WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccms

  1. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    OpenAIRE

    H. Garny; V. Grewe; M. Dameris; G. E. Bodeker; A. Stenke

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry-climate models (CCMs) are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced ...

  2. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    OpenAIRE

    H. Garny; V. Grewe; M. Dameris; G. E. Bodeker; A. Stenke

    2011-01-01

    Chemistry-climate models (CCMs) are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth’s ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is intro...

  3. The Preparation of Capsaicin-Chitosan Microspheres (CCMS Enteric Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to research the preparation and content determination of capsaicin-chitosan microspheres (CCMS enteric coated tablets. The core tablets were prepared with the method of wet granulation. Nine formulae were designed to determine the optimal formula of the core tablet. Eudragit L100 was used to prepare the CCMS enteric-coated tablets. The effect of enteric coated formulation variables such as content of talc (10%, 25% and 40%, plasticisers (TEC and DBS, dosage of plasticiser (10%, 20% and 30% and coating weight (2%, 3% and 5% were evaluated for drug release characteristics. The in vitro release was studied using 0.1 N HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. Enteric coated tablets without ruptures or swelling behaviour over 2 h in 0.1 N HCl indicated that these tablets showed acid resistance. The accumulated release rate in phosphate buffer (pH 6.8 revealed that the prepared tablets were able to sustain drug release into the intestine and a first-order release was obtained for capsaicin. This research is the first report of the preparation and content determination of CCMS enteric coated tablets. The sustained release behavior of enteric coated formulations in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer demonstrated that it would be a potential drug delivery platform for sustained delivery of gastric irritant drugs.

  4. Proceedings of the second NATO-CCMS information meeting on dry hot rock geothermal energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, J.J. (comp.)

    1977-11-01

    A summary is presented of the second and last NATO-CCMS (North Atlantic Treaty Organization--Committee on Challenges of Modern Society) Geothermal Pilot Study Information Meeting on Dry Hot Rock Geothermal Energy. Only summaries of the formal presentations are included. Overviews of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) geothermal projects are included with emphasis on the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Project. Reports of developments in nine foreign countries and on geothermal projects in US universities are also presented.

  5. Attribution of ozone changes to dynamical and chemical processes in CCMs and CTMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Garny

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemistry-climate models (CCMs are commonly used to simulate the past and future development of Earth's ozone layer. The fully coupled chemistry schemes calculate the chemical production and destruction of ozone interactively and ozone is transported by the simulated atmospheric flow. Due to the complexity of the processes acting on ozone it is not straightforward to disentangle the influence of individual processes on the temporal development of ozone concentrations. A method is introduced here that quantifies the influence of chemistry and transport on ozone concentration changes and that is easily implemented in CCMs and chemistry-transport models (CTMs. In this method, ozone tendencies (i.e. the time rate of change of ozone are partitioned into a contribution from ozone production and destruction (chemistry and a contribution from transport of ozone (dynamics. The influence of transport on ozone in a specific region is further divided into export of ozone out of that region and import of ozone from elsewhere into that region. For this purpose, a diagnostic is used that disaggregates the ozone mixing ratio field into 9 separate fields according to in which of 9 predefined regions of the atmosphere the ozone originated. With this diagnostic the ozone mass fluxes between these regions are obtained. Furthermore, this method is used here to attribute long-term changes in ozone to chemistry and transport. The relative change in ozone from one period to another that is due to changes in production or destruction rates, or due to changes in import or export of ozone, are quantified. As such, the diagnostics introduced here can be used to attribute changes in ozone on monthly, interannual and long-term time-scales to the responsible mechanisms. Results from a CCM simulation are shown here as examples, with the main focus of the paper being on introducing the method.

  6. Model-data integration for developing the Cropland Carbon Monitoring System (CCMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. D.; Bandaru, V.; Pnvr, K.; Jin, H.; Reddy, A.; Sahajpal, R.; Sedano, F.; Skakun, S.; Wagle, P.; Gowda, P. H.; Hurtt, G. C.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Cropland Carbon Monitoring System (CCMS) has been initiated to improve regional estimates of carbon fluxes from croplands in the conterminous United States through integration of terrestrial ecosystem modeling, use of remote-sensing products and publically available datasets, and development of improved landscape and management databases. In order to develop these improved carbon flux estimates, experimental datasets are essential for evaluating the skill of estimates, characterizing the uncertainty of these estimates, characterizing parameter sensitivities, and calibrating specific modeling components. Experiments were sought that included flux tower measurement of CO2 fluxes under production of major agronomic crops. Currently data has been collected from 17 experiments comprising 117 site-years from 12 unique locations. Calibration of terrestrial ecosystem model parameters using available crop productivity and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measurements resulted in improvements in RMSE of NEE predictions of between 3.78% to 7.67%, while improvements in RMSE for yield ranged from -1.85% to 14.79%. Model sensitivities were dominated by parameters related to leaf area index (LAI) and spring growth, demonstrating considerable capacity for model improvement through development and integration of remote-sensing products. Subsequent analyses will assess the impact of such integrated approaches on skill of cropland carbon flux estimates.

  7. Intercomparison of spectral irradiance measurements and provision of alternative radiation scheme for CCMs of middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaran, Joseph; Weber, Mark; Burrows, John P.

    The Sun's radiative output (total solar irradiance or TSI) determines the thermal structure of the Earth's atmosphere. Its variability is a strong function of wavelength, which drives the photochemistry and general circulation. Contributions to TSI variability from UV wavelengths below 400 nm, i.e. 0.227-day solar rotation or 0.1to be in the 40-60three decades of UV and about a decade of vis-IR observations. Significant progress in UV/vis-IR regions has been achieved with daily monitoring from SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat (ESA) in 2002 and by SIM aboard SORCE (NASA) about a year after. In this contribution, we intercompare SSI measurements from SCIAMACHY and SIM and RGB filters of SPM/VIRGO SoHO: same (a) day and (b) few 27-day time series of spectral measurements in both irradiance and integrated irradiance over selected wavelength intervals. Finally, we show how SSI measurements from GOME, SOLSTICE, in addition to SCIAMACHY and SIM, can be modeled together with solar proxies F10.7 cm, Mg II and sunspot index (PSI) to derive daily SSI variability in the period 1947-2008. The derived variabilities are currently being used as solar input to Bremen's 3D-CTM and are to be recommended as extended alternative to Berlin's FUBRaD radiation scheme. This proxy-based radiation scheme are compared with SATIRE, NRLSSI (or Lean et al.), SUSIM, SSAI (or DeLand et al), and SIP (or Solar2000) models. The use of realistic spectrally resolved solar input to CCMs is to better understand the effects of solar variability on chemistry and temperature in the middle atmosphere over several decades.

  8. NATO/CCMS pilot project: Risk assessment for accidental pollution related to the maritime transport of harmful substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melguen, M.

    1992-01-01

    The NATO/CCMS Workshop on open-quotes Risk Assessment for Accidental Pollution Related to the Maritime Transport of Harmful Substancesclose quotes which took place at CEDRE in 1991 was a follow-up to the workshops which took place in 1987 and 1989. It was the direct continuation of work accomplished during the first two seminars and covered the following topics: Improvement and Intercomparison of Models: elaboration of the list of indispensable parameters for modeling slick movements analysis and integration of the physico-chemical processes studied at sea. Model Validation: release of bulk chemicals drift of drums and containers of toxic substances. Risk Assessment for Man and the Environment: development and adaptation of Help-in-Decision-Making System (ex: CAMEO, MORGANE, etc.) means for rapid, on-site detection (including the advanced Canadian know how in this domains). Intervention Ways and Means: experience of a rescue company; research for elements for Help-in-Decision-Making regarding the location and eventual recovery of drums and containers lost at sea

  9. Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society solar energy pilot study. First follow-up report, October 1979, pilot country: United States; co-pilot countries: Denmark and France. CCMS report No. 110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-01-01

    During 1973 to 1978, over twenty nations participated in the NATO/CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study, whose objective was to promote and accelerate the use of solar heating and cooling of buildings. The activities in this information exchange included (1) the regular reporting of national solar heating and cooling programs, (2) the development of a format for reporting the performance of solar heating and cooling systems, (3) the exchange of system performance reports, (4) the establishment of two specialized working groups for solar-assisted low energy dwellings and passive solar applications. At the conclusion of the pilot study in 1978, the participants formulated recommendations for continued action at the international level, as well as for action at the national level. This report describes the progress made in implementing those recommendations. In addition to detailing the steps taken to continue collaboration in various efforts initiated within the Solar Energy Pilot Study, the report contains papers on the 1979 status of the solar heating and cooling programs in seventeen CCMS countries.

  10. NATO CCMS Workshop on Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security (SMECS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mezzane, Daoud

    2008-01-01

    Rapid evolution of trade, cultural and human relations provides the qualitative and quantitative enhancement of international collaborations, linking the countries with different economical and technological level. Delocalization of High-Tech industry inevitably leads to development of the material science and engineering researches in emergent countries, requiring transfer of know-how, restructuration of basic research and educational networks. This book presents the contributions of participants of the Advanced Research Workshop “Smart Materials for Energy, Communications and Security” (ARW SMECS; www.smecs.ferroix.net), organized in December 2007 in Marrakech in frame of the “NATO - Science for Peace” program. The objective of this event was the attempt to overview several hot topics of material physics related with problems of modern society: transformation and storage of energy, treatment and transmission of information, environmental security issues etc., with the focus of their implementation i...

  11. 2000 Annual report NATO/CCMS Pilot Study, Clean Products and Processes (Phase I)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Molin, Christine; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2001-01-01

    on several pilot projects being implemented by participating nations and continuing to build a program of collaborative endeavors. This meeting featured a special topical seminar titled, Product Oriented Environmental Measures, which focused participants’ attention on advances in product design and use....... The meeting featured several guest lectures on significant developments in government programs, academic research and industrial applications. The report presents the ideas and views shared by the delegates and invited participants at the Copenhagen meeting. The full report can be viewed on the US EPA...

  12. Proceedings: NATO CCMS (Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society) Seminar Blue Book 159, Preservation of Flora and Fauna in Military Training Areas Held in Soesterberg, Netherlands on 28-30 November 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Zeilinge 1983. The effect of the heather beetle (Lochmea saturalis) on heather (Calluna vulgaris) as cause of mosaic patterns in heathlands. Acta Botanica ...Heathland management in th,. Netherlands scientific and social aims. Acta Botanica Neerlandica 32(3): 252. 1 1.53 EXCURSION TO THE STAKENBERC AREA ON

  13. Landslides caused by extremely heavy rainfall -----A Case Study of Typhoon Morokat, southern Taiwan 2009 Jiun-Chuan Lin Department of Geography National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, 106 E-mail: jclin@ccms.ntu.edu.tw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.

    2009-12-01

    Taiwan is an active tectonic area with abundant annual rainfall. These circumstances produce a great variety of landscapes and habitats. However, landslides and debris flows in the mountain areas caused by heavy rainfall is a typical case. Typhoon Morakot in 1996 was a typical example in Taiwan. Over a four days period between August 8-11 the Alishan weather station recorded a rainfall accumulation of 2965 mm during the typhoon. The intense rainfall caused several landslides, landslide dam and floods which were claimed for more than 500 deaths in Kaoshiung and Pington counties. This was the most severe damage caused in the last five decades. Economic losses totaled over one billion US dollars across the whole island. The research area is in Launon River, southern Taiwan. This paper will review the power and influence of Typhoon Morakot over the island of Taiwan. Morphological study demonstrates that there are several types of erosion from this event. Aerial photo and satellite images interpretation and comparison study also explains different types of hazards occurred in this typhoon event.

  14. Successful weaning of a laryngeal mask airway after a tongue-lip adhesion operation in a case with cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Chi-Yung; Ng, Yan-Yan; Peng, Chih-Yu; Hu, Jui-Ming; Chen, Suh-Jen; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Su, Pen-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) consists of severe micrognathia, glossoptosis, posterior rib-gap defects and developmental delay. It may cause upper airway obstruction andflail chest, resulting in neonatal hypoxia, and possibly death. Early airway management or surgical intervention to maintain a patent airway is critical to avoid hypoxia in CCMS patients. We report a newborn with CCMS who was successfully weaned from a laryngeal mask after undergoing a tongue-lip adhesion operation at 164 days of age.

  15. Ocular Features of Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Zoya; Taylor, Simon; Lindfield, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by micrognathia, posterior rib gaps, and secondary developmental delay. Patients often require ventilation and feeding support throughout life. We describe the first reported ophthalmic findings of CCMS and propose that defects in choroidal permeability lead to chronic macular edema and refractory aqueous misdirection syndrome. Here we discuss the medical and surgical management concerns of recurrent angle closure and raised intraocular pressure in a CCMS patient.

  16. Ex utero intrapartum treatment for an infant with cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Kei; Honda, Yoshinobu; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

    2014-08-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare disorder characterized by multiple rib abnormalities, micrognathia described as Pierre-Robin sequence, and cerebral involvement. Appropriate management of respiratory distress immediately after birth is crucial to rescue these patients. A boy, having a mother with Pierre-Robin sequence and a sister with CCMS, was diagnosed prenatally with CCMS and successfully treated with ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) at 36 weeks 6 days of gestation. EXIT would be an effective option for rescuing patients with prenatally diagnosed CCMS and preventing neonatal hypoxia. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Toward the Establishment of a Common Framework for Model Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    Proceedings of the Twenty-first NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held November 6-10 1995, in Baltimore, Maryland.......Proceedings of the Twenty-first NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held November 6-10 1995, in Baltimore, Maryland....

  18. Tools for Model Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H. R.

    1998-01-01

    Proceedings of the Twenty-Second NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held June 6-10, 1997, in Clermont-Ferrand, France.......Proceedings of the Twenty-Second NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held June 6-10, 1997, in Clermont-Ferrand, France....

  19. Development of a New Operational Air Pollution Forecast System on Regional and Urban Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.; Frohn, L. M.

    2001-01-01

    Proceedings of the Millennium NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held May 15-19 in Boulder, Colorado.......Proceedings of the Millennium NATO/CCMS International Technical Meeting on Air Pollution Modeling and Its Application, held May 15-19 in Boulder, Colorado....

  20. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Wael; Panigrahy, Ashok; Bartoletti, Stefano C

    2011-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare syndrome that includes a constellation of mandibular hypoplasia and posterior rib defects as its basic features. Additional features can include hearing loss, tracheal cartilage abnormalities, scoliosis, elbow hypoplasia, and spina bifida. Here we report two cases of CCMS and discuss the reported long-term outcome of the disease.

  1. Exclusion of MYF5, GSC, RUNX2, and TCOF1 mutation in a case of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yuh; Chiang, Chin-Lung; Ng, Yan-Yan; Chen, Suh-Jen

    2010-04-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is an uncommon multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by severe micrognathia, posterior rib-gap defects, and developmental delay. The cause of CCMS is unknown. Genes hypothesized to have a causal role in CCMS, include myogenic factor 5 (MYF5), goosecoid homeobox (GSC) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) [formerly known as core-binding factor (CBFA1)]. We report an infant with typical features of CCMS who, on prenatal ultrasound, was found to have severe micrognathia. We present the first image by three-dimensional computed tomography of posterior rib-defect, and we exclude mutations of the MYF5, GSC, RUNX2, and TCOF1 genes in our patient. Further molecular studies are needed to evaluate the cause of CCMS.

  2. A mesoporous biomaterial for biomimetic crystallization in dentinal tubules without impairing the bonding of a self-etch resin to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chih; Wang, Yin-Lin; Lin, Po-Yen; Chen, Yen-Yi; Chien, Chih-Yu; Lin, Hong-Ping; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2016-06-01

    CaCO3@mesoporous silica reacted with phosphoric acid (denoted as CCMS-HP) enables the growth of calcium phosphate crystals in dentinal tubules. This study tested whether CCMS-HP could be used to form a biomimetic barrier on the exposed dentin for prevention of dentin sensitivity without impairing the bonding of Single Bond Universal (SBU) self-etch adhesive to the dentin. Twenty-four dentin disks were prepared and divided into three groups: (1) SBU group (n = 8), in which SBU self-etch adhesive was bonded to the dentin disk directly; (2) CCMS-HP group (n = 8), in which CCMS-HP was applied onto the dentin surface; and (3) CCMS-HP/SBU group (n = 8), in which the dentin surface was first treated with CCMS-HP and then boned by SBU. The permeation depth of crystals into the dentinal tubules was examined and measured with a scanning electron microscope. The shear bonding strength of SBU and CCMS-HP/SBU to dentin was also measured. The mean crystal permeation depth was 35.8 ± 6.9 μm for the CCMS-HP/SBU group and 33.6 ± 12.2 μm for the CCMS-HP group; no significant difference was found between the two groups. Moreover, the mean shear bonding strength was 22.7 ± 6.7 MPa for the CCMS-HP/SBU group and 23.3 ± 7.0 MPa for the SBU group. There was also no significant difference between the two groups. CCMS-HP can be used to form a biomimetic barrier for prevention of dentin sensitivity because it neither impedes the bonding of SBU to dentin nor impairs the shear bonding strength between the SBU and dentin. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering and Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video

  4. Using Photogrammetry to Estimate Tank Waste Volumes from Video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) contracted with HiLine Engineering & Fabrication, Inc. to assess the accuracy of photogrammetry tools as compared to video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates. This test report documents the results of using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste in tank 241-C-I04 from post-retrieval videos and results using photogrammetry to estimate the volume of waste piles in the CCMS test video.

  5. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Catherine A.; Wootton, J. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  6. Functional Traits for Carbon Access in Macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, Courtney C; Pfister, Catherine A; Wootton, J Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Understanding functional trait distributions among organisms can inform impacts on and responses to environmental change. In marine systems, only 1% of dissolved inorganic carbon in seawater exists as CO2. Thus the majority of marine macrophytes not only passively access CO2 for photosynthesis, but also actively transport CO2 and the more common bicarbonate (HCO3-, 92% of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon) into their cells. Because species with these carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) are non-randomly distributed in ecosystems, we ask whether there is a phylogenetic pattern to the distribution of CCMs among algal species. To determine macrophyte traits that influence carbon uptake, we assessed 40 common macrophyte species from the rocky intertidal community of the Northeast Pacific Ocean to a) query whether macrophytes have a CCM and b) determine the evolutionary history of CCMs, using ancestral state reconstructions and stochastic character mapping based on previously published data. Thirty-two species not only depleted CO2, but also concentrated and depleted HCO3-, indicative of a CCM. While analysis of CCMs as a continuous trait in 30 families within Phylum Rhodophyta showed a significant phylogenetic signal under a Brownian motion model, analysis of CCMs as a discrete trait (presence or absence) indicated that red algal families are more divergent than expected in their CCM presence or absence; CCMs are a labile trait within the Rhodophyta. In contrast, CCMs were present in each of 18 Ochrophyta families surveyed, indicating that CCMs are highly conserved in the brown algae. The trait of CCM presence or absence was largely conserved within Families. Fifteen of 23 species tested also changed the seawater buffering capacity, or Total Alkalinity (TA), shifting DIC composition towards increasing concentrations of HCO3- and CO2 for photosynthesis. Manipulating the external TA of the local environment may influence carbon availability in boundary layers and

  7. Progress and challenges of engineering a biophysical CO2-concentrating mechanism into higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Benjamin D; Long, Benedict M; Förster, Britta; Nguyen, Nghiem D; Velanis, Christos N; Atkinson, Nicky; Hee, Wei Yih; Mukherjee, Bratati; Price, G Dean; McCormick, Alistair J

    2017-06-01

    Growth and productivity in important crop plants is limited by the inefficiencies of the C3 photosynthetic pathway. Introducing CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into C3 plants could overcome these limitations and lead to increased yields. Many unicellular microautotrophs, such as cyanobacteria and green algae, possess highly efficient biophysical CCMs that increase CO2 concentrations around the primary carboxylase enzyme, Rubisco, to enhance CO2 assimilation rates. Algal and cyanobacterial CCMs utilize distinct molecular components, but share several functional commonalities. Here we outline the recent progress and current challenges of engineering biophysical CCMs into C3 plants. We review the predicted requirements for a functional biophysical CCM based on current knowledge of cyanobacterial and algal CCMs, the molecular engineering tools and research pipelines required to translate our theoretical knowledge into practice, and the current challenges to achieving these goals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Ecological imperatives for aquatic CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2017-06-01

    In aquatic environments, the concentration of inorganic carbon is spatially and temporally variable and CO2 can be substantially oversaturated or depleted. Depletion of CO2 plus low rates of diffusion cause inorganic carbon to be more limiting in aquatic than terrestrial environments, and the frequency of species with a CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and their contribution to productivity, is correspondingly greater. Aquatic photoautotrophs may have biochemical or biophysical CCMs and exploit CO2 from the sediment or the atmosphere. Though partly constrained by phylogeny, CCM activity is related to environmental conditions. CCMs are absent or down-regulated when their increased energy costs, lower CO2 affinity, or altered mineral requirements outweigh their benefits. Aquatic CCMs are most widespread in environments with low CO2, high HCO3-, high pH, and high light. Freshwater species are generally less effective at inorganic carbon removal than marine species, but have a greater range of ability to remove carbon, matching the environmental variability in carbon availability. The diversity of CCMs in seagrasses and marine phytoplankton, and detailed mechanistic studies on larger aquatic photoautotrophs are understudied. Strengthening the links between ecology and CCMs will increase our understanding of the mechanisms underlying ecological success and will place mechanistic studies in a clearer ecological context. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The possible evolution and future of CO2-concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John; Sánchez-Baracaldo, Patricia

    2017-06-01

    CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs), based either on active transport of inorganic carbon (biophysical CCMs) or on biochemistry involving supplementary carbon fixation into C4 acids (C4 and CAM), play a major role in global primary productivity. However, the ubiquitous CO2-fixing enzyme in autotrophs, Rubisco, evolved at a time when atmospheric CO2 levels were very much higher than today and O2 was very low and, as CO2 and O2 approached (by no means monotonically), today's levels, at some time subsequently many organisms evolved a CCM that increased the supply of CO2 and decreased Rubisco oxygenase activity. Given that CO2 levels and other environmental factors have altered considerably between when autotrophs evolved and the present day, and are predicted to continue to change into the future, we here examine the drivers for, and possible timing of, evolution of CCMs. CCMs probably evolved when CO2 fell to 2-16 times the present atmospheric level, depending on Rubisco kinetics. We also assess the effects of other key environmental factors such as temperature and nutrient levels on CCM activity and examine the evidence for evolutionary changes in CCM activity and related cellular processes as well as limitations on continuity of CCMs through environmental variations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. NGNP Composites R and D Technical Issues Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R and D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R and D program need further assessment.

  11. NGNP Composites R&D Technical Issues Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AREVA Federal Services

    2008-09-01

    This study identifies potential applications and design requirements for ceramic materials (CMs) and ceramic composite materials (CCMs) in the NGNP hightemperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) primary circuit. Components anticipated for fabrication from non-graphite CMs and CCMs are identified along with recommended normal and off-normal operating conditions. The evaluation defines required dimensions and material properties of the candidate materials for normal operating conditions (NOC), anticipated transients, abnormal events, and design basis events. The report also identifies additional activities required for codifying the selected materials. The activities include ASTM Standard and ASME Code development and other work to support NRC licensing of the plant. Evaluation of the NGNP baseline design indicates components requiring either CMs or CCMs depend upon the reactor operating temperatures. For a reactor outlet temperature of 900 oC, four of the five evaluated components would benefit from either CMs or CCMs. Although some thermal and mechanical data exist for most of the candidate materials, they all need additional irradiation, thermal, and mechanical testing. The codification process must take into account the type of material and the geometry of components using either CMs or CCMs. The process requires close integration of the design and the research and development (R&D) program, which has already started by using preliminary control rod component designs as the basis for establishing specimen geometry and test conditions. The remaining time and budget for completing the R&D program need further assessment.

  12. Mutations in SNRPB, encoding components of the core splicing machinery, cause cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacrot, Séverine; Doyard, Mathilde; Huber, Céline; Alibeu, Olivier; Feldhahn, Niklas; Lehalle, Daphné; Lacombe, Didier; Marlin, Sandrine; Nitschke, Patrick; Petit, Florence; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2015-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a developmental disorder characterized by the association of Pierre Robin sequence and posterior rib defects. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing in five unrelated CCMS patients revealed five heterozygous variants in the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein polypeptides B and B1 (SNRPB) gene. This gene includes three transcripts, namely transcripts 1 and 2, encoding components of the core spliceosomal machinery (SmB' and SmB) and transcript 3 undergoing nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. All variants were located in the premature termination codon (PTC)-introducing alternative exon of transcript 3. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed a significant increase in transcript 3 levels in leukocytes of CCMS individuals compared to controls. We conclude that CCMS is due to heterozygous mutations in SNRPB, enhancing inclusion of a SNRPB PTC-introducing alternative exon, and show that this developmental disease is caused by defects in the splicing machinery. Our finding confirms the report of SNRPB mutations in CCMS patients by Lynch et al. (2014) and further extends the clinical and molecular observations. © 2014 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  13. Contribution of different processes to changes in tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in chemistry–climate models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Smalley

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Variations in tropical lower-stratospheric humidity influence both the chemistry and climate of the atmosphere. We analyze tropical lower-stratospheric water vapor in 21st century simulations from 12 state-of-the-art chemistry–climate models (CCMs, using a linear regression model to determine the factors driving the trends and variability. Within CCMs, warming of the troposphere primarily drives the long-term trend in stratospheric humidity. This is partially offset in most CCMs by an increase in the strength of the Brewer–Dobson circulation, which tends to cool the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. We also apply the regression model to individual decades from the 21st century CCM runs and compare them to a regression of a decade of observations. Many of the CCMs, but not all, compare well with these observations, lending credibility to their predictions. One notable deficiency is that most CCMs underestimate the impact of the quasi-biennial oscillation on lower-stratospheric water vapor. Our analysis provides a new and potentially superior way to evaluate model trends in lower-stratospheric humidity.

  14. CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION COEXISTING WITH PITUITARY ADENOMA, HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND MENTAL ILLNESS: FIRST CASE REPORT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Guido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCMs are vascular lesions involving brain capillaries. They may occur sporadically or be inherited as autosomal dominant character. Due to incomplete penetrance, CCMs incidence is underestimated and, overall sporadic cases, are often accidentally diagnosed. Rarely CCMs are linked to other pathological conditions. Here we present the first case in literature of a young woman affected by sporadic CCM, pituitary adenoma, Hashimoto thyroiditis and mental illness of unknown etiology. Symptoms’ analysis suggests that she may suffer of Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE, a condition that in very few cases develops together with Hashimoto thyroiditis. Genetic bases of HE are still unknown and symptomatology is very heterogeneous. This paper is a preliminary report of the case and is focused on complexity of clinical manifestations that makes the diagnosis uncertain. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by further analysis, our aim will be to clarify genetic causes of HE.

  15. Supplementation with cumulus cell masses improves the in vitro meiotic competence of porcine cumulus-oocytes complexes derived from small follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, R; Funahashi, H

    2017-08-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the supplemented effect of cumulus cell masses (CCMs) derived from middle follicle (MF; 3-6 mm diameter) on the morphology and the meiotic or developmental competence of oocytes from small follicles (SF; 1-2 mm diameter). The number of cumulus cells surrounding oocytes just after collection was also lower in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) from SF than MF. The ooplasmic diameter of oocytes was significantly smaller in SF-derived oocytes than MF-derived ones before and after in vitro maturation (IVM), whereas the diameter significantly increased during the culture. Co-culture of SF-derived COCs with MF-derived CCMs during IVM significantly improved the meiotic competence of the oocytes to the metaphase-II stage. Furthermore, the ooplasmic diameter of SF-derived COCs during IVM was increased to the similar size of MF-derived those in the presence of MF-derived CCMs. The abilities of oocytes to be penetrated, to form male pronuclear formation and to cleave or develop to the blastocyst stage were not affected by the co-culture with CCMs. Electrophoretic analysis of CCM secretions clearly showed the presence of more protein(s) approximately 27.6 kDa in the conditioned medium when supplemented with MF-derived CCMs. In conclusion, we demonstrate that supplementation with MF-derived CCMs improves the ooplasmic diameter and meiotic competence of SF-derived oocytes. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. First large genomic inversion in familial cerebral cavernous malformation identified by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegler, Stefanie; Rath, Matthias; Hoffjan, Sabine; Dammann, Philipp; Sure, Ulrich; Pagenstecher, Axel; Strom, Tim; Felbor, Ute

    2018-01-01

    Familial cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) predispose to seizures and hemorrhagic stroke. Molecular genetic analyses of CCM1, CCM2, and CCM3 result in a mutation detection rate of up to 98%. However, only whole genome sequencing (WGS) in combination with the Manta algorithm for analyses of structural variants revealed a heterozygous 24 kB inversion including exon 1 of CCM2 in a 12-year-old boy with familial CCMs. Its breakpoints were fine-mapped, and quantitative analysis on RNA confirmed reduced CCM2 expression. Our data expand the spectrum of CCM mutations and indicate that the existence of a fourth CCM disease gene is rather unlikely.

  17. Solar-assisted low energy dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbensen, T V

    1980-02-01

    The Zero Energy House Group was formed as a subproject of the CCMS Solar Energy Pilot Study in 1974 by seven participating countries experimenting with solar-assisted low-energy dwellings for temperate and northern European climatic conditions. A Zero Energy House is one in which solar energy is used to meet the reduced energy needs of buildings incorporating various thermal energy conservation features. This final report of the Zero Energy House Group includes brief descriptions of 13 major low-energy dwellings in the participating CCMS countries. An overall assessment of the state-of-the-art in solar-assisted low-energy dwellings is also included.

  18. 3D Viewer Platform of Cloud Clustering Management System: Google Map 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Ja; Lee, Gang-Soo

    The new management system of framework for cloud envrionemnt is needed by the platfrom of convergence according to computing environments of changes. A ISV and small business model is hard to adapt management system of platform which is offered from super business. This article suggest the clustering management system of cloud computing envirionments for ISV and a man of enterprise in small business model. It applies the 3D viewer adapt from map3D & earth of google. It is called 3DV_CCMS as expand the CCMS[1].

  19. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan; Muthialu, Nagarajan

    2014-01-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  20. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Calder, Alistair Duncan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Muthialu, Nagarajan [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Cardiothoracic surgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects (''rib gaps''). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia. (orig.)

  1. Multi-detector thoracic CT findings in cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: rib gaps and failure of costo-vertebral separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Tom Anthony; Arthurs, Owen John; Muthialu, Nagarajan; Calder, Alistair Duncan

    2014-02-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) describes a triad of mandibular hypoplasia, brain dysfunction and posterior rib defects ("rib gaps"). We present the CT imaging for a 2-year-old girl with CCMS that highlights the rib gap defects and shows absent transverse processes with abnormal fusion of the ribs directly to the vertebral bodies. We argue that this is likely to relate to abnormal lateral sclerotome development in embryology, with the failure of normal costo-vertebral junctions compounding impaired thoracic function. The case also highlights the use of CT for specific indications in skeletal dysplasia.

  2. In Synechococcus sp competition for energy between assimilation and acquisition of C and those of N only occurs when growth is light limited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ruan, Z.; Raven, J. A.; Giordano, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 14 (2017), s. 3829-3839 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ammonium * CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) * cyanobacteria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  3. An overview of online implementable SOC estimation methods for Lithium-ion batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinhao, Meng; Ricco, Mattia; Guangzhao, Luo

    2017-01-01

    . Many different SOC estimation methods have been proposed in the literature. However, only few of them consider the real-time applicability. This paper reviews the recently proposed online SOC estimation methods and classifies them into five categories, that is, Coulomb Counting methods (CCMs), Open...

  4. Vascular permeability in cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikati, Abdul G; Khanna, Omaditya; Zhang, Lingjiao

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the familial form of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are haploinsufficient for the CCM1, CCM2, or CCM3 gene. Loss of corresponding CCM proteins increases RhoA kinase-mediated endothelial permeability in vitro, and in mouse brains in vivo. A prospective case-controlled observ...

  5. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerkes, Erica H.; Fock, J. M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; van Belzen, M. J.; van der Lans, C. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Fakkert, I. E.; Smith, M.J.; Evans, D. G.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are

  6. Effects of safety warnings on prescription rates of cough and cold medicines in children below 2 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.F. Sen (Fatma); K.M.C. Verhamme (Katia); M. Felisi (Mariagrazia); G.W. 't Jong (Geert); C. Giaquinto (Carlo); G. Picelli (Gino); A. Ceci (Adriana); M.C.J.M. Sturkenboom (Miriam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAIM: The aim of the study was to assess the influence of national and international warnings on the prescription rates of cough and cold medicines (CCMs) in the youngest children (<2 years) in the Netherlands and Italy. METHODS: Analysis of outpatient electronic medical records of

  7. 77 FR 16805 - Notice of Request for Extension and Revision of a Currently Approved Information Collection...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... collection regarding both its Consumer Complaint Monitoring System (CCMS) web portal and its electronic Food..., the Agency has put an electronic questionnaire on its web site. The questionnaire solicits information... burden time for these two systems is 513 hours. Copies of this information collection assessment can be...

  8. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: prognosis and proposal for classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Kohno, Yoshinori

    2010-09-01

    Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a very rare syndrome characterized by micrognathia and posterior rib gap, with a poor prognosis. To date, only 75 cases have been reported worldwide. The overall survival rate for patients with this disorder has not been reported, and a classification of the patients on the basis of the prognosis is not yet available. The present study analyzed the figures and prognoses of past patients and documented a new case of CCMS. Formerly published case reports and personal communications were used to reveal the prognosis and classification of CCMS. The occurrence ratios of rib gap defects and of missing ribs were examined. Patients were divided into the following three groups according to their life span: lethal type, where the patients died before 1 month; severe type, where the patients lived for 1-12 months; and mild type, where they survived for more than 1 year. A comparison was made of the number of rib gaps, missing ribs, and the rib gap ratio (defined as the number of rib gaps divided by the number of all existing ribs) among these three groups. A significant difference in the number of rib defects between the lethal type and other types was noted. Short life span of severe type patients, compared to mild type, was attributed to their subjection to severe respiratory infection. CCMS can be classified into three categories--lethal, severe, and mild--according to the severity of the symptoms and prognosis.

  9. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotz, FB; vanEssen, AJ; Bosschaart, AN; Bos, AP

    1996-01-01

    We describe two boys with the cerebro-costomandibular syndrome (CCMS). Both patients presented with Pierre Robin anomaly and respiratory insufficiency and died 12 hours and 10 months after birth. The first boy had muscular hypotonia, severe micrognathia, glossoptosis, short; palate, preauricular

  11. Interactive Palliative and End-of-Life Care Modules for Pediatric Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindy K. Ross

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a need for increased palliative care training during pediatric residency. Objective. In this pilot study, we created a comprehensive experiential model to teach palliative care skills to pediatric residents. Our Comfort Care Modules (CCMs address pediatric palliative care (PPC topics of breaking bad news, dyspnea, anxiety, pain management, and the dying child. We also evaluated a scoring system and gathered qualitative data. Methods. The CCMs are part of the University of California San Diego pediatric residency’s second-year curriculum. Comparisons were made for statistical trends between residents exposed to the modules (n=15 and those not exposed (n=4. Results. Nineteen of 36 residents (52% completed surveys to self-rate their preparedness, knowledge, and confidence about PPC before and after the intervention. Resident scores increased in all areas. All improvements reached statistical significance except confidence when breaking bad news. Overall, the resident feedback about the CCMs was positive. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that the CCMs can be performed effectively in an academic setting and can benefit residents’ self-perception of preparedness, confidence, and knowledge about pediatric palliative care. In the future, we plan to implement the modules on a larger scale. We encourage their use in interprofessional settings and across institutions.

  12. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guang; Liu, Yameng; Li, Xinshu; Feng, Zhihua; Xu, Juntian

    2016-01-01

    Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC) and elevated (HC) CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA) and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  13. An Ocean Acidification Acclimatised Green Tide Alga Is Robust to Changes of Seawater Carbon Chemistry but Vulnerable to Light Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Gao

    Full Text Available Ulva is the dominant genus in the green tide events and is considered to have efficient CO2 concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. However, little is understood regarding the impacts of ocean acidification on the CCMs of Ulva and the consequences of thalli's acclimation to ocean acidification in terms of responding to environmental factors. Here, we grew a cosmopolitan green alga, Ulva linza at ambient (LC and elevated (HC CO2 levels and investigated the alteration of CCMs in U. linza grown at HC and its responses to the changed seawater carbon chemistry and light intensity. The inhibitors experiment for photosynthetic inorganic carbon utilization demonstrated that acidic compartments, extracellular carbonic anhydrase (CA and intracellular CA worked together in the thalli grown at LC and the acquisition of exogenous carbon source in the thalli could be attributed to the collaboration of acidic compartments and extracellular CA. Contrastingly, when U. linza was grown at HC, extracellular CA was completely inhibited, acidic compartments and intracellular CA were also down-regulated to different extents and thus the acquisition of exogenous carbon source solely relied on acidic compartments. The down-regulated CCMs in U. linza did not affect its responses to changes of seawater carbon chemistry but led to a decrease of net photosynthetic rate when thalli were exposed to increased light intensity. This decrease could be attributed to photodamage caused by the combination of the saved energy due to the down-regulated CCMs and high light intensity. Our findings suggest future ocean acidification might impose depressing effects on green tide events when combined with increased light exposure.

  14. Impacts of Climate Change on Surface Ozone and Intercontinental Ozone Pollution: A Multi-Model Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, R. M.; Wild, O.; Shindell, D. T.; Zeng, G.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Collins, W. J.; Fiore, A. M.; Stevenson, D. S.; Dentener, F. J.; Schultz, M. G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    The impact of climate change between 2000 and 2095 SRES A2 climates on surface ozone (O)3 and on O3 source-receptor (S-R) relationships is quantified using three coupled climate-chemistry models (CCMs). The CCMs exhibit considerable variability in the spatial extent and location of surface O3 increases that occur within parts of high NOx emission source regions (up to 6 ppbv in the annual average and up to 14 ppbv in the season of maximum O3). In these source regions, all three CCMs show a positive relationship between surface O3 change and temperature change. Sensitivity simulations show that a combination of three individual chemical processes-(i) enhanced PAN decomposition, (ii) higher water vapor concentrations, and (iii) enhanced isoprene emission-largely reproduces the global spatial pattern of annual-mean surface O3 response due to climate change (R2 = 0.52). Changes in climate are found to exert a stronger control on the annual-mean surface O3 response through changes in climate-sensitive O3 chemistry than through changes in transport as evaluated from idealized CO-like tracer concentrations. All three CCMs exhibit a similar spatial pattern of annual-mean surface O3 change to 20% regional O3 precursor emission reductions under future climate compared to the same emission reductions applied under present-day climate. The surface O3 response to emission reductions is larger over the source region and smaller downwind in the future than under present-day conditions. All three CCMs show areas within Europe where regional emission reductions larger than 20% are required to compensate climate change impacts on annual-mean surface O3.

  15. The effect of climate and climate change on ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla

    2013-01-01

    to reduce uncertainties are therefore highly relevant. It is therefore recommended that both CCMs and CTMs implement a dynamical methodology for simulating ammonia emissions in a similar way as for biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOCs) – a method that has been used for more than a decade in CTMs......Abstract. We present here a dynamical method for modelling temporal and geographical variations in ammonia emissions in regional-scale chemistry transport models (CTMs) and chemistry climate models (CCMs). The method is based on the meteorology in the models and gridded inventories. We use...... the dynamical method to investigate the spatiotemporal variability of ammonia emissions across part of Europe and study how these emissions are related to geographical and year-to-year variations in atmospheric temperature alone. For simplicity we focus on the emission from a storage facility related...

  16. Adverse events associated with opioid-containing cough and cold medications in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M; Reynolds, Kate M; Green, Jody L

    2018-04-10

    Until recently most of the scrutiny of opioid-containing cough and cold medications (CCMs) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was focused on codeine, only recently shifting equal focus to those containing hydrocodone. We characterized adverse events (AEs) in children Dictionary for Regulatory Activities with preferred terms reported. One hundred and fourteen of the 7035 (2%) cases reviewed involved an opioid-containing product. Ninety-eight cases involved an AE at least potentially related to the opioid ingredient (38 (39%) codeine; 60 (61%) hydrocodone). All three fatality cases involved hydrocodone with an antihistamine. Among non-fatalities, somnolence, lethargy, and/or respiratory depression were more commonly reported among hydrocodone cases than codeine cases (86% vs. 61%; p = .005). These safety surveillance data support the FDA's expanded label changes limiting opioid CCMs for children.

  17. Photogrammetry and Laser Imagery Tests for Tank Waste Volume Estimates: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Jim G. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-03-27

    Feasibility tests were conducted using photogrammetry and laser technologies to estimate the volume of waste in a tank. These technologies were compared with video Camera/CAD Modeling System (CCMS) estimates; the current method used for post-retrieval waste volume estimates. This report summarizes test results and presents recommendations for further development and deployment of technologies to provide more accurate and faster waste volume estimates in support of tank retrieval and closure.

  18. The ins and outs of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3(-). The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3(-) use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3(-) active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3(-) can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3(-) pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3(-). Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. The ins and outs of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A.; Beardall, John

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to distinguish influx and efflux of inorganic C in photosynthesizing tissues; this article examines what is known and where there are gaps in knowledge. Irreversible decarboxylases produce CO2, and CO2 is the substrate/product of enzymes that act as carboxylases and decarboxylases. Some irreversible carboxylases use CO2; others use HCO3 –. The relative role of permeation through the lipid bilayer versus movement through CO2-selective membrane proteins in the downhill, non-energized, movement of CO2 is not clear. Passive permeation explains most CO2 entry, including terrestrial and aquatic organisms with C3 physiology and biochemistry, terrestrial C4 plants and all crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) plants, as well as being part of some mechanisms of HCO3 – use in CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) function, although further work is needed to test the mechanism in some cases. However, there is some evidence of active CO2 influx at the plasmalemma of algae. HCO3 – active influx at the plasmalemma underlies all cyanobacterial and some algal CCMs. HCO3 – can also enter some algal chloroplasts, probably as part of a CCM. The high intracellular CO2 and HCO3 – pools consequent upon CCMs result in leakage involving CO2, and occasionally HCO3 –. Leakage from cyanobacterial and microalgal CCMs involves up to half, but sometimes more, of the gross inorganic C entering in the CCM; leakage from terrestrial C4 plants is lower in most environments. Little is known of leakage from other organisms with CCMs, though given the leakage better-examined organisms, leakage occurs and increases the energetic cost of net carbon assimilation. PMID:26466660

  20. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening

    OpenAIRE

    Gerkes, Erica H.; Fock, J. M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; van Belzen, M. J.; van der Lans, C. A.; Hoving, Eelco W.; Fakkert, I. E.; Smith, M.J.; Evans, D. G.; Olderode-Berends, M. J. W.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are causative, giving rise to an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. We report on an extended family with a pediatric CCM patient and an adult CCM patient and several asymptomatic relatives carrying a germl...

  1. Probing platinum degradation in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Martin, Zulima; West, Marcia; Kundu, Sumit; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Stumper, Jürgen; Susac, Darija; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2012-04-14

    Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy (STXM) was used to characterize the local chemical environment at and around the platinum particles in the membrane (PTIM) which form in operationally tested (end-of-life, EOL) catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEM-FC). The band of metallic Pt particles in operationally tested CCM membranes was imaged using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The cathode catalyst layer in the beginning-of-life (BOL) CCMs was fabricated using commercially available catalysts created from Pt precursors with and without nitrogen containing ligands. The surface composition of these catalyst powders was measured by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The local chemical environment of the PTIM in EOL CCMs was found to be directly related to the Pt precursor used in CCM fabrication. STXM chemical mapping at the N 1s edge revealed a characteristic spectrum at and around the dendritic Pt particles in CCMs fabricated with nitrogen containing Pt-precursors. This N 1s spectrum was identical to that of the cathode and different from the membrane. For CCM samples fabricated without nitrogen containing Pt-precursors the N 1s spectrum at the Pt particles was indistinguishable from that of the adjacent membrane. We interpret these observations to indicate that nitrogenous ligands in the nitrogen containing precursors, or decomposition product(s) from that source, are transported together with the dissolved Pt from the cathode into the membrane as a result of the catalyst degradation process. This places constraints on possible mechanisms for the PTIM band formation process.

  2. SWIFT: Semi-empirical and numerically efficient stratospheric ozone chemistry for global climate models

    OpenAIRE

    Kreyling, Daniel; Wohltmann, Ingo; Lehmann, Ralph; Rex, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The SWIFT model is a fast yet accurate chemistry scheme for calculating the chemistry of stratospheric ozone. It is mainly intended for use in Global Climate Models (GCMs), Chemistry Climate Models (CCMs) and Earth System Models (ESMs). For computing time reasons these models often do not employ full stratospheric chem- istry modules, but use prescribed ozone instead. This can lead to insufficient representation between stratosphere and troposphere. The SWIFT stratospheric ozone chem...

  3. Technical Management for Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of an 'instrument' for the optimization of the functionality and conservation of tertiary buildings. This technique has several different names: Building Automation Systems (BAS), Central Control and Monitoring System (CCMS) in English, and Gestion Technique du Bâtiment' (GTB) or Gestion Technique Centralisée (GTC) in French. With this technique it is possible to manage all the functions of a building, it is a modern instrument that introduces the concept of 'auto...

  4. Evolution of photorespiration from cyanobacteria to land plants, considering protein phylogenies and acquisition of carbon concentrating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Martin; Kern, Ramona; Maurino, Veronica G; Hanson, David T; Weber, Andreas P M; Sage, Rowan F; Bauwe, Hermann

    2016-05-01

    Photorespiration and oxygenic photosynthesis are intimately linked processes. It has been shown that under the present day atmospheric conditions cyanobacteria and all eukaryotic phototrophs need functional photorespiration to grow autotrophically. The question arises as to when this essential partnership evolved, i.e. can we assume a coevolution of both processes from the beginning or did photorespiration evolve later to compensate for the generation of 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG) due to Rubisco's oxygenase reaction? This question is mainly discussed here using phylogenetic analysis of proteins involved in the 2PG metabolism and the acquisition of different carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). The phylogenies revealed that the enzymes involved in the photorespiration of vascular plants have diverse origins, with some proteins acquired from cyanobacteria as ancestors of the chloroplasts and others from heterotrophic bacteria as ancestors of mitochondria in the plant cell. Only phosphoglycolate phosphatase was found to originate from Archaea. Notably glaucophyte algae, the earliest branching lineage of Archaeplastida, contain more photorespiratory enzymes of cyanobacterial origin than other algal lineages or land plants indicating a larger initial contribution of cyanobacterial-derived proteins to eukaryotic photorespiration. The acquisition of CCMs is discussed as a proxy for assessing the timing of periods when photorespiratory activity may have been enhanced. The existence of CCMs also had marked influence on the structure and function of photorespiration. Here, we discuss evidence for an early and continuous coevolution of photorespiration, CCMs and photosynthesis starting from cyanobacteria via algae, to land plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration on photosynthesis and growth of micro- and macro-algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, HongYan; Zou, DingHui; Gao, KunShan

    2008-12-01

    Marine photosynthesis drives the oceanic biological CO(2) pump to absorb CO(2) from the atmosphere, which sinks more than one third of the industry-originated CO(2) into the ocean. The increasing atmospheric CO(2) and subsequent rise of pCO(2) in seawater, which alters the carbonate system and related chemical reactions and results in lower pH and higher HCO(3) (-) concentration, affect photosynthetic CO(2) fixation processes of phytoplanktonic and macroalgal species in direct and/or indirect ways. Although many unicellular and multicellular species can operate CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) to utilize the large HCO(3) (-) pool in seawater, enriched CO(2) up to several times the present atmospheric level has been shown to enhance photosynthesis and growth of both phytoplanktonic and macro-species that have less capacity of CCMs. Even for species that operate active CCMs and those whose photosynthesis is not limited by CO(2) in seawater, increased CO(2) levels can down-regulate their CCMs and therefore enhance their growth under light-limiting conditions (at higher CO(2) levels, less light energy is required to drive CCM). Altered physiological performances under high-CO(2) conditions may cause genetic alteration in view of adaptation over long time scale. Marine algae may adapt to a high CO(2) oceanic environment so that the evolved communities in future are likely to be genetically different from the contemporary communities. However, most of the previous studies have been carried out under indoor conditions without considering the acidifying effects on seawater by increased CO(2) and other interacting environmental factors, and little has been documented so far to explain how physiology of marine primary producers performs in a high-CO(2) and low-pH ocean.

  6. Disease: H01843 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H01843 Cerebrocostomandibular syndrome Cerebrocostomandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a...liosis. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps, and abnormal costo-tr... with rib dysplasia: cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. ... JOURNAL ... Arch Dis Chil...eosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. ... JOURNAL ... Nat Commun 5:4483 (2014) DOI:10.1038/ncomms5483

  7. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)–photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. The high CO2 and (initially) O2-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO2 decreased and O2 increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO2 affinity and CO2/O2 selectivity correlated with decreased CO2-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco–PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO2 episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO2 episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO2 ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  8. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    P. De Barbaro and J. Mans.

    2013-01-01

      After the successful operation of the HCAL sub-detector during the proton-proton run in 2012 and heavy-ion run at the beginning of 2013, the group is now focusing on the following four LS1 tasks: ·       Replacement of present, thick-window, single-anode photomultipliers on HF with new, thin-window, multi-anode PMTs. The replacement of photomultipliers will reduce rate of punch-through window hits. All needed PMTs and baseboards have been delivered to CERN. A quality control station has been set up in B904. ·       Replacement of boards responsible for clock distribution in all HBHE and HO Clock and Control Modules (CCMs).  CCMs reside in each Readout Box and are only accessible when the CMS detector is open.  The installation of new CCMs will allow us to eliminate data loss caused by single-event upsets (SEUs) experienced during the 2011&ndash...

  9. POSSIBLE RELATED FUNCTIONS OF THE NON-HOMOLOGOUS CO-REGULATED GENE PAIR PDCD10 AND SERPINI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Scimone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression in mammalians is a very finely controlled mechanism, and bidirectional promoters can be considered one of the most compelling examples of the accuracy of genic expression coordination. As recently reported, a bidirectional promoter regulates the expression of the PDCD10(whose mutations cause familial Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCMs and SERPINI1 gene pair, even though they are non-homologous genes. The aim of this study was to identify any potential common roles of these two coregulated genes. An in-silico approach was used to identify functional correlations, using the BioGraph, IPA® and Cytoscape tools and the KEGG pathway database. The results obtained show that PDCD10 and SERPINI1 may co-regulate some cellular processes, particularly those related to focal adhesion maintenance. All common pathways identified for PDCD10 and SERPINI1 are closely associated with the pathogenic characteristics of CCMs; we thus hypothesize that genes involved in these networks may contribute to the development of CCMs.

  10. A mesoporous silica biomaterial for dental biomimetic crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Hong-Ping; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Tang, Hsin-Yen; Yen, Wei-Ching; Lin, Po-Yen; Chang, Kei-Wen; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2014-12-23

    The loss of overlying enamel or cementum exposes dentinal tubules and increases the risk of several dental diseases, such as dentin hypersensitivity (causing sharp pain and anxiety), caries, and pulp inflammation. This paper presents a fast-reacting, more reliable and biocompatible biomaterial that effectively occludes exposed dentinal tubules by forming a biomimetic crystalline dentin barrier. To generate this biomaterial, a gelatin-templated mesoporous silica biomaterial (CaCO3@mesoporous silica, CCMS) containing nanosized calcium carbonate particles is mixed with 30% H3PO4 at a 1/1 molar ratio of Ca/P (denoted as CCMS-HP), which enables Ca2+ and PO4(3-)/HPO4(2-) ions to permeate the dentinal tubules and form dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), tricalcium phosphate (TCP) or hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals at a depth of approximately 40 μm (sub-μ-CT and nano-SEM/EDS examinations). In vitro biocompatibility tests (WST-1 and lactate dehydrogenase) and ALP assays show high cell viability and mineralization ability in a transwell dentin disc model treated with CCMS-HP (pcrystal growth (DCPD, TCP or HAp-like) and no pulp irritation after 70 days (pcrystals within dentinal tubules. These findings demonstrate that the mesoporous silica biomaterials presented here have great potential for serving as both a catalyst and carrier in the repair or regeneration of dental hard tissue.

  11. Modelling an advanced ManPAD with dual band detectors and a rosette scanning seeker head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchenall, Richard P.; Richardson, Mark A.; Butters, Brian; Walmsley, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Man Portable Air Defence Systems (ManPADs) have been a favoured anti aircraft weapon since their appearance on the military proliferation scene in the mid 1960s. Since this introduction there has been a 'cat and mouse' game of Missile Countermeasures (CMs) and the aircraft protection counter counter measures (CCMs) as missile designers attempt to defeat the aircraft platform protection equipment. Magnesium Teflon Viton (MTV) flares protected the target aircraft until the missile engineers discovered the art of flare rejection using techniques including track memory and track angle bias. These early CCMs relied upon CCM triggering techniques such as the rise rate method which would just sense a sudden increase in target energy and assume that a flare CM had been released by the target aircraft. This was not as reliable as was first thought as aspect changes (bringing another engine into the field of view) or glint from the sun could inadvertently trigger a CCM when not needed. The introduction of dual band detectors in the 1980s saw a major advance in CCM capability allowing comparisons between two distinct IR bands to be made thus allowing the recognition of an MTV flare to occur with minimal false alarms. The development of the rosette scan seeker in the 1980s complemented this advancement allowing the scene in the missile field of view (FOV) to be scanned by a much smaller (1/25) instantaneous FOV (IFOV) with the spectral comparisons being made at each scan point. This took the ManPAD from a basic IR energy detector to a pseudo imaging system capable of analysing individual elements of its overall FOV allowing more complex and robust CCM to be developed. This paper continues the work published in [1,2] and describes the method used to model an advanced ManPAD with a rosette scanning seeker head and robust CCMs similar to the Raytheon Stinger RMP.

  12. Regulatory components of carbon concentrating mechanisms in aquatic unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Vandana; Sidhu, Gurpreet Kaur; Nogia, Panchsheela; Mehrotra, Rajesh; Mehrotra, Sandhya

    2017-11-01

    This review provides an insight into the regulation of the carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) in lower organisms like cyanobacteria, proteobacteria, and algae. CCMs evolved as a mechanism to concentrate CO 2 at the site of primary carboxylating enzyme Ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco), so that the enzyme could overcome its affinity towards O 2 which leads to wasteful processes like photorespiration. A diverse set of CCMs exist in nature, i.e., carboxysomes in cyanobacteria and proteobacteria; pyrenoids in algae and diatoms, the C 4 system, and Crassulacean acid metabolism in higher plants. Prime regulators of CCM in most of the photosynthetic autotrophs belong to the LysR family of transcriptional regulators, which regulate the activity of the components of CCM depending upon the ambient CO 2 concentrations. Major targets of these regulators are carbonic anhydrase and inorganic carbon uptake systems (CO 2 and HCO 3 - transporters) whose activities are modulated either at transcriptional level or by changes in the levels of their co-regulatory metabolites. The article provides information on the localization of the CCM components as well as their function and participation in the development of an efficient CCM. Signal transduction cascades leading to activation/inactivation of inducible CCM components on perception of low/high CO 2 stimuli have also been brought into picture. A detailed study of the regulatory components can aid in identifying the unraveled aspects of these mechanisms and hence provide information on key molecules that need to be explored to further provide a clear understanding of the mechanism under study.

  13. Geothermal pilot study final report: creating an international geothermal energy community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bresee, J.C.; Yen, W.W.S.; Metzler, J.E. (eds.)

    1978-06-01

    The Geothermal Pilot Study under the auspices of the Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS) was established in 1973 to apply an action-oriented approach to international geothermal research and development, taking advantage of the established channels of governmental communication provided by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The Pilot Study was composed of five substudies. They included: computer-based information systems; direct application of geothermal energy; reservoir assessment; small geothermal power plants; and hot dry rock concepts. The most significant overall result of the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study, which is now complete, is the establishment of an identifiable community of geothermal experts in a dozen or more countries active in development programs. Specific accomplishments include the creation of an international computer file of technical information on geothermal wells and fields, the development of studies and reports on direct applications, geothermal fluid injection and small power plants, and the operation of the visiting scientist program. In the United States, the computer file has aready proven useful in the development of reservoir models and of chemical geothermometers. The state-of-the-art report on direct uses of geothermal energy is proving to be a valuable resource document for laypersons and experts in an area of increasing interest to many countries. Geothermal fluid injection studies in El Salvador, New Zealand, and the United States have been assisted by the Reservoir Assessment Substudy and have led to long-range reservoir engineering studies in Mexico. At least seven small geothermal power plants are in use or have been planned for construction around the world since the Small Power Plant Substudy was instituted--at least partial credit for this increased application can be assigned to the CCMS Geothermal Pilot Study. (JGB)

  14. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Downing, John A.

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3-) across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto) in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass-balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3- during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3- uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  15. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Morales-Williams

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3− across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass–balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3− during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3− uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  16. Reducing Uncertainty in Chemistry Climate Model Predictions of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to predict the future evolution of stratospheric ozone as ozone-depleting substances decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM predictions exhibit many common features, but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone-return-to-1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to chlorine change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower atmosphere ozone to chlorine change deltaO3/deltaCly is a near linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine (Cly) into its reservoirs; both Cly and its partitioning are controlled by lower atmospheric transport. CCMs with realistic transport agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035 differences in response to chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM results as the anthropogenic contribution to Cly becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change deltaO3/deltaT due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with their own temperature dependence. In the lower atmosphere, tropical ozone decreases caused by a predicted speed-up in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by middle and high latitude increases, contributing most to the spread in late 21st century predictions.

  17. Understanding Differences in Chemistry Climate Model Projections of Stratospheric Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry climate models (CCMs) are used to project future evolution of stratospheric ozone as concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) decrease and greenhouse gases increase, cooling the stratosphere. CCM projections exhibit not only many common features but also a broad range of values for quantities such as year of ozone return to 1980 and global ozone level at the end of the 21st century. Multiple linear regression is applied to each of 14 CCMs to separate ozone response to ODS concentration change from that due to climate change. We show that the sensitivity of lower stratospheric ozone to chlorine change Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine is a near-linear function of partitioning of total inorganic chlorine into its reservoirs; both inorganic chlorine and its partitioning are largely controlled by lower stratospheric transport. CCMs with best performance on transport diagnostics agree with observations for chlorine reservoirs and produce similar ozone responses to chlorine change. After 2035, differences in Delta Ozone/Delta inorganic chlorine contribute little to the spread in CCM projections as the anthropogenic contribution to inorganic chlorine becomes unimportant. Differences among upper stratospheric ozone increases due to temperature decreases are explained by differences in ozone sensitivity to temperature change Delta Ozone/Delta T due to different contributions from various ozone loss processes, each with its own temperature dependence. Ozone decrease in the tropical lower stratosphere caused by a projected speedup in the Brewer-Dobson circulation may or may not be balanced by ozone increases in the middle- and high-latitude lower stratosphere and upper troposphere. This balance, or lack thereof, contributes most to the spread in late 21st century projections.

  18. The Role of Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms in the Varied Response of the Green Macroalga, Ulva Lactuca, To Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoma, S. R.; Kubler, J.; Nisumaa, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    The majority of fleshy macroalgae, across all groups, contain carbon-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) that facilitate use of dissolved inorganic carbon. Rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and the resulting shift in seawater carbonate chemistry (ocean acidification, OA) may have varying effects on algae depending on their mode of inorganic carbon concentration, if any, and its regulation. Energetic costs of carbon uptake mechanisms may change with rising pCO2 and that may explain the variability in effects of OA on growth and photosynthesis. We investigated the relative activity of CCMs in the green alga Ulva lactuca across a range of atmospheric CO2 concentrations (385-1200 μatm) spanning recent concentrations to the high end predictions for 2100 (IPCC). U. lactuca is a fast growing species with a well characterized, multistep CCM that uses HCO3- to saturate photosynthesis with inorganic carbon. To test for responses to OA, we cultured the alga for 21 days at various pCO2 concentrations. A pH drift experiment was then performed to determine the relative activity of the CCMs if present. The CCM of Ulva showed a potentially bimodal response with sustained activity of bicarbonate anion exchange proteins in some individuals with a declining efficiency of external carbonic anhydrase, as pCO2 increased. The growth rate was enhanced by intermediate pCO2 relative to recent and very high pCO2. The results indicate that the CCM of Ulva is regulated in response to ocean acidification, and there is substantial variation between individual responses. This concurs with the finding that growth increases in Ulva as pCO2 increases, but indicates an upper threshold of this benefit and potentially high variation within populations.

  19. Safety Profile of Cough and Cold Medication Use in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jody L; Wang, George Sam; Reynolds, Kate M; Banner, William; Bond, G Randall; Kauffman, Ralph E; Palmer, Robert B; Paul, Ian M; Dart, Richard C

    2017-06-01

    The safety of cough and cold medication (CCM) use in children has been questioned. We describe the safety profile of CCMs in children medication errors (13.0%) the most common exposure types. Liquid (67.3%), pediatric (75.5%), and single-ingredient (77.5%) formulations were most commonly involved. AEs occurring in >20% of all cases included tachycardia, somnolence, hallucinations, ataxia, mydriasis, and agitation. Twenty cases (0.6%) resulted in death; most were in children pediatric liquid formulations were the most commonly reported products. These characteristics present an opportunity for targeted prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. On the cradle of CCM research: discovery, development, and challenges ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Aaron

    2017-06-01

    Herein, 40 years after its discovery, I briefly and critically survey the development of ideas that propelled research on CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs; a term proposed by Dean Price) of phytoplankton, mainly focusing on cyanobacteria. This is not a comprehensive review on CCM research, but a personal view on the past developments and challenges that lie ahead. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Satellite Based Cropland Carbon Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaru, V.; Jones, C. D.; Sedano, F.; Sahajpal, R.; Jin, H.; Skakun, S.; Pnvr, K.; Kommareddy, A.; Reddy, A.; Hurtt, G. C.; Izaurralde, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Agricultural croplands act as both sources and sinks of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2); absorbing CO2 through photosynthesis, releasing CO2 through autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration, and sequestering CO2 in vegetation and soils. Part of the carbon captured in vegetation can be transported and utilized elsewhere through the activities of food, fiber, and energy production. As well, a portion of carbon in soils can be exported somewhere else by wind, water, and tillage erosion. Thus, it is important to quantify how land use and land management practices affect the net carbon balance of croplands. To monitor the impacts of various agricultural activities on carbon balance and to develop management strategies to make croplands to behave as net carbon sinks, it is of paramount importance to develop consistent and high resolution cropland carbon flux estimates. Croplands are typically characterized by fine scale heterogeneity; therefore, for accurate carbon flux estimates, it is necessary to account for the contribution of each crop type and their spatial distribution. As part of NASA CMS funded project, a satellite based Cropland Carbon Monitoring System (CCMS) was developed to estimate spatially resolved crop specific carbon fluxes over large regions. This modeling framework uses remote sensing version of Environmental Policy Integrated Climate Model and satellite derived crop parameters (e.g. leaf area index (LAI)) to determine vertical and lateral carbon fluxes. The crop type LAI product was developed based on the inversion of PRO-SAIL radiative transfer model and downscaled MODIS reflectance. The crop emergence and harvesting dates were estimated based on MODIS NDVI and crop growing degree days. To evaluate the performance of CCMS framework, it was implemented over croplands of Nebraska, and estimated carbon fluxes for major crops (i.e. corn, soybean, winter wheat, grain sorghum, alfalfa) grown in 2015. Key findings of the CCMS framework will be presented

  2. Enabling Chemistry of Gases and Aerosols for Assessment of Short-Lived Climate Forcers: Improving Solar Radiation Modeling in the DOE-ACME and CESM models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Michael [University of California, Irvine

    2018-01-12

    This proposal seeks to maintain the DOE-ACME (offshoot of CESM) as one of the leading CCMs to evaluate near-term climate mitigation. It will implement, test, and optimize the new UCI photolysis codes within CESM CAM5 and new CAM versions in ACME. Fast-J is a high-order-accuracy (8 stream) code for calculating solar scattering and absorption in a single column atmosphere containing clouds, aerosols, and gases that was developed at UCI and implemented in CAM5 under the previous BER/SciDAC grant.

  3. The nature of the CO2 -concentrating mechanisms in a marine diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Romain; Dimnet, Laura; Maberly, Stephen C; Gontero, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Diatoms are widespread in aquatic ecosystems where they may be limited by the supply of inorganic carbon. Their carbon dioxide-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) involving transporters and carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are well known, but the contribution of a biochemical CCM involving C4 metabolism is contentious. The CCM(s) present in the marine-centric diatom, Thalassiosira pseudonana, were studied in cells exposed to high or low concentrations of CO2 , using a range of approaches. At low CO2 , cells possessed a CCM based on active uptake of CO2 (70% contribution) and bicarbonate, while at high CO2 , cells were restricted to CO2 . CA was highly and rapidly activated on transfer to low CO2 and played a key role because inhibition of external CA produced uptake kinetics similar to cells grown at high CO2 . The activities of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylase (PEPC) and the PEP-regenerating enzyme, pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), were lower in cells grown at low than at high CO2 . The ratios of PEPC and PPDK to ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase were substantially lower than 1, even at low CO2 . Our data suggest that the kinetic properties of this species results from a biophysical CCM and not from C4 type metabolism. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Engineering carbon fixation with artificial protein organelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessen, Tobias W; Silver, Pamela A

    2017-08-01

    Based on projections for global population growth, current techniques for improving agricultural yields will not be able to address future demands for major food crops. Improving photosynthetic efficiency by engineering carbon fixation has been identified as one of the most important approaches for increasing agricultural output. Recent studies indicate that introducing cyanobacterial-like carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) into plant chloroplasts represents a promising strategy for enhancing plant photosynthesis. Here, we give a general outline for transferring CCMs to plants. The proposed trajectory includes introducing bicarbonate transporters and CO 2 -fixing organelles into plant chloroplasts as well as minimizing stromal carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity. We focus on different approaches for constructing compartments that co-localize the CO 2 -fixing enzyme d-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and CA, aimed at increasing RuBisCO turnover and decreasing wasteful photorespiration. We consider strategies based on cyanobacterial carboxysomes and on other protein-based compartments, specifically encapsulin nanocompartments. Finally, recent advances in expressing catalytic and structural carboxysomal components in plants will be highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nanosphere Lithography: A Powerful Method for the Controlled Manufacturing of Nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Colson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The never-ending race towards miniaturization of devices induced an intense research in the manufacturing processes of the components of those devices. However, the complexity of the process combined with high equipment costs makes the conventional lithographic techniques unfavorable for many researchers. Through years, nanosphere lithography (NSL attracted growing interest due to its compatibility with wafer-scale processes as well as its potential to manufacture a wide variety of homogeneous one-, two-, or three-dimensional nanostructures. This method combines the advantages of both top-down and bottom-up approaches and is based on a two-step process: (1 the preparation of a colloidal crystal mask (CCM made of nanospheres and (2 the deposition of the desired material through the mask. The mask is then removed and the layer keeps the ordered patterning of the mask interstices. Many groups have been working to improve the quality of the CCMs. Throughout this review, we compare the major deposition techniques to manufacture the CCMs (focusing on 2D polystyrene nanospheres lattices, with respect to their advantages and drawbacks. In traditional NSL, the pattern is usually limited to triangular structures. However, new strategies have been developed to build up more complex architectures and will also be discussed.

  6. From disasters to decisions: Cape Canaveral Marine Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Five years ago, in August 1992, a tropical depression off the western coast of Africa formed, intensifying and gathering storm clouds as it began its journey westward. By the time it reached the US mainland, it had become a full-fledged hurricane -- Hurricane Andrew -- that blasted over south Florida and into south-central Louisiana. In Florida City, Fla., things went from bad to worse. One piece of metal debris -- airborne from the hurricane's 145 mile-per-hour winds -- punctured an oil tank, triggering a rapidly spreading oil spill that needed to be contained, and fast. The tank had a mechanism whereby oil was replenished when the container was less than full; so as oil was sucked out by the high winds, more came pouring in. In addition, a berm that would have somewhat contained the spill was stuck in open position. Enter Cape Canaveral Marine Services, Inc., (CCMS, Cape Canaveral, Fla.), an environmental services company well-versed in emergency spill response activities. Within seven weeks, CCMS had cleaned up and mitigated the impacts of the spill. Although the job posed significant challenges, the company was uniquely situated to respond quickly, efficiently, and effectively. After all, it had already been in the business for 20 years

  7. From disasters to decisions: Cape Canaveral Marine Services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Connell, K.A.

    1997-07-01

    Five years ago, in August 1992, a tropical depression off the western coast of Africa formed, intensifying and gathering storm clouds as it began its journey westward. By the time it reached the US mainland, it had become a full-fledged hurricane -- Hurricane Andrew -- that blasted over south Florida and into south-central Louisiana. In Florida City, Fla., things went from bad to worse. One piece of metal debris -- airborne from the hurricane`s 145 mile-per-hour winds -- punctured an oil tank, triggering a rapidly spreading oil spill that needed to be contained, and fast. The tank had a mechanism whereby oil was replenished when the container was less than full; so as oil was sucked out by the high winds, more came pouring in. In addition, a berm that would have somewhat contained the spill was stuck in open position. Enter Cape Canaveral Marine Services, Inc., (CCMS, Cape Canaveral, Fla.), an environmental services company well-versed in emergency spill response activities. Within seven weeks, CCMS had cleaned up and mitigated the impacts of the spill. Although the job posed significant challenges, the company was uniquely situated to respond quickly, efficiently, and effectively. After all, it had already been in the business for 20 years.

  8. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Di; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Shrestha, Sudeep; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2015-01-01

    Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis. Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery. Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01). In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001), male-majority (female ratio 1 year) before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01), lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02) and short-term (hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  9. HADRON CALORIMETER (HCAL)

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Mans and P. De Barbaro

    2012-01-01

      During first three months of LHC operation in 2012 (April-June 2012), HCAL performed well.  Out of a total of 6.15 fb–1 recorded by CMS, 230 pb–1 had to be declared as ‘bad’ during certification process due to HCAL-related problems. There were two major sources of ‘bad’ data coming from HCAL. Firstly, RBX data losses resulted in approximately 90 pb–1 declared as ‘bad’. The RBX data loss problems are caused by Single Event Upsets (SEU) in Clock and Control Modules (CCMs). As CCMs are not accessible with the CMS detector closed, this problem can be only fixed during LS1. The second major source of  ‘bad’ data was a failure of TTCrx chip (installed on HF detector), which resulted in a loss of almost 80 pb–1. The intervention required access to the cavern, and so the unit could only be replaced during the inter-fill period. In 2011 and early 2012, we have...

  10. High prevalence of diffusive uptake of CO2 by macroalgae in a temperate subtidal ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwall, Christopher E; Revill, Andrew T; Hurd, Catriona L

    2015-05-01

    Productivity of most macroalgae is not currently considered limited by dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), as the majority of species have CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCM) allowing the active uptake of DIC. The alternative, diffusive uptake of CO2 (non-CCM), is considered rare (0-9% of all macroalgal cover in a given ecosystem), and identifying species without CCMs is important in understanding factors controlling inorganic carbon use by eukaryotic algae. CCM activity has higher energetic requirements than diffusive CO2 uptake, therefore when light is low, CCM activity is reduced in favour of diffusive CO2 uptake. We hypothesized that the proportional cover of macroalgae without CCMs (red and green macroalgae) would be low (green macroalgae (two species). The proportion of non-CCM species increased with depth at three of four sites. 35% of species tested had significantly depleted δ(13)C values at deeper depths. Non-CCM macroalgae are more abundant in some temperate reefs than previously thought. If ocean acidification benefits non-CCM species, the ramifications for subtidal macroalgal assemblages could be larger than previously considered.

  11. Quantifying uncertainties of climate signals related to the 11-year solar cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschke, T.; Kunze, M.; Matthes, K. B.; Langematz, U.; Wahl, S.

    2017-12-01

    Although state-of-the-art reconstructions based on proxies and (semi-)empirical models converge in terms of total solar irradiance, they still significantly differ in terms of spectral solar irradiance (SSI) with respect to the mean spectral distribution of energy input and temporal variability. This study aims at quantifying uncertainties for the Earth's climate related to the 11-year solar cycle by forcing two chemistry-climate models (CCMs) - CESM1(WACCM) and EMAC - with five different SSI reconstructions (NRLSSI1, NRLSSI2, SATIRE-T, SATIRE-S, CMIP6-SSI) and the reference spectrum RSSV1-ATLAS3, derived from observations. We conduct a unique set of timeslice experiments. External forcings and boundary conditions are fixed and identical for all experiments, except for the solar forcing. The set of analyzed simulations consists of one solar minimum simulation, employing RSSV1-ATLAS3 and five solar maximum experiments. The latter are a result of adding the amplitude of solar cycle 22 according to the five reconstructions to RSSV1-ATLAS3. Our results show that the climate response to the 11y solar cycle is generally robust across CCMs and SSI forcings. However, analyzing the variance of the solar maximum ensemble by means of ANOVA-statistics reveals additional information on the uncertainties of the mean climate signals. The annual mean response agrees very well between the two CCMs for most parts of the lower and middle atmosphere. Only the upper mesosphere is subject to significant differences related to the choice of the model. However, the different SSI forcings lead to significant differences in ozone concentrations, shortwave heating rates, and temperature throughout large parts of the mesosphere and upper stratosphere. Regarding the seasonal evolution of the climate signals, our findings for short wave heating rates, and temperature are similar to the annual means with respect to the relative importance of the choice of the model or the SSI forcing for the

  12. Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil from the Aerial Parts of Satureja hortensis As a Potent Medical Plant Using Traditional Hydrodistillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadhosseini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The water-distilled essential oils, which were obtained from the fresh aerial parts of Satureja hortensis were analyzed by means of GC and CC/MS instruments. The plant was collected during the flowering stage from Foroomad Mountains, Semnan Province, and heart of Iran. Twenty compounds were identified in the different samples analyzed, representing 100% of the total oil contents. In terms of general categories, monoterpene hydrocarbons dominated the chemical profile of the oils with γ-terpinene (27.4%, carvacrol (23.7%, p-cymene (11.1%, α-terpinene (10.2%, α-pinene (5.1% and myrcene (5.1% as the main constituent components. The other constituents were found to be α-thujene (3.9%, β-pinene (3.0%, sylvestrene (3.0%, α-phellandrene (1.2% and (--terpinen-4-ol (1.0%.

  13. Vascular permeability and iron deposition biomarkers in longitudinal follow-up of cerebral cavernous malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Zeineddine, Hussein A

    2017-01-01

    and quantifiable biomarkers of disease activity in CCMs. This may be applied in natural history studies and may help calibrate clinical trials. The 2 techniques are likely applicable in other disorders of vascular integrity and iron leakage such as aging, hemorrhagic microangiopathy, and traumatic brain injury....... permeability at baseline (p = 0.001), as well as higher regional permeability (p = 0.003) in the area that would later develop a new lesion as compared with the homologous contralateral brain region. CONCLUSIONS In vivo assessment of vascular permeability and iron deposition on MRI can serve as objective......OBJECTIVE Vascular permeability and iron leakage are central features of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) pathogenesis. The authors aimed to correlate prospective clinical behavior of CCM lesions with longitudinal changes in biomarkers of dynamic contrast-enhanced quantitative permeability...

  14. Specific migration of di-(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (DEHA) from plasticized PVC film: results from an enforcement campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens Højslev; Breindahl, T.

    1998-01-01

    A control campaign on the correct labelling of plasticited PVC film according to current legislation on food contact materials has been performed Analytical methods based on the isotope dilution technique were developed. For enforcement purposes, the films were exposed to the official food simulant...... could be determined by CC-MS without further clean-zip. A good consistency between results from the two different methods was obtained During the campaign, 49 samples of PVC films, the majority intended for use in retail shops, were sampled from importers and wholesalers by the Municipal Food Control....... However, because of the general uncertainty of the analytical method and because the variation in the thickness of the films was calculated to be I mg/dm(2), the action limit in this campaign was 4 mg/cm(2). A migration higher than this action limit was found in 42 films (89% of the samples...

  15. Technical Management for Buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Vairo, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of an 'instrument' for the optimization of the functionality and conservation of tertiary buildings. This technique has several different names: Building Automation Systems (BAS), Central Control and Monitoring System (CCMS) in English, and Gestion Technique du Bâtiment' (GTB) or Gestion Technique Centralisée (GTC) in French. With this technique it is possible to manage all the functions of a building, it is a modern instrument that introduces the concept of 'automation' in the operation of buildings using computerized procedures, earlier reserved for industrial processes. The system is structured with different automation levels with a distributed intelligence, each level characterized by a communication system (Fieldbus for the lowest and Ethernet for the highest level). In order to apply the BAS to CERN buildings it is necessary to evaluate the advantages, the CERN requirements and the integration with the several existing control and automation systems.

  16. Diagnostic tools for evaluating quasi-horizontal transport in global-scale chemistry models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huikyo; Youn, Daeok; Patten, Kenneth O.; Olsen, Seth C.; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    2012-10-01

    The upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) plays an important role in climate and atmospheric chemistry. Despite its importance on the point of causing deep intrusions of tropics originated air into the midlatitudes, the quasi-horizontal transport process in the UTLS, represented by global chemistry-transport models (CTMs) or chemistry-climate models (CCMs), cannot easily be diagnosed with conventional analyses on isobaric surfaces. We use improved diagnostic tools to better evaluate CTMs and CCMs relative to satellite observations in the region of UTLS. Using the Hellinger distance, vertical profiles of probability density functions (PDFs) of chemical tracers simulated by the Model for OZone And Related chemical Tracers 3.1 (MOZART-3.1) are quantitatively compared with satellite data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument in the tropopause relative altitude coordinate to characterize features of tracer distributions near the tropopause. Overall, the comparison of PDFs between MLS and MOZART-3.1 did not satisfy the same population assumption. Conditional PDFs are used to understand the meteorological differences between global climate models and the real atmosphere and the conditional PDFs between MOZART-3.1 and MLS showed better agreement compared to the original PDFs. The low static stability during high tropopause heights at midlatitudes suggests that the variation of tropopause height is related to transport processes from the tropics to midlatitudes. MOZART-3.1 with the GEOS4 GCM winds reproduces episodes of the tropical air intrusions. However, our diagnostic analyses show that the GEOS4 GCM did not properly reproduce the high tropopause cases at midlatitudes especially in spring.

  17. Future Changes in Major Stratospheric Warmings in CCMI Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayarzaguena, B.; Langematz, U.; Polvani, L. M; Abalichin, J.; Akiyoshi, H.; Klekociuk, A.; Michou, M.; Morgenstern, O.; Oman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Major stratospheric warmings (MSWs) are one of the most important phenomena of wintertime Arctic stratospheric variability. They consist of a warming of the Arctic stratosphere and a deceleration of the polar night jet, triggered by an anomalously high injection of tropospheric wave activity into the stratosphere. Due to the relevance and the impact of MSWs on the tropospheric circulation, several model studies have investigated their potential responses to climate change. However, a wide range of results has been obtained, extending from a future increase in the frequency of MSWs to a decrease. These discrepancies might be explained by different factors such as a competition of radiative and dynamical contributors with opposite effects on the Arctic polar vortex, biases of models to reproduce the related processes, or the metric chosen for the identification of MSWs. In this study, future changes in wintertime Arctic stratospheric variability are examined in order to obtaina more precise picture of future changes in the occurrence of MSWs. In particular, transient REFC2 simulations of different CCMs involved in the Chemistry Climate Model Initiative (CCMI) are used. These simulations extend from 1960 to 2100 and include forcings by halogens and greenhouse gases following the specifications of the CCMI-REF-C2 scenario. Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and sea-ice distributions are either prescribed from coupled climate model integrations or calculated internally in the case of fully coupled atmosphere-ocean CCMs. Potential changes in the frequency and main characteristics of MSWs in the future are investigated with special focus on the dependence of the results on the criterion for the identification of MSWs and the tropospheric forcing of these phenomena.

  18. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Ruan

    Full Text Available Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis.Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery.Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01. In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001, male-majority (female ratio 1 year before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01, lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02 and short-term (< 3 years follow-up (OR, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.80; P = 0.005 tended to correlate with a significantly favorable outcome.Patients who underwent extended surrounding hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  19. Effects of different representations of transport in the new EMAC-SWIFT chemistry climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Janice; Langematz, Ulrike; Wohltmann, Ingo; Kreyling, Daniel; Rex, Markus

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the representation of atmospheric ozone chemistry in weather and climate models is essential for a realistic simulation of the atmospheric state. Interactively coupled chemistry climate models (CCMs) provide a means to realistically simulate the interaction between atmospheric chemistry and dynamics. The calculation of chemistry in CCMs, however, is computationally expensive which renders the use of complex chemistry models not suitable for ensemble simulations or simulations with multiple climate change scenarios. In these simulations ozone is therefore usually prescribed as a climatological field or included by incorporating a fast linear ozone scheme into the model. While prescribed climatological ozone fields are often not aligned with the modelled dynamics, a linear ozone scheme may not be applicable for a wide range of climatological conditions. An alternative approach to represent atmospheric chemistry in climate models which can cope with non-linearities in ozone chemistry and is applicable to a wide range of climatic states is the Semi-empirical Weighted Iterative Fit Technique (SWIFT) that is driven by reanalysis data and has been validated against observational satellite data and runs of a full Chemistry and Transport Model. SWIFT has been implemented into the ECHAM/MESSy (EMAC) chemistry climate model that uses a modular approach to climate modelling where individual model components can be switched on and off. When using SWIFT in EMAC, there are several possibilities to represent the effect of transport inside the polar vortex: the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of EMAC and a transport parameterisation that can be useful when using SWIFT in models not having transport of their own. Here, we present results of equivalent simulations with different handling of transport, compare with EMAC simulations with full interactive chemistry and evaluate the results with observations.

  20. Multi-model impacts of climate change on pollution transport from global emission source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Doherty

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of climate change on tropospheric transport, diagnosed from a carbon monoxide (CO-like tracer species emitted from global CO sources, are evaluated from an ensemble of four chemistry–climate models (CCMs contributing to the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP. Model time-slice simulations for present-day and end-of-the-21st-century conditions were performed under the Representative Concentrations Pathway (RCP climate scenario RCP 8.5. All simulations reveal a strong seasonality in transport, especially over the tropics. The highest CO-tracer mixing ratios aloft occur during boreal winter when strong vertical transport is co-located with biomass burning emission source regions. A consistent and robust decrease in future CO-tracer mixing ratios throughout most of the troposphere, especially in the tropics, and an increase around the tropopause is found across the four CCMs in both winter and summer. Decreases in CO-tracer mixing ratios in the tropical troposphere are associated with reduced convective mass fluxes in this region, which in turn may reflect a weaker Hadley cell circulation in the future climate. Increases in CO-tracer mixing ratios near the tropopause are largely attributable to a rise in tropopause height enabling lofting to higher altitudes, although a poleward shift in the mid-latitude jets may also play a minor role in the extratropical upper troposphere. An increase in CO-tracer mixing ratios also occurs near the Equator, centred over equatorial and Central Africa, extending from the surface to the mid-troposphere. This is most likely related to localised decreases in convection in the vicinity of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, resulting in larger CO-tracer mixing ratios over biomass burning regions and smaller mixing ratios downwind.

  1. Multi-model impacts of climate change on pollution transport from global emission source regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Ruth M.; Orbe, Clara; Zeng, Guang; Plummer, David A.; Prather, Michael J.; Wild, Oliver; Lin, Meiyun; Shindell, Drew T.; Mackenzie, Ian A.

    2017-11-01

    The impacts of climate change on tropospheric transport, diagnosed from a carbon monoxide (CO)-like tracer species emitted from global CO sources, are evaluated from an ensemble of four chemistry-climate models (CCMs) contributing to the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP). Model time-slice simulations for present-day and end-of-the-21st-century conditions were performed under the Representative Concentrations Pathway (RCP) climate scenario RCP 8.5. All simulations reveal a strong seasonality in transport, especially over the tropics. The highest CO-tracer mixing ratios aloft occur during boreal winter when strong vertical transport is co-located with biomass burning emission source regions. A consistent and robust decrease in future CO-tracer mixing ratios throughout most of the troposphere, especially in the tropics, and an increase around the tropopause is found across the four CCMs in both winter and summer. Decreases in CO-tracer mixing ratios in the tropical troposphere are associated with reduced convective mass fluxes in this region, which in turn may reflect a weaker Hadley cell circulation in the future climate. Increases in CO-tracer mixing ratios near the tropopause are largely attributable to a rise in tropopause height enabling lofting to higher altitudes, although a poleward shift in the mid-latitude jets may also play a minor role in the extratropical upper troposphere. An increase in CO-tracer mixing ratios also occurs near the Equator, centred over equatorial and Central Africa, extending from the surface to the mid-troposphere. This is most likely related to localised decreases in convection in the vicinity of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), resulting in larger CO-tracer mixing ratios over biomass burning regions and smaller mixing ratios downwind.

  2. CO2 induced growth response in a diatom dominated phytoplankton community from SW Bay of Bengal coastal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Haimanti; Shaik, Aziz Ur Rahman; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita; Chowdhury, Neha

    2017-11-01

    The ongoing increase in surface seawater CO2 level could potentially impact phytoplankton primary production in coastal waters; however, CO2 sensitivity studies on tropical coastal phytoplankton assemblages are rare. The present study investigated the interactive impacts of variable CO2 level, light and zinc (Zn) addition on the diatom dominated phytoplankton assemblages from the western coastal Bay of Bengal. Increased CO2 supply enhanced particulate organic matter (POC) production; a concomitant depletion in δ13CPOM values at elevated CO2 suggested increased CO2 diffusive influx inside the cell. Trace amount of Zn added under low CO2 level accelerated growth probably by accelerating Zn-Carbonic Anhydrase activity which helps in converting bicarbonate ion to CO2. Almost identical values of δ13CPOM in the low CO2 treated cells grown with and without Zn indicated a low discrimination between 13C and 12C probably due to bicarbonate uptake. These evidences collectively indicated the existence of the carbon concentration mechanisms (CCMs) at low CO2. A minimum growth rate was observed at low CO2 and light limited condition indicating light dependence of CCMs activity. Upon the increase of light and CO2 level, growth response was maximum. The cells grown in the low CO2 levels showed higher light stress (higher values of both diatoxanthin index and the ratio of photo-protective to light-harvesting pigments) that was alleviated by both increasing CO2 supply and Zn addition (probably by efficient light energy utilization in presence of adequate CO2). This is likely that the diatom dominated phytoplankton communities benefited from the increasing CO2 supply and thus may enhance primary production in response to any further increase in coastal water CO2 levels and can have large biogeochemical consequences in the study area.

  3. Why are models unable to reproduce multi-decadal trends in lower tropospheric baseline ozone levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Liu, J.; Mickley, L. J.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S.

    2017-12-01

    Assessments of tropospheric ozone radiative forcing rely on accurate model simulations. Parrish et al (2014) found that three chemistry-climate models (CCMs) overestimate present-day O3 mixing ratios and capture only 50% of the observed O3 increase over the last five decades at 12 baseline sites in the northern mid-latitudes, indicating large uncertainties in our understanding of the ozone trends and their implications for radiative forcing. Here we present comparisons of outputs from two chemical transport models (CTMs) - GEOS-Chem and the Global Modeling Initiative model - with O3 observations from the same sites and from the global ozonesonde network. Both CTMs are driven by reanalysis meteorological data (MERRA or MERRA2) and thus are expected to be different in atmospheric transport processes relative to those freely running CCMs. We test whether recent model developments leading to more active ozone chemistry affect the computed ozone sensitivity to perturbations in emissions. Preliminary results suggest these CTMs can reproduce present-day ozone levels but fail to capture the multi-decadal trend since 1980. Both models yield widespread overpredictions of free tropospheric ozone in the 1980s. Sensitivity studies in GEOS-Chem suggest that the model estimate of natural background ozone is too high. We discuss factors that contribute to the variability and trends of tropospheric ozone over the last 30 years, with a focus on intermodel differences in spatial resolution and in the representation of stratospheric chemistry, stratosphere-troposphere exchange, halogen chemistry, and biogenic VOC emissions and chemistry. We also discuss uncertainty in the historical emission inventories used in models, and how these affect the simulated ozone trends.

  4. Satellite Observations and Chemistry Climate Models - A Meandering Path Towards Better Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, Anne R.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the stratospheric ozone layer has grown rapidly since the 1970s, when ideas that depletion of the ozone layer due to human activity were put forth. The concept of ozone depletion due to anthropogenic chlorine increase is simple; quantification of the effect is much more difficult. The future of stratospheric ozone is complicated because ozone is expected to increase for two reasons: the slow decrease in anthropogenic chlorine due to the Montreal Protocol and its amendments and stratospheric cooling caused by increases in carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. Prediction of future ozone levels requires three-dimensional models that represent physical, photochemical and radiative processes, i.e., chemistry climate models (CCMs). While laboratory kinetic and photochemical data are necessary inputs for a CCM, atmospheric measurements are needed both to reveal physical and chemical processes and for comparison with simulations to test the conceptual model that CCMs represent. Global measurements are available from various satellites including but not limited to the LIMS and TOMS instruments on Nimbus 7 (1979 - 1993), and various instruments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (1991 - 2005), Envisat (2002 - ongoing), Sci-Sat (2003 - ongoing) and Aura (2004 - ongoing). Every successful satellite instrument requires a physical concept for the measurement, knowledge of physical chemical properties of the molecules to be measured, and stellar engineering to design an instrument that will survive launch and operate for years with no opportunity for repair but providing enough information that trend information can be separated from any instrument change. The on-going challenge is to use observations to decrease uncertainty in prediction. This talk will focus on two applications. The first considers transport diagnostics and implications for prediction of the eventual demise of the Antarctic ozone hole

  5. Lifetimes of Stratospheric Ozone-Depleting Substances, Their Replacements, and Related Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, P. A.; Ko, M. K.; Reimann, S.; Strahan, S. E.; Atlas, E. L.; Burkholder, J. B.; Chipperfield, M.; Engel, A.; Liang, Q.; Plumb, R. A.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    Estimating the average lifetime of a chemical in the atmosphere is crucial to understanding its current and future atmospheric concentration. Furthermore, for both ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases, information on their lifetimes is of paramount importance for obtaining future estimates for ozone depletion and climate forcing. The 'Lifetimes of Stratospheric Ozone-Depleting Substances, Their Replacements, and Related Species', under the World Climate Research Programme/Stratospheric Processes And their Role in Climate project, was completed in August 2013. The goal was to estimate both lifetimes and uncertainties. In this presentation we will provide: 1) an overview of key aspects of the definitions of lifetimes, 2) discuss the extensively revised photochemical values and uncertainties for obtaining lifetimes, 3) show new observational and 4) modeling estimates of lifetimes, and finally, 5) show new recommendations for the steady-state atmospheric lifetimes of 27 long-lived species. New findings include: * New chemical kinetic and photochemical information on the uncertainties associated with the Lyman-a absorption cross-sections, and revisions of absorption cross-section parameterizations for several chlorofluorocarbons. * State-of-the-art chemistry-climate models (CCMs) were used to estimate lifetimes over the course of the 21st century. Projected increases of the Brewer-Dobson circulation suggest that lifetimes should be shorter during the 21st century. However, the recovery of ozone in the CCMs shows that the photolysis of many species will decline, yielding only small changes in lifetimes of most species * The CFC-11 recommended lifetime increases to 52 years from the WMO (2011) value of 45 years. The most likely range is narrowed to 43-67 years. * The 44 year steady-state lifetime of CCl4 due to atmospheric loss determined in this report is substantially longer than the 35 years from WMO (2011). However, inclusion of the land and ocean

  6. Tracing Growth of Teachers' Classroom Interactions with Representations of Functions in the Connected Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian Lee

    The purpose of this study is to create an empirically based theoretic model of change of the use and treatment of representations of functions with the use of Connected Classroom Technology (CCT) using data previously collected for the Classroom Connectivity in Promoting Mathematics and Science Achievement (CCMS) project. Qualitative analysis of videotapes of three algebra teachers' instruction focused on different categories thought to influence teaching representations with technology: representations, discourse, technology, and decisions. Models for rating teachers low, medium, or high for each of these categories were created using a priori codes and grounded methodology. A cross case analysis was conducted after the completion of the case studies by comparing and contrasting the three cases. Data revealed that teachers' decisions shifted to incorporate the difference in student ideas/representations made visible by the CCT into their instruction and ultimately altered their orientation to mathematics teaching. The shift in orientation seemed to lead to the teachers' growth with regards to representations, discourse, and technology.

  7. A heritable form of SMARCE1-related meningiomas with important implications for follow-up and family screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkes, E H; Fock, J M; den Dunnen, W F A; van Belzen, M J; van der Lans, C A; Hoving, E W; Fakkert, I E; Smith, M J; Evans, D G; Olderode-Berends, M J W

    2016-04-01

    Childhood meningiomas are rare. Recently, a new hereditary tumor predisposition syndrome has been discovered, resulting in an increased risk for spinal and intracranial clear cell meningiomas (CCMs) in young patients. Heterozygous loss-of-function germline mutations in the SMARCE1 gene are causative, giving rise to an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. We report on an extended family with a pediatric CCM patient and an adult CCM patient and several asymptomatic relatives carrying a germline SMARCE1 mutation, and discuss difficulties in genetic counseling for this heritable condition. Because of the few reported cases so far, the lifetime risk of developing meningiomas for SMARCE1 mutation carriers is unclear and the complete tumor spectrum is unknown. There is no surveillance guideline for asymptomatic carriers nor a long-term follow-up recommendation for SMARCE1-related CCM patients as yet. Until more information is available about the penetrance and tumor spectrum of the condition, we propose the following screening advice for asymptomatic SMARCE1 mutation carriers: neurological examination and MRI of the brain and spine, yearly from diagnosis until the age of 18 and once every 3 years thereafter, or in between if there are clinical symptoms. This advice can also be used for long-term patient follow-up. More data is needed to optimize this proposed screening advice.

  8. Understanding Differences in Upper Stratospheric Ozone Response to Changes in Chlorine and Temperature as Computed Using CCMVal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass, A. R.; Stolarski, R. S.; Strahan, S. E.; Oman, L. D.

    2012-01-01

    Projections of future ozone levels are made using models that couple a general circulation model with a representation of atmospheric photochemical processes, allowing interactions among photochemical processes, radiation, and dynamics. Such models are known as chemistry and climate models (CCMs). Although developed from common principles and subject to the same boundary conditions, simulated ozone time series vary for projections of changes in ozone depleting substances (ODSs) and greenhouse gases. In the upper stratosphere photochemical processes control ozone level, and ozone increases as ODSs decrease and temperature decreases due to greenhouse gas increase. Simulations agree broadly but there are quantitative differences in the sensitivity of ozone to chlorine and to temperature. We obtain insight into these differences in sensitivity by examining the relationship between the upper stratosphere annual cycle of ozone and temperature as produced by a suite of models. All simulations conform to expectation in that ozone is less sensitive to temperature when chlorine levels are highest because chlorine catalyzed loss is nearly independent of temperature. Differences in sensitivity are traced to differences in simulated temperature, ozone and reactive nitrogen when chlorine levels are close to background. This work shows that differences in the importance of specific processes underlie differences in simulated sensitivity of ozone to composition change. This suggests a) the multi-model mean is not a best estimate of the sensitivity of upper ozone to changes in ODSs and temperature; b) the spread of values is not an appropriate measure of uncertainty.

  9. Dioxins contamination of food in Italy: an overview of the situation 1999-2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scortichini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Istituto Zooprofilattico dell’Abruzzo e Molise ‘G. Caporale’ (IZS A&M has been monitoring contamination of food by the polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDD and polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDF as part of the National Surveillance Plan (NSP in Italy since 1999, on license from the Italian Ministry of Health. Between 1999 and 2000, 238 samples (including meat, fish, eggs, milk, fat, feedstuffs were analysed. The results of the tests were expressed in terms of international toxic equivalents (I-TEQs from NATO/CCMS, 1988 and World Health Organization toxic equivalents (WHO-TEQs. These results showed contamination levels comparable to those detected in similar studies conducted in other European countries for products such as milk (mean: 0.81 pg I-TEQ/g fat, meat (mean: 0.73 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fat (mean: 0.51 pg I-TEQ/g fat. The highest dioxin content was found in fish (mean: 5.28 pg I-TEQ/g fat and fish feeds (mean 6.60 pg ITEQ/ g fat. These two matrices also showed complete duplication of contamination profiles. Other edible matrices (milk, meat, eggs revealed the presence of HpCDD and OCDD. This could be due to the introduction into Italy of the animal feed additive choline chloride contaminated by these congenerse.

  10. Resource pools: an abstraction for configurable computing codesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, James B.; Athanas, Peter M.

    1996-10-01

    The utility of configurable computing platforms has been demonstrated and documented for a wide variety of applications. Retargeting an application to custom computing machines (CCMs) has been shown to accelerate execution speeds with respect to execution on a sequential, general- purpose processor. Unfortunately, these platforms have proven to be rather difficult to program when compared to contemporary general-purpose platforms. Retargeting applications is non-trivial, due to the lack of design tools which work at a high level and consider all available computational units in the target architecture. To make configurable computing accessible to a wide user base, high- level entry tools -- preferably targeted toward familiar programming environments -- are needed. Also, in order to target a wide variety of custom computing machines, such tools cannot depend on a particular, fixed, architectural configuration. This paper introduces resource pools as an abstraction of general computing devices which provides a homogeneous description of FPGAs, ASICs, CPUs, or even an entire network of workstations. Also presented is an architecture-independent design tool which accepts a target architecture's description as a collection of resource pools, and partitions a program written in a high-level language onto that architecture, effectively synthesizing a hardware description for the FPGA portions of A CCM, and a software description for any attached CPUs.

  11. Assessment of international remedial technologies for application to Superfund sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanning, D.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents some of the logical arguments for conducting research on remedial technologies for contaminated land and groundwater at an international level. It gives information on many of the international organizations that are involved in environmental programs, but it especially gives emphasis to the NATO-CCMS pilot study on Demonstration of Remedial Action Technologies for Contaminated Land and Groundwater. The purpose of the study is to field demonstrate and evaluate new/innovative technologies for remedial action at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. This study is a logical international extension of the US EPA SITE program. It offers the opportunity to obtain a multiple data base on various remedial action unit processes without any single country having to commit a disproportionate amount of its internal resources to any specific activity. Each participating country provides the necessary resources for those demonstrations which they are contributing to the study. Sites are selected by a majority vote of all participating countries (no country is permitted to vote for its own sites). The study is a 5 year program with participants from Canada, Denmark, Federal Republic of Germany, France, Greece, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, and the US. The need for cost-effective remedial action technologies for hazardous waste sites is a problem of all industrialized countries. The need to build a knowledge base of emerging remedial technologies was the impetus behind the USEPA's lead role and commitment to this pilot study

  12. Skin cancer risks avoided by the Montreal Protocol--worldwide modeling integrating coupled climate-chemistry models with a risk model for UV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Arjan; Slaper, Harry; den Outer, Peter N; Morgenstern, Olaf; Braesicke, Peter; Pyle, John A; Garny, Hella; Stenke, Andrea; Dameris, Martin; Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tourpali, Kleareti; Bais, Alkiviadis F

    2013-01-01

    The assessment model for ultraviolet radiation and risk "AMOUR" is applied to output from two chemistry-climate models (CCMs). Results from the UK Chemistry and Aerosols CCM are used to quantify the worldwide skin cancer risk avoided by the Montreal Protocol and its amendments: by the year 2030, two million cases of skin cancer have been prevented yearly, which is 14% fewer skin cancer cases per year. In the "World Avoided," excess skin cancer incidence will continue to grow dramatically after 2030. Results from the CCM E39C-A are used to estimate skin cancer risk that had already been inevitably committed once ozone depletion was recognized: excess incidence will peak mid 21st century and then recover or even super-recover at the end of the century. When compared with a "No Depletion" scenario, with ozone undepleted and cloud characteristics as in the 1960s throughout, excess incidence (extra yearly cases skin cancer per million people) of the "Full Compliance with Montreal Protocol" scenario is in the ranges: New Zealand: 100-150, Congo: -10-0, Patagonia: 20-50, Western Europe: 30-40, China: 90-120, South-West USA: 80-110, Mediterranean: 90-100 and North-East Australia: 170-200. This is up to 4% of total local incidence in the Full Compliance scenario in the peak year. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  13. Extended resection of hemosiderin fringe is better for seizure outcome: a study in patients with cavernous malformation associated with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Tao, Zhang; You, Chao; Li, Qiang; Liu, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) is frequently associated with intractable focal epilepsy. Epileptogenicity is usually attributed to the hemosiderin deposits. Extent of resection is a crucial issue for achieving good seizure outcome. To assess whether seizure outcome is related to the extended resection (ER) of surrounding hemosiderin fringe brain tissue. Between April 2000 and April 2008, 132 patients with CCM and refractory epilepsy were scheduled for surgery based on the high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and intensive video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. All patients underwent pre- and post-operative MRI. Based on MRI findings patients were grouped into: ER group (ER, hemosiderin completely removed) and lesionectomy group (LE, hemosiderin not/partially removed). Post-operative seizure outcome was compared between the two groups based on Engel and the International League Against Epilepsy outcome scales. At 1-year follow-up of the 86 patients in the ER group, 54 (74.4%) achieved seizure free outcome and in the LE group of the 46 patients, 20 (59.5%) achieved seizure-free outcome. At 5-year follow-up, 59.5% (25/42) of patients in ER group and 27.8% (5/18) of patients in LE group achieved seizure-free outcome. ER was not associated with increased neurological morbidity. Our study suggests that complete removal of hemosiderin fringe brain tissue surrounding CCMs may improve short-term and long-term seizure outcome.

  14. De novo formation of cerebral cavernous malformation in a patient with intractable epilepsy: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpan, Mustafa Efkan; Uckardesler, Levent; Sekerci, Zeki; Slavin, Konstantin

    2010-07-01

    The exact origin and process of development of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is currently unknown. In this article, the authors present de novo CCM formation in a patient with intractable epilepsy and discuss the pathogenesis of CCM in light of several current theories. A 34-year-old man presented with a 10-year history of intractable seizures. His neurological examination was normal, and the initial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was suggestive of right mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). Follow-up MRI study showed development of CCM in the right frontal region. Subsequently, invasive monitoring revealed right temporal seizure source, prompting right temporal lobectomy that resulted in abolition of epilepsy. Histological diagnosis of CCM was confirmed after the lesion was removed in a separate surgery. The patient recovered to normal lifestyle without any complications. This appears to be a first documented case of de novo CCM formation in the setting of intractable epilepsy with ipsilateral MTS. Since the possibility of lesion development cannot be ruled out based on clinical examination, updated imaging and thorough neurophysiological workup are needed for successful treatment of patients with intractable epilepsy.

  15. Present status and future prospects for nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, J.H. (ed.)

    1975-10-03

    This report, which is part of a study initiated by the NATO Committee on the Challenges of Modern Society (CCMS), describes the current status of nonelectrical uses of geothermal resources. Such resources are defined as geothermal fluids between the temperatures of 50 and 160/sup 0/C. Current and potential uses of these resources including residential and commercial, agricultural and industrial applications are described. Also discussed are exploration and drilling; extraction and distribution; environmental impact; and economic and regulatory problems. Applications in a number of countries are described. Among the report's conclusions are: (1) Geothermal resources are widely distributed throughout the world. (2) The extraction of these resources presents no serious technical problems. (3) A wide variety of economically viable applications for these resources currently exists. (4) Current nonelectrical applications have a favorable economic structure compared with those of other energy sources. (5) Disposal of spent fluids has a significant ecological impact. Reinjection appears to be the most likely alternative. (6) The legal and institutional framework surrounding these applications needs both clarification and simplification.

  16. A Model and Satellite-Based Analysis of the Tropospheric Ozone Distribution in Clear Versus Convectively Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strode, Sarah A.; Douglass, Anne R.; Ziemke, Jerald R.; Manyin, Michael; Nielsen, J. Eric; Oman, Luke D.

    2017-11-01

    Satellite observations of in-cloud ozone concentrations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and Microwave Limb Sounder instruments show substantial differences from background ozone concentrations. We develop a method for comparing a free-running chemistry-climate model (CCM) to in-cloud and background ozone observations using a simple criterion based on cloud fraction to separate cloudy and clear-sky days. We demonstrate that the CCM simulates key features of the in-cloud versus background ozone differences and of the geographic distribution of in-cloud ozone. Since the agreement is not dependent on matching the meteorological conditions of a specific day, this is a promising method for diagnosing how accurately CCMs represent the relationships between ozone and clouds, including the lower ozone concentrations shown by in-cloud satellite observations. Since clouds are associated with convection as well as changes in chemistry, we diagnose the tendency of tropical ozone at 400 hPa due to chemistry, convection and turbulence, and large-scale dynamics. While convection acts to reduce ozone concentrations at 400 hPa throughout much of the tropics, it has the opposite effect over highly polluted regions of South and East Asia.

  17. Organization and diffusion in biological and material fabrication problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Niall Mari

    This thesis is composed of two problems. The first is a systems level analysis of the carbon concentrating mechanism in cyanobacteria. The second presents a theoretical analysis of femtosecond laser melting for the purpose of hyperdoping silicon with sulfur. While these systems are very distant, they are both relevant to the development of alternative energy (production of biofuels and methods for fabricating photovoltaics respectively). Both problems are approached through analysis of the underlying diffusion equations. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria with a unique carbon concentrating mechanism (CCM) which enhances carbon fixation. A greater understanding of this mechanism would offer new insights into the basic biology and methods for bioengineering more efficient biochemical reactions. The molecular components of the CCM have been well characterized in the last decade, with genetic analysis uncovering both variation and commonalities in CCMs across cyanobacteria strains. Analysis of CCMs on a systems level, however, is based on models formulated prior to the molecular characterization. We present an updated model of the cyanobacteria CCM, and analytic solutions in terms of the various molecular components. The solutions allow us to find the parameter regime (expression levels, catalytic rates, permeability of carboxysome shell) where carbon fixation is maximized and oxygenation is minimized. Saturation of RuBisCO, maximization of the ratio of CO2 to O2, and staying below or at the saturation level for carbonic anhydrase are all needed for maximum efficacy. These constraints limit the parameter regime where the most effective carbon fixation can occur. There is an optimal non-specific carboxysome shell permeability, where trapping of CO2 is maximized, but HCO3 - is not detrimentally restricted. The shell also shields carbonic anhydrase activity and CO2 → HCO3- conversion at the thylakoid and cell membrane from one another. Co-localization of carbonic

  18. Evaluation of the reactive nitrogen budget of the remote atmosphere in global models using airborne measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, L. T.; Strode, S. A.; Fiore, A. M.; Lamarque, J. F.; Prather, M. J.; Thompson, C. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Allen, H.; Blake, D. R.; Crounse, J. D.; Brune, W. H.; Elkins, J. W.; Hall, S. R.; Hintsa, E. J.; Huey, L. G.; Kim, M. J.; Moore, F. L.; Ullmann, K.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2017-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx ≡ NO + NO2) in the background atmosphere are critical precursors for the formation of tropospheric ozone and OH, thereby exerting strong influence on surface air quality, reactive greenhouse gases, and ecosystem health. The impact of NOx on atmospheric composition and climate is sensitive to the relative partitioning of reactive nitrogen between NOx and longer-lived reservoir species of the total reactive nitrogen family (NOy) such as HNO3, HNO4, PAN and organic nitrates (RONO2). Unfortunately, global chemistry-climate models (CCMs) and chemistry-transport models (CTMs) have historically disagreed in their reactive nitrogen budgets outside of polluted continental regions, and we have lacked in situ observations with which to evaluate them. Here, we compare and evaluate the NOy budget of six global models (GEOS-Chem CTM, GFDL AM3 CCM, GISS E2.1 CCM, GMI CTM, NCAR CAM CCM, and UCI CTM) using new observations of total reactive nitrogen and its member species from the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) mission. ATom has now completed two of its four planned deployments sampling the remote Pacific and Atlantic basins of both hemispheres with a comprehensive suite of measurements for constraining reactive photochemistry. All six models have simulated conditions climatologically similar to the deployments. The GMI and GEOS-Chem CTMs have in addition performed hindcast simulations using the MERRA-2 reanalysis, and have been sampled along the flight tracks. We evaluate the performance of the models relative to the observations, and identify factors contributing to their disparate behavior using known differences in model oxidation mechanisms, heterogeneous loss pathways, lightning and surface emissions, and physical loss processes.

  19. Prevalence of cerebral cavernous malformations associated with developmental venous anomalies increases with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinjikji, Waleed; El-Masri, Ali El-Rida; Wald, John T; Flemming, Kelly D; Lanzino, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    To test the hypothesis that the prevalence of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) associated with developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) increases with age, we studied the age-related prevalence of DVA-associated CCM among patients with DVAs. Patients with DVAs on contrast-enhanced MRI exams performed over a 2-year period were included in this study. A single neuroradiologist reviewed all imaging exams for the presence of CCMs. Baseline demographic data collected included age, gender, presence of CNS neoplasm, history of cranial radiation, and history of seizure. Patients were divided into age groups based on decade of life. Cochran-Armitage trend tests were performed to determine if increasing age was associated with CCM prevalence. A total of 1689 patients with DVAs identified on contrast-enhanced MRI were included. Of these patients, 116 (6.9%) had a cavernous malformation associated with the DVA. There was a significant positive association between age and the prevalence of DVA-associated CCM (P = 0.002). The prevalence of DVA-associated CCM was 0.8% for the 0-10 age group, 1.6% for the 11-20 age group, 7.5% for the 21-30 age group, 9.5% for the 31-40 age group, 6.1% for the 41-50 age group, 6.3% for the 51-60 age group, 7.4% for the 61-70 age group, and 11.6% for the >70 age group (P DVA-associated cavernous malformations among patients with DVAs. These findings suggest that DVA-associated cavernous malformations are acquired lesions.

  20. Guided bone regeneration with asymmetric collagen-chitosan membranes containing aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiayu; Ma, Shiqing; Liu, Zihao; Geng, Hongjuan; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Xi; Li, Hongjie; Gao, Chenyuan; Zhang, Xu; Gao, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Membranes allowing the sustained release of drugs that can achieve cell adhesion are very promising for guided bone regeneration. Previous studies have suggested that aspirin has the potential to promote bone regeneration. The purpose of this study was to prepare a local drug delivery system with aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (ACS) contained in an asymmetric collagen-chitosan membrane (CCM). In this study, the ACS were fabricated using different concentrations of aspirin (5 mg, 25 mg, 50 mg, and 75 mg). The drug release behavior of ACS was studied. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to examine the micromorphology of ACS and aspirin-loaded chitosan nanoparticles contained in chitosan-collagen membranes (ACS-CCM). In vitro bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were cultured and critical-sized cranial defects on Sprague-Dawley rats were made to evaluate the effect of the ACS-CCM on bone regeneration. Drug release behavior results of ACS showed that the nanoparticles fabricated in this study could successfully sustain the release of the drug. TEM showed the morphology of the nanoparticles. SEM images indicated that the asymmetric membrane comprised a loose collagen layer and a dense chitosan layer. In vitro studies showed that ACS-CCM could promote the proliferation of BMSCs, and that the degree of differentiated BMSCs seeded on CCMs containing 50 mg of ACS was higher than that of other membranes. Micro-computed tomography showed that 50 mg of ACS-CCM resulted in enhanced bone regeneration compared with the control group. This study shows that the ACS-CCM would allow the sustained release of aspirin and have further osteogenic potential. This membrane is a promising therapeutic approach to guiding bone regeneration.

  1. Clinical, genetic and neuropathological findings in a series of 138 fetuses with a corpus callosum malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alby, Caroline; Malan, Valérie; Boutaud, Lucile; Marangoni, Maria Angela; Bessières, Bettina; Bonniere, Maryse; Ichkou, Amale; Elkhartoufi, Nadia; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Sonigo, Pascale; Millischer, Anne-Elodie; Thomas, Sophie; Ville, Yves; Vekemans, Michel; Encha-Razavi, Férechté; Attié-Bitach, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Corpus callosum malformation (CCM) is the most frequent brain malformation observed at birth. Because CCM is a highly heterogeneous condition, the prognosis of fetuses diagnosed prenatally remains uncertain, making prenatal counseling difficult. We evaluated retrospectively a total of 138 fetuses, 117 with CCM observed on prenatal imaging examination, and 21 after postmortem autopsy. On ultrasound and/or magnetic resonance imaging, CCM was either isolated (N = 40) or associated with other neurological (N = 57) or extra cerebral findings (N = 21/20, respectively). Most fetuses (N = 132) remained without a diagnosis at the time of pregnancy termination. This emphasizes the need to establish a neuropathological classification and to perform a genomic screening using comparative genomic hybridization. A neuropathological examination performed on 138 cases revealed a spectrum of CCMs, classified as follows: agenesis of corpus callosum (55), CC hypoplasia (30), CC dysmorphism (24), and CCM associated with a malformation of cortical development (29). Of interest, after fetopathological examination, only 16/40 malformations were classified as isolated, highlighting the importance of the autopsy following termination of pregnancy. Among the 138 cases, the underlying etiology was found in 46 cases: diabetes (one case), cytomegalovirus infection (one case), 23 chromosome abnormalities, and 21 mendelian conditions. In our series of 138 cases of CCM, prenatal and postmortem examinations identified a variety of genetic causes. However, no diagnosis could be established in 67% of cases. The classification based on the underlying neurodevelopmental defects paves the way for further genetic studies and genotype-phenotype correlations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 1: Meteorology and comparison with satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Russo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Fast convective transport in the tropics can efficiently redistribute water vapour and pollutants up to the upper troposphere. In this study we compare tropical convection characteristics for the year 2005 in a range of atmospheric models, including numerical weather prediction (NWP models, chemistry transport models (CTMs, and chemistry-climate models (CCMs. The model runs have been performed within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The characteristics of tropical convection, such as seasonal cycle, land/sea contrast and vertical extent, are analysed using satellite observations as a benchmark for model simulations. The observational datasets used in this work comprise precipitation rates, outgoing longwave radiation, cloud-top pressure, and water vapour from a number of independent sources, including ERA-Interim analyses. Most models are generally able to reproduce the seasonal cycle and strength of precipitation for continental regions but show larger discrepancies with observations for the Maritime Continent region. The frequency distribution of high clouds from models and observations is calculated using highly temporally-resolved (up to 3-hourly cloud top data. The percentage of clouds above 15 km varies significantly between the models. Vertical profiles of water vapour in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere (UTLS show large differences between the models which can only be partly attributed to temperature differences. If a convective plume reaches above the level of zero net radiative heating, which is estimated to be ~15 km in the tropics, the air detrained from it can be transported upwards by radiative heating into the lower stratosphere. In this context, we discuss the role of tropical convection as a precursor for the transport of short-lived species into the lower stratosphere.

  3. Ozone database in support of CMIP5 simulations: results and corresponding radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cionni

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A continuous tropospheric and stratospheric vertically resolved ozone time series, from 1850 to 2099, has been generated to be used as forcing in global climate models that do not include interactive chemistry. A multiple linear regression analysis of SAGE I+II satellite observations and polar ozonesonde measurements is used for the stratospheric zonal mean dataset during the well-observed period from 1979 to 2009. In addition to terms describing the mean annual cycle, the regression includes terms representing equivalent effective stratospheric chlorine (EESC and the 11-yr solar cycle variability. The EESC regression fit coefficients, together with pre-1979 EESC values, are used to extrapolate the stratospheric ozone time series backward to 1850. While a similar procedure could be used to extrapolate into the future, coupled chemistry climate model (CCM simulations indicate that future stratospheric ozone abundances are likely to be significantly affected by climate change, and capturing such effects through a regression model approach is not feasible. Therefore, the stratospheric ozone dataset is extended into the future (merged in 2009 with multi-model mean projections from 13 CCMs that performed a simulation until 2099 under the SRES (Special Report on Emission Scenarios A1B greenhouse gas scenario and the A1 adjusted halogen scenario in the second round of the Chemistry-Climate Model Validation (CCMVal-2 Activity. The stratospheric zonal mean ozone time series is merged with a three-dimensional tropospheric data set extracted from simulations of the past by two CCMs (CAM3.5 and GISS-PUCCINI and of the future by one CCM (CAM3.5. The future tropospheric ozone time series continues the historical CAM3.5 simulation until 2099 following the four different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs. Generally good agreement is found between the historical segment of the ozone database and satellite observations, although it should be noted that

  4. Ocean acidification of a coastal Antarctic marine microbial community reveals a critical threshold for CO2 tolerance in phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppeler, Stacy; Petrou, Katherina; Schulz, Kai G.; Westwood, Karen; Pearce, Imojen; McKinlay, John; Davidson, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    High-latitude oceans are anticipated to be some of the first regions affected by ocean acidification. Despite this, the effect of ocean acidification on natural communities of Antarctic marine microbes is still not well understood. In this study we exposed an early spring, coastal marine microbial community in Prydz Bay to CO2 levels ranging from ambient (343 µatm) to 1641 µatm in six 650 L minicosms. Productivity assays were performed to identify whether a CO2 threshold existed that led to a change in primary productivity, bacterial productivity, and the accumulation of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and particulate organic matter (POM) in the minicosms. In addition, photophysiological measurements were performed to identify possible mechanisms driving changes in the phytoplankton community. A critical threshold for tolerance to ocean acidification was identified in the phytoplankton community between 953 and 1140 µatm. CO2 levels ≥ 1140 µatm negatively affected photosynthetic performance and Chl a-normalised primary productivity (csGPP14C), causing significant reductions in gross primary production (GPP14C), Chl a accumulation, nutrient uptake, and POM production. However, there was no effect of CO2 on C : N ratios. Over time, the phytoplankton community acclimated to high CO2 conditions, showing a down-regulation of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs) and likely adjusting other intracellular processes. Bacterial abundance initially increased in CO2 treatments ≥ 953 µatm (days 3-5), yet gross bacterial production (GBP14C) remained unchanged and cell-specific bacterial productivity (csBP14C) was reduced. Towards the end of the experiment, GBP14C and csBP14C markedly increased across all treatments regardless of CO2 availability. This coincided with increased organic matter availability (POC and PON) combined with improved efficiency of carbon uptake. Changes in phytoplankton community production could have negative effects on the Antarctic food web and the

  5. Emissions from international shipping: 2. Impact of future technologies on scenarios until 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyring, V.; KöHler, H. W.; Lauer, A.; Lemper, B.

    2005-09-01

    studies of the effects of these emissions on the chemical composition of the atmosphere and on climate. The developed scenarios are suitable for use as input for chemical transport models (CTMs) and coupled chemistry-climate models (CCMs).

  6. Ozone and Temperature Trends in the Upper Stratosphere at Five Stations of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecht, W.; Claude, H.; Schönenborn, F.; McDermid, S.; Leblanc, T.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Keckhut, P.; Hauchecorne, A.; van Gijsel, J. A.; Swart, D. P.; Bodeker, G. E.; Parrish, A.; Boyd, I. S.; Kämpfer, N.; Hocke, K.; Stolarski, R. S.; Frith, S. M.; Thomason, L. W.; Remsberg, E. E.; von~Savigny, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Eyring, V.; Shepherd, T. G.

    2008-12-01

    phaseout of chlorofluorocarbons after the 1987 International Montreal Protocol now shows positive effects on ozone in the upper stratosphere. However, due to increasing CO2, the CCMs simulate a continuous linear cooling by 1~K per decade over the entire 1979 to 2010 period. This is not consistent with the near-constant temperatures observed since the late 1980s.

  7. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Labarthe, Jenni; Légaré, France; Ouimet, Mathieu; Estabrooks, Carole A; Roch, Geneviève; Ghandour, El Kebir; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-07-13

    Knowledge translation (KT) is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR) for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC) have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA) process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care.Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more consensus on the theoretical underpinnings and the

  8. Measuring organizational readiness for knowledge translation in chronic care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouimet Mathieu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation (KT is an imperative in order to implement research-based and contextualized practices that can answer the numerous challenges of complex health problems. The Chronic Care Model (CCM provides a conceptual framework to guide the implementation process in chronic care. Yet, organizations aiming to improve chronic care require an adequate level of organizational readiness (OR for KT. Available instruments on organizational readiness for change (ORC have shown limited validity, and are not tailored or adapted to specific phases of the knowledge-to-action (KTA process. We aim to develop an evidence-based, comprehensive, and valid instrument to measure OR for KT in healthcare. The OR for KT instrument will be based on core concepts retrieved from existing literature and validated by a Delphi study. We will specifically test the instrument in chronic care that is of an increasing importance for the health system. Methods Phase one: We will conduct a systematic review of the theories and instruments assessing ORC in healthcare. The retained theoretical information will be synthesized in a conceptual map. A bibliography and database of ORC instruments will be prepared after appraisal of their psychometric properties according to the standards for educational and psychological testing. An online Delphi study will be carried out among decision makers and knowledge users across Canada to assess the importance of these concepts and measures at different steps in the KTA process in chronic care. Phase two: A final OR for KT instrument will be developed and validated both in French and in English and tested in chronic disease management to measure OR for KT regarding the adoption of comprehensive, patient-centered, and system-based CCMs. Discussion This study provides a comprehensive synthesis of current knowledge on explanatory models and instruments assessing OR for KT. Moreover, this project aims to create more

  9. Mechanisms of carbon dioxide acquisition and CO2 sensing in marine diatoms: a gateway to carbon metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Hopkinson, Brian M; Nakajima, Kensuke; Dupont, Christopher L; Tsuji, Yoshinori

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms are one of the most successful marine eukaryotic algal groups, responsible for up to 20% of the annual global CO 2 fixation. The evolution of a CO 2 -concentrating mechanism (CCM) allowed diatoms to overcome a number of serious constraints on photosynthesis in the marine environment, particularly low [CO 2 ] aq in seawater relative to concentrations required by the CO 2 fixing enzyme, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO), which is partly due to the slow diffusion rate of CO 2 in water and a limited CO 2 formation rate from [Formula: see text] in seawater. Diatoms use two alternative strategies to take up dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from the environment: one primarily relies on the direct uptake of [Formula: see text] through plasma-membrane type solute carrier (SLC) 4 family [Formula: see text] transporters and the other is more reliant on passive diffusion of CO 2 formed by an external carbonic anhydrase (CA). Bicarbonate taken up into the cytoplasm is most likely then actively transported into the chloroplast stroma by SLC4-type transporters on the chloroplast membrane system. Bicarbonate in the stroma is converted into CO 2 only in close proximity to RubisCO preventing unnecessary CO 2 leakage. CAs play significant roles in mobilizing DIC as it is progressively moved towards the site of fixation. However, the evolutionary types and subcellular locations of CAs are not conserved between different diatoms, strongly suggesting that this DIC mobilization strategy likely evolved multiple times with different origins. By contrast, the recent discovery of the thylakoid luminal θ-CA indicates that the strategy to supply CO 2 to RubisCO in the pyrenoid may be very similar to that of green algae, and strongly suggests convergent coevolution in CCM function of the thylakoid lumen not only among diatoms but among eukaryotic algae in general. In this review, both experimental and corresponding theoretical models of the diatom CCMs are

  10. Development and characterization of direct ethanol fuel cells using alkaline anion-exchange membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Peck Cheng

    2009-08-01

    Alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) is a relatively new fuel cell technology that is generating considerable interests. It offers the electrocatalytic advantages of conventional alkaline fuel cells, and the manufacturing and cost advantages of solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells. This project was carried out to develop and characterize high performance membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for all-solid-state AMFCs. The primary fuel of interests is ethanol, but hydrogen was used in the development stages to facilitate the diagnostic and evaluation of the fuel cell performance. In the preliminary investigation, AMFC was assembled using off-the-shelf electrodes and anion-exchange membrane (AEM). It was found that the performance of AMFC operating on ethanol fuel was limited by a large high-frequency resistance (HFR) value. The advantage of using non-toxic ethanol fuel was also compromised by the need to add hydrazine and potassium hydroxide to the fuel blend. Subsequently, a high performance MEA was developed for an all-solid-state AMFC, in which liquid electrolyte or other additives were not required during the operation of the fuel cell. Ionomer was incorporated in the formulation of catalyst ink, and the catalyst ink was directly coated on the anion-exchange membrane (AEM). An ionomer content of 20 wt.% was found to be the optimum amount required in the catalyst layers. It was demonstrated that the AMFC generated a maximum power density of 365 mW/cm2 and 213 mW/cm 2 with the use of hydrogen/oxygen and hydrogen/pure air, respectively. The performance of the AMFC was also found to be influenced by exposure to carbon dioxide in the air. Hence, the CCMs were pre-treated in potassium hydroxide solution and pure oxygen was used to condition the fuel cell to maximize the power output from the AMFCs. Although satisfactory performance was demonstrated in the AMFC, its stability during cell operation remains a major issue. The poor stability was attributed to degradation of

  11. Temporal lobe epilepsy and cavernous malformations: surgical strategies and long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Fernando L; Vivas, Andrew C; Manwaring, Jotham; Schoenberg, Mike R; Benbadis, Selim R

    2015-11-01

    lesions may be beneficial. Management of mesial temporal CCMs (archicortex) should consider resection of a well-defined epileptogenic zone (including mesial structures) due to high probability of pathologically proven MTS. The use of this treatment algorithm is useful for the education and treatment of these patients.

  12. Strategies of dissolved inorganic carbon use in macroalgae across a gradient of terrestrial influence: implications for the Great Barrier Reef in the context of ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Cornwall, Christopher; Gartrell, Patrick; Hurd, Catriona; Tran, Dien V.

    2016-12-01

    Macroalgae are generally used as indicators of coral reef status; thus, understanding the drivers and mechanisms leading to increased macroalgal abundance are of critical importance. Ocean acidification (OA) due to elevated carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations has been suggested to stimulate macroalgal growth and abundance on reefs. However, little is known about the physiological mechanisms by which reef macroalgae use CO2 from the bulk seawater for photosynthesis [i.e., (1) direct uptake of bicarbonate (HCO3 -) and/or CO2 by means of carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCM) and (2) the diffusive uptake of CO2], which species could benefit from increased CO2 or which habitats may be more susceptible to acidification-induced algal proliferations. Here, we provide the first quantitative examination of CO2-use strategies in coral reef macroalgae and provide information on how the proportion of species and the proportional abundance of species utilising each of the carbon acquisition strategies varies across a gradient of terrestrial influence (from inshore to offshore reefs) in the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Four macroalgal groups were identified based on their carbon uptake strategies: (1) CCM-only (HCO3 - only users); (2) CCM-HCO3 -/CO2 (active uptake HCO3 - and/or CO2 use); (3) Non-CCM species (those relying on diffusive CO2 uptake); and (4) Calcifiers. δ13C values of macroalgae, confirmed by pH drift assays, show that diffusive CO2 use is more prevalent in deeper waters, possibly due to low light availability that limits activity of CCMs. Inshore shallow reefs had a higher proportion of CCM-only species, while reefs further away from terrestrial influence and exposed to better water quality had a higher number of non-CCM species than inshore and mid-shelf reefs. As non-CCM macroalgae are more responsive to increased seawater CO2 and OA, reef slopes of the outer reefs are probably the habitats most vulnerable to the impacts of OA. Our results suggest a potentially

  13. Recent variability of the solar spectral irradiance and its impact on climate modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolli, I.; Matthes, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.; Krivova, N. A.; Tourpali, K.; Weber, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Gray, L.; Langematz, U.; Pilewskie, P.; Rozanov, E.; Schmutz, W.; Shapiro, A.; Solanki, S. K.; Woods, T. N.

    2013-04-01

    measurements. However, the integral of the SSI computed with this model over the entire spectral range does not reproduce the measured cyclical changes of the total solar irradiance, which is an essential requisite for realistic evaluations of solar effects on the Earth's climate in CCMs. We show that within the range provided by the recent SSI observations and semi-empirical models discussed here, the NRLSSI model and SORCE observations represent the lower and upper limits in the magnitude of the SSI solar cycle variation. The results of the CCM simulations, forced with the SSI solar cycle variations estimated from the NRLSSI model and from SORCE measurements, show that the direct solar response in the stratosphere is larger for the SORCE than for the NRLSSI data. Correspondingly, larger UV forcing also leads to a larger surface response. Finally, we discuss the reliability of the available data and we propose additional coordinated work, first to build composite SSI data sets out of scattered observations and to refine current SSI models, and second, to run coordinated CCM experiments.

  14. How Relevant Is Occlusion of Associated Developmental Venous Anomaly in Cerebral Cavernoma Surgery? A Clinical and Radiographic Comparison Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantongtip, Dilok; Spetzger, Uwe; Arnold, Sebastian; von Schilling, Andrej; Kiriyanthan, George

    2016-03-01

    significant difference was seen in patients with no associated DVA (group I) and patients with impaired DVA (group II) (p =0.215). The average postoperative Karnofsky score was 88.33 ± 9.17 in group I, 92.0 ± 6.32 in group II,; and 90.0 ± 8.16 in group III (p =0.51). The peri-resectional edema volume in group I was 8.90 ± 9.75 cm(3); in group II, 8.16 ± 3.78 cm(3); and in group III, 2.48 ± 1.48 cm(3) (p = 0.35). The location (eloquent or noneloquent region) of the CCM and the DVA, respectively, was the only significant factor for any additional neurologic deficit (p = 0.001). Our results demonstrated similar postoperative clinical outcomes and radiographic findings between patients with impaired and unimpaired DVA after resection of CCMs. Postoperative MR images showed less peri-resectional edema in patients with preserved and unimpaired DVA. However, these results will not convert the paradigm in cavernoma surgery to preserve the associated DVA. The overall goal is still preservation of unimpaired venous drainage, but our results show that the occlusion of a DVA adjacent to a CCM can be tolerated because of a low risk of complications. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stenke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size" against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North

  16. Extreme Events: low and high total ozone over Arosa, Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, H. E.; Staehelin, J.; Maeder, J. A.; Ribatet, M.; Stübi, R.; Weihs, P.; Holawe, F.; Peter, T.; Davison, A. C.

    2009-04-01

    The frequency distribution of days with extreme low (termed ELOs) and high (termed EHOs) total ozone is analyzed for the world's longest total ozone record (Arosa, Switzerland - for details see Staehelin et al.,1998a,b), with new tools from extreme value theory (e.g. Coles, 2001; Ribatet, 2007). A heavy-tail focused approach is used through the fitting of the Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) to the Arosa time series. Asymptotic arguments (Pickands, 1975) justify the use of the GPD for modeling exceedances over a high (or below a low) enough threshold (Coles, 2001). The analysis shows that the GPD is appropriate for modeling the frequency distribution in total ozone above or below a mathematically well-defined threshold. While previous studies focused on so termed ozone mini-holes and mini-highs (e.g. Bojkov and Balis, 2001, Koch et al., 2005), this study is the first to present a mathematical description of extreme events in low and high total ozone for a northern mid-latitudes site (Rieder et al., 2009). The results show (a) an increase in days with extreme low (ELOs) and (b) a decrease in days with extreme high total ozone (EHOs) during the last decades, (c) that the general trend in total ozone is strongly determined by these extreme events and (d) that fitting the GPD is an appropriate method for the estimation of the frequency distribution of so-called ozone mini-holes. Furthermore, this concept allows one to separate the effect of Arctic ozone depletion from that of in situ mid-latitude ozone loss. As shown by this study, ELOs and EHOs have a strong influence on mean values in total ozone and the "extremes concept" could be further used also for validation of Chemistry-Climate-Models (CCMs) within the scientific community. References: Bojkov, R. D., and Balis, D.S.: Characteristics of episodes with extremely low ozone values in the northern middle latitudes 1975-2000, Ann. Geophys., 19, 797-807, 2001. Coles, S.: An Introduction to Statistical Modeling of

  17. Climate and chemistry effects of a regional scale nuclear conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenke, A.; Hoyle, C. R.; Luo, B.; Rozanov, E.; Gröbner, J.; Maag, L.; Brönnimann, S.; Peter, T.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have highlighted the severity of detrimental effects for life on earth after an assumed regionally limited nuclear war. These effects are caused by climatic, chemical and radiative changes persisting for up to one decade. However, so far only a very limited number of climate model simulations have been performed, giving rise to the question how realistic previous computations have been. This study uses the coupled chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL, which belongs to a different family of CCMs than previously used, to investigate the consequences of such a hypothetical nuclear conflict. In accordance with previous studies, the present work assumes a scenario of a nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan, each applying 50 warheads with an individual blasting power of 15 kt ("Hiroshima size") against the major population centers, resulting in the emission of tiny soot particles, which are generated in the firestorms expected in the aftermath of the detonations. Substantial uncertainties related to the calculation of likely soot emissions, particularly concerning assumptions of target fuel loading and targeting of weapons, have been addressed by simulating several scenarios, with soot emissions ranging from 1 to 12 Tg. Their high absorptivity with respect to solar radiation leads to a rapid self-lofting of the soot particles into the strato- and mesosphere within a few days after emission, where they remain for several years. Consequently, the model suggests earth's surface temperatures to drop by several degrees Celsius due to the shielding of solar irradiance by the soot, indicating a major global cooling. In addition, there is a substantial reduction of precipitation lasting 5 to 10 yr after the conflict, depending on the magnitude of the initial soot release. Extreme cold spells associated with an increase in sea ice formation are found during Northern Hemisphere winter, which expose the continental land masses of North America and Eurasia to a

  18. Multi-model assessment of stratospheric ozone return dates and ozone recovery in CCMVal-2 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Eyring

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Projections of stratospheric ozone from a suite of chemistry-climate models (CCMs have been analyzed. In addition to a reference simulation where anthropogenic halogenated ozone depleting substances (ODSs and greenhouse gases (GHGs vary with time, sensitivity simulations with either ODS or GHG concentrations fixed at 1960 levels were performed to disaggregate the drivers of projected ozone changes. These simulations were also used to assess the two distinct milestones of ozone returning to historical values (ozone return dates and ozone no longer being influenced by ODSs (full ozone recovery. The date of ozone returning to historical values does not indicate complete recovery from ODSs in most cases, because GHG-induced changes accelerate or decelerate ozone changes in many regions. In the upper stratosphere where CO2-induced stratospheric cooling increases ozone, full ozone recovery is projected to not likely have occurred by 2100 even though ozone returns to its 1980 or even 1960 levels well before (~2025 and 2040, respectively. In contrast, in the tropical lower stratosphere ozone decreases continuously from 1960 to 2100 due to projected increases in tropical upwelling, while by around 2040 it is already very likely that full recovery from the effects of ODSs has occurred, although ODS concentrations are still elevated by this date. In the midlatitude lower stratosphere the evolution differs from that in the tropics, and rather than a steady decrease in ozone, first a decrease in ozone is simulated from 1960 to 2000, which is then followed by a steady increase through the 21st century. Ozone in the midlatitude lower stratosphere returns to 1980 levels by ~2045 in the Northern Hemisphere (NH and by ~2055 in the Southern Hemisphere (SH, and full ozone recovery is likely reached by 2100 in both hemispheres. Overall, in all regions except the tropical lower stratosphere, full ozone recovery from ODSs occurs significantly later than the

  19. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhnke, Roland; Geomon, Ndacc Infrared, Modelling Working Group

    2010-05-01

    Institute of Technology (KIT), IMK-IFU, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, (16) University of Denver, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Denver, CO, USA, (17) National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO, USA, (18) NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, USA, (19) Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Steinbuch Centre for Computing, Karlsruhe, Germany Total column abundances of HCl and ClONO2, the primary components of the stratospheric inorganic chlorine (Cly) budget, and of HF have been retrieved from ground-based, high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 17 sites of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) located at latitudes between 80.05°N and 77.82°S. These data extend over more than 20 years (through 2007) during a period when the growth in atmospheric halogen loading has slowed in response to the Montreal Protocol (and ammendments). These observed time series are interpreted with calculations performed with a 2-D model, the 3-D chemistry-transport models (CTMs) KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the 3-D chemistry-climate models (CCMs) EMAC and SOCOLv2.0. The observed Cly and in particular HCl column abundances decreases significantely since the end of the nineties at all stations, which is consistent with the observed changes in the halocarbon source gases, with an increasing rate in the last years. In contrast to Cly, the trend values for total column HF at the different stations show a less consistent behaviour pointing to the fact that the time development of the HF columns is peaking. There is a good overall qualitative agreement regarding trends between models and data. With respect to the CTMs the agreement improves if simulation results for measurement days only are used in the trend analysis instead of simulation results for each day.

  20. Uncertainties in modelling Mt. Pinatubo eruption with 2-D AER model and CCM SOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    measurements and from AER model calculation serve as input for the 3D chemistry climate model (CCM) SOCOL [Schraner et al., 2008]. The heating rates, calculated with SOCOL, are compared with a reference radiative transfer model LibRadtran [Mayer and Kylling, 2005]. This comparison suggests that SOCOL underestimates the net heating rate by 10-20%. In stark contrast, the temperature increase in the lower stratosphere due to absorption of longwave and near infrared radiation is overestimated by all SOCOL scenarios. This lets us conclude that SOCOL, and similarly other state-of-the-art CCMs, misrepresent processes required to model the effect of volcanic eruptions on the lower stratosphere and tropopause region. Possible reasons for model deficiencies could be too coarse vertical resolution or missing dynamical feedbacks near the tropopause and in the lower stratosphere. Another important feature is the warming of the tropical troposphere, which is present in the model simulation but was not observed with comparable amplitude in reality. The heating of the lower stratosphere in the models leads to an increase of stratospheric water vapour and influences the radiative and chemical properties of the stratosphere. Eyring, V. et al (2006), Assessment of temperature, trace species, and ozone in chemistry-climate model simulations of the recent past, Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 111, D22,308. Guo, S., G. J. S. Bluth, W. I. Rose, I. M. Watson, and A. J. Prata (2004), Re-evaluation of SO2 release of the 15 June 1991 Pinatubo eruption using ultraviolet and infrared satellite sensors, Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems, 5. Mayer, B., and A. Kylling (2005), Technical note: The libRadtran software package for radiative transfer calculations - description and examples of use, Atmos. Chem. Phys, 5, 1855-1877. McCormick, M. P. (1992), Initial assessment of the stratospheric and climatic impact of the 1991 Mount- Pinatubo eruption - prologue, Geophysical Research Letters, 19 (2