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Sample records for ccms

  1. Proceedings of the second NATO-CCMS information meeting on dry hot rock geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, J.J. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    A summary is presented of the second and last NATO-CCMS (North Atlantic Treaty Organization--Committee on Challenges of Modern Society) Geothermal Pilot Study Information Meeting on Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy. Only summaries of the formal presentations are included. Overviews of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geothermal projects are included with emphasis on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Reports of developments in nine foreign countries and on geothermal projects in US universities are also presented.

  2. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced here that quantifies the influence of chemistry and transport on ozone concentration changes and that is easily implemented in CCMs and chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this method, ozone tendencies (i.e. the time rate of change of ozone are partitioned into a contribution from ozone production and destruction (chemistry and a contribution from transport of ozone (dynamics. The influence of transport on ozone in a specific region is further divided into export of ozone out of that region and import of ozone from elsewhere into that region. For this purpose, a diagnostic is used that disaggregates the ozone mixing ratio field into 9 separate fields according to in which of 9 predefined regions of the atmosphere the ozone originated. With this diagnostic the ozone mass fluxes between these regions are obtained. Furthermore, this method is used here to attribute long-term changes in ozone to chemistry and transport. The relative change in ozone from one period to another that is due to changes in production or destruction rates, or due to changes in import or export of ozone, are quantified. As such, the diagnostics introduced here can be used to attribute changes in ozone on monthly, interannual and long-term time-scales to the responsible mechanisms. Results from a CCM simulation are shown here as examples, with the main focus of the paper being on introducing the method.

  3. NATO/CCMS pilot project: Risk assessment for accidental pollution related to the maritime transport of harmful substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melguen, M.

    1992-01-01

    The NATO/CCMS Workshop on open-quotes Risk Assessment for Accidental Pollution Related to the Maritime Transport of Harmful Substancesclose quotes which took place at CEDRE in 1991 was a follow-up to the workshops which took place in 1987 and 1989. It was the direct continuation of work accomplished during the first two seminars and covered the following topics: Improvement and Intercomparison of Models: elaboration of the list of indispensable parameters for modeling slick movements analysis and integration of the physico-chemical processes studied at sea. Model Validation: release of bulk chemicals drift of drums and containers of toxic substances. Risk Assessment for Man and the Environment: development and adaptation of Help-in-Decision-Making System (ex: CAMEO, MORGANE, etc.) means for rapid, on-site detection (including the advanced Canadian know how in this domains). Intervention Ways and Means: experience of a rescue company; research for elements for Help-in-Decision-Making regarding the location and eventual recovery of drums and containers lost at sea

  4. Summary of 19. NATO/CCMS international technical meeting (ITM) round table discussion on the harmonization of atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    A Round Table discussion was held at the 19th NATO/CCMS Conference on Atmospheric Dispersion with participation of approximately 50 scientists involved with various aspects of air quality assessment from over 15 countries. The premise of discussion was there is a need within the European Countries to provide a basis for developing an approach towards harmonization of air quality modeling. The term ''harmonization'' was used mostly in the sense that for the same input a simulation model would compute the same output. Concern was expressed that this usage was overly simplistic, prohibitively restrictive and counterproductive. The main benefits of achieving harmonization were 1) proper use of available meteorological data and 2) consistent treatment of source impacts throughout the European Community. The challenge before the European Community is to resolve in a realistic manner the problem of assessing environmental impacts in a manner that is fair throughout the European Community and proper within the scientific community. The resolution will involve compromises between 'being fair' and 'being state-of-the-science'. Accuracy and realism may be willingly sacrificed in order to achieve fairness. Developing consensus on how and what is to be achieved in the process of harmonization will involve difficult value judgments. But the consensus process should be encouraged given the significant and worthwhile benefits. (au)

  5. Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society solar energy pilot study. First follow-up report, October 1979, pilot country: United States; co-pilot countries: Denmark and France. CCMS report No. 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    During 1973 to 1978, over twenty nations participated in the NATO/CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study, whose objective was to promote and accelerate the use of solar heating and cooling of buildings. The activities in this information exchange included (1) the regular reporting of national solar heating and cooling programs, (2) the development of a format for reporting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems, (3) the exchange of system performance reports, (4) the establishment of two specialized working groups for solar-assisted low energy dwellings and passive solar applications. At the conclusion of the pilot study in 1978, the participants formulated recommendations for continued action at the international level, as well as for action at the national level. This report describes the progress made in implementing those recommendations. In addition to detailing the steps taken to continue collaboration in various efforts initiated within the Solar Energy Pilot Study, the report contains papers on the 1979 status of the solar heating and cooling programs in seventeen CCMS countries.

  6. NATO CCMS Workshop on Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security (SMECS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzane, Daoud

    2008-01-01

    Rapid evolution of trade, cultural and human relations provides the qualitative and quantitative enhancement of international collaborations, linking the countries with different economical and technological level. Delocalization of High-Tech industry inevitably leads to development of the material science and engineering researches in emergent countries, requiring transfer of know-how, restructuration of basic research and educational networks. This book presents the contributions of participants of the Advanced Research Workshop “Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security” (ARW SMECS; www.smecs.ferroix.net), organized in December 2007 in Marrakech in frame of the “NATO - Science for Peace” program. The objective of this event was the attempt to overview several hot topics of material physics related with problems of modern society: transformation and storage of energy, treatment and transmission of information, environmental security issues etc., with the focus of their implementation i...

  7. 2000 Annual report NATO/CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes (Phase I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Molin, Christine; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2001-01-01

    The NATO/Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society third Pilot Study meeting on Clean Products and Processes was held in Copenhagen, Denmark on May 7-12, 2000. This meeting maintained the momentum generated during the of the first two years of the pilot study, focusing on progress made on sev...... homepage....

  8. Report of the NATO/CCMS drinking water pilot study on health aspects of drinking water contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borzelleca, J F

    1981-04-01

    Various methods of disinfection are being successfully used to control water borne diseases due to biological contaminants in water (viruses, bacteria, protozoa). These methods of chemical control are adding chemical contaminants to the drinking water. For example, trihalomethanes may be formed by the interaction of chlorine with humic and/or fulvic acids. In addition, chemical contaminants may arise from natural, agricultural, industrial or distributional sources. Acute or chronic exposures to these chemicals may result in adverse health effects that are immediate or delayed, reversible or irreversible. Since these contaminants rarely occur singly, chemical interactions (additives, synergistic, antagonistic) must be considered. The nature of the adverse health effects can usually be determined from properly designed and executed animal experiments and/or human epidemiological studies. Potentially toxic agents may also be identified by the use of short term or in vitro tests. Other methods of identification of potentially toxic agents include chemical similarity with known toxicants. Attempts should be made to reduce the number of potentially toxic chemical contaminants but the microbiological quality of drinking water must not be compromised.

  9. Practical demonstration of urban air quality simulation models. Part I. A report of the NATO/CCMS pilot study on air pollution assessment methodology and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-08-01

    Report shows cooperation of NATO member nations in developing standardized methods for emissions data storage and retrieval to support requirements in conduct of national air quality management programs. Shows cooperation in developing standardized techniques for projecting emissions and predicting future ambient air quality.

  10. Proceedings: NATO CCMS (Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society) Seminar Blue Book 159, Preservation of Flora and Fauna in Military Training Areas Held in Soesterberg, Netherlands on 28-30 November 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    CONSERVATION MEASURES AND CULTIVATION ON MILITARY TRAINING AREAS... .o...o......, ..... **.. 99 Ulrich V. Coler PROTECTION OF SPECIES AND BIOTOPES ON MTAs.o...stone cliffs. The climate is coastal and there are very few species of beast and bird of prey. Most of the land side is cultivated for agricultural or...experimentations, trainings, etc.) and the checks carried out and going on at present on waste waters from the ecotoxicological point of view, are

  11. Ocular Features of Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Zoya; Taylor, Simon; Lindfield, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by micrognathia, posterior rib gaps, and secondary developmental delay. Patients often require ventilation and feeding support throughout life. We describe the first reported ophthalmic findings of CCMS and propose that defects in choroidal permeability lead to chronic macular edema and refractory aqueous misdirection syndrome. Here we discuss the medical and surgical management concerns of recurrent angle closure and raised intraocular pressure in a CCMS patient.

  12. Ex utero intrapartum treatment for an infant with cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Kei; Honda, Yoshinobu; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2014-08-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare disorder characterized by multiple rib abnormalities, micrognathia described as Pierre-Robin sequence, and cerebral involvement. Appropriate management of respiratory distress immediately after birth is crucial to rescue these patients. A boy, having a mother with Pierre-Robin sequence and a sister with CCMS, was diagnosed prenatally with CCMS and successfully treated with ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) at 36 weeks 6 days of gestation. EXIT would be an effective option for rescuing patients with prenatally diagnosed CCMS and preventing neonatal hypoxia. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  13. Computer based core monitoring system for an operating CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Moon Young; Kwon, O Hwan; Kim, Kyung Hwa; Yeom, Choong Sub

    2004-01-01

    The research was performed to develop a CANDU-6 Core Monitoring System(CCMS) that enables operators to have efficient core management by monitoring core power distribution, burnup distribution, and the other important core variables and managing the past core history for Wolsong nuclear power plant unit 1. The CCMS uses Reactor Fueling Simulation Program(RFSP, developed by AECL) for continuous core calculation by integrating the algorithm and assumptions validated and uses the information taken from Digital Control Computer(DCC) for the purpose of producing basic input data. The CCMS has two modules; CCMS server program and CCMS client program. The CCMS server program performs automatic and continuous core calculation and manages overall output controlled by DataBase Management System. The CCMS client program enables users to monitor current and past core status in the predefined GUI(Graphic-User Interface) environment. For the purpose of verifying the effectiveness of CCMS, we compared field-test data with the data used for Wolsong unit 1 operation. In the verification the mean percent differences of both cases were the same(0.008%), which showed that the CCMS could monitor core behaviors well

  14. Development of CANDU core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, M. Y.; Yeam, C. S.; Kwon, O. H.; Kim, K. H.

    2003-01-01

    The research was performed to develop a CANDU Core Monitoring System(CCMS) that enables operators to have efficient core management by monitoring core power distribution, burnup distribution, and the other important core variables and managing the past core history for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) No. 1. CCMS uses RFSP(Reactor Fueling Simulation Program) for continuous core calculation by integrating the algorithm and assumptions validated and uses the information taken from DCC(Digital Control Computer) for the purpose of producing basic input data. CCMS could be largely divided into two modules; CCMS server program and CCMS client program. CCMS server program plays the role in automatic and continuous RFSP run and management of the past output data resulting from the run using Data Base Management System(DBMS). CCMS client program enables users to monitor current and past core status with GUI(Graphic-User Interface) environment predefined. The effectiveness of CCMS was verified by comparing the data resulted from field-test of the system for about 43 hours with the data used in the field of Wolsong NPP No. 1

  15. Development of CANDU core monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, M. Y.; Yeam, C. S.; Kwon, O. H.; Kim, K. H. [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    The research was performed to develop a CANDU Core Monitoring System(CCMS) that enables operators to have efficient core management by monitoring core power distribution, burnup distribution, and the other important core variables and managing the past core history for Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant(NPP) No. 1. CCMS uses RFSP(Reactor Fueling Simulation Program) for continuous core calculation by integrating the algorithm and assumptions validated and uses the information taken from DCC(Digital Control Computer) for the purpose of producing basic input data. CCMS could be largely divided into two modules; CCMS server program and CCMS client program. CCMS server program plays the role in automatic and continuous RFSP run and management of the past output data resulting from the run using Data Base Management System(DBMS). CCMS client program enables users to monitor current and past core status with GUI(Graphic-User Interface) environment predefined. The effectiveness of CCMS was verified by comparing the data resulted from field-test of the system for about 43 hours with the data used in the field of Wolsong NPP No. 1.

  16. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Wael; Panigrahy, Ashok; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare syndrome that includes a constellation of mandibular hypoplasia and posterior rib defects as its basic features. Additional features can include hearing loss, tracheal cartilage abnormalities, scoliosis, elbow hypoplasia, and spina bifida. Here we report two cases of CCMS and discuss the reported long-term outcome of the disease.

  17. Development of a New Operational Air Pollution Forecast System on Regional and Urban Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Frohn, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the Millennium NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held May 15-19 in Boulder, Colorado.......Proceedings of the Millennium NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held May 15-19 in Boulder, Colorado....

  18. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

  19. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Courtney C; Pfister, Catherine A; Wootton, J Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  20. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  1. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video

  2. A case of severe type of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS is a rare disorder, with only 75 cases described in the literature to date. CCMS is characterized by association of micrognathia and specific multiple rib defects. It is accompanied by mental deficiency in considerable number of cases. Sometimes, there are associated anomalies and problems, such as spine deformities, brain, heart, kidney or ear anomalies, feeding difficulties, delayed psychomotor development, and growth impairment. Depending on severity of deformities and consecutive respiratory insufficiency, in about 35-50% of CCMS cases, death occurs during the first year of life. These cases are referred to as severe types of CCMS. Case Outline. In this paper we present a female infant with severe type of CCMS. Diagnosis was established in the first day of life, based on micrognathia and findings of posterior rib-gap defects on the chest X-ray, accompanied by dyspnea. Progressive severe respiratory insufficiency caused by chest and air-way deformities and exacerbated by episodes of pneumonia, led to respiratory failure and death at the age of 7.5 months. Conclusion. CCMS should be considered in every infant with micrognathia and rib-gap defects on chest X-ray.

  3. A case of severe type of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matić, Aleksandra; Velisavljev-Filipović, Gordana; Lovrenski, Jovan; Gajdobranski, Djordje

    2016-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare disorder, with only 75 cases described in the literature to date. CCMS is characterized by association of micrognathia and specific multiple rib defects. It is accompanied by mental deficiency in considerable number of cases. Sometimes, there are associated anomalies and problems, such as spine deformities, brain, heart, kidney or ear anomalies, feeding difficulties, delayed psychomotor development, and growth impairment. Depending on severity of deformities and consecutive respiratory insufficiency, in about 35–50% of CCMS cases, death occurs during the first year of life. These cases are referred to as severe types of CCMS. In this paper we present a female infant with severe type of CCMS. Diagnosis was established in the first day of life, based on micrognathia and findings of posterior rib-gap defects on the chest X-ray, accompanied by dyspnea. Progressive severe respiratory insufficiency caused by chest and air-way deformities and exacerbated by episodes of pneumonia, led to respiratory failure and death at the age of 7.5 months. CCMS should be considered in every infant with micrognathia and rib-gap defects on chest X-ray.

  4. The possible evolution and future of CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs), based either on active transport of inorganic carbon (biophysical CCMs) or on biochemistry involving supplementary carbon fixation into C4 acids (C4 and CAM), play a major role in global primary productivity. However, the ubiquitous CO2-fixing enzyme in autotrophs, Rubisco, evolved at a time when atmospheric CO2 levels were very much higher than today and O2 was very low and, as CO2 and O2 approached (by no means monotonically), today's levels, at some time subsequently many organisms evolved a CCM that increased the supply of CO2 and decreased Rubisco oxygenase activity. Given that CO2 levels and other environmental factors have altered considerably between when autotrophs evolved and the present day, and are predicted to continue to change into the future, we here examine the drivers for, and possible timing of, evolution of CCMs. CCMs probably evolved when CO2 fell to 2-16 times the present atmospheric level, depending on Rubisco kinetics. We also assess the effects of other key environmental factors such as temperature and nutrient levels on CCM activity and examine the evidence for evolutionary changes in CCM activity and related cellular processes as well as limitations on continuity of CCMs through environmental variations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. NGNP Composites R and D Technical Issues Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R and D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R and D program need further assessment.

  6. Progress and challenges of engineering a biophysical CO2-concentrating mechanism into higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Benjamin D; Long, Benedict M; Förster, Britta; Nguyen, Nghiem D; Velanis, Christos N; Atkinson, Nicky; Hee, Wei Yih; Mukherjee, Bratati; Price, G Dean; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-06-01

    Growth and productivity in important crop plants is limited by the inefficiencies of the C3 photosynthetic pathway. Introducing CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into C3 plants could overcome these limitations and lead to increased yields. Many unicellular microautotrophs, such as cyanobacteria and green algae, possess highly efficient biophysical CCMs that increase CO2 concentrations around the primary carboxylase enzyme, Rubisco, to enhance CO2 assimilation rates. Algal and cyanobacterial CCMs utilize distinct molecular components, but share several functional commonalities. Here we outline the recent progress and current challenges of engineering biophysical CCMs into C3 plants. We review the predicted requirements for a functional biophysical CCM based on current knowledge of cyanobacterial and algal CCMs, the molecular engineering tools and research pipelines required to translate our theoretical knowledge into practice, and the current challenges to achieving these goals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. NGNP Composites R&D Technical Issues Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AREVA Federal Services

    2008-09-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R&D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R&D program need further assessment.

  9. Ecological imperatives for aquatic CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2017-06-01

    In aquatic environments, the concentration of inorganic carbon is spatially and temporally variable and CO2 can be substantially oversaturated or depleted. Depletion of CO2 plus low rates of diffusion cause inorganic carbon to be more limiting in aquatic than terrestrial environments, and the frequency of species with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and their contribution to productivity, is correspondingly greater. Aquatic photoautotrophs may have biochemical or biophysical CCMs and exploit CO2 from the sediment or the atmosphere. Though partly constrained by phylogeny, CCM activity is related to environmental conditions. CCMs are absent or down-regulated when their increased energy costs, lower CO2 affinity, or altered mineral requirements outweigh their benefits. Aquatic CCMs are most widespread in environments with low CO2, high HCO3-, high pH, and high light. Freshwater species are generally less effective at inorganic carbon removal than marine species, but have a greater range of ability to remove carbon, matching the environmental variability in carbon availability. The diversity of CCMs in seagrasses and marine phytoplankton, and detailed mechanistic studies on larger aquatic photoautotrophs are understudied. Strengthening the links between ecology and CCMs will increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ecological success and will place mechanistic studies in a clearer ecological context. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION COEXISTING WITH PITUITARY ADENOMA, HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND MENTAL ILLNESS: FIRST CASE REPORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Guido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCMs are vascular lesions involving brain capillaries. They may occur sporadically or be inherited as autosomal dominant character. Due to incomplete penetrance, CCMs incidence is underestimated and, overall sporadic cases, are often accidentally diagnosed. Rarely CCMs are linked to other pathological conditions. Here we present the first case in literature of a young woman affected by sporadic CCM, pituitary adenoma, Hashimoto thyroiditis and mental illness of unknown etiology. Symptoms’ analysis suggests that she may suffer of Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE, a condition that in very few cases develops together with Hashimoto thyroiditis. Genetic bases of HE are still unknown and symptomatology is very heterogeneous. This paper is a preliminary report of the case and is focused on complexity of clinical manifestations that makes the diagnosis uncertain. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by further analysis, our aim will be to clarify genetic causes of HE.

  11. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI evaluation of cerebral cavernous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Blaine L; Taheri, Saeid; Rosenberg, Gary A; Morrison, Leslie A

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of CNS cavernous malformations (CCMs) using a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCEMRI) technique sensitive for slow transfer rates of gadolinium. The prospective study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPPA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained from 14 subjects with familial CCMs (4 men and 10 women, ages 22-76 years, mean 48.1 years). Following routine anatomic MRI of the brain, DCEMRI was performed for six slices, using T1 mapping with partial inversion recovery (TAPIR) to calculate T1 values, following administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadolinium DTPA. The transfer rate (Ki) was calculated using the Patlak model, and Ki within CCMs was compared to normal-appearing white matter as well as to 17 normal control subjects previously studied. All subjects had typical MRI appearance of CCMs. Thirty-nine CCMs were studied using DCEMRI. Ki was low or normal in 12 lesions and elevated from 1.4 to 12 times higher than background in the remaining 27 lesions. Ki ranged from 2.1E-6 to 9.63E-4 min(-1), mean 3.55E-4. Normal-appearing white matter in the CCM patients had a mean Ki of 1.57E-4, not statistically different from mean WM Ki of 1.47E-4 in controls. TAPIR-based DCEMRI technique permits quantifiable assessment of CCMs in vivo and reveals considerable differences not seen with conventional MRI. Potential applications include correlation with biologic behavior such as lesion growth or hemorrage, and measurement of drug effects.

  12. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Muthialu, Nagarajan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  13. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Calder, Alistair Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects ("rib gaps"). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia.

  14. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan; Muthialu, Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  15. 3D Viewer Platform of Cloud Clustering Management System: Google Map 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Ja; Lee, Gang-Soo

    The new management system of framework for cloud envrionemnt is needed by the platfrom of convergence according to computing environments of changes. A ISV and small business model is hard to adapt management system of platform which is offered from super business. This article suggest the clustering management system of cloud computing envirionments for ISV and a man of enterprise in small business model. It applies the 3D viewer adapt from map3D & earth of google. It is called 3DV_CCMS as expand the CCMS[1].

  16. Solar-assisted low energy dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbensen, T V

    1980-02-01

    The Zero Energy House Group was formed as a subproject of the CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study in 1974 by seven participating countries experimenting with solar-assisted low-energy dwellings for temperate and northern European climatic conditions. A Zero Energy House is one in which solar energy is used to meet the reduced energy needs of buildings incorporating various thermal energy conservation features. This final report of the Zero Energy House Group includes brief descriptions of 13 major low-energy dwellings in the participating CCMS countries. An overall assessment of the state-of-the-art in solar-assisted low-energy dwellings is also included.

  17. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    % for the human network. The high controllability (low number of drivers needed to control the system) in yeast, mouse and human is due to the presence of internal loops in their regulatory networks where the TFs regulate each other in a circular fashion. We refer to these internal loops as circular control...... motifs (CCM). The E. coli transcriptional regulatory network, which does not have any CCMs, shows a hierarchical structure of the transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to the eukaryal networks. The presence of CCMs also has influence on the stability of these networks, as the presence of cycles...

  18. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotz, FB; vanEssen, AJ; Bosschaart, AN; Bos, AP

    1996-01-01

    We describe two boys with the cerebro-costomandibular syndrome (CCMS). Both patients presented with Pierre Robin anomaly and respiratory insufficiency and died 12 hours and 10 months after birth. The first boy had muscular hypotonia, severe micrognathia, glossoptosis, short; palate, preauricular

  19. 75 FR 27182 - Energy Conservation Program: Web-Based Compliance and Certification Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... Conservation Program: Web-Based Compliance and Certification Management System AGENCY: Office of Energy... following means: 1. Compliance and Certification Management System (CCMS)--via the Web portal: http... certification reports to the Department of Energy (DOE) through an electronic Web-based tool, the Compliance and...

  20. The Seasonal cycle of the Tropical Lower Stratospheric Water Vapor in Chemistry-Climate Models in Comparison with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Dessler, A. E.

    2017-12-01

    The seasonal cycle is one of the key features of the tropical lower stratospheric water vapor, so it is important that the climate models reproduce it. In this analysis, we evaluate how well the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) reproduce the seasonal cycle of tropical lower stratospheric water vapor. We do this by comparing the models to observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim (ERAi). We also evaluate if the chemistry-climate models (CCMs) reproduce the key transport and dehydration processes that regulate the seasonal cycle using a forward, domain filling, diabatic trajectory model. Finally, we explore the changes of the seasonal cycle during the 21st century in the two CCMs. Our results show general agreement in the seasonal cycles from the MLS, the ERAi, and the CCMs. Despite this agreement, there are some clear disagreements between the models and the observations on the details of transport and dehydration in the TTL. Finally, both the CCMs predict a moister seasonal cycle by the end of the 21st century. But they disagree on the changes of the seasonal amplitude, which is predicted to increase in the GEOSCCM and decrease in the WACCM.

  1. Central Control and Automation Systems: A Management and Procurement Handbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges, Washington, DC.

    It is presumed that those reading this book presently own and operate a central control and monitoring system (CCMS) or plan to implement one in the near future. One objective of this workbook is to present useful knowledge from case histories of members of the Association of Physical Plant Administrators of Universities and Colleges as well as…

  2. Differences in TRICARE Knowledge from Department of Defense Active Duty Family Member Beneficiaries,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-01

    becomes most important. Lamb (1994) coined the term "promotion mix" (p.494) as a combination of advertising, personal selling, sales promotion and...interests in the health status of their county residents (i.e., personal selling), patient attitudes quickly improved toward the CCMS. Sales promotion , the

  3. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  4. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: prognosis and proposal for classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Kohno, Yoshinori

    2010-09-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a very rare syndrome characterized by micrognathia and posterior rib gap, with a poor prognosis. To date, only 75 cases have been reported worldwide. The overall survival rate for patients with this disorder has not been reported, and a classification of the patients on the basis of the prognosis is not yet available. The present study analyzed the figures and prognoses of past patients and documented a new case of CCMS. Formerly published case reports and personal communications were used to reveal the prognosis and classification of CCMS. The occurrence ratios of rib gap defects and of missing ribs were examined. Patients were divided into the following three groups according to their life span: lethal type, where the patients died before 1 month; severe type, where the patients lived for 1-12 months; and mild type, where they survived for more than 1 year. A comparison was made of the number of rib gaps, missing ribs, and the rib gap ratio (defined as the number of rib gaps divided by the number of all existing ribs) among these three groups. A significant difference in the number of rib defects between the lethal type and other types was noted. Short life span of severe type patients, compared to mild type, was attributed to their subjection to severe respiratory infection. CCMS can be classified into three categories--lethal, severe, and mild--according to the severity of the symptoms and prognosis.

  5. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of safety warnings on prescription rates of cough and cold medicines in children below 2 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. Sen (Fatma); K.M.C. Verhamme (Katia); M. Felisi (Mariagrazia); G.W. 't Jong (Geert); C. Giaquinto (Carlo); G. Picelli (Gino); A. Ceci (Adriana); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAIM: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of national and international warnings on the prescription rates of cough and cold medicines (CCMs) in the youngest children (<2 years) in the Netherlands and Italy. METHODS: Analysis of outpatient electronic medical records of

  7. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkes, Erica H.; Fock, J. M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; van Belzen, M. J.; van der Lans, C. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Fakkert, I. E.; Smith, M.J.; Evans, D. G.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are

  8. In Synechococcus sp competition for energy between assimilation and acquisition of C and those of N only occurs when growth is light limited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruan, Z.; Raven, J. A.; Giordano, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 14 (2017), s. 3829-3839 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ammonium * CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  9. Impacts of Climate Change on Surface Ozone and Intercontinental Ozone Pollution: A Multi-Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, R. M.; Wild, O.; Shindell, D. T.; Zeng, G.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Collins, W. J.; Fiore, A. M.; Stevenson, D. S.; Dentener, F. J.; Schultz, M. G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The impact of climate change between 2000 and 2095 SRES A2 climates on surface ozone (O)3 and on O3 source-receptor (S-R) relationships is quantified using three coupled climate-chemistry models (CCMs). The CCMs exhibit considerable variability in the spatial extent and location of surface O3 increases that occur within parts of high NOx emission source regions (up to 6 ppbv in the annual average and up to 14 ppbv in the season of maximum O3). In these source regions, all three CCMs show a positive relationship between surface O3 change and temperature change. Sensitivity simulations show that a combination of three individual chemical processes-(i) enhanced PAN decomposition, (ii) higher water vapor concentrations, and (iii) enhanced isoprene emission-largely reproduces the global spatial pattern of annual-mean surface O3 response due to climate change (R2 = 0.52). Changes in climate are found to exert a stronger control on the annual-mean surface O3 response through changes in climate-sensitive O3 chemistry than through changes in transport as evaluated from idealized CO-like tracer concentrations. All three CCMs exhibit a similar spatial pattern of annual-mean surface O3 change to 20% regional O3 precursor emission reductions under future climate compared to the same emission reductions applied under present-day climate. The surface O3 response to emission reductions is larger over the source region and smaller downwind in the future than under present-day conditions. All three CCMs show areas within Europe where regional emission reductions larger than 20% are required to compensate climate change impacts on annual-mean surface O3.

  10. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Gao

    Full Text Available Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC and elevated (HC CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  11. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome in a father and a female fetus: early prenatal ultrasonographic diagnosis and autosomal dominant transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, G; Gekas, J; Naepels, P; Gondry, J; Devauchelle, B; Testelin, S; Sevestre, H; Thépôt, F; Mathieu, M

    2001-10-01

    Ultrasonography in a female fetus revealed cystic cervical hygroma, severe micrognathia, and vertebral and upper limb anomalies suggestive of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) which was diagnosed ultrasonographically at 16 weeks' gestation. The father is affected and presents with a Pierre Robin sequence, short stature and typical costovertebral anomalies. CCMS is a rare and severe disorder. The high frequency of sporadic cases, vertical transmission, and the excess of sibs affected via horizontal transmission suggest dominant autosomal mutation with possible germinal mosaicism. The vertical familial case detailed in the present report is a reminder of the high risk when one parent or one sibling is affected and the extreme variability of phenotype and costal ossification. Early prenatal ultrasound diagnosis is possible in a severely affected fetus. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Staying Connected: Sustaining Collaborative Care Models with Limited Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brenda J; Peppard, Lora; Newton, Marian

    2015-08-01

    Providing psychiatric services in the primary care setting is challenging. The multidisciplinary, coordinated approach of collaborative care models (CCMs) addresses these challenges. The purpose of the current article is to discuss the implementation of a CCM at a free medical clinic (FMC) where volunteer staff provide the majority of services. Essential components of CCMs include (a) comprehensive screening and assessment, (b) shared development and communication of care plans among providers and the patient, and (c) care coordination and management. Challenges to implementing and sustaining a CCM at a FMC in Virginia attempting to meet the medical and psychiatric needs of the underserved are addressed. Although the CCM produced favorable outcomes, sustaining the model long-term presented many challenges. Strategies for addressing these challenges are discussed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. Adverse events associated with opioid-containing cough and cold medications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M; Reynolds, Kate M; Green, Jody L

    2018-04-10

    Until recently most of the scrutiny of opioid-containing cough and cold medications (CCMs) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was focused on codeine, only recently shifting equal focus to those containing hydrocodone. We characterized adverse events (AEs) in children Dictionary for Regulatory Activities with preferred terms reported. One hundred and fourteen of the 7035 (2%) cases reviewed involved an opioid-containing product. Ninety-eight cases involved an AE at least potentially related to the opioid ingredient (38 (39%) codeine; 60 (61%) hydrocodone). All three fatality cases involved hydrocodone with an antihistamine. Among non-fatalities, somnolence, lethargy, and/or respiratory depression were more commonly reported among hydrocodone cases than codeine cases (86% vs. 61%; p = .005). These safety surveillance data support the FDA's expanded label changes limiting opioid CCMs for children.

  14. A Semi-empirical Model of the Stratosphere in the Climate System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodergren, A. H.; Bodeker, G. E.; Kremser, S.; Meinshausen, M.; McDonald, A.

    2014-12-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) currently used to project changes in Antarctic ozone are extremely computationally demanding. CCM projections are uncertain due to lack of knowledge of future emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and ozone depleting substances (ODSs), as well as parameterizations within the CCMs that have weakly constrained tuning parameters. While projections should be based on an ensemble of simulations, this is not currently possible due to the complexity of the CCMs. An inexpensive but realistic approach to simulate changes in stratospheric ozone, and its coupling to the climate system, is needed as a complement to CCMs. A simple climate model (SCM) can be used as a fast emulator of complex atmospheric-ocean climate models. If such an SCM includes a representation of stratospheric ozone, the evolution of the global ozone layer can be simulated for a wide range of GHG and ODS emissions scenarios. MAGICC is an SCM used in previous IPCC reports. In the current version of the MAGICC SCM, stratospheric ozone changes depend only on equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC). In this work, MAGICC is extended to include an interactive stratospheric ozone layer using a semi-empirical model of ozone responses to CO2and EESC, with changes in ozone affecting the radiative forcing in the SCM. To demonstrate the ability of our new, extended SCM to generate projections of global changes in ozone, tuning parameters from 19 coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) and 10 carbon cycle models (to create an ensemble of 190 simulations) have been used to generate probability density functions of the dates of return of stratospheric column ozone to 1960 and 1980 levels for different latitudes.

  15. Evolution of photorespiration from cyanobacteria to land plants, considering protein phylogenies and acquisition of carbon concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Martin; Kern, Ramona; Maurino, Veronica G; Hanson, David T; Weber, Andreas P M; Sage, Rowan F; Bauwe, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration and oxygenic photosynthesis are intimately linked processes. It has been shown that under the present day atmospheric conditions cyanobacteria and all eukaryotic phototrophs need functional photorespiration to grow autotrophically. The question arises as to when this essential partnership evolved, i.e. can we assume a coevolution of both processes from the beginning or did photorespiration evolve later to compensate for the generation of 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG) due to Rubisco's oxygenase reaction? This question is mainly discussed here using phylogenetic analysis of proteins involved in the 2PG metabolism and the acquisition of different carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). The phylogenies revealed that the enzymes involved in the photorespiration of vascular plants have diverse origins, with some proteins acquired from cyanobacteria as ancestors of the chloroplasts and others from heterotrophic bacteria as ancestors of mitochondria in the plant cell. Only phosphoglycolate phosphatase was found to originate from Archaea. Notably glaucophyte algae, the earliest branching lineage of Archaeplastida, contain more photorespiratory enzymes of cyanobacterial origin than other algal lineages or land plants indicating a larger initial contribution of cyanobacterial-derived proteins to eukaryotic photorespiration. The acquisition of CCMs is discussed as a proxy for assessing the timing of periods when photorespiratory activity may have been enhanced. The existence of CCMs also had marked influence on the structure and function of photorespiration. Here, we discuss evidence for an early and continuous coevolution of photorespiration, CCMs and photosynthesis starting from cyanobacteria via algae, to land plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  17. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure

  18. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chem- istry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chem...

  19. The ins and outs of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  20. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    P. De Barbaro and J. Mans.

    2013-01-01

      After the successful operation of the HCAL sub-detector during the proton-proton run in 2012 and heavy-ion run at the beginning of 2013, the group is now focusing on the following four LS1 tasks: ·       Replacement of present, thick-window, single-anode photomultipliers on HF with new, thin-window, multi-anode PMTs. The replacement of photomultipliers will reduce rate of punch-through window hits. All needed PMTs and baseboards have been delivered to CERN. A quality control station has been set up in B904. ·       Replacement of boards responsible for clock distribution in all HBHE and HO Clock and Control Modules (CCMs).  CCMs reside in each Readout Box and are only accessible when the CMS detector is open.  The installation of new CCMs will allow us to eliminate data loss caused by single-event upsets (SEUs) experienced during the 2011&ndash...

  1. Evolutionary bursts in Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae) are linked with photosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, James W; Xi, Zhenxiang; Riina, Ricarda; Peirson, Jess A; Yang, Ya; Dorsey, Brian L; Berry, Paul E; Davis, Charles C; Wurdack, Kenneth J

    2014-12-01

    The mid-Cenozoic decline of atmospheric CO2 levels that promoted global climate change was critical to shaping contemporary arid ecosystems. Within angiosperms, two CO2 -concentrating mechanisms (CCMs)-crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and C4 -evolved from the C3 photosynthetic pathway, enabling more efficient whole-plant function in such environments. Many angiosperm clades with CCMs are thought to have diversified rapidly due to Miocene aridification, but links between this climate change, CCM evolution, and increased net diversification rates (r) remain to be further understood. Euphorbia (∼2000 species) includes a diversity of CAM-using stem succulents, plus a single species-rich C4 subclade. We used ancestral state reconstructions with a dated molecular phylogeny to reveal that CCMs independently evolved 17-22 times in Euphorbia, principally from the Miocene onwards. Analyses assessing among-lineage variation in r identified eight Euphorbia subclades with significantly increased r, six of which have a close temporal relationship with a lineage-corresponding CCM origin. Our trait-dependent diversification analysis indicated that r of Euphorbia CCM lineages is approximately threefold greater than C3 lineages. Overall, these results suggest that CCM evolution in Euphorbia was likely an adaptive strategy that enabled the occupation of increased arid niche space accompanying Miocene expansion of arid ecosystems. These opportunities evidently facilitated recent, replicated bursts of diversification in Euphorbia. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Variable expression of cerebral cavernous malformations in carriers of a premature termination codon in exon 17 of the Krit1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamero Miguel A

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM present as either sporadic or autosomal dominant conditions with incomplete penetrance of symptoms. Differences in genetic and environmental factors might be minimized among first-degree relatives. We therefore studied clinical expression in a family with several affected members. Methods We studied a three-generation family with the onset of CCM as a cerebral haemorrhage in the younger (four-year-old sibling. Identification and enumeration of CCMs were performed in T2-weighted or gradient-echo MRIs of the whole brains. Genetic analysis comprised SCCP, sequencing and restriction polymorphism of the Krit1 gene in the proband and at risk relatives. Results The phenotypes of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs in carriers of Krit1 mutations were very variable. We identified a novel frameshift mutation caused by a 1902A insertion in exon 17 of the Krit1 gene, which leads to a premature TAA triplet and predicts the truncating phenotype Y634X. A very striking finding was the absence of both clinical symptoms and CCMs in the eldest sibling harbouring the 1902insA. Conclusions Patients in this family, harbouring the same mutation, illustrate the very variable clinical and radiological expression of a Krit1 mutation. The early and critical onset in the proband contrasts with minor clinical findings in affected relatives. This consideration is important in genetic counselling.

  3. POSSIBLE RELATED FUNCTIONS OF THE NON-HOMOLOGOUS CO-REGULATED GENE PAIR PDCD10 AND SERPINI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Scimone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression in mammalians is a very finely controlled mechanism, and bidirectional promoters can be considered one of the most compelling examples of the accuracy of genic expression coordination. As recently reported, a bidirectional promoter regulates the expression of the PDCD10(whose mutations cause familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCMs and SERPINI1 gene pair, even though they are non-homologous genes. The aim of this study was to identify any potential common roles of these two coregulated genes. An in-silico approach was used to identify functional correlations, using the BioGraph, IPA® and Cytoscape tools and the KEGG pathway database. The results obtained show that PDCD10 and SERPINI1 may co-regulate some cellular processes, particularly those related to focal adhesion maintenance. All common pathways identified for PDCD10 and SERPINI1 are closely associated with the pathogenic characteristics of CCMs; we thus hypothesize that genes involved in these networks may contribute to the development of CCMs.

  4. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  5. Algal and aquatic plant carbon concentrating mechanisms in relation to environmental change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C

    2011-09-01

    Carbon dioxide concentrating mechanisms (also known as inorganic carbon concentrating mechanisms; both abbreviated as CCMs) presumably evolved under conditions of low CO(2) availability. However, the timing of their origin is unclear since there are no sound estimates from molecular clocks, and even if there were, there are no proxies for the functioning of CCMs. Accordingly, we cannot use previous episodes of high CO(2) (e.g. the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum) to indicate how organisms with CCMs responded. Present and predicted environmental change in terms of increased CO(2) and temperature are leading to increased CO(2) and HCO(3)(-) and decreased CO(3)(2-) and pH in surface seawater, as well as decreasing the depth of the upper mixed layer and increasing the degree of isolation of this layer with respect to nutrient flux from deeper waters. The outcome of these forcing factors is to increase the availability of inorganic carbon, photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) to aquatic photolithotrophs and to decrease the supply of the nutrients (combined) nitrogen and phosphorus and of any non-aeolian iron. The influence of these variations on CCM expression has been examined to varying degrees as acclimation by extant organisms. Increased PAR increases CCM expression in terms of CO(2) affinity, whilst increased UVB has a range of effects in the organisms examined; little relevant information is available on increased temperature. Decreased combined nitrogen supply generally increases CO(2) affinity, decreased iron availability increases CO(2) affinity, and decreased phosphorus supply has varying effects on the organisms examined. There are few data sets showing interactions amongst the observed changes, and even less information on genetic (adaptation) changes in response to the forcing factors. In freshwaters, changes in phytoplankton species composition may alter with environmental change with consequences for frequency of

  6. Capture compound mass spectrometry sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of liver toxicity of two Parkinson drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jenny J; Michaelis, Simon; Schrey, Anna K; Graebner, Olivia Graebner nee; Glinski, Mirko; Dreger, Mathias; Kroll, Friedrich; Koester, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Capture compound mass spectrometry (CCMS) is a novel technology that helps understand the molecular mechanism of the mode of action of small molecules. The Capture Compounds are trifunctional probes: A selectivity function (the drug) interacts with the proteins in a biological sample, a reactivity function (phenylazide) irreversibly forms a covalent bond, and a sorting function (biotin) allows the captured protein(s) to be isolated for mass spectrometric analysis. Tolcapone and entacapone are potent inhibitors of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. We aimed to understand the molecular basis of the difference of both drugs with respect to side effects. Using Capture Compounds with these drugs as selectivity functions, we were able to unambiguously and reproducibly isolate and identify their known target COMT. Tolcapone Capture Compounds captured five times more proteins than entacapone Capture Compounds. Moreover, tolcapone Capture Compounds isolated mitochondrial and peroxisomal proteins. The major tolcapone-protein interactions occurred with components of the respiratory chain and of the fatty acid beta-oxidation. Previously reported symptoms in tolcapone-treated rats suggested that tolcapone might act as decoupling reagent of the respiratory chain (Haasio et al., 2002b). Our results demonstrate that CCMS is an effective tool for the identification of a drug's potential off targets. It fills a gap in currently used in vitro screens for drug profiling that do not contain all the toxicologically relevant proteins. Thereby, CCMS has the potential to fill a technological need in drug safety assessment and helps reengineer or to reject drugs at an early preclinical stage.

  7. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Morales-Williams

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3− across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass–balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3− during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3− uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  8. Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

  9. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Downing, John A.

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3-) across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto) in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass-balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3- during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3- uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  10. Regulatory components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in aquatic unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Vandana; Sidhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Nogia, Panchsheela; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Sandhya

    2017-11-01

    This review provides an insight into the regulation of the carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in lower organisms like cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and algae. CCMs evolved as a mechanism to concentrate CO 2 at the site of primary carboxylating enzyme Ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), so that the enzyme could overcome its affinity towards O 2 which leads to wasteful processes like photorespiration. A diverse set of CCMs exist in nature, i.e., carboxysomes in cyanobacteria and proteobacteria; pyrenoids in algae and diatoms, the C 4 system, and Crassulacean acid metabolism in higher plants. Prime regulators of CCM in most of the photosynthetic autotrophs belong to the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, which regulate the activity of the components of CCM depending upon the ambient CO 2 concentrations. Major targets of these regulators are carbonic anhydrase and inorganic carbon uptake systems (CO 2 and HCO 3 - transporters) whose activities are modulated either at transcriptional level or by changes in the levels of their co-regulatory metabolites. The article provides information on the localization of the CCM components as well as their function and participation in the development of an efficient CCM. Signal transduction cascades leading to activation/inactivation of inducible CCM components on perception of low/high CO 2 stimuli have also been brought into picture. A detailed study of the regulatory components can aid in identifying the unraveled aspects of these mechanisms and hence provide information on key molecules that need to be explored to further provide a clear understanding of the mechanism under study.

  11. Food authenticity studies via multi-elemental and isotopic pattern using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katona, R.; Brunner, M.; Abranko, L.; Prohaska, T.; Stefanka, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The aim of our study has been the development of an analytical method based on Sr isotope and elemental fingerprint analysis for discriminating food samples from different geographical origin. Several types of foods were involved in the investigation representing different stages of food processing such as pulverized spicy paprika (sparsely processed food product) and wine samples (processed product). Independent inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like ICP-SFMS, ICP-CCMS, and MC-ICPMS were used for method validation and investigation of the geographical origin. The advantage and limitations of the developed methods are discussed critically. (author)

  12. On the cradle of CCM research: discovery, development, and challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aaron

    2017-06-01

    Herein, 40 years after its discovery, I briefly and critically survey the development of ideas that propelled research on CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs; a term proposed by Dean Price) of phytoplankton, mainly focusing on cyanobacteria. This is not a comprehensive review on CCM research, but a personal view on the past developments and challenges that lie ahead. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Safety Profile of Cough and Cold Medication Use in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jody L; Wang, George Sam; Reynolds, Kate M; Banner, William; Bond, G Randall; Kauffman, Ralph E; Palmer, Robert B; Paul, Ian M; Dart, Richard C

    2017-06-01

    The safety of cough and cold medication (CCM) use in children has been questioned. We describe the safety profile of CCMs in children pediatric (75.5%), and single-ingredient (77.5%) formulations were most commonly involved. AEs occurring in >20% of all cases included tachycardia, somnolence, hallucinations, ataxia, mydriasis, and agitation. Twenty cases (0.6%) resulted in death; most were in children pediatric liquid formulations were the most commonly reported products. These characteristics present an opportunity for targeted prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Satellite Based Cropland Carbon Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaru, V.; Jones, C. D.; Sedano, F.; Sahajpal, R.; Jin, H.; Skakun, S.; Pnvr, K.; Kommareddy, A.; Reddy, A.; Hurtt, G. C.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Agricultural croplands act as both sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); absorbing CO2 through photosynthesis, releasing CO2 through autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, and sequestering CO2 in vegetation and soils. Part of the carbon captured in vegetation can be transported and utilized elsewhere through the activities of food, fiber, and energy production. As well, a portion of carbon in soils can be exported somewhere else by wind, water, and tillage erosion. Thus, it is important to quantify how land use and land management practices affect the net carbon balance of croplands. To monitor the impacts of various agricultural activities on carbon balance and to develop management strategies to make croplands to behave as net carbon sinks, it is of paramount importance to develop consistent and high resolution cropland carbon flux estimates. Croplands are typically characterized by fine scale heterogeneity; therefore, for accurate carbon flux estimates, it is necessary to account for the contribution of each crop type and their spatial distribution. As part of NASA CMS funded project, a satellite based Cropland Carbon Monitoring System (CCMS) was developed to estimate spatially resolved crop specific carbon fluxes over large regions. This modeling framework uses remote sensing version of Environmental Policy Integrated Climate Model and satellite derived crop parameters (e.g. leaf area index (LAI)) to determine vertical and lateral carbon fluxes. The crop type LAI product was developed based on the inversion of PRO-SAIL radiative transfer model and downscaled MODIS reflectance. The crop emergence and harvesting dates were estimated based on MODIS NDVI and crop growing degree days. To evaluate the performance of CCMS framework, it was implemented over croplands of Nebraska, and estimated carbon fluxes for major crops (i.e. corn, soybean, winter wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa) grown in 2015. Key findings of the CCMS framework will be presented

  15. Enabling Chemistry of Gases and Aerosols for Assessment of Short-Lived Climate Forcers: Improving Solar Radiation Modeling in the DOE-ACME and CESM models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Michael [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2018-01-12

    This proposal seeks to maintain the DOE-ACME (offshoot of CESM) as one of the leading CCMs to evaluate near-term climate mitigation. It will implement, test, and optimize the new UCI photolysis codes within CESM CAM5 and new CAM versions in ACME. Fast-J is a high-order-accuracy (8 stream) code for calculating solar scattering and absorption in a single column atmosphere containing clouds, aerosols, and gases that was developed at UCI and implemented in CAM5 under the previous BER/SciDAC grant.

  16. Teratogenic potency of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran and of three mixtures of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in mice. Problems with risk assessment using TCDD toxic-equivalency factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Tetsuji (Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Embryopharmakologie, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)); Golor, G. (Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Embryopharmakologie, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany)); Hagenmaier, H. (Inst. fuer Organische Chemie, Univ. Tuebingen (Germany)); Neubert, D. (Inst. fuer Toxikologie und Embryopharmakologie, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The potency of 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran (P5CDF) and of three defined 2,3,7,8-TCDD-free mixtures of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/PCDFs) to induce cleft palates in NMRI mice was studied. The data were compared with a dose-response curve for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The slope of the dose-response curve for P5CDF was the same as for TCDD. However, application of the International-TCDD-Toxic-Equivalency (I-TE) factor (NATO/CCMS 1988) of 0.5 overestimated the potency of the pentachlorinated congener about 2.5-fold under these experimental conditions, suggesting 0.2 as a TE factor. When assessing the cleft palate frequency on the basis of I-TEs and the weight of the substances, the potencies of the two PCDF mixtures studied were also clearly overestimated. This result was not substantially changed when using the TE factor of 0.2 for P5CDF. For the PCDD mixture studied, the cleft palate-inducing potency found largely agreed with the prediction when applying the I-TE factors. According to our data, the use of TE factors as calculated by the UBA/BGA (1985) or the NATO/CCMS (1988) are both conservative when attempting to assess the cleft palate incidence induced by PCDF mixtures in mice. (orig.)

  17. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Mans and P. De Barbaro

    2012-01-01

      During first three months of LHC operation in 2012 (April-June 2012), HCAL performed well.  Out of a total of 6.15 fb–1 recorded by CMS, 230 pb–1 had to be declared as ‘bad’ during certification process due to HCAL-related problems. There were two major sources of ‘bad’ data coming from HCAL. Firstly, RBX data losses resulted in approximately 90 pb–1 declared as ‘bad’. The RBX data loss problems are caused by Single Event Upsets (SEU) in Clock and Control Modules (CCMs). As CCMs are not accessible with the CMS detector closed, this problem can be only fixed during LS1. The second major source of  ‘bad’ data was a failure of TTCrx chip (installed on HF detector), which resulted in a loss of almost 80 pb–1. The intervention required access to the cavern, and so the unit could only be replaced during the inter-fill period. In 2011 and early 2012, we have...

  18. From disasters to decisions: Cape Canaveral Marine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Five years ago, in August 1992, a tropical depression off the western coast of Africa formed, intensifying and gathering storm clouds as it began its journey westward. By the time it reached the US mainland, it had become a full-fledged hurricane -- Hurricane Andrew -- that blasted over south Florida and into south-central Louisiana. In Florida City, Fla., things went from bad to worse. One piece of metal debris -- airborne from the hurricane's 145 mile-per-hour winds -- punctured an oil tank, triggering a rapidly spreading oil spill that needed to be contained, and fast. The tank had a mechanism whereby oil was replenished when the container was less than full; so as oil was sucked out by the high winds, more came pouring in. In addition, a berm that would have somewhat contained the spill was stuck in open position. Enter Cape Canaveral Marine Services, Inc., (CCMS, Cape Canaveral, Fla.), an environmental services company well-versed in emergency spill response activities. Within seven weeks, CCMS had cleaned up and mitigated the impacts of the spill. Although the job posed significant challenges, the company was uniquely situated to respond quickly, efficiently, and effectively. After all, it had already been in the business for 20 years

  19. Quantifying uncertainties of climate signals related to the 11-year solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschke, T.; Kunze, M.; Matthes, K. B.; Langematz, U.; Wahl, S.

    2017-12-01

    Although state-of-the-art reconstructions based on proxies and (semi-)empirical models converge in terms of total solar irradiance, they still significantly differ in terms of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) with respect to the mean spectral distribution of energy input and temporal variability. This study aims at quantifying uncertainties for the Earth's climate related to the 11-year solar cycle by forcing two chemistry-climate models (CCMs) - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - with five different SSI reconstructions (NRLSSI1, NRLSSI2, SATIRE-T, SATIRE-S, CMIP6-SSI) and the reference spectrum RSSV1-ATLAS3, derived from observations. We conduct a unique set of timeslice experiments. External forcings and boundary conditions are fixed and identical for all experiments, except for the solar forcing. The set of analyzed simulations consists of one solar minimum simulation, employing RSSV1-ATLAS3 and five solar maximum experiments. The latter are a result of adding the amplitude of solar cycle 22 according to the five reconstructions to RSSV1-ATLAS3. Our results show that the climate response to the 11y solar cycle is generally robust across CCMs and SSI forcings. However, analyzing the variance of the solar maximum ensemble by means of ANOVA-statistics reveals additional information on the uncertainties of the mean climate signals. The annual mean response agrees very well between the two CCMs for most parts of the lower and middle atmosphere. Only the upper mesosphere is subject to significant differences related to the choice of the model. However, the different SSI forcings lead to significant differences in ozone concentrations, shortwave heating rates, and temperature throughout large parts of the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. Regarding the seasonal evolution of the climate signals, our findings for short wave heating rates, and temperature are similar to the annual means with respect to the relative importance of the choice of the model or the SSI forcing for the

  20. Cross-Continuum Tool Is Associated with Reduced Utilization and Cost for Frequent High-Need Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauran Hardin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: High-need, high-cost (HNHC patients can over-use acute care services, a pattern of behavior associated with many poor outcomes that disproportionately contributes to increased U.S. healthcare cost. Our objective was to reduce healthcare cost and improve outcomes by optimizing the system of care. We targeted HNHC patients and identified root causes of frequent healthcare utilization. We developed a crosscontinuum intervention process and a succinct tool called a Complex Care Map (CCM© that addresses fragmentation in the system and links providers to a comprehensive individualized analysis of the patient story and causes for frequent access to health services. Methods: Using a pre-/post-test design in which each subject served as his/her own historical control, this quality improvement project focused on determining if the interdisciplinary intervention called CCM© had an impact on healthcare utilization and costs for HNHC patients. We conducted the analysis between November 2012 and December 2015 at Mercy Health Saint Mary’s, a Midwestern urban hospital with greater than 80,000 annual emergency department (ED visits. All referred patients with three or more hospital visits (ED or inpatient [IP] in the 12 months prior to initiation of a CCM© (n=339 were included in the study. Individualized CCMs© were created and made available in the electronic medical record (EMR to all healthcare providers. We compared utilization, cost, social, and healthcare access variables from the EMR and cost-accounting system for 12 months before and after CCMs© implementation. We used both descriptive and limited inferential statistics. Results: ED mean visits decreased 43% (p<0.001, inpatient mean admissions decreased 44% (p<0.001, outpatient mean visits decreased 17% (p<0.001, computed tomography mean scans decreased 62% (p<0.001, and OBS/IP length of stay mean days decreased 41% (p<0.001. Gross charges decreased 45% (p<0.001, direct expenses

  1. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil from the Aerial Parts of Satureja hortensis As a Potent Medical Plant Using Traditional Hydrodistillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadhosseini

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The water-distilled essential oils, which were obtained from the fresh aerial parts of Satureja hortensis were analyzed by means of GC and CC/MS instruments. The plant was collected during the flowering stage from Foroomad Mountains, Semnan Province, and heart of Iran. Twenty compounds were identified in the different samples analyzed, representing 100% of the total oil contents. In terms of general categories, monoterpene hydrocarbons dominated the chemical profile of the oils with γ-terpinene (27.4%, carvacrol (23.7%, p-cymene (11.1%, α-terpinene (10.2%, α-pinene (5.1% and myrcene (5.1% as the main constituent components. The other constituents were found to be α-thujene (3.9%, β-pinene (3.0%, sylvestrene (3.0%, α-phellandrene (1.2% and (--terpinen-4-ol (1.0%.

  2. [Total analysis of organic rubber additives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Xuan; Robert, Shanks; You, Ye-Ming

    2010-03-01

    In the present paper, after middle pressure chromatograph separation using both positive phase and reversed-phase conditions, the organic additives in ethylene-propylene rubber were identified by infrared spectrometer. At the same time, by using solid phase extraction column to maintain the main component-fuel oil in organic additves to avoid its interfering with minor compounds, other organic additves were separated and analysed by GC/Ms. In addition, the remaining active compound such as benzoyl peroxide was identified by CC/Ms, through analyzing acetone extract directly. Using the above mentioned techniques, soften agents (fuel oil, plant oil and phthalte), curing agent (benzoylperoxide), vulcanizing accelerators (2-mercaptobenzothiazole, ethyl thiuram and butyl thiuram), and antiagers (2, 6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methyl phenol and styrenated phenol) in ethylene-propylene rubber were identified. Although the technique was established in ethylene-propylene rubber system, it can be used in other rubber system.

  3. The effect of climate and climate change on ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. We present here a dynamical method for modelling temporal and geographical variations in ammonia emissions in regional-scale chemistry transport models (CTMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs). The method is based on the meteorology in the models and gridded inventories. We use...... to a standard Danish pig stable with 1000 animals and display how emissions from this source would vary geographically throughout central and northern Europe and from year to year. In view of future climate changes, we also evaluate the potential future changes in emission by including temperature projections....... Finally, the climate penalty on ammonia emissions should be taken into account at the policy level such as the NEC and IPPC directives....

  4. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil from the Aerial Parts of Satureja hortensis As a Potent Medical Plant Using Traditional Hydrodistillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadhosseini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The water-distilled essential oils, which were obtained from the fresh aerial parts of Satureja hortensis were analyzed by means of GC and CC/MS instruments. The plant was collected during the flowering stage from Foroomad Mountains, Semnan Province, and heart of Iran. Twenty compounds were identified in the different samples analyzed, representing 100% of the total oil contents. In terms of general categories, monoterpene hydrocarbons dominated the chemical profile of the oils with γ-terpinene (27.4%, carvacrol (23.7%, p-cymene (11.1%, α-terpinene (10.2%, α-pinene (5.1% and myrcene (5.1% as the main constituent components. The other constituents were found to be α-thujene (3.9%, β-pinene (3.0%, sylvestrene (3.0%, α-phellandrene (1.2% and (--terpinen-4-ol (1.0%.

  5. CO2 induced growth response in a diatom dominated phytoplankton community from SW Bay of Bengal coastal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Haimanti; Shaik, Aziz Ur Rahman; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita; Chowdhury, Neha

    2017-11-01

    The ongoing increase in surface seawater CO2 level could potentially impact phytoplankton primary production in coastal waters; however, CO2 sensitivity studies on tropical coastal phytoplankton assemblages are rare. The present study investigated the interactive impacts of variable CO2 level, light and zinc (Zn) addition on the diatom dominated phytoplankton assemblages from the western coastal Bay of Bengal. Increased CO2 supply enhanced particulate organic matter (POC) production; a concomitant depletion in δ13CPOM values at elevated CO2 suggested increased CO2 diffusive influx inside the cell. Trace amount of Zn added under low CO2 level accelerated growth probably by accelerating Zn-Carbonic Anhydrase activity which helps in converting bicarbonate ion to CO2. Almost identical values of δ13CPOM in the low CO2 treated cells grown with and without Zn indicated a low discrimination between 13C and 12C probably due to bicarbonate uptake. These evidences collectively indicated the existence of the carbon concentration mechanisms (CCMs) at low CO2. A minimum growth rate was observed at low CO2 and light limited condition indicating light dependence of CCMs activity. Upon the increase of light and CO2 level, growth response was maximum. The cells grown in the low CO2 levels showed higher light stress (higher values of both diatoxanthin index and the ratio of photo-protective to light-harvesting pigments) that was alleviated by both increasing CO2 supply and Zn addition (probably by efficient light energy utilization in presence of adequate CO2). This is likely that the diatom dominated phytoplankton communities benefited from the increasing CO2 supply and thus may enhance primary production in response to any further increase in coastal water CO2 levels and can have large biogeochemical consequences in the study area.

  6. GRACILE: a comprehensive climatology of atmospheric gravity wave parameters based on satellite limb soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ern

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Gravity waves are one of the main drivers of atmospheric dynamics. The spatial resolution of most global atmospheric models, however, is too coarse to properly resolve the small scales of gravity waves, which range from tens to a few thousand kilometers horizontally, and from below 1 km to tens of kilometers vertically. Gravity wave source processes involve even smaller scales. Therefore, general circulation models (GCMs and chemistry climate models (CCMs usually parametrize the effect of gravity waves on the global circulation. These parametrizations are very simplified. For this reason, comparisons with global observations of gravity waves are needed for an improvement of parametrizations and an alleviation of model biases. We present a gravity wave climatology based on atmospheric infrared limb emissions observed by satellite (GRACILE. GRACILE is a global data set of gravity wave distributions observed in the stratosphere and the mesosphere by the infrared limb sounding satellite instruments High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER. Typical distributions (zonal averages and global maps of gravity wave vertical wavelengths and along-track horizontal wavenumbers are provided, as well as gravity wave temperature variances, potential energies and absolute momentum fluxes. This global data set captures the typical seasonal variations of these parameters, as well as their spatial variations. The GRACILE data set is suitable for scientific studies, and it can serve for comparison with other instruments (ground-based, airborne, or other satellite instruments and for comparison with gravity wave distributions, both resolved and parametrized, in GCMs and CCMs. The GRACILE data set is available as supplementary data at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879658.

  7. Cross-Continuum Tool Is Associated with Reduced Utilization and Cost for Frequent High-Need Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Lauran; Kilian, Adam; Muller, Leslie; Callison, Kevin; Olgren, Michael

    2017-02-01

    High-need, high-cost (HNHC) patients can over-use acute care services, a pattern of behavior associated with many poor outcomes that disproportionately contributes to increased U.S. healthcare cost. Our objective was to reduce healthcare cost and improve outcomes by optimizing the system of care. We targeted HNHC patients and identified root causes of frequent healthcare utilization. We developed a cross-continuum intervention process and a succinct tool called a Complex Care Map (CCM)© that addresses fragmentation in the system and links providers to a comprehensive individualized analysis of the patient story and causes for frequent access to health services. Using a pre-/post-test design in which each subject served as his/her own historical control, this quality improvement project focused on determining if the interdisciplinary intervention called CCM© had an impact on healthcare utilization and costs for HNHC patients. We conducted the analysis between November 2012 and December 2015 at Mercy Health Saint Mary's, a Midwestern urban hospital with greater than 80,000 annual emergency department (ED) visits. All referred patients with three or more hospital visits (ED or inpatient [IP]) in the 12 months prior to initiation of a CCM© (n=339) were included in the study. Individualized CCMs© were created and made available in the electronic medical record (EMR) to all healthcare providers. We compared utilization, cost, social, and healthcare access variables from the EMR and cost-accounting system for 12 months before and after CCMs© implementation. We used both descriptive and limited inferential statistics. ED mean visits decreased 43% (pcost of care.

  8. Why are models unable to reproduce multi-decadal trends in lower tropospheric baseline ozone levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Liu, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S.

    2017-12-01

    Assessments of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing rely on accurate model simulations. Parrish et al (2014) found that three chemistry-climate models (CCMs) overestimate present-day O3 mixing ratios and capture only 50% of the observed O3 increase over the last five decades at 12 baseline sites in the northern mid-latitudes, indicating large uncertainties in our understanding of the ozone trends and their implications for radiative forcing. Here we present comparisons of outputs from two chemical transport models (CTMs) - GEOS-Chem and the Global Modeling Initiative model - with O3 observations from the same sites and from the global ozonesonde network. Both CTMs are driven by reanalysis meteorological data (MERRA or MERRA2) and thus are expected to be different in atmospheric transport processes relative to those freely running CCMs. We test whether recent model developments leading to more active ozone chemistry affect the computed ozone sensitivity to perturbations in emissions. Preliminary results suggest these CTMs can reproduce present-day ozone levels but fail to capture the multi-decadal trend since 1980. Both models yield widespread overpredictions of free tropospheric ozone in the 1980s. Sensitivity studies in GEOS-Chem suggest that the model estimate of natural background ozone is too high. We discuss factors that contribute to the variability and trends of tropospheric ozone over the last 30 years, with a focus on intermodel differences in spatial resolution and in the representation of stratospheric chemistry, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, halogen chemistry, and biogenic VOC emissions and chemistry. We also discuss uncertainty in the historical emission inventories used in models, and how these affect the simulated ozone trends.

  9. GRACILE: a comprehensive climatology of atmospheric gravity wave parameters based on satellite limb soundings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Manfred; Trinh, Quang Thai; Preusse, Peter; Gille, John C.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Russell, James M., III; Riese, Martin

    2018-04-01

    Gravity waves are one of the main drivers of atmospheric dynamics. The spatial resolution of most global atmospheric models, however, is too coarse to properly resolve the small scales of gravity waves, which range from tens to a few thousand kilometers horizontally, and from below 1 km to tens of kilometers vertically. Gravity wave source processes involve even smaller scales. Therefore, general circulation models (GCMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs) usually parametrize the effect of gravity waves on the global circulation. These parametrizations are very simplified. For this reason, comparisons with global observations of gravity waves are needed for an improvement of parametrizations and an alleviation of model biases. We present a gravity wave climatology based on atmospheric infrared limb emissions observed by satellite (GRACILE). GRACILE is a global data set of gravity wave distributions observed in the stratosphere and the mesosphere by the infrared limb sounding satellite instruments High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER). Typical distributions (zonal averages and global maps) of gravity wave vertical wavelengths and along-track horizontal wavenumbers are provided, as well as gravity wave temperature variances, potential energies and absolute momentum fluxes. This global data set captures the typical seasonal variations of these parameters, as well as their spatial variations. The GRACILE data set is suitable for scientific studies, and it can serve for comparison with other instruments (ground-based, airborne, or other satellite instruments) and for comparison with gravity wave distributions, both resolved and parametrized, in GCMs and CCMs. The GRACILE data set is available as supplementary data at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879658" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.879658.

  10. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Ruan

    Full Text Available Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis.Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery.Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01. In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001, male-majority (female ratio 1 year before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01, lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02 and short-term (< 3 years follow-up (OR, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.80; P = 0.005 tended to correlate with a significantly favorable outcome.Patients who underwent extended surrounding hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  11. The effect of climate and climate change on ammonia emissions in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Skjøth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present here a dynamical method for modelling temporal and geographical variations in ammonia emissions in regional-scale chemistry transport models (CTMs and chemistry climate models (CCMs. The method is based on the meteorology in the models and gridded inventories. We use the dynamical method to investigate the spatiotemporal variability of ammonia emissions across part of Europe and study how these emissions are related to geographical and year-to-year variations in atmospheric temperature alone. For simplicity we focus on the emission from a storage facility related to a standard Danish pig stable with 1000 animals and display how emissions from this source would vary geographically throughout central and northern Europe and from year to year. In view of future climate changes, we also evaluate the potential future changes in emission by including temperature projections from an ensemble of climate models. The results point towards four overall issues. (1 Emissions can easily vary by 20% for different geographical locations within a country due to overall variations in climate. The largest uncertainties are seen for large countries such as the UK, Germany and France. (2 Annual variations in overall climate can at specific locations cause uncertainties in the range of 20%. (3 Climate change may increase emissions by 0–40% in central to northern Europe. (4 Gradients in existing emission inventories that are seen between neighbour countries (e.g. between the UK and France can be reduced by using a dynamical methodology for calculating emissions. Acting together these four factors can cause substantial uncertainties in emission. Emissions are generally considered among the largest uncertainties in the model calculations made with CTM and CCM models. Efforts to reduce uncertainties are therefore highly relevant. It is therefore recommended that both CCMs and CTMs implement a dynamical methodology for simulating ammonia emissions in a

  12. Clinical course of untreated cerebral cavernous malformations: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Margaret A; Flemming, Kelly D; Su, I-Chang; Stapf, Christian; Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Li, Da; Maxwell, Susanne S; White, Philip; Christianson, Teresa J; Agid, Ronit; Cho, Won-Sang; Oh, Chang Wan; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun-Ting; Kim, Jeong Eun; Ter Brugge, Karel; Willinsky, Robert; Brown, Robert D; Murray, Gordon D; Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

    2016-02-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) can cause symptomatic intracranial haemorrhage (ICH), but the estimated risks are imprecise and predictors remain uncertain. We aimed to obtain precise estimates and predictors of the risk of ICH during untreated follow-up in an individual patient data meta-analysis. We invited investigators of published cohorts of people aged at least 16 years, identified by a systematic review of Ovid MEDLINE and Embase from inception to April 30, 2015, to provide individual patient data on clinical course from CCM diagnosis until first CCM treatment or last available follow-up. We used survival analysis to estimate the 5-year risk of symptomatic ICH due to CCMs (primary outcome), multivariable Cox regression to identify baseline predictors of outcome, and random-effects models to pool estimates in a meta-analysis. Among 1620 people in seven cohorts from six studies, 204 experienced ICH during 5197 person-years of follow-up (Kaplan-Meier estimated 5-year risk 15·8%, 95% CI 13·7-17·9). The primary outcome of ICH within 5 years of CCM diagnosis was associated with clinical presentation with ICH or new focal neurological deficit (FND) without brain imaging evidence of recent haemorrhage versus other modes of presentation (hazard ratio 5·6, 95% CI 3·2-9·7) and with brainstem CCM location versus other locations (4·4, 2·3-8·6), but age, sex, and CCM multiplicity did not add independent prognostic information. The 5-year estimated risk of ICH during untreated follow-up was 3·8% (95% CI 2·1-5·5) for 718 people with non-brainstem CCM presenting without ICH or FND, 8·0% (0·1-15·9) for 80 people with brainstem CCM presenting without ICH or FND, 18·4% (13·3-23·5) for 327 people with non-brainstem CCM presenting with ICH or FND, and 30·8% (26·3-35·2) for 495 people with brainstem CCM presenting with ICH or FND. Mode of clinical presentation and CCM location are independently associated with ICH within 5 years of CCM diagnosis. These

  13. Ocean acidification modulates expression of genes and physiological performance of a marine diatom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Zhuang, S.; Wu, Y.; Ren, H.; Cheng, F.; Lin, X.; Wang, K.; Beardall, J.; Gao, K.

    2015-09-01

    Ocean Acidification (OA) is known to affect various aspects of the physiological performance of diatoms, but there is little information on the underlining molecular mechanisms involved. Here, we show that in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum expression of the genes related to light harvesting, carbon acquisition and carboxylation, nitrite assimilation and ATP synthesis are modulated by OA. Growth and photosynthetic carbon fixation were enhanced by elevated CO2 (1000 μatm) under both constant indoor and fluctuating outdoor light regimes. The genetic expression of nitrite reductase (NiR) was up-regulated by OA regardless of light levels and/or regimes. The transcriptional expression of fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c protein (lhcf type (FCP)) and mitochondrial ATP synthase (mtATP synthase) genes were also enhanced by OA, but only under high light intensity. OA treatment decreased the expression of β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) along with down-regulation of CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). Additionally, the genes for these proteins (NiR, FCP, mtATP synthase, β-CA) showed diel expressions either under constant indoor light or fluctuating sunlight. Thus, OA enhanced photosynthetic and growth rates by stimulating nitrogen assimilation and indirectly by down-regulating the energy-costly inorganic carbon acquisition process.

  14. Preliminary evidences of CCM operation and its down regulation in relation to increasing CO2 levels in natural phytoplankton assemblages from the coastal waters of Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Haimanti; Rahman Shaik, Aziz Ur; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita

    2014-05-01

    Bay of Bengal (BoB), a low productive part of the North Indian Ocean, often possesses low CO2 levels in its surface water and diatoms dominate the phytoplankton communities. Virtually no studies are available from this area reporting how this diatom dominated phytoplankton community would respond any increase in dissolved CO2 levels either naturally or anthopogenically. In most of the marine phytoplankton, the inefficiency of the sole carbon fixing enzyme Rubisco necessitates the need of concentrating dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (mostly as HCO3) inside the cell in excess of the ambient water concentrations in order to maintain high rate of photosynthesis under low CO2 levels through an energy consuming carbon concentration mechanisms (CCMs). The ubiquitous enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) plays a vital role in CCMs by converting HCO3- to CO2 and usually utilizes the trace metal zinc (Zn) as a cofactor. However, it is evident in many marine phytoplankton species that with increasing external CO2 levels, CCMs can be down-regulated leading to energetic savings which can be reallocated to growth; although exceptions occur. Hence, in order to predict their responses to the projected changes, it is imperative to understand their carbon metabolism patterns. We have conducted a series of incubation experiments in microcosms with natural phytoplankton communities from the coastal waters of BoB under different CO2 levels. Our results revealed that the rate of net photosynthetic oxygen evolution and biomass build-up increased in response to increasing CO2 levels. The depletion in δ13CPOM values were more in the high CO2 treatments relative to the low CO2 treated cells (control), indicating that dissolved CO2 uptake was higher when CO2 levels were increased. When additional Zn was added to the low CO2 treated cells, net photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate was increased significantly than that of the untreated control. It is likely that upon the supply of Zn under low CO2

  15. Tracing Growth of Teachers' Classroom Interactions with Representations of Functions in the Connected Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian Lee

    The purpose of this study is to create an empirically based theoretic model of change of the use and treatment of representations of functions with the use of Connected Classroom Technology (CCT) using data previously collected for the Classroom Connectivity in Promoting Mathematics and Science Achievement (CCMS) project. Qualitative analysis of videotapes of three algebra teachers' instruction focused on different categories thought to influence teaching representations with technology: representations, discourse, technology, and decisions. Models for rating teachers low, medium, or high for each of these categories were created using a priori codes and grounded methodology. A cross case analysis was conducted after the completion of the case studies by comparing and contrasting the three cases. Data revealed that teachers' decisions shifted to incorporate the difference in student ideas/representations made visible by the CCT into their instruction and ultimately altered their orientation to mathematics teaching. The shift in orientation seemed to lead to the teachers' growth with regards to representations, discourse, and technology.

  16. Electric utility load management: rational use of energy program pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-08-01

    In recognition of the role that load management can play in ensuring that the growing demand for electricity is met in a cost- and energy-efficient manner, in mid-1974, the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society sponsored all three meetings to provide a forum for representatives of U.S. and European utilities to exchange views and experiences on the various aspects of load management. It was the consensus of representatives at the meetings that three overall approaches offer significant opportunities for achieving improved load management: development of marginal-cost rate structures; power pooling and energy storage by utilities; and efforts by consumers. Industrial consumers can assist electric utilities in their efforts to level system loads through three important methods: interruptible power and deferred load control; peak self-generation; and shifts in operating schedules. Residential/commercial consumers also have an important role to play by managing both their electric heating load (through the interruption of direct-resistance heating and the storage of heat) and their air conditioning load. In response to the interest expressed by the participants in the CCMS conferences, the U.S. and several European governments, national electric utility industry organizations, state public utility commissions, and many individual utilities have undertaken R and D projects to investigate and test various aspects of these three approaches to load management. This report describes the projects that were presented by the utility representatives.

  17. Assessment of international remedial technologies for application to Superfund sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanning, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents some of the logical arguments for conducting research on remedial technologies for contaminated land and groundwater at an international level. It gives information on many of the international organizations that are involved in environmental programs, but it especially gives emphasis to the NATO-CCMS pilot study on Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater. The purpose of the study is to field demonstrate and evaluate new/innovative technologies for remedial action at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. This study is a logical international extension of the US EPA SITE program. It offers the opportunity to obtain a multiple data base on various remedial action unit processes without any single country having to commit a disproportionate amount of its internal resources to any specific activity. Each participating country provides the necessary resources for those demonstrations which they are contributing to the study. Sites are selected by a majority vote of all participating countries (no country is permitted to vote for its own sites). The study is a 5 year program with participants from Canada, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and the US. The need for cost-effective remedial action technologies for hazardous waste sites is a problem of all industrialized countries. The need to build a knowledge base of emerging remedial technologies was the impetus behind the USEPA's lead role and commitment to this pilot study

  18. Dioxins contamination of food in Italy: an overview of the situation 1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scortichini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Istituto Zooprofilattico dell’Abruzzo e Molise ‘G. Caporale’ (IZS A&M has been monitoring contamination of food by the polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDD and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF as part of the National Surveillance Plan (NSP in Italy since 1999, on license from the Italian Ministry of Health. Between 1999 and 2000, 238 samples (including meat, fish, eggs, milk, fat, feedstuffs were analysed. The results of the tests were expressed in terms of international toxic equivalents (I-TEQs from NATO/CCMS, 1988 and World Health Organization toxic equivalents (WHO-TEQs. These results showed contamination levels comparable to those detected in similar studies conducted in other European countries for products such as milk (mean: 0.81 pg I-TEQ/g fat, meat (mean: 0.73 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fat (mean: 0.51 pg I-TEQ/g fat. The highest dioxin content was found in fish (mean: 5.28 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fish feeds (mean 6.60 pg ITEQ/ g fat. These two matrices also showed complete duplication of contamination profiles. Other edible matrices (milk, meat, eggs revealed the presence of HpCDD and OCDD. This could be due to the introduction into Italy of the animal feed additive choline chloride contaminated by these congenerse.

  19. More than half the families of mobile intensive care unit patients experience inadequate communication with physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaty, Guillaume; Ageron, François-Xavier; Minguet, Laetitia; Courtiol, Guillaume; Escallier, Christophe; Henniche, Adeline; Maignan, Maxime; Briot, Raphaël; Carpentier, Françoise; Savary, Dominique; Labarere, José; Danel, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to assess comprehension by family members of the patient's severity in the prehospital setting. We conducted a cross-sectional study in four mobile intensive care units (ICUs, medicalized ambulances) in France from June to October 2012. Nurses collected data on patients, patient's relatives, and mobile ICU physicians. For each patient, one relative and one physician independently rated the patient's severity using a simplified version of the Clinical Classification of Out-of-Hospital Emergency Patients scale (CCMS). Relatives were also asked to assess their interview with the physician. The primary outcome was agreement between the relative's and physician's ratings of the patient's severity. Data were available for 184 patients, their relatives, and mobile ICU physicians. Full and partial agreement between relatives and physicians regarding the patient's severity was found for 79 (43%) and 121 (66%) cases, respectively [weighted kappa = 0.32 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.23-0.42)]. Relatives overestimated the patient's severity assessed by the physician [6 (5-8) vs. 4 (3-7), p communicated by mobile ICU physicians.

  20. Present status and future prospects for nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H. (ed.)

    1975-10-03

    This report, which is part of a study initiated by the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS), describes the current status of nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources. Such resources are defined as geothermal fluids between the temperatures of 50 and 160/sup 0/C. Current and potential uses of these resources including residential and commercial, agricultural and industrial applications are described. Also discussed are exploration and drilling; extraction and distribution; environmental impact; and economic and regulatory problems. Applications in a number of countries are described. Among the report's conclusions are: (1) Geothermal resources are widely distributed throughout the world. (2) The extraction of these resources presents no serious technical problems. (3) A wide variety of economically viable applications for these resources currently exists. (4) Current nonelectrical applications have a favorable economic structure compared with those of other energy sources. (5) Disposal of spent fluids has a significant ecological impact. Reinjection appears to be the most likely alternative. (6) The legal and institutional framework surrounding these applications needs both clarification and simplification.

  1. De novo formation of cerebral cavernous malformation in a patient with intractable epilepsy: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpan, Mustafa Efkan; Uckardesler, Levent; Sekerci, Zeki; Slavin, Konstantin

    2010-07-01

    The exact origin and process of development of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is currently unknown. In this article, the authors present de novo CCM formation in a patient with intractable epilepsy and discuss the pathogenesis of CCM in light of several current theories. A 34-year-old man presented with a 10-year history of intractable seizures. His neurological examination was normal, and the initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was suggestive of right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Follow-up MRI study showed development of CCM in the right frontal region. Subsequently, invasive monitoring revealed right temporal seizure source, prompting right temporal lobectomy that resulted in abolition of epilepsy. Histological diagnosis of CCM was confirmed after the lesion was removed in a separate surgery. The patient recovered to normal lifestyle without any complications. This appears to be a first documented case of de novo CCM formation in the setting of intractable epilepsy with ipsilateral MTS. Since the possibility of lesion development cannot be ruled out based on clinical examination, updated imaging and thorough neurophysiological workup are needed for successful treatment of patients with intractable epilepsy.

  2. Organization and diffusion in biological and material fabrication problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Niall Mari

    This thesis is composed of two problems. The first is a systems level analysis of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria. The second presents a theoretical analysis of femtosecond laser melting for the purpose of hyperdoping silicon with sulfur. While these systems are very distant, they are both relevant to the development of alternative energy (production of biofuels and methods for fabricating photovoltaics respectively). Both problems are approached through analysis of the underlying diffusion equations. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria with a unique carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) which enhances carbon fixation. A greater understanding of this mechanism would offer new insights into the basic biology and methods for bioengineering more efficient biochemical reactions. The molecular components of the CCM have been well characterized in the last decade, with genetic analysis uncovering both variation and commonalities in CCMs across cyanobacteria strains. Analysis of CCMs on a systems level, however, is based on models formulated prior to the molecular characterization. We present an updated model of the cyanobacteria CCM, and analytic solutions in terms of the various molecular components. The solutions allow us to find the parameter regime (expression levels, catalytic rates, permeability of carboxysome shell) where carbon fixation is maximized and oxygenation is minimized. Saturation of RuBisCO, maximization of the ratio of CO2 to O2, and staying below or at the saturation level for carbonic anhydrase are all needed for maximum efficacy. These constraints limit the parameter regime where the most effective carbon fixation can occur. There is an optimal non-specific carboxysome shell permeability, where trapping of CO2 is maximized, but HCO3 - is not detrimentally restricted. The shell also shields carbonic anhydrase activity and CO2 → HCO3- conversion at the thylakoid and cell membrane from one another. Co-localization of carbonic

  3. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Wooldridge

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae" is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching". Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (regrowth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  4. Breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis: towards formalising a linkage between warm-water bleaching thresholds and the growth rate of the intracellular zooxanthellae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, S. A.

    2013-03-01

    Impairment of the photosynthetic machinery of the algal endosymbiont ("zooxanthellae") is the proximal driver of the thermal breakdown of the coral-algae symbiosis ("coral bleaching"). Yet, the initial site of damage, and early dynamics of the impairment are still not well resolved. In this perspective essay, I consider further a recent hypothesis which proposes an energetic disruption to the carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) of the coral host, and the resultant onset of CO2-limitation within the photosynthetic "dark reactions" as a unifying cellular mechanism. The hypothesis identifies the enhanced retention of photosynthetic carbon for zooxanthellae (re)growth following an initial irradiance-driven expulsion event as a strong contributing cause of the energetic disruption. If true, then it implies that the onset of the bleaching syndrome and setting of upper thermal bleaching limits are emergent attributes of the coral symbiosis that are ultimately underpinned by the characteristic growth profile of the intracellular zooxanthellae; which is known to depend not just on temperature, but also external (seawater) nutrient availability and zooxanthellae genotype. Here, I review this proposed bleaching linkage at a variety of observational scales, and find it to be parsimonious with the available evidence. Future experiments are suggested that can more formally test the linkage. If correct, the new cellular model delivers a valuable new perspective to consider the future prospects of the coral symbiosis in an era of rapid environmental change, including: (i) the underpinning mechanics (and biological significance) of observed changes in resident zooxanthellae genotypes, and (ii) the now crucial importance of reef water quality in co-determining thermal bleaching resistance.

  5. Using Transport Diagnostics to Understand Chemistry Climate Model Ozone Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Akiyoshi, H.; Bekki, S.; Braesicke, P.; Butchart, N.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Cugnet, D.; Dhomse, S.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate how observations of N2O and mean age in the tropical and midlatitude lower stratosphere (LS) can be used to identify realistic transport in models. The results are applied to 15 Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) participating in the 2010 WMO assessment. Comparison of the observed and simulated N2O/mean age relationship identifies models with fast or slow circulations and reveals details of model ascent and tropical isolation. The use of this process-oriented N2O/mean age diagnostic identifies models with compensating transport deficiencies that produce fortuitous agreement with mean age. We compare the diagnosed model transport behavior with a model's ability to produce realistic LS O3 profiles in the tropics and midlatitudes. Models with the greatest tropical transport problems show the poorest agreement with observations. Models with the most realistic LS transport agree more closely with LS observations and each other. We incorporate the results of the chemistry evaluations in the SPARC CCMVal Report (2010) to explain the range of CCM predictions for the return-to-1980 dates for global (60 S-60 N) and Antarctic column ozone. Later (earlier) Antarctic return dates are generally correlated to higher (lower) vortex Cl(sub y) levels in the LS, and vortex Cl(sub y) is generally correlated with the model's circulation although model Cl(sub y) chemistry or Cl(sub y) conservation can have a significant effect. In both regions, models that have good LS transport produce a smaller range of predictions for the return-to-1980 ozone values. This study suggests that the current range of predicted return dates is unnecessarily large due to identifiable model transport deficiencies.

  6. Surgical Management and Long-Term Seizure Outcome After Surgery for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Associated with Cerebral Cavernous Malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng-Fan; Pei, Jia-Sheng; Jia, Yan-Zeng; Lin, Qiao; Xiao, Hui; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Zhong, Zhong-Hui

    2018-02-01

    Operative strategies for cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM)-associated temporal lobe epilepsy and timing of surgical intervention continue to be debated. This study aimed to establish an algorithm to evaluate the efficacy of surgical intervention strategies, to maximize positive surgical outcomes and minimize postsurgical neurologic deficits. 47 patients having undergone operation for CCM-associated temporal lobe epilepsy were retrospectively reviewed. They had received a diagnostic series for seizure localization, including long-term video electroencephalography (vEEG), high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT). In patients with mesial temporal lobe CCMs, the involved structures (amygdala, hippocampus, or parahippocampal gyrus) were resected in addition to the lesions. Patients with neocortical epileptogenic CCM underwent extended lesionectomy guided by intraoperative electrocorticography; further performance of amygdalohippocampectomy depended on the extent of hippocampal epileptogenicity. The study cohort contained 28 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE), 12 with chronic epilepsy (CE), and 7 with sporadic seizure (SS). Normal temporal lobe metabolism was seen in 7/7 patients of the SS group. Hypometabolism was found in all patients with chronic disease except for those with posterior inferior and middle temporal gyrus cavernous malformations (CMs). Of the 31 patients with superficial neocortical CCM, 7 had normal PET without hippocampal sclerosis, 14 had ipsilateral temporal lobe hypometabolism without hippocampal sclerosis, and 10 had obvious hippocampal sclerosis and hypometabolism. Seizure freedom in DRE, CE, and SS was 82.1%, 75%, and 100%, respectively. A significant difference was found between lesion laterality and postoperative seizure control; the rate was lower in left-sided cases because of less aggressive resection. Our study demonstrates that the data from the

  7. Evaluation of the reactive nitrogen budget of the remote atmosphere in global models using airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L. T.; Strode, S. A.; Fiore, A. M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Prather, M. J.; Thompson, C. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Allen, H.; Blake, D. R.; Crounse, J. D.; Brune, W. H.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, S. R.; Hintsa, E. J.; Huey, L. G.; Kim, M. J.; Moore, F. L.; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) in the background atmosphere are critical precursors for the formation of tropospheric ozone and OH, thereby exerting strong influence on surface air quality, reactive greenhouse gases, and ecosystem health. The impact of NOx on atmospheric composition and climate is sensitive to the relative partitioning of reactive nitrogen between NOx and longer-lived reservoir species of the total reactive nitrogen family (NOy) such as HNO3, HNO4, PAN and organic nitrates (RONO2). Unfortunately, global chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and chemistry-transport models (CTMs) have historically disagreed in their reactive nitrogen budgets outside of polluted continental regions, and we have lacked in situ observations with which to evaluate them. Here, we compare and evaluate the NOy budget of six global models (GEOS-Chem CTM, GFDL AM3 CCM, GISS E2.1 CCM, GMI CTM, NCAR CAM CCM, and UCI CTM) using new observations of total reactive nitrogen and its member species from the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) mission. ATom has now completed two of its four planned deployments sampling the remote Pacific and Atlantic basins of both hemispheres with a comprehensive suite of measurements for constraining reactive photochemistry. All six models have simulated conditions climatologically similar to the deployments. The GMI and GEOS-Chem CTMs have in addition performed hindcast simulations using the MERRA-2 reanalysis, and have been sampled along the flight tracks. We evaluate the performance of the models relative to the observations, and identify factors contributing to their disparate behavior using known differences in model oxidation mechanisms, heterogeneous loss pathways, lightning and surface emissions, and physical loss processes.

  8. Quantifying the effect of mixing on the mean age of air in CCMVal-2 and CCMI-1 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Eichinger, Roland; Garny, Hella; Birner, Thomas; Boenisch, Harald; Pitari, Giovanni; Mancini, Eva; Visioni, Daniele; Stenke, Andrea; Revell, Laura; Rozanov, Eugene; Plummer, David A.; Scinocca, John; Jöckel, Patrick; Oman, Luke; Deushi, Makoto; Kiyotaka, Shibata; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Garcia, Rolando; Morgenstern, Olaf; Zeng, Guang; Stone, Kane Adam; Schofield, Robyn

    2018-05-01

    The stratospheric age of air (AoA) is a useful measure of the overall capabilities of a general circulation model (GCM) to simulate stratospheric transport. Previous studies have reported a large spread in the simulation of AoA by GCMs and coupled chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Compared to observational estimates, simulated AoA is mostly too low. Here we attempt to untangle the processes that lead to the AoA differences between the models and between models and observations. AoA is influenced by both mean transport by the residual circulation and two-way mixing; we quantify the effects of these processes using data from the CCM inter-comparison projects CCMVal-2 (Chemistry-Climate Model Validation Activity 2) and CCMI-1 (Chemistry-Climate Model Initiative, phase 1). Transport along the residual circulation is measured by the residual circulation transit time (RCTT). We interpret the difference between AoA and RCTT as additional aging by mixing. Aging by mixing thus includes mixing on both the resolved and subgrid scale. We find that the spread in AoA between the models is primarily caused by differences in the effects of mixing and only to some extent by differences in residual circulation strength. These effects are quantified by the mixing efficiency, a measure of the relative increase in AoA by mixing. The mixing efficiency varies strongly between the models from 0.24 to 1.02. We show that the mixing efficiency is not only controlled by horizontal mixing, but by vertical mixing and vertical diffusion as well. Possible causes for the differences in the models' mixing efficiencies are discussed. Differences in subgrid-scale mixing (including differences in advection schemes and model resolutions) likely contribute to the differences in mixing efficiency. However, differences in the relative contribution of resolved versus parameterized wave forcing do not appear to be related to differences in mixing efficiency or AoA.

  9. Longitudinal changes in seizure outcomes after resection of cerebral cavernous malformations in patients presenting with seizures: a long-term follow-up of 46 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiha; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee

    2014-08-01

    Seizure is the most common presentation in patients with cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). Although many articles have documented seizure outcomes after resection of CCM, few have conducted long-term follow-ups; thus, the fluctuating seizure outcomes have been neglected. The purpose of this study is to describe long-term postoperative seizure outcomes in patients with CCM and to compare seizure outcomes between patients with sporadic seizures and those with chronic seizures. Forty-six patients with CCM presenting with seizures underwent surgery. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1, and the average age at initial seizure onset was 27.6 years. The mean preoperative seizure duration was 42.7 months. Patients were divided into two groups: a chronic group (N = 20) and a sporadic group (N = 26) according to seizure frequency and duration. The mean postoperative follow-up duration was 96.3 months, and the postoperative seizure outcomes were checked annually based upon Engel's classification. After the first year of follow-up, 80.8 % of the sporadic group and 75.0 % of the chronic group were evaluated as Engel class I. These rates increased to 100.0 % and 90.0 %, respectively, at the eighth year of follow-up. Overall, 29 (63.0 %) of the 46 patients experienced changes in seizure outcomes over the follow-up period. Despite their delayed improvements, the chronic group showed less favorable outcomes throughout follow-up (p = 0.025). Long-term follow-up is indispensable for accurately assessing postoperative seizure outcomes because these outcomes change continuously. We recommend earlier surgery to achieve seizure-free status in patients with CCM. However, even in the chronic group, surgery is recommended, considering the overall delayed improvement.

  10. An inorganic carbon transport system responsible for acclimation specific to air levels of CO2 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingjun; Spalding, Martin H

    2006-06-27

    Many photosynthetic microorganisms acclimate to CO(2) limited environments by induction and operation of CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). Despite their central role in CCM function, inorganic carbon (Ci) transport systems never have been identified in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. In the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a mutant, pmp1, was described in 1983 with deficiencies in Ci transport, and a Pmp1 protein-associated Ci uptake system has been proposed to be responsible for Ci uptake in low CO(2) (air level)-acclimated cells. However, even though pmp1 represents the only clear genetic link to Ci transport in microalgae and is one of only a very few mutants directly affecting the CCM itself, the identity of Pmp1 has remained unknown. Physiological analyses indicate that C. reinhardtii possesses multiple Ci transport systems responsible for acclimation to different levels of limiting CO(2) and that the Pmp1-associated transport system is required specifically for low (air level) CO(2) acclimation. In the current study, we identified and characterized a pmp1 allelic mutant, air dier 1 (ad1) that, like pmp1, cannot grow in low CO(2) (350 ppm) but can grow either in high CO(2) (5% CO(2)) or in very low CO(2) (<200 ppm). Molecular analyses revealed that the Ad1/Pmp1 protein is encoded by LciB, a gene previously identified as a CO(2)-responsive gene. LciB and three related genes in C. reinhardtii compose a unique gene family that encode four closely related, apparently soluble plastid proteins with no clearly identifiable conserved motifs.

  11. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A continuous tropospheric and stratospheric vertically resolved ozone time series, from 1850 to 2099, has been generated to be used as forcing in global climate models that do not include interactive chemistry. A multiple linear regression analysis of SAGE I+II satellite observations and polar ozonesonde measurements is used for the stratospheric zonal mean dataset during the well-observed period from 1979 to 2009. In addition to terms describing the mean annual cycle, the regression includes terms representing equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle variability. The EESC regression fit coefficients, together with pre-1979 EESC values, are used to extrapolate the stratospheric ozone time series backward to 1850. While a similar procedure could be used to extrapolate into the future, coupled chemistry climate model (CCM simulations indicate that future stratospheric ozone abundances are likely to be significantly affected by climate change, and capturing such effects through a regression model approach is not feasible. Therefore, the stratospheric ozone dataset is extended into the future (merged in 2009 with multi-model mean projections from 13 CCMs that performed a simulation until 2099 under the SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B greenhouse gas scenario and the A1 adjusted halogen scenario in the second round of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal-2 Activity. The stratospheric zonal mean ozone time series is merged with a three-dimensional tropospheric data set extracted from simulations of the past by two CCMs (CAM3.5 and GISS-PUCCINI and of the future by one CCM (CAM3.5. The future tropospheric ozone time series continues the historical CAM3.5 simulation until 2099 following the four different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. Generally good agreement is found between the historical segment of the ozone database and satellite observations, although it should be noted that

  12. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Labarthe, Jenni; Légaré, France; Ouimet, Mathieu; Estabrooks, Carole A; Roch, Geneviève; Ghandour, El Kebir; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-07-13

    Knowledge translation (KT) is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR) for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC) have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA) process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care.Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more consensus on the theoretical underpinnings and the

  13. Ocean acidification of a coastal Antarctic marine microbial community reveals a critical threshold for CO2 tolerance in phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppeler, Stacy; Petrou, Katherina; Schulz, Kai G.; Westwood, Karen; Pearce, Imojen; McKinlay, John; Davidson, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    High-latitude oceans are anticipated to be some of the first regions affected by ocean acidification. Despite this, the effect of ocean acidification on natural communities of Antarctic marine microbes is still not well understood. In this study we exposed an early spring, coastal marine microbial community in Prydz Bay to CO2 levels ranging from ambient (343 µatm) to 1641 µatm in six 650 L minicosms. Productivity assays were performed to identify whether a CO2 threshold existed that led to a change in primary productivity, bacterial productivity, and the accumulation of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and particulate organic matter (POM) in the minicosms. In addition, photophysiological measurements were performed to identify possible mechanisms driving changes in the phytoplankton community. A critical threshold for tolerance to ocean acidification was identified in the phytoplankton community between 953 and 1140 µatm. CO2 levels ≥ 1140 µatm negatively affected photosynthetic performance and Chl a-normalised primary productivity (csGPP14C), causing significant reductions in gross primary production (GPP14C), Chl a accumulation, nutrient uptake, and POM production. However, there was no effect of CO2 on C : N ratios. Over time, the phytoplankton community acclimated to high CO2 conditions, showing a down-regulation of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) and likely adjusting other intracellular processes. Bacterial abundance initially increased in CO2 treatments ≥ 953 µatm (days 3-5), yet gross bacterial production (GBP14C) remained unchanged and cell-specific bacterial productivity (csBP14C) was reduced. Towards the end of the experiment, GBP14C and csBP14C markedly increased across all treatments regardless of CO2 availability. This coincided with increased organic matter availability (POC and PON) combined with improved efficiency of carbon uptake. Changes in phytoplankton community production could have negative effects on the Antarctic food web and the

  14. Spatial clustering and meteorological drivers of summer ozone in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro-Calvo, Leopoldo; Ordóñez, Carlos; García-Herrera, Ricardo; Schnell, Jordan L.

    2017-04-01

    but do not seem to exert a large impact on the variability of surface O3 over most regions. The identification of these independent regions where surface ozone presents a coherent behaviour and responds similarly to specific meteorological modes of variability has multiple applications. For instance, the performance of chemical transport models (CTMs) and chemistry-climate models (CCMs) can be separately assessed over such regions to identify areas where they present large biases that need to be corrected. Our results can also be used to test the models' sensitivity to the day-to-day changing meteorology and to climate change over specific regions.

  15. Ocean acidification of a coastal Antarctic marine microbial community reveals a critical threshold for CO2 tolerance in phytoplankton productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deppeler

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude oceans are anticipated to be some of the first regions affected by ocean acidification. Despite this, the effect of ocean acidification on natural communities of Antarctic marine microbes is still not well understood. In this study we exposed an early spring, coastal marine microbial community in Prydz Bay to CO2 levels ranging from ambient (343 µatm to 1641 µatm in six 650 L minicosms. Productivity assays were performed to identify whether a CO2 threshold existed that led to a change in primary productivity, bacterial productivity, and the accumulation of chlorophyll a (Chl a and particulate organic matter (POM in the minicosms. In addition, photophysiological measurements were performed to identify possible mechanisms driving changes in the phytoplankton community. A critical threshold for tolerance to ocean acidification was identified in the phytoplankton community between 953 and 1140 µatm. CO2 levels  ≥ 1140 µatm negatively affected photosynthetic performance and Chl a-normalised primary productivity (csGPP14C, causing significant reductions in gross primary production (GPP14C, Chl a accumulation, nutrient uptake, and POM production. However, there was no effect of CO2 on C : N ratios. Over time, the phytoplankton community acclimated to high CO2 conditions, showing a down-regulation of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs and likely adjusting other intracellular processes. Bacterial abundance initially increased in CO2 treatments  ≥ 953 µatm (days 3–5, yet gross bacterial production (GBP14C remained unchanged and cell-specific bacterial productivity (csBP14C was reduced. Towards the end of the experiment, GBP14C and csBP14C markedly increased across all treatments regardless of CO2 availability. This coincided with increased organic matter availability (POC and PON combined with improved efficiency of carbon uptake. Changes in phytoplankton community production could have negative

  16. Mechanisms of carbon dioxide acquisition and CO2 sensing in marine diatoms: a gateway to carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Hopkinson, Brian M; Nakajima, Kensuke; Dupont, Christopher L; Tsuji, Yoshinori

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms are one of the most successful marine eukaryotic algal groups, responsible for up to 20% of the annual global CO 2 fixation. The evolution of a CO 2 -concentrating mechanism (CCM) allowed diatoms to overcome a number of serious constraints on photosynthesis in the marine environment, particularly low [CO 2 ] aq in seawater relative to concentrations required by the CO 2 fixing enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), which is partly due to the slow diffusion rate of CO 2 in water and a limited CO 2 formation rate from [Formula: see text] in seawater. Diatoms use two alternative strategies to take up dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from the environment: one primarily relies on the direct uptake of [Formula: see text] through plasma-membrane type solute carrier (SLC) 4 family [Formula: see text] transporters and the other is more reliant on passive diffusion of CO 2 formed by an external carbonic anhydrase (CA). Bicarbonate taken up into the cytoplasm is most likely then actively transported into the chloroplast stroma by SLC4-type transporters on the chloroplast membrane system. Bicarbonate in the stroma is converted into CO 2 only in close proximity to RubisCO preventing unnecessary CO 2 leakage. CAs play significant roles in mobilizing DIC as it is progressively moved towards the site of fixation. However, the evolutionary types and subcellular locations of CAs are not conserved between different diatoms, strongly suggesting that this DIC mobilization strategy likely evolved multiple times with different origins. By contrast, the recent discovery of the thylakoid luminal θ-CA indicates that the strategy to supply CO 2 to RubisCO in the pyrenoid may be very similar to that of green algae, and strongly suggests convergent coevolution in CCM function of the thylakoid lumen not only among diatoms but among eukaryotic algae in general. In this review, both experimental and corresponding theoretical models of the diatom CCMs are

  17. Guided bone regeneration with asymmetric collagen-chitosan membranes containing aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang J

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jiayu Zhang,1 Shiqing Ma,1 Zihao Liu,1 Hongjuan Geng,1 Xin Lu,1 Xi Zhang,1 Hongjie Li,1 Chenyuan Gao,2 Xu Zhang,1 Ping Gao1 1School of Dentistry, Hospital of Stomatology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, 2Beijing Laboratory of Biomedical Materials, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Introduction: Membranes allowing the sustained release of drugs that can achieve cell adhesion are very promising for guided bone regeneration. Previous studies have suggested that aspirin has the potential to promote bone regeneration. The purpose of this study was to prepare a local drug delivery system with aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (ACS contained in an asymmetric collagen-chitosan membrane (CCM. Methods: In this study, the ACS were fabricated using different concentrations of aspirin (5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 75 mg. The drug release behavior of ACS was studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to examine the micromorphology of ACS and aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles contained in chitosan-collagen membranes (ACS-CCM. In vitro bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs were cultured and critical-sized cranial defects on Sprague-Dawley rats were made to evaluate the effect of the ACS-CCM on bone regeneration.Results: Drug release behavior results of ACS showed that the nanoparticles fabricated in this study could successfully sustain the release of the drug. TEM showed the morphology of the nanoparticles. SEM images indicated that the asymmetric membrane comprised a loose collagen layer and a dense chitosan layer. In vitro studies showed that ACS-CCM could promote the proliferation of BMSCs, and that the degree of differentiated BMSCs seeded on CCMs containing 50 mg of ACS was higher than that of other membranes. Micro-computed tomography showed that 50 mg of ACS-CCM resulted in enhanced bone regeneration compared with the control group.Conclusion: This

  18. Strong signatures of high-latitude blocks and subtropical ridges in winter PM10 over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, C.; Garrido-Perez, J. M.; Garcia-Herrera, R.

    2017-12-01

    particulate matter (PM) concentrations to large-scale circulation patterns is stronger than previously reported for Europe and other mid-latitude regions. These findings can be exploited in the future to evaluate the modelled response of air quality to circulation changes within chemical transport models (CTMs) and chemistry-climate models (CCMs).

  19. A Climatology of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Types by MIPAS-Envisat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, Reinhold; Hoffmann, Lars; Griessbach, Sabine; Orr, Andrew; Höpfner, Michael; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    For Chemistry Climate Models (CCM) it is still a challenging task to properly represent the evolution of the polar vortices over the entire winter season. The models usually do not include comprehensive microphysical modules to evolve the formation of different types of polar stratospheric clouds (PSC) over the winter. Consequently, predictions on the development and recovery of the future ozone hole have relatively large uncertainties. A climatological record of hemispheric measurement of PSC types could help to better validate and improve the PSC schemes in CCMs. The Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) instrument onboard the ESA Envisat satellite operated from July 2002 to April 2012. The infra-red limb emission measurements compile a unique dataset of day and night measurements of polar stratospheric clouds up to the poles. From the spectral measurements in the 4.15-14.6 microns range it is possible to select a number of atmospheric window regions and spectral signatures to classify PSC cloud types like nitric acid hydrates, sulfuric ternary solution droplets, and ice particles. The cloud detection sensitivity is similar to space borne lidars, but MIPAS adds complementary information due to its different measurement technique (limb instead of nadir) and wavelength region. Here we will describe a new classification method for PSCs based on the combination of multiple brightness temperature differences (BTD) and colour ratios. Probability density functions (PDF) of the MIPAS measurements in conjunction with a database of radiative transfer model calculations of realistic PSC particle size distributions enable the definition of regions attributed to specific or mixed types clouds. Applying a naive bias classifier for independent criteria to all defined classes in four 2D PDF distributions, it is possible to assign the most likely PSC type to any measured cloud spectrum. Statistical Monte Carlo test have been applied to quantify

  20. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouimet Mathieu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Methods Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care. Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. Discussion This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more

  1. Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Eyring

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite of chemistry-climate models (CCMs have been analyzed. In addition to a reference simulation where anthropogenic halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODSs and greenhouse gases (GHGs vary with time, sensitivity simulations with either ODS or GHG concentrations fixed at 1960 levels were performed to disaggregate the drivers of projected ozone changes. These simulations were also used to assess the two distinct milestones of ozone returning to historical values (ozone return dates and ozone no longer being influenced by ODSs (full ozone recovery. The date of ozone returning to historical values does not indicate complete recovery from ODSs in most cases, because GHG-induced changes accelerate or decelerate ozone changes in many regions. In the upper stratosphere where CO2-induced stratospheric cooling increases ozone, full ozone recovery is projected to not likely have occurred by 2100 even though ozone returns to its 1980 or even 1960 levels well before (~2025 and 2040, respectively. In contrast, in the tropical lower stratosphere ozone decreases continuously from 1960 to 2100 due to projected increases in tropical upwelling, while by around 2040 it is already very likely that full recovery from the effects of ODSs has occurred, although ODS concentrations are still elevated by this date. In the midlatitude lower stratosphere the evolution differs from that in the tropics, and rather than a steady decrease in ozone, first a decrease in ozone is simulated from 1960 to 2000, which is then followed by a steady increase through the 21st century. Ozone in the midlatitude lower stratosphere returns to 1980 levels by ~2045 in the Northern Hemisphere (NH and by ~2055 in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, and full ozone recovery is likely reached by 2100 in both hemispheres. Overall, in all regions except the tropical lower stratosphere, full ozone recovery from ODSs occurs significantly later than the

  2. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, (16) University of Denver, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Denver, CO, USA, (17) National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA, (18) NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA, (19) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe, Germany Total column abundances of HCl and ClONO2, the primary components of the stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) budget, and of HF have been retrieved from ground-based, high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 17 sites of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) located at latitudes between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. These data extend over more than 20 years (through 2007) during a period when the growth in atmospheric halogen loading has slowed in response to the Montreal Protocol (and ammendments). These observed time series are interpreted with calculations performed with a 2-D model, the 3-D chemistry-transport models (CTMs) KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the 3-D chemistry-climate models (CCMs) EMAC and SOCOLv2.0. The observed Cly and in particular HCl column abundances decreases significantely since the end of the nineties at all stations, which is consistent with the observed changes in the halocarbon source gases, with an increasing rate in the last years. In contrast to Cly, the trend values for total column HF at the different stations show a less consistent behaviour pointing to the fact that the time development of the HF columns is peaking. There is a good overall qualitative agreement regarding trends between models and data. With respect to the CTMs the agreement improves if simulation results for measurement days only are used in the trend analysis instead of simulation results for each day.

  3. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North America and Eurasia to a

  4. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size" against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North

  5. Stratospheric changes caused by geoengineering applications: potential repercussions and uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    , larger injections might be required than previously assumed. Rasch et al. (2008) showed that smaller particles would be advantageous in terms of cooling the surface. However, with a continuous injection of sulphur dioxide into to lower tropical stratosphere aerosol size distributions with mode radii larger than 0.5 microns are likely to form. An additional complication is that the sedimenting particles tend to heat the tropical tropopause region and as a consequence the entry mixing ratio of water vapour increases. For the extreme scenario of 10 Mt/year injection SOCOL predicts an enhancement of the water vapour entry mixing ratio by more than 1 ppmv. This is predicted to have a significant impact on the radiative forcing and the total ozone, because of enhanced heterogeneous reactions and because the increased water vapour intensifies the hydrogen and chlorine catalysed ozone destruction cycles. The intense warming of the lower stratosphere further intensifies the catalytic ozone destruction cycles. Furthermore, the stratospheric circulation is predicted to change due to the strong heating of the lower stratosphere. As a consequence of the intensified meridional temperature gradient the polar vortices are strengthened with enhanced formation of polar stratospheric clouds and ozone depletion. The ozone loss due to changed stratospheric dynamic is four times larger than the ozone loss caused by the increase of aerosol surface for heterogeneous reactions, which would postpone the recovery of the ozone hole even more as already pointed out by Tilmes et al. [2008]. At the same time the uncertainties involved in the different modelling steps are tremendous. Model validation, by comparing model runs of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo eruption with observations, reveals that the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere and the tropopause region is probably overestimated by SOCOL. Other CCMs show similar behaviour. This lets us conclude that with the present modelling tools we are

  6. Uncertainties in modelling Mt. Pinatubo eruption with 2-D AER model and CCM SOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    measurements and from AER model calculation serve as input for the 3D chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL [Schraner et al., 2008]. The heating rates, calculated with SOCOL, are compared with a reference radiative transfer model LibRadtran [Mayer and Kylling, 2005]. This comparison suggests that SOCOL underestimates the net heating rate by 10-20%. In stark contrast, the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere due to absorption of longwave and near infrared radiation is overestimated by all SOCOL scenarios. This lets us conclude that SOCOL, and similarly other state-of-the-art CCMs, misrepresent processes required to model the effect of volcanic eruptions on the lower stratosphere and tropopause region. Possible reasons for model deficiencies could be too coarse vertical resolution or missing dynamical feedbacks near the tropopause and in the lower stratosphere. Another important feature is the warming of the tropical troposphere, which is present in the model simulation but was not observed with comparable amplitude in reality. The heating of the lower stratosphere in the models leads to an increase of stratospheric water vapour and influences the radiative and chemical properties of the stratosphere. Eyring, V. et al (2006), Assessment of temperature, trace species, and ozone in chemistry-climate model simulations of the recent past, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 111, D22,308. Guo, S., G. J. S. Bluth, W. I. Rose, I. M. Watson, and A. J. Prata (2004), Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 5. Mayer, B., and A. Kylling (2005), Technical note: The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations - description and examples of use, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 5, 1855-1877. McCormick, M. P. (1992), Initial assessment of the stratospheric and climatic impact of the 1991 Mount- Pinatubo eruption - prologue, Geophysical Research Letters, 19 (2