lei; Morrison, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained by a perivascular niche in bone marrow but it is unclear whether the niche is reciprocally regulated by HSCs. Here, we systematically assessed the expression and function of Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) in bone marrow. Angpt1 was not expressed by osteoblasts. Angpt1 was most highly expressed by HSCs, and at lower levels by c-kit+ hematopoietic progenitors, megakaryocytes, and Leptin Receptor+ (LepR+) stromal cells. Global conditional deletion of Angpt1, or deletion from osteoblasts, LepR+ cells, Nes-cre-expressing cells, megakaryocytes, endothelial cells or hematopoietic cells in normal mice did not affect hematopoiesis, HSC maintenance, or HSC quiescence. Deletion of Angpt1 from hematopoietic cells and LepR+ cells had little effect on vasculature or HSC frequency under steady-state conditions but accelerated vascular and hematopoietic recovery after irradiation while increasing vascular leakiness. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells and LepR+ stromal cells regulate niche regeneration by secreting Angpt1, reducing vascular leakiness but slowing niche recovery. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05521.001 PMID:25821987

  5. Dissection of the transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells by the oncogene NUP98-HOXA9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R Yassin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of a group of oncoproteins associated with acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 fused to the homeodomain of HOXA9 and is believed to act as an aberrant transcription factor that binds DNA through the homeodomain. Here we show that NUP98-HOXA9 can regulate transcription without binding to DNA. In order to determine the relative contributions of the NUP98 and HOXA9 portions to the transforming ability of NUP98-HOXA9, the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on primary human CD34+ cells were dissected and compared to those of wild-type HOXA9. In contrast to previous findings in mouse cells, HOXA9 had only mild effects on the differentiation and proliferation of primary human hematopoietic cells. The ability of NUP98-HOXA9 to disrupt the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells was found to depend primarily on the NUP98 portion, whereas induction of long-term proliferation required both the NUP98 moiety and an intact homeodomain. Using oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human CD34+ cells, a group of genes was identified whose dysregulation by NUP98-HOXA9 is attributable primarily to the NUP98 portion. These include RAP1A, HEY1, and PTGS2 (COX-2. Their functions may reflect the contribution of the NUP98 moiety of NUP98-HOXA9 to leukemic transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on gene transcription and cell transformation are mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms: one that involves promoter binding through the homeodomain with direct transcriptional activation, and another that depends predominantly on the NUP98 moiety and does not involve direct DNA binding.

  6. Dissection of the transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells by the oncogene NUP98-HOXA9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Enas R; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Dombrowski, James; Han, Ye; Takeda, Akiko; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2009-08-21

    NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of a group of oncoproteins associated with acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 fused to the homeodomain of HOXA9 and is believed to act as an aberrant transcription factor that binds DNA through the homeodomain. Here we show that NUP98-HOXA9 can regulate transcription without binding to DNA. In order to determine the relative contributions of the NUP98 and HOXA9 portions to the transforming ability of NUP98-HOXA9, the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on primary human CD34+ cells were dissected and compared to those of wild-type HOXA9. In contrast to previous findings in mouse cells, HOXA9 had only mild effects on the differentiation and proliferation of primary human hematopoietic cells. The ability of NUP98-HOXA9 to disrupt the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells was found to depend primarily on the NUP98 portion, whereas induction of long-term proliferation required both the NUP98 moiety and an intact homeodomain. Using oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human CD34+ cells, a group of genes was identified whose dysregulation by NUP98-HOXA9 is attributable primarily to the NUP98 portion. These include RAP1A, HEY1, and PTGS2 (COX-2). Their functions may reflect the contribution of the NUP98 moiety of NUP98-HOXA9 to leukemic transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on gene transcription and cell transformation are mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms: one that involves promoter binding through the homeodomain with direct transcriptional activation, and another that depends predominantly on the NUP98 moiety and does not involve direct DNA binding.

  7. Sources of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Methods to Optimize Yields for Clinical Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panch, Sandhya R; Szymanski, James; Savani, Bipin N; Stroncek, David F

    2017-08-01

    Bone marrow (BM) aspirates, mobilized peripheral blood, and umbilical cord blood (UCB) have developed as graft sources for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) for stem cell transplantation and other cellular therapeutics. Individualized techniques are necessary to enhance graft HSPC yields and cell quality from each graft source. BM aspirates yield adequate CD34 + cells but can result in relative delays in engraftment. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)-primed BM HSPCs may facilitate faster engraftment while minimizing graft-versus-host disease in certain patient subsets. The levels of circulating HSPCs are enhanced using mobilizing agents, such as G-CSF and/or plerixafor, which act via the stromal cell-derived factor 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 axis. Alternate niche pathway mediators, including very late antigen-4/vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, heparan sulfate proteoglycans, parathyroid hormone, and coagulation cascade intermediates, may offer promising alternatives for graft enhancement. UCB grafts have been expanded ex vivo with cytokines, notch-ligand, or mesenchymal stromal cells, and most studies demonstrated greater quantities of CD34 + cells ex vivo and improved short-term engraftment. No significant changes were observed in long-term repopulating potential or in patient survival. Early phase clinical trials using nicotinamide and StemReginin1 may offer improved short- and long-term repopulating ability. Breakthroughs in genome editing and stem cell reprogramming technologies may hasten the generation of pooled, third-party HSPC grafts. This review elucidates past, present, and potential future approaches to HSPC graft optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  9. Mediatized Humanitarianism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts to legiti......The article investigates the implications of mediatization for the legitimation strategies of humanitarian organizations. Based on a (full population) corpus of ~400 pages of brochure material from 1970 to 2007, the micro-textual processes involved in humanitarian organizations' efforts...... legitimation by accountancy, legitimation by institutionalization, and legitimation by compensation. The analysis relates these changes to a problem of trust associated with mediatization through processes of mediation....

  10. LMW Heparin Prevents Increased Kidney Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in (NZBxNZWF1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annica Hedberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated that continuous infusion of low molecular weight (LMW heparin delays autoantibody production and development of lupus nephritis in (NZBxNZWF1 (B/W mice. In this study we investigated the effect of LMW heparin on renal cytokine and chemokine expression and on nucleosome-mediated activation of nucleosome-specific splenocytes. Total mRNA extracted from kidneys of heparin-treated or -untreated B/W mice was analysed by qPCR for the expression of several cytokines, chemokines, and Toll-like receptors. Splenocytes taken from B/W mice were stimulated with nucleosomes with or without the presence of heparin. Splenocyte cell proliferation as thymidine incorporation and the expression of costimulatory molecules and cell activation markers were measured. Heparin treatment of B/W mice reduced the in vivo expression of CCR2, IL1β, and TLR7 compared to untreated B/W mice. Nucleosome-induced cell proliferation of splenocytes was not influenced by heparin. The expression of CD80, CD86, CD69, CD25, CTLA-4, and TLR 2, 7, 8, and 9 was upregulated upon stimulation by nucleosomes, irrespective of whether heparin was added to the cell culture or not. In conclusion, treatment with heparin lowers the kidney expression of proinflammatory mediators in B/W mice but does not affect nucleosomal activation of splenocytes.

  11. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petz LD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lawrence D Petz,1 John C Burnett,2 Haitang Li,3 Shirley Li,3 Richard Tonai,1 Milena Bakalinskaya,4 Elizabeth J Shpall,5 Sue Armitage,6 Joanne Kurtzberg,7 Donna M Regan,8 Pamela Clark,9 Sergio Querol,10 Jonathan A Gutman,11 Stephen R Spellman,12 Loren Gragert,13 John J Rossi2 1StemCyte International Cord Blood Center, Baldwin Park, CA, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Irell and Manella Graduate School of Biological Sciences, 3Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA; 4CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 Research Department, StemCyte International Cord Blood Center, Baldwin Park, CA, USA; 5Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 6MD Anderson Cord Blood Bank, Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA; 7Carolinas Cord Blood Bank, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 8St Louis Cord Blood Bank, SSM Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center, St Louis, MO, USA; 9Enhance Quality Consulting Inc., Oviedo, FL, USA; 10Cell Therapy Service and Cord Blood Bank, Banc de Sang i Teixits, Barcelona, Spain; 11BMT/Hematologic Malignancies, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA; 12Immunobiology and Observational Research, CIBMTR, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 13National Marrow Donor Program/Be The Match, Minneapolis, MN, USA Abstract: HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-Δ32/Δ32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV

  12. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  13. OP9-Lhx2 stromal cells facilitate derivation of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Generating engraftable hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is an ideal approach for obtaining induced HSCs for cell therapy. However, the path from PSCs to robustly induced HSCs (iHSCs in vitro remains elusive. We hypothesize that the modification of hematopoietic niche cells by transcription factors facilitates the derivation of induced HSCs from PSCs. The Lhx2 transcription factor is expressed in fetal liver stromal cells but not in fetal blood cells. Knocking out Lhx2 leads to a fetal hematopoietic defect in a cell non-autonomous role. In this study, we demonstrate that the ectopic expression of Lhx2 in OP9 cells (OP9-Lhx2 accelerates the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. OP9-Lhx2 significantly increased the yields of hematopoietic progenitor cells via co-culture with PSCs in vitro. Interestingly, the co-injection of OP9-Lhx2 and PSCs into immune deficient mice also increased the proportion of hematopoietic progenitors via the formation of teratomas. The transplantation of phenotypic HSCs from OP9-Lhx2 teratomas but not from the OP9 control supported a transient repopulating capability. The upregulation of Apln gene by Lhx2 is correlated to the hematopoietic commitment property of OP9-Lhx2. Furthermore, the enforced expression of Apln in OP9 cells significantly increased the hematopoietic differentiation of PSCs. These results indicate that OP9-Lhx2 is a good cell line for regeneration of hematopoietic progenitors both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Interleukin-21 promotes thymopoiesis recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Tormo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impaired T cell reconstitution remains a major deterrent in the field of bone marrow (BM transplantation (BMT due to pre-conditioning-induced damages inflicted to the thymi of recipient hosts. Given the previously reported thymo-stimulatory property of interleukin (IL-21, we reasoned that its use post-BMT could have a profound effect on de novo T cell development. Methods To evaluate the effect of IL-21 on de novo T cell development in vivo, BM derived from RAG2p-GFP mice was transplanted into LP/J mice. Lymphocyte reconstitution was first assessed using a hematological analyzer and a flow cytometer on collected blood samples. Detailed flow cytometry analysis was then performed on the BM, thymus, and spleen of transplanted animals. Finally, the effect of human IL-21 on thymopoiesis was validated in humanized mice. Results Using a major histocompatibility complex (MHC-matched allogeneic BMT model, we found that IL-21 administration improves immune reconstitution by triggering the proliferation of BM Lin−Sca1+c-kit+ (LSK subsets. The pharmacological effect of IL-21 also culminates in the recovery of both hematopoietic (thymocytes and non-hematopoietic (stromal cells within the thymi of IL-21-treated recipient animals. Although T cells derived from all transplanted groups proliferate, secrete various cytokines, and express granzyme B similarly in response to T cell receptor (TCR stimulation, full regeneration of peripheral naïve CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and normal TCRvβ distribution could only be detected in IL-21-treated recipient mice. Astonishingly, none of the recipient mice who underwent IL-21 treatment developed graft-versus-host disease (GVHD in the MHC-matched allogeneic setting while the graft-versus-tumor (GVT effect was strongly retained. Inhibition of GVHD onset could also be attributed to the enhanced generation of regulatory B cells (B10 observed in the IL-21, but not PBS, recipient mice. We also tested the

  15. Response of hematopoietic stem cells to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, A.

    2008-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood and immune system throughout life and restore them after hematological injuries. Exposure of an organism to ionizing radiation (IR) causes rapid and acute myelosuppression and challenges the replenishment capacity of HSCs. Yet, the precise damages that are generated remain largely unexplored. To better understand these effects, phenotypic and functional changes in the stem/progenitor compartments of sublethally irradiated mice were monitored over a ten week period after radiation exposure. We report that shortly after sublethal IR-exposure, HSCs, defined by their repopulating ability, still segregate in the Hoechst dye excluding side population (SP); yet, their Sca-1 (S) and c-Kit (K) expression levels are increased and severely reduced, respectively, with a concurrent increase in the proportion of SP SK cells positive for established indicators of HSC presence: CD150 + and CD105 + . A great proportion of HSCs quickly but transiently enter the cell cycle to replenish the bone marrow of myelo-ablated mice. Ten weeks after, whereas bone marrow cellularity has recovered and hematopoietic homeostasis is restored, major phenotypic modifications can be observed within the Lin -/low Sca-1 + c-Kit + (LSK) stem/progenitor compartment: CD150 + /Flk2 - and CD150 - /Flk2 + LSK cell frequencies are increased and dramatically reduced, respectively. CD150 + LSK cells also show impaired reconstitution capacity, accrued number of γ-H2AX foci and increased tendency to apoptosis. This demonstrates that the LSK compartment is not properly restored 10 weeks after sublethal exposure, and that long-term IR-induced injury to the bone marrow proceeds, at least partially, through direct damage to the stem cell pool. Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been shown to promote the survival of lethally irradiated mice when administrated quickly after exposure. We investigated the mechanisms underlying this effect, and found in a competitive transplant

  16. Distinguishing imaging features between spinal hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow and bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigematsu, Y; Hirai, T; Kawanaka, K; Shiraishi, S; Yoshida, M; Kitajima, M; Uetani, H; Azuma, M; Iryo, Y; Yamashita, Y

    2014-10-01

    Systematic investigations of the distinguishing imaging features between spinal hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow and bone metastasis have not been reported, to our knowledge. The purpose of this study was to determine the distinguishing imaging features of the 2 entities. We retrospectively reviewed the radiologic images of 8 consecutive male patients (age range, 52-78 years; mean, 64 years) with suspected spinal metastasis on MR imaging and FDG-PET, which was later confirmed as hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow. MR imaging, FDG-PET, CT, and bone scintigraphy images were qualitatively and/or quantitatively evaluated. Imaging findings in 24 patients with spinal metastasis were compared, and differences were statistically analyzed. All 8 vertebral hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow lesions were hypointense on T1- and T2-weighted images; lesions contiguous with the adjacent vertebra were significantly more often seen in hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow than in metastasis (P = .035). T2 signal intensity of the lesion was significantly different between the 2 entities (P = .033). FDG-PET showed slightly higher uptake in all hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow lesions; their maximum standard uptake value was significantly lower than that of metastatic lesions (P = .037). CT attenuation of hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow was equal to or slightly higher than that of adjacent normal-appearing vertebra; the CT appearances of hyperplastic hematopoietic bone marrow and metastasis were significantly different (P bone marrow; the uptake was significantly different from that of metastasis (P 3.6, the lesion was considered metastatic. A normal appearance on CT or bone scintigraphy excluded metastasis. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Administration of interleukin-6 stimulates multilineage hematopoiesis and accelerates recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic depression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Williams, J.L.; Schwartz, G.N.; Souza, L.M. (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    Hematopoietic depression and subsequent susceptibility to potentially lethal opportunistic infections are well-documented phenomena following radiotherapy. Methods to therapeutically mitigate radiation-induced myelosuppression could offer great clinical value. In vivo studies have demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (CFU-s), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC), and erythroid progenitor cell (CFU-e) proliferation in normal mice. Based on these results, the ability of IL-6 to stimulate hematopoietic regeneration following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury was also evaluated. C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy 60Co radiation and subcutaneously administered either saline or IL-6 on days 1 through 3 or 1 through 6 postexposure. On days 7, 10, 14, 17, and 22, femoral and splenic CFU-s, GM-CFC, and CFU-e contents and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet counts were determined. Compared with saline treatment, both 3-day and 6-day IL-6 treatments accelerated hematopoietic recovery; 6-day treatment produced the greater effects. For example, compared with normal control values (N), femoral and splenic CFU-s numbers in IL-6-treated mice 17 days postirradiation were 27% N and 136% N versus 2% N and 10% N in saline-treated mice. At the same time, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC values were 58% N and 473% N versus 6% N and 196% N in saline-treated mice; bone marrow and splenic CFU-e numbers were 91% N and 250% N versus 31% N and 130% N in saline-treated mice; and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet values were 210% N, 60% N, and 24% N versus 18% N, 39% N, and 7% N in saline-treated mice. These studies demonstrate that therapeutically administered IL-6 can effectively accelerate multilineage hematopoietic recovery following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury.

  18. Complex Mediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Andersen, Peter Bøgh

    2005-01-01

    This article has its starting point in a large number of empirical findings regarding computer-mediated work. These empirical findings have challenged our understanding of the role of mediation in such work; on the one hand as an aspect of communication and cooperation at work and on the other hand...... as an aspect of human engagement with instruments of work. On the basis of previous work in activity-theoretical and semiotic human—computer interaction, we propose a model to encompass both of these aspects. In a dialogue with our empirical findings we move on to propose a number of types of mediation...... that have helped to enrich our understanding of mediated work and the design of computer mediation for such work....

  19. Zinc finger protein 521 antagonizes early B-cell factor 1 and modulates the B-lymphoid differentiation of primary hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Tiziana; Lupia, Michela; Amodio, Nicola; Horton, Sarah J; Mesuraca, Maria; Pelaggi, Daniela; Agosti, Valter; Grieco, Michele; Chiarella, Emanuela; Spina, Raffaella; Moore, Malcolm A S; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Bond, Heather M; Morrone, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (EHZF/ZNF521) is a multi-functional transcription co-factor containing 30 zinc fingers and an amino-terminal motif that binds to the nucleosome remodelling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZNF521 is believed to be a relevant player in the regulation of the homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we show that this protein plays an important role in the control of B-cell development by inhibiting the activity of early B-cell factor-1 (EBF1), a master factor in B-lineage specification. In particular, our data demonstrate that: (1) ZNF521 binds to EBF1 via its carboxyl-terminal portion and this interaction is required for EBF1 inhibition; (2) NuRD complex recruitment by ZNF521 is not essential for the inhibition of transactivation of EBF1-dependent promoters; (3) ZNF521 represses EBF1 target genes in a human B-lymphoid molecular context; and (4) RNAi-mediated silencing of ZNF521/Zfp521 in primary human and murine hematopoietic progenitors strongly enhances the generation of B-lymphocytes in vitro. Taken together, our data indicate that ZNF521 can antagonize B-cell development and lend support to the notion that it may contribute to conserve the multipotency of primitive lympho-myeloid progenitors by preventing or delaying their EBF1-driven commitment toward the B-cell lineage.

  20. The role of hematopoietic SCT in adult Burkitt lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S O; Sureda, A; Aljurf, M

    2013-05-01

    Adult Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is an aggressive disease characterized by frequent extranodal presentation, bulky disease and a rapid clinical course. Although intensive chemotherapeutic regimes result in long-term disease-free survival in most patients, a significant proportion of patients will have high-risk disease that may be refractory or that will relapse. In these patients, the role of hematopoietic SCT is not well defined, especially in the era of modern chemoimmunotherapy. Upfront auto-SCT has been reported to be feasible in patients who have high-risk features at presentation, and in whom it is a clinical option. In patients with relapsed disease, auto-SCT can result in a PFS of 30-40%. Allo-SCT is an option in relapsing patients with a sibling or matched related donor who may not be eligible for, or may have previously received, an auto-SCT; the role of RIC and T-cell depletion is not well defined. Disease status at transplant is the most significant predictor of outcome in patients undergoing SCT. Here we review the available evidence pertaining to SCT in patients with BL, including in those who are HIV positive (HIV+) and those with B-cell lymphoma unclassified (BCLU). Prospective studies in the era of modern intensive chemoimmunotherapeutic regimes are required to delineate the precise role of transplantation for BL. Developments in molecular diagnostics, incorporation of FDG-PET and minimal residual disease monitoring along with new therapies may further assist in refining treatment algorithms.

  1. Massage for Children Undergoing Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Qualitative Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Sara L.; Lown, E. Anne; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Dunn, Elizabeth A.; Abrams, Donald I.; Horn, Biljana N.; Degelman, Marcia; Cowan, Morton J.; Mehling, Wolf E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. No in-depth qualitative research exists about the effects of therapeutic massage with children hospitalized to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The objective of this study is to describe parent caregivers' experience of the effects of massage/acupressure for their children undergoing HCT. Methods. We conducted a qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 15 parents of children in the intervention arm of a massage/acupressure trial. Children received both practitioner and parent-provided massage/acupressure. Results. Parents reported that their child experienced relief from pain and nausea, relaxation, and greater ease falling asleep. They also reported increased caregiver competence and closeness with their child as a result of learning and performing massage/acupressure. Parents supported a semistandardized massage protocol. Conclusion. Massage/acupressure may support symptom relief and promote relaxation and sleep among pediatric HCT patients if administered with attention to individual patients' needs and hospital routines and may relieve stress among parents, improve caregiver competence, and enhance the sense of connection between parent and child. PMID:22474526

  2. Replication stress in hematopoietic stem cells in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Johanna; Milyavsky, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Life-long blood regeneration relies on a rare population of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These cells' nearly unlimited self-renewal potential and lifetime persistence in the body signifies the need for tight control of their genome integrity. Their quiescent state, tightly linked with low metabolic activity, is one of the main strategies employed by HSCs to preserve an intact genome. On the other hand, HSCs need to be able to quickly respond to increased blood demands and rapidly increase their cellular output in order to fight infection-associated inflammation or extensive blood loss. This increase in proliferation rate, however, comes at the price of exposing HSCs to DNA damage inevitably associated with the process of DNA replication. Any interference with normal replication fork progression leads to a specialized molecular response termed replication stress (RS). Importantly, increased levels of RS are a hallmark feature of aged HSCs, where an accumulating body of evidence points to causative relationships between RS and the aging-associated impairment of the blood system's functional capacity. In this review, we present an overview of RS in HSCs focusing on its causes and consequences for the blood system of mice and men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic Nutritional Support in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuji, Shigeo; Einsele, Hermann; Savani, Bipin N; Kapp, Markus

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become an established treatment modality for various hematological diseases. However, in allogeneic HSCT, patients often suffer from severe gastrointestinal complications caused by the conditioning regimen and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease, which requires support by multidisciplinary nutritional support teams (NST). In addition, pretransplantation nutritional status can affect the clinical outcome after allogeneic HSCT. Therefore, it is important to refer the patient to a NST when becoming aware of nutritional problems before allogeneic HSCT. It is also important to follow nutritional status over the long term, as patients often suffer from various nutritional problems, such as malnutrition and metabolic syndrome, even late after allogeneic HSCT. In summary, NST can contribute to the improvement of nutritional status and possibly prognosis at every stage before and after allogeneic HSCT. Here, we aim to give a comprehensive overview of current understanding about nutritional support in allogeneic HSCT and try to provoke a constructive discussion to stimulate further investigation. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT: phenotypes and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, A; Godet, C; Chevret, S; Lorillon, G; Peffault de Latour, R; de Revel, T; Robin, M; Ribaud, P; Socié, G; Tazi, A

    2013-06-01

    Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is recognized as a new-onset obstructive lung defect (OLD) in pulmonary function testing and is related to pulmonary chronic GVHD. Little is known about the different phenotypes of patients with BOS and their outcomes. We reviewed the data of all allogeneic HSCT recipients referred to our pulmonary department for a non-infectious bronchial disease between 1999 and 2010. We identified 103 patients (BOS (n=77), asthma (n=11) and chronic bronchitis (n=15)). In patients with BOS, we identified two functional phenotypes: a typical OLD, that is, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio <0.7 (n=53), and an atypical OLD with a concomitant decrease in the FEV1 <80% and FVC <80% predicted with a normal total lung capacity (n=24). The typical OLD was characterized by more severe FEV1 and fewer centrilobular nodules on the computed tomography scan. The FEV1 was not significantly affected during the follow-up, regardless of the phenotype. In addition to acute and extensive chronic GVHD, only the occurrence of BOS soon after transplantation and the intentional treatment of BOS with steroids were associated with a poor survival. The determination of patient subgroups should be explored to improve the management of this condition.

  5. Fever and neutropenia in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, C A; Nair, J; Sandesh, S; Chan, K W

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify patterns of fever and neutropenia in pediatric patients undergoing initial hospitalization for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A retrospective review of 75 HSCTs over a 4-year period at a single institution was performed, of which 68% were allogeneic and 32% were autologous. Stem cell sources included bone marrow (29%), PBSC (52%) and umbilical cord blood (16%). Fever occurred in 74 (98%) of the episodes. Unexplained fever (FUO) occurred in 43%. Bacteremia without an anatomic focus occurred in 29%, while CVC associated infections occurred in 17%. In 49% of transplants at least one blood culture was positive. The incidence of bacteremia was higher in allogeneic HSCTs (58%) than in autologous transplants (29%). Gram-positive bacteria accounted for 71% of the isolates. Lower rates of bacteremia were observed in patients receiving oral fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. The median duration of fever was 12.5 days and time to engraftment 14 days. Regression analysis demonstrated that duration of fever was strongly associated with time to engraftment, and that time to engraftment was associated with source of cells and number of CD34+ cells/kg administered. Recipients of autologous PBSC had the shortest durations of fever and time to engraftment, while recipients of allogeneic umbilical cord blood had the longest. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 59-65.

  6. HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR OLDER PATIENTS WITH MDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazyar Shadman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS increases with age. While several therapeutic modalities have been developed, for most of these patients the only treatment with curative potential is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. The development of reduced/low intensity transplant conditioning regimens allows to successfully transplant patients in their ‘60s and even ‘70s, although comorbidities may determine who does come to transplantation and who does not. Also, as many as half of the patients will develop graft versus host disease (GVHD, even with HLA matched  donors, requiring therapy for extended periods of time,  and GVHD and treatment  with glucocorticoids is likely to impact the quality  of life. Nevertheless, dependent upon disease stage at HCT, the presence of comorbidities and the regimen used, 30% to 50% of patients  60 years of age or older, may survive long-term cured of their disease. Future studies should focus on the incorporation of non-transplant modalities into the overall transplant approach, the prevention of GVHD, and the utilization of immunotherapy to reduce the incidence of relapse and GVHD and further improve overall transplant success.

  7. Hematopoietic lineage distribution and evolutionary dynamics of clonal hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Christopher Maximilian; Galan-Sousa, Joel; Hoyer, Kaja; Chan, Willy; Jäger, Marten; Yoshida, Kenichi; Seemann, Ricarda; Noerenberg, Daniel; Waldhueter, Nils; Fleischer-Notter, Helga; Christen, Friederike; Schmitt, Clemens A; Dörken, Bernd; Pelzer, Uwe; Sinn, Marianne; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Ogawa, Seishi; Märdian, Sven; Schreiber, Adrian; Kunitz, Annegret; Krüger, Ulrike; Bullinger, Lars; Mylonas, Elena; Frick, Mareike; Damm, Frederik

    2018-03-01

    Clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential (CHIP) occurs in an age-related manner and associates with an increased risk of hematologic cancer, atherosclerotic disease, and shorter overall survival. Little is known about the cell of origin, repartition patterns of clonal mutations within the hematopoietic differentiation tree, and its dynamics under evolutionary pressure. Using targeted sequencing, CHIP was identified in 121 out of 437 elderly individuals (27.7%). Variant allele frequencies (VAFs) of 91 mutations were studied in six peripheral blood cell fractions. VAFs were significantly higher in monocytes, granulocytes, and NK-cells compared to B- or T cells. In all cases with available bone marrow material, mutations could be identified in Lin - CD34 + CD38 - HSCs with subsequent expansion to myeloid primed progenitors. In 22 patients with solid cancer receiving (radio-)chemotherapy, longitudinal study of 32 mutations at 121 time points identified relative VAF changes of at least 50% in 13/32 mutations. VAFs of DNMT3A, were stable in 12/13 cases (P < .001). Cancer patients with a clonal mutation other than DNMT3A required more often red blood cell transfusions and dose reductions. Our results provide novel insights into cellular distribution of clonal mutations, their dynamics under chemotherapy, and advocate for systematic analyses for CHIP in cancer patients.

  8. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells as Effectors in Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Granick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shed light on novel functions of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC. While they are critical for maintenance and replenishment of blood cells in the bone marrow, these cells are not limited to the bone marrow compartment and function beyond their role in hematopoiesis. HSPC can leave bone marrow and circulate in peripheral blood and lymph, a process often manipulated therapeutically for the purpose of transplantation. Additionally, these cells preferentially home to extramedullary sites of inflammation where they can differentiate to more mature effector cells. HSPC are susceptible to various pathogens, though they may participate in the innate immune response without being directly infected. They express pattern recognition receptors for detection of endogenous and exogenous danger-associated molecular patterns and respond not only by the formation of daughter cells but can themselves secrete powerful cytokines. This paper summarizes the functional and phenotypic characterization of HSPC, their niche within and outside of the bone marrow, and what is known regarding their role in the innate immune response.

  9. Trimming the fat: obesity and hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, B M; Vogl, D T; Berger, N A; Stadtmauer, E A; Lazarus, H M

    2013-09-01

    Obesity, increasing worldwide, is common in patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). This complex physiological state may alter the outcome of cancer therapies by many mechanisms including direct effects on pathogenesis, host responses to disease and altered pharmacology of chemotherapy. Obesity has been associated with multiple adverse health outcomes. Reports of obese patients undergoing HCT are challenging to interpret because of the heterogeneity of obesity definitions, underlying diseases, graft sources and chemotherapy regimens employed. Compared with normal-weight patients, it appears that obese patients undergoing allogeneic HCT have a higher risk of non-relapse mortality and inferior survival whereas those receiving autologous HCT appear to have equivalent outcomes. These findings are also difficult to interpret because there is no consistent standard for calculating chemotherapy dose in this group and future studies on specific regimens in this population are urgently needed. Patients who have undergone bariatric surgery may be at risk for unexpected events because of impaired nutritional state and altered pharmacokinetics of oral drugs. We recommend that future studies utilize more consistent and biologically relevant definitions of obesity and that the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of specific conditioning regimens be studied. Until more evidence is available, a rationale is presented for dosing based on adjusted body weight. Moreover, recommendations are provided to guide future research efforts based on more definitive measurements of body fat and its distribution available through modern quantitative imaging techniques using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or magnetic resonance imaging scanning.

  10. Central nervous system infection following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanajiri, Ryo; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Kosuke; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watakabe, Kyoko; Murata, Yutaka; Hagino, Takeshi; Seno, Yasushi; Najima, Yuho; Igarashi, Aiko; Doki, Noriko; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2017-03-01

    Here, we described the clinical characteristics and outcomes of central nervous system (CNS) infections occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in a single institution over the previous 6 years. Charts of 353 consecutive allogeneic transplant recipients were retrospectively reviewed for CNS infection. A total of 17 cases of CNS infection were identified at a median of 38 days (range, 10-1028 days) after allo-HSCT. Causative pathogens were human herpesvirus-6 (n=6), enterococcus (n=2), staphylococcus (n=2), streptococcus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=1), cytomegalovirus (n=1), John Cunningham virus (n=1), adenovirus (n=1), and Toxoplasma gondii (n=1). The cumulative incidence of CNS infection was 4.1% at 1 year and 5.5% at 5 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that high-risk disease status was a risk factor for developing CNS infection (p=.02), and that overall survival at 3 years after allo-HSCT was 33% in patients with CNS infection and 53% in those without CNS infection (p=.04). Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential Cellular Signatures of Viral Infections in Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mikovits

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Expression profiling of cellular genes was performed using a 10,000 cDNA human gene array in order to identify expression changes following chronic infection of human hematopoietic cells with Kapsosi’s Sarcoma -associated Virus (KSHV also known as Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV8 and Human T cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1. We performed cell-free {\\it in vitro} infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells using semi-purified HHV8 and a mature IL-2 dependent T cell line, KIT 225, using highly concentrated viral stocks prepared from an infectious molecular clone of HTLV-1. Thirty days post infection, mRNA was isolated from infected cultures and uninfected controls and submitted for microarray analysis. More than 400 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following HHV8 infection of primary bone marrow derived CD34+ cells. Of these 400, interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4, cyclin B2, TBP-associated factor, eukaryotic elongation factor and pim 2 were up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. In contrast, less than 100 genes were differentially expressed more than two-fold following chronic infection of a mature T cell line with HTLV-1. Of these, only cdc7 was up-regulated more than 3.5 fold. These data may provide insight into cellular signatures of infection useful for diagnosis of infection as well as potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-02-10

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients' functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients' functional status at the time of critical illness.

  13. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT.

  14. l-Arginine is a Radioprotector for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Linda L.; Zheng, Xichen; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Kerr, Patrick P.; Khlangwiset, Pornsri; Epperly, Michael W.; Fink, Mitchell P.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Peterson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine is shown to protect hematopoietic progenitor (32D cl 3) cells from death due to exposure to γ radiation (137Cs). Some of the other intermediates in the urea cycle, namely ornithine and citrulline, plus urea itself, were not found to have any significant impact on cell survival after irradiation. Intriguingly, supplementation of irradiated cells with l-arginine results in decreased production of peroxynitrite, suggesting that suppression of superoxide generation by nitric oxide synthase in one or more microenvironments is an important factor in the observed radioprotection. The absence of any radioprotective effect of l-arginine in cells at 3% oxygen also confirms the involvement of one or more oxygen-derived species. Knockdown experiments with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) siRNAs in cells and NOS knockout animals confirm that the observed radioprotection is associated with nNOS (NOS-1). l-Arginine also ameliorates the transient inhibition of the electron-transport chain complex I that occurs within 30 min of completing the dose (10 Gy) and that appears to be a functional marker for postirradiation mitochondrial oxidant production. PMID:22175298

  15. [Sirolimus associated pneumonitis in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Estefanía; Buenasmañanas, Diana; Martín, Carmen; Rojas, Rafael

    2015-07-06

    Sirolimus (SR) is a lipophilic macrocytic lactone with immunosuppressive properties (mTOR inhibitor) commonly used in solid organ transplantation and recently introduced in the prophylaxis and treatment of graft-versus-host disease. Its numerous side effects include: hyperlipidemia, arthralgias, noncardiac peripheral edema, thrombotic microangiopathy and interstitial pneumonitis. SR-associated pneumonitis is a rare but potentially serious complication due to its increasing utilization in transplant patients. We report the case of a patient undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with severe respiratory distress and SR therapy. Microbiological tests were all negative and other complications related to transplantation were discarded. The chest computed tomography of high-resolution showed pneumonitis. The SR therapy was interrupted and treatment was started with steroids with resolution of symptoms. SR associated pneumonitis is a potentially fatal side effect. In patients treated with SR and respiratory failure, we must suspect this complication because early recognition along with drug discontinuation and steroid treatment is essential to reverse this complication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Sleep disruption among cancer patients following autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashley M; Jim, Heather S L; Small, Brent J; Nishihori, Taiga; Gonzalez, Brian D; Cessna, Julie M; Hyland, Kelly A; Rumble, Meredith E; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2018-03-01

    Despite a high prevalence of sleep disruption among hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients, relatively little research has investigated its relationships with modifiable cognitive or behavioral factors or used actigraphy to characterize sleep disruption in this population. Autologous HCT recipients who were 6-18 months post transplant completed self-report measures of cancer-related distress, fear of cancer recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors upon enrollment. Patients then wore an actigraph for 7 days and completed a self-report measure of sleep disruption on day 7 of the study. Among the 84 participants (age M = 60, 45% female), 41% reported clinically relevant sleep disruption. Examination of actigraph data confirmed that, on average, sleep was disrupted (wake after sleep onset M = 66 min) and sleep efficiency was less than recommended (sleep efficiency M = 78%). Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and inhibitory sleep behaviors were related to self-reported sleep disruption (p valuesdisruption after transplant. Cancer-related distress, fear of recurrence, dysfunctional sleep cognitions, and maladaptive sleep behaviors are related to self-reported sleep disruption and should be considered targets for cognitive behavioral intervention in this population.

  17. Hematopoietic ontogeny and its relevance for pediatric leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udroiu, Ion; Sgura, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    Fetal and infant hematopoiesis display characteristics different from the adult one: our suggestion is that these features may help to explain the peculiar incidence rates of acute leukemias. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are fast-cycling (those in adults instead are largely quiescent) and studies in mice demonstrated that their relative contribution to myelo- and lymphopoiesis varies during development. We hypothesize that during development some of the "hits" needed for the onset of leukemia are usually occurring (being part of the normal development), so leukemogenesis needs less mutations than in adults to take place and therefore it's more probable. The switch between the relative incidence of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias may be related to the changes of the percentage of lymphoid-deficient and lymphoid-proficient sub-set of HSCs during development. Further investigations may clarify this hypothesis, elucidating also the roles of the different microenvironments in determining the myeloid/lymphoid predisposition of the HSCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tolerance associated gene expression following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Pidala

    Full Text Available Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10 for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL. These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted.

  19. Growth and development after hematopoietic cell transplant in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J E

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) following high-dose chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy for children with malignant or nonmalignant hematologic disorders has resulted in an increasing number of long-term disease-free survivors. The preparative regimens include high doses of alkylating agents, such as CY with or without BU, and may include TBI. These agents impact the neuroendocrine system in growing children and their subsequent growth and development. Children receiving high-dose CY or BUCY have normal thyroid function, but those who receive TBI-containing regimens may develop thyroid function abnormalities. Growth is not impacted by chemotherapy-only preparative regimens, but TBI is likely to result in growth hormone deficiency and decreased growth rates that need to be treated with synthetic growth hormone therapy. Children who receive high-dose CY-only have normal development through puberty, whereas those who receive BUCY have a high incidence of delayed pubertal development. Following fractionated TBI preparative regimens, approximately half of the patients have normal pubertal development. These data demonstrate that the growth and development problems after HCT are dependent upon the preparative regimen received. All children should be followed for years after HCT for detection of growth and development abnormalities that are treatable with appropriate hormone therapy.

  20. Engineering the hematopoietic stem cell niche: Frontiers in biomaterial science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Sun; Mahadik, Bhushan P.; Harley, Brendan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) play a crucial role in the generation of the body’s blood and immune cells. This process takes place primarily in the bone marrow in specialized ‘niche’ microenvironments, which provide signals responsible for maintaining a balance between HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and lineage specification required for life-long hematopoiesis. While our understanding of these signaling mechanisms continues to improve, our ability to engineer them in vitro for the expansion of clinically relevant HSC populations is still lacking. In this review, we focus on development of biomaterials-based culture platforms for in vitro study of interactions between HSCs and their local microenvironment. The tools and techniques used for both examining HSC-niche interactions as well as applying these findings towards controlled HSC expansion or directed differentiation in 2D and 3D platforms are discussed. These novel techniques hold the potential to push the existing boundaries of HSC cultures towards high-throughput, real-time, and single-cell level biomimetic approaches that enable a more nuanced understanding of HSC regulation and function. Their application in conjunction with innovative biomaterial platforms can pave the way for engineering artificial bone marrow niches for clinical applications as well as elucidating the pathology of blood-related cancers and disorders. PMID:26356030