WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccms

  1. 1999 ANNUAL REPORT NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    This annual report present the proceedings of the second annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Belfast, UK in March 1999. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, and pollution prevention tools.

  2. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The proposed objective of the NATO/CCMS Pilot on clean products and processes is to facilitate further gains in pollution prevention, waste minimization, and design for the environment. It is anticipated that the free exchange of knowledge, experience, data, and models will fost...

  3. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER (PHASE III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Council of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) established the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) in 1969. CCMS was charged with developing meaningful programs to share information among countries on environmental and societal issues that complemen...

  4. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY - CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE I) 2000 ANNUAL REPORT, NUMBER 242

    Science.gov (United States)

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the Third Annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Copenhagen, Denmark. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the area of research of clean products and processes, life cycle analysis, computer tools and pollution prevention.

  5. NATO CCMS PILOT STUDY ON CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES -(PHASE I) - 2002 ANNUAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The annual report summarizes the activities of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study on clean products and processes for 2002, including the proceedings of the 2002 annual meeting held in Vilnius, Lithuania. The report presents a wealth of information on cleaner production activities in ove...

  6. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE II) 2003 ANNUAL REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 6th annual meeting of the NATO CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes, was held in Cetraro, Italy, from May 11 to 15, 2003. This was also the first meeting of its Phase II study. 24 country representatives attended this meeting. This meeting was very ably run by th...

  7. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    OpenAIRE

    Garny, H.; Grewe, V.; Dameris, M.; Bodeker, G. E.; Stenke, A.

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry-climate models (CCMs) are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced ...

  8. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    OpenAIRE

    Garny, Hella; Grewe, Volker; Dameris, Martin; Bodeker, Greg; Stenke, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry-climate models (CCMs) are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth’s ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is intro...

  9. The Preparation of Capsaicin-Chitosan Microspheres (CCMS Enteric Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to research the preparation and content determination of capsaicin-chitosan microspheres (CCMS enteric coated tablets. The core tablets were prepared with the method of wet granulation. Nine formulae were designed to determine the optimal formula of the core tablet. Eudragit L100 was used to prepare the CCMS enteric-coated tablets. The effect of enteric coated formulation variables such as content of talc (10%, 25% and 40%, plasticisers (TEC and DBS, dosage of plasticiser (10%, 20% and 30% and coating weight (2%, 3% and 5% were evaluated for drug release characteristics. The in vitro release was studied using 0.1 N HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. Enteric coated tablets without ruptures or swelling behaviour over 2 h in 0.1 N HCl indicated that these tablets showed acid resistance. The accumulated release rate in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8 revealed that the prepared tablets were able to sustain drug release into the intestine and a first-order release was obtained for capsaicin. This research is the first report of the preparation and content determination of CCMS enteric coated tablets. The sustained release behavior of enteric coated formulations in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer demonstrated that it would be a potential drug delivery platform for sustained delivery of gastric irritant drugs.

  10. NATO/CCMS PILOT STUDY CLEAN PRODUCTS AND PROCESSES (PHASE 1) 1998 ANNUAL REPORT (EPA/600/R-98/065)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This annual report presents the proceedings of the first annual NATO/CCMS pilot study meeting in Cincinnati in March 1998. Guest speakers focused on efforts in the research arena of clean products, clean processes, life cycle analysis, ecolabeling, and pollution prevention tools.

  11. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced here that quantifies the influence of chemistry and transport on ozone concentration changes and that is easily implemented in CCMs and chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this method, ozone tendencies (i.e. the time rate of change of ozone are partitioned into a contribution from ozone production and destruction (chemistry and a contribution from transport of ozone (dynamics. The influence of transport on ozone in a specific region is further divided into export of ozone out of that region and import of ozone from elsewhere into that region. For this purpose, a diagnostic is used that disaggregates the ozone mixing ratio field into 9 separate fields according to in which of 9 predefined regions of the atmosphere the ozone originated. With this diagnostic the ozone mass fluxes between these regions are obtained. Furthermore, this method is used here to attribute long-term changes in ozone to chemistry and transport. The relative change in ozone from one period to another that is due to changes in production or destruction rates, or due to changes in import or export of ozone, are quantified. As such, the diagnostics introduced here can be used to attribute changes in ozone on monthly, interannual and long-term time-scales to the responsible mechanisms. Results from a CCM simulation are shown here as examples, with the main focus of the paper being on introducing the method.

  12. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced here that quantifies the influence of chemistry and transport on ozone concentration changes and that is easily implemented in CCMs and chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this method, ozone tendencies (i.e. the time rate of change of ozone are partitioned into a contribution from ozone production and destruction (chemistry and a contribution from transport of ozone (dynamics. The influence of transport on ozone in a specific region is further divided into export of ozone out of that region and import of ozone from elsewhere into that region. For this purpose, a diagnostic is used that disaggregates the ozone mixing ratio field into 9 separate fields according to in which of 9 predefined regions of the atmosphere the ozone originated. With this diagnostic the ozone mass fluxes between these regions are obtained. Furthermore, this method is used here to attribute long-term changes in ozone to chemistry and transport. The relative change in ozone from one period to another that is due to changes in production or destruction rates, or due to changes in import or export of ozone, are quantified. As such, the diagnostics introduced here can be used to attribute changes in ozone on monthly, interannual and long-term time-scales to the responsible mechanisms. Results from a CCM simulation are shown here as examples, with the main focus of the paper being on introducing the method.

  13. Can stable isotope fractionation in diatom and coccolith biominerals elucidate the significance of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in the past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, H.; Bolton, C.; Isensee, K.; Mendez-Vicente, A.; Rubio-Ramos, M.; Mejia-Ramirez, L. M.

    2012-04-01

    Carbon isotopic fractionation in fossil algal biomarkers is typically interpreted to reflect atmospheric CO2 changes assuming simple diffusive uptake of CO2 by cells, however modern algae employ a diverse array of additional strategies to concentrate DIC inside the cell (CCMs). We previously hypothesized that the size-correlated range of vital effects in carbonate liths produced by different coccolithophore species was due to variable significance of CCMs in their C acquisition, and that an absence of interspecific vital effects may reflect a reduced importance of CCMs (or more similar CCMs employed). Here, we present stable isotope data from size-separated deep-sea sediments dominated by small, intermediate and large coccoliths from time slices throughout the Cenozoic. We show that the range of coccolith vital effects is distinct during several major Cenozoic proxy-inferred climate-CO2 transitions, and where vital effects are significant their magnitude scales with cell size in the same sense as modern culture genera (increasing C and O isotope enrichment with decreasing coccolith size). Our new culture experiments with coccolithophorids reveal strong plasticity in the magnitude of stable carbon isotope vital effects in coccoliths of Calcidiscus leptoporus and Emiliania huxleyi with variable CO2. At high CO2 coccoliths of both species are more isotopically enriched, but the magnitude is greater in C. leptoporus leading to reduced interspecific offsets at high CO2. In the case of E. huxleyi, higher CO2 conditions resulted in significant reduction in the magnitude of DIC accumulation in the intracellular carbon pool, and more positive carbon isotopic values inside the particulate organic matter. A model of carbon acquisition incorporating both photosynthetic and carbonate production is used to explore mechanisms for these relationships. We also investigate fractionation in diatom organic matter and diatom biomineral-bound organic matter. While the carbon isotopic

  14. Improvement of Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry Technology (CCMS) for the Profiling of Human Kinases by Combination with 2D LC-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jenny J.; Graebner, Olivia; Dreger, Mathias; Glinski, Mirko; Baumgart, Sabine; Koester, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    An increasingly popular and promising field in functional proteomics is the isolation of proteome subsets based on small molecule-protein interactions. One platform approach in this field are Capture Compounds that contain a small molecule of interest to bind target proteins, a photo-activatable reactivity function to covalently trap bound proteins, and a sorting function to isolate captured protein conjugates from complex biological samples for direct protein identification by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS). In this study we used staurosporine as a selectivity group for analysis in HepG2 cells derived from human liver. In the present study, we combined the functional isolation of kinases with different separation workflows of automated split-free nanoflow liquid chromatography prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Two different CCMS setups, CCMS technology combined with 1D LC-MS and 2D LC-MS, were compared regarding the total number of kinase identifications. By extending the chromatographic separation of the tryptic digested captured proteins from 1D LC linear gradients to 2D LC we were able to identify 97 kinases. This result is similar to the 1D LC setup we previously reported but this time 4 times less input material was needed. This makes CCMS of kinases an even more powerful tool for the proteomic profiling of this important protein family. PMID:21941435

  15. Summary of 19. NATO/CCMS international technical meeting (ITM) round table discussion on the harmonization of atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Round Table discussion was held at the 19th NATO/CCMS Conference on Atmospheric Dispersion with participation of approximately 50 scientists involved with various aspects of air quality assessment from over 15 countries. The premise of discussion was there is a need within the European Countries to provide a basis for developing an approach towards harmonization of air quality modeling. The term ''harmonization'' was used mostly in the sense that for the same input a simulation model would compute the same output. Concern was expressed that this usage was overly simplistic, prohibitively restrictive and counterproductive. The main benefits of achieving harmonization were 1) proper use of available meteorological data and 2) consistent treatment of source impacts throughout the European Community. The challenge before the European Community is to resolve in a realistic manner the problem of assessing environmental impacts in a manner that is fair throughout the European Community and proper within the scientific community. The resolution will involve compromises between 'being fair' and 'being state-of-the-science'. Accuracy and realism may be willingly sacrificed in order to achieve fairness. Developing consensus on how and what is to be achieved in the process of harmonization will involve difficult value judgments. But the consensus process should be encouraged given the significant and worthwhile benefits. (au)

  16. Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society solar energy pilot study. First follow-up report, October 1979, pilot country: United States; co-pilot countries: Denmark and France. CCMS report No. 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    During 1973 to 1978, over twenty nations participated in the NATO/CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study, whose objective was to promote and accelerate the use of solar heating and cooling of buildings. The activities in this information exchange included (1) the regular reporting of national solar heating and cooling programs, (2) the development of a format for reporting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems, (3) the exchange of system performance reports, (4) the establishment of two specialized working groups for solar-assisted low energy dwellings and passive solar applications. At the conclusion of the pilot study in 1978, the participants formulated recommendations for continued action at the international level, as well as for action at the national level. This report describes the progress made in implementing those recommendations. In addition to detailing the steps taken to continue collaboration in various efforts initiated within the Solar Energy Pilot Study, the report contains papers on the 1979 status of the solar heating and cooling programs in seventeen CCMS countries.

  17. 2000 Annual report NATO/CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes (Phase I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Molin, Christine; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky;

    2001-01-01

    several pilot projects being implemented by participating nations and continuing to build a program of collaborative endeavors. This meeting featured a special topical seminar titled, Product Oriented Environmental Measures, which focused participants’ attention on advances in product design and use. The...... meeting featured several guest lectures on significant developments in government programs, academic research and industrial applications. The report presents the ideas and views shared by the delegates and invited participants at the Copenhagen meeting. The full report can be viewed on the US EPA...

  18. NATO CCMS Workshop on Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security (SMECS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzane, Daoud

    2008-01-01

    Rapid evolution of trade, cultural and human relations provides the qualitative and quantitative enhancement of international collaborations, linking the countries with different economical and technological level. Delocalization of High-Tech industry inevitably leads to development of the material science and engineering researches in emergent countries, requiring transfer of know-how, restructuration of basic research and educational networks. This book presents the contributions of participants of the Advanced Research Workshop “Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security” (ARW SMECS; www.smecs.ferroix.net), organized in December 2007 in Marrakech in frame of the “NATO - Science for Peace” program. The objective of this event was the attempt to overview several hot topics of material physics related with problems of modern society: transformation and storage of energy, treatment and transmission of information, environmental security issues etc., with the focus of their implementation i...

  19. Summary of the NATO/CCMS Conference The Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and GroundWater

    Science.gov (United States)

    The problem of contamination to land and groundwa- ter from improper handling of hazardous materials/ waste is faced by all countries. Also, the need for reliable, cost-effective technologies to address this problem at contaminated sites exists throughout the world. Many countrie...

  20. Treating cough and cold: Guidance for caregivers of children and youth

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications (CCMs), the effectiveness of most CCMs has not been proven in children. A meta-analysis summarizing trials using OTC CCMs for viral-induced cough found no evidence for or against the use of OTC medicines in both paediatric and adult populations when cough frequency and severity, as well as physician assessments, were compared. Furthermore, North American data suggest that OTC CCMs may be associated with medication...

  1. 75 FR 27182 - Energy Conservation Program: Web-Based Compliance and Certification Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... electronic Web-based tool, the Compliance and Certification Management System (CCMS), which will be the... Certification Management System (CCMS)--via the Web portal: http://regulations.doe.gov/ccms . Follow the.... Include in the address the subject line: Compliance and Certification Management System....

  2. Transatlantic "environmental security" in the 1970s? NATO's "Third Dimension" as an early environmental and human security approach

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    "This paper deals with the early stages of NATO's 'Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society' (CCMS), established as environmental 'Third Dimension' of the Alliance in 1969. It discusses 'environmental security' as a prime CCMS motive, assuming that the early CCMS-pioneers already projected global environmental uncertainty factors as security threats to the Atlantic Alliance. NATO's environmental concept already showed elements of environmental and human security being considered in the f...

  3. Computer based core monitoring system for an operating CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research was performed to develop a CANDU-6 Core Monitoring System(CCMS) that enables operators to have efficient core management by monitoring core power distribution, burnup distribution, and the other important core variables and managing the past core history for Wolsong nuclear power plant unit 1. The CCMS uses Reactor Fueling Simulation Program(RFSP, developed by AECL) for continuous core calculation by integrating the algorithm and assumptions validated and uses the information taken from Digital Control Computer(DCC) for the purpose of producing basic input data. The CCMS has two modules; CCMS server program and CCMS client program. The CCMS server program performs automatic and continuous core calculation and manages overall output controlled by DataBase Management System. The CCMS client program enables users to monitor current and past core status in the predefined GUI(Graphic-User Interface) environment. For the purpose of verifying the effectiveness of CCMS, we compared field-test data with the data used for Wolsong unit 1 operation. In the verification the mean percent differences of both cases were the same(0.008%), which showed that the CCMS could monitor core behaviors well

  4. Toward the Establishment of a Common Framework for Model Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    Proceedings of the Twenty-first NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held November 6-10 1995, in Baltimore, Maryland.......Proceedings of the Twenty-first NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held November 6-10 1995, in Baltimore, Maryland....

  5. Tools for Model Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    Proceedings of the Twenty-Second NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held June 6-10, 1997, in Clermont-Ferrand, France.......Proceedings of the Twenty-Second NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held June 6-10, 1997, in Clermont-Ferrand, France....

  6. Performance of single comb White Leghorn layers fed corn-soybean meal and barley-corn-soybean meal diets supplemented with a direct-fed microbial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahashon, S N; Nakaue, H S; Snyder, S P; Mirosh, L W

    1994-11-01

    An experiment was conducted with Single Comb White Leghorn (SCWL) layers to determine the effect of feeding either corn-soybean meal (C-S) or barley-corn soybean meal (B-C-S) diets with or without condensed cane molasses solubles (CCMS) or with or without CCMS-1,100 mg Lactobacillus (Lacto)/kg (ppm) diet on performance, nutrient retentions, digesta passage rate, and histological changes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tracts. Six dietary treatments were fed for eight 28-d periods and consisted of C-S (control), C-S + CCMS, C-S + CCMS-1,100 ppm Lacto (4.4 x 107 cfu/mg Lacto), B-C-S (control), B-C-S + CCMS, and B-C-S + CCMS-1,100 ppm Lacto. The CCMS served as the carrier for the Lacto, and the CCMS-Lacto premix (55 g Lacto/kg) was incorporated at 2% of the diet. Lactobacillus supplementation in C-S diets improved (P Lacto. Lactobacillus supplementations of the C-S and B-C-S diets increased (P fat and calcium, and fat, phosphorus, copper, and manganese retentions, respectively. Increased cellularity of Peyer's patches in the ileum indicated a stimulation of the mucosal immune system that responds to antigenic stimuli by secreting immunoglobulin (IgA). PMID:7862611

  7. Energy costs of carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms in aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Minimum energy (as photon) costs are predicted for core reactions of photosynthesis, for photorespiratory metabolism in algae lacking CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) and for various types of CCMs; in algae, with CCMs; allowance was made for leakage of CO2 from the internal pool. These predicted values are just compatible with the minimum measured photon costs of photosynthesis in microalgae and macroalgae lacking or expressing CCMs. More energy-expensive photorespiration, for example for organisms using Rubiscos with lower CO2-O2 selectivity coefficients, would be less readily accommodated within the lowest measured photon costs of photosynthesis by algae lacking CCMs. The same applies to the cases of CCMs with higher energy costs of active transport of protons or inorganic carbon species, or greater allowance for significant leakage from the accumulated intracellular pool of CO2. High energetic efficiency can involve a higher concentration of catalyst to achieve a given rate of reaction, adding to the resource costs of growth. There are no obvious mechanistic interpretations of the occurrence of CCMs algae adapted to low light and low temperatures using the rationales adopted for the occurrence of C4 photosynthesis in terrestrial flowering plants. There is an exception for cyanobacteria with low-selectivity Form IA or IB Rubiscos, and those dinoflagellates with low-selectivity Form II Rubiscos, for which very few natural environments have high enough CO2:O2 ratios to allow photosynthesis in the absence of CCMs. PMID:24390639

  8. Treating cough and cold: Guidance for caregivers of children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ran D

    2011-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of over-the-counter (OTC) cough and cold medications (CCMs), the effectiveness of most CCMs has not been proven in children. A meta-analysis summarizing trials using OTC CCMs for viral-induced cough found no evidence for or against the use of OTC medicines in both paediatric and adult populations when cough frequency and severity, as well as physician assessments, were compared. Furthermore, North American data suggest that OTC CCMs may be associated with medication errors and adverse events, resulting in visits to emergency departments and even leading to death. The present article provides information on current evidence for cough and cold therapies, including fluid intake, humidified air, antihistamines, echinacea, zinc, honey and vitamin C, for caregivers of children and youth. PMID:23115499

  9. 2015 NAIP Partner Availability Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — Shows the available NAIP imagery which NAIP Partners can access. Either Quarter Quads (QQs), Compressed County Mosaics (CCMs) or data that has been physically...

  10. Radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one “lightning rod” topic addressed by the vascular neurosurgery community, radiosurgery vs. CCMs is that topic. While ... after stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with cavernous malformations. Neurosurgery. 2002 Jun;50(6):1190-7; discussion 1197- ...

  11. Mental Health Collaborative Care and its Role in Primary Care Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Goodrich, David E.; Kilbourne, Amy M.; Nord, Kristina M; Bauer, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative care models (CCMs) provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated mental health and medical care for persons with mental health conditions served in primary care settings. CCMs are team-based intervention to enact system-level redesign by improving patient care through organizational leadership support, provider decision support, and clinical information systems as well as engaging patients in their care through self-management support and linkages to community resources. Th...

  12. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Courtney C; Pfister, Catherine A; Wootton, J Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  13. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video

  14. Integrating Bipolar Disorder Management in Primary Care

    OpenAIRE

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Goodrich, David E.; O’Donnell, Allison N.; Miller, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    There is growing realization that persons with bipolar disorder may exclusively be seen in primary (general medical) care settings, notably because of limited access to mental health care and stigma in seeking mental health treatment. At least two clinical practice guidelines for bipolar disorder recommend collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) to help integrate mental health care to better manage this illness. CCMs, which include provider guideline support, self-management support, care ma...

  15. Cerebrocostomandibular syndrome in four sibs, two pairs of twins.

    OpenAIRE

    Drossou-Agakidou, V; Andreou, A.; Soubassi-Griva, V; Pandouraki, M

    1991-01-01

    We report four sibs, two pairs of twins, with cerebrocostomandibular syndrome (CCMS). The family history was negative. All four babies had the characteristic features of CCMS, including Pierre-Robin anomalad and rib dysplasia. Cerebral involvement was evident in two of the patients who had suffered perinatal asphyxia. The presence of the syndrome in all four sibs together with the negative family history in previous generations is consistent with Mendelian autosomal recessive inheritance with...

  16. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Extratropics

    OpenAIRE

    Hegglin, Michaela; Gettelman, Andrew; Hoor, P.; Krichevsky, R.; Manney, G. L.; Pan, L. L.; Son, S.-W.; G. Stiller; Tilmes, S.; K. A. Walker; Eyring, Veronika; T. G. Shepherd; Waugh, D.; H. Akiyoshi; Añel, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    A multimodel assessment of the performance of chemistry�climate models (CCMs) in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) is conducted for the first time. Process�oriented diagnostics are used to validate dynamical and transport characteristics of 18 CCMs using meteorological analyses and aircraft and satellite observations. The main dynamical and chemical climatological characteristics of the extratropical UTLS are generally well represented by the model...

  17. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Extra-tropics

    OpenAIRE

    Hegglin, M. I.; Gettelman, A.; Hoor, P.; Krichevsky, R.; Manney, G. L.; Pan, L. L.; Son, S.-W.; G. Stiller; Tilmes, S.; K. A. Walker; Eyring, V.; T. G. Shepherd; Waugh, D.; H. Akiyoshi; Añel, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    A multimodel assessment of the performance of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) is conducted for the first time. Process-oriented diagnostics are used to validate dynamical and transport characteristics of 18 CCMs using meteorological analyses and aircraft and satellite observations. The main dynamical and chemical climatological characteristics of the extratropical UTLS are generally well represented by the models, despite the li...

  18. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

  19. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: tropics and global trends

    OpenAIRE

    Gettelman, A.; Hegglin, Michaela I.; Son, S.-W.; Kim, J; Fujiwara, M; Birner, T.; S. Kremser; Rex, M.; Añel, J. A.; Akiyoshi, H.; J. Austin; Bekki, S.; Braesike, P.; C. Brühl; Butchart, N.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of 18 coupled Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) is evaluated using qualitative and quantitative diagnostics. Trends in tropopause quantities in the tropics and the extratropical Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are analyzed. A quantitative grading methodology for evaluating CCMs is extended to include variability and used to develop four different grades for tropical tropopause temperature and pressure, water vapor and ozone....

  20. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Tropics and global trends

    OpenAIRE

    Gettelman, Andrew; Hegglin, Michaela; Son, S.-W.; Kim, J; Fujiwara, M; Birner, T.; S. Kremser; Rex, M.; Añel, A.J.; Akiyoshi, H.; J. Austin; Bekki, S.; P. Braesicke; C. Brühl; Butchart, N.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of 18 coupled Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) is evaluated using qualitative and quantitative diagnostics. Trends in tropopause quantities in the tropics and the extratropical Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are analyzed. A quantitative grading methodology for evaluating CCMs is extended to include variability and used to develop four different grades for tropical tropopause temperature and pressure, water vapor and ...

  1. Verification and Configuration of a Run-Time Reconfigurable Custom Computing Integrated Circuit for DSP Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cherbaka, Mark F.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, interest in the area of custom computing machines (CCMs) has been on a steady increase. Much of the activity surrounding CCMs has centered around Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology and rapid prototyping applications. While higher performance has been a concern in some applications, the solutions are limited by the relatively small FPGA bandwidth, density and throughput. This leads to area, speed, power, and application-specific constraints. In recent months, an i...

  2. Output-Feedback Control of Nonlinear Systems using Control Contraction Metrics and Convex Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Manchester, Ian R.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    2014-01-01

    Control contraction metrics (CCMs) are a new approach to nonlinear control design based on contraction theory. The resulting design problems are expressed as pointwise linear matrix inequalities and are and well-suited to solution via convex optimization. In this paper, we extend the theory on CCMs by showing that a pair of "dual" observer and controller problems can be solved using pointwise linear matrix inequalities, and that when a solution exists a separation principle holds. That is, a ...

  3. General pathway toward crystalline-core micelles with tunable morphology and corona segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Joachim; Karg, Matthias; Hellweg, Thomas; Schmalz, Holger

    2011-12-27

    We present a general mechanism for the solution self-assembly of crystalline-core micelles (CCMs) from triblock copolymers bearing a semicrystalline polyethylene (PE) middle block. This approach enables the production of nanoparticles with tunable dimensions and surface structures. Depending on the quality of the solvent used for PE, either spherical or worm-like CCMs can be generated in an easy and highly selective fashion from the same triblock copolymers via crystallization-induced self-assembly upon cooling. If the triblock copolymer stays molecularly dissolved at temperatures above the crystallization temperature of the PE block, worm-like CCMs with high aspect ratios are formed by a nucleation and growth process. Their length can be conveniently controlled by varying the applied crystallization temperature. If exclusively spherical micelles with an amorphous PE core are present before crystallization, confined crystallization within the cores of the preformed micelles takes place and spherical CCMs are formed. For polystyrene-block-polyethylene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) triblock terpolymers a patch-like microphase separation of the corona is obtained for both spherical and worm-like CCMs due to the incompatibility of the PS and PMMA blocks. The structure of the patch-like corona depends on the selectivity of the employed solvent for the PS and PMMA corona blocks, whereby nonselective solvents produce a more homogeneous patch size and distribution. Annealing of the semicrystalline PE cores results in an increasingly uniform crystallite size distribution and thus core thickness of the worm-like CCMs. PMID:22047455

  4. NGNP Composites R and D Technical Issues Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R and D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R and D program need further assessment.

  5. NGNP Composites R&D Technical Issues Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AREVA Federal Services

    2008-09-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R&D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R&D program need further assessment.

  6. 3D Viewer Platform of Cloud Clustering Management System: Google Map 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Ja; Lee, Gang-Soo

    The new management system of framework for cloud envrionemnt is needed by the platfrom of convergence according to computing environments of changes. A ISV and small business model is hard to adapt management system of platform which is offered from super business. This article suggest the clustering management system of cloud computing envirionments for ISV and a man of enterprise in small business model. It applies the 3D viewer adapt from map3D & earth of google. It is called 3DV_CCMS as expand the CCMS[1].

  7. Evaluation of radiation scheme performance within chemistry climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, P. M.; Mayer, B.; et, al.

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates global mean radiatively important properties of chemistry climate models (CCMs). We evaluate stratospheric temperatures and their 1980�2000 trends, January clear sky irradiances, heating rates, and greenhouse gas radiative forcings from an offline comparison of CCM radiation codes with line�by�line models, and CCMs� representation of the solar cycle. CCM global mean temperatures and their change can give an indication of errors in radiative trans...

  8. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Muthialu, Nagarajan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  9. Evolution of photorespiration from cyanobacteria to land plants, considering protein phylogenies and acquisition of carbon concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Martin; Kern, Ramona; Maurino, Veronica G; Hanson, David T; Weber, Andreas P M; Sage, Rowan F; Bauwe, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration and oxygenic photosynthesis are intimately linked processes. It has been shown that under the present day atmospheric conditions cyanobacteria and all eukaryotic phototrophs need functional photorespiration to grow autotrophically. The question arises as to when this essential partnership evolved, i.e. can we assume a coevolution of both processes from the beginning or did photorespiration evolve later to compensate for the generation of 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG) due to Rubisco's oxygenase reaction? This question is mainly discussed here using phylogenetic analysis of proteins involved in the 2PG metabolism and the acquisition of different carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). The phylogenies revealed that the enzymes involved in the photorespiration of vascular plants have diverse origins, with some proteins acquired from cyanobacteria as ancestors of the chloroplasts and others from heterotrophic bacteria as ancestors of mitochondria in the plant cell. Only phosphoglycolate phosphatase was found to originate from Archaea. Notably glaucophyte algae, the earliest branching lineage of Archaeplastida, contain more photorespiratory enzymes of cyanobacterial origin than other algal lineages or land plants indicating a larger initial contribution of cyanobacterial-derived proteins to eukaryotic photorespiration. The acquisition of CCMs is discussed as a proxy for assessing the timing of periods when photorespiratory activity may have been enhanced. The existence of CCMs also had marked influence on the structure and function of photorespiration. Here, we discuss evidence for an early and continuous coevolution of photorespiration, CCMs and photosynthesis starting from cyanobacteria via algae, to land plants. PMID:26931168

  10. EVALUATION OF DEMONSTRATED AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND GROUNDWATER (PHASE III) - 1999 SPECIAL SESSION ON MONITORED NATURAL ATTENUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report includes the papers presented at the NATO/CCMS Pilot Study Meeting in Angers, France, May 9-14, 1999, for the special session on Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA). This is the Phase III of the Evaluation of Demonstrated and Emerging Technologies for the Treatment a...

  11. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkes, Erica H.; Fock, J. M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; van Belzen, M. J.; van der Lans, C. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Fakkert, I. E.; Smith, M.J.; Evans, D. G.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are causative

  12. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26971886

  13. Cerebral cavernous malformations: from genes to proteins to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Daniel D; Kalani, M Yashar S; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Eales, Justin; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2012-01-01

    Over the past half century molecular biology has led to great advances in our understanding of angio- and vasculogenesis and in the treatment of malformations resulting from these processes gone awry. Given their sporadic and familial distribution, their developmental and pathological link to capillary telangiectasias, and their observed chromosomal abnormalities, cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are regarded as akin to cancerous growths. Although the exact pathological mechanisms involved in the formation of CCMs are still not well understood, the identification of 3 genetic loci has begun to shed light on key developmental pathways involved in CCM pathogenesis. Cavernous malformations can occur sporadically or in an autosomal dominant fashion. Familial forms of CCMs have been attributed to mutations at 3 different loci implicated in regulating important processes such as proliferation and differentiation of angiogenic precursors and members of the apoptotic machinery. These processes are important for the generation, maintenance, and pruning of every vessel in the body. In this review the authors highlight the latest discoveries pertaining to the molecular genetics of CCMs, highlighting potential new therapeutic targets for the treatment of these lesions. PMID:21962164

  14. 77 FR 15298 - Rule Concerning Disclosures Regarding Energy Consumption and Water Use of Certain Home Appliances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... FR 1038 (Jan. 6, 2011) (televisions). ] The Rule requires manufacturers to attach yellow EnergyGuide... Management System'' (CCMS)).\\13\\ Once manufacturers upload their data, the FTC would be able to obtain the... (measured diagonally) may print or affix the EnergyGuide label on the product package.\\50\\ \\50\\ 76 FR...

  15. 32 CFR 321.13 - Exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... informed decision-making by the Department when making required suitability, eligibility, and qualification... name: Case Control Management System (CCMS). (2) Exemption: (i) Investigatory material compiled for law... access to the disclosure accounting could alert the subject of an investigation to the existence...

  16. The Revenge of K-12: How Common Core and the New SAT Lower College Standards in the U.S. White Paper No. 122

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Richard P.; Milgram, R. James

    2014-01-01

    It is now clear that the original promise to anchor K-12 education to higher education and backmap the Common Core Mathematics Standards (CCMS) from the upper grades down to the primary grades was empty rhetoric. Higher education has scarcely been involved at all, with the exception of the institutions that agreed to place high school students who…

  17. Annex II. Technique on predictive maintenance for magnetic Jack type control rod driving system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, maintaining a high level of availability and reliability in Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation is one of the most important issues. In this point of view, the nuclear power generation industry is experiencing an increased awareness and emphasis on the benefits of predictive maintenance because the condition based predictive maintenance can enhance the operability and reliability of the plant and reduce possibility of unwanted reactor trips. KOPEC has developed the online Coil Current Monitoring System (CCMS) for the effective and predictive maintenance of the magnetic jack type Control Rod Driving System (CRDS) of the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants (KSNPs). The CRDS of KSNP is composed of 73 Control Element Drive Mechanisms (CEDMs) and CEDM Control System(CEDMCS). The CCMS is capable of monitoring all coil current traces of up to 8 CEDMs at the same time. All coil currents of selected CEDMs are monitored and acquired automatically at high speed sampling rate depending on the CEDM movement. The acquired coil current data is automatically analyzed to check the timing sequence of CEDM motion, coil current amplitude and pattern mismatch of waveform. The various analytical results and diagnosis information of abnormal conditions are provided on MMI displays. For a more precise analysis, the CCMS provides various data manipulation tools of noise filtering, data comparison and database generation for automatic fault detection. The CCMS has been supplied to six KSNP units and mainly used for the predictive maintenance of the CEDM and CEDMCS during plant overhaul period. The CCMS has shown that it is very useful to diagnosis quickly and exactly the status of many control components of the CEDM and CEDMCS such as CEDM coils, hall effect current sensor, timing control cards, voltage adjustment cards and Silicon Controlled Rectifier (SCR). If enough coil current data are accumulated historically, the degradation trends of CEDM coil, hall effect current sensor

  18. Radiosurgery for cerebral cavernomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, G; Kemeny, A A

    2015-09-01

    The role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the management of cerebral cavernomas (CCMs) remains controversial. However, during the last decade the increasing knowledge on natural history and numerous publications from SRS centers using modern treatment protocols has been changing the initial resistance of the neurosurgical community. Unfortunately, the quality of publications on CCM SRS remains heterogeneous. Controversies arise from the lack of control groups, the different definition of hemorrhage, heterogeneous patient populations, and poor definition of treatment protocols. The key for proper interpretation of results is the understanding of the natural history of CCMs, which is varied both according to anatomical location and the presence or absence of previous hemorrhage. Hemispheric lesions appear to be more benign with lower annual bleed rate and risk of persisting disability, whereas those found in the thalamus, basal ganglia and brainstem typically have higher rebleed risk resulting in higher cumulative morbidity following subsequent hemorrhages. However, we are still unable at presentation to predict the future behavior of an individual lesion. In the present paper we critically review and analyze the modern SRS literature on CCMs. The expanding number of available data with current treatment protocols strongly supports the initial intuition that SRS is an effective treatment alternative for deep-seated CCMs with multiple hemorrhages reducing pretreatment annual rebleed rates from 32% pre-treatment to 1.5% within 2 years after treatment (N.=197). Moreover, it appears to stabilize lesions with no more than one bleed, and it is also effective for CCMs causing therapy resistant epilepsy especially if applied within 3 years after presentation. In modern SRS series the rate of persisting adverse radiation effects is low, resulting only in mild morbidity even in deep-seated lesions (4.16%, N.=376), and morbidity caused by post-treatment hemorrhages is also

  19. Wave activity in the tropical tropopause layer in seven reanalysis and four chemistry climate model data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, M.; Suzuki, J.; Gettelman, A.; Hegglin, M. I.; Akiyoshi, H.; Shibata, K.

    2012-06-01

    Sub-seasonal variability including equatorial waves significantly influence the dehydration and transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). This study investigates the wave activity in the TTL in 7 reanalysis data sets (RAs; NCEP1, NCEP2, ERA40, ERA-Interim, JRA25, MERRA, and CFSR) and 4 chemistry climate models (CCMs; CCSRNIES, CMAM, MRI, and WACCM) using the zonal wave number-frequency spectral analysis method with equatorially symmetric-antisymmetric decomposition. Analyses are made for temperature and horizontal winds at 100 hPa in the RAs and CCMs and for outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), which is a proxy for convective activity that generates tropopause-level disturbances, in satellite data and the CCMs. Particular focus is placed on equatorial Kelvin waves, mixed Rossby-gravity (MRG) waves, and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The wave activity is defined as the variance, i.e., the power spectral density integrated in a particular zonal wave number-frequency region. It is found that the TTL wave activities show significant difference among the RAs, ranging from ˜0.7 (for NCEP1 and NCEP2) to ˜1.4 (for ERA-Interim, MERRA, and CFSR) with respect to the averages from the RAs. The TTL activities in the CCMs lie generally within the range of those in the RAs, with a few exceptions. However, the spectral features in OLR for all the CCMs are very different from those in the observations, and the OLR wave activities are too low for CCSRNIES, CMAM, and MRI. It is concluded that the broad range of wave activity found in the different RAs decreases our confidence in their validity and in particular their value for validation of CCM performance in the TTL, thereby limiting our quantitative understanding of the dehydration and transport processes in the TTL.

  20. Evaluation of the inter-annual variability of stratospheric chemical composition in chemistry-climate models using ground-based multi species time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, V.; Bekki, S.; Marchand, M.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Khodri, M.; Lefèvre, F.; Dhomse, S.; Bodeker, G. E.; Toumi, R.; De Maziere, M.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Pazmino, A.; Goutail, F.; Plummer, D.; Rozanov, E.; Mancini, E.; Akiyoshi, H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Austin, J.

    2016-07-01

    The variability of stratospheric chemical composition occurs on a broad spectrum of timescales, ranging from day to decades. A large part of the variability appears to be driven by external forcings such as volcanic aerosols, solar activity, halogen loading, levels of greenhouse gases (GHG), and modes of climate variability (quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)). We estimate the contributions of different external forcings to the interannual variability of stratospheric chemical composition and evaluate how well 3-D chemistry-climate models (CCMs) can reproduce the observed response-forcing relationships. We carry out multivariate regression analyses on long time series of observed and simulated time series of several traces gases in order to estimate the contributions of individual forcings and unforced variability to their internannual variability. The observations are typically decadal time series of ground-based data from the international Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) and the CCM simulations are taken from the CCMVal-2 REF-B1 simulations database. The chemical species considered are column O3, HCl, NO2, and N2O. We check the consistency between observations and model simulations in terms of the forced and internal components of the total interannual variability (externally forced variability and internal variability) and identify the driving factors in the interannual variations of stratospheric chemical composition over NDACC measurement sites. Overall, there is a reasonably good agreement between regression results from models and observations regarding the externally forced interannual variability. A much larger fraction of the observed and modelled interannual variability is explained by external forcings in the tropics than in the extratropics, notably in polar regions. CCMs are able to reproduce the amplitudes of responses in chemical composition to specific external forcings

  1. Ex-situ tensile fatigue-creep testing: A powerful tool to simulate in-situ mechanical degradation in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, A.; Venkatesan, S. V.; Khorasany, R. M. H.; Kim, W. H. J.; Kjeang, E.

    2016-04-01

    An ex-situ tensile fatigue and creep based accelerated stress test (TFC-AST) is proposed to evaluate the mechanical stability of catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) used in fuel cells. The fatigue-creep action of the TFC test is analyzed by tensile and hygrothermal expansion measurements on partially degraded specimens supplemented by microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy, revealing significant decay in mechanical properties as well as morphological rearrangement due to the combined fatigue and creep loading. Through comparison with in-situ hygrothermally degraded CCMs, the TFC-AST protocol is demonstrated to be an economical alternative to the costly in-situ mechanical accelerated stress tests that can reduce the test duration by more than 99%.

  2. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU HongYan; ZOU DingHui; GAO KunShan

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  3. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro-and macro-algae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO2 pump to absorb CO2 from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO2 into the ocean. The increasing atmos-pheric CO2 and subsequent rise of pCO2 in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO3- concentration, affect photosynthetic CO2 fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to util-ize the large HCO3- pool in seawater, enriched CO2 up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photo-synthesis is not limited by CO2 in seawater, increased CO2 levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO2 levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO2 conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO2 oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO2 and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physi-ology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO2 and low-pH ocean.

  4. Mechanical properties of catalyst coated membranes: A powerful indicator of membrane degradation in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical durability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is investigated in this thesis. This work contributes to a systematic characterization of the decay in mechanical properties of membranes and catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) that are subjected to controlled chemical and/or mechanical degradation mechanisms. During field operation of PEFCs, the membrane is subjected to a combination of chemical and mechanical degradation, resulti...

  5. Partnering with health system operations leadership to develop a controlled implementation trial

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Mark S.; Miller, Christopher; Kim, Bo; Lew, Robert; Weaver, Kendra; Coldwell, Craig; Henderson, Kathy; Holmes, Sally; Seibert, Marjorie Nealon; STOLZMANN, KELLY; Elwy, A. Rani; Kirchner, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outcome for mental health conditions is suboptimal, and care is fragmented. Evidence from controlled trials indicates that collaborative chronic care models (CCMs) can improve outcomes in a broad array of mental health conditions. US Department of Veterans Affairs leadership launched a nationwide initiative to establish multidisciplinary teams in general mental health clinics in all medical centers. As part of this effort, leadership partnered with implementation researchers to de...

  6. Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models

    OpenAIRE

    V. Eyring; I. Cionni; Bodeker, G. E.; Charlton-Perez, A. J.; Kinnison, D. E.; J. F. Scinocca; Waugh, D. W.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S; Chipperfield, M. P.; Dameris, M.; S. Dhomse; S. M. Frith; Garny, H.; Gettelman, A.

    2010-01-01

    Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) have been analyzed. In addition to a reference simulation where anthropogenic halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases (GHGs) vary with time, sensitivity simulations with either ODS or GHG concentrations fixed at 1960 levels were performed to disaggregate the drivers of projected ozone changes. These simulations were also used to assess the two distinct milestones of ozone returning to...

  7. Review of the formulation of present-generation stratospheric chemistry-climate models and associated external forcings

    OpenAIRE

    O. Morgenstern; M. A. Giorgetta; Shibata, K; Eyring, V.; D. W. Waugh; T. G. Shepherd; H. Akiyoshi; Austin, J; Baumgaertner, A.J.G.; Bekki, S.; P. Braesicke; Brühl, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; M. Dameris

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal) activity is to improve understanding of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) through process-oriented evaluation and to provide reliable projections of stratospheric ozone and its impact on climate. An appreciation of the details of model formulations is essential for understanding how models respond to the changing external forcings of greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting substances, and hence for understanding the ozone and climate fore...

  8. Wave activity in the tropical tropopause layer in seven reanalysis and four chemistry climate model data sets

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, M.; Suzuki, J; Gettelman, A.; Hegglin, Michaela I.; H. Akiyoshi; Shibata, K

    2012-01-01

    Sub-seasonal variability including equatorial waves significantly influence the dehydration and transport processes in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). This study investigates the wave activity in the TTL in 7 reanalysis data sets (RAs; NCEP1, NCEP2, ERA40, ERA-Interim, JRA25, MERRA, and CFSR) and 4 chemistry climate models (CCMs; CCSRNIES, CMAM, MRI, and WACCM) using the zonal wave number-frequency spectral analysis method with equatorially symmetric-antisymmetric decomposition. Analyses...

  9. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  10. A Strategy for Process-Oriented Validation of Coupled Chemistry-Climate Models

    OpenAIRE

    Eyring, V.; Harris, N. R. P.; Rex, M.; Shepherd, T. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Amanatidis, G. T.; J. Austin; M. P. Chipperfield; Dameris, M.; P. M. De F. Forster; Gettelman, A.; Graf, H. F.; Nagashima, T.; Newman, P. A.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Accurate and reliable predictions and an understanding of future changes in the stratosphere are of major importance to our understanding of climate change. Simulating the interaction between chemistry and climate is of particular importance, because continued increases in greenhouse gases and a slow decrease in halogen loading are expected. These both influence the abundance of stratospheric ozone. In recent years a number of coupled chemistry climate models (CCMs) with different levels of c...

  11. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  12. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the ph...

  13. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    OpenAIRE

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset o...

  14. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  15. Sporadic Cerebral Cavernous Malformations: Report of Further Mutations of CCM Genes in 40 Italian Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Alafaci, Concetta; Scimone, Concetta; Ruggeri, Alessia; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Bramanti, Placido; Tomasello, Francesco; Sidoti, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities, affecting the central nervous system. CCMs can occur sporadically or as a familial autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression attributable to mutations in three different genes: CCM1 (K-Rev interaction trapped 1 (KRIT1)), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10). CCMs occur as a single or multiple malformations that can lead to seizures, focal neurological deficits, hemorrhagic stroke, and headache. However, patients are frequently asymptomatic. In our previous mutation screening, performed in a cohort of 95 Italian patients, both sporadic and familial, we have identified several mutations in CCM genes, three of which in three distinct sporadic patients. In this study, representing further molecular screening of the three CCM genes, in a south Italian cohort of CCM patients enrolled by us in the last three years, we report the identification of other four new mutations in 40 sporadic patients with either single or multiple CCM. PMID:24058906

  16. Quantitative performance metrics for stratospheric-resolving chemistry-climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. Waugh

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A set of performance metrics is applied to stratospheric-resolving chemistry-climate models (CCMs to quantify their ability to reproduce key processes relevant for stratospheric ozone. The same metrics are used to assign a quantitative measure of performance ("grade" to each model-observations comparison shown in Eyring et al. (2006. A wide range of grades is obtained, both for different diagnostics applied to a single model and for the same diagnostic applied to different models, highlighting the wide range in ability of the CCMs to simulate key processes in the stratosphere. No model scores high or low on all tests, but differences in the performance of models can be seen, especially for transport processes where several models get low grades on multiple tests. The grades are used to assign relative weights to the CCM projections of 21st century total ozone. However, only small differences are found between weighted and unweighted multi-model mean total ozone projections. This study raises several issues with the grading and weighting of CCMs that need further examination, but it does provide a framework that will enable quantification of model improvements and assignment of relative weights to the model projections.

  17. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    P. De Barbaro and J. Mans.

    2013-01-01

      After the successful operation of the HCAL sub-detector during the proton-proton run in 2012 and heavy-ion run at the beginning of 2013, the group is now focusing on the following four LS1 tasks: ·       Replacement of present, thick-window, single-anode photomultipliers on HF with new, thin-window, multi-anode PMTs. The replacement of photomultipliers will reduce rate of punch-through window hits. All needed PMTs and baseboards have been delivered to CERN. A quality control station has been set up in B904. ·       Replacement of boards responsible for clock distribution in all HBHE and HO Clock and Control Modules (CCMs).  CCMs reside in each Readout Box and are only accessible when the CMS detector is open.  The installation of new CCMs will allow us to eliminate data loss caused by single-event upsets (SEUs) experienced during the 2011&ndash...

  18. FAM222B Is Not a Likely Novel Candidate Gene for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Kirchmaier, Bettina; Rath, Matthias; Korenke, G Christoph; Tetzlaff, Fabian; van de Vorst, Maartje; Neveling, Kornelia; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Kuss, Andreas W; Gilissen, Christian; Fischer, Andreas; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Felbor, Ute

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are prevalent slow-flow vascular lesions which harbour the risk to develop intracranial haemorrhages, focal neurological deficits, and epileptic seizures. Autosomal dominantly inherited CCMs were found to be associated with heterozygous inactivating mutations in 3 genes, CCM1 (KRIT1), CCM2 (MGC4607), and CCM3 (PDCD10) in 1999, 2003 and 2005, respectively. Despite the availability of high-throughput sequencing techniques, no further CCM gene has been published since. Here, we report on the identification of an autosomal dominantly inherited frameshift mutation in a gene of thus far unknown function, FAM222B (C17orf63), through exome sequencing of CCM patients mutation-negative for CCM1-3. A yeast 2-hybrid screen revealed interactions of FAM222B with the tubulin cytoskeleton and STAMBP which is known to be associated with microcephaly-capillary malformation syndrome. However, a phenotype similar to existing models was not found, neither in fam222bb/fam222ba double mutant zebrafish generated by transcription activator-like effector nucleases nor in an in vitro sprouting assay using human umbilical vein endothelial cells transfected with siRNA against FAM222B. These observations led to the assumption that aberrant FAM222B is not involved in the formation of CCMs. PMID:27587990

  19. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: ► BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. ► Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. ► The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent ► In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  20. Stratospheric Ozone Predictions For The Late 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L.

    2013-12-01

    Simulations of ozone evolution from 1960 until ~2100 from chemistry climate models (CCMs) that participated in CCMVal-2 are broadly consistent in that stratospheric ozone increases as chlorofluorcarbons decrease and the stratosphere cools (which affects the rate of temperature dependent loss processes), however, details of the projections vary significantly. Differences in the ozone response to specified changes in chlorine containing source gases dominate during the first half of the integrations. For example, from 1980 to 2000, chlorine change is by far the most important cause of ozone change, and the CCMs produce changes in the 60S-60N average column ozone that range between -3 DU and -17 DU. In the second half of the 21st century climate change is primarily responsible for ozone change. By 2080 the CCMs produce changes in the 60S-60N average upper stratospheric ozone column that range from 4 DU to 10 DU. The CCM range of differences is due to differences in both composition and upper stratospheric temperature. Ozone loss processes each have their own temperature sensitivity, and the net sensitivity of ozone to temperature change in each CCM depends on the relative importance of each loss process; this depends on the composition and temperature for the baseline atmosphere. In the lower stratosphere, climate change affects ozone evolution through changes in photochemical reaction rates due to stratospheric cooling and through circulation differences affecting transport of ozone and other trace gases. These are not separable using an approach such as multiple linear regression because changes in circulation and temperature have the same time dependence after accounting for contributions due to chlorine change. Recent attention has focused on similarity of the CCMs in that all predict a speed-up of the Brewer Dobson circulation. However, differences in the magnitude of the speed-up, differences in horizontal mixing and differences in the photochemical response to

  1. Algal and aquatic plant carbon concentrating mechanisms in relation to environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms (also known as inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms; both abbreviated as CCMs) presumably evolved under conditions of low CO(2) availability. However, the timing of their origin is unclear since there are no sound estimates from molecular clocks, and even if there were, there are no proxies for the functioning of CCMs. Accordingly, we cannot use previous episodes of high CO(2) (e.g. the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) to indicate how organisms with CCMs responded. Present and predicted environmental change in terms of increased CO(2) and temperature are leading to increased CO(2) and HCO(3)(-) and decreased CO(3)(2-) and pH in surface seawater, as well as decreasing the depth of the upper mixed layer and increasing the degree of isolation of this layer with respect to nutrient flux from deeper waters. The outcome of these forcing factors is to increase the availability of inorganic carbon, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) to aquatic photolithotrophs and to decrease the supply of the nutrients (combined) nitrogen and phosphorus and of any non-aeolian iron. The influence of these variations on CCM expression has been examined to varying degrees as acclimation by extant organisms. Increased PAR increases CCM expression in terms of CO(2) affinity, whilst increased UVB has a range of effects in the organisms examined; little relevant information is available on increased temperature. Decreased combined nitrogen supply generally increases CO(2) affinity, decreased iron availability increases CO(2) affinity, and decreased phosphorus supply has varying effects on the organisms examined. There are few data sets showing interactions amongst the observed changes, and even less information on genetic (adaptation) changes in response to the forcing factors. In freshwaters, changes in phytoplankton species composition may alter with environmental change with consequences for frequency of

  2. Impact of large atmospheric CO2 decline on marine life and sedimentation 375-325 million years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, R.

    2010-12-01

    Mass Extinctions, widespread deposition of black shale and carbonate mud mounds, and decline in atmospheric CO2 occurred during the Late Devonian-Early Mississippian (LDEM), 375-325 million years ago. These at first sight unrelated events can be linked by the response of phytoplankton to reduced CO2 supply. pCO2 declined from >10 to CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in present-day cyanobacteria. CCMs act to maintain photosynthesis, but also have effects that parallel LDEM events. First, by helping to overcome carbon limitation, CCMs increase primary productivity, promoting bloom conditions, anoxia and black shale accumulation. Second, so long as carbonate saturation state is sufficiently elevated, cyanobacterial CCMs also promote water-column precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 (whitings) due to active import of HCO3- raising pH adjacent to cells. Intense whitings would provide a sustained source of fine-grained carbonate for mud mound formation. Third, by affecting the success of other phytoplankton in which CCMs are less well-developed or lacking, CCM induction by cyanobacteria could have promoted Late Devonian acritarch extinction. It is also possible that toxic blooms of cyanobacteria, generated by CCMs, contributed to Late Devonian extinction of very shallow water reef and other communities. Further evidence consistent with CCM induction and proliferation of planktic cyanobacteria during the LDEM includes increases in cyanobacterial biomarkers, cyanobacterial sheath-calcification, and δ13C isotope values. Carbonate mud mound abundance increased in the Late Devonian, reaching its Paleozoic acme in the Early Mississippian. The source of this mud and its unusual abundance at this time has defied resolution. It has been suggested that the carbonate mud was largely precipitated in situ on the mounds. However,this mechanism is inconsistent with bedded mound structure, leaves unanswered questions concerning mound accretion, and fails to explain the exceptional

  3. Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

  4. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  5. Drivers of hemispheric differences in return dates of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone to historical levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs project an earlier return of northern mid-latitude total column ozone to 1980 values compared to the southern mid-latitudes. The chemical and dynamical drivers of this hemispheric difference are investigated in this study. The hemispheric asymmetry in return dates is a robust result across different CCMs and is qualitatively independent of the method used to estimate return dates. However, the differences in dates of return to 1980 levels between the southern and northern mid-latitudes can vary between 0 and 30 yr across the range of CCM projections analyzed. An attribution analysis performed with two CCMs shows that chemically-induced changes in ozone are the major driver of the earlier return of ozone to 1980 levels in northern mid-latitudes; transport changes are of minor importance. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the spread in the simulated hemispheric difference in return dates across an ensemble of twelve models is only weakly related to the spread in the simulated hemispheric asymmetry of trends in the strength of the Brewer–Dobson circulation. The causes for chemically-induced asymmetric ozone trends relevant for the total column ozone return date differences are found to be (i stronger increases in ozone production due to enhanced NOx concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere lowermost stratosphere and troposphere, (ii stronger decreases in the destruction rates of ozone by the NOx cycle in the Northern Hemisphere lower stratosphere linked to effects of dynamics and temperature on NOx concentrations and (iii an increasing efficiency of heterogeneous ozone destruction by Cly in the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes as a result of decreasing temperatures.

  6. Design of core cooling monitoring system based on SOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling'ao phase Ⅱ nuclear power project is the first SOP adopted plant in China. According to the requirement of this procedure, Core Cooling Monitoring System (CCMS) shall perform two of six status function monitoring tasks of SOP, including primary loop coolant inventory, pressure and temperature. Inventory is monitored by reactor vessel level and the rest are monitored by saturation margin ΔTsat. To fulfill these tasks, the system design, including sensors, data processing and information display, is significantly different from EOP design. This paper gives a generally description from the system design aspect. (authors)

  7. Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol - Worldwide modeling integrating coupled climate-chemistry models with a risk model for UV

    OpenAIRE

    Dijk van, Arjan; Slaper, Harry; Outer den, Peter; Morgenstern, Olaf; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John; Garny, Hella; Stenke, Andrea; Dameris, Martin; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis

    2013-01-01

    The assessment model for ultraviolet radiation and risk “AMOUR” is applied to output from two chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Results from the UK Chemistry and Aerosols CCM are used to quantify the worldwide skin cancer risk avoided by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments: by the year 2030, two million cases of skin cancer have been prevented yearly, which is 14% fewer skin cancer cases per year. In the “World Avoided,” excess skin cancer incidence will continue to grow dramatically afte...

  8. Food authenticity studies via multi-elemental and isotopic pattern using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of our study has been the development of an analytical method based on Sr isotope and elemental fingerprint analysis for discriminating food samples from different geographical origin. Several types of foods were involved in the investigation representing different stages of food processing such as pulverized spicy paprika (sparsely processed food product) and wine samples (processed product). Independent inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like ICP-SFMS, ICP-CCMS, and MC-ICPMS were used for method validation and investigation of the geographical origin. The advantage and limitations of the developed methods are discussed critically. (author)

  9. Multi-model prediction of climate-induced changes in ozone and reactive nitrogen fluxes into the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Shepherd, T. G.; Ccmval Modelling Team

    2010-12-01

    Chemistry-Climate Models (CCMs) consistently predict a strengthening of the stratospheric Brewer-Dobson circulation due to climate change. The associated changes in the distribution of stratospheric ozone and reactive nitrogen will affect not only the flux of those tracers into the troposphere, but also the amount of ultra-violet radiation reaching the troposphere. While the contribution of stratospheric ozone to the total tropospheric ozone budget is only about 10%, it strongly affects ozone concentrations in the upper troposphere, where ozone has a relatively long lifetime (about one month) and its largest impact on radiative forcing. At the same time, changes in reactive nitrogen and UV radiation may influence the efficacy of chemical processes in the troposphere, and have adverse effects on human beings and the ecosystem. We present new results from a multi-model comparison of predicted changes in stratospheric ozone and reactive nitrogen fluxes using state-of-the-art CCMs, and the role of ozone depletion and recovery in modulating them. In order to gain confidence in the model predictions, we also evaluate the models’ capabilities to represent dynamical and chemical processes in the lower stratosphere through process-oriented diagnostics using both aircraft and satellite data.

  10. Clear sky UV simulations for the 21st century based on ozone and temperature projections from Chemistry-Climate Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tourpali

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have estimated changes in surface solar ultraviolet (UV radiation under cloud free conditions in the 21st century based on simulations of 11 coupled Chemistry-Climate Models (CCMs. The total ozone columns and vertical profiles of ozone and temperature projected from CCMs were used as input to a radiative transfer model in order to calculate the corresponding erythemal irradiance levels. Time series of monthly erythemal irradiance received at the surface during local noon are presented for the period 1960 to 2100. Starting from the first decade of the 21st century, the surface erythemal irradiance decreases globally as a result of the projected stratospheric ozone recovery at rates that are larger in the first half of the 21st century and smaller towards its end. This decreasing tendency varies with latitude, being more pronounced over areas where stratospheric ozone has been depleted the most after 1980. Between 2000 and 2100 surface erythemal irradiance is projected to decrease over midlatitudes by 5 to 15%, while at the southern high latitudes the decrease is twice as much. In this study we have not included effects from changes in cloudiness, surface reflectivity and tropospheric aerosol loading, which will likely be affected in the future due to climate change. Consequently, over some areas the actual changes in future UV radiation may be different depending on the evolution of these parameters.

  11. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Mans and P. De Barbaro

    2012-01-01

      During first three months of LHC operation in 2012 (April-June 2012), HCAL performed well.  Out of a total of 6.15 fb–1 recorded by CMS, 230 pb–1 had to be declared as ‘bad’ during certification process due to HCAL-related problems. There were two major sources of ‘bad’ data coming from HCAL. Firstly, RBX data losses resulted in approximately 90 pb–1 declared as ‘bad’. The RBX data loss problems are caused by Single Event Upsets (SEU) in Clock and Control Modules (CCMs). As CCMs are not accessible with the CMS detector closed, this problem can be only fixed during LS1. The second major source of  ‘bad’ data was a failure of TTCrx chip (installed on HF detector), which resulted in a loss of almost 80 pb–1. The intervention required access to the cavern, and so the unit could only be replaced during the inter-fill period. In 2011 and early 2012, we have...

  12. Can fractional release be used as a diagnostic of changes in stratospheric transport?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermöller, Jennifer; Bönisch, Harald; Andreas, Engel; Joeckel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Mean age of air (AOA), the time elapsed since the entry of an air parcel into the stratosphere, is used as a diagnostic tool for changes in the stratospheric circulation. Different Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) show a decrease in AOA which is indicative of acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson-Circulation (BDC). The available observation however cannot confirm this acceleration. In principle, AOA could mask changes of the relative strength of different stratospheric transport pathways and thus may not be sufficient for general predictions on the BDC. We suggest to use the concept of fractional release factors (FRF) and their correlations with AOA as an additional tool to investigate changes in circulation. The FRF can be understood as the fraction of a trace gas that has been dissociated in the stratosphere by chemical processes. Changes of FRF at constant age surfaces for chemical active species with different stratospheric lifetimes may then be an evidence for circulation changes. Par example, the changing of the amount of recirculated stratospheric air parcels would alter the relation between FRF and AOA. Analysing the temporal evolution of FRF for different CFC species calculated by the EMAC Model, we find an increase of FRF with time in the mid-latitudes which is in agreement with other CCMs. Observations of FRF and mean age are very sparse: We will present and discuss an analysis of FRF and its relation to AOA from available balloon and aircraft flights in comparison to the model results.

  13. Nanosphere Lithography: A Powerful Method for the Controlled Manufacturing of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Colson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The never-ending race towards miniaturization of devices induced an intense research in the manufacturing processes of the components of those devices. However, the complexity of the process combined with high equipment costs makes the conventional lithographic techniques unfavorable for many researchers. Through years, nanosphere lithography (NSL attracted growing interest due to its compatibility with wafer-scale processes as well as its potential to manufacture a wide variety of homogeneous one-, two-, or three-dimensional nanostructures. This method combines the advantages of both top-down and bottom-up approaches and is based on a two-step process: (1 the preparation of a colloidal crystal mask (CCM made of nanospheres and (2 the deposition of the desired material through the mask. The mask is then removed and the layer keeps the ordered patterning of the mask interstices. Many groups have been working to improve the quality of the CCMs. Throughout this review, we compare the major deposition techniques to manufacture the CCMs (focusing on 2D polystyrene nanospheres lattices, with respect to their advantages and drawbacks. In traditional NSL, the pattern is usually limited to triangular structures. However, new strategies have been developed to build up more complex architectures and will also be discussed.

  14. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao;

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ......Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case......-controlled observational study investigated whether the brains of human subjects with familial CCM show vascular hyperpermeability by dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative perfusion magnetic resonance imaging, in comparison with CCM cases without familial disease, and whether lesional or brain vascular permeability...... correlates with CCM disease activity. Permeability in white matter far (WMF) from lesions was significantly greater in familial than in sporadic cases, but was similar in CCM lesions. Permeability in WMF increased with age in sporadic patients, but not in familial cases. Patients with more aggressive...

  15. From disasters to decisions: Cape Canaveral Marine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five years ago, in August 1992, a tropical depression off the western coast of Africa formed, intensifying and gathering storm clouds as it began its journey westward. By the time it reached the US mainland, it had become a full-fledged hurricane -- Hurricane Andrew -- that blasted over south Florida and into south-central Louisiana. In Florida City, Fla., things went from bad to worse. One piece of metal debris -- airborne from the hurricane's 145 mile-per-hour winds -- punctured an oil tank, triggering a rapidly spreading oil spill that needed to be contained, and fast. The tank had a mechanism whereby oil was replenished when the container was less than full; so as oil was sucked out by the high winds, more came pouring in. In addition, a berm that would have somewhat contained the spill was stuck in open position. Enter Cape Canaveral Marine Services, Inc., (CCMS, Cape Canaveral, Fla.), an environmental services company well-versed in emergency spill response activities. Within seven weeks, CCMS had cleaned up and mitigated the impacts of the spill. Although the job posed significant challenges, the company was uniquely situated to respond quickly, efficiently, and effectively. After all, it had already been in the business for 20 years

  16. The Developing Field of Geothermal Energy Le développement du domaine de l'énergie géothermique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresee J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal energy is a rapidly growing source of power and heat in many countries of the world: production of electricity is generally confined to the most scismically active areas of the world; non electric uses are found throughout the earth. A cooperative program (CCMS was organized in 1973 under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS of the NATO with which non NATO countries could participate. This program included computer, based information systems, direct uses of geothermal energy, multipurpose processing and disposal of geothermai brines, small geothermal power plants, and hot dry rocks concepts. Several of the CCMS cooperative efforts were continued under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, often by way of bilateral agreements. Hot dry rock activities are diversified with funding from several nations. The US Geothermal program has expanded greatly in the last five years with the target to reach a geothermal energy production of 4 to 9 x 10. 15 Btu/yr at the end of the Twentieth Century, about half coming from geopressured methane. Dans de nombreux pays, la géothermie croît rapidement comme source d'énergie et de chaleur. La production d'électricité se cantonne dans les régions fortement sismiques, tandis que les usages non électriques sont répandus largement à la surface de la Terre. Un programme de coopération (CCMS s'est organisé en 1973 pour cinq ans sous les auspices du Comité pour le Défi de la Société Moderne de l'OTAN auquel pouvaient s'associer des nations qui ne sont pas membres du traité. Le programme comprenait : un système de documentation par ordinateurs, l'utilisation directe de l'énergie géothermique, le traitement diversifié et l'élimination des saumures géo-thermiques, de petites centrales géothermiques et l'étude des procédés par roches chaudes sèches. Plusieurs des efforts coopératifs du CCMS se sont poursuivis sous les auspices de l

  17. Drivers of hemispheric differences in return dates of mid-latitude stratospheric ozone to historical levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs project an earlier return of northern mid-latitude total column ozone to 1980 values compared to the southern mid-latitudes. The chemical and dynamical drivers of this hemispheric difference are investigated in this study. The hemispheric asymmetry in return dates is a robust result across different CCMs and is qualitatively independent of the method used to estimate return dates. However, the differences in dates of return to 1980 levels between the southern and northern mid-latitudes can vary between 0 and 30 yr across the range of CCM projections analyzed. Positive linear trends in ozone lead to an earlier return of ozone than expected from the return of Cly to 1980 levels. This forward shift is stronger in the Northern than in the Southern Hemisphere because (i trends have a larger effect on return dates if the sensitivity of ozone to Cly is lower and (ii the trends in the Northern Hemisphere are stronger than in the Southern Hemisphere. An attribution analysis performed with two CCMs shows that chemically-induced changes in ozone are the major driver of the earlier return of ozone to 1980 levels in northern mid-latitudes; therefore transport changes are of minor importance. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the spread in the simulated hemispheric difference in return dates across an ensemble of twelve models is only weakly related to the spread in the simulated hemispheric asymmetry of trends in the strength of the Brewer–Dobson circulation. The causes for chemically-induced asymmetric ozone trends relevant for the total column ozone return date differences are found to be (i stronger increases in ozone production due to enhanced NOx concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere lowermost stratosphere and troposphere, (ii stronger decreases in the destruction rates of ozone by the NOx cycle in the Northern Hemisphere lower stratosphere linked to effects of dynamics and temperature on NOx

  18. Technical Management for Buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of an 'instrument' for the optimization of the functionality and conservation of tertiary buildings. This technique has several different names: Building Automation Systems (BAS), Central Control and Monitoring System (CCMS) in English, and Gestion Technique du Bâtiment' (GTB) or Gestion Technique Centralisée (GTC) in French. With this technique it is possible to manage all the functions of a building, it is a modern instrument that introduces the concept of 'automation' in the operation of buildings using computerized procedures, earlier reserved for industrial processes. The system is structured with different automation levels with a distributed intelligence, each level characterized by a communication system (Fieldbus for the lowest and Ethernet for the highest level). In order to apply the BAS to CERN buildings it is necessary to evaluate the advantages, the CERN requirements and the integration with the several existing control and automation systems.

  19. Using the sense of coherence framework as a tactical approach to communicating corrective action in crisis situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Daniel Morten; Jacobsen, Johan Martin Hjorth

    effective or influential is the use of crisis responses to shape, reinforce, or change stakeholders’ perceptions.” (Fediuk et. al., 2010: 238) In order to create knowledge of how an organization can reassure its stakeholders during a crisis, even when the organization is at fault, we have chosen the...... response strategy named corrective action for our study. According to Coombs, corrective action means giving stakeholders information about a crisis and explaining what is being done to handle it (Coombs, 2012: 150). Corrective action shows stakeholders that their safety is a priority, and thus reduces...... integrate in CCMs to external stakeholders, the three components are understood as follows: First, the element of comprehensibility describes the individual’s need to be able to place stimuli in a context, that is to have a feeling that things happen in an orderly and a somewhat predictable manner. Thus...

  20. Specific migration of di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (DEHA) from plasticized PVC film: results from an enforcement campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens Højslev; Breindahl, T.

    1998-01-01

    , olive oil, followed by clean-up using size exclusion chromatography and final determination of di-(2-ethylhexyl) adipate (DEHA) by combined capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In the initial screening, the samples were exposed to the alternative food simulant, isooctane, and DEHA...... could be determined by CC-MS without further clean-zip. A good consistency between results from the two different methods was obtained During the campaign, 49 samples of PVC films, the majority intended for use in retail shops, were sampled from importers and wholesalers by the Municipal Food Control...... Units. Initially, all films were screened for the migration into isooctane (exposed 2 h at 40 degrees C) of DEHA and other potentially present low molecular weight plasticizers using full scanning mass spectrometry. Films showing a substantial migration of DEHA were further tested with olive oil...

  1. On-line stable isotope gas exchange reveals an inducible but leaky carbon concentrating mechanism in Nannochloropsis salina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, David T; Collins, Aaron M; Jones, Howland D T; Roesgen, John; Lopez-Nieves, Samuel; Timlin, Jerilyn A

    2014-09-01

    Carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are common among microalgae, but their regulation and even existence in some of the most promising biofuel production strains is poorly understood. This is partly because screening for new strains does not commonly include assessment of CCM function or regulation despite its fundamental role in primary carbon metabolism. In addition, the inducible nature of many microalgal CCMs means that environmental conditions should be considered when assessing CCM function and its potential impact on biofuels. In this study, we address the effect of environmental conditions by combining novel, high frequency, on-line (13)CO2 gas exchange screen with microscope-based lipid characterization to assess CCM function in Nannochloropsis salina and its interaction with lipid production. Regulation of CCM function was explored by changing the concentration of CO2 provided to continuous cultures in airlift bioreactors where cell density was kept constant across conditions by controlling the rate of media supply. Our isotopic gas exchange results were consistent with N. salina having an inducible "pump-leak" style CCM similar to that of Nannochloropsis gaditana. Though cells grew faster at high CO2 and had higher rates of net CO2 uptake, we did not observe significant differences in lipid content between conditions. Since the rate of CO2 supply was much higher for the high CO2 conditions, we calculated that growing cells bubbled with low CO2 is about 40 % more efficient for carbon capture than bubbling with high CO2. We attribute this higher efficiency to the activity of a CCM under low CO2 conditions. PMID:24844569

  2. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Ruan

    Full Text Available Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis.Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery.Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01. In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001, male-majority (female ratio 1 year before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01, lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02 and short-term (< 3 years follow-up (OR, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.80; P = 0.005 tended to correlate with a significantly favorable outcome.Patients who underwent extended surrounding hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  3. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Extratropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Gettelman, A.; Hoor, P.; Krichevsky, R.; Manney, G. L.; Pan, L. L.; Son, S.-W.; Stiller, G.; Tilmes, S.; Walker, K. A.; Eyring, V.; Shepherd, T. G.; Waugh, D.; Akiyoshi, H.; AñEl, J. A.; Austin, J.; Baumgaertner, A.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Brühl, C.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M.; Dameris, M.; Dhomse, S.; Frith, S.; Garny, H.; Hardiman, S. C.; JöCkel, P.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Mancini, E.; Michou, M.; Morgenstern, O.; Nakamura, T.; Olivié, D.; Pawson, S.; Pitari, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Pyle, J. A.; Rozanov, E.; Scinocca, J. F.; Shibata, K.; Smale, D.; TeyssèDre, H.; Tian, W.; Yamashita, Y.

    2010-01-01

    A multimodel assessment of the performance of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) in the extratropical upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) is conducted for the first time. Process-oriented diagnostics are used to validate dynamical and transport characteristics of 18 CCMs using meteorological analyses and aircraft and satellite observations. The main dynamical and chemical climatological characteristics of the extratropical UTLS are generally well represented by the models, despite the limited horizontal and vertical resolution. The seasonal cycle of lowermost stratospheric mass is realistic, however with a wide spread in its mean value. A tropopause inversion layer is present in most models, although the maximum in static stability is located too high above the tropopause and is somewhat too weak, as expected from limited model resolution. Similar comments apply to the extratropical tropopause transition layer. The seasonality in lower stratospheric chemical tracers is consistent with the seasonality in the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Both vertical and meridional tracer gradients are of similar strength to those found in observations. Models that perform less well tend to use a semi-Lagrangian transport scheme and/or have a very low resolution. Two models, and the multimodel mean, score consistently well on all diagnostics, while seven other models score well on all diagnostics except the seasonal cycle of water vapor. Only four of the models are consistently below average. The lack of tropospheric chemistry in most models limits their evaluation in the upper troposphere. Finally, the UTLS is relatively sparsely sampled by observations, limiting our ability to quantitatively evaluate many aspects of model performance.

  4. Production variables and nutrient retention in single comb White Leghorn laying pullets fed diets supplemented with direct-fed microbials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahashon, S N; Nakaue, H S; Mirosh, L W

    1994-11-01

    Two experiments were carried out for six and seven 28-d periods, respectively, with DeKalb XL Single Comb White Leghorn laying pullets to ascertain the effect of feeding 1,100 mg Lactobacillus (Lacto)/kg diet (ppm) and 2,200 ppm Lacto diets, and the supplementation of these diets with 1 and 3% fat, on layer performance and nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus retention. The dietary treatments were corn-soybean meal (C-S) control, C-S plus condensed cane molasses solubles (CCMS)-1,100 ppm Lacto (4.4 x 10(7) cfu/mg Lacto), and C-S plus CCMS-2,200 ppm Lacto (8.8 x 10(7) cfu/mg Lacto) without fat (Experiment 1) and without and with 1 and 3% supplemental fat to each Lacto level (Experiment 2). In both experiments, layers fed the 1,100 ppm Lacto diets had better (P Lacto. Egg mass, interior egg quality, and feed conversion (Experiment 1), mean body weight gains, and nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus retention (Experiment 2) were further improved (P Lacto diets. Feeding Lacto diets with 1% fat provided (P fat decreased (P Lacto diets and nitrogen and calcium retentions, daily feed consumption, and egg size were observed. Feeding 1,100 ppm Lacto diets to layers stimulated appetite and improved egg production, egg mass, egg weight, egg size, and feed conversion. Addition of fat to Lacto diets reduced daily feed consumption and provided better feed conversion, egg masses, egg sizes, body weight gains, and nutrient retentions. PMID:7862610

  5. Multimodel assessment of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere: Tropics and global trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettelman, A.; Hegglin, M. I.; Son, S.-W.; Kim, J.; Fujiwara, M.; Birner, T.; Kremser, S.; Rex, M.; AñEl, J. A.; Akiyoshi, H.; Austin, J.; Bekki, S.; Braesike, P.; Brühl, C.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M.; Dameris, M.; Dhomse, S.; Garny, H.; Hardiman, S. C.; JöCkel, P.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J. F.; Mancini, E.; Marchand, M.; Michou, M.; Morgenstern, O.; Pawson, S.; Pitari, G.; Plummer, D.; Pyle, J. A.; Rozanov, E.; Scinocca, J.; Shepherd, T. G.; Shibata, K.; Smale, D.; TeyssèDre, H.; Tian, W.

    2010-01-01

    The performance of 18 coupled Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) is evaluated using qualitative and quantitative diagnostics. Trends in tropopause quantities in the tropics and the extratropical Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) are analyzed. A quantitative grading methodology for evaluating CCMs is extended to include variability and used to develop four different grades for tropical tropopause temperature and pressure, water vapor and ozone. Four of the 18 models and the multi-model mean meet quantitative and qualitative standards for reproducing key processes in the TTL. Several diagnostics are performed on a subset of the models analyzing the Tropopause Inversion Layer (TIL), Lagrangian cold point and TTL transit time. Historical decreases in tropical tropopause pressure and decreases in water vapor are simulated, lending confidence to future projections. The models simulate continued decreases in tropopause pressure in the 21st century, along with ˜1K increases per century in cold point tropopause temperature and 0.5-1 ppmv per century increases in water vapor above the tropical tropopause. TTL water vapor increases below the cold point. In two models, these trends are associated with 35% increases in TTL cloud fraction. These changes indicate significant perturbations to TTL processes, specifically to deep convective heating and humidity transport. Ozone in the extratropical lowermost stratosphere has significant and hemispheric asymmetric trends. O3 is projected to increase by nearly 30% due to ozone recovery in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and due to enhancements in the stratospheric circulation. These UTLS ozone trends may have significant effects in the TTL and the troposphere.

  6. Satellite Observations and Chemistry Climate Models - A Meandering Path Towards Better Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the stratospheric ozone layer has grown rapidly since the 1970s, when ideas that depletion of the ozone layer due to human activity were put forth. The concept of ozone depletion due to anthropogenic chlorine increase is simple; quantification of the effect is much more difficult. The future of stratospheric ozone is complicated because ozone is expected to increase for two reasons: the slow decrease in anthropogenic chlorine due to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and stratospheric cooling caused by increases in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Prediction of future ozone levels requires three-dimensional models that represent physical, photochemical and radiative processes, i.e., chemistry climate models (CCMs). While laboratory kinetic and photochemical data are necessary inputs for a CCM, atmospheric measurements are needed both to reveal physical and chemical processes and for comparison with simulations to test the conceptual model that CCMs represent. Global measurements are available from various satellites including but not limited to the LIMS and TOMS instruments on Nimbus 7 (1979 - 1993), and various instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (1991 - 2005), Envisat (2002 - ongoing), Sci-Sat (2003 - ongoing) and Aura (2004 - ongoing). Every successful satellite instrument requires a physical concept for the measurement, knowledge of physical chemical properties of the molecules to be measured, and stellar engineering to design an instrument that will survive launch and operate for years with no opportunity for repair but providing enough information that trend information can be separated from any instrument change. The on-going challenge is to use observations to decrease uncertainty in prediction. This talk will focus on two applications. The first considers transport diagnostics and implications for prediction of the eventual demise of the Antarctic ozone hole

  7. Assessment of the interannual variability and impact of the QBO and upwelling on tracer-tracer distributions of N2O and O3 in the tropical lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Olschewski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A modified form of tracer-tracer correlations of N2O and O3 has been used as a tool for the evaluation of atmospheric photochemical models. Applying this method monthly averages of N2O and O3 are derived for both hemispheres by partitioning the data into altitude (or potential temperature bins and then averaging over a fixed interval of N2O. In a previous study, the method has been successfully applied to the validation of two Chemical Transport Models (CTMs and one Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM using 1-year climatology derived from the Odin Sub Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR. However, the applicability of a 1-year climatology of monthly averages of N2O and O3 has been questioned due to the inability of some CCMs to simulate a specific year for the evaluation of CCMs. In this study, satellite measurements from Odin/SMR, the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (Aura/MLS, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding on ENVISAT (ENVISAT/MIPAS, and the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA-1 and CRISTA-2 as well as model simulations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM are considered. By using seven to eight years of satellite measurements derived between 2003 and 2010 from Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, ENVISAT/MIPAS and six years of model simulations from WACCM the interannual variability of lower stratospheric monthly averages of N2O and O3 is assessed. It is shown that the interannual variability of the monthly averages of N2O and O3 is low and thus can be easily distinguished from model deficiencies. Further, it is investigated why large differences between Odin/SMR observations and model simulations from the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA and the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5/Messy1 are found for the Northern and Southern Hemisphere tropics (0° to 30° N and 0° to −30° S, respectively. The differences between model simulations and

  8. Variability of tropospheric methane above the Mediterranean Basin inferred from satellite and model data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The space and time variabilities of methane (CH4 total column and upper tropospheric mixing ratios are analyzed above the Mediterranean Basin (MB as part of the Chemical and Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment (ChArMEx programme. Spaceborne measurements from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS instrument on the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT satellite, the Atmospheric InfraRed Spectrometer (AIRS on the AURA platform and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounder Interferometer (IASI instrument aboard the MetOp-A platform are used in conjunction with model results from the Chemical Transport Model (CTM MOCAGE, and the Chemical Climate Models (CCMs CNRM-AOCCM and LMDz-OR-INCA (according to different emission scenarios. In order to minimize systematic errors in the spaceborne measurements, we have only considered maritime pixels over the MB. The period under interest spans from 2008 to 2011 considering satellite and MOCAGE data and, regarding the CCMs, from 2001 to 2010. An East-West gradient in CH4 is observed and modelled whatever the season considered. In winter, air masses mainly originating from Atlantic Ocean and Europe tend to favour an elevated amount of mid-to-upper tropospheric CH4 in the West vs. the East of the MB, with a general upward transport above the MB. In summer, the meteorological state of the MB is changed, favouring air from Northern Africa and Middle East together with Atlantic Ocean and Europe, with a general downward motion above the MB. The Asian Monsoon traps and uplifts high amounts of CH4 that are transported towards North Africa and Middle East by the Asian Monsoon Anticyclone to finally reach and descent in the East of the MB. Consequently, the mid-to-upper tropospheric CH4 is much greater in the East than in the West of the MB. The seasonal variation of the difference in CH4 between the East and the West MB does show a maximum in summer for pressures

  9. PDCD10,一个新的多功能信号转导调节分子%PDCD10, a Novel Signal Transduction Regulating Molecule with Multiple Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄东宁; 赵红珊

    2013-01-01

    人程序性细胞死亡分子10(Homo sapiens programmed cell death 10,PDCD10),最初被称为TFAR15 (TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene 15),是由撤除粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子诱导凋亡的人红白血病细胞系TF-1中克隆得到的1个凋亡相关基因.后来发现它的突变可引起散发性或家族性颅内海绵状血管瘤(cerebral cavernous malformations,CCMs)的发生,为CCMs的第3个致病基因,所以又被叫做CCM3.近年来研究发现,PDCD10能够和GCKⅢ蛋白、γ-PCDH、CCM2、VEGFR2、ERM等众多蛋白相互作用,并能调控ERK-MAPK通路,增加MST4/VEGFR2的稳定性,增强相应的信号转导,促进细胞的增殖、分化和中枢神经系统的发育,与癌症的发生相关,还能调节细胞的凋亡.以上研究证明了PDCD10的多种生物学效应,并提示其在血管生成、氧化应激、肿瘤中发挥重要作用.%Homo sapiens programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10) , also termed as TF-1 cell apoptosis related gene 15 ( TFAR15 ) , was a apoptosis-related gene initially. It was originally identified in a premyeloid cell line TF-1 , which was induced by removing granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) . Since the mutation of PDCD10 can give rise to sporadic or familial cerebral cavernous malformations, PDCD10 could also be referred as CCM3 , the third disease gene of CCMs. It has been verified that PDCD10 can interact with a wide range of proteins including GCKⅢ, γ-PCDH , CCM2 , VEGFR2 and ERM. It can also stimulate the ERK-MAPK pathway by stabilizing MST4/ VEGFR2, and thus enhance the signal transduction, promote proliferation and differentiation of cells. Recent studies revealed multiple biological effects from PDCD10. The results suggest that PDCD10 play important roles in angiogenesis, oxidative stress and oncogenesis.

  10. Conference Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colman, B. [ed.

    1998-06-01

    Invited reviews and contributed papers comprise the Proceedings of the 3. International Symposium on Inorganic Carbon Acquisition by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms, held on the campus of the University of British Columbia from 28. July to 1. August 1998. The symposium was attended by 70 participants from Australia, Canada, Israel, Japan, the United States, and several western European countries, to discuss the unique problems of microorganisms in aquatic environments, particularly in the acquisition of inorganic carbon to support photosynthesis. It is known that aquatic microorganisms must obtain inorganic carbon from a medium where dissolved carbon dioxide is often present in limiting concentrations. Despite these limitations, evidence is widely available to show that aquatic plants can build up high intracellular concentrations of inorganic carbon under carbon-limited conditions that enable these plants to reduce or suppress photorespiration, a major source of carbon dioxide in C{sub 3} plants growing under carbon-limiting conditions. This active accumulation of carbon has been described as a carbon dioxide concentration mechanism (CCM). Papers at this symposium document advances in the physiology of inorganic carbon transport systems and their regulation in green algae, especially cyanobacteria, mechanisms of carbon acquisition, and ecological implications of CCMs and their role in the global carbon cycle.

  11. Diatom acclimation to elevated CO2 via cAMP signalling and coordinated gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennon, Gwenn M. M.; Ashworth, Justin; Groussman, Ryan D.; Berthiaume, Chris; Morales, Rhonda L.; Baliga, Nitin S.; Orellana, Mónica V.; Armbrust, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    Diatoms are responsible for ~40% of marine primary productivity, fuelling the oceanic carbon cycle and contributing to natural carbon sequestration in the deep ocean. Diatoms rely on energetically expensive carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to fix carbon efficiently at modern levels of CO2 (refs , , ). How diatoms may respond over the short and long term to rising atmospheric CO2 remains an open question. Here we use nitrate-limited chemostats to show that the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana rapidly responds to increasing CO2 by differentially expressing gene clusters that regulate transcription and chromosome folding, and subsequently reduces transcription of photosynthesis and respiration gene clusters under steady-state elevated CO2. These results suggest that exposure to elevated CO2 first causes a shift in regulation, and then a metabolic rearrangement. Genes in one CO2-responsive cluster included CCM and photorespiration genes that share a putative cAMP-responsive cis-regulatory sequence, implying these genes are co-regulated in response to CO2, with cAMP as an intermediate messenger. We verified cAMP-induced downregulation of CCM gene δ-CA3 in nutrient-replete diatom cultures by inhibiting the hydrolysis of cAMP. These results indicate an important role for cAMP in downregulating CCM and photorespiration genes under elevated CO2 and provide insights into mechanisms of diatom acclimation in response to climate change.

  12. Investigations on degradation of the long-term proton exchange membrane water electrolysis stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shucheng; Shao, Zhigang; Yu, Hongmei; Li, Guangfu; Yi, Baolian

    2014-12-01

    A 9-cell proton exchange membrane (PEM) water electrolysis stack is developed and tested for 7800 h. The average degradation rate of 35.5 μV h-1 per cell is measured. The 4th MEA of the stack is offline investigated and characterized. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) shows that the charge transfer resistance and ionic resistance of the cell both increase. The linear sweep scan (LSV) shows the hydrogen crossover rate of the membrane has slight increase. The electron probe X-ray microanalyze (EPMA) illustrates further that Ca, Cu and Fe elements distribute in the membrane and catalyst layers of the catalyst-coated membranes (CCMs). The cations occupy the ion exchange sites of the Nafion polymer electrolyte in the catalyst layers and membrane, which results in the increase in the anode and the cathode overpotentials. The metallic impurities originate mainly from the feed water and the components of the electrolysis unit. Fortunately, the degradation was reversible and can be almost recovered to the initial performance by using 0.5 M H2SO4. This indicates the performance degradation of the stack running 7800 h is mainly caused by a recoverable contamination.

  13. SPARC's Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate Activity (SSiRC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The stratospheric aerosol layer is a key component in the climate system. It affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere directly through interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation, and indirectly through its effect on stratospheric ozone. Because the stratospheric aerosol layer is prescribed in many climate models and Chemistry-Climate Models (CCMs), model simulations of future atmospheric conditions and climate generally do not account for the interaction between the aerosol-sulfur cycle and changes in the climate system. The present understanding of how the stratospheric aerosol layer may be affected by future climate change and how the stratospheric aerosol layer may drive climate change is, therefore, very limited. The purposes of SSiRC (Stratospheric Sulfur and its Role in Climate) include: (i) providing a coordinating structure for the various individual activities already underway in different research centers; (ii) encouraging and supporting new instrumentation and measurements of sulfur containing compounds, such as COS, DMS, and non-volcanic SO2 in the UT/LS globally; and (iii) initiating new model/data inter-comparisons. SSiRC is developing collaborations with a number of other SPARC activities including CCMI and ACAM. This presentation will highlight the scientific goals of this project and on-going activities and propose potential interactions between SSiRC and ACAM.

  14. The diversity and coevolution of Rubisco, plastids, pyrenoids, and chloroplast-based CO{sub 2}-concentrating mechanisms in algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, M. R.; Andrews, T. J.; Whitney, S. M.; Ludwig, M.; Price, G. D. [Australian National Univ., Research School of Biological Sciences, Canberra, ACT (Australia); Yellowlees, D. C.; Leggat, W. [James Cook Univ., Dept of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Townsville, QLD (Australia)

    1998-06-01

    The potential diversity of Rubisco and chloroplast-based carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in green and non-green algae are examined. The review emphasized recent advances in understanding the subject and areas with future research potential. In general, the review found that Rubisco enzymes from algae have evolved a higher affinity for carbon dioxide when the algae have adopted a strategy for carbon dioxide fixation that does not utilize a CCM. This appears to be true for both the Green and Red Form I Rubisco enzymes found in green and non-green algae. In some microalgae there is a strong correlation between the existence of a high-affinity CCM physiology and the presence of pyrenoids, suggestive of the potential importance of these chloroplast Rubisco-containing bodies. In contrast, in macroalgae a greater diversity of the apparent relationships between pyrenoids and chloroplast features and the CCM physiology was found. With regard to future research, the function of the pyrenoid and other chloroplast features, the operation of chloroplast-based CCM, and the assessment of the coevolution of Rubisco, appeared to be the most promising areas. 109 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  15. Stabiliztin of VEGFR2 Signaling by Cerebral Cavernous Malformation 3 is Critical for Vascular Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y He; H Zhang; L Yu; M Gunel; T Boggon; H Chen; W Min

    2011-12-31

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are human vascular malformations caused by mutations in three genes of unknown function: CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3. CCM3, also known as PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10), was initially identified as a messenger RNA whose abundance was induced by apoptotic stimuli in vitro. However, the in vivo function of CCM3 has not been determined. Here, we describe mice with a deletion of the CCM3 gene either ubiquitously or specifically in the vascular endothelium, smooth muscle cells, or neurons. Mice with global or endothelial cell-specific deletion of CCM3 exhibited defects in embryonic angiogenesis and died at an early embryonic stage. CCM3 deletion reduced vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling in embryos and endothelial cells. In response to VEGF stimulation, CCM3 was recruited to and stabilized VEGFR2, and the carboxyl-terminal domain of CCM3 was required for the stabilization of VEGFR2. Indeed, the CCM3 mutants found in human patients lacking the carboxyl-terminal domain were labile and were unable to stabilize and activate VEGFR2. These results demonstrate that CCM3 promotes VEGFR2 signaling during vascular development.

  16. Review of the formulation of present-generation stratospheric chemistry-climate models and associated external forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, O.; Giorgetta, M. A.; Shibata, K.; Eyring, V.; Waugh, D. W.; Shepherd, T. G.; Akiyoshi, H.; Austin, J.; Baumgaertner, A. J. G.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Brühl, C.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; Dameris, M.; Dhomse, S.; Frith, S. M.; Garny, H.; Gettelman, A.; Hardiman, S. C.; Hegglin, M. I.; JöCkel, P.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Mancini, E.; Manzini, E.; Marchand, M.; Michou, M.; Nakamura, T.; Nielsen, J. E.; Olivié, D.; Pitari, G.; Plummer, D. A.; Rozanov, E.; Scinocca, J. F.; Smale, D.; TeyssèDre, H.; Toohey, M.; Tian, W.; Yamashita, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal) activity is to improve understanding of chemistry-climate models (CCMs) through process-oriented evaluation and to provide reliable projections of stratospheric ozone and its impact on climate. An appreciation of the details of model formulations is essential for understanding how models respond to the changing external forcings of greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting substances, and hence for understanding the ozone and climate forecasts produced by the models participating in this activity. Here we introduce and review the models used for the second round (CCMVal-2) of this intercomparison, regarding the implementation of chemical, transport, radiative, and dynamical processes in these models. In particular, we review the advantages and problems associated with approaches used to model processes of relevance to stratospheric dynamics and chemistry. Furthermore, we state the definitions of the reference simulations performed, and describe the forcing data used in these simulations. We identify some developments in chemistry-climate modeling that make models more physically based or more comprehensive, including the introduction of an interactive ocean, online photolysis, troposphere-stratosphere chemistry, and non-orographic gravity-wave deposition as linked to tropospheric convection. The relatively new developments indicate that stratospheric CCM modeling is becoming more consistent with our physically based understanding of the atmosphere.

  17. Evaluation of the simulations of the North American Monsoon in the NCAR CCM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zong-Liang; Gochis, Dave; Shuttleworth, William James

    The six-year average of a ten-year integration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3), forced with prescribed, climatological sea surface temperatures, was compared with the Legates-Willmott precipitation climatology and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-NCAR reanalysis product. Summertime precipitation associated with the North American Monsoon (NAM) circulation is largely underrepresented in simulations using the CCMS. The CCM3 simulates excessive amounts of tropical eastern Pacific and Caribbean precipitation, depressed precipitation over Mexico and the southwestern United States, and largely misrepresents the summertime circulation pattern over North America as compared to the reanalysis climatology fields. Basic diagnostic analyses suggest that excessive convection over tropical waters in the eastern Pacific and the Caribbean alters the summertime circulation pattern which produces excess subsidence over much of Northern Mexico and the southwestern U.S. and prohibits the northward transport of atmospheric moisture into the NAM region. The vertically integrated moisture flux and precipitable water estimated by the CCM3 are significantly different in amount and direction (in the case of fluxes) than those observed in the reanalysis data. Introducing anomalously wet land-surface conditions over the NAM region at model initialization yields minimal improvement. Suspected causes for the erroneous simulation of the summertime circulation in the CCM3 are discussed.

  18. Soils containing 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin: aspects of their microbial activity and the potential for their microbially-mediated decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three soils from Missouri and a soil from New Jersey, containing between 0.008 and 26.3 ug/g of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), were examined for microbial activity; the Missouri soils were also monitored for TCDD biodegradation. The objective was to simulate TCDD biodegradation by the indigenous microflora in order to develop a cost-effective method to decontaminate soils in situ. Microbial activity in TCDD soils was examined by enumeration of aerobic eutrophic and oligotrophic bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi; determination of soil enzyme activity, including dehydrogenase, acid and alkaline phosphatase, arylsulfatase, and rhodanese; and measurement of soil respiration. The Missouri soils were subsequently amended with fertilizer, 14C-TCDD and a TCDD-solubilizing nonionic surfactant in order to improve the availability of TCDD to the indigenous soil microflora. Biodegradation of TCDD was monitored by the evolution of 14CO2 and by high resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (CC/MS)

  19. The impact on vessel level measurement due to natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The Core Cooling and Monitoring System (CCMS) of CPR1000 nuclear power station supplies monitoring means for two primary state functions defined in State Oriented Procedure (SOP). Purpose: We aim to deal with the errors caused by L VSL measurement and discuss the influence on SOP accident treatment. Methods: The calculation formula of natural recirculation flow rate was estimated. The maximum flow rates of single phase natural recirculation (at the time of reactor trip) and two phase natural recirculation (the void fraction in hot leg was 0.2) were calculated. The impact on SOP due to the measurement error of L VSL was analyzed. Results: Firstly, in the condition of single phase recirculation, the estimated error of L VSL measurement induced by the natural recirculation was less than 1.6%. Secondly, in the condition of two phase natural recirculation, the natural recirculation induced an over-estimated error' about 3.6% to L VSL measurement when the void fraction in hot leg was 0.2. Conclusion: As multi-parameters are adopted for SOP to diagnose the core cooling state, the implementation of the safety related operations is guaranteed. (authors)

  20. Identification of Potential Off-target Toxicity Liabilities of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Inhibitors by Differential Competition Capture Compound Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kleist, Lisa; Michaelis, Simon; Bartho, Kathrin; Graebner, Olivia; Schlief, Marén; Dreger, Mathias; Schrey, Anna K; Sefkow, Michael; Kroll, Friedrich; Koester, Hubert; Luo, Yan

    2016-05-26

    Structurally related inhibitors of a shared therapeutic target may differ regarding potential toxicity issues that are caused by different off-target bindings. We devised a differential competition capture compound mass spectrometry (dCCMS) strategy to effectively differentiate off-target profiles. Tolcapone and entacapone are potent inhibitors of catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Tolcapone is also known for its hepatotoxic side effects even though it is therapeutically more potent than entacapone. Here, we identified 3-hydroxyisobutyryl-CoA hydrolase (HIBCH) as a possible toxicity-causing off-target of tolcapone, and this protein is not bound by the less toxic COMT inhibitor entacapone. Moreover, two novel compounds from a focused library synthesized in-house, N(2),N(2),N(3),N(3)-tetraethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-5-nitronaphthalene-2,3-dicarboxamide and 5-(3,4-dihydroxy-5-nitrobenzylidene)-3-ethylthiazolidine-2,4-dione, were utilized to gain insight into the structure-activity relationships in binding to COMT and the novel off-target HIBCH. These compounds, especially N(2),N(2),N(3),N(3)-tetraethyl-6,7-dihydroxy-5-nitronaphthalene-2,3-dicarboxamide, could serve as starting point for the development of improved and more specific COMT inhibitors. PMID:27074629

  1. Polyaromatic polymers as binders in PEMFC catalyst layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peron, J.M.; Edwards, D.; Le Marquand, P.; Shi, Z.; Holdcroft, S. [National Research Council of Canada, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Inst. for Fuel Cell Innovation

    2009-07-01

    The catalyst layers in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are typically composed of platinum as the catalyst and carbon as the electron conductor. The binder that ensures the ionic pathway between catalyst particles and the electrolyte membrane is a perfluorinated polymer that brings the electrolyte, gaseous reactants, electrocatalyst and current collector into close contact within a confined spatial region known as the triple-phase-boundary. New non-fluorinated polymers have been developed in an effort to lower the cost and improve the stability of fuel cells. Although polyaromatic polymers have been extensively presented in the literature for membrane preparation, these new materials have been mainly characterized in presence of Nafion as a binder in the catalyst layer. This paper discussed the incorporation of polyaromatic polymers, such as sulfonated-PEEK (sPEEK), and its properties as a binder. sPEEK-based catalyst ink solutions, using different sPEEK/Pt ratios and preparation methods, have been deposited on membranes to form catalyst-coated-membranes (CCM). Initial catalyst ink were characterized using dynamic light scattering to determine agglomerate size. Catalyst layers were examined using SEM and TEM and their porosity was determined by Hg porosimetry. Various electrochemical techniques were used for in-situ characterization of prepared sPEEK CCMs.

  2. Preliminary evidences of CCM operation and its down regulation in relation to increasing CO2 levels in natural phytoplankton assemblages from the coastal waters of Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Haimanti; Rahman Shaik, Aziz Ur; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita

    2014-05-01

    Bay of Bengal (BoB), a low productive part of the North Indian Ocean, often possesses low CO2 levels in its surface water and diatoms dominate the phytoplankton communities. Virtually no studies are available from this area reporting how this diatom dominated phytoplankton community would respond any increase in dissolved CO2 levels either naturally or anthopogenically. In most of the marine phytoplankton, the inefficiency of the sole carbon fixing enzyme Rubisco necessitates the need of concentrating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (mostly as HCO3) inside the cell in excess of the ambient water concentrations in order to maintain high rate of photosynthesis under low CO2 levels through an energy consuming carbon concentration mechanisms (CCMs). The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a vital role in CCMs by converting HCO3- to CO2 and usually utilizes the trace metal zinc (Zn) as a cofactor. However, it is evident in many marine phytoplankton species that with increasing external CO2 levels, CCMs can be down-regulated leading to energetic savings which can be reallocated to growth; although exceptions occur. Hence, in order to predict their responses to the projected changes, it is imperative to understand their carbon metabolism patterns. We have conducted a series of incubation experiments in microcosms with natural phytoplankton communities from the coastal waters of BoB under different CO2 levels. Our results revealed that the rate of net photosynthetic oxygen evolution and biomass build-up increased in response to increasing CO2 levels. The depletion in δ13CPOM values were more in the high CO2 treatments relative to the low CO2 treated cells (control), indicating that dissolved CO2 uptake was higher when CO2 levels were increased. When additional Zn was added to the low CO2 treated cells, net photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate was increased significantly than that of the untreated control. It is likely that upon the supply of Zn under low CO2

  3. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal trigger for the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the primary site of thermal damage is not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions", as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as the cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. This provides a new standpoint to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  4. Targeted drug delivery systems 6: Intracellular bioreductive activation, uptake and transport of an anticancer drug delivery system across intestinal Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharat, L; Taneja, R; Weerapreeyakul, N; Rege, B; Polli, J; Chikhale, P J

    2001-05-21

    We demonstrate transport across, intracellular accumulation and bioreductive activation of a conformationally constrained, anticancer drug delivery system (the CH(3)-TDDS) using Caco-2 cell monolayers (CCMs) as an in vitro model of the human intestinal mucosa. Reverse-phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) coupled with UV detection was used to detect CH(3)-TDDS, the bioreduction product (lactone) and the released drug (melphalan methyl ester; MME). Upon incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS with the apical (AP) surface of 21-day-old CCM, we observed rapid decrease in the AP concentration of the CH(3)-TDDS (60%/hr) as a result of cellular uptake. Rapid intracellular accumulation of the CH(3)-TDDS was followed by bioreductive activation to deplete the cellular levels of CH(3)-TDDS. The drug part (MME) and lactone, as well as CH(3)-TDDS, were detected in the basolateral (BL) chamber. Intracellular Caco-2 levels of TDDS and lactone were also detectable. Bioreductive activation of the CH(3)-TDDS was additionally confirmed by formation of lactone after incubation of the CH(3)-TDDS in the presence of freshly prepared Caco-2 cell homogenates. During transport studies of melphalan or MME alone (as control), the intact drug was not detected in the intracellular compartment or in the BL chamber. These observations demonstrate that CH(3)-TDDS has potential for improving intestinal delivery of MME. TDDS could be useful in facilitating oral absorption of MME as well as the oral delivery of other agents. PMID:11337161

  5. Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol--worldwide modeling integrating coupled climate-chemistry models with a risk model for UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Arjan; Slaper, Harry; den Outer, Peter N; Morgenstern, Olaf; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John A; Garny, Hella; Stenke, Andrea; Dameris, Martin; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2013-01-01

    The assessment model for ultraviolet radiation and risk "AMOUR" is applied to output from two chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Results from the UK Chemistry and Aerosols CCM are used to quantify the worldwide skin cancer risk avoided by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments: by the year 2030, two million cases of skin cancer have been prevented yearly, which is 14% fewer skin cancer cases per year. In the "World Avoided," excess skin cancer incidence will continue to grow dramatically after 2030. Results from the CCM E39C-A are used to estimate skin cancer risk that had already been inevitably committed once ozone depletion was recognized: excess incidence will peak mid 21st century and then recover or even super-recover at the end of the century. When compared with a "No Depletion" scenario, with ozone undepleted and cloud characteristics as in the 1960s throughout, excess incidence (extra yearly cases skin cancer per million people) of the "Full Compliance with Montreal Protocol" scenario is in the ranges: New Zealand: 100-150, Congo: -10-0, Patagonia: 20-50, Western Europe: 30-40, China: 90-120, South-West USA: 80-110, Mediterranean: 90-100 and North-East Australia: 170-200. This is up to 4% of total local incidence in the Full Compliance scenario in the peak year. PMID:22924540

  6. Transport in the Asian Anticyclone at the synoptic and intraseasonal scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierli, Federico; Galuzzo, Daniele; Biondi, Riccardo; Cairo, Francesco; Cagnazzo, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    Asian Anticyclone (AA) contains air from the troposphere that can enter directly in the lower stratosphere with observational evidence of low ozone / high water vapor and enhanced pollutants or precursors. We focus on the dynamics and variability for transport in the AA from the Monsoon region to the lowermost stratosphere from the synoptic to the intra-seasonal scale, making use of regional scale modelling, lagrangian analysis, Cosmic GPS, the MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and MIPAS (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding) and convection proxies. This to identify the impact of processes acting at these scales (Monsoon break-up, stronger convection phases) on the injection of pollutants and water vapour in the Asian Anticyclone region. Concerning the synoptic variability, it is known that specific convection patterns and episodes as for instance those occuring at the flanks of Himalayan foothills, may generate a substantial flux of pollutants and water vapour in the AA, an estimate of their impact on the seasonal overall transport budget is still missing. This information is also particularly important to optimize in-situ observations in terms of expected variability, target regions, expected concentrations and to develop focused diagnostics for evaluation of Climate Models such as CCMs.

  7. Present status and future prospects for nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H. (ed.)

    1975-10-03

    This report, which is part of a study initiated by the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS), describes the current status of nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources. Such resources are defined as geothermal fluids between the temperatures of 50 and 160/sup 0/C. Current and potential uses of these resources including residential and commercial, agricultural and industrial applications are described. Also discussed are exploration and drilling; extraction and distribution; environmental impact; and economic and regulatory problems. Applications in a number of countries are described. Among the report's conclusions are: (1) Geothermal resources are widely distributed throughout the world. (2) The extraction of these resources presents no serious technical problems. (3) A wide variety of economically viable applications for these resources currently exists. (4) Current nonelectrical applications have a favorable economic structure compared with those of other energy sources. (5) Disposal of spent fluids has a significant ecological impact. Reinjection appears to be the most likely alternative. (6) The legal and institutional framework surrounding these applications needs both clarification and simplification.

  8. 驱蚊抑菌绿色蚊香工艺研制及其效果评价%Processing Technology of Anti-bacterial and Mosquito-repellent Green Incense and Its Effect Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓蓉; 陈功锡; 陈良; 潘涛; 雷玉茸; 徐定华

    2011-01-01

    基于绿色无毒蚊香应用的重要性,本文以药用植物黄花蒿(Artemisia annua L.)为主要原料研究了驱蚊抑菌绿色蚊香工艺.考察了蚊香产品的驱蚊和抑菌效果,采用CC-MS分析了蚊香中黄花蒿挥发油的驱蚊成分,并对蚊香产品性状进行了评价.实验结果表明,添加黄花蒿植物、木炭、榆木粉及苍术等组分为最优化的原料组成;室内药效试验表明最优化原料组分研制的蚊香产品具有较好驱蚊效果,其KT50为4 min;抑菌实验表明制备的蚊香对供试5种微生物均具有抑制作用,具广谱抑菌性;GC-MS分析表明蚊香工艺处理后的黄花蒿挥发油存在11个相对含量大于2.0%的活性组分;性状评价结果表明蚊香产品在外观与感官、水分、抗折力及连续燃烧时间等性状均达到国家标准;燃烧试验发现蚊香燃烧时间与蚊香横切面积有关.%Based on the important application of the nontoxic and mosquito-repellent green incense,the processing technology of green incense using Chinese medicinal plant of Artemisia annua L. as the major materials was developed. And the anti-bacterial and mosquito-repellent functions of incense were studied. The volatile oil of A. annua was analyzed by CC-MS method. The production properties of incense were evaluated based on the national standard. The results suggested that the optimal material compositions of incense process were A. annua, wood charcoal,elm powder and Atractylodes lancea. The laboratory efficacy test showed that the anti-bacterial mosquito-repellent green incense had strong mosquito-repellent effect. The KTjq was 4 min. The antimicrobial tests implied that the anti-bacterial mosquito-repellent green incense was the broad-spectrum anti-bacteria agent,which could effectively inhibit the growth of five experimental bacteri-a. The volatile oil of A annua by CC-MS method included eleven compositions with relative content more than 2.0%. The effect

  9. Evaluation of Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds data obtained by ground based lidars (at Dome C, McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville) and the satellite based CALIOP lidar system versus a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snels, Marcel; Fierli, Federico; de Muro, Mauro; Cagnazzo, Chiara; Cairo, Francesco; Di Liberto, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds play an important role in the ozone depletion process in polar regions and are thus strongly linked to climate changes. Long term observations are needed to monitor the presence of PSCs and to compare to climate models. The last decades PSCs in Antarctica have been observed by using the CALIOP lidar system on the CALIPSO satellite and by ground based lidars at Dumont D'Urville, McMurdo, Casey, and since 2014 at Dome C. We evaluate the Antarctic PSC observational databases of CALIPSO and the ground-based lidars of NDACC (Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Changes) located in McMurdo and Dumont D'Urville and Dome C stations and provide a process-oriented evaluation of PSC in a subset of CCMVAL-2 chemistry-climate models. Lidar observatories have a decadal coverage, albeit with discontinuities, spanning from 1992 to today hence offering a unique database. A clear issue is the representativeness of ground-based long-term data series of the Antarctic stratosphere conditions that may limit their value in climatological studies and model evaluation. The comparison with the CALIPSO observations with a global coverage is, hence, a key issue. In turn, models can have a biased representation of the stratospheric conditions and of the PSC microphysics leading to large discrepancies in PSC occurrence and composition. Point-to-point comparison is difficult due to sparseness of the database and to intrinsic differences in spatial distribution between models and observations. However, a statistical analysis of PSC observations shows a satisfactory agreement between ground-based and satellite borne-lidar. The differences may be attributed to averaging processes for data with a bad signal to noise ratio, which tends to smear out the values of the optical parameters. Data from some Chemistry Climate models (CCMs) having provided PSC surface areas on daily basis have been evaluated using the same diagnostic type that may be derived CALIPSO (i

  10. Assessment of the interannual variability and influence of the QBO and upwelling on tracer–tracer distributions of N2O and O3 in the tropical lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Khosrawi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A modified form of tracer–tracer correlations of N2O and O3 has been used as a tool for the evaluation of atmospheric photochemical models. Applying this method, monthly averages of N2O and O3 are derived for both hemispheres by partitioning the data into altitude (or potential temperature bins and then averaging over a fixed interval of N2O. In a previous study, the method has been successfully applied to the evaluation of two chemical transport models (CTMs and one chemistry–climate model (CCM using a 1 yr climatology derived from the Odin Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR. However, the applicability of a 1 yr climatology of monthly averages of N2O and O3 has been questioned due to the inability of some CCMs to simulate a specific year for the evaluation of CCMs. In this study, satellite measurements from Odin/SMR, the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (Aura/MLS, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding on ENVISAT (ENVISAT/MIPAS, and the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere (CRISTA-1 and CRISTA-2 as well as model simulations from the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM are considered. By using seven to eight years of satellite measurements derived between 2003 and 2010 from Odin/SMR, Aura/MLS, ENVISAT/MIPAS and six years of model simulations from WACCM, the interannual variability of lower stratospheric monthly averages of N2O and O3 is assessed. It is shown that the interannual variability of the monthly averages of N2O and O3 is low, and thus can be easily distinguished from model deficiencies. Furthermore, it is investigated why large differences are found between Odin/SMR observations and model simulations from the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA and the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5/Messy1 for the Northern and Southern Hemisphere tropics (0° to 30° N and 0° to −30° S, respectively. The differences between model simulations and

  11. Introducing an algal carbon-concentrating mechanism into higher plants: location and incorporation of key components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Nicky; Feike, Doreen; Mackinder, Luke C M; Meyer, Moritz T; Griffiths, Howard; Jonikas, Martin C; Smith, Alison M; McCormick, Alistair J

    2016-05-01

    Many eukaryotic green algae possess biophysical carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that enhance photosynthetic efficiency and thus permit high growth rates at low CO2 concentrations. They are thus an attractive option for improving productivity in higher plants. In this study, the intracellular locations of ten CCM components in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were confirmed. When expressed in tobacco, all of these components except chloroplastic carbonic anhydrases CAH3 and CAH6 had the same intracellular locations as in Chlamydomonas. CAH6 could be directed to the chloroplast by fusion to an Arabidopsis chloroplast transit peptide. Similarly, the putative inorganic carbon (Ci) transporter LCI1 was directed to the chloroplast from its native location on the plasma membrane. CCP1 and CCP2 proteins, putative Ci transporters previously reported to be in the chloroplast envelope, localized to mitochondria in both Chlamydomonas and tobacco, suggesting that the algal CCM model requires expansion to include a role for mitochondria. For the Ci transporters LCIA and HLA3, membrane location and Ci transport capacity were confirmed by heterologous expression and H(14) CO3 (-) uptake assays in Xenopus oocytes. Both were expressed in Arabidopsis resulting in growth comparable with that of wild-type plants. We conclude that CCM components from Chlamydomonas can be expressed both transiently (in tobacco) and stably (in Arabidopsis) and retargeted to appropriate locations in higher plant cells. As expression of individual Ci transporters did not enhance Arabidopsis growth, stacking of further CCM components will probably be required to achieve a significant increase in photosynthetic efficiency in this species. PMID:26538195

  12. Role of external factors in the evolution of the ozone layer and stratospheric circulation in 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zubov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemistry-climate model (CCM SOCOL has been used to evaluate the contribution of the main anthropogenic factors to the simulated changes of ozone and stratospheric dynamics during the 21st century. As the main anthropogenic factors we consider atmospheric concentration of the greenhouse gases (GHG, ozone depleting substances (ODS and sea surface temperature and sea ice (SST/SI distribution. The last one is considered here as an independent factor because the majority of the CCMs prescribe its evolution. We have performed three sets of "time-slice" numerical experiments with CCM SOCOL for the years 2000, 2050, and 2100 taking into account all factors separately and all together. It was established that the total column ozone increase during the first half of the 21st century is caused by the ODS, especially in the middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. In the tropics and the extra tropical region of the Northern Hemisphere (NH the SST/SI forcing plays very important role in the evolution of ozone atmospheric content during the second half of the 21st century. The GHG affect the temperature and ozone mainly in the upper stratosphere and in the lower stratosphere of the high latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere (SH. In the lower tropical stratosphere of the NH the long-term changes of the temperature, zonal wind velocity and the meridional circulation intensity are controlled mainly by the SST/SI. The strong contribution of the SST/SI to the ozone and circulation changes in the future implies that some differences between the simulated results could be caused by the applied SST/SI rather than by the CCM's deficiencies. We suggest taking this issue into account for the planning of the future model evaluation campaigns.

  13. Optimization of Steam Distillation of Essential Oil in Perilla Frutescens by Response Surface Analysis and the Study on Chemical Compositions%响应面法优化紫苏挥发油的水蒸气提取工艺及其成分研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林梦南; 苏平

    2012-01-01

    Based on single factor tests,the optimum extraction conditions of essential oil from Perillae frutescens were obtained through response surface methodology: steam distilling time 3 h, liquid to material ratio 5:1, soaking time 2 h, 5% NaCl, the actual detection value was 0.1517%, that was almost equal to the predictable value. Thirty-six compounds, identified by means of CC-MS, made up 97.83% of the essential oil. The result showed that the main components were Perillaldehyde(35.31%) and limonene(29.09%). Electron micrographs showed the mechanism of the distillation was related to structural change of the cells.%在单因素试验的基础上,利用响应面法优化紫苏挥发油的水蒸气提取工艺,确定其工艺参数是:蒸馏时间3h,液料比5∶1,浸泡时间2h,NaCl质量分数5%,实际得率为0.1517%,与理论值较接近.通过GC-MS分析,鉴定出紫苏挥发油中的36种物质,占总量的97.83%,其中以紫苏醛(35.31%)和柠檬烯(29.09%)的含量最高.拍摄了透射电镜照片,探讨在水蒸气加热过程中对紫苏叶细胞结构的破坏机理.

  14. Tropical tropospheric ozone column retrieval for GOME-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Valks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the operational retrieval of tropical tropospheric ozone columns (TOC from the Second Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME-2 instruments using the convective-cloud-differential (CCD method. The retrieval is based on total ozone and cloud property data provided by the GOME Data Processor (GDP 4.7, and uses above-cloud and clear-sky ozone column measurements to derive a monthly mean TOC between 20° N and 20° S. Validation of the GOME-2 TOC with several tropical ozonesonde sites shows good agreement, with a high correlation between the GOME-2 and sonde measurements, and small biases within ~ 3 DU. The TOC data have been used in combination with tropospheric NO2 measurements from GOME-2 to analyse the effect of the 2009–2010 El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO on the tropospheric ozone distribution in the tropics. El-Niño induced dry conditions in September–October 2009 resulted in relatively high tropospheric ozone columns over the southern Indian Ocean and northern Australia, while La Niña conditions in September–October 2010 resulted in a strong increase in tropospheric NO2 in South America, and enhanced ozone in the eastern Pacific and South America. Comparisons of the GOME-2 tropospheric ozone data with simulations of the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model for 2009 El Nino conditions, illustrate the usefulness of the GOME-2 TOC measurements in evaluating chemistry climate models. Evaluation of CCMs with appropriate satellite observations helps to identify strengths and weaknesses of the model systems, providing a better understanding of driving mechanisms and adequate relations and feedbacks in the Earth atmosphere, and finally leading to improved models.

  15. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 1: Meteorology and comparison with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Russo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast convective transport in the tropics can efficiently redistribute water vapour and pollutants up to the upper troposphere. In this study we compare tropical convection characteristics for the year 2005 in a range of atmospheric models, including numerical weather prediction (NWP models, chemistry transport models (CTMs, and chemistry-climate models (CCMs. The model runs have been performed within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The characteristics of tropical convection, such as seasonal cycle, land/sea contrast and vertical extent, are analysed using satellite observations as a benchmark for model simulations. The observational datasets used in this work comprise precipitation rates, outgoing longwave radiation, cloud-top pressure, and water vapour from a number of independent sources, including ERA-Interim analyses. Most models are generally able to reproduce the seasonal cycle and strength of precipitation for continental regions but show larger discrepancies with observations for the Maritime Continent region. The frequency distribution of high clouds from models and observations is calculated using highly temporally-resolved (up to 3-hourly cloud top data. The percentage of clouds above 15 km varies significantly between the models. Vertical profiles of water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS show large differences between the models which can only be partly attributed to temperature differences. If a convective plume reaches above the level of zero net radiative heating, which is estimated to be ~15 km in the tropics, the air detrained from it can be transported upwards by radiative heating into the lower stratosphere. In this context, we discuss the role of tropical convection as a precursor for the transport of short-lived species into the lower stratosphere.

  16. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  17. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  18. The Brewer-Dobson circulation and total ozone from seasonal to decadal time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Weber

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the winter Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC on the seasonal and decadal evolution of total ozone in both hemispheres is investigated using satellite total ozone data and outputs from two chemistry-climate models (CCM. Combining data from both hemispheres a linear relationship between the winter cumulative extratropical 100 hPa eddy heat flux and the ozone ratio with respect to fall ozone levels exists and is statistically significant for tropical as well as polar ozone. The high correlation at high latitudes persists well into the summer months until the onset of the next winter season. The anti-correlation of the cumulative eddy heat flux with tropical ozone ratios, however, breaks down in spring as the polar vortex erodes and changes to a weak positive correlation similar to that observed at high latitudes. The inter-annual variability and decadal evolution of ozone in each hemisphere in winter, spring, and summer are therefore driven by the cumulative effect of the previous winter's meridional circulation. This compact linear relationship is also found in two different CCMs (EMAC-FUB, DLR-E39C-A indicating that current models realistically describe the variability in stratospheric circulation and its climate effect on total ozone. Both models show a positive trend in the winter mean eddy heat flux (and winter BDC strength in both hemispheres until year 2050, however the inter-annual variability (peak-to-peak is two to three times larger than the mean change between 1960 and 2050. It is, therefore, possible to detect a shift in this compact linear relationship related to past and future changes in the stratospheric halogen load. A similar shift is difficult to derive from observational data since the satellite era now spanning more than thirty years is still fairly short.

  19. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A continuous tropospheric and stratospheric vertically resolved ozone time series, from 1850 to 2099, has been generated to be used as forcing in global climate models that do not include interactive chemistry. A multiple linear regression analysis of SAGE I+II satellite observations and polar ozonesonde measurements is used for the stratospheric zonal mean dataset during the well-observed period from 1979 to 2009. In addition to terms describing the mean annual cycle, the regression includes terms representing equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle variability. The EESC regression fit coefficients, together with pre-1979 EESC values, are used to extrapolate the stratospheric ozone time series backward to 1850. While a similar procedure could be used to extrapolate into the future, coupled chemistry climate model (CCM simulations indicate that future stratospheric ozone abundances are likely to be significantly affected by climate change, and capturing such effects through a regression model approach is not feasible. Therefore, the stratospheric ozone dataset is extended into the future (merged in 2009 with multi-model mean projections from 13 CCMs that performed a simulation until 2099 under the SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B greenhouse gas scenario and the A1 adjusted halogen scenario in the second round of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal-2 Activity. The stratospheric zonal mean ozone time series is merged with a three-dimensional tropospheric data set extracted from simulations of the past by two CCMs (CAM3.5 and GISS-PUCCINI and of the future by one CCM (CAM3.5. The future tropospheric ozone time series continues the historical CAM3.5 simulation until 2099 following the four different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. Generally good agreement is found between the historical segment of the ozone database and satellite observations, although it should be noted that

  20. Thermal Degradation of DGEBA/EDA Epoxy Resin%双酚A缩水甘油醚/乙二胺环氧树脂的热分解行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁宏博; 张剑秋; 蔡培

    2011-01-01

    采用傅里叶红外光谱法研究了双酚A缩水甘油醚/乙二胺环氧树脂(DGEBA/EDA)在不同温度时分解残留物的红外吸收光谱;利用热分析技术考察了DGEBA/EDA从室温到600℃之间的热解反应.结果表明,DGEBA/EDA环氧树脂在氮气中分解时存在一个热解阶段,最低热解活化能为195.74 kJ/mol.色谱-质谱联用(GC/MS)分析DGEBA/EDA环氧树脂热解残留物,表明在热解过程中主要生成苯酚、对异丙基苯酚和双酚A.讨论了DGEBA/EDA环氧树脂热解的机理.经热解后的残留环氧树脂的热稳定性降低明显,环氧树脂发生了明显的化学裂解.%The thermal degradation behaviors of diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A /ethylenediamine (DGEBA/EDA) epoxy resin in N2 atmosphere were investigated by using thermogravimetry(TG) analysis from 25 ℃ to 600 ℃. The TG results show that DGEBA/EDA epoxy resin has only one degradation step, the lowest activation energy is 195.74 kJ/mol. The gaseous pyrolysis products were collected and characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (CC/MS) and their formation was discussed. The main pyrolysis products were phenol, pisopropylphenol and bisphenol-A. The thermal degradation mechanism of DGEBA/EDA epoxy resin was discussed.The TG analysis of raw materials and solid epoxy resin product shows that the thermal stability of the resin reduces significantly after the degradation. The molecular weight of the solid product decreases and its degree of polymerization of epoxy resin is below the raw materials.

  1. Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Eyring

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite of chemistry-climate models (CCMs have been analyzed. In addition to a reference simulation where anthropogenic halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODSs and greenhouse gases (GHGs vary with time, sensitivity simulations with either ODSs or GHGs concentrations fixed at 1960 levels were performed to disaggregate the drivers of projected ozone changes. These simulations were also used to assess the two distinct milestones of ozone returning to historical values (ozone return dates and ozone no longer being influenced by ODSs (full ozone recovery. These two milestones are different. The date of ozone returning to historical values does not indicate complete recovery from ODSs in most cases, because GHG induced changes accelerate or decelerate ozone changes in many regions. In the upper stratosphere where GHG induced stratospheric cooling increases ozone, full ozone recovery has not likely occurred by 2100 while ozone returns to its 1980 or even 1960 levels well before (~2025 and 2040, respectively. In contrast, in the tropical lower stratosphere ozone decreases continuously from 1960 to 2100 due to projected increases in tropical upwelling, while by around 2040 it is already very likely that full recovery from the effects of ODSs has occurred, although ODS concentrations are still elevated by this date. In the lower midlatitude stratosphere the evolution differs from that in the tropics, and rather than a steady decrease of ozone, first a decrease of ozone is simulated between 1960 and 2000, which is then followed by a steady increase throughout the 21st century. Ozone in the lower stratosphere midlatitudes returns to its 1980 levels ${sim}$2045 in the NH and ~2055 in the SH, and full ozone recovery is likely reached by 2100 in both hemispheres. Overall, in all regions except the tropical lower stratosphere, full ozone recovery from ODSs occurs significantly later than the return of total column

  2. Comparison of the 200 hPa circulation in CSM and CCM3 simulations and NCEP and ERA reanalysis: principal and common principa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, J S

    1998-10-20

    In this paper the interannual variation of monthly mean vorticity and divergence at 200 hPa are compared from four data sources: The NCEP/NCAR reanalyses 1958 through 1994, the ECMWF (ERA) reanalyses, 1979 through 1994, a NCAR CCM3 integration using prescribed SSTs from 1979 through 1993, and the NCAR CSM 300 year integration. Four twenty year periods were taken from the 300 year simulation for analysis. The NCEP, ERA and CCM3 all provide data for the period 1979 through1993. The techniques used are principal and common principal component analyses on the fields transformed to spherical harmonics. The seasonal cycle is removed. For the common time period, 1979 through 1994, the ERA, NCEP and CCM3 display a close correspondence for the leading PC of the 200 hPa vorticity.This mode is closely related to the ENSO variations of the period but the agreement extends to the extratropics. All four CSM periods have similar leading modes which are dominated by a PNA type pattern and lack any Equatorial Pacific ENSO patterns. The agreement between the leading PC for the 200 hPa divergence was somewhat less than that of the vorticity. The CCM3 and ERA indicate a larger magnitude center in the Equatorial Pacific about the dateline than NCEP. The CSM has an intense center a 150E. There are indications in the vorticity and divergence fields that this center is at the source for waves propagating to the midlatitudes. Two twenty year periods of the 1958 to 1996 NCEP reanalyses show a distinct difference between the two periods. The variations are comparable in magnitude if not nature to the variations seen amongst the time sections of the CSM run examined. A CPC analysis of the NCEP, ERA and CCM3 show a common ENS0 type response as the leading common component. The models depart from the reanalyses for the second component. Combining the CCMS, CSM, NCEP and ERA shows that the CSM does have a common component like the other three.

  3. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on Earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size" against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a tremendous self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests Earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with massive sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of Northern America and Eurasia to chilling

  4. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouimet Mathieu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Methods Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care. Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. Discussion This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more

  5. Development and characterization of direct ethanol fuel cells using alkaline anion-exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Peck Cheng

    2009-08-01

    Alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) is a relatively new fuel cell technology that is generating considerable interests. It offers the electrocatalytic advantages of conventional alkaline fuel cells, and the manufacturing and cost advantages of solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This project was carried out to develop and characterize high performance membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for all-solid-state AMFCs. The primary fuel of interests is ethanol, but hydrogen was used in the development stages to facilitate the diagnostic and evaluation of the fuel cell performance. In the preliminary investigation, AMFC was assembled using off-the-shelf electrodes and anion-exchange membrane (AEM). It was found that the performance of AMFC operating on ethanol fuel was limited by a large high-frequency resistance (HFR) value. The advantage of using non-toxic ethanol fuel was also compromised by the need to add hydrazine and potassium hydroxide to the fuel blend. Subsequently, a high performance MEA was developed for an all-solid-state AMFC, in which liquid electrolyte or other additives were not required during the operation of the fuel cell. Ionomer was incorporated in the formulation of catalyst ink, and the catalyst ink was directly coated on the anion-exchange membrane (AEM). An ionomer content of 20 wt.% was found to be the optimum amount required in the catalyst layers. It was demonstrated that the AMFC generated a maximum power density of 365 mW/cm2 and 213 mW/cm 2 with the use of hydrogen/oxygen and hydrogen/pure air, respectively. The performance of the AMFC was also found to be influenced by exposure to carbon dioxide in the air. Hence, the CCMs were pre-treated in potassium hydroxide solution and pure oxygen was used to condition the fuel cell to maximize the power output from the AMFCs. Although satisfactory performance was demonstrated in the AMFC, its stability during cell operation remains a major issue. The poor stability was attributed to degradation of

  6. GLORIA: A new instrument for atmospheric research deployed to Geophysica and HALO during the ESSENCE and TACTS/ESMVAL missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelhaf, Hermann; Preusse, Peter; Friedl-Vallon, Felix

    2013-04-01

    Antarctic vortex, signals of pollution in air outflowing from Asia on the fight leg from the Maldives Islands to Cyprus, and validation of Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs). The paper will provide an overview of the instrument, its capabilities and first results from the Geophysica and HALO deployments.

  7. Climate variability related to the 11 year solar cycle as represented in different spectral solar irradiance reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschke, Tim; Kunze, Markus; Misios, Stergios; Matthes, Katja; Langematz, Ulrike; Tourpali, Kleareti

    2016-04-01

    Advanced spectral solar irradiance (SSI) reconstructions differ significantly from each other in terms of the mean solar spectrum, that is the spectral distribution of energy, and solar cycle variability. Largest uncertainties - relative to mean irradiance - are found for the ultraviolet range of the spectrum, a spectral region highly important for radiative heating and chemistry in the stratosphere and troposphere. This study systematically analyzes the effects of employing different SSI reconstructions in long-term (40 years) chemistry-climate model (CCM) simulations to estimate related uncertainties of the atmospheric response. These analyses are highly relevant for the next round of CCM studies as well as climate models within the CMIP6 exercise. The simulations are conducted by means of two state-of-the-art CCMs - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - run in "atmosphere-only"-mode. These models are quite different with respect to the complexity of the implemented radiation and chemistry schemes. CESM1(WACCM) features a chemistry module with considerably higher spectral resolution of the photolysis scheme while EMAC employs a radiation code with notably higher spectral resolution. For all simulations, concentrations of greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances, as well as observed sea surface temperatures (SST) are set to average conditions representative for the year 2000 (for SSTs: mean of decade centered over year 2000) to exclude anthropogenic influences and differences due to variable SST forcing. Only the SSI forcing differs for the various simulations. Four different forcing datasets are used: NRLSSI1 (used as a reference in all previous climate modeling intercomparisons, i.e. CMIP5, CCMVal, CCMI), NRLSSI2, SATIRE-S, and the SSI forcing dataset recommended for the CMIP6 exercise. For each dataset, a solar maximum and minimum timeslice is integrated, respectively. The results of these simulations - eight in total - are compared to each other with respect to their

  8. Implementing collaborative care for depression treatment in primary care: A cluster randomized evaluation of a quality improvement practice redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Martin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meta-analyses show collaborative care models (CCMs with nurse care management are effective for improving primary care for depression. This study aimed to develop CCM approaches that could be sustained and spread within Veterans Affairs (VA. Evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI uses QI approaches within a research/clinical partnership to redesign care. The study used EBQI methods for CCM redesign, tested the effectiveness of the locally adapted model as implemented, and assessed the contextual factors shaping intervention effectiveness. Methods The study intervention is EBQI as applied to CCM implementation. The study uses a cluster randomized design as a formative evaluation tool to test and improve the effectiveness of the redesign process, with seven intervention and three non-intervention VA primary care practices in five different states. The primary study outcome is patient antidepressant use. The context evaluation is descriptive and uses subgroup analysis. The primary context evaluation measure is naturalistic primary care clinician (PCC predilection to adopt CCM. For the randomized evaluation, trained telephone research interviewers enrolled consecutive primary care patients with major depression in the evaluation, referred enrolled patients in intervention practices to the implemented CCM, and re-surveyed at seven months. Results Interviewers enrolled 288 CCM site and 258 non-CCM site patients. Enrolled intervention site patients were more likely to receive appropriate antidepressant care (66% versus 43%, p = 0.01, but showed no significant difference in symptom improvement compared to usual care. In terms of context, only 40% of enrolled patients received complete care management per protocol. PCC predilection to adopt CCM had substantial effects on patient participation, with patients belonging to early adopter clinicians completing adequate care manager follow-up significantly more often than patients of

  9. AP/RDX/AI/HTPB推进剂用硼酸酯键合剂的合成与应用研究%Synthesis and application of borate bonding agents for AP/RDX/Al/HTPB propellant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔瑞禧; 张炜; 陈浪

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the existing problems of processing property and mechanical property of high-energy hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene propellant, the new borate-ester bonding agents wa9 synthesized. With the dieihanolamine,l-bromobutane,acryloni-trile.and glacial acetic acid as raw materials,the intermediates N.N-two hydroxyethyl n-butyl amine,N-(2-cyanoethyl) dielhano-lamine.and N.N-two hydroxyethyl ethyl amide were synthesized. The reaction product of diethanolamine and acrylonitrile was analyzed by using IR and CC-MS method. It has been testified that the product is target compound. Four kinds of new borate-ester bonding agents were synthesized by utilizing the synthesized intermediates as well as the methyldiethanolamine and tributyl borate. By u-sing the formula of high-energy hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene propellant, it has been verified that all the newly synthesized bonding agents could improve the flow of the slurry, and among them, BA-3, BA-4 have good bonding effects, which significantly improve the mechanical properties of the propellants.%针对丁羟四组元推进剂存在的工艺性能与力学性能的问题,设计合成了新型硼酸酯键合剂.选用二乙醇胺、1-溴代正丁烷、丙烯腈、冰乙酸为原料,合成了N,N-二羟乙基正丁胺、N-(2-腈乙基)二乙醇胺、N,N-二羟乙基乙酰胺中间体.对二乙醇胺和丙烯腈反应的产物做了红外和气-质联用分析,证实合成产物为目标化合物.利用所合成的中间体及甲基二乙醇胺与硼酸三正丁酯,合成了4种新型硼酸酯键合剂,采用丁羟四组元推进剂配方装药,验证了它们的使用效果.结果表明,新合成的4种键合剂都能明显改善药浆流动流平性,其中BA-3和BA-4具有很好的键合效果,显著提升了推进剂的力学性能.

  10. Study on Enzymatie Hydrolysis Conditions of Glueosinolate in Broccolini Seeds and Identify the Products%西兰苔籽中硫代葡萄糖苷酶解条件的研究及产物的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博超; 杨艳婧; 张学武

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究西兰苔籽中硫代葡萄糖苷酶解的影响因素,确定硫苷酶解的最佳条件并分析和鉴定酶解产物.[方法]以西兰苔籽粉末为材料,研究不同的温度、pH以及时间对酶水解的影响,并且利用气相色谱-质谱连用技术分析鉴定了酶解产物.[结果]酶解时间为8 h,水解温度为25 ℃,pH值为7是最佳酶解条件.利用气象色谱-质谱连用技术分析鉴定出5种化合物,占硫苷酶解产物中挥发性化合物总量的80%. [结论]确定了西兰苔籽中硫代葡萄糖苷酶解的最佳条件,并为西兰苔籽的抗癌活性研究提供了一定的理论基础.%[ Objective] The aim was to research the impact of factors of enzymatic hydrolysis for glueosinolate in broccolini seeds, determine the optimum conditions of enzymatic hydrolysis and identify the enzymatic hydrolysis products. [ Methods] Take the broccolini seeds powder as the material ,the impact of the different temperatures, pH value and time respectively was analysed and the enzymatic hydrolysis products were identified by CC-MS. [ Result]The results showed that the optimum enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for the glucosinolate were time 8 h, temperature 25 ℃, ph 7.0 and five compounds were identified from the enzymatic hydrolysis products of the glucosinolate by GC-MS and they accounted for 80% of the whole volatile products. [ Conclusion] This paper identified the optimum conditions of the enzymatic hydrolysis for glucosinolate in broccolini seeds and provided the theoretical basis of broccolini seeds for anticancer activity.

  11. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size" against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North

  12. 木质素超临界溶剂降解反应及其在酚醛树脂合成中的应用%REDUCTIVE DEGRADATION OF LIGNIN IN SUPERCRITICAL SOLVENT AND APPLICATION IN PHENOLIC RESIN SYNTHESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王明存

    2011-01-01

    The lignin was readily decomposed into phenol compounds via reductive liquefaction in supercritical ethanol media ( formic acid decomposed into hydrogen at reaction temperatures) , opening a promising opportunity to lignin-derived value-added aromatic compounds for highly possible application in phenol-formaldehyde resin production. The supercritical ethanol was the ideal reaction medium for lignin degradation, and the in situ generated hydrogen exactly promoted the decomposition reactions to smaller molecules via encapping the lignin radicals to terminate the further coupling and condensation. The liquefaction mechanism was radical thermal degradation. Some transition metal salts could catalyze the above lignin thermal decomposition, including nickel nitrate, cobalt nitrate and chloroplatinum acid. The yield of the lignin-degraded liquid increased with the increase of formic acid used in the ethanol solvent, while slightly deceased when the reaction temperature increased. The molecular weight of the lignin-derived liquid highly decreased with increase of the reaction temperature,e, g. At 350℃ the number average molecular weight was 143 while for the original lignin feedstock it was 588. The optimum reaction conditions are found to be ethanol-formic acid weight ratio at 1:1; lignin load at 10 wt% ; reaction temperature at 350℃ for 4 h. The lignin-derived phenols were characterized by CC-MS technique, and the liquefied product was mainly phenol derivatives with simple structures. Compared with the lignin, the bio-phenols possessed highly improved solubility and reactivity in phenol-formaldehyde synthesis. As the ideal replacement of industrial phenol, lignin-degraded bio-phenol was utilized readily in resol type phenolic resin production with a replacement higher than 50 wt%. The thermal stability was slightly decreased with the increased amount of lignin-derived biophenol in the phenolic resin formula. The results showed the effective reductive degradation of

  13. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North America and Eurasia to a

  14. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, (16) University of Denver, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Denver, CO, USA, (17) National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA, (18) NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA, (19) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe, Germany Total column abundances of HCl and ClONO2, the primary components of the stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) budget, and of HF have been retrieved from ground-based, high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 17 sites of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) located at latitudes between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. These data extend over more than 20 years (through 2007) during a period when the growth in atmospheric halogen loading has slowed in response to the Montreal Protocol (and ammendments). These observed time series are interpreted with calculations performed with a 2-D model, the 3-D chemistry-transport models (CTMs) KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the 3-D chemistry-climate models (CCMs) EMAC and SOCOLv2.0. The observed Cly and in particular HCl column abundances decreases significantely since the end of the nineties at all stations, which is consistent with the observed changes in the halocarbon source gases, with an increasing rate in the last years. In contrast to Cly, the trend values for total column HF at the different stations show a less consistent behaviour pointing to the fact that the time development of the HF columns is peaking. There is a good overall qualitative agreement regarding trends between models and data. With respect to the CTMs the agreement improves if simulation results for measurement days only are used in the trend analysis instead of simulation results for each day.

  15. How do changes in the stratospheric circulation impact ozone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garny, Hella; Dameris, Martin; Bodeker, Greg; Grewe, Volker; Stenke, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    The Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) and tropical upwelling in the lower stratosphere are predicted to increase with increasing greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations by most climate models and chemistry-climate models (CCMs). This change in the meridional circulation is likely to alter the transport of trace gases, and in particular ozone. In addition, ozone is affected by other processes such as changes in stratospheric temperatures that act to change the reaction rates of ozone-relevant chemistry. These climate-change related modifications of the ozone amount and distribution are superimposed on the depletion and recovery of the ozone layer due to stratospheric halogen loading. To assess the recovery of ozone correctly, it is important to understand the processes that affect ozone in a changing climate. In this study, multiple transient numerical simulations and complementary sensitivity studies with the E39CA CCM are used to disentangle the direct effect of changes in GHG concentrations, the indirect effect of GHG-induced sea surface temperature (SST) changes, and changes in CFC concentrations. It is shown that the increase in tropical upwelling is driven by the changes in SSTs rather than by the direct radiative effect of increased GHG concentrations. Therefore, the sensitivity simulations that separate the direct effect of increased amounts of GHGs and the indirect effect via increased SSTs can be used to separate the impact of the increase in tropical upwelling and the impact of stratospheric cooling on ozone. It is shown that the changes in the meridional circulation cause weak negative trends in the tropical lower stratosphere and associated positive trends in the extra-tropical lower stratosphere. Stratospheric cooling, on the other hand, causes a broad increase in ozone in the stratosphere. To study the processes that lead to changes in the ozone distribution in more detail, different diagnostics that can separate the changes in chemistry (production or

  16. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Ermolli

    2013-04-01

    SORCE measurements. However, the integral of the SSI computed with this model over the entire spectral range does not reproduce the measured cyclical changes of the total solar irradiance, which is an essential requisite for realistic evaluations of solar effects on the Earth's climate in CCMs. We show that within the range provided by the recent SSI observations and semi-empirical models discussed here, the NRLSSI model and SORCE observations represent the lower and upper limits in the magnitude of the SSI solar cycle variation. The results of the CCM simulations, forced with the SSI solar cycle variations estimated from the NRLSSI model and from SORCE measurements, show that the direct solar response in the stratosphere is larger for the SORCE than for the NRLSSI data. Correspondingly, larger UV forcing also leads to a larger surface response. Finally, we discuss the reliability of the available data and we propose additional coordinated work, first to build composite SSI data sets out of scattered observations and to refine current SSI models, and second, to run coordinated CCM experiments.

  17. Uncertainties in modelling Mt. Pinatubo eruption with 2-D AER model and CCM SOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    measurements and from AER model calculation serve as input for the 3D chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL [Schraner et al., 2008]. The heating rates, calculated with SOCOL, are compared with a reference radiative transfer model LibRadtran [Mayer and Kylling, 2005]. This comparison suggests that SOCOL underestimates the net heating rate by 10-20%. In stark contrast, the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere due to absorption of longwave and near infrared radiation is overestimated by all SOCOL scenarios. This lets us conclude that SOCOL, and similarly other state-of-the-art CCMs, misrepresent processes required to model the effect of volcanic eruptions on the lower stratosphere and tropopause region. Possible reasons for model deficiencies could be too coarse vertical resolution or missing dynamical feedbacks near the tropopause and in the lower stratosphere. Another important feature is the warming of the tropical troposphere, which is present in the model simulation but was not observed with comparable amplitude in reality. The heating of the lower stratosphere in the models leads to an increase of stratospheric water vapour and influences the radiative and chemical properties of the stratosphere. Eyring, V. et al (2006), Assessment of temperature, trace species, and ozone in chemistry-climate model simulations of the recent past, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 111, D22,308. Guo, S., G. J. S. Bluth, W. I. Rose, I. M. Watson, and A. J. Prata (2004), Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 5. Mayer, B., and A. Kylling (2005), Technical note: The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations - description and examples of use, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 5, 1855-1877. McCormick, M. P. (1992), Initial assessment of the stratospheric and climatic impact of the 1991 Mount- Pinatubo eruption - prologue, Geophysical Research Letters, 19 (2

  18. Correlation of changes of glucose fluctuation with endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation in type 2 diabetic patients with coronary heart disease%2型糖尿病合并冠心病患者血糖变化与内皮功能的相关性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵大坤; 吕肖锋; 程千鹏; 高宇; 周淑香

    2012-01-01

    病程、糖化血红蛋白等一般临床资料匹配的经冠脉造影术排除冠心病的2型糖尿病患者20例为T2DM2组,所有对象接受FMD检测及动态血糖监测系统(CCMS)监测.比较T2DM1组血糖波动的变化,并分析其与FMD的相关性.结果 (1)与T2DM2组相比,T2DM1组的日内平均血糖波动幅度(MAGE)、日间血糖平均绝对差(MODD)、平均餐后血糖波动幅度(MPPGE)、低血糖曲线下面积(IAUC70)明显升高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).(2)对T2DM1组FMD进行分析显示,FMD与MAGE、MODD、PPGE、IAUC70等血糖波动系数明显相关(P<0.05),其中与MAGE相关性最强;以FMD为因变量,各相关因素为自变量行多元逐步回归分析显示,调整其他影响因素后,MAGE仍与FMD呈负相关,且MAGE、IAUC70、收缩压均是影响FMD的独立因素. 结论 2型糖尿病合并冠心病患者血糖波动较不合并冠心病患者明显增加,FMD明显受损,血糖波动与FMD受损具有相关性.