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Sample records for ccl20 chemokine expression

  1. The chemokines CCL11, CCL20, CCL21, and CCL24 are preferentially expressed in polarized human secondary lymphoid follicles.

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    Buri, Caroline; Gutersohn, Andreas; Hauser, Chantal; Kappeler, Andreas; Mueller, Christoph

    2004-10-01

    Chemokines regulate cellular trafficking to and from lymphoid follicles. Here, the distribution pattern of four CCL chemokines is defined by in situ hybridization in human lymphoid follicles from tonsils and lymph nodes (LNs) of newborns and adults. Cells expressing CCL11 (eotaxin) and CCL20 (Exodus) were preferentially located within follicles, while cells expressing CCL21 (secondary lymphoid-tissue chemokine) and CCL24 (eotaxin-2) mRNA were almost exclusively found in the perifollicular areas. Hence, the two CCR3-binding chemokines, CCL11 and CCL24, showed a mutually exclusive expression pattern in the intra- and extra-follicular areas, respectively. Chemokine gene expression paralleled follicular maturation: in tonsils, where approximately 80% of follicles are polarized, CCL11 and CCL20 mRNA-positive cells were detected more frequently than in lymph nodes from adults, where about half of follicles are non-polarized. No intrafollicular chemokine expression was detectable in the primary follicles from newborns. Extrafollicular cells expressing CCL21 and CCL24 were again more frequent in tonsils than in LNs from adults. The observed preferential presence of cells expressing CC chemokines in polarized human lymphoid follicles indicates that chemokines are not only instrumental in the induction of follicle formation, but may also be involved in their further differentiation.

  2. Lateral fluid percussion injury of the brain induces CCL20 inflammatory chemokine expression in rats

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    Das Mahasweta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI evokes a systemic immune response including leukocyte migration into the brain and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines; however, the mechanisms underlying TBI pathogenesis and protection are poorly understood. Due to the high incidence of head trauma in the sports field, battlefield and automobile accidents identification of the molecular signals involved in TBI progression is critical for the development of novel therapeutics. Methods In this report, we used a rat lateral fluid percussion impact (LFPI model of TBI to characterize neurodegeneration, apoptosis and alterations in pro-inflammatory mediators at two time points within the secondary injury phase. Brain histopathology was evaluated by fluoro-jade (FJ staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL assay, polymerase chain reaction (qRT PCR, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunohistochemistry were employed to evaluate the CCL20 gene expression in different tissues. Results Histological analysis of neurodegeneration by FJ staining showed mild injury in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus. TUNEL staining confirmed the presence of apoptotic cells and CD11b+ microglia indicated initiation of an inflammatory reaction leading to secondary damage in these areas. Analysis of spleen mRNA by PCR microarray of an inflammation panel led to the identification of CCL20 as an important pro-inflammatory signal upregulated 24 h after TBI. Although, CCL20 expression was observed in spleen and thymus after 24h of TBI, it was not expressed in degenerating cortex or hippocampal neurons until 48 h after insult. Splenectomy partially but significantly decreased the CCL20 expression in brain tissues. Conclusion These results demonstrate that the systemic inflammatory reaction to TBI starts earlier than the local brain response and suggest that spleen- and/ or thymus-derived CCL20 might play a role in

  3. The anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose radiation therapy involves a diminished CCL20 chemokine expression and granulocyte/endothelial cell adhesion

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    Roedel, F. [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Univ. of Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hofmann, D.; Auer, J.; Roellinghoff, M.; Beuscher, H.U. [Inst. of Microbiology and Immunology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Keilholz, L. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Clinical Center Bayreuth (Germany); Sauer, R. [Dept. of Radiooncology, Univ. of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Background and purpose: low-dose radiotherapy (LD-RT) is known to exert an anti-inflammatory effect, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. The manipulation of polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) function and/or recruitment may be one mechanism. Chemokines contribute to this process by creating a chemotactic gradient and by activating integrins. This study aimed to characterize the effect of LD-RT on CCL20 chemokine production and PMN/endothelial cell (EC) adhesion. Material and methods: the EC line EA.hy.926 was irradiated with doses ranging from 0 to 3 Gy and was co-cultured with PMNs from healthy donors either by direct cell contact or separated by transwell membrane chambers. CXCL8, CCL18, CCL20 chemokine and tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-){alpha} cytokine levels in supernatants were determined by ELISA and adhesion assays were performed. The functional impact of the cytokines transforming growth factor-(TGF-){beta}{sub 1} and TNF-{alpha} and of the intercellular adhesion molecule-(ICAM-)1 on CCL20 expression was analyzed by using neutralizing antibodies. Results: as compared to CXCL8 and CCL18, CCL20 chemokine secretion was found to be exclusively induced by a direct cell-cell contact between PMNs and EA.hy.926 ECs in a TNF-{alpha}-dependent, but ICAM-1-independent manner. Furthermore, irradiation with doses between 0.5 and 1 Gy resulted in a significant reduction of CCL20 release which was dependent on TGF-{beta}{sub 1} (p < 0.01). The decrease of CCL20 paralleled with a significant reduction in PMN/EA.hy.926 EC adhesion (p < 0.001). Conclusion: the modulation of CCL20 chemokine expression and PMN/EC adhesion adds a further facet to the plethora of mechanisms contributing to the anti-inflammatory efficacy of LD-RT. (orig.)

  4. Transforming Growth Factor-β and Interleukin-1β Signaling Pathways Converge on the Chemokine CCL20 Promoter.

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    Brand, Oliver J; Somanath, Sangeeta; Moermans, Catherine; Yanagisawa, Haruhiko; Hashimoto, Mitsuo; Cambier, Stephanie; Markovics, Jennifer; Bondesson, Andrew J; Hill, Arthur; Jablons, David; Wolters, Paul; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Baron, Jody L; Nishimura, Stephen L

    2015-06-05

    CCL20 is the only chemokine ligand for the chemokine receptor CCR6, which is expressed by the critical antigen presenting cells, dendritic cells. Increased expression of CCL20 is likely involved in the increased recruitment of dendritic cells observed in fibroinflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). CCL20 expression is increased by the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We have determined that IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression is also dependent on the multifunctional cytokine TGF-β. TGF-β is expressed in a latent form that must be activated to function, and activation is achieved through binding to the integrin αvβ8 (itgb8). Here we confirm correlative increases in αvβ8 and IL-1β with CCL20 protein in lung parenchymal lysates of a large cohort of COPD patients. How IL-1β- and αvβ8-mediated TGF-β activation conspire to increase fibroblast CCL20 expression remains unknown, because these pathways have not been shown to directly interact. We evaluate the 5'-flanking region of CCL20 to determine that IL-1β-driven CCL20 expression is dependent on αvβ8-mediated activation of TGF-β. We identify a TGF-β-responsive element (i.e. SMAD) located on an upstream enhancer of the human CCL20 promoter required for efficient IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, this upstream enhancer complexes with the p50 subunit of NF-κB on a NF-κB-binding element close to the transcriptional start site of CCL20. These interactions are confirmed by electromobility shift assays in nuclear extracts from human lung fibroblasts. These data define a mechanism by which αvβ8-dependent activation of TGF-β regulates IL-1β-dependent CCL20 expression in COPD. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. The Increased Expression of CCL20 and CCR6 in Rectal Mucosa Correlated to Severe Inflammation in Pediatric Ulcerative Colitis

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    Keiichi Uchida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. The aim of this study is to clarify the differences of CCL20 and CCR6 expression, chemokine correlated to intestinal homeostasis, between pediatric and adult ulcerative colitis (UC patients. Methods. Onehundred forty-one patients who underwent proctocolectomy were divided to two groups including childhood-onset UC (CUC, <16 years old, n=24 and adult-onset UC (AUC, ≧16 years old, n=117. A total of 141 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples of rectum were obtained from these patients. Histological inflammation of rectum in resected specimen was evaluated by using Geboes histological assessment. In immunohistochemistry study, the CCL20 expression was evaluated by intensity and the stained area, and the CCR6 expression was evaluated by lymphocytes infiltration pattern. Results. CCL20 score and CCR6 positive lymphocytes infiltration pattern were statistically significantly correlated with histological inflammation severity of UC in all patients (P<0.05. CCL20 and CCR6 expression in CUC were statistically significantly higher than that in AUC in all or pathologically severe cases (P<0.05. Conclusions. CCL20 and CCR6 may play a significant role in local damage and pathological changes in UC especially pediatric patients. In the future, our understanding of the differences in CCL-CCR6 interaction between adults and children may lead to the pathogenesis of IBD.

  6. Protein engineering of the chemokine CCL20 prevents psoriasiform dermatitis in an IL-23-dependent murine model

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    Getschman, A E; Imai, Y; Larsen, O

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by the infiltration of T cell and other immune cells to the skin in response to injury or autoantigens. Conventional, as well as unconventional, γδ T cells are recruited to the dermis and epidermis by CCL20 and other chemokines. Toget...

  7. Interaction between CXCR4 and CCL20 pathways regulates tumor growth.

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    Katia Beider

    Full Text Available The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand CXCL12 is overexpressed in the majority of tumors and is critically involved in the development and metastasis of these tumors. CXCR4 is expressed in malignant tumor cells whereas its ligand SDF-1 (CXCL12 is expressed mainly by cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF. Similarly to CXCR4, the chemokine CCL20 is overexpressed in variety of tumors; however its role and regulation in tumors is not fully clear. Here, we show that the chemokine receptor CXCR4 stimulates the production of the chemokine CCL20 and that CCL20 stimulates the proliferation and adhesion to collagen of various tumor cells. Furthermore, overexpression of CCL20 in tumor cells promotes growth and adhesion in vitro and increased tumor growth and invasiveness in vivo. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to CCL20 inhibit the in vivo growth of tumors that either overexpress CXCR4 or CCL20 or naturally express CCL20. These results reveal a role for CCL20 in CXCR4-dependent and -independent tumor growth and suggest a therapeutic potential for CCL20 and CCR6 antagonists in the treatment of CXCR4- and CCL20-dependent malignancies.

  8. Involvement of CCR6/CCL20/IL-17 Axis in NSCLC Disease Progression

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    Amir, Gail; Demma, Jonathan; Vernea, Fiona; Beider, Katia; Shlomai, Zippora; Wald, Hanna; Zamir, Gideon; Shapira, Oz M.; Peled, Amnon; Wald, Ori

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Autocrine and paracrine chemokine/chemokine receptor-based interactions promote non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC) carcinogenesis. CCL20/CCR6 interactions are involved in prostatic and colonic malignancy pathogenesis. The expression and function of CCL20/CCR6 and its related Th-17 type immune response in NSCLC is not yet defined. We sought to characterize the role of the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis in NSCLC tumor growth. Methods A specialized histopathologist blindly assessed CCL20/CCR6 expression levels in 49 tissue samples of NSCLC patients operated in our department. Results were correlated to disease progression. Colony assays, ERK signaling and chemokine production were measured to assess cancer cell responsiveness to CCL20 and IL-17 stimulation. Results CCL20 was highly expressed in the majority (38/49, 77.5%) of tumor samples. Only a minority of samples (8/49, 16.5%) showed high CCR6 expression. High CCR6 expression was associated with a shorter disease-free survival (P = 0.008) and conferred a disease stage-independent 4.87-fold increased risk for disease recurrence (P = 0.0076, CI 95% 1.52–15.563). Cancerous cell colony-forming capacity was increased by CCL20 stimulation; this effect was dependent in part on ERK phosphorylation and signaling. IL-17 expression was detected in NSCLC; IL-17 potentiated the production of CCL20 by cancerous cells. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CCL20/CCR6 axis promotes NSCLC disease progression. CCR6 is identified as a potential new prognostic marker and the CCL20/CCR6/IL-17 axis as a potential new therapeutic target. Larger scale studies are required to consolidate these observations. PMID:21949768

  9. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE

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    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20...... immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ...

  10. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

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    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    -κB activation inhibited CCL20 expression in mtBALB cybrids and decreased their migratory capabilities. Thus, acquired mtDNA mutations may promote tumorigenic phenotypes through up-regulation of chemokine CCL20.

  11. Transgenic mouse model harboring the transcriptional fusion ccl20-luciferase as a novel reporter of pro-inflammatory response.

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    Martina Crispo

    Full Text Available The chemokine CCL20, the unique ligand of CCR6 functions as an attractant of immune cells. Expression of CCL20 is induced by Toll-like Receptor (TLR signaling or proinflammatory cytokine stimulation. However CCL20 is also constitutively produced at specific epithelial sites of mucosa. This expression profile is achieved by transcriptional regulation. In the present work we characterized regulatory features of mouse Ccl20 gene. Transcriptional fusions between the mouse Ccl20 promoter and the firefly luciferase (luc encoding gene were constructed and assessed in in vitro and in vivo assays. We found that liver CCL20 expression and luciferase activity were upregulated by systemic administration of the TLR5 agonist flagellin. Using shRNA and dominant negative form specific for mouse TLR5, we showed that this expression was controlled by TLR5. To address in situ the regulation of gene activity, a transgenic mouse line harboring a functional Ccl20-luc fusion was generated. The luciferase expression was highly concordant with Ccl20 expression in different tissues. Our data indicate that the transgenic mouse model can be used to monitor activation of innate response in vivo.

  12. Rhinovirus-bacteria coexposure synergistically induces CCL20 production from human bronchial epithelial cells.

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    Maciejewski, Barbara A; Jamieson, Kyla C; Arnason, Jason W; Kooi, Cora; Wiehler, Shahina; Traves, Suzanne L; Leigh, Richard; Proud, David

    2017-05-01

    Exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are triggered by viral or bacterial pathogens, with human rhinovirus (HRV) and nontypeable Hemophilus influenzae (NTHI) among the most commonly detected pathogens. Patients who suffer from concomitant viral and bacterial infection have more severe exacerbations. The airway epithelial cell is the initial site of viral and bacterial interactions, and CCL20 is an epithelial chemokine that attracts immature dendritic cells to the airways and can act as an antimicrobial. As such, it contributes to innate and adaptive immune responses to infection. We used primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells and the BEAS-2B cell line to examine the effects of bacterial-viral coexposure, as well as each stimulus alone, on epithelial expression of CXCL8 and, in particular, CCL20. HRV-bacterial coexposure induced synergistic production of CXCL8 and CCL20 compared with the sum of each stimulus alone. Synergistic induction of CCL20 did not require viral replication and occurred with two different HRV serotypes that use different viral receptors. Synergy was also seen with either NTHI or Pseudomonas aeruginosa Synergistic induction of CCL20 was transcriptionally regulated. Although NF-κB was required for transcription, it did not regulate synergy, but NF-IL-6 did appear to contribute. Among MAPK inhibitors studied, neither SB203580 nor PD98059 had any effect on synergy, whereas U0126 prevented synergistic induction of CCL20 by HRV and bacteria, apparently via "off-target" effects. Thus bacterial-viral coexposure synergistically increases innate immune responses compared with individual infections. We speculate that this increased inflammatory response leads to worse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine Induces CCL20 Secretion by Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in the Presence of the Short-Chain Fatty Acid, Butyrate

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    Ju-Ri Sim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs, such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, modulate immune responses in the gut. However, the effect of SCFAs on mucosal vaccine-induced immune cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether SCFAs modulate chemokine expression induced by the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine, Shanchol™, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Shanchol™ induced expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level. Interestingly, CCL20 secretion was substantially increased by co-stimulation with Shanchol™ and butyrate, while neither acetate nor propionate showed such effect. Enhanced CCL20 secretion was associated with GPR109A activation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibition. In addition, co-treatment with Shanchol™ and butyrate synergistically increased the secretion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Moreover, CCL20 secretion was decreased by inhibiting the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. However, neither inflammasomes nor caspases were involved in CCL20 production. The culture supernatant of cells treated with Shanchol™ and butyrate augmented human immature dendritic cell migration. Collectively, these results suggest that butyrate enhances Shanchol™-induced CCL20 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via HDAC inhibition and ATP-P2X7 signaling by activating GPR109A. These effects potentially enhance the mucosal immune responses in the gut induced by this oral cholera vaccine.

  14. Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccine Induces CCL20 Secretion by Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells in the Presence of the Short-Chain Fatty Acid, Butyrate.

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    Sim, Ju-Ri; Kang, Seok-Seong; Lee, Daesang; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), such as acetate, butyrate, and propionate, modulate immune responses in the gut. However, the effect of SCFAs on mucosal vaccine-induced immune cell migration is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether SCFAs modulate chemokine expression induced by the killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccine, Shanchol™, in human intestinal epithelial cells. Shanchol™ induced expression of CCL2, CCL5, CCL20, and CXCL10 at the mRNA level, but not at the protein level. Interestingly, CCL20 secretion was substantially increased by co-stimulation with Shanchol™ and butyrate, while neither acetate nor propionate showed such effect. Enhanced CCL20 secretion was associated with GPR109A activation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition. In addition, co-treatment with Shanchol™ and butyrate synergistically increased the secretion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Moreover, CCL20 secretion was decreased by inhibiting the extracellular ATP receptor P2X7. However, neither inflammasomes nor caspases were involved in CCL20 production. The culture supernatant of cells treated with Shanchol™ and butyrate augmented human immature dendritic cell migration. Collectively, these results suggest that butyrate enhances Shanchol™-induced CCL20 production in human intestinal epithelial cells via HDAC inhibition and ATP-P2X7 signaling by activating GPR109A. These effects potentially enhance the mucosal immune responses in the gut induced by this oral cholera vaccine.

  15. Obesity exacerbates colitis-associated cancer via IL-6-regulated macrophage polarisation and CCL-20/CCR-6-mediated lymphocyte recruitment.

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    Wunderlich, Claudia M; Ackermann, P Justus; Ostermann, Anna Lena; Adams-Quack, Petra; Vogt, Merly C; Tran, My-Ly; Nikolajev, Alexei; Waisman, Ari; Garbers, Christoph; Theurich, Sebastian; Mauer, Jan; Hövelmeyer, Nadine; Wunderlich, F Thomas

    2018-04-25

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide in which the vast majority of cases exhibit little genetic risk but are associated with a sedentary lifestyle and obesity. Although the mechanisms underlying CRC and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC) remain unclear, we hypothesised that obesity-induced inflammation predisposes to CAC development. Here, we show that diet-induced obesity accelerates chemically-induced CAC in mice via increased inflammation and immune cell recruitment. Obesity-induced interleukin-6 (IL-6) shifts macrophage polarisation towards tumour-promoting macrophages that produce the chemokine CC-chemokine-ligand-20 (CCL-20) in the CAC microenvironment. CCL-20 promotes CAC progression by recruiting CC-chemokine-receptor-6 (CCR-6)-expressing B cells and γδ T cells via chemotaxis. Compromised cell recruitment as well as inhibition of B and γδ T cells protects against CAC progression. Collectively, our data reveal a function for IL-6 in the CAC microenvironment via lymphocyte recruitment through the CCL-20/CCR-6 axis, thereby implicating a potential therapeutic intervention for human patients.

  16. CCL20 secreted from IgA1-stimulated human mesangial cells recruits inflammatory Th17 cells in IgA nephropathy.

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    Guoyuan Lu

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy (IgAN is the most common primary glomerulonephritis characterized by human mesangial cells (HMC proliferation and extracellular matrix expansion associated with immune deposits consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1. However, how IgA1 contributes to IgAN has yet to be completely elucidated. In this study, the expression profile of chemokines was more altered in IgA1-treated HMC than in the control group. CCL20 was significantly higher either in the serum of IgAN patients or in IgA1-treated HMC. Further experiments demonstrated that CCR6, the only receptor of CCL20, was highly expressed in activated T cells. Intracellular staining assay and cytokine expression profile implied that CCR6+ T cells produced high IL-17 levels. Transwell experiment immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence experiments extensively demonstrated that CCL20 could recruit inflammatory Th17 cells to the kidneys. These phenomena caused a series of immune inflammatory responses and further damaged the kidneys. Therefore, HMC stimulated by IgA1 could produce CCL20 and consequently recruit inflammatory Th17 cells to the kidneys to induce further lesion in IgA nephropathy.

  17. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20, a potential biomarker for Graves' disease, is regulated by osteopontin.

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    Xiaoli Li

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Graves' disease (GD is a common autoimmune disease involving the thyroid gland. The altered balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GD. Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 20 (CCL20 is important for interleukin-17 (IL-17 signal activation and a potent chemoattractant for Th17 cells. Meanwhile, Osteopontin (OPN, a broadly expressed pleiotropic cytokine, has been implicated in GD through inducing Th1-involved response to enhance the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but little is known about the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 and IL-17 signaling. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to explore the possibility of CCL20 level as a biomarker for GD, as well as investigate the role of OPN in regulating CCL20 production. METHODS: Fifty untreated GD patients, fifteen euthyroid GD patients, twelve TRAb-negative GD patients and thirty-five healthy control donors were recruited. OPN, CCL20 and other clinical GD diagnosis parameters were measured. CD4+T cells were isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs using antibody-coated magnetic beads. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction were used to determine CCL20 expression level. RESULTS: We found that the plasma CCL20 level was enhanced in GD patients and decreased in euthyroid and TRAb-negative GD patients. In addition, CCL20 level correlated with GD clinical diagnostic parameters and plasma OPN level. Moreover, we demonstrated that recombinant OPN and plasma from untreated GD patients increased the expression of CCL20 in CD4+T cells, which could be blocked by OPN antibody. Furthermore, we found that the effect of OPN on CCL20 expression was mediated by β3 integrin receptor, IL-17, NF-κB and MAPK pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrated that CCL20 might serve as a biomarker for GD and suggested the possible role of OPN in induction of CCL20 expression.

  18. Modulation of pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion from HT-29 human intestinal epithelial cells by commensal bacteria.

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    Sibartie, Shomik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) secrete the chemokine CCL20 in response to infection by various enteropathogenic bacteria or exposure to bacterial flagellin. CCL20 recruits immature dendritic cells and lymphocytes to target sites. Here we investigated IEC responses to various pathogenic and commensal bacteria as well as the modulatory effects of commensal bacteria on pathogen-induced CCL20 secretion. HT-29 human IECs were incubated with commensal bacteria (Bifidobacterium infantis or Lactobacillus salivarius), or with Salmonella typhimurium, its flagellin, Clostridium difficile, Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, or Mycobacterium smegmatis for varying times. In some studies, HT-29 cells were pre-treated with a commensal strain for 2 hr prior to infection or flagellin stimulation. CCL20 and interleukin (IL)-8 secretion and nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Compared to untreated cells, S. typhimurium, C. difficile, M. paratuberculosis, and flagellin activated NF-kappaB and stimulated significant secretion of CCL20 and IL-8 by HT-29 cells. Conversely, B. infantis, L. salivarius or M. smegmatis did not activate NF-kappaB or augment CCL20 or IL-8 production. Treatment with B. infantis, but not L. salivarius, dose-dependently inhibited the baseline secretion of CCL20. In cells pre-treated with B. infantis, C. difficile-, S. typhimurium-, and flagellin-induced CCL20 were significantly attenuated. B. infantis did not limit M. Paratuberculosis-induced CCL20 secretion. CONCLUSION: This study is the first to demonstrate that a commensal strain can attenuate CCL20 secretion in HT-29 IECs. Collectively, the data indicate that M. paratuberculosis may mediate mucosal damage and that B. infantis can exert immunomodulatory effects on IECs that mediate host responses to flagellin and flagellated enteric pathogens.

  19. IL-4 Modulates CCL11 and CCL20 Productions from IL-1β-Stimulated Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

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    Yoshitaka Hosokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: IL-4 is a multifunctional cytokine that is related with the pathological conditions of periodontal disease. However, it is uncertain whether IL-4 could control T cells migration in periodontal lesions. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IL-4 on CCL11, which is a Th2-type chemokine, and CCL20, which is related with Th17 cells migration, productions from human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs. Methods: CCL20 and CCL11 productions from HPDLCs were monitored by ELISA. Western blot analysis was performed to detect phosphorylations of signal transduction molecules in HPDLCs. Results: IL-1β could induce both CCL11 and CCL20 productions in HPDLCs. IL-4 enhanced CCL11 productions from IL-1β-stimulated HPDLCs, though IL-4 inhibited CCL20 production. Western blot analysis showed that protein kinase B (Akt and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT6 pathways were highly activated in IL-4/IL-1β-stimulated HPDLCs. Akt and STAT6 inhibitors decreased CCL11 production, but enhanced CCL20 production in HPDLCs stimulated with IL-4 and IL-1β. Conclusions: These results mean that IL-4 enhanced Th2 cells migration in periodontal lesion to induce CCL11 production from HPDLCs. On the other hand, IL-4 inhibits Th17 cells accumulation in periodontally diseased tissues to inhibit CCL20 production. Therefore, IL-4 is positively related with the pathogenesis of periodontal disease to control chemokine productions in periodontal lesions.

  20. Semen lactoferrin promotes CCL20 production by epithelial cells: Involvement in HIV transmission

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    Lourenço, Alan Grupioni; Komesu, Marilena Chinalli; Machado, Alcyone Artioli; Quintana, Silvana Maria; Bourlet, Thomas; Pozzetto, Bruno; Delézay, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of seminal plasma on Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20 (CCL20) production by epithelial cells and its relationship with lactoferrin. METHODS: HEC-1A cells, a cell line derived from a monostratified endocervical epithelium, were incubated with samples of seminal plasma (diluted 1:10 in culture medium) recovered from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative (HIV-) or HIV seropositive (HIV+) subjects. Recombinant human interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) was used as positive control, and culture medium only as negative control. The measurement of CCL20 production in the supernatants of HEC-1A cells and of lactoferrin in seminal plasma was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. A fractionation of seminal plasma proteins was performed by ion exchange chromatography on a pool of seminal plasma specimens from HIV- subjects. Each fraction was tested for its ability to stimulate the production of CCL20 by HEC-1A cells and for its lactoferrin concentration. The HIV viral load in seminal plasma samples from HIV+ patients was measured using the HIV-Monitor kit (Roche Diagnostic Systems, Branchburg, NJ, United States). RESULTS: The positive control IL-1β was responsible for an increase of 11.36 ± 3.36 times in the production of CCL20. Stimulation of HEC-1A cells was performed in 34 seminal plasma samples (22 from HIV+ subjects and 12 from HIV- subjects). The mean production of CCL20 by HEC-1A in presence of seminal plasma from HIV- and HIV+ subjects was respectively 5.38 ± 0.91 and 7.57 ± 3.26 times higher than that obtained with the untreated cells (P < 0.05 between the two groups). Using the same 34 specimens of seminal plasma, no correlation was observed between the concentration of total proteins in seminal plasma and their ability to stimulate the secretion of CCL20 by HEC-1 cells. In contrast, the ability to produce CCL20 by HEC-1A cells correlated to the concentration of lactoferrin in the seminal plasma samples (r

  1. Varicose veins show enhanced chemokine expression.

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    Solá, L del Rio; Aceves, M; Dueñas, A I; González-Fajardo, J A; Vaquero, C; Crespo, M Sanchez; García-Rodríguez, C

    2009-11-01

    Leucocyte infiltration in the wall of varicose veins has been reported previously. This study was designed to investigate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in control and in patients with varicose veins and to test the effect of treating varicose vein patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) on cytokine expression prior to removal of varices. Sections of vein were removed during operation from both patient groups, and ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs) were performed to assess the expression of chemokines. Group I included non-varicose saphenous veins from healthy patients undergoing amputation for trauma. Varicose veins were obtained from patients with primary varicose undergoing surgical treatment who received no drug (group II) or treatment with 300 mg day(-1) of ASA for 15 days before surgery (group III). Non-varicose veins constitutively expressed low levels of monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) and interleukin (IL)-8 mRNA. Varicose veins had a distinct chemokine expression pattern, since significant up-regulation of MCP-1 and IL-8 and a marked expression of IP-10, RANTES, MIP-1alpha and MIP-1beta mRNA were detected. Removal of the endothelium did not alter this pattern. Varicose veins obtained from patients treated with ASA showed a consistent decrease in chemokine expression, although it did not reach statistical significance. Varicose veins showed increased expression of several chemokines compared to control veins. A non-significant reduction of activation was observed following treatment with ASA for 15 days.

  2. Stat3 inhibition attenuates mechanical allodynia through transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in spinal astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is known to induce cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating gene transcription. Recent studies showed that Stat3 modulates nociceptive transmission by reducing spinal astrocyte proliferation. However, it is unclear whether Stat3 also contributes to the modulation of nociceptive transmission by regulating inflammatory response in spinal astrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of Stat3 on neuroinflammation during development of pain in rats after intrathecal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS: Stat3 specific siRNA oligo and synthetic selective inhibitor (Stattic were applied to block the activity of Stat3 in primary astrocytes or rat spinal cord, respectively. LPS was used to induce the expression of proinflammatory genes in all studies. Immunofluorescence staining of cells and slices of spinal cord was performed to monitor Stat3 activation. The impact of Stat3 inhibition on proinflammatory genes expression was determined by cytokine antibody array, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mechanical allodynia, as determined by the threshold pressure that could induce hind paw withdrawal after application of standardized von Frey filaments, was used to detect the effects of Stat3 inhibition after pain development with intrathecal LPS injection. RESULTS: Intrathecal injection of LPS activated Stat3 in reactive spinal astrocytes. Blockade of Stat3 activity attenuated mechanical allodynia significantly and was correlated with a lower number of reactive astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. In vitro study demonstrated that Stat3 modulated inflammatory response in primary astrocytes by transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression including Cx3cl1, Cxcl5, Cxcl10 and Ccl20. Similarly, inhibition of Stat3 reversed the expression of these chemokines in the spinal dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: Stat3 acted as a

  3. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Songbing; Wang, Liang; Wu, Yugang; Li, Dechun; Zhang, Yanyun

    2010-04-27

    To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC) precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3) and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1) ex vivo and in vivo. B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). For adenoviral (Ad)-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-gamma production was determined with an INF-gamma ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-gamma ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P anti-tumor immunity specific to gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo. This system may prove to be an efficient strategy for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  4. Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Horuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a family of polypeptides that direct the migration of leukocytestoward a site of infection. They play a major role in autoimmune disease and chemokine receptors have recently been found to mediate HIV-1 fusion. In this short review we examine the role of chemokines in host defence and in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases. We conclude by discussing various therapeutic approaches that target chemokine receptors and that could be beneficial in disease.

  5. Chemokines and chemokine receptors expression in the lesions of patients with American cutaneous leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilka Luisa Diaz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL presents distinct active clinical forms with different grades of severity, known as localised (LCL, intermediate (ICL and diffuse (DCL cutaneous leishmaniasis. LCL and DCL are associated with a polarised T-helper (Th1 and Th2 immune response, respectively, whereas ICL, or chronic cutaneous leishmaniasis, is associated with an exacerbated immune response and a mixed cytokine expression profile. Chemokines and chemokine receptors are involved in cellular migration and are critical in the inflammatory response. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of the chemokines CXCL10, CCL4, CCL8, CCL11 and CXCL8 and the chemokine receptors CCR3, CXCR3, CCR5 and CCR7 in the lesions of patients with different clinical forms of ACL using immunohistochemistry. LCL patients exhibited a high density of CXCL10+, CCL4+ and CCL8+ cells, indicating an important role for these chemokines in the local Th1 immune response and the migration of CXCR3+ cells. LCL patients showed a higher density of CCR7+ cells than ICL or DCL patients, suggesting major dendritic cell (DC migration to lymph nodes. Furthermore, DCL was associated with low expression levels of Th1-associated chemokines and CCL11+ epidermal DCs, which contribute to the recruitment of CCR3+ cells. Our findings also suggest an important role for epidermal cells in the induction of skin immune responses through the production of chemokines, such as CXCL10, by keratinocytes.

  6. CCL3 and CCL20-recruited dendritic cells modified by melanoma antigen gene-1 induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanyun

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate whether dendritic cell (DC precursors, recruited by injection of chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3 and CCL20, induce anti-tumor immunity against gastric cancer induced by a DC vaccine expressing melanoma antigen gene-1 (MAGE-1 ex vivo and in vivo. Methods B6 mice were injected with CCL3 and CCL20 via the tail vein. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were analyzed by phenotype analysis and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. For adenoviral (Ad-mediated gene transduction, cultured F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells were incubated with Ad-MAGE-1. Vaccination of stimulated DC induced T lymphocytes. The killing effect of these T cells against gastric carcinoma cells was assayed by MTT. INF-γ production was determined with an INF-γ ELISA kit. In the solid tumor and metastases model, DC-based vaccines were used for immunization after challenge with MFC cells. Tumor size, survival of mice, and number of pulmonary metastatic foci were used to assess the therapeutic effect of DC vaccines. Results F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cell numbers increased after CCL3 and CCL20 injection. Freshly isolated F4/80-B220-CD11c+ cells cultured with cytokines were phenotyically identical to typical DC and gained the capacity to stimulate allogeneic T cells. These DCs were transduced with Ad-MAGE-1, which were prepared for DC vaccines expressing tumor antigen. T lymphocytes stimulated by DCs transduced with Ad-MAGE-1 exhibited specific killing effects on gastric carcinoma cells and produced high levels of INF-γ ex vivo. In vivo, tumor sizes of the experimental group were much smaller than both the positive control group and the negative control groups (P P Conclusions CCL3 and CCL20-recruited DCs modified by adenovirus-trasnsduced, tumor-associated antigen, MAGE-1, can stimulate anti-tumor immunity specific to gastric cancer ex vivo and in vivo. This system may prove to be an efficient strategy for anti-tumor immunotherapy.

  7. CCL20 and Beta-Defensin 2 Production by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Macrophages in Response to Brucella abortus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Andrea G.; Bonetto, Josefina; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.

    2015-01-01

    Both CCL20 and human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) interact with the same membrane receptor and display chemotactic and antimicrobial activities. They are produced by airway epithelia in response to infectious agents and proinflammatory cytokines. Whereas Brucella spp. can infect humans through inhalation, their ability to induce CCL20 and hBD2 in lung cells is unknown. Here we show that B. abortus induces CCL20 expression in human alveolar (A549) or bronchial (Calu-6) epithelial cell lines, primary alveolar epithelial cells, primary human monocytes, monocyte-derived macrophages and the monocytic cell line THP-1. CCL20 expression was mainly mediated by JNK1/2 and NF-kB in both Calu-6 and THP-1 cells. CCL20 secretion was markedly induced in A549, Calu-6 and THP-1 cells by heat-killed B. abortus or a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19) but not by the B. abortus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Accordingly, CCL20 production by B. abortus-infected cells was strongly TLR2-dependent. Whereas hBD2 expression was not induced by B. abortus infection, it was significantly induced in A549 cells by conditioned media from B. abortus-infected THP-1 monocytes (CMB). A similar inducing effect was observed on CCL20 secretion. Experiments using blocking agents revealed that IL-1β, but not TNF-α, was involved in the induction of hBD2 and CCL20 secretion by CMB. In the in vitro antimicrobial assay, the lethal dose (LD) 50 of CCL20 for B. abortus (>50 μg/ml) was markedly higher than that against E. coli (1.5 μg/ml) or a B. abortus mutant lacking the O polysaccharide in its LPS (8.7 ug/ml). hBD2 did not kill any of the B. abortus strains at the tested concentrations. These results show that human lung epithelial cells secrete CCL20 and hBD2 in response to B. abortus and/or to cytokines produced by infected monocytes. Whereas these molecules do not seem to exert antimicrobial activity against this pathogen, they could recruit immune cells to the infection site. PMID:26448160

  8. Correlation between lymph node pathology and chemokine expression during bovine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdison, Stephanie; Watson, Michael; Coffey, Tracey J

    2009-11-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a disease of worldwide importance yet comparatively little is known about chemokine responses to infection. We report on the levels of chemokine expression within lymph nodes of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis when infection would be well established. Expression levels of a number of chemokines were increased in infected cattle and could be correlated to levels of respective chemokine receptors. Several chemokines were significantly correlated to pathology within the lymph node, indicating a direct relationship between chemokine expression and disease. Vaccinated animals challenged with M. bovis had lower levels of chemokine expression than unvaccinated, challenged animals, correlating with lower levels of disease in vaccinated animals. The chemokine expression profile correlated with previous evidence for a pro-inflammatory bias within the lymph node. At this stage of infection we suggest there is on-going chemokine expression by cells associated with the granuloma and continual recruitment of cells to control infection.

  9. Stress-induced production of chemokines by hair follicles regulates the trafficking of dendritic cells in skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Keisuke; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Moro, Kazuyo; Ohyama, Manabu; Adachi, Takeya; Kitashima, Daniela Y; Ueha, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Kabashima, Kenji; Kubo, Akiharu; Cho, Young-hun; Clausen, Björn E; Matsushima, Kouji; Suematsu, Makoto; Furtado, Glaucia C; Lira, Sergio A; Farber, Joshua M; Udey, Mark C; Amagai, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are epidermal dendritic cells with incompletely understood origins that associate with hair follicles for unknown reasons. Here we show that in response to external stress, mouse hair follicles recruited Gr-1hi monocyte-derived precursors of LCs whose epidermal entry was dependent on the chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR6, whereas the chemokine receptor CCR8 inhibited the recruitment of LCs. Distinct hair-follicle regions had differences in their expression of ligands for CCR2 and CCR6. The isthmus expressed the chemokine CCL2; the infundibulum expressed the chemokine CCL20; and keratinocytes in the bulge produced the chemokine CCL8, which is the ligand for CCR8. Thus, distinct hair-follicle keratinocyte subpopulations promoted or inhibited repopulation with LCs via differences in chemokine production, a feature also noted in humans. Pre-LCs failed to enter hairless skin in mice or humans, which establishes hair follicles as portals for LCs. PMID:22729248

  10. Inflammatory microenvironment and expression of chemokines in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ke-Qi; He, Xue-Qun; Ma, Meng-Yu; Guo, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xue-Min; Chen, Jie; Han, Hui; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Quan-Gang; Nian, Hua; Ma, Li-Jun

    2015-04-28

    To study the inflammatory microenvironment and expression of chemokines in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in nude mice. CBRH-7919 HCC cells were injected into the subcutaneous region of nude mice. Beginning two weeks after the challenge, tumor growth was measured every week for six weeks. The stromal microenvironment and inflammatory cell infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paired tumor and adjacent peritumoral samples, and macrophage phenotype was assessed using double-stain immunohistochemistry incorporating expression of an intracellular enzyme. A chemokine PCR array, comprised of 98 genes, was used to screen differential gene expressions, which were validated by Western blotting. Additionally, expression of identified chemokines was knocked-down by RNA interference, and the effect on tumor growth was assessed. Inflammatory cell infiltrates are a key feature of adjacent peritumoral tissues with increased macrophage, neutrophil, and T cell (specifically helper and activated subsets) infiltration. Macrophages within adjacent peritumoral tissues express inducible nitric oxide synthase, suggestive of a proinflammatory phenotype. Fifty-one genes were identified in tumor tissues during the progression period, including 50 that were overexpressed (including CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL3) and three that were underexpressed (CXCR1, Ifg and Actb). RNA interference of CXCL1 in the CBRH-7919 cells decreased the growth of tumors in nude mice and inhibited expression of CXCL2, CXCL3 and interleukin-1β protein. These findings suggest that CXCL1 plays a critical role in tumor growth and may serve as a potential molecular target for use in HCC therapy.

  11. ELR+ CXC chemokine expression in benign and malignant colorectal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubie, Claudia; Frick, Vilma Oliveira; Wagner, Mathias; Schuld, Jochen; Gräber, Stefan; Brittner, Brigitte; Bohle, Rainer M; Schilling, Martin K

    2008-01-01

    CXCR2 chemokine ligands CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 were shown to be involved in chemoattraction, inflammatory responses, tumor growth and angiogenesis. Here, we comparatively analyzed their expression profile in resection specimens from patients with colorectal adenoma (CRA) (n = 30) as well as colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 48) and corresponding colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) (n = 16). Chemokine expression was assessed by microdissection, quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR), the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In contrast to CXCL6, we demonstrated CXCL1 and CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression to be significantly up-regulated in CRC and CRLM tissue specimens in relation to their matched tumor neighbor tissues. Moreover, both chemokine ligands were demonstrated to be significantly higher expressed in CRC tissues than in CRA tissues thus indicating a progressive increase in the transition from the premalignant condition to the development of the malignant status. Although a comparative analysis of the CXCL1/CXCL5 protein expression profiles in CRC patients revealed that the absolute expression level of CXCL1 was significantly higher in comparison to CXCL5, mRNA- and protein overexpression of CXCL5 in CRC and CRLM tissues was much more pronounced (80- and 60- fold in CRC tissues, respectively) in comparison to CXCL1 (5- and 3.5- fold in CRC tissues, respectively). Our results demonstrate a significant association between CXCL1 and CXCL5 expression with CRC and CRLM suggesting for both chemokine ligands a potential role in the progression from CRA to CRC and thus, in the initiation of CRC

  12. Differential Expression of Chemokine Receptors and their Roles in Cancer Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine/chemokine receptor interactions play diverse roles in cell migration and homeostasis. Emerging evidence suggests that cancer cells co-opt chemokine networks for survival, proliferation, immune evasion, and metastasis. Most of the chemokine receptors are reported to be involved in tumor progression. Given their extensive implication in cancer progression, several chemokine receptor/ligand axes are considered as potential therapeutic targets. This review provides a survey of chemokine receptor expression in cancer and evaluates the potential of chemokine receptor imaging as a tool for molecular characterization of cancer.

  13. Chemokine receptor expression on B cells and effect of interferon-beta in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Roed, Hanne; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the B-cell expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3, CXCR5 and CCR5 in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients in relapse of multiple sclerosis (MS) and in neurological controls. Chemokine receptor expression was also studied in interferon-beta-treated patients with r......, and chemokine receptor expression was not affected by interferon-beta treatment....

  14. Expression of specific chemokines and chemokine receptors in the central nervous system of multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Tani, M; Jensen, J

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines direct tissue invasion by specific leukocyte populations. Thus, chemokines may play a role in multiple sclerosis (MS), an idiopathic disorder in which the central nervous system (CNS) inflammatory reaction is largely restricted to mononuclear phagocytes and T cells. We asked whether...

  15. Brucella invasion of human intestinal epithelial cells elicits a weak proinflammatory response but a significant CCL20 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Rumbo, Martín; Baldi, Pablo C

    2012-10-01

    In spite of the frequent acquisition of Brucella infection by the oral route in humans, the interaction of the bacterium with cells of the intestinal mucosa has been poorly studied. Here, we show that different Brucella species can invade human colonic epithelial cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29), in which only smooth species can replicate efficiently. Infection with smooth strains did not produce a significant cytotoxicity, while the rough strain RB51 was more cytotoxic. Infection of Caco-2 cells or HT-29 cells with either smooth or rough strains of Brucella did not result in an increased secretion of TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IL-10 or TGF-β as compared with uninfected controls, whereas all the infections induced the secretion of IL-8 and CCL20 by both cell types. The MCP-1 response to flagellin from Salmonella typhimurium was similar in Brucella-infected or uninfected cells, ruling out a bacterial inhibitory mechanism as a reason for the weak proinflammatory response. Infection did not modify ICAM-1 expression levels in Caco-2 cells, but increased them in HT-29 cells. These results suggest that Brucella induces only a weak proinflammatory response in gut epithelial cells, but produces a significant CCL20 secretion. The latter may be important for bacterial dissemination given the known ability of Brucella to survive in dendritic cells. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dienogest inhibits C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 expression in human endometriotic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Shizuka; Nakakuki, Masanori; Ichioka, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yutaka; Hashiba, Masamichi; Miyazaki, Hiroyasu; Kyo, Satoru

    2017-07-01

    C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 is thought to contribute to the development of endometriosis by recruiting Th17 lymphocytes into endometriotic foci. The present study investigated the effects of dienogest, a progesterone receptor agonist used to treat endometriosis, on C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 expression by endometriotic cells. Effects of dienogest on mRNA expression and protein secretion of C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 induced by interleukin 1β were assessed in three immortalized endometriotic epithelial cell lines, parental cells (EMosis-CC/TERT1), and stably expressing human progesterone receptor isoform A (EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA+) or isoform B (EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA-/PRB+). Dienogest markedly inhibited interleukin 1β-stimulated C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA expression and protein secretion in EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA-/PRB+, which was abrogated by the progesterone receptor antagonist RU486. In EMosis-CC/TERT1/PRA+, dienogest slightly inhibited C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA and protein. In EMosis-CC/TERT1, dienogest slightly inhibited C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 mRNA, but had no effect on C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 protein. Dienogest inhibited interleukin 1β-induced up-regulation of C-C motif chemokine ligand 20 in endometriotic epithelial cells, mainly mediated by progesterone receptor B. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Expression of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on CD4+ T cells and plasma chemokine levels during treatment of active tuberculosis in HIV-1-coinfected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolday, Dawit; Tegbaru, Belete; Kassu, Afework; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Coutinho, Roel; van Baarle, Debbie; Miedema, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The pathogenesis of persistently elevated plasma HIV viremia in patients coinfected with tuberculosis (TB) during anti-TB treatment in Africans remains unknown. We examined the expression of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 on CD4+ T cells and plasma chemokine levels of macrophage inflammatory

  18. Gene Expression Profiling of Chemokines and Their Receptors in Low and High Grade Astrocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ira; Singh, Avninder; Sharma, Karam Chand; Saxena, Sunita

    2017-05-01

    Background: Despite intense interest in molecular characterization and searches for novel therapeutic targets, the glioblastoma remains a formidable clinical challenge. Among many contributors to gliomagenesis, chemokines have drawn special attention due to their involvement in a plethora of biological processes and pathological conditions. In the present study we aimed to elucidate any pro-gliomagenic chemokine axis and probable roles in development of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Method: An array of 84 chemokines, chemokine receptors and related genes were studied by real time PCR with comparison between low grade astrocytoma (diffuse astrocytoma – grade II) and high grade astrocytoma (glioblastoma multiforme – grade IV). Gene ontology analysis and database mining were performed to funnel down the important axis in GBM followed by validation at the protein level by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Results: Gene expression and gene ontology analysis identified CXCL8 as an important chemokine which was more frequently up-regulated in GBM as compared to diffuse astrocytoma. Further we demonstrated localization of CXCL8 and its receptors in glioblastoma possibly affecting autocrine and paracrine signalling that promotes tumor cell proliferation and neovascularisation with vascular mimicry. Conclusion: From these results CXCL8 appears to be an important gliomagenic chemokine which may be involved in GBM growth by promoting tumor cell proliferation and neovascularization via vascular mimicry. Further in vitro and in vivo investigations are required to explore its potential candidature in anti-GBM therapy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  19. Basic Research on Virus-Induced Asthma Exacerbation: Inhibition of Inflammatory Chemokine Expression by Fluticasone Propionate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, Satoshi; Kurokawa, Masatsugu; Homma, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Shin; Suzuki, Shintaro; Ieki, Koushi; Takeuchi, Hiroko; Notomi, Kyoko; Schleimer, Robert P.; Kawaguchi, Mio; Kokubu, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral infection can exacerbate asthma by inducing the accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airway. We have previously reported that double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a viral product and ligand of the Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3), activates the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF-3 and upregulates the expression of inflammatory chemokines in airway epithelial cells. Here, we examined the effects of the glucocorticoid fluticasone propionate (FP) on the expression of the inflammatory chemokines CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10. Methods The airway epithelial cell line BEAS-2B was used for this study. Expression of CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 mRNA and protein was quantified by real-time PCR and ELISA assay, respectively. To examine the association of FP with the physiology of chemokine production, we included several methods. Nuclear translocation of transcription factors was determined by performing Western blot analysis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in nuclear extracts was measured using a colorimetric assay. Stability of the chemokine mRNAs was examined in cells incubated with actinomycin D. The activities of the CCL5 promoter and the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF-3 were assessed using luciferase reporter assays. Results Treatment of BEAS-2B cells with FP significantly and dose-dependently (10−9 to 10−6 M) inhibited dsRNA-induced expression of CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 protein and mRNA, but did not affect mRNA stability. FP also significantly inhibited dsRNA-stimulated CCL5 promoter activity. However, FP had no effect on the activity of HDAC or the nuclear translocation of NF-κB and IRF-3. Conclusions FP inhibits the dsRNA-stimulated expression of inflammatory chemokines in airway epithelial cells. FP may act by inhibiting chemokine transcription through an as yet Unidentified mechanism. PMID:23711858

  20. Dynamic T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression induced by interferon-beta therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krakauer, M; Sorensen, P S; Khademi, M

    2006-01-01

    and immunoregulatory genes. In conclusion, IFN-beta treatment caused 'steady-state' increases of several chemokine receptors relevant for CD4(+) T-lymphocyte trafficking and function, possibly facilitating lymphocyte migration into the CNS. An important therapeutic effect of IFN-beta treatment may be the normalization......Treatment with interferon (IFN)-beta reduces clinical disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS). Using flow cytometry, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a real-time polymerase chain reaction, we studied in vivo IFN-beta-induced effects on CD4(+) T-lymphocyte chemokine receptor expression...... as these influence central nervous system (CNS) transmigration and inflammation. At 'steady state' (>/=1 day after the most recent IFN-beta injection), IFN-beta treatment increased CD4(+) T-cell surface expression of CC chemokine receptor (CCR)4, CCR5 and CCR7 after 3 months of treatment, whereas that of CXC...

  1. Strong Expression of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 by Renal Cell Carcinoma Correlates with Advanced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Wehler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse chemokines and their receptors have been associated with tumor growth, tumor dissemination, and local immune escape. In different tumor entities, the level of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression has been linked with tumor progression and decreased survival. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of CXCR4 expression on the progression of human renal cell carcinoma. CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 113 patients. Intensity of CXCR4 expression was correlated with both tumor and patient characteristics. Human renal cell carcinoma revealed variable intensities of CXCR4 expression. Strong CXCR4 expression of renal cell carcinoma was significantly associated with advanced T-status (P=.039, tumor dedifferentiation (P = .0005, and low hemoglobin (P = .039. In summary, strong CXCR4 expression was significantly associated with advanced dedifferentiated renal cell carcinoma.

  2. Association study of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in hand foot and mouth disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Wenzhong; Qian, Suying; Fang, Lijuan; Han, Yong; Zheng, Cuiping

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship of cytokine/chemokine expression with the clinical presentation of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Results All cytokine/chemokine levels were higher in severe HFMD patients than in mild HFMD patients or controls (P < 0.01). RANTES, MCP-1, IL-4, IL-12 and IL-18 levels were higher in mild HFMD patients than in the controls (P < 0.05). In severe HFMD, all levels (except IL-8 and IL-4) were higher in patients with encephalitis plus pulmonary edema than...

  3. Inflammation-induced chemokine expression in uveal melanoma cell lines stimulates monocyte chemotaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Juel, Helene B

    2014-01-01

    of activated T cells on the expression of chemotactic cytokines in UM cells. Furthermore, we examined the ability of stimulated UM cells to attract monocytes. METHODS: We used an in vitro coculture system in which UM cell lines and T cells were cultured together, but separated by a membrane. Uveal melanoma...... resulted in an upregulation of chemokines such as CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL2, CCL5, VEGF, intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The upregulation of these molecules was confirmed at the protein level. This increase of chemokines...

  4. Vitamin D limits chemokine expression in adipocytes and macrophage migration in vitro and in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkeni, Esma; Marcotorchino, Julie; Tourniaire, Franck; Astier, Julien; Peiretti, Franck; Darmon, Patrice; Landrier, Jean-François

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D (VD) displays immunoregulatory effects and reduces adipocyte inflammation, which may participate to a reduction of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration in the context of obesity-associated low-grade inflammation. These observations have been described mainly in vitro, through the evaluation of a limited number of inflammatory markers. Here, we studied the effects of 1,25 dihydroxy-VD on chemokine network expression in adipocytes (by transcriptomic approach), and we confirm the physiological relevance of these data in vivo, by demonstrating the effect of VD on cytokine and chemokine gene expression as well as on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue. 1,25 dihydroxy-VD down-regulated (-1.3- to -10.8-fold) the mRNA expression of 29 chemokines and limited macrophage migration in TNFα-conditioned adipocyte medium (1.5-fold; P < .05). This effect was associated with a reduction in p65 and IκB (nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha) phosphorylation (2-fold compared with TNFα; P < .05). The effects of VD were confirmed in mice injected ip with lipopolysaccharide (acute inflammation) and diet-induced obese mice (metabolic inflammation), where the levels of mRNA encoding proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines (∼2-fold) were reduced in adipocytes (acute and metabolic inflammation) and adipose tissue and that macrophage infiltration was also inhibited in the adipose tissue of obese mice (metabolic inflammation). Altogether, these results showed that VD displayed a global immunoregulatory impact on adipocytes, notably via the inhibition of chemokine expression and macrophage infiltration in inflamed adipose tissue.

  5. Iroquois homeobox 2 suppresses cellular motility and chemokine expression in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Stefan; Stamm, Hauke; Pandjaitan, Mutiha; Kemming, Dirk; Brors, Benedikt; Pantel, Klaus; Wikman, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) can be detected using ultrasensitive immunocytochemical assays and their presence in the bone marrow can predict the subsequent occurrence of overt metastasis formation and metastatic relapse. Using expression profiling on early stage primary breast tumors, low IRX2 expression was previously shown to be associated with the presence of DTCs in the bone marrow, suggesting a possible role of IRX2 in the early steps of metastasis formation. The purpose of this study is to gain insights into the significance of IRX2 protein function in the progression of breast cancer. To assess the physiological relevance of IRX2 in breast cancer, we evaluated IRX2 expression in a large breast cancer cohort (n = 1992). Additionally, constitutive IRX2 over expression was established in BT-549 and Hs578T breast cancer cell lines. Subsequently we analyzed whether IRX2 overexpression effects chemokine secretion and cellular motility of these cells. Low IRX2 mRNA expression was found to correlate with high tumor grade, positive lymph node status, negative hormone receptor status, and basal type of primary breast tumors. Also in cell lines low IRX2 expression was associated with mainly basal breast cancer cell lines. The functional studies show that overexpression of the IRX2 transcription factor in basal cell lines suppressed secretion of the pro-metastatic chemokines and inhibited cellular motility but did not influence cell proliferation. Our results imply that the IRX2 transcription factor might represent a novel metastasis associated protein that acts as a negative regulator of cellular motility and as a repressor of chemokine expression. Loss of IRX2 expression could therefore contribute to early hematogenous dissemination of breast cancer by sustaining chemokine secretion and enabling mobilization of tumor cells. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1907-4) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  6. Chemokine Signatures in the Skin Disorders of Lyme Borreliosis in Europe: Predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in Erythema Migrans and Acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in Lymphocytoma▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Robert R.; Means, Terry K.; Shin, Junghee J.; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L.; Glickstein, Lisa J.; Luster, Andrew D.; Steere, Allen C.

    2007-01-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3+ T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20+ B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13. PMID:17606602

  7. Chemokine signatures in the skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe: predominance of CXCL9 and CXCL10 in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis and CXCL13 in lymphocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllegger, Robert R; Means, Terry K; Shin, Junghee J; Lee, Marshall; Jones, Kathryn L; Glickstein, Lisa J; Luster, Andrew D; Steere, Allen C

    2007-09-01

    The three skin disorders of Lyme borreliosis in Europe include erythema migrans, an acute, self-limited lesion; borrelial lymphocytoma, a subacute lesion; and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans, a chronic lesion. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, we determined mRNA expression of selected chemokines, cytokines, and leukocyte markers in skin samples from 100 patients with erythema migrans, borrelial lymphocytoma, or acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans and from 25 control subjects. Chemokine patterns in lesional skin in each of the three skin disorders included low but significant mRNA levels of the neutrophil chemoattractant CXCL1 and the dendritic cell chemoattractant CCL20 and intermediate levels of the macrophage chemoattractant CCL2. Erythema migrans and particularly acrodermatitis lesions had high mRNA expression of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and low levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13, whereas lymphocytoma lesions had high levels of CXCL13 and lower levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10. This pattern of chemokine expression was consistent with leukocyte marker mRNA in lesional skin. Moreover, using immunohistologic methods, CD3(+) T cells and CXCL9 were visualized in erythema migrans and acrodermatitis lesions, and CD20(+) B cells and CXCL13 were seen in lymphocytoma lesions. Thus, erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans have high levels of the T-cell-active chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, whereas borrelial lymphocytoma has high levels of the B-cell-active chemokine CXCL13.

  8. Enhanced T cell transmigration across the murine liver sinusoidal endothelium is mediated by transcytosis and surface presentation of chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, Arnhild; Wechsung, Katja; Neumann, Katrin; Schumann, Michael; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter; Engelhardt, Britta; Zeitz, Martin; Hamann, Alf; Klugewitz, Katja

    2008-10-01

    Transmigration through the liver endothelium is a prerequisite for the homeostatic balance of intrahepatic T cells and a key regulator of inflammatory processes within the liver. Extravasation into the liver parenchyma is regulated by the distinct expression patterns of adhesion molecules and chemokines and their receptors on the lymphocyte and endothelial cell surface. In the present study, we investigated whether liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) inhibit or support the chemokine-driven transmigration and differentially influence the transmigration of pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory CD4(+) T cells, indicating a mechanism of hepatic immunoregulation. Finally, the results shed light on the molecular mechanisms by which LSEC modulate chemokine-dependent transmigration. LSEC significantly enhanced the chemotactic effect of CXC-motif chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12) and CXCL9, but not of CXCL16 or CCL20, on naive and memory CD4(+) T cells of a T helper 1, T helper 2, or interleukin-10-producing phenotype. In contrast, brain and lymphatic endothelioma cells and ex vivo isolated lung endothelia inhibited chemokine-driven transmigration. As for the molecular mechanisms, chemokine-induced activation of LSEC was excluded by blockage of G(i)-protein-coupled signaling and the use of knockout mice. After preincubation of CXCL12 to the basal side, LSEC took up CXCL12 and enhanced transmigration as efficiently as in the presence of the soluble chemokine. Blockage of transcytosis in LSEC significantly inhibited this effect, and this suggested that chemokines taken up from the basolateral side and presented on the luminal side of endothelial cells trigger T cell transmigration. Our findings demonstrate a unique capacity of LSEC to present chemokines to circulating lymphocytes and highlight the importance of endothelial cells for the in vivo effects of chemokines. Chemokine presentation by LSEC could provide a future therapeutic target for inhibiting lymphocyte

  9. Enhanced Chemokine Receptor Expression on Leukocytes of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Goldeck

    Full Text Available Although primarily a neurological complaint, systemic inflammation is present in Alzheimer's Disease, with higher than normal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the periphery as well as the brain. A gradient of these factors may enhance recruitment of activated immune cells into the brain via chemotaxis. Here, we investigated the phenotypes of circulating immune cells in AD patients with multi-colour flow cytometry to determine whether their expression of chemokine receptors is consistent with this hypothesis. In this study, we confirmed our previously reported data on the shift of early- to late-differentiated CD4+ T-cells in AD patients. The percentage of cells expressing CD25, a marker of acute T-cell activation, was higher in patients than in age-matched controls, and percentages of CCR6+ cells were elevated. This chemokine receptor is primarily expressed on pro-inflammatory memory cells and Th17 cells. The proportion of cells expressing CCR4 (expressed on Th2 cells and CCR5 (Th1 cells and dendritic cells was also greater in patients, and was more pronounced on CD4+ than CD8+ T-cells. These findings allow a more detailed insight into the systemic immune status of patients with Alzheimer's disease and suggest possible novel targets for immune therapy.

  10. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of blood processing variations on Natural Killer cell frequency, activation, chemokine receptor expression and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranbhai, Vivek; Bartman, Pat; Ndlovu, Dudu; Ramkalawon, Pamela; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Wilson, Douglas; Altfeld, Marcus; Carr, William H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the role of natural killer (NK) cells in human disease pathogenesis is crucial and necessitates study of patient samples directly ex vivo. Manipulation of whole blood by density gradient centrifugation or delays in sample processing due to shipping, however, may lead to artifactual changes in immune response measures. Here, we assessed the impact of density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of both whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at multiple timepoints (2–24 hrs) on flow cytometric measures of NK cell frequency, activation status, chemokine receptor expression, and effector functions. We found that density gradient centrifugation activated NK cells and modified chemokine receptor expression. Delays in processing beyond 8 hours activated NK cells in PBMC but not in whole blood. Likewise, processing delays decreased chemokine receptor (CCR4 and CCR7) expression in both PBMC and whole blood. Finally, delays in processing PBMC were associated with a decreased ability of NK cells to degranulate (as measured by CD107a expression) or secrete cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF-α). In summary, our findings suggest that density gradient centrifugation and delayed processing of PBMC can alter measures of clinically relevant NK cell characteristics including effector functions; and therefore should be taken into account in designing clinical research studies. PMID:21255578

  12. Melatonin reduces the expression of chemokines in rat with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jun H.; Zhou, W.; Liu, K.; Li, Hong X.; Wang, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effect of melatonin on the colon inflammatory injury of rats with colitis and determine whether this effect is associated with inhibition of chemoattractant molecules interleukins (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1.The study was designed and implemented in JingMen No.1 People's Hospital, HuBei Province, from May 2006 to April 2007. It involved 72 animals divided into 6 groups of 12 each: normal group, model group, 5-aminosalisalicylic acid group, and melatonin group (dose of 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0mg/kg). Rat colitis model was established by 2, 4, 6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) enema. Interleukin-8 and MCP-1 proteins in colon tissue were examined by immunohistochemistry and western blot. The messenger-RNA expressions of chemokines were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. Trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enema resulted in pronounced pathological changes of colonic mucosa in model rats, which were in accordance with the significantly elevated Myeloperoxidase activity. Expressions of chemokines were up-regulated in colitis. Melatonin treatment reduced colonic lesions and improved colitis symptom, and decreased the protein and mRNA expressions of IL-8 and MCP-1 significantly in colon tissues of rats with colitis. Chemokines IL-8 and MCP-1 are elevated in mucosal tissues in colitis and play an important role in the perpetuation of tissue destructive inflammatory process; melatonin reduces colonic inflammatory injury of rats colitis through down-regulating the expressions of chemokines. Melatonin can be considered as a novel therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. (author)

  13. Selective loss of chemokine receptor expression on leukocytes after cell isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Nieto

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors are distinctively exposed on cells to characterize their migration pattern. However, little is known about factors that may regulate their expression. To determine the optimal conditions for an accurate analysis of chemokine receptors, we compared the expression of CCR2, CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3 and CXCR4 on different leukocyte subsets using whole blood (WB plus erythrocyte lysis and density gradient isolation (Ficoll. Most WB monocytes were CCR2+ (93.5 ± 2.9% whereas 32.8 ± 6.0% of monocytes from Ficoll-PBMC expressed CCR2 (p<0.001. Significant reductions of CCR6 and CXCR3 on monocytes were also observed after Ficoll isolation (WB: 46.4 ± 7.5% and 57.1 ± 5.5%; Ficoll: 29.5 ± 2.2% and 5.4 ± 4.3% respectively (p<0.01. Although comparable percentages of WB and Ficoll-PBMC monocytes expressed CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR4, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the levels of CXCR4 (WB: MFI 5 ± 0.4 and Ficoll: MFI 3.3 ± 0.1 (p<0.05. Similarly to monocytes, CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR4 were also reduced on lymphocytes. In addition, Ficoll isolation significantly reduced the percentage of CCR4 positive lymphocytes (WB: 90.2 ± 4.5% and Ficoll: 55 ± 4.1% (p<0.01. The loss of expression of chemokine receptors after isolation of monocytes was not dependent on either the anticoagulant or the density gradient method. It was irreversible and could not be restored by LPS activation or in vitro macrophage differentiation. Experiments tagged with anti-CCR2 antibodies prior to density gradient isolation demonstrated that Ficoll internalized chemokine receptors. The method for cell isolation may alter not only the expression of certain chemokine receptors but also the respective functional migration assay. The final choice to analyze their expression should therefore depend on the receptor to be measured.

  14. CXCL12 chemokine expression suppresses human pancreatic cancer growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishan Roy

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an unsolved health problem with nearly 75% of patients diagnosed with advanced disease and an overall 5-year survival rate near 5%. Despite the strong link between mortality and malignancy, the mechanisms behind pancreatic cancer dissemination and metastasis are poorly understood. Correlative pathological and cell culture analyses suggest the chemokine receptor CXCR4 plays a biological role in pancreatic cancer progression. In vivo roles for the CXCR4 ligand CXCL12 in pancreatic cancer malignancy were investigated. CXCR4 and CXCR7 were consistently expressed in normal and cancerous pancreatic ductal epithelium, established cell lines, and patient-derived primary cancer cells. Relative to healthy exocrine ducts, CXCL12 expression was pathologically repressed in pancreatic cancer tissue specimens and patient-derived cell lines. To test the functional consequences of CXCL12 silencing, pancreatic cancer cell lines stably expressingthe chemokine were engineered. Consistent with a role for CXCL12 as a tumor suppressor, cells producing the chemokine wereincreasingly adherent and migration deficient in vitro and poorly metastatic in vivo, compared to control cells. Further, CXCL12 reintroduction significantly reduced tumor growth in vitro, with significantly smaller tumors in vivo, leading to a pronounced survival advantage in a preclinical model. Together, these data demonstrate a functional tumor suppressive role for the normal expression of CXCL12 in pancreatic ducts, regulating both tumor growth andcellulardissemination to metastatic sites.

  15. Chemokine Receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 and Their Ligands in the Liver and Blood of Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsent'eva, N A; Semenov, A V; Lyubimova, N E; Ostankov, Yu V; Elezo, D S; Kudryavtsev, I V; Basina, V V; Esaulenko, E V; Kozlov, K V; Zhdanov, K V; Totolyan, A A

    2015-12-01

    We performed a comprehensive analysis of CCR6 and CXCR3 chemokine receptors and their ligands CCL20/MIP-3α, CXCL9/MIG, CXCL10/IP-10, and CXCL11/ITAC in the liver and blood of patients with chronic hepatitis C at different stages of the disease. TaqMan PCR was used to determine mRNA gene expression of chemokines and their receptors in liver specimens, xMAP multiplex analysis was performed to estimate the concentration of chemokines in blood plasma, and fl ow cytofluorometry was used to evaluate CCR6 and CXCR3 expression on peripheral blood lymphocyte populations. In the liver of patients with hepatitis C, mRNA expression of CXCL10, CCR6, and CXCR3 genes increases with fibrosis progression in the liver tissue. In the plasma, concentrations of all studied chemokines increased depending on the stage of liver fibrosis, CCR6 and CXCR3 expression was changed in various lymphocyte populations. Thus, chemokines are involved in the immunopathogenesis and fibrogenesis in chronic viral hepatitis C. The results suggest using these chemokines in the diagnosis and prognosis of the disease.

  16. Distinct chemokine receptor and cytokine expression profile in secondary progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS).......Chemokines, small chemotactic cytokines, have been implicated in active relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). However, the role of chemokines and chemokine receptors has not been specifically studied in secondary progressive MS (SPMS)....

  17. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its splice variant are expressed in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Yang, Yi; Shahabuddin, Syed; Litvin, Judith; Safadi, Fayez; Rogers, Thomas J

    2004-09-01

    Activation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 by its cognate ligands induces several differentiated cellular responses important to the growth and migration of a variety of hematopoietic and structural cells. In the human respiratory tract, human airway epithelial cells (HAEC) release the CXCR3 ligands Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11. Simultaneous expression of CXCR3 by HAEC would have important implications for the processes of airway inflammation and repair. Accordingly, in the present study we sought to determine whether HAEC also express the classic CXCR3 chemokine receptor CXCR3-A and its splice variant CXCR3-B and hence may respond in autocrine fashion to its ligands. We found that cultured HAEC (16-HBE and tracheocytes) constitutively expressed CXCR3 mRNA and protein. CXCR3 mRNA levels assessed by expression array were approximately 35% of beta-actin expression. In contrast, CCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR8, and CX3CR1 were <5% beta-actin. Both CXCR3-A and -B were expressed. Furthermore, tracheocytes freshly harvested by bronchoscopy stained positively for CXCR3 by immunofluorescence microscopy, and 68% of cytokeratin-positive tracheocytes (i.e., the epithelial cell population) were positive for CXCR3 by flow cytometry. In 16-HBE cells, CXCR3 receptor density was approximately 78,000 receptors/cell when assessed by competitive displacement of 125I-labeled IP-10/CXCL10. Finally, CXCR3 ligands induced chemotactic responses and actin reorganization in 16-HBE cells. These findings indicate constitutive expression by HAEC of a functional CXC chemokine receptor, CXCR3. Our data suggest the possibility that autocrine activation of CXCR3 expressed by HAEC may contribute to airway inflammation and remodeling in obstructive lung disease by regulating HAEC migration.

  18. Chemokine expression by glial cells directs leukocytes to sites of axonal injury in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Kuziel, William A; Rivest, Serge

    2003-01-01

    Innate responses in the CNS are critical to first line defense against infection and injury. Leukocytes migrate to inflammatory sites in response to chemokines. We studied leukocyte migration and glial chemokine expression within the denervated hippocampus in response to axonal injury caused...... by entorhinodentate lesions. A population of Mac1/CD11b+ CD45high macrophages (distinct from CD45low microglia) was specifically detected within the lesion-reactive hippocampus by 12 hr after injury. Significant infiltration by CD3+ T cells did not occur in the denervated hippocampus until 24 hr after axotomy...... hr after axotomy, whereas MCP-1/CCL2 was significantly induced before leukocyte infiltration occurred. Neither T cells nor macrophages infiltrated the denervated hippocampus of CCR2-deficient mice, arguing for a critical role for the CCR2 ligand MCP-1/CCL2 in leukocyte migration. Both T cells...

  19. CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptor expression and β-chemokine production during early T cell repopulation induced by highly active anti-retroviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, A; Ensoli, F; Mazzetta, F; De Cristofaro, M; Pierdominici, M; Muratori, D S; Fiorelli, V; Aiuti, F

    1999-01-01

    Expression of chemokine receptors and β-chemokine production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were determined in HIV-1-infected individuals before and after highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) and their relationship to viral load, T cell phenotype and the expression of immunological activation markers was examined. We found that the expression of CCR5 is up-regulated in HIV-1-infected individuals while CXCR4 appears down-regulated on both CD4 and CD8 T cells compared with normal controls. These alterations are associated with the high levels of viral load. In addition, a relationship was observed between the degree of immune activation and chemokine receptor expression on T cells. However, after 3 months of combined anti-retroviral regimen, expression of CXCR4 significantly increased while CCR5 decreased when compared with pretherapy determinations. This was seen in strict association with a dramatic decrease of viral load and an increase of both CD45RA+/CD62L+ (naive) and CD45RA−/CD62L+ or CD45RA+/CD62L− (memory) T cells accompanied by a significant decrease of the expression of immune activation markers such as HLA-DR and CD38. At enrolment, both spontaneous and lectin-induced RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) and MIP-1β production by PBMC were higher in HIV-1-infected individuals compared with normal controls, although differences for MIP-1β were not statistically significant. However, RANTES and MIP-1α production decreased during HAART at levels closer to that determined with normal controls, while MIP-1β production was less consistently modified. These data indicate that the expression of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 and the production of β-chemokines are altered in HIV-infected individuals, and suggest that their early modifications during HAART reflect both the peripheral redistribution of naive/memory T cell compartments and the decrease in levels of T cell activation. Such modifications in the

  20. Annulus fibrosus cells express and utilize C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) for migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weijun; Liu, David; Zheng, Justin; Shi, Peng; Chou, Po-Hsin; Oh, Chundo; Chen, Di; An, Howard S; Chee, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Disc degeneration is associated with the progressive loss of the proteoglycan content of the intervertebral disc, decreased matrix synthesis, higher concentrations of proteolytic enzymes, and increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. In previous studies, we have shown that C-C chemokine ligand (CCL)2, CCL3, and CCL5 are highly expressed by cultured nucleus pulposus (NP) and annulus fibrosus (AF) cells that have been treated by interleukin-1. The major function of these chemokines is to recruit immune cells into the disc. It is unclear if disc cells can respond to these chemokines. Recent studies by Phillips et al. (2015) showed that NP cells express a number of cytokines and chemokine receptors. The purpose of this study is to determine the gene and protein expression of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR)1, CCR2, and CCR5 in NP and AF cells, and to test if these receptors can respond to their ligands in these cells by cell signaling and migration. This is an in vitro study. For RNA, surface expression, and cell signaling studies, human cells were isolated from the NP and AF tissues collected after spine surgery or from donated spine segments (Gift of Hope Human Donor & Tissue Network of Illinois) and cultured in monolayer. The gene expression of human CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The surface expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was analyzed using flow cytometry and fluorescently tagged antibodies specific for these proteins. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation was analyzed from the cell lysates of NP and AF cells treated with CCL2 and CCL5 for 1 hour using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Migration of primary rabbit AF cells was assayed using 8-µm Corning Transwell inserts in the presence or absence of CCL5. This study was partially funded by a North American Spine Society 2014 Basic Research Grant Award ($50,000). RNA analysis showed that gene expression of CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5 was evident in

  1. Relationship of serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels with recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer after thoracoscopic radical operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Kun Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the relationship of serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels with recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer after thoracoscopic radical operation. Method: A total of 93 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received thoracoscopic radical operation in our hospital were selected, followed up for 2 years and divided into recurrence group and non-recurrence group, serum was collected before operation as well as 30 d and 90 d after operation to determine CCL20 and PCDGF levels, chest CT perfusion imaging was carried out after recurrence and the perfusion parameters were measured, and recurrent tumor tissue was collected to determine apoptosis molecule levels. Results: Before operation as well as 30 d and 90 d after operation, serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels of recurrence group and nonrecurrence group were not significantly different; 180 d after operation, serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels of recurrence group were significantly higher than those of non-recurrence group, and there were significant differences between two groups. Patients with recurrence were grouped according to serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels 180 d after operation, BF, BV and PS of recurrent patients with high CCL20 and PCDGF levels were sig.nificantly higher than those of recurrent patients with low CCL20 and PCDGF levels while MTT and TTP as well as Caspase-3, -8, -9, pULK, Beclin1, PICKC3, Atg21 and Atg24 levels in tumor tissue were lower than those of recurrent patients with low CCL20 and PCDGF levels. Conclusion: Monitoring of postoperative serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels can provide reference for the evaluation of postoperative non-small cell lung cancer recurrence, and serum CCL20 and PCDGF levels 180 d after operation are closely related to tumor tissue perfusion and cell apoptosis.

  2. Doxycycline and Benznidazole Reduce the Profile of Th1, Th2, and Th17 Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors in Cardiac Tissue from Chronic Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Costa, Guilherme; Lopes, Laís Roquete; Horta, Aline Luciano; Pontes, Washington Martins; Milanezi, Cristiane M.; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Mata; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Schulz, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines (CKs) and chemokine receptors (CKR) promote leukocyte recruitment into cardiac tissue infected by the Trypanosoma cruzi. This study investigated the long-term treatment with subantimicrobial doses of doxycycline (Dox) in association, or not, with benznidazole (Bz) on the expression of CK and CKR in cardiac tissue. Thirty mongrel dogs were infected, or not, with the Berenice-78 strain of T. cruzi and grouped according their treatments: (i) two months after infection, Dox (50 mg/kg) 2x/day for 12 months; (ii) nine months after infection, Bz (3,5 mg/kg) 2x/day for 60 days; (iii) Dox + Bz; and (iv) vehicle. After 14 months of infection, hearts were excised and processed for qPCR analysis of Th1 (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11), Th2 (CCL1, CCL17, CCL24, and CCL26), Th17 (CCL20) CKs, Th1 (CCR5, CCR6, and CXCR3), and Th2/Th17 (CCR3, CCR4, and CCR8) CKR, as well as IL-17. T. cruzi infection increases CCL1, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, CCL17, CXCL10, and CCR5 expression in the heart. Dox, Bz, or Dox + Bz treatments cause a reversal of CK and CKR and reduce the expression of CCL20, IL-17, CCR6, and CXCR3. Our data reveal an immune modulatory effect of Dox with Bz, during the chronic phase of infection suggesting a promising therapy for cardiac protection. PMID:27688600

  3. Altered expression of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors in the spinal cord of type 2 diabetic monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguchi, Norikazu; Ding, Huiping; Peters, Christopher M; Kock, Nancy D; Kishioka, Shiroh; Cline, J Mark; Wagner, Janice D; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is a pathological condition that underlies diabetes and affects sensory processing. Given the high prevalence of pain in diabetic patients and crosstalk between chemokines and opioids, it is pivotal to know whether neuroinflammation-associated mediators are dysregulated in the central nervous system of diabetic primates. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether mRNA expression levels of glial markers, chemokines, and opioid receptors are altered in the spinal cord and thalamus of naturally occurring type 2 diabetic monkeys (n=7) compared with age-matched non-diabetic monkeys (n=6). By using RT-qPCR, we found that mRNA expression levels of both GFAP and IBA1 were up-regulated in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) of diabetic monkeys compared with non-diabetic monkeys. Among all chemokines, expression levels of three chemokine ligand-receptor systems, i.e., CCL2-CCR2, CCL3-CCR1/5, and CCL4-CCR5, were up-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys. Moreover, in the SDH, seven additional chemokine receptors, i.e., CCR4, CCR6, CCR8, CCR10, CXCR3, CXCR5, and CXCR6, were also up-regulated in diabetic monkeys. In contrast, expression levels of MOP, KOP, and DOP, but not NOP receptors, were down-regulated in the SDH of diabetic monkeys, and the thalamus had fewer changes in the glial markers, chemokines and opioids. These findings indicate that neuroinflammation, manifested as glial activation and simultaneous up-regulation of multiple chemokine ligands and receptors, seems to be permanent in type 2 diabetic monkeys. As chemokines and opioids are important pain modulators, this first-in-primate study provides a translational bridge for determining the functional efficacy of spinal drugs targeting their signaling cascades. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Angiogenic CXC chemokine expression during differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells towards the osteoblastic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D S; Zhu, J H; Makhijani, N S; Kumar, A; Yamaguchi, D T

    2008-02-15

    The potential role of ELR(+) CXC chemokines in early events in bone repair was studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). Inflammation, which occurs in the initial phase of tissue healing in general, is critical to bone repair. Release of cytokines from infiltrating immune cells and injured bone can lead to recruitment of MSCs to the region of repair. CXC chemokines bearing the Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR) motif are also released by inflammatory cells and serve as angiogenic factors stimulating chemotaxis and proliferation of endothelial cells. hMSCs, induced to differentiate with osteogenic medium (OGM) containing ascorbate, beta-glycerophosphate (beta-GP), and dexamethasone (DEX), showed an increase in mRNA and protein secretion of the ELR(+) CXC chemokines CXCL8 and CXCL1. CXCL8 mRNA half-life studies reveal an increase in mRNA stability upon OGM stimulation. Increased expression and secretion is a result of DEX in OGM and is dose-dependent. Inhibition of the glucocorticoid receptor with mifepristone only partially inhibits DEX-stimulated CXCL8 expression indicating both glucocorticoid receptor dependent and independent pathways. Treatment with signal transduction inhibitors demonstrate that this expression is due to activation of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and is mediated through the G(alphai)-coupled receptors. Angiogenesis assays demonstrate that OGM-stimulated conditioned media containing secreted CXCL8 and CXCL1 can induce angiogenesis of human microvascular endothelial cells in an in vitro Matrigel assay. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Clinical significance of inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression in hand, foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ping; Wu, Xiaoxin; Li, Hongbo; Wu, Zhigang; Yang, Zongxin; Yao, Hangping

    2017-05-01

    The present study examined the relationship between cytokine and chemokine expression and the clinical presentation of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), which is currently unclear. The present study involved 28 patients with mild HFMD, 44 patients with severe HFMD and 26 healthy children. Venous blood was tested for cytokine [interleukin (IL)‑4, IL‑12, IL‑18, tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interferon‑γ (IFN‑γ)] and chemokine expression [IL‑8, regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), monocyte chemoattractant protein‑1 (MCP‑1) and IFN-γ-inducible protein‑10 (IP‑10)]. Stool samples from the patients were tested for enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that all cytokine/chemokine levels were increased in patients with severe HFMD compared with in patients with mild HFMD or control subjects. In addition, RANTES, MCP‑1, IL‑4, IL‑12 and IL‑18 levels were higher in mild HFMD patients than in the controls. In patients with severe HFMD, all expression levels (with the exception of IL‑8 and IL‑4) were increased in patients with encephalitis plus pulmonary edema compared with those with encephalitis alone. Furthermore, all levels (with the exception of IL‑8) were increased in EV71‑positive patients compared with EV71‑negative patients. In mild HFMD, all levels (with the exception of IL‑8 and IL‑4) were increased in EV71‑positive patients compared with EV71‑negative patients. However, in severe HFMD, only RANTES, IP‑10 and IFN‑γ levels were increased in EV71‑positive patients compared with EV71‑negative patients. In the EV71‑negative group, all levels were increased in severe HFMD compared with mild HFMD. In the EV71‑positive group, all levels (with the exception of IL‑8) were increased in severe HFMD compared with mild HFMD. These results indicated that cytokines and chemokines participate in HFMD

  6. UNBS5162, a Novel Naphthalimide That Decreases CXCL Chemokine Expression in Experimental Prostate Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Mijatovic

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Several naphthalimides have been evaluated clinically as potential anticancer agents. UNBS3157, a naphthalimide that belongs to the same class as amonafide, was designed to avoid the specific activating metabolism that induces amonafide’s hematotoxicity. The current study shows that UNBS3157 rapidly and irreversibly hydrolyzes to UNBS5162 without generating amonafide. In vivo UNBS5162 after repeat administration significantly increased survival in orthotopic human prostate cancer models. Results obtained by the National Cancer Institute (NCI using UNBS3157 and UNBS5162 against the NCI 60 cell line panel did not show a correlation with any other compound present in the NCI database, including amonafide, thereby suggesting a unique mechanism of action for these two novel naphthalimides. Affymetrix genome-wide microarray analysis and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that in vitro exposure of PC-3 cells to UNBS5162 (1 μM for 5 successive days dramatically decreased the expression of the proangiogenic CXCL chemokines. Histopathology additionally revealed antiangiogenic properties in vivo for UNBS5162 in the orthotopic PC-3 model. In conclusion, the present study reveals UNBS5162 to be a pan-antagonist of CXCL chemokine expression, with the compound displaying antitumor effects in experimental models of human refractory prostate cancer when administered alone and found to enhance the activity of taxol when coadministered with the taxoid.

  7. Onbaekwon Suppresses Colon Cancer Cell Invasion by Inhibiting Expression of the CXC Chemokine Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Buyun; Yoon, Jaewoo; Yoon, Seong Woo; Park, Byoungduck

    2017-06-01

    Cysteine X cysteine (CXC) chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) were originally identified as chemoattractants between immune cells and sites of inflammation. Since studies have validated an increased level of CXCL12 and its receptor in patients with colorectal cancers, CXCL12/CXCR4 axis has been considered as a valuable marker of cancer metastasis. Therefore, identification of CXCR4 inhibitors has great potential to abrogate tumor metastasis. Onbaekwon (OBW) is a complex herbal formula that is derived from the literature of traditional Korean medicine Dongeuibogam. In this study, we demonstrated that OBW suppressed CXCR4 expression in various cancer cell types in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Both proteasomal and lysosomal inhibitors had no effect to prevent the OBW-induced suppression of CXCR4, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of OBW was not due to proteolytic degradation but occurred at the transcriptional level. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay further confirmed that OBW could block endogenous activation of nuclear factor kappa B, a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of CXCR4 in colon cancer cells. Consistent with the aforementioned molecular basis, OBW abolished cell invasion induced by CXCL12 in colon cancer cells. Together, our results suggest that OBW, as a novel inhibitor of CXCR4, could be a promising therapeutic agent contributing to cancer treatment.

  8. Alpha-mangostin inhibits both dengue virus production and cytokine/chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasuk, Mayuri; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Chimma, Pattamawan; Sratongno, Panudda; Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-Thai

    2017-08-15

    Since severe dengue virus (DENV) infection in humans associates with both high viral load and massive cytokine production - referred to as "cytokine storm", an ideal drug for treatment of DENV infection should efficiently inhibit both virus production and cytokine expression. In searching for such an ideal drug, we discovered that α-mangostin (α-MG), a major bioactive compound purified from the pericarp of the mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana Linn), which has been used in traditional medicine for several conditions including trauma, diarrhea, wound infection, pain, fever, and convulsion, inhibits both DENV production in cultured hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh-7 cells, and cytokine/chemokine expression in HepG2 cells. α-MG could also efficiently inhibit all four serotypes of DENV. Treatment of DENV-infected cells with α-MG (20μM) significantly reduced the infection rates of four DENV serotypes by 47-55%. α-MG completely inhibited production of DENV-1 and DENV-3, and markedly reduced production of DENV-2 and DENV-4 by 100 folds. Furthermore, it could markedly reduce cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (RANTES, MIP-1β, and IP-10) transcription. These actions of α-MG are more potent than those of antiviral agent (ribavirin) and anti-inflammatory drug (dexamethasone). Thus, α-MG is potential to be further developed as therapeutic agent for DENV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemokine Expression in Retinal Pigment Epithelial ARPE-19 Cells in Response to Coculture with Activated T Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Helene Bæk; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja

    2012-01-01

    -cell–derived cytokines by upregulating expression of multiple chemokines related to microglial, T-cell, and monocyte chemotaxis and activation. This inflammatory stress response may have implications for immune homeostasis in the retina, and for the further understanding of inflammatory ocular diseases such as uveitis......Purpose. To investigate the effects of T-cell–derived cytokines on gene and protein expression of chemokines in a human RPE cell line (ARPE-19). Methods. We used an in vitro coculture system in which the RPE and CD3/CD28–activated T-cells were separated by a membrane. RPE cell expression...

  10. The prognostic significance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 expression in colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenqian; Han, Xiaodong; Yan, Jun; Pan, Ye; Gong, Jianfeng; Di, Jianzhong; Cheng, Zhe; Jin, Zhiming; Wang, Zhigang; Zheng, Qi; Wang, Yu

    2012-07-01

    The expression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 has been associated with tumor dissemination and poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. However, it is still unclear whether CXCR3 can be used as an independent molecular marker for predicting the prognosis of colonrectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In this study, we found that the relative level of CXCR3 mRNA expression in primary colorectal cancer tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding non-tumor colon tissues. CXCR3 protein expression was also detected in 98 of 112 primary CRC patients. Thus, CXCR3 might play a vital role in the progression of colorectal cancer. By analyzing the correlation between clinicopathological factors of patients and expression of CXCR3 protein, we showed that high level of CXCR3 protein expression was significantly associated with tumor differentiation, tumor size, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and Dukes' classification, but not with other factors of CRC patients including gender, age, tumor location and tumor invasion. Furthermore, patients with high CXCR3 expression showed poorer overall survival than those with low CXCR3 expression. Univariate and multivariate analysis indicated that the status of CXCR3 protein expression might be an independent prognostic marker for CRC patients. Therefore, CXCR3 is an indicator of a poor prognosis and a promising target for cancer therapy in colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of oral fibroblast chemokine receptors identifies CCR3 and CCR4 as potential wound healing targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskermolen, Jeroen K.; Roffel, Sanne

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this study was to determine which chemokine receptors are present on oral fibroblasts and whether these receptors influence proliferation, migration, and/or the release of wound healing mediators. This information may provide insight into the superior wound healing characteristics of the oral mucosa. The gingiva fibroblasts expressed 12 different chemokine receptors (CCR3, CCR4, CCR6, CCR9, CCR10, CXCR1, CXCR2, CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCR7, CX3CR1, and XCR1), as analyzed by flow cytometry. Fourteen corresponding chemokines (CCL5, CCL15, CCL20, CCL22, CCL25, CCL27, CCL28, CXCL1, CXCL8, CXCL11, CXCL12, CXCL13, CX3CL1, and XCL1) were used to study the activation of these receptors on gingiva fibroblasts. Twelve of these fourteen chemokines stimulated gingiva fibroblast migration (all except for CXCL8 and CXCL12). Five of the chemokines stimulated proliferation (CCL5/CCR3, CCL15/CCR3, CCL22/CCR4, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10, and XCL1/XCR1). Furthermore, CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 and CCL22/CCR4 stimulation increased IL‐6 secretion and CCL28/CCR3/CCR10 together with CCL27/CCR10 upregulated HGF secretion. Moreover, TIMP‐1 secretion was reduced by CCL15/CCR3. In conclusion, this in‐vitro study identifies chemokine receptor‐ligand pairs which may be used in future targeted wound healing strategies. In particular, we identified the chemokine receptors CCR3 and CCR4, and the mucosa specific chemokine CCL28, as having an predominant role in oral wound healing by increasing human gingiva fibroblast proliferation, migration, and the secretion of IL‐6 and HGF and reducing the secretion of TIMP‐1. PMID:28387445

  12. Dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression and function in leukocytes from ALS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perner, Caroline; Perner, Florian; Stubendorff, Beatrice; Förster, Martin; Witte, Otto W; Heidel, Florian H; Prell, Tino; Grosskreutz, Julian

    2018-03-28

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is rapidly progressive adult-onset motor neuron disease characterized by the neurodegeneration of both upper and lower motor neurons in the cortex and the spinal cord; the majority of patients succumb to respiratory failure. Although the etiology is not yet fully understood, there is compelling evidence that ALS is a multi-systemic disorder, with peripheral inflammation critically contributing to the disease process. However, the full extent and nature of this immunological dysregulation remains to be established, particularly within circulating blood cells. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to identify dysregulated inflammatory molecules in peripheral blood cells of ALS patients and analyze for functional consequences of the observed findings. To this end, we employed flow cytometry-based screening to quantify the surface expression of major chemokine receptors and integrins. A significantly increased expression of CXCR3, CXCR4, CCL2, and CCL5 was observed on T cells in ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Intriguingly, the expression was even more pronounced in patients with a slow progressive phenotype. To further investigate the functional consequences of this altered surface expression, we used a modified Boyden chamber assay to measure chemotaxis in ALS patient-derived lymphocytes. Interestingly, chemoattraction with the CXCR3-Ligand IP10 led to upregulated migratory behavior of ALS lymphocytes compared to healthy controls. Taken together, our data provides evidence for a functional dysregulation of IP10-directed chemotaxis in peripheral blood cells in ALS patients. However, whether the chemokine itself or its receptor CXCR3, or both, could serve as potential therapeutic targets in ALS requires further investigations.

  13. Endogenous NAMPT dampens chemokine expression and apoptotic responses in stressed tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-Martin, Alberto; Ucero, Alvaro C; Izquierdo, María Concepción; Santamaria, Beatriz; Picatoste, Belén; Carrasco, Susana; Lorenzo, Oscar; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Ortiz, Alberto

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and identification of new therapeutic targets is needed. Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is both an extracellular and intracellular protein. Circulating NAMPT is increased in diabetics and in chronic kidney disease patients. The role of NAMPT in renal cell biology is poorly understood. NAMPT mRNA and protein were increased in the kidneys of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Immunohistochemistry localized NAMPT to glomerular and tubular cells in diabetic rats. The inflammatory cytokine TNFα increased NAMPT mRNA, protein and NAD production in cultured kidney human tubular cells. Exogenous NAMPT increased the mRNA expression of chemokines MCP-1 and RANTES. The NAMPT enzymatic activity inhibitor FK866 prevented these effects. By contrast, FK866 boosted TNFα-induced expression of MCP-1 and RANTES mRNA and endogenous NAMPT targeting by siRNA also had a proinflammatory effect. Furthermore, FK866 promoted tubular cell apoptosis in an inflammatory milieu containing the cytokines TNFα/IFNγ. In an inflammatory environment FK866 promoted tubular cell expression of the lethal cytokine TRAIL. These data are consistent with a role of endogenous NAMPT activity as an adaptive, protective response to an inflammatory milieu that differs from the proinflammatory activity of exogenous NAMPT. Thus, disruption of endogenous NAMPT function in stressed cells promotes tubular cell death and chemokine expression. This information may be relevant for the design of novel therapeutic strategies in DN. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Rose hip and its constituent galactolipids confer cartilage protection by modulating cytokine, and chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwager, Joseph; Hoeller, Ulrich; Wolfram, Swen; Richard, Nathalie

    2011-11-03

    Clinical studies have shown that rose hip powder (RHP) alleviates osteoarthritis (OA). This might be due to anti-inflammatory and cartilage-protective properties of the complete RHP or specific constituents of RHP. Cellular systems (macrophages, peripheral blood leukocytes and chondrocytes), which respond to inflammatory and OA-inducing stimuli, are used as in vitro surrogates to evaluate the possible pain-relief and disease-modifying effects of RHP. (1) Inflammatory processes were induced in RAW264.7 cells or human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) with LPS. Inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and cytokines/chemokines) were determined by the Griess reaction, EIA and multiplex ELISA, respectively. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR. RHP or its constituent galactolipid, GLGPG (galactolipid (2S)-1, 2-di-O-[(9Z, 12Z, 15Z)-octadeca-9, 12, 15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl glycerol), were added at various concentrations and the effects on biochemical and molecular parameters were evaluated. (2) SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells and primary human knee articular chondrocytes (NHAC-kn) were treated with interleukin (IL)-1β to induce in vitro processes similar to those occurring during in vivo degradation of cartilage. Biomarkers related to OA (NO, PGE(2), cytokines, chemokines, metalloproteinases) were measured by multiplex ELISA and gene expression analysis in chondrocytes. We investigated the modulation of these events by RHP and GLGPG. In macrophages and PBL, RHP and GLGPG inhibited NO and PGE(2) production and reduced the secretion of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12) and chemokines (CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10). In SW1353 cells and primary chondrocytes, RHP and GLGPG diminished catabolic gene expression and inflammatory protein secretion as shown by lower mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13), aggrecanase (ADAMTS-4), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2, MIP-3α), CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP

  15. Rose hip and its constituent galactolipids confer cartilage protection by modulating cytokine, and chemokine expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwager Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical studies have shown that rose hip powder (RHP alleviates osteoarthritis (OA. This might be due to anti-inflammatory and cartilage-protective properties of the complete RHP or specific constituents of RHP. Cellular systems (macrophages, peripheral blood leukocytes and chondrocytes, which respond to inflammatory and OA-inducing stimuli, are used as in vitro surrogates to evaluate the possible pain-relief and disease-modifying effects of RHP. Methods (1 Inflammatory processes were induced in RAW264.7 cells or human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL with LPS. Inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide (NO, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and cytokines/chemokines were determined by the Griess reaction, EIA and multiplex ELISA, respectively. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR. RHP or its constituent galactolipid, GLGPG (galactolipid (2S-1, 2-di-O-[(9Z, 12Z, 15Z-octadeca-9, 12, 15-trienoyl]-3-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl glycerol, were added at various concentrations and the effects on biochemical and molecular parameters were evaluated. (2 SW1353 chondrosarcoma cells and primary human knee articular chondrocytes (NHAC-kn were treated with interleukin (IL-1β to induce in vitro processes similar to those occurring during in vivo degradation of cartilage. Biomarkers related to OA (NO, PGE2, cytokines, chemokines, metalloproteinases were measured by multiplex ELISA and gene expression analysis in chondrocytes. We investigated the modulation of these events by RHP and GLGPG. Results In macrophages and PBL, RHP and GLGPG inhibited NO and PGE2 production and reduced the secretion of cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 and chemokines (CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. In SW1353 cells and primary chondrocytes, RHP and GLGPG diminished catabolic gene expression and inflammatory protein secretion as shown by lower mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, aggrecanase (ADAMTS-4, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-2, MIP-3

  16. The chemokine CXCL9 expression is associated with better prognosis for colorectal carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenqian; Huang, Xiuyan; Han, Xiaodong; Li, Zhongnan; Zhu, Qinchao; Yan, Jun; Yu, Song; Jin, Zhiming; Wang, Zhigang; Zheng, Qi; Wang, Yu

    2016-03-01

    The chemokine CXCL9 has been demonstrated to play an important role in the development of human malignancies. However, its prognostic significance in cancer patients remains unclear and less is known about its role in colonrectal carcinoma (CRC) patients. In this study, we found that the relative mRNA expression level of CXCL9 in primary colorectal tumor tissues was significantly higher than that in corresponding normal colon tissues. CXCL9 protein expression was also detected in 102 of 130 primary CRC patients by immunochemistry. Thus, CXCL9 might play a vital role in the progression of colorectal cancer. By analyzing the correlation between clinicopathological factors of patients and expression of CXCL9 protein, we showed that the expression of CXCL9 was significantly associated with tumor differentiation, tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, and vascular invasion, but not with other factors of CRC patients including age, gender, tumor location and tumor size. Furthermore, by performing Kaplan-Meier method as well as Cox's univariate and multivariate hazard regression model, we found that the higher the CXCL9 expression, the higher overall survival rate was observed, and CXCL9 expression was a significant independent prognostic factor for CRC patients. Therefore, CXCL9 is a useful predictor of better clinical outcome in CRC patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  17. Hepatic Chemerin and Chemokine-Like Receptor 1 Expression in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Kukla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chemerin seems to be involved in pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Hepatic expressions of chemerin and its receptor, chemokine receptor-like 1 (CMKLR1, in CHC have not been studied so far. Aim. To evaluate chemerin and CMKLR1 hepatic expression together with serum chemerin concentration in CHC patients and to assess their relationship with metabolic and histopathological abnormalities. Methods. The study included 63 nonobese CHC patients. Transcription of chemerin and CMKLR1 was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR, while serum chemerin was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. Expression of chemerin and CMKLR1 was present in the liver of all CHC patients regardless of sex or age. This expression was not associated with necroinflammatory activity and steatosis grade, fibrosis stage, and metabolic abnormalities. There was a negative association between serum chemerin and chemerin hepatic expression (r = (−0.41, P = 0.006. Conclusion. The study for the first time confirmed a marked expression of chemerin and CMKLR1 in the liver of CHC patients. The study was performed using the homogenates of human liver tissue, so it is not possible to define whether hepatocytes or other cell types which are abundantly represented in the liver constitute the main source of chemerin and CMKLR1 mRNA.

  18. Equine herpesvirus type-1 modulates CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10 chemokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimer, Christine L; Damiani, Armando; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Wagner, Bettina

    2011-04-15

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is highly prevalent in horses and causes rhinopneumonitis, abortion, and encephalopathy. Studies on the related human herpes simplex virus and of murine models of EHV-1 suggest that chemokines play important roles in coordinating of innate and adaptive immune responses, and thus effective control of herpesvirus infection and prevention of severe clinical disease. Here, equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were infected with one of three EHV-1 strains, which differ in pathogenicity (RacL11, NY03=abortogenic, Ab4=neurogenic). Changes in CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10 chemokine gene expression relative to non-infected PBMC were measured by real-time PCR. CXCL9 and CXCL10 gene expression was up-regulated 10h post infection and decreased to the level of non-infected cells after 24h. CCL2 and CCL3 were significantly down-regulated 24h post infection with NY03 and Ab4. CCL5 was up-regulated 24h after infection with RacL11. Ab4 infected PBMC had significantly lower expression of all chemokines except CCL2 24h post infection then RacL11 infected cells. While there was not a significant difference between NY03 and the other strains, there was a trend with each chemokine toward NY03 inducing less expression then RacL11 but more then Ab4. The data suggested that EHV-1 infection of PBMC induced up-regulation of inflammatory chemokines CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10, and down-regulation of chemotactic CCL2 and CCL3. The data also implies that different EHV-1 strains have varying effects on all five chemokines, with the nuropathogenic strain, Ab4, having the greatest suppressive potential. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential effects of Radix Paeoniae Rubra (Chishao on cytokine and chemokine expression inducible by mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li James

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon initial infection with mycobacteria, macrophages secrete multiple cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, to mediate host immune responses against the pathogen. Mycobacteria also induce the production of IL-10 via PKR activation in primary human monocytes and macrophages. As an anti-inflammatory cytokine, over-expression of IL-10 may contribute to mycobacterial evasion of the host immunity. Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR, Chishao, a Chinese medicinal herb with potentials of anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and neuroprotective effects, is used to treat tuberculosis. This study investigates the immunoregulatory effects of RPR on primary human blood macrophages (PBMac during mycobacterial infection. Methods The interaction of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG with PBMac was used as an experimental model. A series of procedures involving solvent extraction and fractionation were used to isolate bioactive constituents in RPR. RPR-EA-S1, a fraction with potent immunoregulatory effects was obtained with a bioactivity guided fractionation scheme. PBMac were treated with crude RPR extracts or RPR-EA-S1 before BCG stimulation. The expression levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and TNF-α were measured by qPCR and ELISA. Western blotting was used to determine the effects of RPR-EA-S1 on signaling kinases and transcriptional factors in the BCG-activated PBMac. Results In BCG-stimulated macrophages, crude RPR extracts and fraction RPR-EA-S1 specifically inhibited IL-10 production while enhanced IL-8 expression at both mRNA and protein levels without affecting the expressions of IL-6 and TNF-α. Inhibition of BCG-induced IL-10 expression by RPR-EA-S1 occurred in a dose- and time-dependent manner. RPR-EA-S1 did not affect the phosphorylation of cellular protein kinases including MAPK, Akt and GSK3β. Instead, it suppressed the degradation of IκBα in the cytoplasm and inhibited the

  20. Expression of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in esophageal squamous cell and adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gockel, Ines; Galle, Peter R; Junginger, Theodor; Moehler, Markus; Schimanski, Carl C; Heinrich, Christian; Wehler, T; Frerichs, K; Drescher, Daniel; Langsdorff, Christian von; Domeyer, Mario; Biesterfeld, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor despite curative surgery. The chemokine receptor CXCR4 has been proposed to distinctly contribute to tumor growth, dissemination and local immune escape in a limited number of malignancies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of CXCR4 in tumor spread of esophageal cancer with a differentiated view of the two predominant histologic types – squamous cell and adenocarcinoma. Esophageal cancer tissue samples were obtained from 102 consecutive patients undergoing esophageal resection for cancer with curative intent. The LSAB+ System was used to detect the protein CXCR4. Tumor samples were classified into two groups based on the homogeneous staining intensity. A cut-off between CXCR4w (= weak expression) and CXCR4s (= strong expression) was set at 1.5 (grouped 0 – 1.5 versus 2.0 – 3). Long-term survival rates were calculated using life tables and the Kaplan-Meier method. Using the Cox's proportional hazards analysis, a model of survival prediction was established. The overall expression rate for CXCR4 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was 94.1%. Subdividing these samples, CXCR4w was found in 54.9% and CXCR4s in 45.1%. In adenocarcinoma, an overall expression rate of 89.1% was detected with a weak intensitiy in 71.7% compared to strong staining in 29.3% (p = 0.066 squamous cell versus adenocarcinoma). The Cox's proportional hazards analysis identified the pM-category with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.860 (95% CI: 1.014–3.414) (p = 0.045), the histologic tumor type (HR: 0.334; 95% CI: 0.180–0.618) (p = 0.0001) and the operative approach (transthoracic > transhiatal esophageal resection) (HR: 0.546; 95% CI: 0.324–0.920) (p = 0.023) as independent factors with a possible influence on the long-term prognosis in patients with esophageal carcinoma, whereas CXCR4 expression was statistically not significant (>0.05). Expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in esophageal cancer is of major relevance in both

  1. IL-1 beta-induced chemokine and Fas expression are inhibited by suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 in insulin-producing cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M.L.B.; Ronn, S.G.; Bruun, C.

    2009-01-01

    -induced Fas and chemokine expression in beta cells. Using a beta cell line with inducible Socs3 expression or primary neonatal rat islet cells transduced with a Socs3-encoding adenovirus, we employed real-time RT-PCR analysis to investigate whether SOCS-3 affects cytokine-induced chemokine and Fas m...

  2. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z

    2002-01-01

    It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites of inflamma......It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites...

  3. Selective suppression of chemokine receptor CXCR3 expression by interferon-beta1a in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F

    2002-01-01

    We studied the expression of chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR3 on CD4 and CD8 positive T cells, and on CD14 positive monocytes in blood from 10 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) at initiation of interferon (IFN)-beta treatment, after 1 month and after 3...

  4. Gene expression profile of cytokines and chemokines in skin lesions from Brazilian Indians with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Rodrigues-Silva, Renata; Freire, Janaína de Moura; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Pascoal-Xavier, Marcelo Antônio; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Serakides, Rogéria; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Melo, Maria Norma; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by dermotropic Leishmania species belonging to the Viannia subgenera, with Leishmania (V.) braziliensis considered the main agent in Brazil. After infection, a local inflammatory process is initiated, inducing the expression of several cytokine/chemokine genes. We evaluated the immunity to CL of patients living in the indigenous community Xakriabá, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, by performing detailed analyses of the mRNA expression of different cytokines and chemokines in CL lesions, considering the time evolution (recent or late). We also studied the profile of the inflammatory infiltrate by histopathological analysis. The histopathological features of recent CL lesions showed an intense inflammatory reaction, characterized by the presence of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells, whereas late CL lesions exhibited a predominance of mononuclear leukocytes. The gene expression of cytokines/chemokines in skin biopsies from the CL group showed higher transcript levels of modulatory (IL10 and TGFB1), anti-inflammatory (IL4), and pro-inflammatory (TNF, IFNG, IL12B, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL10) biomarkers in recent lesions than in late lesions. Our findings suggest that differential gene expression of cytokines and chemokines found in skin lesions from CL patients is associated with time evolution of lesions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibition of zymosan-induced cytokine and chemokine expression in human corneal fibroblasts by triptolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the effects of triptolide on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression induced by the fungal component zymosan in cultured human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs. METHODS: HCFs were cultured in the absence or presence of zymosan or triptolide. The release of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 into culture supernatants was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The cellular abundance of the mRNAs for these proteins was determined by reverse transcription and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and the endogenous nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α was examined by immunoblot analysis. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity from HCFs was measured with a colorimetric assay. RESULTS: Triptolide inhibited the zymosan-induced release of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 from HCFs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. It also inhibited the zymosan-induced up-regulation of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 mRNA abundance in these cells. Furthermore, triptolide attenuated zymosan-induced phosphorylation of the MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38 as well as the phosphorylation and degradation of IκB-α. Triptolide did not exhibit cytotoxicity for HCFs. CONCLUSION: Triptolide inhibited proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production by HCFs exposed to zymosan, with this action likely being mediated by suppression of MAPK and NF-κB signaling pathways. This compound might thus be expected to limit the infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea associated with fungal infection.

  6. Genetic polymorphisms in the cytokine and chemokine system: their possible importance in allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, Juergen; Ok, Michael; Morton, Oliver C; Mezger, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines represent central players of the innate and adaptive immunity and are involved in the regulation of inflammatory events occurring during infectious complications or during graft vs. host disease (GvHD). Patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) are at a high risk for the development of acute GvHD or to suffer from fungal infections. Susceptibility to fungal infections and the course of GvHD can be genetically influenced by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which regulate expression or biological activity of chemokines, and therefore have an impact on the outcome of invasive aspergillosis and GvHD. High lightened studies of abetting factors for GvHD revealed SNPs in TNFA, IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, CCL2, CCL5 (RANTES), IL-1Ra, IL-23R, IL-7Ralpha, IL-10RB, and CCR9 genes as prevalent considerable. Furthermore, additional SNPs were described to be significantly associated with fungal infections (Aspergillus fumigatus, Candida albicans), including markers in CCL3, CCL4, CCL20, CXCL2, CXCL8, CXCL10, CCR1, and CCR2. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the growing number of genetic markers in chemokine genes and their relevance for patients after alloSCT.

  7. Nanofibrous scaffolds incorporating PDGF-BB microspheres induce chemokine expression and tissue neogenesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiming Jin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF exerts multiple cellular effects that stimulate wound repair in multiple tissues. However, a major obstacle for its successful clinical application is the delivery system, which ultimately controls the in vivo release rate of PDGF. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres (MS in nanofibrous scaffolds (NFS have been shown to control the release of rhPDGF-BB in vitro. In order to investigate the effects of rhPDGF-BB release from MS in NFS on gene expression and enhancement of soft tissue engineering, rhPDGF-BB was incorporated into differing molecular weight (MW polymeric MS. By controlling the MW of the MS over a range of 6.5 KDa-64 KDa, release rates of PDGF can be regulated over periods of weeks to months in vitro. The NFS-MS scaffolds were divided into multiple groups based on MS release characteristics and PDGF concentration ranging from 2.5-25.0 microg and evaluated in vivo in a soft tissue wound repair model in the dorsa of rats. At 3, 7, 14 and 21 days post-implantation, the scaffold implants were harvested followed by assessments of cell penetration, vasculogenesis and tissue neogenesis. Gene expression profiles using cDNA microarrays were performed on the PDGF-releasing NFS. The percentage of tissue invasion into MS-containing NFS at 7 days was higher in the PDGF groups when compared to controls. Blood vessel number in the HMW groups containing either 2.5 or 25 microg PDGF was increased above those of other groups at 7d (p<0.01. Results from cDNA array showed that PDGF strongly enhanced in vivo gene expression of the CXC chemokine family members such as CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL5. Thus, sustained release of rhPDGF-BB, controlled by slow-releasing MS associated with the NFS delivery system, enhanced cell migration and angiogenesis in vivo, and may be related to an induced expression of chemokine-related genes. This approach offers a technology to accurately control growth factor release to promote

  8. Blood expression levels of chemokine receptor CCR3 and chemokine CCL11 in age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of the CCR3/CCL11 pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of choroidal neovascularisation, a common feature of late age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of CCR3 and its ligand CCL11 in peripheral blood in patients...

  9. Human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/CC chemokine receptor 9 is selectively expressed on intestinal homing T lymphocytes, mucosal lymphocytes, and thymocytes and is required for thymus-expressed chemokine-mediated chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, B A; Agace, W W; Campbell, J J; Heath, H M; Parent, D; Roberts, A I; Ebert, E C; Kassam, N; Qin, S; Zovko, M; LaRosa, G J; Yang, L L; Soler, D; Butcher, E C; Ponath, P D; Parker, C M; Andrew, D P

    1999-11-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein-coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory alpha4beta7(high) intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen-positive (CLA(+)) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic alpha4beta7(-)CLA(-) memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti-GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response.

  10. Myocardial chemokine expression and intensity of myocarditis in Chagas cardiomyopathy are controlled by polymorphisms in CXCL9 and CXCL10.

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    Luciana Gabriel Nogueira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC, a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. Even though the Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis, little is known about the factors controlling inflammatory cell migration to CCC myocardium. METHODS AND RESULTS: Using confocal immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR, we studied cell surface staining and gene expression of the CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 receptors and their chemokine ligands in myocardial samples from end-stage CCC patients. CCR5+, CXCR3+, CCR4+, CCL5+ and CXCL9+ mononuclear cells were observed in CCC myocardium. mRNA expression of the chemokines CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL17, CCL19 and their receptors was upregulated in CCC myocardium. CXCL9 mRNA expression directly correlated with the intensity of myocarditis, as well as with mRNA expression of CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 and their ligands. We also analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms for genes encoding the most highly expressed chemokines and receptors in a cohort of Chagas disease patients. CCC patients with ventricular dysfunction displayed reduced genotypic frequencies of CXCL9 rs10336 CC, CXCL10 rs3921 GG, and increased CCR5 rs1799988CC as compared to those without dysfunction. Significantly, myocardial samples from CCC patients carrying the CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes associated to a lower risk displayed a 2-6 fold reduction in mRNA expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, and other chemokines and receptors, along with reduced intensity of myocarditis, as compared to those with other CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes. CONCLUSIONS: Results may indicate that genotypes associated to reduced risk in closely linked CXCL9 and CXCL10 genes may modulate local expression of the chemokines themselves, and simultaneously affect myocardial expression of other key chemokines as well as intensity of myocarditis. Taken together our

  11. Myocardial Chemokine Expression and Intensity of Myocarditis in Chagas Cardiomyopathy Are Controlled by Polymorphisms in CXCL9 and CXCL10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luciana Gabriel; Santos, Ronaldo Honorato Barros; Ianni, Barbara Maria; Fiorelli, Alfredo Inácio; Mairena, Eliane Conti; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Frade, Amanda; Donadi, Eduardo; Dias, Fabrício; Saba, Bruno; Wang, Hui-Tzu Lin; Fragata, Abilio; Sampaio, Marcelo; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Buck, Paula; Mady, Charles; Bocchi, Edimar Alcides; Stolf, Noedir Antonio; Kalil, Jorge; Cunha-Neto, Edecio

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC), a life-threatening inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy, affects 30% of the approximately 8 million patients infected by Trypanosoma cruzi. Even though the Th1 T cell-rich myocarditis plays a pivotal role in CCC pathogenesis, little is known about the factors controlling inflammatory cell migration to CCC myocardium. Methods and Results Using confocal immunofluorescence and quantitative PCR, we studied cell surface staining and gene expression of the CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 receptors and their chemokine ligands in myocardial samples from end-stage CCC patients. CCR5+, CXCR3+, CCR4+, CCL5+ and CXCL9+ mononuclear cells were observed in CCC myocardium. mRNA expression of the chemokines CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL17, CCL19 and their receptors was upregulated in CCC myocardium. CXCL9 mRNA expression directly correlated with the intensity of myocarditis, as well as with mRNA expression of CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CCR8 and their ligands. We also analyzed single-nucleotide polymorphisms for genes encoding the most highly expressed chemokines and receptors in a cohort of Chagas disease patients. CCC patients with ventricular dysfunction displayed reduced genotypic frequencies of CXCL9 rs10336 CC, CXCL10 rs3921 GG, and increased CCR5 rs1799988CC as compared to those without dysfunction. Significantly, myocardial samples from CCC patients carrying the CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes associated to a lower risk displayed a 2–6 fold reduction in mRNA expression of CXCL9, CXCL10, and other chemokines and receptors, along with reduced intensity of myocarditis, as compared to those with other CXCL9/CXCL10 genotypes. Conclusions Results may indicate that genotypes associated to reduced risk in closely linked CXCL9 and CXCL10 genes may modulate local expression of the chemokines themselves, and simultaneously affect myocardial expression of other key chemokines as well as intensity of myocarditis. Taken together our results may suggest that

  12. Inhibition of chemokine expression in rat inflamed paws by systemic use of the antihyperalgesic oxidized ATP

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    Ticozzi Paolo

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously showed that local use of periodate oxidized ATP (oATP, a selective inhibitor of P2X7 receptors for ATP in rat paw treated with Freund's adjuvant induced a significant reduction of hyperalgesia Herein we investigate the role of oATP, in the rat paws inflamed by carrageenan, which mimics acute inflammation in humans. Results Local, oral or intravenous administration of a single dose of oATP significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia in hind paws of rats for 24 hours, and such effect was greater than that induced by diclofenac or indomethacin. Following oATP treatment, the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokines interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10, mon ocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 within the inflamed tissues markedly decreased on vessels and infiltrated cells. In parallel, the immunohistochemical findings showed an impairment, with respect to the untreated rats, in P2X7 expression, mainly on nerves and vessels close to the site of inflammation. Finally, oATP treatment significantly reduced the presence of infiltrating inflammatory macrophages in the paw tissue. Conclusion Taken together these results clearly show that oATP reduces carrageenan-induced inflammation in rats.

  13. LPS-induced expression of a novel chemokine receptor (L-CCR) in mouse glial cells in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, MW; Heeroma, J; Brouwer, N; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    There is increasing evidence that chemokines, specialized regulators of the peripheral immune system, are also involved in the physiology and pathology of the CNS. It is known that glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) express various chemokine receptors like CCR1, -3, -5, and CXCR4. We have

  14. Keratinocyte cytokine and chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Yalçin; Antonov, Meltem; Dolar, Neslihan; Wolf, Ronni

    2007-10-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small, secreted proteins that regulate cell traffic in homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Keratinocytes synthesize many chemokines, including members of the CC and CXC subfamilies, such as regulated on activation of normal T-cell expressed and secreted, gamma-interferon inducible protein-10, monokine induced by gamma-interferon, and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine. They also express some chemokine receptors that mediate the inflammatory or immune response by attracting various kinds of leukocytes.

  15. Expression of human immunodeficiency virus coreceptors CXC chemokine receptor 4 and CC chemokine receptor 5 on monocytes is down-regulated during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juffermans, Nicole P.; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Verbon, Annelies; Speelman, Peter; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) can inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in monocytes in vitro. To test the hypothesis that an LPS effect on CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), known coreceptors for HIV, contributes to this effect, 8 healthy men were

  16. Reduced IL-37 Production Increases Spontaneous Chemokine Expressions in Colon Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günaltay, Sezin; Ghiboub, Mohammed; Hultgren, Olof; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2017-01-01

    Microscopic colitis, comprising collagenous colitis and lymphocytic colitis, is a common cause of chronic diarrhea. Previously, we showed enhanced chemokine productions in microscopic colitis patients, indicating dysregulated immune cell chemotaxis in the immunopathogenesis. We also showed decreased

  17. Illicium verum extract inhibits TNF-α- and IFN-γ-induced expression of chemokines and cytokines in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2012-10-31

    Illicium verum Hook. f. (star anise) has been used in traditional medicine for treatment of skin inflammation, rheumatism, asthma, and bronchitis. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Illicium verum extract (IVE) in the human keratinocyte HaCaT cell line. We investigated the effectiveness of IVE in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)/interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced human keratinocytes. To measure the effects of IVE on chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in HaCaT cells, we used the following methods: cell viability assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blotting, and luciferase reporter assay. IVE inhibited the expression of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced mRNA and protein expression of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β. Furthermore, IVE decreased TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced mRNA expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). IVE inhibited nuclear factor (NF)-κB translocation into the nucleus, as well as phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. IVE inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 activation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, IVE significantly inhibited activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt. Furthermore, IVE contained 2.14% trans-anethole and possessed significant anti-inflammatory activities. IVE exerts anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing the expression of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced chemokines, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and adhesion molecules via blockade of NF-κB, STAT1, MAPK, and Akt activation, suggesting that IVE may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The early activation marker CD69 regulates the expression of chemokines and CD4 T cell accumulation in intestine.

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    Katarina Radulovic

    Full Text Available Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4(+ T cells and/or CD4(- cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69(-/- CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69(-/- CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69(-/- mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69(-/- CD45RB(high CD4 T cells into RAG(-/- hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis.

  19. The pathogenic and vaccine strains of equine infectious anemia virus differentially induce cytokine and chemokine expression and apoptosis in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yue-Zhi; Cao, Xue-Zhi; Li, Liang; Li, Li; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2011-09-01

    The attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine was the first attenuated lentivirus vaccine to be used in a large-scale application and has been used to successfully control the spread of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. To better understand the potential role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of EIAV infection and resulting immune response, we used branched DNA technology to compare the mRNA expression levels of 12 cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IP-10, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and MCP-2, in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs) infected with the EIAV(DLV121) vaccine strain or the parental EIAV(DLV34) pathogenic strain. Infection with EIAV(DLV34) and EIAV(DLV121) both caused changes in the mRNA levels of various cytokines and chemokines in eMDMs. In the early stage of infection with EIAV(DLV34) (0-24h), the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly up-regulated, while with EIAV(DLV121), expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 was markedly up-regulated. The effects on the expression of other cytokines and chemokines were similar between these two strains of virus. During the first 4 days after infection, the expression level of IL-4 in cells infected with the pathogenic strain were significantly higher than that in cells infected with the vaccine strain, but the expression of IL-1α and IL-1β induced by the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that observed with the pathogenic strain. In addition, after 4 days of infection with the pathogenic strain, the expression levels of 5 chemokines, but not IP-10, were markedly increased in eMDMs. In contrast, the vaccine strain did not up-regulate these chemokines to this level. Contrary to our expectation, induced apoptosis in eMDMs infected with the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that infected with the pathogenic strain 4 days and 6 days after infection. Together, these

  20. Chemokines, lymphocytes, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farber J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are members of a family of more than 30 human cytokines whose best-described activities are as chemotactic factors for leukocytes and that are presumed to be important in leukocyte recruitment and trafficking. While many chemokines can act on lymphocytes, the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology are poorly understood. The recent discoveries that chemokines can suppress infection by HIV-1 and that chemokine receptors serve, along with CD4, as obligate co-receptors for HIV-1 entry have lent urgency to studies on the relationships between chemokines and lymphocytes. My laboratory has characterized Mig and Crg-2/IP-10, chemokines that are induced by IFN-g and that specifically target lymphocytes, particularly activated T cells. We have demonstrated that the genes for these chemokines are widely expressed during experimental infections in mice with protozoan and viral pathogens, but that the patterns of mig and crg-2 expression differed, suggesting non-redundant roles in vivo. Our related studies to identify new chemokine receptors from activated lymphocytes resulted in the cloning of STRL22 and STRL33. We and others have shown that STRL22 is a receptor for the CC chemokine MIP-3a, and STRL22 has been re-named CCR6. Although STRL33 remains an orphan receptor, we have shown that it can function as a co-receptor for HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins, and that it is active with a broader range of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins than the major co-receptors described to date. The ability of STRL33 to function with a wide variety of envelope glycoproteins may become particularly important if therapies are instituted to block other specific co-receptors. We presume that investigations into the roles of chemokines and their receptors in lymphocyte biology will provide information important for understanding the pathogenesis of AIDS and for manipulating immune and inflammatory responses for clinical benefit

  1. CC-Chemokine CCL15 Expression and Possible Implications for the Pathogenesis of IgE-Related Severe Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Shimizu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Airway inflammation is accompanied by infiltration of inflammatory cells and an abnormal response of airway smooth muscle. These cells secrete chemokines and express the cell surface chemokine receptors that play an important role in the migration and degranulation of inflammatory cells. Omalizumab is a monoclonal antibody directed against immunoglobulin E, and its blocking of IgE signaling not only reduces inflammatory cell infiltration mediated by the Th2 immune response but also inhibits other immune responses. The chemokine CCL15 is influenced by omalizumab, and the source of CCL15 has been reported to be airway smooth muscle cells and basophils. CCL15 binds to its receptor CCR1, which has been reported to be expressed by various inflammatory cells and also by airway smooth muscle cells. Therefore, CCL15/CCR1 signaling could be a target for the treatment of asthma. We review the role of CCL15 in the pathogenesis of asthma and also discuss the influence of IgE-mediated immunomodulation via CCL15 and its receptor CCR1.

  2. Chemokine (C-X-C) ligand 1 (CXCL1) protein expression is increased in aggressive bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Goodison, Steve; Urquidi, Virginia; Gomes-Giacoia, Evan; Zhang, Ge; Ross, Shanti; Kim, Jeongsoon; Rosser, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Chemokines, including chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), may regulate tumor epithelial-stromal interactions that facilitate tumor growth and invasion. Studies have linked CXCL1 expression to gastric, colon and skin cancers, but limited studies to date have described CXCL1 protein expression in human bladder cancer (BCa). CXCL1 protein expression was examined in 152 bladder tissue specimens (142 BCa) by immunohistochemical staining. The expression of CXCL1 was scored by assigning a combined score based on the proportion of cells staining and intensity of staining. CXCL1 expression patterns were correlated with clinicopathological features and follow-up data. CXCL1 protein expression was present in cancerous tissues, but was entirely absent in benign tissue. CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was significantly higher in high-grade tumors relative to low-grade tumors (p = 0.012). Similarly, CXCL1 combined immunostaining score was higher in high stage tumors (T2-T4) than in low stage tumors (Ta-T1) (p < 0.0001). An increase in the combined immunostaining score of CXCL1 was also associated with reduced disease-specific survival. To date, this is the largest study describing increased CXCL1 protein expression in more aggressive phenotypes in human BCa. Further studies are warranted to define the role CXCL1 plays in bladder carcinogenesis and progression

  3. Regulation of Chemokine Expression by Lipopolysaccharide In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-10

    McMurray, D. Smith, J. Sims, 194 T. Bird , and L. O’Neil. 2001. Mal (MyD88-adapter-like) is required for Toll-like receptor-4 signal transduction. Nature...HuMig: a new human member of the chemokine family of cytokines. Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192:223. 128. Cole, K., C. Strick, T. Paradis , K

  4. [Chemokines in ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleul, T; Schlunck, G; Reinhard, T; Lapp, T

    2017-12-07

    Chemokines are chemotactically active cytokines, which coordinate the distribution of immune cells within the body and also regulate the migration of leukocytes in malignant and inflammatory processes. Chemokines are a heterogeneous group of short-chain proteins that are divided into different subgroups on the basis of their structure. In addition to the chemokines (ligands) various chemokine receptors also exist. The chemokine system is given its complexity by the high redundancy of ligand-receptor interactions: one single ligand can bind to different receptors and a single receptor can interact with different ligands. In terms of receptors, distinct immune cell types have characteristic receptor expression patterns, which can be used for the immunological characterization of leukocytes. Important basic research is currently leading to a better understanding of the chemokine system. The essential importance of the chemokine system in various diseases of the anterior and posterior eye segments is becoming increasingly apparent. The following synopsis explains the individual clinical aspects as well as the underlying scientific work in the context of "chemokines in ophthalmology".

  5. Inhibition of dengue virus production and cytokine/chemokine expression by ribavirin and compound A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanaburee, Thidarath; Junking, Mutita; Panya, Aussara; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Suttitheptumrong, Aroonroong; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Haegeman, Guy; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2015-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing magnitude. The severity of disease in the patients with DENV infection correlates with high viral load and massive cytokine production - the condition referred to as "cytokine storm". Thus, concurrent inhibition of DENV and cytokine production should be more effective for treatment of DENV infection. In this study, we investigated the effects of the antiviral agent - ribavirin (RV), and the anti-inflammatory compound - compound A (CpdA), individually or in combination, on DENV production and cytokine/chemokine transcription in human lung epithelial carcinoma (A549) cells infected with DENV. Initially, the cells infected with DENV serotype 2 (DENV2) was studied. The results showed that treatment of DENV-infected cells with RV could significantly reduce both DENV production and cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (IP-10 and RANTES) transcription while treatment of DENV-infected cells with CpdA could significantly reduce cytokine (IL-6 and TNF-α) and chemokine (RANTES) transcription. Combined RV and CpdA treatment of the infected cells showed greater reduction of DENV production and cytokine/chemokine transcription. Similar results of this combined treatment were observed for infection with any one of the four DENV (DENV1, 2, 3, and 4) serotypes. These results indicate that combination of the antiviral agent and the anti-inflammatory compound offers a greater efficiency in reduction of DENV and cytokine/chemokine production, providing a new therapeutic approach for DENV infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. T-cells in the cerebrospinal fluid express a similar repertoire of inflammatory chemokine receptors in the absence or presence of CNS inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivisäkk, P; Trebst, C; Liu, Z

    2002-01-01

    It is believed that chemokines and their receptors are involved in trafficking of T-cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of the current study was to define the expression on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) T-cells of six chemokine receptors associated with trafficking to sites...... is not sufficient for the trafficking of CD3+T-cells to the CSF. We hypothesize that CXCR3 is the principal inflammatory chemokine receptor involved in intrathecal accumulation of T-cells in MS. Through interactions with its ligands, CXCR3 is proposed to mediate retention of T-cells in the inflamed CNS....

  7. Glutamine Supplementation Attenuates Expressions of Adhesion Molecules and Chemokine Receptors on T Cells in a Murine Model of Acute Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chen Hou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Migration of T cells into the colon plays a major role in the pathogenesis in inflammatory bowel disease. This study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln supplementation on chemokine receptors and adhesion molecules expressed by T cells in mice with dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were fed either a standard diet or a Gln diet replacing 25% of the total nitrogen. After being fed the diets for 5 days, half of the mice from both groups were given 1.5% DSS in drinking water to induce colitis. Mice were killed after 5 days of DSS exposure. Results. DSS colitis resulted in higher expression levels of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand- (PSGL- 1, leukocyte function-associated antigen- (LFA- 1, and C-C chemokine receptor type 9 (CCR9 by T helper (Th and cytotoxic T (Tc cells, and mRNA levels of endothelial adhesion molecules in colons were upregulated. Gln supplementation decreased expressions of PSGL-1, LFA-1, and CCR9 by Th cells. Colonic gene expressions of endothelial adhesion molecules were also lower in Gln-colitis mice. Histological finding showed that colon infiltrating Th cells were less in the DSS group with Gln administration. Conclusions. Gln supplementation may ameliorate the inflammation of colitis possibly via suppression of T cell migration.

  8. Induction of cytokine (interleukin-1alpha and tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and chemokine (CCL20, CCL27, and CXCL8) alarm signals after allergen and irritant exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiekstra, S.W.; Toebak, M.J.; Sampat-Sardjoepersad, S.; van Beek, P.J; Boorsma, D.M.; Stoof, T.J.; von Blomberg, B.M.; Scheper, R.J.; Bruynzeel, D.P.; Rustemeyer, T.; Gibbs, S.

    2005-01-01

    The immune system is called into action by alarm signals generate from injured tissues. We examined the nature of these alarm signals after exposure of skin residential cells to contact allergens (nickel sulfate and potassium dichromate) and a contact irritant [sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)]. Nickel

  9. Preparation of C-terminally modified chemokines by expressed protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Lars; Steinhagen, Max; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2013-01-01

    In order to link structural features on a molecular level to the function of chemokines, site-specific modification strategies are strongly required. These can be used to incorporate fluorescent dyes and/or physical probes to allow investigations in a wide range of biological and physical techniques, e.g., nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), or fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Only a limited number of functional groups within the 20 canonical amino acids allow ligation strategies that can be helpful to introduce novel functionalities, which in turn expand the scope of chemoselective and orthogonal reactivity of (semi)synthetic chemokines. In the present chapter we mainly focus on the fabulous history of native chemical ligation (NCL) and provide a general protocol for the preparation of C-terminally modified SDF-1α including tips and tricks for practical work. We believe that this protocol can be easily adapted to other chemokines and many proteins in general.

  10. Brain microvascular pericytes are immunoactive in culture: cytokine, chemokine, nitric oxide, and LRP-1 expression in response to lipopolysaccharide

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    Erickson Michelle A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain microvascular pericytes are important constituents of the neurovascular unit. These cells are physically the closest cells to the microvascular endothelial cells in brain capillaries. They significantly contribute to the induction and maintenance of the barrier functions of the blood-brain barrier. However, very little is known about their immune activities or their roles in neuroinflammation. Here, we focused on the immunological profile of brain pericytes in culture in the quiescent and immune-challenged state by studying their production of immune mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines. We also examined the effects of immune challenge on pericyte expression of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP-1, a protein involved in the processing of amyloid precursor protein and the brain-to-blood efflux of amyloid-β peptide. Methods Supernatants were collected from primary cultures of mouse brain pericytes. Release of nitric oxide (NO was measured by the Griess reaction and the level of S-nitrosylation of pericyte proteins measured with a modified "biotin-switch" method. Specific mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway inhibitors were used to determine involvement of these pathways on NO production. Cytokines and chemokines were analyzed by multianalyte technology. The expression of both subunits of LRP-1 was analyzed by western blot. Results Lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced release of NO by pericytes in a dose-dependent manner that was mediated through MAPK pathways. Nitrative stress resulted in S-nitrosylation of cellular proteins. Eighteen of twenty-three cytokines measured were released constitutively by pericytes or with stimulation by LPS, including interleukin (IL-12, IL-13, IL-9, IL-10, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, eotaxin, chemokine (C-C motif ligand (CCL-3, and CCL-4. Pericyte expressions of both subunits of

  11. CpG Oligodeoxynucleotides Induce Differential Cytokine and Chemokine Gene Expression Profiles in Dapulian and Landrace Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiaqing; Yang, Dandan; Wang, Hui; Li, Chuanhao; Zeng, Yongqing; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG ODN) mimic the immunostimulatory activity of microbial DNA by interacting with Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) to activate both the innate and adaptive immune responses in different species. However, few studies have been published to compare the effects of CpG ODN on different pig breeds. Therefore, in this study, whole blood gene expression profiles of DPL and Landrace pigs treated with CpG ODN were studied using RNA-seq technology. Five Hundred differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the two breeds. DPL pigs had significantly higher number of immune-relevant DEGs than the Landrace pigs after CpG ODN treatment. Pathway analysis showed that cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction and chemokine signaling pathway were the major enriched pathways of the immune-relevant DEGs. Further in vitro experiments showed that PBMCs of the DPL pigs had significantly higher levels of TLR9 mRNA than those of the Landrace pigs, both before and after CpG ODN stimulation. Cytokine and chemokine induction in the PBMCs of both breeds were also measured after CpG ODN stimulation. Our data showed that mRNA levels of cytokines (IFNα, IL8, IL12 p40) and chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL13) were significantly higher in the PBMCs of the DPL pigs than those of the Landrace pigs. Taken together, our data provide new information regarding the pig breed difference in response to CpG ODN stimulation and that higher levels of TLR9 mRNA in DPL pigs may be a major contributor for disease resistance.

  12. The expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 in predicting postoperative tumour progression in stages I-II colon cancer: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Changzheng; Yao, Yunfeng; Xue, Weicheng; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Peng, Yifan; Gu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of chemokine receptors in stage I/II colon cancer is unclear. We assessed the prognostic value of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and CXCR4 in stage I/II colon cancer. 145 patients with stage I/II colon cancer who underwent curative surgery alone from 2000 to 2007 were investigated. Chemokine receptor expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The associations between CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological variables were analysed using the χ2 test, and the relationships between chemokine receptors and a 5-year disease-free survival were analysed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The high-expression rates of CXCR3 and CXCR4 were 17.9% (26/145) and 38.6% (56/145), respectively. There were no significant associations between the expressions of CXCR3, CXCR4 and clinicopathological factors including gender, age, tumour location, histological differentiation, pathological stage, lymphovascular invasion and pretreatment serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). The 5-year disease-free survival was not significantly different between low-expression groups and high-expression groups of CXCR3 and CXCR4. Multivariate analysis revealed that serum CEA and a number of retrieved lymph nodes, rather than chemokine receptors, were independent prognosticators. CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not independent prognosticators for stage I/II colon cancer after curative surgery.

  13. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter and protein expression of the chemokine Eotaxin-1 in colorectal cancer patients

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    Dienus Olaf

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies suggest that chemokines (chemotactic cytokines promote and regulate neoplastic progression including metastasis and angiogenesis. The chemokine eotaxin-1 is a powerful eosinophil attractant but also exerts chemotaxis of other leukocytes. Eotaxin-1 has been implicated in gastrointestinal disorders and may play an important role in colorectal mucosal immunity. Patients and methods The objective of this study was to assess the role of eotaxin-1 in colorectal cancer (CRC. Levels of eotaxin-1 protein in CRC tissues (n = 86 and paired normal mucosa were compared after determination by ELISA. Plasma eotaxin-1 levels from CRC patients (n = 67 were also compared with controls (n = 103 using the same method. Moreover, a TaqMan system was used to evaluate the -384A>G eotaxin-1 gene variant in CRC patients (n = 241 and in a control group (n = 253. Results Eotaxin-1 protein levels in colorectal tumours were significantly (P Conclusion The up-regulated eotaxin-1 protein expression in cancer tissue may reflect an eotaxin-1 mediated angiogenesis and/or a recruitment of leukocytes with potential antitumourigenic role. We noticed a dominance of the G allele in rectal cancer patients compared with colon cancer patients that was independent of eotaxin-1 expression.

  14. The Lymphotoxin Pathway Regulates Aire-Independent Expression of Ectopic Genes and Chemokines in Thymic Stromal Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seach, Natalie; Ueno, Tomoo; Fletcher, Anne L.; Lowen, Tamara; Mattesich, Monika; Engwerda, Christian R.; Scott, Hamish S.; Ware, Carl F.; Chidgey, Ann P.; Gray, Daniel H. D.; Boyd, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTEC) play an important and unique role in central tolerance, expressing tissue-restricted Ags (TRA) which delete thymocytes autoreactive to peripheral organs. Since deficiencies in this cell type or activity can lead to devastating autoimmune diseases, it is important to understand the factors which regulate mTEC differentiation and function. Lymphotoxin (LT) ligands and the LTβR have been recently shown to be important regulators of mTEC biology; however, the precise role of this pathway in the thymus is not clear. In this study, we have investigated the impact of this signaling pathway in greater detail, focusing not only on mTEC but also on other thymic stromal cell subsets. LTβR expression was found in all TEC subsets, but the highest levels were detected in MTS-15+ thymic fibroblasts. Rather than directing the expression of the autoimmune regulator Aire in mTEC, we found LTβR signals were important for TRA expression in a distinct population of mTEC characterized by low levels of MHC class II (mTEClow), as well as maintenance of MTS-15+ fibroblasts. In addition, thymic stromal cell subsets from LT-deficient mice exhibit defects in chemokine production similar to that found in peripheral lymphoid organs of Lta−/− and Ltbr−/− mice. Thus, we propose a broader role for LTα1β2-LTβR signaling in the maintenance of the thymic microenvironments, specifically by regulating TRA and chemokine expression in mTEClow for efficient induction of central tolerance. PMID:18390720

  15. T-Cadherin Expression in Melanoma Cells Stimulates Stromal Cell Recruitment and Invasion by Regulating the Expression of Chemokines, Integrins and Adhesion Molecules

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    Rubina, Kseniya A., E-mail: rkseniya@mail.ru; Surkova, Ekaterina I.; Semina, Ekaterina V.; Sysoeva, Veronika Y.; Kalinina, Natalia I. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation); Poliakov, Alexei A. [Division of Developmental Neurobiology, MRC National Institute for Medical Research, The Ridgeway, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Treshalina, Helena M. [Federal State Budgetary Scietific Institution «N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center» (FSBSI “N.N.Blokhin RCRC”), Kashirskoe Shosse 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Tkachuk, Vsevolod A. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Lomonosovsky av., 31/5, Moscow 119192 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-21

    T-cadherin is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored member of the cadherin superfamily involved in the guidance of migrating cells. We have previously shown that in vivo T-cadherin overexpression leads to increased melanoma primary tumor growth due to the recruitment of mesenchymal stromal cells as well as the enhanced metastasis. Since tumor progression is highly dependent upon cell migration and invasion, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanisms of T-cadherin participation in these processes. Herein we show that T-cadherin expression results in the increased invasive potential due to the upregulated expression of pro-oncogenic integrins, chemokines, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. The detected increase in chemokine expression could be responsible for the stromal cell recruitment. At the same time our previous data demonstrated that T-cadherin expression inhibited neoangiogenesis in the primary tumors. We demonstrate that T-cadherin overexpression leads to the increase in the expression of anti-angiogenic molecules and reduction in pro-angiogenic factors. Thus, T-cadherin plays a dual role in melanoma growth and progression: T-cadherin expression results in anti-angiogenic effects in melanoma, however, this also stimulates transcription of genes responsible for migration and invasion of melanoma cells.

  16. Efficient T-cell surveillance of the CNS requires expression of the CXC chemokine receptor 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Nansen, Anneline; Moos, Torben

    2004-01-01

    T-cells play an important role in controlling viral infections inside the CNS. To study the role of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 in the migration and positioning of virus-specific effector T-cells within the brain, CXCR3-deficient mice were infected intracerebrally with lymphocytic choriomeningitis......-cell-mediated immunopathology. Quantitative analysis of the cellular infiltrate in CSF of infected mice revealed modest, if any, decrease in the number of mononuclear cells recruited to the meninges in the absence of CXCR3. However, immunohistological analysis disclosed a striking impairment of CD8+ T-cells from CXCR3......-deficient mice to migrate from the meninges into the outer layers of the brain parenchyma despite similar localization of virus-infected target cells. Reconstitution of CXCR3-deficient mice with wild-type CD8+ T-cells completely restored susceptibility to LCMV-induced meningitis. Thus, taken together, our...

  17. Different expression of chemokines in rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca-Warnawin, Ewa H; Kurowska, Weronika J; Radzikowska, Anna; Massalska, Magdalena A; Burakowski, Tomasz; Kontny, Ewa; Słowińska, Iwona; Gasik, Robert; Maśliński, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to joint destruction. In addition to involvement of the joints, there is growing evidence that inflammatory/autoimmune processes take place in bone marrow, beginning the disease onset. Activated T and B cells accumulate in bone marrow, where also effective antigen presentation takes place. An increased number of activated T cells was observed in RA in comparison to osteoarthritis (OA) bone marrow. In the present study we analyzed the levels of chemokines that may be responsible for accumulation/retention of T-cells in the bone marrow of RA and OA patients. Bone marrow samples were obtained from RA and OA patients during total hip replacement surgery, and bone marrow plasma was obtained by gradient centrifugation. Levels of the chemokines CX3CL1, CCL5, CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 were measured in bone marrow plasma by specific ELISAs. Comparison between the groups of patients and statistical significance were analyzed by the two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test. Increased levels of CX3CL1 (818 ±431 pg/ml vs. 502 ±131 pg/ml, p < 0.0007) and CCL5 (5967 ±1680 pg/ml vs. 4878 ±2360 pg/ml, p < 0.05) respectively in bone marrow plasma from RA in comparison with OA patients were observed. In contrast, similar levels of CCL2, CXCL12 and CXCL1 in RA and OA bone marrow suggest that these cytokines do not play a significant role in the observed T cell accumulation in RA bone marrow. CX3CL1 and CCL5 overproduced in RA bone marrow may contribute to the accumulation of T cells observed in RA bone marrow.

  18. Oxidative damage and chemokine production dominate days before immune cell infiltration and EAE disease debut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasseldam, Henrik; Rasmussen, Rune Skovgaard; Johansen, Flemming Fryd

    2016-01-01

    with cytochrome C release, cleavage of caspases 9 (38/40 kDa) and 3 (17/19 kDa), and cleavage of PARP (89 kDa) or spectrin (120/150 kDa), and apoptosis was not initiated. Axonal degeneration was only present at disease onset. Increases in a range of cytokines and chemokines were observed systemically...... as a consequence of immunization with complete Freund's adjuvant, whereas the encephalitogenic emulsion induced an upregulation of the chemokines Ccl2, Ccl20, and Cxcl1, specifically in brain tissue, 7 days after immunization. CONCLUSION: Five to seven days after immunization, subtle decreases in the mitochondrial...

  19. Chemokines in tumor proximal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyza, Jaromir

    2017-03-01

    Chemokines are chemotactic cytokines produced by leukocytes and other types of cells including tumor cells. Their action is determined by the expression of cognate receptors and subsequent signaling in target cells, followed by the modulation of cytoskeletal proteins and the induction of other responses. In tumors, chemokines produced by neoplastic/stroma cells control the leukocyte infiltrate influencing tumor growth and progression. Tumor cells also express functional chemokine receptors responding to chemokine signals, promoting cell survival, proliferation and metastasis formation. Chemokines may be detected in serum of cancer patients, but due to the paracrine nature of these molecules, more significant concentrations are found in the tumor adjacent, non-vascular fluids, collectively called tumor proximal fluids. This review summarizes the expression of CC and CXC chemokines in these fluids, namely in interstitial fluid, pleural, ascitic, and cyst fluids, but also in urine, saliva, cerebrospinal fluid, cervical secretions and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Most comparative clinical studies reveal increased chemokine levels in high-grade tumor proximal fluids rather than in low-grade tumors and benign conditions, indicating shorter survival periods. The data confirm peritumoral fluid chemokines as sensitive diagnostic and prognostic markers, as well as offer support for chemokines and their receptors as potential targets for antitumor therapy.

  20. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

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    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  1. RTN3 Regulates the Expression Level of Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 and is Required for Migration of Primordial Germ Cells

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    Haitao Li

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available CXCR4 is a crucial chemokine receptor that plays key roles in primordial germ cell (PGC homing. To further characterize the CXCR4-mediated migration of PGCs, we screened CXCR4-interacting proteins using yeast two-hybrid screening. We identified reticulon3 (RTN3, a member of the reticulon family, and considered an apoptotic signal transducer, as able to interact directly with CXCR4. Furthermore, we discovered that the mRNA and protein expression levels of CXCR4 could be regulated by RTN3. We also found that RTN3 altered CXCR4 translocation and localization. Moreover, increasing the signaling of either CXCR4b or RTN3 produced similar PGC mislocalization phenotypes in zebrafish. These results suggested that RTN3 modulates PGC migration through interaction with, and regulation of, CXCR4.

  2. Ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory chemokine ligand 2 gene in humans

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    Fischer Alexandra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coenzyme Q10 is an essential cofactor in the respiratory chain and serves in its reduced form, ubiquinol, as a potent antioxidant. Studies in vitro and in vivo provide evidence that ubiquinol reduces inflammatory processes via gene expression. Here we investigate the putative link between expression and DNA methylation of ubiquinol sensitive genes in monocytes obtained from human volunteers supplemented with 150 mg/ day ubiquinol for 14 days. Findings Ubiquinol decreases the expression of the pro-inflammatory chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 gene (CXCL2 more than 10-fold. Bisulfite-/ MALDI-TOF-based analysis of regulatory regions of the CXCL2 gene identified six adjacent CpG islands which showed a 3.4-fold decrease of methylation status after ubiquinol supplementation. This effect seems to be rather gene specific, because ubiquinol reduced the expression of two other pro-inflammatory genes (PMAIP1, MMD without changing the methylation pattern of the respective gene. Conclusion In conclusion, ubiquinol decreases monocytic expression and DNA methylation of the pro-inflammatory CXCL2 gene in humans. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN26780329.

  3. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

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    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  4. CCR2 and CXCR3 agonistic chemokines are differently expressed and regulated in human alveolar epithelial cells type II

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    Prasse Antje

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The attraction of leukocytes from circulation to inflamed lungs depends on the activation of both the leukocytes and the resident cells within the lung. In this study we determined gene expression and secretion patterns for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2 and T-cell specific CXCR3 agonistic chemokines (Mig/CXCL9, IP-10/CXCL10, and I-TAC/CXCL11 in TNF-α-, IFN-γ-, and IL-1β-stimulated human alveolar epithelial cells type II (AEC-II. AEC-II constitutively expressed high level of CCL2 mRNA in vitro and in situ , and released CCL2 protein in vitro . Treatment of AEC-II with proinflammatory cytokines up-regulated both CCL2 mRNA expression and release of immunoreactive CCL2, whereas IFN-γ had no effect on CCL2 release. In contrast, CXCR3 agonistic chemokines were not detected in freshly isolated AEC-II or in non-stimulated epithelial like cell line A549. IFN-γ, alone or in combination with IL-1β and TNF-α resulted in an increase in CXCL10, CXCL11, and CXCL9 mRNA expression and generation of CXCL10 protein by AEC-II or A549 cells. CXCL10 gene expression and secretion were induced in dose-dependent manner after cytokine-stimulation of AEC-II with an order of potency IFN-γ>>IL-1β ≥ TNF-α. Additionally, we localized the CCL2 and CXCL10 mRNAs in human lung tissue explants by in situ hybridization, and demonstrated the selective effects of cytokines and dexamethasone on CCL2 and CXCL10 expression. These data suggest that the regulation of the CCL2 and CXCL10 expression exhibit significant differences in their mechanisms, and also demonstrate that the alveolar epithelium contributes to the cytokine milieu of the lung, with the ability to respond to locally generated cytokines and to produce potent mediators of the local inflammatory response.

  5. Fusion of antigen to a dendritic cell targeting chemokine combined with adjuvant yields a malaria DNA vaccine with enhanced protective capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Zhang, Hong; Zavala, Fidel; Biragyn, Arya; Espinosa, Diego A; Markham, Richard B

    2014-01-01

    Although sterilizing immunity to malaria can be elicited by irradiated sporozoite vaccination, no clinically practical subunit vaccine has been shown to be capable of preventing the approximately 600,000 annual deaths attributed to this infection. DNA vaccines offer several potential advantages for a disease that primarily affects the developing world, but new approaches are needed to improve the immunogenicity of these vaccines. By using a novel, lipid-based adjuvant, Vaxfectin, to attract immune cells to the immunization site, in combination with an antigen-chemokine DNA construct designed to target antigen to immature dendritic cells, we elicited a humoral immune response that provided sterilizing immunity to malaria challenge in a mouse model system. The chemokine, MIP3αCCL20, did not significantly enhance the cellular infiltrate or levels of cytokine or chemokine expression at the immunization site but acted with Vaxfectin to reduce liver stage malaria infection by orders of magnitude compared to vaccine constructs lacking the chemokine component. The levels of protection achieved were equivalent to those observed with irradiated sporozoites, a candidate vaccine undergoing development for further large scale clinical trial. Only vaccination with the combined regimen of adjuvant and chemokine provided 80-100% protection against the development of bloodstream infection. Treating the immunization process as requiring the independent steps of 1) attracting antigen-presenting cells to the site of immunization and 2) specifically directing vaccine antigen to the immature dendritic cells that initiate the adaptive immune response may provide a rational strategy for the development of a clinically applicable malaria DNA vaccine.

  6. Induction of CXC chemokine mRNA expression in chicken oviduct epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis via the type three secretion system-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    The messenger-RNA (mRNA) expression of selected cytokines and chemokines in primary chicken oviduct epithelial cells (COEC) was determined following in vitro infection with wild type or type three secretion system (T3SS) mutant Salmonella enteritidis (SE) strains. All SE strains examined in this stu...

  7. Overexpression of microRNA-155 suppresses chemokine expression induced by Interleukin-13 in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells

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    Satoshi Matsukura

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: miR-155 specifically inhibits IL-13-induced expression of eosinophilic chemokines CCL11 and CCL26 in bronchial epithelial cells, even though the 3'-untranslated region of these genes do not contain a consensus binding site for miR-155.

  8. Cigarette smoke extract (CSE delays NOD2 expression and affects NOD2/RIPK2 interactions in intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Marian C Aldhous

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD: NOD2 is the strongest individual genetic determinant and smoking the best-characterised environmental factor. Carriage of NOD2 mutations predispose to small-intestinal, stricturing CD, a phenotype also associated with smoking. We hypothesised that cigarette smoke extract (CSE altered NOD2 expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells.Intestinal epithelial cell-lines (SW480, HT29, HCT116 were stimulated with CSE and nicotine (to mimic smoking ±TNFα (to mimic inflammation. NOD2 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting; NOD2-RIPK2 interactions by co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP; nuclear NFκB-p65 by ELISA; NFκB activity by luciferase reporter assays and chemokines (CCL20, IL8 in culture supernatants by ELISA. In SW480 and HT29 cells the TNFα-induced NOD2 expression at 4 hours was reduced by CSE (p = 0.0226, a response that was dose-dependent (p = 0.003 and time-dependent (p = 0.0004. Similar effects of CSE on NOD2 expression were seen in cultured ileal biopsies from healthy individuals. In SW480 cells CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB-p65 translocation at 15 minutes post-stimulation, upstream of NOD2. Levels of the NOD2-RIPK2 complex were no different at 8 hours post-stimulation with combinations of CSE, nicotine and TNFα, but at 18 hours it was increased in cells stimulated with TNFα+CSE but decreased with TNFα alone (p = 0.0330; CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB activity (p = 0.0014 at the same time-point. At 24 hours, basal CCL20 and IL8 (p<0.001 for both and TNFα-induced CCL20 (p = 0.0330 production were decreased by CSE. CSE also reduced NOD2 expression, CCL20 and IL8 production seen with MDP-stimulation of SW480 cells pre-treated with combinations of TNFα and CSE.CSE delayed TNFα-induced NOD2 mRNA expression and was associated with abnormal NOD2/RIPK2 interaction, reduced NFκB activity and decreased chemokine

  9. Changes of plasma cytokines and chemokines expression level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after treatment with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT.

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    Ya-Bin Jin

    Full Text Available Potential clinical application values of certain cytokines and chemokines that participate in the process of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis have been reported. However, there still lack of biomarkers for a great many of malignancy. This study identified cytokines or chemokines involved in the occurrence and development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC, which might be a biomarker for noninvasive early diagnosis.The plasma levels of 19 cytokines and chemokines were detected by the luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays in 39 NPC patients before and after treatment by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT.Plasma levels of almost all of the 19 cytokines and chemokines in NPC patients were higher than healthy controls, while only IFN-γ, IL-1b IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, FKN, IL-12P70, IL-2, IL-5 and IP-10 showed significant differences. However, expression levels of most of the 19 cytokines and chemokines decreased after therapy, especially IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α, VEGF, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-5 and MIP-1b, have a dramatic decline. Taking together, plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-5 are significantly increased in NPC patients and dramatically decreased after treatment, suggesting these cytokines and chemokines might play important roles in the progress of NPC. More interestingly, the expression level of MPC-1 is significantly associated with clinical stage.MCP-1 might involve in the genesis and development process of NPC, which might serve as a noninvasive biomarker for early diagnosis.

  10. Changes of plasma cytokines and chemokines expression level in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients after treatment with definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Bin; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Lin, Kai-Rong; Chen, Xiang-Ping; Cui, Jin-Huan; Wang, Yue-Jian; Luo, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Potential clinical application values of certain cytokines and chemokines that participate in the process of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis have been reported. However, there still lack of biomarkers for a great many of malignancy. This study identified cytokines or chemokines involved in the occurrence and development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which might be a biomarker for noninvasive early diagnosis. The plasma levels of 19 cytokines and chemokines were detected by the luminex liquid array-based multiplexed immunoassays in 39 NPC patients before and after treatment by definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Plasma levels of almost all of the 19 cytokines and chemokines in NPC patients were higher than healthy controls, while only IFN-γ, IL-1b IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, FKN, IL-12P70, IL-2, IL-5 and IP-10 showed significant differences. However, expression levels of most of the 19 cytokines and chemokines decreased after therapy, especially IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TNF-α, VEGF, IL-17A, IL-2, IL-5 and MIP-1b, have a dramatic decline. Taking together, plasma levels of IFN-γ, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF-α, IL-2 and IL-5 are significantly increased in NPC patients and dramatically decreased after treatment, suggesting these cytokines and chemokines might play important roles in the progress of NPC. More interestingly, the expression level of MPC-1 is significantly associated with clinical stage. MCP-1 might involve in the genesis and development process of NPC, which might serve as a noninvasive biomarker for early diagnosis.

  11. Voluntary exercise blocks Western diet-induced gene expression of the chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2 in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesse L; Grissom, Nicola; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Reyes, Teresa M

    2016-11-01

    Obesity increases inflammation, both peripherally and centrally, and exercise can ameliorate some of the negative health outcomes associated with obesity. Within the brain, the effect of obesity on inflammation has been well characterized in the hypothalamus and hippocampus, but has been relatively understudied in other brain regions. The current study was designed to address two primary questions; (1) whether western diet (high fat/high sucrose) consumption would increase markers of inflammation in the prefrontal cortex and (2) whether concurrent voluntary wheel running would ameliorate any inflammation. Adult male mice were exposed to a western diet or a control diet for 8weeks. Concurrently, half the animals were given running wheels in their home cages, while half did not have access to wheels. At the conclusion of the study, prefrontal cortex was removed and expression of 18 proinflammatory genes was assayed. Expression of a number of proinflammatory molecules was upregulated by consumption of the western diet. For two chemokines, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10), voluntary exercise blocked the increase in the expression of these genes. Cluster analysis confirmed that the majority of the tested genes were upregulated by western diet, and identified another small cluster of genes that were downregulated by either diet or exercise. These data identify a proinflammatory phenotype within the prefrontal cortex of mice fed a western diet, and indicate that chemokine induction can be blocked by voluntary exercise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Loss of epidermal AP1 transcription factor function reduces filaggrin level, alters chemokine expression and produces an ichthyosis-related phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Christina A; Rorke, Ellen A; Adhikary, Gautam; Xu, Wen; Eckert, Richard L

    2017-06-01

    AP1 transcription factors are important controllers of epidermal differentiation. Multiple family members are expressed in the epidermis in a differentiation-dependent manner, where they function to regulate gene expression. To study the role of AP1 factor signaling, TAM67 (dominant-negative c-jun) was inducibly expressed in the suprabasal epidermis. The TAM67-positive epidermis displays keratinocyte hyperproliferation, hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis, delayed differentiation, extensive subdermal vasodilation, nuclear loricrin localization, tail and digit pseudoainhum and reduced filaggrin level. These changes are associated with increased levels of IFNγ, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 (Th1-associated chemokines), and CCL1, CCL2, CCL5 and CCL11 (Th2-associated chemokines) in the epidermis and serum. S100A8 and S100A9 protein levels are also markedly elevated. These changes in epidermal chemokine level are associated with increased levels of the corresponding chemokine mRNA. The largest increases were observed for CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and S100A8 and S100A9. To assess the role of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, which bind to CXCR3, on phenotype development, we expressed TAM67 in CXCR3 knockout mice. Using a similar strategy, we examine the role of S100A8 and S100A9. Surprisingly, loss of CXCR3 or S100A8/A9 did not attenuate phenotype development. These studies suggest that interfering with epidermal AP1 factor signaling initiates a loss of barrier function leading to enhanced epidermal chemokine production, but that CXCR3 and S100A8/A9 do not mediate the phenotypic response.

  13. Atypical chemokine receptors in cancer: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Matteo; Bonavita, Ornella; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2016-06-01

    The chemokine system is a fundamental component of cancer-related inflammation involved in all stages of cancer development. It controls not only leukocyte infiltration in primary tumors but also angiogenesis, cancer cell proliferation, and migration to metastatic sites. Atypical chemokine receptors are a new, emerging class of regulators of the chemokine system. They control chemokine bioavailability by scavenging, transporting, or storing chemokines. They can also regulate the activity of canonical chemokine receptors with which they share the ligands by forming heterodimers or by modulating their expression levels or signaling activity. Here, we summarize recent results about the role of these receptors (atypical chemokine receptor 1/Duffy antigen receptor for chemokine, atypical chemokine receptor 2/D6, atypical chemokine receptor 3/CXC-chemokine receptor 7, and atypical chemokine receptor 4/CC-chemokine receptor-like 1) on the tumorigenesis process, indicating that their effects are strictly dependent on the cell type on which they are expressed and on their coexpression with other chemokine receptors. Indeed, atypical chemokine receptors inhibit tumor growth and progression through their activity as negative regulators of chemokine bioavailability, whereas, on the contrary, they can promote tumorigenesis when they regulate the signaling of other chemokine receptors, such as CXC-chemokine receptor 4. Thus, atypical chemokine receptors are key components of the regulatory network of inflammation and immunity in cancer and may have a major effect on anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic strategies. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  14. Expression of antimicrobial peptides and interleukin-8 during early stages of inflammation: An experimental gingivitis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommisch, H; Staufenbiel, I; Schulze, K; Stiesch, M; Winkel, A; Fimmers, R; Dommisch, J; Jepsen, S; Miosge, N; Adam, K; Eberhard, J

    2015-12-01

    In the oral cavity, the epithelial surface is constantly exposed to a number of different microorganisms that are organized in a well-structured biofilm. The aim of this study was to monitor gingival expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in an early gingivitis model. Experimental gingivitis was allowed to develop in healthy volunteers (n = 17). Bleeding on probing (BOP%) and gingival crevicular fluid volume (GCF) were assessed at baseline and day 1, 3, 5, 7 and 14. Expression of AMPs (human beta-defensin-2, hBD-2; CC-chemokine ligand 20, CCL20; psoriasin, pso/S100A7) and IL-8 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in gingival biopsies. In addition, hBD-2 and IL-8 protein expression was monitored in GCF using the ELISA technology. Experimental gingivitis gradually developed with an increase in BOP scores and GCF volume over time. In GCF, elevated concentrations of hBD-2 and IL-8 were monitored at day 1, 5 and 7 (p ≤ 0.0002). Immunohistochemical analysis of gingival sections demonstrated increased staining for hBD-2 at day 3, whereas the CCL20, pso/S100A7, and IL-8 expression was increased at later time points (p gingival inflammation. Differential temporal expression for AMPs may ensure a constant antimicrobial activity against changes in the bacterial composition of the growing dental biofilm. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Protein expression profiling of inflammatory mediators in human temporal lobe epilepsy reveals co-activation of multiple chemokines and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kan Anne A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE is a chronic and often treatment-refractory brain disorder characterized by recurrent seizures originating from the hippocampus. The pathogenic mechanisms underlying mTLE remain largely unknown. Recent clinical and experimental evidence supports a role of various inflammatory mediators in mTLE. Here, we performed protein expression profiling of 40 inflammatory mediators in surgical resection material from mTLE patients with and without hippocampal sclerosis, and autopsy controls using a multiplex bead-based immunoassay. In mTLE patients we identified 21 upregulated inflammatory mediators, including 10 cytokines and 7 chemokines. Many of these upregulated mediators have not previously been implicated in mTLE (for example, CCL22, IL-7 and IL-25. Comparing the three patient groups, two main hippocampal expression patterns could be distinguished, pattern I (for example, IL-10 and IL-25 showing increased expression in mTLE + HS patients compared to mTLE-HS and controls, and pattern II (for example, CCL4 and IL-7 showing increased expression in both mTLE groups compared to controls. Upregulation of a subset of inflammatory mediators (for example, IL-25 and IL-7 could not only be detected in the hippocampus of mTLE patients, but also in the neocortex. Principle component analysis was used to cluster the inflammatory mediators into several components. Follow-up analyses of the identified components revealed that the three patient groups could be discriminated based on their unique expression profiles. Immunocytochemistry showed that IL-25 IR (pattern I and CCL4 IR (pattern II were localized in astrocytes and microglia, whereas IL-25 IR was also detected in neurons. Our data shows co-activation of multiple inflammatory mediators in hippocampus and neocortex of mTLE patients, indicating activation of multiple pro- and anti-epileptogenic immune pathways in this disease.

  16. Expression of interferon-inducible chemokines and sleep/wake changes during early encephalitis in experimental African trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, leads to neuroinflammation and characteristic sleep/wake alterations. The relationship between the onset of these alterations and the development of neuroinflammation is of high translational relevance, but remains unclear. This study investigates the expression of interferon (IFN-γ and IFN-inducible chemokine genes in the brain, and the levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid prior to and during the encephalitic stage of trypanosome infection, and correlates these with sleep/wake changes in a rat model of the disease.The expression of genes encoding IFN-γ, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 was assessed in the brain of rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei and matched controls using semi-quantitative end-point RT-PCR. Levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid were determined using ELISA. Sleep/wake states were monitored by telemetric recording. Using immunohistochemistry, parasites were found in the brain parenchyma at 14 days post-infection (dpi, but not at 6 dpi. Ifn-γ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Cxcl11 mRNA levels showed moderate upregulation by 14 dpi followed by further increase between 14 and 21 dpi. CXCL10 concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid increased between 14 and 21 dpi, preceded by a rise in the serum CXCL10 level between 6 and 14 dpi. Sleep/wake pattern fragmentation was evident at 14 dpi, especially in the phase of wake predominance, with intrusion of sleep episodes into wakefulness.The results show a modest increase in Cxcl9 and Cxcl11 transcripts in the brain and the emergence of sleep/wake cycle fragmentation in the initial encephalitic stage, followed by increases in Ifn-γ and IFN-dependent chemokine transcripts in the brain and of CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid. The latter parameter and sleep/wake alterations could provide combined humoral and functional biomarkers of the early encephalitic stage in African

  17. IL-4 attenuates Th1-associated chemokine expression and Th1 trafficking to inflamed tissues and limits pathogen clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lazarski

    Full Text Available Interleukin 4 (IL-4 plays a central role in the orchestration of Type 2 immunity. During T cell activation in the lymph node, IL-4 promotes Th2 differentiation and inhibits Th1 generation. In the inflamed tissue, IL-4 signals promote innate and adaptive Type-2 immune recruitment and effector function, positively amplifying the local Th2 response. In this study, we identify an additional negative regulatory role for IL-4 in limiting the recruitment of Th1 cells to inflamed tissues. To test IL-4 effects on inflammation subsequent to Th2 differentiation, we transiently blocked IL-4 during ongoing dermal inflammation (using anti-IL-4 mAb and analyzed changes in gene expression. Neutralization of IL-4 led to the upregulation of a number of genes linked to Th1 trafficking, including CXCR3 chemokines, CCL5 and CCR5 and an associated increase in IFNγ, Tbet and TNFα genes. These gene expression changes correlated with increased numbers of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells in the inflamed dermis. Moreover, using an adoptive transfer approach to directly test the role of IL-4 in T cell trafficking to the inflamed tissues, we found IL-4 neutralization led to an early increase in Th1 cell recruitment to the inflamed dermis. These data support a model whereby IL-4 dampens Th1-chemokines at the site of inflammation limiting Th1 recruitment. To determine biological significance, we infected mice with Leishmania major, as pathogen clearance is highly dependent on IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells at the infection site. Short-term IL-4 blockade in established L. major infection led to a significant increase in the number of IFNγ-producing CD4+ T cells in the infected ear dermis, with no change in the draining LN. Increased lymphocyte influx into the infected tissue correlated with a significant decrease in parasite number. Thus, independent of IL-4's role in the generation of immune effectors, IL-4 attenuates lymphocyte recruitment to the inflamed/infected dermis and

  18. Expression of interferon-inducible chemokines and sleep/wake changes during early encephalitis in experimental African trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperchia, Claudia; Tesoriero, Chiara; Seke-Etet, Paul F; La Verde, Valentina; Colavito, Valeria; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Rodgers, Jean; Montague, Paul; Kennedy, Peter G E; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2017-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei, leads to neuroinflammation and characteristic sleep/wake alterations. The relationship between the onset of these alterations and the development of neuroinflammation is of high translational relevance, but remains unclear. This study investigates the expression of interferon (IFN)-γ and IFN-inducible chemokine genes in the brain, and the levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid prior to and during the encephalitic stage of trypanosome infection, and correlates these with sleep/wake changes in a rat model of the disease. The expression of genes encoding IFN-γ, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 was assessed in the brain of rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei and matched controls using semi-quantitative end-point RT-PCR. Levels of CXCL10 in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid were determined using ELISA. Sleep/wake states were monitored by telemetric recording. Using immunohistochemistry, parasites were found in the brain parenchyma at 14 days post-infection (dpi), but not at 6 dpi. Ifn-γ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10 and Cxcl11 mRNA levels showed moderate upregulation by 14 dpi followed by further increase between 14 and 21 dpi. CXCL10 concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid increased between 14 and 21 dpi, preceded by a rise in the serum CXCL10 level between 6 and 14 dpi. Sleep/wake pattern fragmentation was evident at 14 dpi, especially in the phase of wake predominance, with intrusion of sleep episodes into wakefulness. The results show a modest increase in Cxcl9 and Cxcl11 transcripts in the brain and the emergence of sleep/wake cycle fragmentation in the initial encephalitic stage, followed by increases in Ifn-γ and IFN-dependent chemokine transcripts in the brain and of CXCL10 in the cerebrospinal fluid. The latter parameter and sleep/wake alterations could provide combined humoral and functional biomarkers of the early encephalitic stage in African trypanosomiasis.

  19. Chemokine C-C motif ligand 18 expression correlates with tumor malignancy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Li, Z-H; Tang, W; Wu, Q-N; Liu, G-H; Zheng, W-B

    2015-09-01

    To investigate whether CCL18 is involved in breast cancer, and the relationship between CCL18 and MVD (MVD was recognized by CD34) which is a well-accepted angiogenic maker of multiple cancers including breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry staining for CCL18 and CD34 was performed on 179 cases, including 29 normal cases as control, 47 cases with benign breast diseases, and 103 cases with breast cancer. We found that CCL18 was significantly up-regulated in breast cancer samples as compared with benign tumors or normal breast tissues. Moreover, the expression level of CCL18 increased with the size of tumors, the number of lymph node metastasis, and advancing tumor stage, suggesting that CCL18 expression correlates with tumor malignancy scales. At the same time, we found that MVD was also significantly over-expressed in cancer tissues as compared with normal control group and benign tumor group, but it was not significantly differentially expressed among tumors with different malignancy scale like CCL18, while the expression of MVD in CCL18 positive breast cancer cases was higher than in the CCL18 negative breast cancer cases (P=0.016, Pcancer. CCL18 is a better biomarker than MVD in determining whether the tumor is malignant and the severity of malignancy of breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Toll-like receptor 2 contributes to chemokine gene expression and macrophage infiltration in the dorsal root ganglia after peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sung Joong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain is attenuated in toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 knock-out mice. In these mice, inflammatory gene expression and spinal cord microglia actvation is compromised, whereas the effects in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG have not been tested. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR2 in inflammatory responses in the DRG after peripheral nerve injury. Results L5 spinal nerve transection injury induced the expression of macrophage-attracting chemokines such as CCL2/MCP-1 and CCL3/MIP-1 and subsequent macrophage infiltration in the DRG of wild-type mice. In TLR2 knock-out mice, however, the induction of chemokine expression and macrophage infiltration following nerve injury were markedly reduced. Similarly, the induction of IL-1β and TNF-α expression in the DRG by spinal nerve injury was ameliorated in TLR2 knock-out mice. The reduced inflammatory response in the DRG was accompanied by attenuation of nerve injury-induced spontaneous pain hypersensitivity in TLR2 knock-out mice. Conclusions Our data show that TLR2 contributes to nerve injury-induced proinflammatory chemokine/cytokine gene expression and macrophage infiltration in the DRG, which may have relevance in the reduced pain hypersensitivity in TLR2 knock-out mice after spinal nerve injury.

  1. Expression of co-stimulatory and adhesion molecules and chemokine or apoptosis receptors on acute myeloid leukaemia : high CD40 and CD11a expression correlates with poor prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, RE; Hoefnagel, J; van der Burg, BB; Jedema, [No Value; Zwinderman, KH; Starrenburg, ICW; Kluin-Nelemans, HC; Barge, RMY; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, JHF

    2001-01-01

    The expression of adhesion and co-stimulatory molecules. and chemokine and death receptors such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and FAS on acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) may influence the biology of the disease and response to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. In this study, we analysed the expression

  2. Chemokine CXCL16 Expression Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness and Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeying Fang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Increasing evidence argues that soluble CXCL16 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of cancer cells in vitro. However, the role of transmembrane or cellular CXCL16 in cancer remains relatively unknown. In this study, we determine the function of cellular CXCL16 as tumor suppressor in breast cancer cells. Methods. Expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines was determined at both RNA and protein levels. In vitro and in vivo studies that overexpressed or downregulated CXCL16 were conducted in breast cancer cells. Results. We report differential expression of cellular CXCL16 in breast cancer cell lines that was negatively correlated with cell invasiveness and migration. Overexpression of CXCL16 in MDA-MB-231 cells led to a decrease in cell invasion and migration and induced apoptosis of the cells; downregulation of CXCL16 in MCF-7 cells increased cell migration and invasiveness. Consistent with the in vitro data, CXCL16 overexpression inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Conclusions. Cellular CXCL16 suppresses invasion and metastasis of breast cancer cells in vitro and inhibits tumorigenesis in vivo. Targeting of cellular CXCL16 expression is a potential therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  3. CC chemokine receptor 5 cell-surface expression in relation to CC chemokine receptor 5 genotype and the clinical course of HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Roda Husman, A. M.; Blaak, H.; Brouwer, M.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1999-01-01

    CCR5 cell-surface expression was studied in relation to CCR5 genotype and clinical course of HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 infected CCR5+/+ individuals had higher percentages of CCR5-expressing CD4+ T cells as compared with HIV-1-infected CCR532/+ individuals. For both genotypic groups, the percentages of

  4. Chemokine expression in GKO mice (lacking interferon-gamma) with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glabinski, A R; Krakowski, M; Han, Y

    1999-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) considered to be an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). The detailed mechanism that specifies accumulation of inflammatory cells within the CNS in these conditions remains a subject...... in the CNS of mice with an intact IFN-gamma gene and EAE, was strikingly absent. In vitro experiments confirmed that IFNgamma selectively stimulates astrocytes for IP-10 expression. These results indicate that IP-10 is dependent upon IFN-gamma for its upregulation during this model disease, and document...

  5. Dogs infected with the blood trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi display an increase expression of cytokines and chemokines plus an intense cardiac parasitism during acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Sheler Martins; Vieira, Paula Melo de Abreu; Roatt, Bruno Mendes; Reis, Levi Eduardo Soares; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Nogueira, Nívia Carolina; Reis, Alexandre Barbosa; Tafuri, Washington Luiz; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins

    2014-03-01

    The recent increase in immigration of people from areas endemic for Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi) to the United States and Europe has raised concerns about the transmission via blood transfusion and organ transplants in these countries. Infection by these pathways occurs through blood trypomastigotes (BT), and these forms of T. cruzi are completely distinct of metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT), released by triatomine vector, in relation to parasite-host interaction. Thus, research comparing infection with these different infective forms is important for explaining the potential impacts on the disease course. Here, we investigated tissue parasitism and relative mRNA expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in the heart during acute infection by MT or BT forms in dogs. BT-infected dogs presented a higher cardiac parasitism, increased relative mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory cytokines and of the chemokines CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL5/RANTES, and the chemokine receptor CCR5 during the acute phase of infection, as compared to MT-infected dogs. These results suggest that infection with BT forms may lead to an increased immune response, as revealed by the cytokines ratio, but this kind of immune response was not able to control the cardiac parasitism. Infection with the MT form presented an increase in the relative mRNA expression of IL-12p40 as compared to that of IL-10 or TGF-β1. Correlation analysis showed increased relative mRNA expression of IFN-γ as well as IL-10, which may be an immunomodulatory response, as well as an increase in the correlation of CCL5/RANTES and its CCR5 receptor. Our findings revealed a difference between inoculum sources of T. cruzi, as vectorial or transfusional routes of T. cruzi infection may trigger distinct parasite-host interactions during the acute phase, which may influence immunopathological aspects of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

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    Tun-Pin Hsueh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  7. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-02-05

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  8. Chemokine Levels and Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Blood and the Cerebrospinal Fluid of HIV-Infected Patients With Cryptococcal Meningitis and Cryptococcosis-Associated Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Christina C.; Omarjee, Saleha; Lim, Andrew; Spelman, Tim; Gosnell, Bernadett I.; Carr, William H.; Elliott, Julian H.; Moosa, Mohamed-Yunus S.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; French, Martyn A.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus–infected patients with treated cryptococcal meningitis who start combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) are at risk of further neurological deterioration, in part caused by paradoxical cryptococcosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (C-IRIS). We hypothesized that C-IRIS is associated with alterations of chemokine receptor expression on T cells and chemokine concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that enhance recruitment of T-helper 1 cells and/or myeloid cells to the central nervous system. Methods. In a prospective study of 128 human immunodeficiency virus–infected patients with cryptococcal meningitis who received antifungal therapy followed by cART, we examined the proportions of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing CCR5 and/or CXCR3, in CSF and whole blood and the concentrations of CXCL10, CCL2, and CCL3 in stored CSF and plasma. Results. The proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing CXCR3+CCR5+ and the concentrations of CXCL10, CCL2 and CCL3 were increased in CSF compared with blood at cART initiation (P < .0001). Patients with C-IRIS (n = 26), compared with those with no neurological deterioration (n = 63), had higher CSF ratios of CCL2/CXCL10 and CCL3/CXCL10 and higher proportions of CXCR3+CCR5+CD8+T cells in CSF compared with blood at cART initiation (P = .03, .0053, and .02, respectively). Conclusion. CD8+ T-cell and myeloid cell trafficking to the central nervous system may predispose patients to C-IRIS. PMID:23908492

  9. Expression and reactivation of HIV in a chemokine induced model of HIV latency in primary resting CD4+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoury Gabriela

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We recently described that HIV latent infection can be established in vitro following incubation of resting CD4+ T-cells with chemokines that bind to CCR7. The main aim of this study was to fully define the post-integration blocks to virus replication in this model of CCL19-induced HIV latency. Results High levels of integrated HIV DNA but low production of reverse transcriptase (RT was found in CCL19-treated CD4+ T-cells infected with either wild type (WT NL4.3 or single round envelope deleted NL4.3 pseudotyped virus (NL4.3- Δenv. Supernatants from CCL19-treated cells infected with either WT NL4.3 or NL4.3- Δenv did not induce luciferase expression in TZM-bl cells, and there was no expression of intracellular p24. Following infection of CCL19-treated CD4+ T-cells with NL4.3 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP inserted into the nef open reading frame (NL4.3- Δnef-EGFP, there was no EGFP expression detected. These data are consistent with non-productive latent infection of CCL19-treated infected CD4+ T-cells. Treatment of cells with phytohemagluttinin (PHA/IL-2 or CCL19, prior to infection with WT NL4.3, resulted in a mean fold change in unspliced (US RNA at day 4 compared to day 0 of 21.2 and 1.1 respectively (p = 0.01; n = 5, and the mean expression of multiply spliced (MS RNA was 56,000, and 5,000 copies/million cells respectively (p = 0.01; n = 5. In CCL19-treated infected CD4+ T-cells, MS-RNA was detected in the nucleus and not in the cytoplasm; in contrast to PHA/IL-2 activated infected cells where MS RNA was detected in both. Virus could be recovered from CCL19-treated infected CD4+ T-cells following mitogen stimulation (with PHA and phorbyl myristate acetate (PMA as well as TNFα, IL-7, prostratin and vorinostat. Conclusions In this model of CCL19-induced HIV latency, we demonstrate HIV integration without spontaneous production of infectious virus, detection of MS RNA in the nucleus only, and the

  10. Molecular cloning of the feline thymus and activation-regulated chemokine cDNA and its expression in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Sadatoshi; Okayama, Taro; Ohmori, Keitaro; Masuda, Kenichi; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2003-02-01

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is a member of CC chemokine and plays an essential role in recruitment of CC chemokine receptor 4 positive Th2 cells to allergic lesion. To investigate the association of TARC in allergic inflammation of cats, a TARC cDNA was cloned from feline thymus by RT-PCR with 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The feline TARC clone contained a full length open reading frame encoding 99 amino acids which shared 80.8%, 72.5%, 65.6% and 67.8% homology with dog, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. Expression of TARC mRNA was detected not only in thymus but also in spleen, lung, lymph node, kidney, small intestine, colon and skin of the normal cat tissues examined. Furthermore, it was found that TARC mRNA was strongly expressed in lesional skin of cats with eosinophilic plaque. The present results demonstrated that TARC might be involved in the pathogenesis of eosinophilic plaque in cats.

  11. Modulation of Chemokine Gene Expression in CD133 Cord Blood-Derived Human Mast Cells by Cyclosporin A and Dexamethasone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Mette; Kvistgaard, Helene; Dahl, Christine

    2006-01-01

    following receptor mediated mast cell activation or following pharmacological activation of specific signal transduction cascades that become activated upon classical FcepsilonRI receptor crosslinking. We demonstrate that chemokine genes encoding IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta are induced...... 150-fold, which vastly exceeds the yields of conventional protocols using CD34(+) cells as a source of progenitors. Taking advantage of the large quantities of in vitro differentiated mast cells, here we assess at the levels of transcription and translation the kinetics of chemokine gene induction...

  12. Cathepsin D Specifically Cleaves the Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α, Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1β, and SLC That Are Expressed in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marlene; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Buri, Caroline; Langen, Hanno; Lis, Maddalena; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2003-01-01

    Cathepsin D (Cath-D) expression in human primary breast cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis. In search of a better understanding of the Cath-D substrates possibly involved in cancer invasiveness and metastasis, we investigated the potential interactions between this protease and chemokines. Here we report that purified Cath-D, as well as culture supernatants from the human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, selectively degrade macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (CCL3), MIP-1β (CCL4), and SLC (CCL21). Proteolysis was totally blocked by the protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and specificity of Cath-D cleavage was demonstrated using a large chemokine panel. Whereas MIP-1α and MIP-1β degradation was rapid and complete, cleavage of SLC was slow and not complete. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Cath-D cleaves the Leu58 to Trp59 bond of SLC producing two functionally inactive fragments. Analysis of Cath-D proteolysis of a series of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3/MIP-1β hybrids indicated that processing of MIP-1β might start by cleaving off amino acids located in the C-terminal domain. In situ hybridization studies revealed MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and Cath-D gene expression mainly in the stromal compartment of breast cancers whereas SLC transcripts were found in endothelial cells of capillaries and venules within the neoplastic tissues. Cath-D production in the breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of culture supernatants and cell lysates, was not affected by stimulation with chemokines such as interleukin-8 (CXCL8), SDF-1 (CXCL12), and SLC. These data suggest that inactivation of chemokines by Cath-D possibly influences regulatory mechanisms in the tumoral extracellular microenvironment that in turn may affect the generation of the antitumoral immune response, the migration of cancer cells, or both processes. PMID:12651610

  13. Expression and function of the SDF-1 chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 during mouse limb muscle development and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Conny; Ödemis, Veysel; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-10-15

    The chemokine, SDF-1/CXCL12, and its receptor, CXCR4, have been implied to play major roles during limb myogenesis. This concept was recently challenged by the identification of CXCR7 as an alternative SDF-1 receptor, which can either act as a scavenger receptor, a modulator of CXCR4, or an active chemokine receptor. We have now re-examined this issue by determining whether SDF-1 would signal to C2C12 myoblasts and subsequently influence their differentiation via CXCR4 and/or CXCR7. In addition, we have analyzed CXCR7, CXCR4, and SDF-1 expression in developing and injured mouse limb muscles. We demonstrate that in undifferentiated C2C12 cells, SDF-1-dependent cell signaling and resulting inhibitory effects on myogenic differentiation are entirely mediated by CXCR4. We further demonstrate that CXCR7 expression increases in differentiating C2C12 cells, which in turn abrogates CXCR4 signaling. Moreover, consistent with the view that CXCR4 and CXCR7 control limb myogenesis in vivo by similar mechanisms, we found that CXCR4 expression is the highest in late embryonic hindlimb muscles and drops shortly after birth when secondary muscle growth terminates. Vice versa, CXCR7 expression increased perinatally and persisted into adult life. Finally, underscoring the role of the SDF-1 system in muscle regeneration, we observed that SDF-1 is continuously expressed by endomysial cells of postnatal and adult muscle fibers. Analysis of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice additionally revealed that muscle regeneration is associated with muscular re-expression of CXCR4. The apparent tight control of limb muscle development and regeneration by CXCR4 and CXCR7 points to these chemokine receptors as promising therapeutic targets for certain muscle disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemokine/cytokine profiling after rituximab: reciprocal expression of BCA-1/CXCL13 and BAFF in childhood OMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Travelstead, Anna L; Verhulst, Steven J

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that B-cell repopulation following rituximab (anti-CD20) therapy is orchestrated by chemokines and non-chemokine cytokines. Twenty-five children with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) received rituximab with or without conventional agents. A comprehensive panel of 40 chemokines and other cytokines were measured in serum by ELISA and multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Serum BAFF concentration changed dramatically (even after first infusion) and inversely with B-cell depletion/repopulation and CXCL13 concentration at 1, 3, and 6 months. Negative correlations were found for BAFF concentration vs blood B cell percentage and serum CXCL13 concentration; positive correlations with serum rituximab concentrations. Six months after initiation of therapy, no significant difference in the levels of APRIL, CXCL10, IL-6, or 17 other cytokines/chemokines were detected. These data reveal a major role for BAFF in peripheral B cell repopulation following rituximab-induced B-cell depletion, and novel changes in CXCL13. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT0024436. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Innate recognition is essential in the antiviral response against infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV). Chemokines are important for control of HSV via recruitment of natural killer cells, T lymphocytes, and antigen-presenting cells. We previously found that early HSV-1...

  16. Distinctive Treg associated CCR4-CCL22 expression profile with altered frequency of Th17/Treg cell in the immunopathogenesis of Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asothai, R; Anand, Vivek; Das, Dayasagar; Antil, Parul Singh; Khandpur, Sujay; Sharma, V K; Sharma, Alpana

    2015-10-01

    Pemphigus Vulgaris (PV), a relatively common autoimmune blistering disease in India, primarily mediated by anti-Desmoglein 3 (anti-Dsg3) autoantibodies. T-helper 17 (Th17) and T-regulatory (Treg) cells play significant role in regulating immune homeostasis in autoimmune disorders. To understand immunopathogenesis of PV, it is crucial to unfold the phenotypic expression and functional characteristics of these cells along with their specific homing chemokine receptor-ligand. This proposed study aims to unravel the functional expression of Th17 and Treg cells along with their specific homing chemokine receptor-ligand, transcription factors and cytokine levels to better understand the immunopathogenesis of PV. The Flow cytometry results showed decreased frequency of Treg cells and high number of Th17 cells (p<0.001) indicating immune dysregulation in PV. A significant increase (p<0.001) in the serum levels of Th17 associated molecules (IL-17A, CCL-20) and relative expression of RORγt, CCR6 and CCL20 was found in patients. For Treg cells, transcription factor FOXp3 was significantly lowered along with defective CCR4-CCL22 (p<0.05) that might be playing an ambiguous role in Treg generated immune regulation, leading to homing defect at lesional sites. This maiden study revealed the role of defective receptor-ligand interface that might have failed to suppress inflammatory milieu produced by Th17 cells thus promoting inflammation and contributing to immunopathogenesis of PV. This chemokine receptor-ligand can further be explored as potential target for development of novel therapies in PV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Exercise-induced liver chemokine CXCL-1 expression is linked to muscle-derived interleukin-6 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Pilegaard, Henriette; Hansen, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    . The aim of this study was to unravel the mechanisms whereby CXCL-1 is regulated by exercise inmice. After a single bout of exercise, CXCL-1 protein increased in serum(2.4-fold), and CXCL-1 mRNA in muscle (6.5-fold) and liver (41-fold). These increases in CXCL-1 were preceded by increases in serum...... interleukin-6 (IL-6) and muscle IL-6 mRNA. In contrast, exercise-induced regulation of liver CXCL-1 mRNA expression was completely blunted in IL-6 knockout mice. Based on these findings, we examined the possible existence of a muscle-to-liver axis by overexpressing IL-6 in muscles. This resulted in increases...... significantly augmented serum CXCL-1, and CXCL-1 expression in liver and muscle. Taken together, these data indicate that liver is the main source of serum CXCL-1 during exercise in mice, and that the CXCL-1 expression in the liver is regulated by muscle-derived IL-6....

  18. Curcumin modulates the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines by type II alveolar epithelial cells in a rat COPD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lixing Gan,1 Chengye Li,2 Jian Wang,1 Xuejun Guo3 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Shanghai Ninth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Studies have suggested that histone modification has a positive impact on various aspects associated with the progression of COPD. Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2 suppresses proinflammatory gene expression through deacetylation of core histones.Objective: To investigate the effect of histone modification on the expression of chemokines in type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC II in a rat COPD model and regulation of HDAC2 expression by curcumin in comparison with corticosteroid.Materials and methods: The rat COPD model was established by cigarette smoke exposure and confirmed by histology and pathophysioloy. AEC II were isolated and cultured in vitro from the COPD models and control animals. The cells were treated with curcumin, corticosteroid, or trichostatin A, and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2α (MIP-2α was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The expression of HDAC2 was measured by Western blot. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect H3/H4 acetylation and H3K9 methylation in the promoter region of three kinds of chemokine genes (IL-8, MCP-1, and MIP-2α. Results: Compared to the control group, the mRNAs of MCP-1, IL-8, and MIP-2α were upregulated 4.48-fold, 3.14-fold, and 2.83-fold, respectively, in the AEC II from COPD model. The protein expression of HDAC2 in the AEC II from COPD model was significantly lower than from the control group (P<0

  19. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    This article focuses on the production of chemokines by resident glial cells of the nervous system. We describe studies in two distinct categories of inflammation within the nervous system: immune-mediated inflammation as seen in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or multiple sclerosis...... (MS) and post-traumatic inflammation. We provide evidence that chemokines play a role in amplifying the inflammatory reaction in EAE (and, probably, MS). In the context of neural trauma, chemokines appear to be primary stimuli for leukocyte recruitment. Strikingly, expression of monocyte...... that produce aggregates of simultaneous stimuli. These characteristics, in turn, mirror the expression patterns of the endogenous genes: MCP-1 is expressed under a variety of circumstances, while IP-10 appears primarily during immune-mediated processes that feature exposure of resident neuroglia to high levels...

  20. Cell differentiation dependent expressed CCR6 mediates ERK-1/2, SAPK/JNK, and Akt signaling resulting in proliferation and migration of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Stephan; Olszak, Torsten; Beigel, Florian; Diebold, Joachim; Otte, Jan-Michel; Eichhorst, Soeren T; Göke, Burkhard; Dambacher, Julia

    2006-03-01

    The expression of CCL20 (MIP-3alpha), which chemoattracts leukocytes to sites of inflammation, has been shown in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). Aim of this study was to analyze the role of the CCL20 receptor CCR6 in IEC and colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Expression of CCR6 and CCL20 was analyzed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Signaling was investigated by Western blotting, proliferation by MTS assays and chemotactic cell migration by wounding assays. The effect of CCL20 on Fas-induced apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry. CCR6 and its ligand CCL20 are expressed in IEC. Moreover, CRC and CRC metastases express CCR6, which is upregulated during IEC differentiation. Stimulation of IEC with CCL20 and proinflammatory stimuli (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, LPS) significantly upregulates CCL20 mRNA expression. CCL20 expression was significantly increased in inflamed colonic lesions in Crohn's disease and correlated significantly with the IL-8 mRNA expression in these lesions (r = 0.71) but was downregulated in CRC metastases. CCL20 activated Akt, ERK-1/2, and SAPK/JNK MAP kinases and increased IL-8 protein expression. The CCL20 mediated activation of these pathways resulted in a 2.6-fold increase of cell migration (P = 0.001) and in a significant increase of cell proliferation (P differentiation. CCR6 mediated signals result in increased IEC migration and proliferation suggesting an important role in intestinal homeostasis and intestinal inflammation by mediating chemotaxis of IEC but also in mediating migration of CRC cells. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Patterns of chemokine receptor expression on peripheral blood gamma delta T lymphocytes: strong expression of CCR5 is a selective feature of V delta 2/V gamma 9 gamma delta T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzel, Andrea; Wesch, Daniela; Schiemann, Florian; Brandt, Ernst; Janssen, Ottmar; Kabelitz, Dieter

    2002-05-15

    Gammadelta T lymphocytes play an important role in the immune defense against infection, based on the unique reactivity of human Vdelta2Vgamma9 gammadelta T cells toward bacterial phosphoantigens. Chemokines and their corresponding receptors orchestrate numerous cellular reactions, including leukocyte migration, activation, and degranulation. In this study we investigated the expression of various receptors for inflammatory and homeostatic chemokines on peripheral blood gammadelta T cells and compared their expression patterns with those on alphabeta T cells. Although several of the analyzed receptors (including CCR6, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR5) were not differentially expressed on gammadelta vs alphabeta T cells, gammadelta T cells expressed strongly increased levels of the RANTES/macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha/-1beta receptor CCR5 and also enhanced levels of CCR1-3 and CXCR1-3. CCR5 expression was restricted to Vdelta2 gammadelta T cells, while the minor subset of Vdelta1 gammadelta T cells preferentially expressed CXCR1. Stimulation with heat-killed extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis down-modulated cell surface expression of CCR5 on gammadelta T cells in a macrophage-dependent manner, while synthetic phosphoantigen isopentenyl pyrophosphate and CCR5 ligands directly triggered CCR5 down-modulation on gammadelta T cells. The functionality of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 on gammadelta T cells was demonstrated by Ca(2+) mobilization and chemotactic response to the respective chemokines. Our results identify high level expression of CCR5 as a characteristic and selective feature of circulating Vdelta2 gammadelta T cells, which is in line with their suspected function as Th1 effector T cells.

  2. A polymorphism in the mouse crg-2/IP-10 gene complicates chemokine gene expression analysis using a commercial ribonuclease protection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallensleben, W; Biro, L; Sauder, C; Hausmann, J; Asensio, V C; Campbell, I L; Staeheli, P

    2000-02-03

    The use of multiprobe RPAs is becoming an increasingly popular method for the detection and quantitation of RNA levels in cells and tissues. Here we report that due to a polymorphism in the 3'-noncoding region of the mouse Crg-2/IP-10 gene, the mCK-5 chemokine probe set available from Pharmingen can yield aberrant signal patterns with RNA samples from BALB/c, MRL and possibly other mouse strains that may lead to false conclusions regarding expression of the Crg-2/IP-10 and MCP-1 genes.

  3. Human G Protein–Coupled Receptor Gpr-9-6/Cc Chemokine Receptor 9 Is Selectively Expressed on Intestinal Homing T Lymphocytes, Mucosal Lymphocytes, and Thymocytes and Is Required for Thymus-Expressed Chemokine–Mediated Chemotaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Brian A.; Agace, William W.; Campbell, James J.; Heath, Heidi M.; Parent, David; Roberts, Arthur I.; Ebert, Ellen C.; Kassam, Nasim; Qin, Shixin; Zovko, Maria; LaRosa, Gregory J.; Yang, Li-Li; Soler, Dulce; Butcher, Eugene C.; Ponath, Paul D.; Parker, Christina M.; Andrew, David P.

    1999-01-01

    TECK (thymus-expressed chemokine), a recently described CC chemokine expressed in thymus and small intestine, was found to mediate chemotaxis of human G protein–coupled receptor GPR-9-6/L1.2 transfectants. This activity was blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3C3. GPR-9-6 is expressed on a subset of memory α4β7high intestinal trafficking CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes. In addition, all intestinal lamina propria and intraepithelial lymphocytes express GPR-9-6. In contrast, GPR-9-6 is not displayed on cutaneous lymphocyte antigen–positive (CLA+) memory CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes, which traffic to skin inflammatory sites, or on other systemic α4β7−CLA− memory CD4/CD8 lymphocytes. The majority of thymocytes also express GPR-9-6, but natural killer cells, monocytes, eosinophils, basophils, and neutrophils are GPR-9-6 negative. Transcripts of GPR-9-6 and TECK are present in both small intestine and thymus. Importantly, the expression profile of GPR-9-6 correlates with migration to TECK of blood T lymphocytes and thymocytes. As migration of these cells is blocked by anti–GPR-9-6 mAb 3C3, we conclude that GPR-9-6 is the principal chemokine receptor for TECK. In agreement with the nomenclature rules for chemokine receptors, we propose the designation CCR-9 for GPR-9-6. The selective expression of TECK and GPR-9-6 in thymus and small intestine implies a dual role for GPR-9-6/CCR-9, both in T cell development and the mucosal immune response. PMID:10544196

  4. Human p38δ MAP kinase mediates UV irradiation induced up-regulation of the gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Shigeyuki; Ito, Shin; Kato, Yasumasa; Kubota, Eiro; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro

    2010-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family comprises ERK, JNK, p38 and ERK5 (big-MAPK, BMK1). UV irradiation of squamous cell carcinoma cells induced up-regulation of gene expression of chemokine BRAK/CXCL14, stimulated p38 phosphorylation, and down-regulated the phosphorylation of ERK. Human p38 MAPKs exist in 4 isoforms: p38α, β, γ and δ. The UV stimulation of p38 phosphorylation was not inhibited by the presence of SB203580 or PD169316, inhibitors of p38α and β, suggesting p38 phosphorylation was not dependent on these 2 isoforms and that p38γ and/or δ was responsible for the phosphorylation. In fact, inhibition of each of these 4 p38 isoforms by the introduction of short hairpin (sh) RNAs for respective isoforms revealed that only shRNA for p38δ attenuated the UV-induced up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. In addition, over-expression of p38 isoforms in the cells showed the association of p38δ with ERK1 and 2, concomitant with down-regulation of ERK phosphorylation. The usage of p38δ isoform by UV irradiation is not merely due to the abundance of this p38 isoform in the cells. Because serum deprivation of the cells also induced an increase in BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression, and in this case p38α and/or β isoform is responsible for up-regulation of BRAK/CXCL14 gene expression. Taken together, the data indicate that the respective stress-dependent action of p38 isoforms is responsible for the up-regulation of the gene expression of the chemokine BRAK/CXCL14.

  5. Inhibition of cytokine gene expression and induction of chemokine genes in non-lymphatic cells infected with SARS coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Friedemann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiologic agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV mainly infects tissues of non-lymphatic origin, and the cytokine profile of those cells can determine the course of disease. Here, we investigated the cytokine response of two human non-lymphatic cell lines, Caco-2 and HEK 293, which are fully permissive for SARS-CoV. Results A comparison with established cytokine-inducing viruses revealed that SARS-CoV only weakly triggered a cytokine response. In particular, SARS-CoV did not activate significant transcription of the interferons IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, as well as of the interferon-induced antiviral genes ISG56 and MxA, the chemokine RANTES and the interleukine IL-6. Interestingly, however, SARS-CoV strongly induced the chemokines IP-10 and IL-8 in the colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, but not in the embryonic kidney cell line 293. Conclusion Our data indicate that SARS-CoV suppresses the antiviral cytokine system of non-immune cells to a large extent, thus buying time for dissemination in the host. However, synthesis of IP-10 and IL-8, which are established markers for acute-stage SARS, escapes the virus-induced silencing at least in some cell types. Therefore, the progressive infiltration of immune cells into the infected lungs observed in SARS patients could be due to the production of these chemokines by the infected tissue cells.

  6. High levels of CC-chemokine expression and downregulated levels of CCR5 during HIV-1/HTLV-1 and HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Z; Barrios, C S; Castillo, L; Beilke, M A

    2015-05-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HTLV-2 are common copathogens among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HTLV-2 may confer a survival benefit among patients with HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfections, along with lower plasma HIV-1 levels and delayed rates of CD4(+) T-cell decline. These effects have been attributed to the ability of the HTLV-2 viral transactivating Tax2 protein to induce the production of high levels of antiviral CC-chemokines and to downregulate expression of the CCR5 receptor, resulting in impaired entry of HIV-1 into CD4(+) T-cells. This study investigated the innate immunity of coinfected HIV/HTLV individuals by testing the ability of patient PBMCs to produce CC-chemokines in association CCR5 receptor modulation. The cellular proliferative responses of HIV/HTLV coinfected versus HIV monoinfected individuals were also evaluated. Higher levels of MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES (P HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected group compared to HIV-1 monoinfected population. Upregulated levels of RANTES were shown in HIV-1/HTLV-1 after 1 and 3 days of culture (P HIV-1/HTLV-2 coinfected individuals showed significant CCR5 downregulation after 1 and 3 days of culture compared to lymphocytes from HIV-1 and uninfected groups (P CCR5-positive cells were found in HIV-1/HTLV-1 coinfected after 3 days of incubation (P HIV-1/HTLV-1 group compared to HIV-1 alone (P HIV-1 via stimulation of CC-chemokines and receptors, potentially modifying CCR5/HIV-1 binding and HIV-1 progression in coinfected individuals. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Muscle-derived expression of the chemokine CXCL1 attenuates diet-induced obesity and improves fatty acid oxidation in the muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Line; Holkmann Olsen, Caroline; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Serum levels and muscle expression of the chemokine CXCL1 increase markedly in response to exercise in mice. Because several studies have established muscle-derived factors as important contributors of metabolic effects of exercise, this study aimed at investigating the effect of increased...... with control muscles (chow fed: 2.2-fold, P associated with increased muscle mRNA expression of VEGF and CD31, suggesting a role for CXCL1...... in muscle angiogenesis. In conclusion, our data show that overexpression of CXCL1 within a physiological range attenuates diet-induced obesity, likely mediated through a CXCL1-induced improvement of fatty acid oxidation and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle tissue....

  8. Apigenin suppresses migration and invasion of transformed cells through down-regulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei; Kuang, Lisha; Hitron, John Andrew; Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Xin; Budhraja, Amit [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Institute of Oral Biosciences and BK21 Program, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Pratheeshkumar, Poyil [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Environmental exposure to arsenic is known to cause various cancers. There are some potential relationships between cell malignant transformation and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expressions. Metastasis, one of the major characteristics of malignantly transformed cells, contributes to the high mortality of cells. CXCR4 and its natural chemokine ligand C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12) play a critical role in metastasis. Therefore, identification of nutritional factors which are able to inhibit CXCR4 is important for protection from environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis and for abolishing metastasis of malignantly transformed cells. The present study demonstrates that apigenin (4′,5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a natural dietary flavonoid, suppressed CXCR4 expression in arsenic-transformed Beas-2B cells (B-AsT) and several other types of transformed/cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Neither proteasome nor lysosome inhibitor had any effect in reducing the apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4, indicating that apigenin-induced down-regulation of CXCR4 is not due to proteolytic degradation. The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to the inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Apigenin also abolished migration and invasion of transformed cells induced by CXCL12. In a xenograft mouse model, apigenin down-regulated CXCR4 expression and suppressed tumor growth. Taken together, our results show that apigenin is a novel inhibitor of CXCR4 expression. This dietary flavonoid has the potential to suppress migration and invasion of transformed cells and prevent environmental arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Apigenin has a potential in preventing environmental arsenic induced carcinogenesis. • Apigenin suppresses CXCR4 in malignant transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. • The down-regulation of CXCR4 is mainly due to inhibition of NF-κB activity.

  9. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenda; He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Maiko; Krantis, Anthony; Durst, Tony; Zhang, Haibin; Pestka, James J

    2014-07-15

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemokine-like factor-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing 3 expression is associated with a favorable prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianci; Shu, Tianci; Dong, Siyuan; Li, Peiwen; Li, Weinan; Liu, Dali; Qi, Ruiqun; Zhang, Shuguang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-05-01

    Decreased expression of human chemokine-like factor-like MARVEL transmembrane domain-containing 3 (CMTM3) has been identified in a number of human tumors and tumor cell lines, including gastric and testicular cancer, and PC3, CAL27 and Tca-83 cell lines. However, the association between CMTM3 expression and the clinicopathological features and prognosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between CMTM3 expression and clinicopathological parameters and prognosis in ESCC. CMTM3 mRNA and protein expression was analyzed in ESCC and paired non-tumor tissues by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to plot survival curves and the Cox proportional hazards regression model was also used for univariate and multivariate survival analysis. The results revealed that CMTM3 mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in 82.5% (30/40) and 75% (30/40) of ESCC tissues, respectively, when compared with matched non-tumor tissues. Statistical analysis demonstrated that CMTM3 expression was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.002) and clinical stage (P<0.001) in ESCC tissues. Furthermore, the survival time of ESCC patients exhibiting low CMTM3 expression was significantly shorter than that of ESCC patients exhibiting high CMTM3 expression (P=0.01). In addition, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that the overall survival time of patients exhibiting low CMTM3 expression was significantly decreased compared with patients exhibiting high CMTM3 expression (P=0.010). Cox multivariate analysis indicated that CMTM3 protein expression was an independent prognostic predictor for ESCC after resection. This study indicated that CMTM3 expression is significantly decreased in ESCC tissues and CMTM3 protein expression in resected tumors may present an effective prognostic

  11. Expression of the B cell differentiation factor BAFF and chemokine CXCL13 in a murine model of Respiratory Syncytial Virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturaiki, Wael; McFarlane, Amanda J; Rose, Katie; Corkhill, Rachel; McNamara, Paul S; Schwarze, Jürgen; Flanagan, Brian F

    2018-01-26

    Innate immune responses are known to influence the subsequent development of adaptive immunity. We have previously shown that RSV infection of human airway epithelial cells results in production of the B cell growth factor, BAFF. To better understand how the airway responds to RSV infection by production of this and other factors to support or enhance local B cell responses to infection, we analysed the lung expression of BAFF and B cell homeostatic chemokines CXCL12, CXCL13, CCL19 and CCL21 in a murine model of RSV infection. Following infection with A2 strain RSV, the highest RSV N gene expression was observed at day 4 after challenge with virus. In contrast, two peaks of elevated BAFF expression at days 2 and 7 were observed. CXCL13 was significantly elevated at days 1, 2 and 7. CXCL12, CCL19 and CCL21 were expressed within lung tissue from control and RSV challenged animals but no significant difference in expression was found. Immunofluorescence showed BAFF to be present throughout the tissue however CXCL13 expression was localized to cell rich areas probably constituting lymphoid aggregates. Our results define the kinetics of B cell chemoattractant and growth factor expression during RSV infection and indicate an important role for these cytokines in the airway response to RSV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of a2 Vacuolar ATPase in Spermatozoa is Associated with Semen Quality and Chemokine-Cytokine Profiles in Infertile Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Kuniaki; Jaiswal, Mukesh Kumar; Ramu, Sivakumar; Jeyendran, Rajasinjham; Kwak-Kim, Joanne; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Beaman, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of laboratory tests have been developed to determine properties of spermatozoa quality but few have been adopted into routine clinical use in place of the WHO semen analysis. We investigated whether Atp6v0a2 (a2 isoform of vacuolar ATPase) is associated with abnormal semen quality and changes in chemokine-cytokine profiles in infertile men. Patients and Methods Semen samples were collected from 35 healthy donors and 35 infertile men at the Andrology laboratory from August 2011 to June 2012. The levels of Atp6v0a2 mRNA and protein, and its localization in spermatozoa were determined. a2NTD (the N-terminal portion of Atp6v0a2) and secreted chemokine-cytokine profiles in seminal fluid were measured. Results Atp6v0a2 protein (Pspermatozoa from infertile men were significantly lower than those from fertile men. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Atp6v0a2 is mainly expressed in the acrosomal region. Infertile men’s seminal fluid had significantly lower G-CSF (Pspermatozoa and its decreased level in spermatozoa could be used to predict male infertility. This study provides a possibility that Atp6v0a2 could be potentially used as a diagnostic marker for the evaluation of male infertility. PMID:23936208

  13. Chemokines and immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Diana Carolina Torres; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines and generally have low molecular weight ranging from 7 to 15kDa. Chemokines and their receptors are able to control the migration and residence of all immune cells. Some chemokines are considered pro-inflammatory, and their release can be induced during an immune response at a site of infection, while others are considered homeostatic and are involved in controlling of cells migration during tissue development or maintenance. The physiologic importance of this family of mediators is resulting from their specificity − members of the chemokine family induce recruitment of well-defined leukocyte subsets. There are two major chemokine sub-families based upon cysteine residues position: CXC and CC. As a general rule, members of the CXC chemokines are chemotactic for neutrophils, and CC chemokines are chemotactic for monocytes and sub-set of lymphocytes, although there are some exceptions. This review discusses the potential role of chemokines in inflammation focusing on the two best-characterized chemokines: monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a CC chemokine, and interleukin-8, a member of the CXC chemokine sub-family. PMID:26466066

  14. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (Ppeptic ulcer. CXCL12 serum levels may also be used to distinguish between GA and GH phases of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sulindac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, selectively inhibits interferon-γ-induced expression of the chemokine CXCL9 gene in mouse macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaeda, Yoshiichi; Hiroi, Miki; Shimojima, Takahiro; Iguchi, Mayumi; Kanegae, Haruhide; Ohmori, Yoshihiro

    2006-01-01

    Sulindac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to exert an anti-tumor effect on several types of cancer. To determine the effect of sulindac on intracellular signaling pathways in host immune cells such as macrophages, we investigated the effect of the drug on interferon gamma (IFNγ)-induced expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) and other genes in mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Sulindac, but not aspirin or sodium salicylate, inhibited IFNγ-induced expression of the CXC ligand 9 (CXCL9) mRNA, a chemokine for activated T cells, whereas the interferon-induced expression of CXCL10 or IFN regulatory factor-1 was not affected by sulindac. Luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that sulindac inhibited IFNγ-induced promoter activity of the CXCL9 gene. Surprisingly, sulindac had no inhibitory effect on IFNγ-induced STAT1 activation; however, constitutive nuclear factor κB activity was suppressed by the drug. These results indicate that sulindac selectively inhibited IFNγ-inducible gene expression without inhibiting STAT1 activation

  16. Touch of chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eBLANCHET

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractant cytokines or chemokines constitute a family of structurally related proteins found in vertebrates, bacteria or viruses. So far, 48 chemokines genes have been identified in humans, which bind to around 20 chemokine receptors. These receptors belong to the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors family. Chemokines and their receptors were originally studied for their role in cellular trafficking of leukocytes during inflammation and immune surveillance as well. It is now known that they exert different functions under physiological conditions such as homeostasis, development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis but also under pathological disorders including tumorigenesis, cancer metastasis, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Physicochemical properties of chemokines and chemokine receptors confer them the ability to homo- and hetero-oligomerize. Many efforts are currently performed in establishing new therapeutically compounds able to target the chemokine/chemokine receptors system.In this review, we are interested in the role of chemokines in inflammatory disease and leukocyte trafficking with a focus on vascular inflammatory diseases, the operating synergism and the emerging therapeutic approaches of chemokines.

  17. Cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression profiles in tracheobronchial lymph nodes from pigs singularly infected or coinfected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MHYO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to determine cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression profiles in tracheobronchial lymph nodes from pigs singularly infected with porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (MHYO), or coinfected with both. Twenty-eight pigs were randomly assigned to one ...

  18. Increased expression of the chemokines CXCL1 and MIP-1α by resident brain cells precedes neutrophil infiltration in the brain following prolonged soman-induced status epilepticus in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koemeter-Cox Andrew I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD causes neuronal cell death and impaired behavioral function dependent on the induction of status epilepticus (SE. Little is known about the maturation of this pathological process, though neuroinflammation and infiltration of neutrophils are prominent features. The purpose of this study is to quantify the regional and temporal progression of early chemotactic signals, describe the cellular expression of these factors and the relationship between expression and neutrophil infiltration in damaged brain using a rat GD seizure model. Methods Protein levels of 4 chemokines responsible for neutrophil infiltration and activation were quantified up to 72 hours in multiple brain regions (i.e. piriform cortex, hippocampus and thalamus following SE onset using multiplex bead immunoassays. Chemokines with significantly increased protein levels were localized to resident brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, microglia and endothelial cells. Lastly, neutrophil infiltration into these brain regions was quantified and correlated to the expression of these chemokines. Results We observed significant concentration increases for CXCL1 and MIP-1α after seizure onset. CXCL1 expression originated from neurons and endothelial cells while MIP-1α was expressed by neurons and microglia. Lastly, the expression of these chemokines directly preceded and positively correlated with significant neutrophil infiltration in the brain. These data suggest that following GD-induced SE, a strong chemotactic response originating from various brain cells, recruits circulating neutrophils to the injured brain. Conclusions A strong induction of neutrophil attractant chemokines occurs following GD-induced SE resulting in neutrophil influx into injured brain tissues. This process may play a key role in the progressive secondary brain pathology observed in this model though further study is warranted.

  19. Hepatitis C virus NS2 and NS3/4A proteins are potent inhibitors of host cell cytokine/chemokine gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiscott John

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV encodes several proteins that interfere with the host cell antiviral response. Previously, the serine protease NS3/4A was shown to inhibit IFN-β gene expression by blocking dsRNA-activated retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-mediated signaling pathways. Results In the present work, we systematically studied the effect of all HCV proteins on IFN gene expression. NS2 and NS3/4A inhibited IFN gene activation. NS3/4A inhibited the Sendai virus-induced expression of multiple IFN (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-λ1/IL-29 and chemokine (CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 gene promoters. NS2 and NS3/4A, but not its proteolytically inactive form NS3/4A-S139A, were found to inhibit promoter activity induced by RIG-I or its adaptor protein Cardif (or IPS-1/MAVS/VISA. Both endogenous and transfected Cardif were proteolytically cleaved by NS3/4A but not by NS2 indicating different mechanisms of inhibition of host cell cytokine production by these HCV encoded proteases. Cardif also strongly colocalized with NS3/4A at the mitochondrial membrane, implicating the mitochondrial membrane as the site for proteolytic cleavage. In many experimental systems, IFN priming dramatically enhances RNA virus-induced IFN gene expression; pretreatment of HEK293 cells with IFN-α strongly enhanced RIG-I expression, but failed to protect Cardif from NS3/4A-mediated cleavage and failed to restore Sendai virus-induced IFN-β gene expression. Conclusion HCV NS2 and NS3/4A proteins were identified as potent inhibitors of cytokine gene expression suggesting an important role for HCV proteases in counteracting host cell antiviral response.

  20. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wenda; He, Kaiyu; Zhou, Hui-Ren; Berthiller, Franz; Adam, Gerhard; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Watanabe, Maiko; Krantis, Anthony; Durst, Tony; Zhang, Haibin; Pestka, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6 h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. - Highlights: • We compared effects of DON congeners on biomarker proinflammatory genes in mice. • Oral DON induced splenic IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNAs. • 8-Ketotrichothecene ranking

  1. Effects of oral exposure to naturally-occurring and synthetic deoxynivalenol congeners on proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine mRNA expression in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wenda [College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); He, Kaiyu [Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Berthiller, Franz [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Mycotoxin Metabolism and Center for Analytical Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Tulln (Austria); Adam, Gerhard [Dept. of Applied Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria); Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko [Food and Life Sciences, Azabu University, 1-17-71 Fuchinobe Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa Pref., 252-5201 (Japan); Watanabe, Maiko [Division of Microbiology, National Institute of Health Sciences, 1-18-1 Kamiyoga, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Krantis, Anthony [Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa (Canada); Durst, Tony [Dept. of Chemistry, University of Ottawa (Canada); Zhang, Haibin [College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Dept. of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Dept. of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The foodborne mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) induces a ribotoxic stress response in mononuclear phagocytes that mediate aberrant multi-organ upregulation of TNF-α, interleukins and chemokines in experimental animals. While other DON congeners also exist as food contaminants or pharmacologically-active derivatives, it is not known how these compounds affect expression of these cytokine genes in vivo. To address this gap, we compared in mice the acute effects of oral DON exposure to that of seven relevant congeners on splenic expression of representative cytokine mRNAs after 2 and 6 h. Congeners included the 8-ketotrichothecenes 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON), 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol (15-ADON), fusarenon X (FX), nivalenol (NIV), the plant metabolite DON-3-glucoside (D3G) and two synthetic DON derivatives with novel satiety-inducing properties (EN139528 and EN139544). DON markedly induced transient upregulation of TNF-α IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNA expressions. The two ADONs also evoked mRNA expression of these genes but to a relatively lesser extent. FX induced more persistent responses than the other DON congeners and, compared to DON, was: 1) more potent in inducing IL-1β mRNA, 2) approximately equipotent in the induction of TNF-α and CCL-2 mRNAs, and 3) less potent at upregulating IL-6, CXCL-2, and CCL-2 mRNAs. EN139528's effects were similar to NIV, the least potent 8-ketotrichothecene, while D3G and EN139544 were largely incapable of eliciting cytokine or chemokine mRNA responses. Taken together, the results presented herein provide important new insights into the potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic DON congeners to elicit aberrant mRNA upregulation of cytokines associated with acute and chronic trichothecene toxicity. - Highlights: • We compared effects of DON congeners on biomarker proinflammatory genes in mice. • Oral DON induced splenic IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α,CXCL-2, CCL-2 and CCL-7 mRNAs. • 8-Ketotrichothecene ranking

  2. Chemokine (CC motif) ligand 18 upregulates Slug expression to promote stem-cell like features by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongfei; Liang, Xueyi; Li, Mianxiang; Tao, Xiaoan; Tai, Shanshan; Fan, Zhaona; Wang, Zhi; Cheng, Bin; Xia, Juan

    2017-08-01

    Chemokine (CC motif) ligand 18 (CCL18) is involved in remodeling of the tumor microenvironment and plays critical roles in oncogenesis, invasiveness, and metastasis. We previously investigated the overexpression of CCL18 in primary oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues and its association with advanced clinical stage in OSCC patients. However, the underlying mechanisms of this CCL18-derived activity remains unidentified. This study showed exogenous CCL18 increased cell migration and invasion and induced cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and that E-cadherin, an epithelial marker, decreased and N-cadherin, a mesenchymal marker, increased, compared to negative control in OSCC cells. Furthermore, we detected that CCL18 induced the acquisition of cancer stem(-like) cell characteristics in oral cancer cells, but also found a significantly positive correlation between the expression of CCL18 and Bmi-1 (P Slug expression by stimulating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in OSCC cell lines. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway by INK128, or Slug knockdown by RNA interference, reversed CCL18-induced EMT and the stemness response at both molecular and functional levels. In conclusion, our data suggested that CCL18 upregulated Slug expression to promote EMT and stem cell-like features by activating the mTOR pathway in oral cancer. These findings provide new potential targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of OSCC. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Effects of in vitro exposure to hay dust on the gene expression of chemokines and cell-surface receptors in primary bronchial epithelial cell cultures established from horses with chronic recurrent airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Dorothy M; Matychak, Marybeth; Reyner, Claudia L; Erb, Hollis N; Young, Jean C

    2009-03-01

    To examine effects of in vitro exposure to solutions of hay dust, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or beta-glucan on chemokine and cell-surface receptor (CSR) gene expression in primary bronchial epithelial cell cultures (BECCs) established from healthy horses and horses with recurrent airway obstruction (RAO). BECCs established from bronchial biopsy specimens of 6 RAO-affected horses and 6 healthy horses. 5-day-old BECCs were treated with PBS solution, hay dust solutions, LPS, or beta-glucan for 6 or 24 hours. Gene expression of interleukin (IL)-8, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 2 (CXCL2), IL-1beta, toll-like receptor 2, toll-like receptor 4, IL-1 receptor 1, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was measured with a kinetic PCR assay. Treatment with PBS solution for 6 or 24 hours was not associated with a significant difference in chemokine or CSR expression between BECCs from either group of horses. In all BECCs, treatment with hay dust or LPS for 6 hours increased IL-8, CXCL2, and IL-1beta gene expression > 3-fold; at 24 hours, only IL-1beta expression was upregulated by > 3-fold. In all BECCs, CSR gene expression was not increased following any treatment. With the exception of a 3.7-fold upregulation of CXCL2 in BECCs from RAO-affected horses (following 6-hour hay dust treatment), no differences in chemokine or CSR gene expression were detected between the 2 groups. At 24 hours, CXCL2 gene expression in all BECCs was downregulated. Epithelial CXCL2 upregulation in response to hay dust particulates may incite early airway neutrophilia in horses with RAO.

  4. CpG-ODNs induces up-regulated expression of chemokine CCL9 in mouse macrophages and microglia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ravindran, C.; Cheng, Y.-C.; Liang, S.-M.

    , cancer antigens and allergens [32]. Analysis on BALB/c mice to CpG-ODN indicated that normal macrophages from the spleen and lymph nodes are triggered by CpG-ODN to increase MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MIP-1γ, RANTES, JE/ MCP-1, and IP-10 mRNA expression [33...

  5. Chemokine Receptor Expression Identifies Pre–T Helper (Th)1, Pre–Th2, and Nonpolarized Cells among Human CD4+ Central Memory T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivino, Laura; Messi, Mara; Jarrossay, David; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Sallusto, Federica; Geginat, Jens

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that central–memory T cells (TCM cells), which express lymph node homing receptors CCR7 and CD62L, are largely devoid of effector functions but acquire characteristics of effector–memory T cells (TEM cells) (i.e., CCR7− T helper [Th]1 or Th2 cells) after stimulation with T cell receptor agonists or homeostatic cytokines. Here we show that three chemokine receptors identify functional subsets within the human CD4+ TCM cell pool. TCM cells expressing CXCR3 secreted low amounts of interferon γ, whereas CCR4+ TCM cells produced some interleukin (IL)-4, but not IL-5. In response to IL-7 and IL-15, CXCR3+ TCM and CCR4+ TCM cells invariably generated fully differentiated CCR7− Th1 and Th2 cells, respectively, suggesting that they represent pre-Th1 and pre-Th2 cells. Conversely, CXCR5+ TCM cells lacking CXCR3 and CCR4 remained nonpolarized and retained CCR7 and CD62L expression upon cytokine-driven expansion. Unlike naive cells, all memory subsets had a low T cell receptor rearrangement excision circle content, spontaneously incorporated bromodeoxyuridine ex vivo, and contained cells specific for tetanus toxoid. Conversely, recall responses to cytomegalovirus and vaccinia virus were largely restricted to CXCR3+ TCM and TEM cells. We conclude that antigen-specific memory T cells are distributed between TEM cells and different subsets of TCM cells. Our results also explain how the quality of primary T cell responses could be maintained by TCM cells in the absence of antigen. PMID:15381728

  6. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 expression in allergic asthmatic airways: role in airway smooth muscle migration and chemokine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Zhang

    Full Text Available Pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble pattern recognition receptor with non-redundant functions in inflammation and innate immunity. PTX3 is produced by immune and structural cells. However, very little is known about the expression of PTX3 and its role in allergic asthma.We sought to determine the PTX3 expression in asthmatic airways and its function in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMC. In vivo PTX3 expression in bronchial biopsies of mild, moderate and severe asthmatics was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. PTX3 mRNA and protein were measured by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Proliferation and migration were examined using (3H-thymidine incorporation, cell count and Boyden chamber assays.PTX3 immunoreactivity was increased in bronchial tissues of allergic asthmatics compared to healthy controls, and mainly localized in the smooth muscle bundle. PTX3 protein was expressed constitutively by HASMC and was significantly up-regulated by TNF, and IL-1β but not by Th2 (IL-4, IL-9, IL-13, Th1 (IFN-γ, or Th-17 (IL-17 cytokines. In vitro, HASMC released significantly higher levels of PTX3 at the baseline and upon TNF stimulation compared to airway epithelial cells (EC. Moreover, PTX3 induced CCL11/eotaxin-1 release whilst inhibited the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2-driven HASMC chemotactic activity.Our data provide the first evidence that PTX3 expression is increased in asthmatic airways. HASMC can both produce and respond to PTX3. PTX3 is a potent inhibitor of HASMC migration induced by FGF-2 and can upregulate CCL11/eotaxin-1 release. These results raise the possibility that PTX3 may play a dual role in allergic asthma.

  7. B cell attracting chemokine 1 (CXCL13) and its receptor CXCR5 are expressed in normal and aberrant gut associated lymphoid tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Carlsen, H S; Baekkevold, E S; Johansen, F-E; Haraldsen, G; Brandtzaeg, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and aims: In mice, the B lymphocyte chemoattractant (BLC) CXC chemokine ligand 13 (CXCL13) is sufficient to induce a series of events leading to the formation of organised lymphoid tissue. Its receptor, CXCR5, is required for normal development of secondary lymphoid tissue. However, the human counterpart, B cell attracting chemokine 1 (BCA-1) has only been detected in the stomach and appendix and not in other parts of normal or diseased gut. Hence to elucidate the potential role of...

  8. Chemokine CXCL3 mediates prostate cancer cells proliferation, migration and gene expression changes in an autocrine/paracrine fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hua; Cao, Yu; Shao, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Chun-Bin; Wang, Jing-Tao; Liang, Li-Chun; Shao, Wen-Wu; Qi, Ya-Ling; Li, Yue; Zhang, Ze-Yu; Yang, Zhe; Sun, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Peng-Xia; Jia, Lin-Lin; Wang, Wei-Qun

    2018-03-09

    We have previously indicated that CXCL3 was upregulated in the tissues of prostate cancer, and exogenous administration of CXCL3 played a predominant role in the tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells. In the present study, we further explored the role and the underlying mechanism of CXCL3 overexpression in the oncogenic potential of prostate cancer in an autocrine/paracrine fashion. CXCL3-overexpressing prostate cancer cell line PC-3 and immortalized prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 were established by gene transfection. CCK-8, transwell assays and growth of tumor xenografts were conducted to characterize the effects of CXCL3 on PC-3 cells' proliferation and migration. Western blotting was conducted to test whether CXCL3 could affect the expression of tumorigenesis-associated genes. The results showed that CXCL3 overexpression in PC-3 cells and the PC-3 cells treated with the supernatants of CXCL3-transfected WPMY-1 cells stimulated the proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells in vitro and in a nude mouse xenograft model. Western blotting revealed higher levels of p-ERK, Akt and Bcl-2 and lower levels of Bax in the tumor xenografts transplanted with CXCL3-transfected PC-3 cells. Moreover, the tumor xenografts derived from the PC-3 cells treated with supernatants of CXCL3-transfected WPMY-1 cells showed higher expression of ERK, Akt and Bcl-2 and lower expression of Bax. These findings suggest that CXCL3 autocrine/paracrine pathways are involved in the development of prostate cancer by regulating the expression of the target genes that are related to the progression of malignancies.

  9. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, T B; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta).......To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta)....

  10. Chemokines and antimicrobial peptides have a cag-dependent early response to Helicobacter pylori infection in primary human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Paris, Isabelle; Garcia, Magali; Tran, Cong Tri; Cremniter, Julie; Garnier, Martine; Faure, Jean-Pierre; Barthes, Thierry; Boneca, Ivo G; Morel, Franck; Lecron, Jean-Claude; Burucoa, Christophe; Bodet, Charles

    2014-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection systematically causes chronic gastric inflammation that can persist asymptomatically or evolve toward more severe gastroduodenal pathologies, such as ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric cancer. The cag pathogenicity island (cag PAI) of H. pylori allows translocation of the virulence protein CagA and fragments of peptidoglycan into host cells, thereby inducing production of chemokines, cytokines, and antimicrobial peptides. In order to characterize the inflammatory response to H. pylori, a new experimental protocol for isolating and culturing primary human gastric epithelial cells was established using pieces of stomach from patients who had undergone sleeve gastrectomy. Isolated cells expressed markers indicating that they were mucin-secreting epithelial cells. Challenge of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori B128 underscored early dose-dependent induction of expression of mRNAs of the inflammatory mediators CXCL1 to -3, CXCL5, CXCL8, CCL20, BD2, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In AGS cells, significant expression of only CXCL5 and CXCL8 was observed following infection, suggesting that these cells were less reactive than primary epithelial cells. Infection of both cellular models with H. pylori B128ΔcagM, a cag PAI mutant, resulted in weak inflammatory-mediator mRNA induction. At 24 h after infection of primary epithelial cells with H. pylori, inflammatory-mediator production was largely due to cag PAI substrate-independent virulence factors. Thus, H. pylori cag PAI substrate appears to be involved in eliciting an epithelial response during the early phases of infection. Afterwards, other virulence factors of the bacterium take over in development of the inflammatory response. Using a relevant cellular model, this study provides new information on the modulation of inflammation during H. pylori infection. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Benzopyrene promotes lung cancer A549 cell migration and invasion through up-regulating cytokine IL8 and chemokines CCL2 and CCL3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Chang, Li; Jin, Hanyu; Xia, Yaoxiong; Wang, Li; He, Wenjie; Li, Wenhui; Chen, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Tobacco-sourced carcinogen including benzopyrene (B[a]P) in lung cancer metastasis has not been fully reported. In this study, lung carcinoma A549 cell line was used to investigate the potential roles of tobacco-sourced B[a]P on cell metastasis and invasion and to assess its underlying mechanism. Effects of tobacco-sourced carcinogen on A549 cell proliferation, metastasis, and invasion were analyzed using MTT assay, Transwell assay, and scratch method, respectively. The effects of tobacco-sourced carcinogen on cytokines and chemokines secretion were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, correlation between inflammatory factor expression and cancer cell migration and invasion was assessed using siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Data showed that both B[a]P and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone either at high or low dose performed no significant difference on A549 cell proliferation with time increasing. 4-(Methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone performed no significant difference on A549 cell migration and invasion while B[a]P significantly increased A549 cell migration and invasion compared to the control group (P A549 cells were significantly decreased compared to the control, respectively (P < 0.05), while silenced IL-8 drastically decreased the migrated and invasive cells compared to the control (P < 0.01). Taken together, this study illustrated that there may be significant correlation between smoking and lung cancer metastasis. B[a]P maybe an excellent contributor for lung cancer metastasis through up-regulating IL-8, CCL-2, and CCL-3 expression. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  12. Expression of Human CD4 and chemokine receptors in cotton rat cells confers permissiveness for productive HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current small animal models for studying HIV-1 infection are very limited, and this continues to be a major obstacle for studying HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis, as well as for the urgent development and evaluation of effective anti-HIV-1 therapies and vaccines. Previously, it was shown that HIV-1 can infect cotton rats as indicated by development of antibodies against all major proteins of the virus, the detection of viral cDNA in spleen and brain of challenged animals, the transmission of infectious virus, albeit with low efficiency, from animal to animal by blood, and an additional increase in the mortality in the infected groups. Results Using in vitro experiments, we now show that cotton rat cell lines engineered to express human receptor complexes for HIV-1 (hCD4 along with hCXCR4 or hCCR5 support virus entry, viral cDNA integration, and the production of infectious virus. Conclusion These results further suggest that the development of transgenic cotton rats expressing human HIV-1 receptors may prove to be useful small animal model for HIV infection.

  13. CXC chemokine receptor 7 (CXCR7) regulates CXCR4 protein expression and capillary tuft development in mouse kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haege, Sammy; Einer, Claudia; Thiele, Stefanie; Mueller, Wiebke; Nietzsche, Sandor; Lupp, Amelie; Mackay, Fabienne; Schulz, Stefan; Stumm, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is involved in kidney development by regulating formation of the glomerular tuft. Recently, a second CXCL12 receptor was identified and designated CXCR7. Although it is established that CXCR7 regulates heart and brain development in conjunction with CXCL12 and CXCR4, little is known about the influence of CXCR7 on CXCL12 dependent kidney development. We provided analysis of CXCR7 expression and function in the developing mouse kidney. Using in situ hybridization, we identified CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial cells including podocytes at all nephron stages up to the mature glomerulus. CXCL12 mRNA showed a striking overlap with CXCR7 mRNA in epithelial structures. In addition, CXCL12 was detected in stromal cells and the glomerular tuft. Expression of CXCR4 was complementary to that of CXCR7 as it occurred in mesenchymal cells, outgrowing ureteric buds and glomerular endothelial cells but not in podocytes. Kidney examination in CXCR7 null mice revealed ballooning of glomerular capillaries as described earlier for CXCR4 null mice. Moreover, we detected a severe reduction of CXCR4 protein but not CXCR4 mRNA within the glomerular tuft and in the condensed mesenchyme. Malformation of the glomerular tuft in CXCR7 null mice was associated with mesangial cell clumping. We established that there is a similar glomerular pathology in CXCR7 and CXCR4 null embryos. Based on the phenotype and the anatomical organization of the CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 system in the forming glomerulus, we propose that CXCR7 fine-tunes CXCL12/CXCR4 mediated signalling between podocytes and glomerular capillaries.

  14. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins involved in the direction of migration of immune cells both during normal homeostasis and inflammation. Chemokines have been implicated in the pathology of many different inflammatory disorders and are therefore appealing therapeutic targets. Using a chemokine....../chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis...

  15. Chemokines: Small Molecules Participate in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mostafa Hosseini-Zijoud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chemokines are small protein molecules involved in cell signaling processes. They play a crucial role in many physiological and pathological processes. Chemokines are functionally classified into two categories; inflammatory/inducible and constitutive. Their biologic functional differences are the result of their receptors structural differences. Recently some studies were performed about the chemokines changes in diabetes. Inflammatory mechanisms have an important role in diabetes.Materials and Methods: In this review article we searched the keywords chemokines, diabetes, diabetes pathogenesis, and type 1 and 2 diabetes in Persian resources, PubMed and famous English-language websites through advanced search engines and found the newest studies about the role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of diabetes.Results: The results of the studies showed that diabetes and its disorders enhance the activation of immune cells and the expression of cytokines such as IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, SDF-1, INF-γ, TGF-β, MCP-1, IP-10, TNF-α, and RANTES; most of them have impact on the pathogenesis of diabetes.Conclusion: Comparison and analysis of the results obtained from our research and the results of performed studies in the world and Iran shows that chemokines, like other protein molecules involved in the pathogenesis and etiology of diabetes, play a role in this process.

  16. Molecular characterization and expression analysis of four fish-specific CC chemokine receptors CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11 in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Holland, Jason W; Jiang, Yousheng; Secombes, Christopher J; Nie, Pin; Wang, Tiehui

    2017-09-01

    The chemokine and chemokine receptor networks regulate leukocyte trafficking, inflammation, immune cell differentiation, cancer and other biological processes. Comparative immunological studies have revealed that both chemokines and their receptors have expanded greatly in a species/lineage specific way. Of the 10 human CC chemokine receptors (CCR1-10) that bind CC chemokines, orthologues only to CCR6, 7, 9 and 10 are present in teleost fish. In this study, four fish-specific CCRs, termed as CCR4La, CCR4Lc1, CCR4Lc2 and CCR11, with a close link to human CCR1-5 and 8, in terms of amino acid homology and syntenic conservation, have been identified and characterized in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). These CCRs were found to possess the conserved features of the G protein-linked receptor family, including an extracellular N-terminal, seven TM domains, three extracellular loops and three intracellular loops, and a cytoplasmic carboxyl tail with multiple potential serine/threonine phosphorylation sites. Four cysteine residues known to be involved in forming two disulfide bonds are present in the extracellular domains and a DRY motif is present in the second intracellular loop. Signaling mediated by these receptors might be regulated by N-glycosylation, tyrosine sulfation, S-palmitoylation, a PDZ ligand motif and di-leucine motifs. Studies of intron/exon structure revealed distinct fish-specific CCR gene organization in different fish species/lineages that might contribute to the diversification of the chemokine ligand-receptor networks in different fish lineages. Fish-specific trout CCRs are highly expressed in immune tissues/organs, such as thymus, spleen, head kidney and gills. Their expression can be induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFNγ, by the pathogen associated molecular patterns, PolyIC and peptidoglycan, and by bacterial infection. These data suggest that fish-specific CCRs are likely to have an important role in immune

  17. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for imaging of chemokine receptor CXCR4 expression in multiple myeloma - Comparison to [18F]FDG and laboratory values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapa, Constantin; Schreder, Martin; Schirbel, Andreas; Samnick, Samuel; Kortüm, Klaus Martin; Herrmann, Ken; Kropf, Saskia; Einsele, Herrmann; Buck, Andreas K.; Wester, Hans-Jürgen; Knop, Stefan; Lückerath, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    Chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is a key factor for tumor growth and metastasis in several types of human cancer including multiple myeloma (MM). Proof-of-concept of CXCR4-directed radionuclide therapy in MM has recently been reported. This study assessed the diagnostic performance of the CXCR4-directed radiotracer [68Ga]Pentixafor in MM and a potential role for stratifying patients to CXCR4-directed therapies. Thirty-five patients with MM underwent [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET/CT for evaluation of eligibility for endoradiotherapy. In 19/35 cases, [18F]FDG-PET/CT for correlation was available. Scans were compared on a patient and on a lesion basis. Tracer uptake was correlated with standard clinical parameters of disease activity. [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected CXCR4-positive disease in 23/35 subjects (66%). CXCR4-positivity at PET was independent from myeloma subtypes, cytogenetics or any serological parameters and turned out as a negative prognostic factor. In the 19 patients in whom a comparison to [18F]FDG was available, [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET detected more lesions in 4/19 (21%) subjects, [18F]FDG proved superior in 7/19 (37%). In the remaining 8/19 (42%) patients, both tracers detected an equal number of lesions. [18F]FDG-PET positivity correlated with [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET positivity (p=0.018). [68Ga]Pentixafor-PET provides further evidence that CXCR4 expression frequently occurs in advanced multiple myeloma, representing a negative prognostic factor and a potential target for myeloma specific treatment. However, selecting patients for CXCR4 directed therapies and prognostic stratification seem to be more relevant clinical applications for this novel imaging modality, rather than diagnostic imaging of myeloma. PMID:28042328

  18. Dysregulation of chemokine/chemokine receptor axes and NK cell tissue localization during diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bernardini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTChemokines are small chemotactic molecules that play key roles in physiological and pathological conditions. Upon signaling via their specific receptors, chemokines regulate tissue mobilization and trafficking of a wide array of immune cells, including NK cells. Current research is focused in analyzing changes of chemokine/chemokine receptor expression during various diseases to interfere with pathological trafficking of cells, or to recruit selected cell types to specific tissues. NK cells are a heterogeneous lymphocyte population comprising several subsets endowed with distinct functional properties and mainly representing distinct stages of a linear development process. Because of their different functional potential, the type of subset that accumulates in a tissue drives the final outcome of NK cell-regulated immune response, leading to either protection or pathology. Correspondingly, chemokine receptors including CXCR4, CXCR3 and CX3CR1 are differentially expressed by NK cell subsets and their expression levels can be modulated during NK cell activation. This review will at first summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of chemokines to the localization and generation of NK cell subsets in homeostasis. How an inappropriate chemotactic response can lead to pathology and how chemokine targeting can therapeutically affect tissue recruitment/localization of distinct NK cell subsets will also be discussed.

  19. Docosahexaenoyl serotonin emerges as most potent inhibitor of IL-17 and CCL-20 released by blood mononuclear cells from a series of N-acyl serotonins identified in human intestinal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Balvers, Michiel G J; Hendriks, Henk F J; Wilpshaar, Tessa; van Heek, Tjarda; Witkamp, Renger F; Meijerink, Jocelijn

    2017-09-01

    Fatty acid amides (FAAs), conjugates of fatty acids with ethanolamine, mono-amine neurotransmitters or amino acids are a class of molecules that display diverse functional roles in different cells and tissues. Recently we reported that one of the serotonin-fatty acid conjugates, docosahexaenoyl serotonin (DHA-5-HT), previously found in gut tissue of mouse and pig, attenuates the IL-23-IL-17 signaling axis in LPS-stimulated mice macrophages. However, its presence and effects in humans remained to be elucidated. Here, we report for the first time its identification in human intestinal (colon) tissue, along with a series of related N-acyl serotonins. Furthermore, we tested these fatty acid conjugates for their ability to inhibit the release of IL-17 and CCL-20 by stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Serotonin conjugates with palmitic acid (PA-5-HT), stearic acid (SA-5-HT) and oleic acid (OA-5-HT) were detected in higher levels than arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5-HT) and DHA-5-HT, while eicosapentaenoyl serotonin (EPA-5-HT) could not be quantified. Among these, DHA-5-HT was the most potent in inhibiting IL-17 and CCL-20, typical Th17 pro-inflammatory mediators, by Concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human PBMCs. These results underline the idea that DHA-5-HT is a gut-specific endogenously produced mediator with the capacity to modulate the IL-17/Th17 signaling response. Our findings may be of relevance in relation to intestinal inflammatory diseases like Crohn's disease and Ulcerative colitis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Plasma macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) and its receptor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    CCR. 4+ P. BT. L. %. Fig. 2B (In-between attacks). Figure 2. Positive correlations between the percentage of peripheral blood T lymphocytes expressing the chemokine CC receptor-4 (CCR4) and plasma levels of macrophage derived chemokine (MDC) among asthmatic children during acute attacks (Fig.2A) and after ...

  1. The role of chemokines and chemokine receptors in eosinophil activation during inflammatory allergic reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira S.H.P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are important chemotactic cytokines that play a fundamental role in the trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. They are also potent cell-activating factors, inducing cytokine and histamine release and free radical production, a fact that makes them particularly important in the pathogenesis of allergic inflammation. The action of chemokines is regulated at the level of agonist production and processing as well as at the level of receptor expression and coupling. Therefore, an analysis of the ligands must necessarily consider receptors. Eosinophils are target cells involved in the allergic inflammatory response since they are able to release a wide variety of mediators including CC and CXC chemokines and express their receptors. These mediators could damage the airway epithelial cells and might be important to stimulate other cells inducing an amplification of the allergic response. This review focuses on recently emerging data pertaining to the importance of chemokines and chemokine receptors in promoting eosinophil activation and migration during the allergic inflammatory process. The analysis of the function of eosinophils and their chemokine receptors during allergic inflammation might be a good approach to understanding the determinants of asthma severity and to developing novel therapies.

  2. Chemokine-Derived Peptides: Novel Antimicrobial and Antineoplasic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Valdivia-Silva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a burgeoning family of chemotactic cytokines displaying a broad array of functions such as regulation of homeostatic leukocyte traffic and development, as well as activating the innate immune system. Their role in controlling early and late inflammatory stages is now well recognized. An improper balance either in chemokine synthesis or chemokine receptor expression contributes to various pathological disorders making chemokines and their receptors a useful therapeutic target. Research in this area is progressing rapidly, and development of novel agents based on chemokine/ chemokine receptors antagonist functions are emerging as attractive alternative drugs. Some of these novel agents include generation of chemokine-derived peptides (CDP with potential agonist and antagonist effects on inflammation, cancer and against bacterial infections. CDP have been generated mainly from N- and C-terminus chemokine sequences with subsequent modifications such as truncations or elongations. In this review, we present a glimpse of the different pharmacological actions reported for CDP and our current understanding regarding the potential use of CDP alone or as part of the novel therapies proposed in the treatment of microbial infections and cancer.

  3. The human MCP-2 gene (SCYA8): Cloning, sequence analysis, tissue expression, and assignment to the CC chemokine gene contig on chromosome 17q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Coillie, E.; Fiten, P.; Van Damme, J.; Opdenakker, G. [Univ. of Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Monocyte chemotactic proteins (MCPs) form a subfamily of chemokines that recruit leukocytes to sites of inflammation and that may contribute to tumor-associated leukocyte infiltration and to the antiviral state against HIV infection. With the use of degenerate primers that were based on CC chemokine consensus sequences, the known MIP-1{alpha}/LD78{alpha}, MCP-1, and MCP-3 genes and the previously unidentified eotaxin and MCP-2 genes were isolated from a YAC contig from human chromosome 17q11.2. The amplified genomic MCP-2 fragment was used to isolate an MCP-2 cosmid from which the gene sequence was determined. The MCP-2 gene shares with the MCP-1 and MCP-3 genes a conserved intron-exon structure and a coding nucleotide sequence homology of 77%. By Northern blot analysis the 1.0-kb MCP-2 mRNA was predominantly detectable in the small intestine, peripheral blood, heart, placenta, lung, skeletal muscle, ovary, colon, spinal cord, pancreas, and thymus. Transcripts of 1.5 and 2.4 kb were found in the testis, the small intestine, and the colon. The isolation of the MCP-2 gene from the chemokine contig localized it on YAC clones of chromosome 17q11.2, which also contain the eotaxin, MCP-1, MCP-3, and NCC-1/MCP-4 genes. The combination of using degenerate primer PCR and YACs illustrates that novel genes can efficiently be isolated from gene cluster contigs with less redundancy and effort than the isolation of novel ESTs. 42 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. CXC chemokine receptor 3 expression on CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitors from human cord blood induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -induced CD34(+) progenitor chemotaxis. These chemotactic attracted CD34(+) progenitors are colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage. gamma IP-10 and Mig also induced GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitor adhesion and aggregation by means of CXCR3, a finding confirmed by the observation that anti-CXCR3 m......Ab blocked these functions of gammaIP-10 and Mig but not of chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. gamma IP-10-induced and Mig-induced up-regulation of integrins (CD49a and CD49b) was found to play a crucial role in adhesion of GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. Moreover, gamma IP-10 and Mig...... stimulated CXCR3 redistribution and cellular polarization in GM-CSF-stimulated CD34(+) progenitors. These results indicate that CXCR3-gamma IP-10 and CXCR3-Mig receptor-ligand pairs, as well as the effects of GM-CSF on them, may be especially important in the cytokine/chemokine environment...

  5. Activation-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (Traf3) alternative splicing controls the noncanonical nuclear factor κB pathway and chemokine expression in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Monika; Wilhelmi, Ilka; Schultz, Astrid-Solveig; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2014-05-09

    The noncanonical nuclear factor κB (ncNFκB) pathway regulates the expression of chemokines required for secondary lymphoid organ formation and thus plays a pivotal role in adaptive immunity. Whereas ncNFκB signaling has been well described in stromal cells and B cells, its role and regulation in T cells remain largely unexplored. ncNFκB activity critically depends on the upstream NFκB-inducing kinase (NIK). NIK expression is negatively regulated by the full-length isoform of TNF receptor-associated factor 3 (Traf3) as formation of a NIK-Traf3-Traf2 complex targets NIK for degradation. Here we show that T cell-specific and activation-dependent alternative splicing generates a Traf3 isoform lacking exon 8 (Traf3DE8) that, in contrast to the full-length protein, activates ncNFκB signaling. Traf3DE8 disrupts the NIK-Traf3-Traf2 complex and allows accumulation of NIK to initiate ncNFκB signaling in activated T cells. ncNFκB activity results in expression of several chemokines, among them B cell chemoattractant (CxCL13), both in a model T cell line and in primary human CD4(+) T cells. Because CxCL13 plays an important role in B cell migration and activation, our data suggest an involvement and provide a mechanistic basis for Traf3 alternative splicing and ncNFκB activation in contributing to T cell-dependent adaptive immunity.

  6. A preliminary study on the expression and clinical value of platelet-derived growth factor BB, hypoxia inducible factor-1α and C-C motif chemokine receptor-2 in peripheral blood during the pathogenesis of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tang, Jinglan; Hu, Qiaohong; Lu, Kefeng; Hou, Chunjie

    2018-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) plays an important role in the development of GD (Graves' disease). However, it is still unknown whether PDGF-BB is expressed in peripheral blood and whether the expression of PDGF-BB contributes to GD. We aim to study the expression of PDGF-BB, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α and C-C motif chemokine receptor (CCR)-2 in peripheral blood of patients with GD and explore its effect and potential mechanism in pathogenesis. 41 patients with GD (GD group) and forty-five healthy people (control group) were chosen. The concentration of PDGF-BB and HIF-1α in peripheral blood specimens were detected and compared between the two groups. The expression of CCR2 in macrophages in the peripheral blood specimens were examined using FCM (Flow Cytometry). Both PDGF-BB and HIF-1α were expressed in human peripheral blood from the two groups. Compared with specimens from healthy people, there were statistically increased concentrations of PDGF-BB and HIF-1α in the GD group (P BB through HIF-1α signal, and the high expression of PDGF-BB may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD.

  7. Generating substrate bound functional chemokine gradients in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Hansen, Morten; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2009-01-01

    Microcontact printing (mCP) is employed to generate discontinuous microscale gradients of active fractalkine, a chemokine expressed by endothelial cells near sites of inflammation where it is believed to form concentration gradients descending away from the inflamed area. In vivo, fractalkine is ...... surface-bound chemokines (haptotactic gradients). The use of a capture antibody facilitates control of the orientation of tagged molecules, thereby ensuring a high degree of bio-functionality through correct presentation and reduced protein denaturation....

  8. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptor...

  9. Temporal expression and cellular origin of CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 in the central nervous system: insight into mechanisms of MOG-induced EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ericsson-Dahlstrand Anders

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CC chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 are critical for the recruitment of mononuclear phagocytes to the central nervous system (CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Mononuclear phagocytes are effector cells capable of phagocytosing myelin and damaging axons. In this study, we characterize the regional, temporal and cellular expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord of rats with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (MOG-EAE. While resembling human MS, this animal model allows unique access to CNS-tissue from various time-points of relapsing neuroinflammation and from various lesional stages: early active, late active, and inactive completely demyelinated lesions. Methods The expression of CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was studied with in situ hybridization using radio labelled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining for phenotypic cell markers. Spinal cord sections from healthy rats and rats with MOG-EAE (acute phase, remission phase, relapse phase were analysed. In defined lesion stages, the number of cells expressing CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 mRNA was determined. Data were statistically analysed by the nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test. Results In MOG-EAE rats, extensive up-regulation of CCR1 and CCR5 mRNA, and moderate up-regulation of CCR2 mRNA, was found in the spinal cord during episodes of active inflammation and demyelination. Double staining with phenotypic cell markers identified the chemokine receptor mRNA-expressing cells as macrophages/microglia. Expression of all three receptors was substantially reduced during clinical remission, coinciding with diminished inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. Healthy control rats did not show any detectable expression of CCR1, CCR2 or CCR5 mRNA in the spinal cord. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that the acute and chronic-relapsing phases of MOG

  10. IFN-gamma-induced chemokines synergize with pertussis toxin to promote T cell entry to the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Caruso, Maria; Campbell, Iain L

    2007-01-01

    for the chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5, to levels comparable to those seen during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Other chemokines (CXCL2, CCL2, CCL3) were not induced. Mice lacking the IFN-gammaR showed no response, and a control viral vector did not induce chemokine expression. Chemokine expression...... was predominantly localized to meningeal and ependymal cells, and was also seen in astrocytes and microglia. IFN-gamma-induced chemokine expression did not lead to inflammation. However, when pertussis toxin was given i.p. to mice infected with the IFN-gamma vector, there was a dramatic increase in the number of T...

  11. Expression of chemokine receptor-4 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on experimental rat abdominal aortic aneurysms and the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with stromal-derived factor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Yun Long

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the expression and role of chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4 in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs from experimental rats with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA for migration of BMSCs. Sprague–Dawley rats were divided into an experimental group and control group (n = 18 each. AAA was induced with 0.75 M solution infiltrate for 30 minutes, after which the abdomen was rinsed and closed. Saline was used in place of CaCl2 in the control group. CD34 and CD29 were detected by flow cytometry, the gene and protein expression of CXCR4 were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively. The migration of BMSCs with stromal-derived factor-1 was detected by Transwell chamber. CD34 expression was negative and CD29 expression was positive. The gene and protein expression of CXCR4 were significantly higher in experimental group than them in control group (p < 0.05, the migration ability of BMSCs from the experimental group was significantly higher than that from the control group (p < 0.05. Stromal-derived factor -1/CXCR4 can enhance the migration of BMSCs in vitro in a rat AAA model.

  12. The flavonoid baicalin exhibits anti-inflammatory activity by binding to chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B Q; Fu, T; Gong, W H; Dunlop, N; Kung, H; Yan, Y; Kang, J; Wang, J M

    2000-09-01

    Baicalin (BA) is a flavonoid compound purified from the medicinal plant Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-viral activities. In order to elucidate the mechanism(s) of action of BA, we tested whether BA could interfere with chemokines or chemokine receptors, which are critical mediators of inflammation and infection. We observed that BA inhibited the binding of a number of chemokines to human leukocytes or cells transfected to express specific chemokine receptors. This was associated with a reduced capacity of the chemokines to induce cell migration. Co-injection of BA with CXC chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) into rat skin significantly inhibited IL-8 elicited neutrophil infiltration. BA did not directly compete with chemokines for binding to receptors, but rather acted through its selective binding to chemokine ligands. This conclusion was supported by the fact that BA cross-linked to oxime resin bound chemokines of the CXC (stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1alpha, IL-8), CC (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1beta, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-2), and C (lymphotactin (Ltn)) subfamilies. BA did not interact with CX3C chemokine fractalkine/neurotactin or other cytokines, such as TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma, indicating that its action is selective. These results suggest that one possible anti-inflammatory mechanism of BA is to bind a variety of chemokines and limit their biological function.

  13. Chemokine-Mediated Choreography of Thymocyte Development and Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Jessica N; Li, Yu; Ehrlich, Lauren I R

    2018-02-01

    As they differentiate, thymocytes encounter spatially restricted cues critical for differentiation and selection of a functional, self-tolerant T cell repertoire. Sequential migration of developing T cells through distinct thymic microenvironments is enforced by the ordered expression of chemokine receptors. Herein, we provide an updated perspective on T cell differentiation through the lens of recent advances that illuminate the dynamics of chemokine-driven thymocyte migration, localization, and interactions with stromal cells. We consider these findings in the context of earlier groundwork exploring the contribution of chemokines to T cell development, recent advances regarding the specificity of chemokine signaling, and novel techniques for evaluating the T cell repertoire. We suggest future research should amalgamate visualization of localized cellular interactions with downstream molecular signals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha activates basophils by means of CXCR4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Jacobi, H H; Jing, C

    2000-01-01

    The CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is predominantly expressed on inactivated naive T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and endothelial cells. CXC chemokine stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha) is the only known ligand for CXCR4. To date, the CXCR4 expression and function...... of SDF-1alpha in basophils are unknown....

  15. Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines mediates chemokine endocytosis through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhao

    Full Text Available The Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC shows high affinity binding to multiple inflammatory CC and CXC chemokines and is expressed by erythrocytes and endothelial cells. Recent evidence suggests that endothelial DARC facilitates chemokine transcytosis to promote neutrophil recruitment. However, the mechanism of chemokine endocytosis by DARC remains unclear.We investigated the role of several endocytic pathways in DARC-mediated ligand internalization. Here we report that, although DARC co-localizes with caveolin-1 in endothelial cells, caveolin-1 is dispensable for DARC-mediated (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis as knockdown of caveolin-1 failed to inhibit ligand internalization. (125I-CXCL1 endocytosis by DARC was also independent of clathrin and flotillin-1 but required cholesterol and was, in part, inhibited by silencing Dynamin II expression.(125I-CXCL1 endocytosis was inhibited by amiloride, cytochalasin D, and the PKC inhibitor Gö6976 whereas Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF enhanced ligand internalization through DARC. The majority of DARC-ligand interactions occurred on the endothelial surface, with DARC identified along plasma membrane extensions with the appearance of ruffles, supporting the concept that DARC provides a high affinity scaffolding function for surface retention of chemokines on endothelial cells.These results show DARC-mediated chemokine endocytosis occurs through a macropinocytosis-like process in endothelial cells and caveolin-1 is dispensable for CXCL1 internalization.

  16. CXC chemokine receptor 4 expression and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced chemotaxis in CD4+ T lymphocytes are regulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    We report that interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 can significantly up- or down-regulate CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively. Stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha)-induced CD4+ T-lymphocyte chemotaxis was also correspondingly regulated by IL-4 and IL......-10. IL-4 and IL-10 up- or down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively, as detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Scatchard analysis revealed a type of CXCR4 with affinity (Kd approximately 6.3 nM), and approximately 70....... The regulation of CXCR4 expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes by IL-4 and IL-10 could be blocked by a selective inhibitor of protein kinase (staurosporine) or by a selective inhibitor of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (H-8), indicating that these cytokines regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes via both c...

  17. Chemokine-Ligands/Receptors: Multiplayers in Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Knerlich-Lukoschus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI results in complex posttraumatic sequelae affecting the whole neuraxis. Due to its involvement in varied neuromodulatory processes, the chemokine-ligand/receptor-network is a key element of secondary lesion cascades induced by SCI. This review will provide a synopsis of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression along the whole neuraxis after traumatic spinal cord (sc insults on basis of recent in vivo and in vitro findings in a SCI paradigm of thoracic force-defined impact lesions (Infinite Horizon Impactor in adult rats. Analyses of chemokine-ligand/receptor-expression at defined time points after sc lesion of different severity grades or sham operation revealed that these inflammatory mediators are induced in distinct anatomical sc regions and in thalamic nuclei, periaqueductal grey, and hippocampal structures in the brain. Cellular and anatomical expression profiles together with colocalization/expression of neural stem/progenitor cell markers in adult sc stem cells niches or with pain-related receptors and mediators in dorsal horns, dorsal columns, and pain-processing brain areas support the notion that chemokines are involved in distinct cascades underlying clinical posttraumatic impairments and syndromes. These aspects and their implication in concepts of tailored SCI treatment are reviewed in the context of the recent literature on chemokine-ligand/receptor involvement in complex secondary lesion cascades.

  18. TARC, a CC chemokine, is frequently expressed in classic Hodgkin's lymphoma but not in NLP Hodgkin's lymphoma, T-cell-rich B-cell lymphoma, and most cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peh, SC; Kim, LH; Poppema, S

    Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) has been identified as a lymphocyte-directed CC chemokine that attracts activated T-helper type 2 (Th2) cells in humans. Recent studies showed that the T cells surrounding Reed-Sternberg cells in Hodgkin's lymphomas (HL) are Th2 type. Anaplastic large

  19. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  20. The porcine skin associated T-cell homing chemokine CCL27: molecular cloning and mRNA expression in piglets infected experimentally with Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, C. K.; Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Ahrens, P.

    2003-01-01

    . In this paper, we report the cloning of porcine CCL27 cDNA and investigation of CCL27 mRNA expression in Staphylococcus hyicus infected piglets. At the protein level, 77 and 74% homology was found to human and mouse CCL27 sequences, respectively. The results of the expression analyses show that CCL27 m...

  1. Bacterial sepsis and chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Makiko; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Takeuchi, Dan; Utsunomiya, Tokuichiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Fujio

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial sepsis causes a high mortality rate when it occurs in patients with compromised host defenses. Severely burned patients, typical immunocompromised hosts, are extremely susceptible to infections from various pathogens, and a local wound infection frequently escalates into sepsis. In these patients, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are familiar pathogens that cause opportunistic infections. Also, polymicrobial sepsis frequently occurs in these patients. In this review, therefore, the roles of chemokines in thermally injured patients infected with these 3 pathogens and polymicrobial sepsis will be discussed. These infections in thermally injured patients may be controlled immunologically, because immunocompetent hosts are resistant to infections with these pathogens. Classically activated macrophages (M1Mphi) are major effector cells for host innate immune responses against these infections. However, M1Mphi are not generated in thermally injured patients whose alternatively activated macrophages (M2Mphi) predominate. M2Mphi appear in patients early after severe burn injuries. M2Mphi inhibit M1Mphi generation through the secretion of CCL17 and IL-10. As a modulator of Mphi, two different subsets of neutrophils (PMN-I, PMN-II) are described. PMN-I direct the polarization of resident Mphi into M1Mphi through the production of CCL3. M2Mphi are induced from resident Mphi by CCL2 released from PMN-II. Therefore, as an inhibitor of CCL2, glycyrrhizin protects individuals infected with S. aureus. Sepsis stemming from P. aeruginosa wound infection is also influenced by CCL2 released from immature myeloid cells. A large number of immature myeloid cells appear in association with burn injuries. Host resistance to S. aureus, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa or polymicrobial infections may be improved in thermally injured patients through the induction of M1Mphi, elimination of CCL2 and/or depletion of M2Mphi induced by CCL2.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells exhibit firm adhesion, crawling, spreading and transmigration across aortic endothelial cells: effects of chemokines and shear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Chamberlain

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties and may be useful in the therapy of diseases such as arteriosclerosis. MSCs have some ability to traffic into inflamed tissues, however to exploit this therapeutically their migratory mechanisms need to be elucidated. This study examines the interaction of murine MSCs (mMSCs with, and their migration across, murine aortic endothelial cells (MAECs, and the effects of chemokines and shear stress. The interaction of mMSCs with MAECs was examined under physiological flow conditions. mMSCs showed lack of interaction with MAECs under continuous flow. However, when the flow was stopped (for 10 min and then started, mMSCs adhered and crawled on the endothelial surface, extending fine microvillous processes (filopodia. They then spread extending pseudopodia in multiple directions. CXCL9 significantly enhanced the percentage of mMSCs adhering, crawling and spreading and shear forces markedly stimulated crawling and spreading. CXCL9, CXCL16, CCL20 and CCL25 significantly enhanced transendothelial migration across MAECs. The transmigrated mMSCs had down-regulated receptors CXCR3, CXCR6, CCR6 and CCR9. This study furthers the knowledge of MSC transendothelial migration and the effects of chemokines and shear stress which is of relevance to inflammatory diseases such as arteriosclerosis.

  3. The Modulatory Effect of Ellagic Acid and Rosmarinic Acid on Ultraviolet-B-Induced Cytokine/Chemokine Gene Expression in Skin Keratinocyte (HaCaT Cells

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    Serena Lembo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet radiation (UV induces an increase in multiple cutaneous inflammatory mediators. Ellagic acid (EA and rosmarinic acid (RA are natural anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory compounds found in many plants, fruits, and nuts. We assessed the ability of EA and RA to modulate IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF-α gene expression in HaCaT cells after UVB irradiation. Cells were treated with UVB (100 mJ/cm2 and simultaneously with EA (5 μM in 0.1% DMSO or RA (2.7 μM in 0.5% DMSO. Moreover, these substances were added to the UVB-irradiated cells 1 h or 6 h before harvesting, depending on the established UVB-induced cytokine expression peak. Cytokine gene expression was examined using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction. RA produced a significant reduction in UVB-induced expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, and TNF-α when applied at the same time as irradiation. EA showed milder effects compared with RA, except for TNF-α. Both substances decreased IL-6 expression, also when applied 5 h after irradiation, and always produced a significant increase in UVB-induced IL-10 expression. Our findings suggest that EA and RA are able to prevent and/or limit the UVB-induced inflammatory cascade, through a reduction in proinflammatory mediators and the enhancement of IL-10, with its protective function.

  4. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D

    2001-01-01

    ORF74 (or KSHV-vGPCR) is a highly constitutively active G protein-coupled receptor encoded by HHV8 that is regulated both positively and negatively by endogenous chemokines. When expressed in transgenic mice, this chemokine receptor induces an angioproliferative disease closely resembling Kaposi...

  5. Orphan chemokine receptors in neuroimmunology : functional and pharmacological analysis of L-CCR and HCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurman, Michael Wilhelmer

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we have investigated the expression and biological activity of the orphan chemokine receptors L-CCR/HCR in astrocytes and microglia. Several lines of evidence indicate that the chemokines CCL2, CCL5, CCL7 and CCL8 are agonists for these receptors. Although a variety of biological

  6. Atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 mediates chemokine scavenging by primary human trophoblasts and can regulate fetal growth, placental structure, and neonatal mortality in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Pek Joo; Menzies, Fiona M; Hansell, Chris A H; Clarke, Mairi; Waddell, Carolann; Burton, Graham J; Nelson, Scott M; Nibbs, Robert J B

    2014-11-15

    Inflammatory chemokines produced in the placenta can direct the migration of placental leukocytes using chemokine receptors that decorate the surface of these cells. Fetal trophoblasts can also express receptors for inflammatory chemokines, and they are one of the few cell types that express atypical chemokine receptor 2 (ACKR2), previously known as D6. ACKR2 binds many inflammatory CC chemokines but cannot stimulate cell migration or activate signaling pathways used by conventional chemokine receptors. Existing evidence suggests that ACKR2 is a specialized chemokine scavenger, but its function in primary human trophoblasts has not been explored. In mice, ACKR2 is thought to be dispensable for the reproductive success of unchallenged females that have conceived naturally, but it can suppress inflammation-induced abortion and aid the survival of implanted allogeneic embryos. In this article, we demonstrate that cultured primary human trophoblasts express ACKR2 far more strongly than genes encoding conventional receptors for inflammatory CC chemokines. Moreover, these cells are capable of the rapid internalization and efficient scavenging of extracellular chemokine, and this is mediated by ACKR2. We also report that in unchallenged DBA/1j mice, Ackr2 deficiency increases the incidence of stillbirth and neonatal death, leads to structural defects in the placenta, and can decrease fetal weight. Loss of Ackr2 specifically from fetal cells makes a key contribution to the placental defects. Thus, primary human trophoblasts use ACKR2 to scavenge chemokines, and ACKR2 deficiency can cause abnormal placental structure and reduced neonatal survival. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. An increased MRP8/14 expression and adhesion, but a decreased migration towards proinflammatory chemokines of type 1 diabetes monocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Bouma (Gerben); J.M.C. Coppens (Jojanneke); W.K. Lam-Tse; W. Luini (W.); K. Sintnicolaas (Krijn); W.H.B.M. Levering; S. Sozzani (Silvano); H.A. Drexhage (Hemmo); M.A. Versnel (Marjan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn the early development of type 1 diabetes macrophages and dendritic cells accumulate around the islets of Langerhans at sites of fibronectin expression. It is thought that these macrophages and dendritic cells are derived from blood monocytes. Previously, we showed an increased serum

  8. Selected CC and CXC chemokines in children with atopic asthma

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    Edyta Machura

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : There are only limited data on CC and CXC chemokines regulation in children with asthma. Aim: We compared the serum profile of selected CC and CXC chemokines in patients with atopic asthma and healthy children. Material and methods : Serum concentration of CC chemokines RANTES, MCP-1, and CXC chemokines IP-10, MIG, IL-8, RANTES was measured using cytometric bead array in 44 children with atopic asthma and 17 healthy subjects. Results: The concentration of RANTES was significantly higher and the MIG level was lower in all children with asthma as compared to their control counterparts. We observed increased RANTES and decreased MIG levels also in patients with stable asthma when compared with children in the control group. The IP-10 concentration was similar between the whole asthma group and healthy controls, while significantly increased levels of this chemokine in acute asthma have been observed when compared to stable asthma. For MCP-1 and IL-8, the serum concentration was similar in all compared groups. The MIG concentration correlated positively with IP-10, IL-8, and CRP levels and negatively with the eosinophil count. A negative correlation between the IP-10 and eosinophil count and a negative correlation between FEV1 and IP-10 were found. Conclusions : An increased serum RANTES level in children with asthma may result in enhancement of Th2 lymphocyte recruitment into the airway. A decreased expression of Th1 chemokine MIG in children with stable asthma may contribute to a diminished antagonizing effect on Th2 cytokine production and hence intensify Th2 predominance. An increased IP-10 level in children during an asthma attack suggest that this chemokine is a serological marker of disease exacerbation.

  9. Human astrocytes: secretome profiles of cytokines and chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung S Choi

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a key role in maintenance of neuronal functions in the central nervous system by producing various cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors, which act as a molecular coordinator of neuron-glia communication. At the site of neuroinflammation, astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines play both neuroprotective and neurotoxic roles in brain lesions of human neurological diseases. At present, the comprehensive profile of human astrocyte-derived cytokines and chemokines during inflammation remains to be fully characterized. We investigated the cytokine secretome profile of highly purified human astrocytes by using a protein microarray. Non-stimulated human astrocytes in culture expressed eight cytokines, including G-CSF, GM-CSF, GROα (CXCL1, IL-6, IL-8 (CXCL8, MCP-1 (CCL2, MIF and Serpin E1. Following stimulation with IL-1β and TNF-α, activated astrocytes newly produced IL-1β, IL-1ra, TNF-α, IP-10 (CXCL10, MIP-1α (CCL3 and RANTES (CCL5, in addition to the induction of sICAM-1 and complement component 5. Database search indicated that most of cytokines and chemokines produced by non-stimulated and activated astrocytes are direct targets of the transcription factor NF-kB. These results indicated that cultured human astrocytes express a distinct set of NF-kB-target cytokines and chemokines in resting and activated conditions, suggesting that the NF-kB signaling pathway differentially regulates gene expression of cytokines and chemokines in human astrocytes under physiological and inflammatory conditions.

  10. Pulsed high-dose dexamethasone modulates Th1-/Th2-chemokine imbalance in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongtang; Wang, Meiying; Zhou, Shufen; Ma, Ji; Shi, Yan; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming; Guo, Chengshan

    2016-10-24

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in autoimmune diseases; however, their role in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is unclear. High-dose dexamethasone (HD-DXM) may become a first-line therapy for adult patients with ITP, but the effect of HD-DXM on chemokines in ITP patients is unknown. Our aim was to investigate the mechanism of pulsed HD-DXM for management of ITP, specifically regarding the chemokine pathways. Th1-/Th2-associated chemokine and chemokine receptor profiles in ITP patients before and after pulsed HD-DXM was studied. Plasma levels of CCL5 and CXCL11 (Th1-associated) and of CCL11 (Th2-associated) were determined by ELISA. Gene expression of these three chemokines and their corresponding receptors CCR5, CXCR3, and CCR3, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Thirty-three of the thirty-eight ITP patients responded effectively to HD-DXM (oral, 40 mg/day, 4 days). In ITP patients, plasma CXCL11 levels increased, while CCL11 and CCL5 decreased compared to controls (P Th1-/Th2-associated chemokines and chemokine receptors may play important roles in the pathogenesis of ITP. Importantly, regulating Th1 polarization by pulsed HD-DXM may represent a novel approach for immunoregulation in ITP.

  11. Genome Diversification Mechanism of Rodent and Lagomorpha Chemokine Genes

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    Kanako Shibata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines that are involved in host defence and body homeostasis through recruitment of cells expressing their receptors. Their genes are known to undergo rapid evolution. Therefore, the number and content of chemokine genes can be quite diverse among the different species, making the orthologous relationships often ambiguous even between closely related species. Given that rodents and rabbit are useful experimental models in medicine and drug development, we have deduced the chemokine genes from the genome sequences of several rodent species and rabbit and compared them with those of human and mouse to determine the orthologous relationships. The interspecies differences should be taken into consideration when experimental results from animal models are extrapolated into humans. The chemokine gene lists and their orthologous relationships presented here will be useful for studies using these animal models. Our analysis also enables us to reconstruct possible gene duplication processes that generated the different sets of chemokine genes in these species.

  12. Human osteoarthritic cartilage shows reduced in vivo expression of IL-4, a chondroprotective cytokine that differentially modulates IL-1β-stimulated production of chemokines and matrix-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Assirelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In osteoarthritis (OA, an inflammatory environment is responsible for the imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic activity of chondrocytes and, thus, for articular cartilage derangement. This study was aimed at providing further insight into the impairment of the anabolic cytokine IL-4 and its receptors in human OA cartilage, as well as the potential ability of IL-4 to antagonize the catabolic phenotype induced by IL-1β. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The in vivo expression of IL-4 and IL-4 receptor subunits (IL-4R, IL-2Rγ, IL-13Rα1 was investigated on full thickness OA or normal knee cartilage. IL-4 expression was found to be significantly lower in OA, both in terms of the percentage of positive cells and the amount of signal per cell. IL-4 receptor type I and II were mostly expressed in mid-deep cartilage layers. No significant difference for each IL-4 receptor subunit was noted. IL-4 anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic activity was assessed in vitro in the presence of IL-1β and/or IL-4 for 24 hours using differentiated high density primary OA chondrocyte also exhibiting the three IL-4 R subunits found in vivo. Chemokines, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes and their inhibitors were evaluated at mRNA (real time PCR and protein (ELISA or western blot levels. IL-4 did not affect IL-1β-induced mRNA expression of GRO-α/CXCL1, IL-8/CXCL8, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-1 or TIMP-3. Conversely, IL-4 significantly inhibited RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. These results were confirmed at protein level for RANTES/CCL5 and MMP-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate for the first time that OA cartilage has a significantly lower expression of IL-4. Furthermore, we found differences in the spectrum of biological effects of IL-4. The findings that IL-4 has the ability to hamper the IL-1β-induced release of both MMP-13 and CCL5/RANTES, both markers of OA chondrocytes, strongly indicates IL-4 as a

  13. Chemokines in the corpus luteum: Implications of leukocyte chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liptak Amy R

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chemokines are small molecular weight peptides responsible for adhesion, activation, and recruitment of leukocytes into tissues. Leukocytes are thought to influence follicular atresia, ovulation, and luteal function. Many studies in recent years have focused attention on the characterization of leukocyte populations within the ovary, the importance of leukocyte-ovarian cell interactions, and more recently, the mechanisms of ovarian leukocyte recruitment. Information about the role of chemokines and leukocyte trafficking (chemotaxis during ovarian function is important to understanding paracrine-autocrine relationships shared between reproductive and immune systems. Recent advances regarding chemokine expression and leukocyte accumulation within the ovulatory follicle and the corpus luteum are the subject of this mini-review.

  14. Rationally designed chemokine-based toxin targeting the viral G protein-coupled receptor US28 potently inhibits cytomegalovirus infection in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Jeppesen, Mads G.; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    to target the human viral pathogen, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), on the basis of its expression of the 7TM G protein-coupled chemokine receptor US28. The virus origin of US28 provides an exceptional chemokine-binding profile with high selectivity and improved binding for the CX3C chemokine, CX3CL1...

  15. Induction of glial L-CCR mRNA expression in spinal cord and brain in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, N; Zuurman, MW; Wei, T; Ransohoff, RM; Boddeke, HWGM; Biber, K

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are important regulators of leukocyte trafficking and immune response. It is well established that chemokines and their receptors are also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), where their expression has been associated with various neuroinflammatory

  16. Effects of Laser Printer–Emitted Engineered Nanoparticles on Cytotoxicity, Chemokine Expression, Reactive Oxygen Species, DNA Methylation, and DNA Damage: A Comprehensive in Vitro Analysis in Human Small Airway Epithelial Cells, Macrophages, and Lymphoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirela, Sandra V.; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Lu, Xiaoyan; Castranova, Vincent; Thomas, Treye; Qian, Yong; Bello, Dhimiter; Kobzik, Lester; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) incorporated into toner formulations of printing equipment become airborne during consumer use. Although information on the complex physicochemical and toxicological properties of both toner powders and printer-emitted particles (PEPs) continues to grow, most toxicological studies have not used the actual PEPs but rather have primarily used raw toner powders, which are not representative of current exposures experienced at the consumer level during printing. Objectives We assessed the biological responses of a panel of human cell lines to PEPs. Methods Three physiologically relevant cell lines—small airway epithelial cells (SAECs), macrophages (THP-1 cells), and lymphoblasts (TK6 cells)—were exposed to PEPs at a wide range of doses (0.5–100 μg/mL) corresponding to human inhalation exposure durations at the consumer level of 8 hr or more. Following treatment, toxicological parameters reflecting distinct mechanisms were evaluated. Results PEPs caused significant membrane integrity damage, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine release in different cell lines at doses equivalent to exposure durations from 7.8 to 1,500 hr. Furthermore, there were differences in methylation patterns that, although not statistically significant, demonstrate the potential effects of PEPs on the overall epigenome following exposure. Conclusions The in vitro findings obtained in this study suggest that laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles may be deleterious to lung cells and provide preliminary evidence of epigenetic modifications that might translate to pulmonary disorders. Citation Pirela SV, Miousse IR, Lu X, Castranova V, Thomas T, Qian Y, Bello D, Kobzik L, Koturbash I, Demokritou P. 2016. Effects of laser printer–emitted engineered nanoparticles on cytotoxicity, chemokine expression, reactive oxygen species, DNA methylation, and DNA damage: a comprehensive in

  17. Structure and function of A41, a vaccinia virus chemokine binding protein.

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    Mohammad W Bahar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The vaccinia virus (VACV A41L gene encodes a secreted 30 kDa glycoprotein that is nonessential for virus replication but affects the host response to infection. The A41 protein shares sequence similarity with another VACV protein that binds CC chemokines (called vCKBP, or viral CC chemokine inhibitor, vCCI, and strains of VACV lacking the A41L gene induced stronger CD8+ T-cell responses than control viruses expressing A41. Using surface plasmon resonance, we screened 39 human and murine chemokines and identified CCL21, CCL25, CCL26 and CCL28 as A41 ligands, with Kds of between 8 nM and 118 nM. Nonetheless, A41 was ineffective at inhibiting chemotaxis induced by these chemokines, indicating it did not block the interaction of these chemokines with their receptors. However the interaction of A41 and chemokines was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by heparin, suggesting that A41 and heparin bind to overlapping sites on these chemokines. To better understand the mechanism of action of A41 its crystal structure was solved to 1.9 A resolution. The protein has a globular beta sandwich structure similar to that of the poxvirus vCCI family of proteins, but there are notable structural differences, particularly in surface loops and electrostatic charge distribution. Structural modelling suggests that the binding paradigm as defined for the vCCI-chemokine interaction is likely to be conserved between A41 and its chemokine partners. Additionally, sequence analysis of chemokines binding to A41 identified a signature for A41 binding. The biological and structural data suggest that A41 functions by forming moderately strong (nM interactions with certain chemokines, sufficient to interfere with chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions at the cell surface (microM-nM and thereby to destroy the chemokine concentration gradient, but not strong enough to disrupt the (pM chemokine-chemokine receptor interactions.

  18. Immune response CC Chemokines, CCL2 and CCL5 are associated with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav

    2011-04-04

    Abstract Background Pulmonary sarcoidosis involves an intense leukocyte infiltration of the lung with the formation of non-necrotizing granulomas. CC chemokines (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)-CCL5) are chemoattractants of mononuclear cells and act through seven transmembrane G-coupled receptors. Previous studies have demonstrated conflicting results with regard to the associations of these chemokines with sarcoidosis. In an effort to clarify previous discrepancies, we performed the largest observational study to date of CC chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. Results BALF chemokine levels from 72 patients affected by pulmonary sarcoidosis were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and compared to 8 healthy volunteers. BALF CCL3 and CCL4 levels from pulmonary sarcoidosis patients were not increased compared to controls. However, CCL2 and CCL5 levels were elevated, and subgroup analysis showed higher levels of both chemokines in all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis. CCL2, CCL5, CC chemokine receptor type 1 (CCR1), CCR2 and CCR3 were expressed from mononuclear cells forming the lung granulomas, while CCR5 was only found on mast cells. Conclusions These data suggest that CCL2 and CCL5 are important mediators in recruiting CCR1, CCR2, and CCR3 expressing mononuclear cells as well as CCR5-expressing mast cells during all stages of pulmonary sarcoidosis.

  19. The Imbalance in Serum Concentration of Th-1- and Th-2-Derived Chemokines as One of the Factors Involved in Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

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    Joanna Narbutt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is an inflammatory skin disease in which pathogenesis chemokines are partially involved. The aim of the paper was to assess the serum level of CXCL-9, CXCL-10, CXCL-11, CXCL-12, CCL-17, CCL-20, CCL-21, CCL-22, CCL-27, and IL-18 chosen in AD patients by ELISA assay. Forty patients (mean age 11.4 years old with AD and 50 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The patients and controls were divided into two age categories: under 10 years old (Group 1 and Control 1 and over 10 years old (Group 2 and Control 2. Significantly lower serum concentration of CXCL-9, CXCL-10, CCL-17, and IL-18 and higher concentration of CXCL-12 and CCL-27 were found in Group 1 when compared to Control 1. In Group 2 serum concentration of CXCL-12, CCL-17, CCL-22 was higher than in Control 2. The obtained results indicate the imbalance in chemokine serum levels in AD what suggests their role in the disease pathogenesis.

  20. Possible Roles of CC- and CXC-Chemokines in Regulating Bovine Endometrial Function during Early Pregnancy

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    Ryosuke Sakumoto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the possible roles of chemokines in regulating bovine endometrial function during early pregnancy. The expression of six chemokines, including CCL2, CCL8, CCL11, CCL14, CCL16, and CXCL10, was higher in the endometrium at 15 and 18 days of pregnancy than at the same days in non-pregnant animals. Immunohistochemical staining showed that chemokine receptors (CCR1, CCR2, CCR3, and CXCR3 were expressed in the epithelial cells and glandular epithelial cells of the bovine endometrium as well as in the fetal trophoblast obtained from a cow on day 18 of pregnancy. The addition of interferon-τ (IFNT to an endometrial tissue culture system increased CCL8 and CXCL10 expression in the tissues, but did not affect CCL2, CCL11, and CCL16 expression. CCL14 expression by these tissues was inhibited by IFNT. CCL16, but not other chemokines, clearly stimulated interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15 and myxovirus-resistance gene 1 (MX1 expression in these tissues. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 expression decreased after stimulation with CCL8 and CCL14, and oxytocin receptor (OTR expression was decreased by CCL2, CCL8, CCL14, and CXCL10. Collectively, the expression of chemokine genes is increased in the endometrium during early pregnancy. These genes may contribute to the regulation of endometrial function by inhibiting COX2 and OTR expression, subsequently decreasing prostaglandin production and preventing luteolysis in cows.

  1. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules, chemokines and chemokine receptors in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haringman, Jasper J.; Oostendorp, Roos L.; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    The development of specific targeted therapies, such as anti-TNF-alpha treatment, for chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, has significantly improved treatment, although not all patients respond. Targeting cellular adhesion molecules and chemokines/chemokine receptors as

  2. Enhanced monocyte migration to CXCR3 and CCR5 chemokines in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Claudia; Traves, Suzanne L; Tudhope, Susan J; Fenwick, Peter S; Belchamber, Kylie B R; Russell, Richard E K; Barnes, Peter J; Donnelly, Louise E

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients exhibit chronic inflammation, both in the lung parenchyma and the airways, which is characterised by an increased infiltration of macrophages and T-lymphocytes, particularly CD8+ cells. Both cell types can express chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor (CXCR)3 and C-C chemokine receptor 5 and the relevant chemokines for these receptors are elevated in COPD. The aim of this study was to compare chemotactic responses of lymphocytes and monocytes of nonsmokers, smokers and COPD patients towards CXCR3 ligands and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL)5. Migration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes from nonsmokers, smokers and COPD patients toward CXCR3 chemokines and CCL5 was analysed using chemotaxis assays. There was increased migration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from COPD patients towards all chemokines studied when compared with nonsmokers and smokers. Both lymphocytes and monocytes contributed to this enhanced response, which was not explained by increased receptor expression. However, isolated lymphocytes failed to migrate and isolated monocytes from COPD patients lost their enhanced migratory capacity. Both monocytes and lymphocytes cooperate to enhance migration towards CXCR3 chemokines and CCL5. This may contribute to increased numbers of macrophages and T-cells in the lungs of COPD patients, and inhibition of recruitment using selective antagonists might be a treatment to reduce the inflammatory response in COPD.

  3. Impact of genetic variations in C-C chemokine receptors and ligands on infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qidwai, Tabish; Khan, M Y

    2016-10-01

    Chemokine receptors and ligands are crucial for extensive immune response against infectious diseases such as malaria, leishmaniasis, HIV and tuberculosis and a wide variety of other diseases. Role of chemokines are evidenced in the activation and regulation of immune cell migration which is important for immune response against diseases. Outcome of disease is determined by complex interaction among pathogen, host genetic variability and surrounding milieu. Variation in expression or function of chemokines caused by genetic polymorphisms could be associated with attenuated immune responses. Exploration of chemokine genetic polymorphisms in therapeutic response, gene regulation and disease outcome is important. Infectious agents in human host alter the expression of chemokines via epigenetic alterations and thus contribute to disease pathogenesis. Although some fragmentary data are available on chemokine genetic variations and their contribution in diseases, no unequivocal conclusion has been arrived as yet. We therefore, aim to investigate the association of CCR5-CCL5 and CCR2-CCL2 genetic polymorphisms with different infectious diseases, transcriptional regulation of gene, disease severity and response to therapy. Furthermore, the role of epigenetics in genes related to chemokines and infectious disease are also discussed. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Methylmercury Contained in a Diet Mimicking the Wayana Amerindians Contamination through Fish Consumption: Mercury Accumulation, Metallothionein Induction, Gene Expression Variations, and Role of the Chemokine CCL2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Brèthes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylmercury (MeHg is a potent neurotoxin, and human beings are mainly exposed to this pollutant through fish consumption. We addressed the question of whether a diet mimicking the fish consumption of Wayanas Amerindians from French Guiana could result in observable adverse effects in mice. Wayanas adult men are subjected to a mean mercurial dose of 7 g Hg/week/kg of body weight. We decided to supplement a vegetarian-based mice diet with 0.1% of lyophilized Hoplias aimara fish, which Wayanas are fond of and equivalent to the same dose as that afflicting the Wayanas Amerindians. Total mercury contents were 1.4 ± 0.2 and 5.4 ± 0.5 ng Hg/g of food pellets for the control and aimara diets, respectively. After 14 months of exposure, the body parts and tissues displaying the highest mercury concentration on a dry weight (dw basis were hair (733 ng/g and kidney (511 ng/g, followed by the liver (77 ng/g. Surprisingly, despite the fact that MeHg is a neurotoxic compound, the brain accumulated low levels of mercury (35 ng/g in the cortex. The metallothionein (MT protein concentration only increased in those tissues (kidney, muscles in which MeHg demethylation had occurred. This can be taken as a molecular sign of divalent mercurial contamination since only Hg2+ has been reported yet to induce MT accumulation in contaminated tissues. The suppression of the synthesis of the chemokine CCL2 in the corresponding knockout (KO mice resulted in important changes in gene expression patterns in the liver and brain. After three months of exposure to an aimara-containing diet, eight of 10 genes selected (Sdhb, Cytb, Cox1, Sod1, Sod2, Mt2, Mdr1a and Bax were repressed in wild-type mice liver whereas none presented a differential expression in KO Ccl2/ mice. In the wild-type mice brain, six of 12 genes

  5. Microbiological exploitation of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2003-01-01

    Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance in the m...... in the mammalian immune system for antiviral responses and suggested future antiviral and anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategies.......Several viruses encode chemokine elements in their genome. This review focuses on the roles of such elements in the ongoing battle between the virus and the host. The biological and pharmacological characterizations of several of these chemokine elements have highlighted their importance...

  6. Tumorigenesis induced by the HHV8-encoded chemokine receptor requires ligand modulation of high constitutive activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, P J; Rosenkilde, M M; Manfra, D

    2001-01-01

    sarcoma (KS). Here we demonstrate that several lines of mice carrying mutated receptors deficient in either constitutive activity or chemokine regulation fail to develop KS-like disease. In addition, animals expressing a receptor that preserves chemokine binding and constitutive activity but that does...... not respond to agonist stimulation have a much lower incidence of angiogenic lesions and tumors. These results indicate that induction of the KS-like disease in transgenic mice by ORF74 requires not only high constitutive signaling activity but also modulation of this activity by endogenous chemokines....

  7. Deficiency for the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 aggravates tubular damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroo, Ingrid; Claessen, Nike; Teske, Gwendoline J. D.; Butter, Loes M.; Florquin, Sandrine; Leemans, Jaklien C.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal expression of chemokines is a crucial factor in the regulation of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury and repair. Beside their role in the migration and activation of inflammatory cells to sites of injury, chemokines are also involved in other processes such as angiogenesis, development

  8. Human cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor US28 induces migration of cells on a CX3CL1-presenting surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Gertrud M; Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Selmeczi, David

    2013-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded G protein-coupled-receptor US28 is believed to participate in virus dissemination through modulation of cell migration and immune evasion. US28 binds different CC chemokines and the CX3C chemokine CX3CL1. Membrane-anchored CX3CL1 is expressed by immune...

  9. Chemokines in neuron-glial cell interaction and pathogenesis of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Jiang, Bao-Chun; Gao, Yong-Jing

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathic pain resulting from damage or dysfunction of the nervous system is a highly debilitating chronic pain state and is often resistant to currently available treatments. It has become clear that neuroinflammation, mainly mediated by proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, plays an important role in the establishment and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines were originally identified as regulators of peripheral immune cell trafficking and were also expressed in neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system. In recent years, accumulating studies have revealed the expression, distribution and function of chemokines in the spinal cord under chronic pain conditions. In this review, we provide evidence showing that several chemokines are upregulated after peripheral nerve injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain via different forms of neuron-glia interaction in the spinal cord. First, chemokine CX3CL1 is expressed in primary afferents and spinal neurons and induces microglial activation via its microglial receptor CX3CR1 (neuron-to-microglia signaling). Second, CCL2 and CXCL1 are expressed in spinal astrocytes and act on CCR2 and CXCR2 in spinal neurons to increase excitatory synaptic transmission (astrocyte-to-neuron signaling). Third, we recently identified that CXCL13 is highly upregulated in spinal neurons after spinal nerve ligation and induces spinal astrocyte activation via receptor CXCR5 (neuron-to-astrocyte signaling). Strategies that target chemokine-mediated neuron-glia interactions may lead to novel therapies for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  10. submitter Emerging importance of chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligands in cardiovascular diseases

    CERN Document Server

    Altara, R; Brandao, R D; Zeidan, A; Booz, G W; Zouein, F A

    2016-01-01

    The CXC chemokines, CXCL4, -9, -10, -11, CXCL4L1, and the CC chemokine CCL21, activate CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3), a cell-surface G protein-coupled receptor expressed mainly by Th1 cells, cytotoxic T (Tc) cells and NK cells that have a key role in immunity and inflammation. However, CXCR3 is also expressed by vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells, and appears to be important in controlling physiological vascular function. In the last decade, evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies has revealed the participation of CXCR3 and its ligands in multiple cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) of different aetiologies including atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as in heart transplant rejection and transplant coronary artery disease (CAD). CXCR3 ligands have also proven to be valid biomarkers for the development of heart failure and left ventricular dysfunction, suggesting an underlining pathophysiological relation between levels of these chemokines and the deve...

  11. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in inflammation of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, D; Han, Yong-Chang; Rani, M R

    2000-01-01

    chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) are largely restricted to astrocytes or other glial cells in these diverse pathological states. The remainder of the review focuses on studies that address the molecular mechanisms which underlie transcriptional regulation of three...... astrocyte-derived chemokines: MCP-1, IP-10 and beta-R1/interferon-gamma-inducible T-cell chemoattractant (I-TAC). Based on these studies, we propose that the complex promoters of these genes are marvelously organized for flexible and efficient response to challenge. In the case of MCP-1, several different...... stimuli can elicit gene transcription, acting through a conserved mechanism that includes binding of inducible transcription factors and recruitment of the constitutive factor Sp1. For IP-10 and beta-R1/I-TAC, it appears that efficient gene transcription occurs only in highly inflammatory circumstances...

  12. Changes in gene expression induced by histamine, fexofenadine and osthole: Expression of histamine H1receptor, COX-2, NF-κB, CCR1, chemokine CCL5/RANTES and interleukin-1β in PBMC allergic and non-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordulewska, Natalia Karolina; Kostyra, Elżbieta; Cieślińska, Anna; Matysiewicz, Michał; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Sienkiewicz-Szłapka, Edyta

    2017-03-01

    Fexofenadine (FXF) is a third-generation antihistamine drug and osthole is assumed as a natural antihistamine alternative. This paper compares results of histamine, FXF and osthole impact on HRH-1, COX-2, NF-κB-p50, CCR1 mRNA expression. We also measured mRNA expression of IL-1β and CCL5/RANTES in incubated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to compared how histamine, FXF and osthole had influence on expression level and interacts on product secretion. The purpose was to investigate expression pattern in asthma PBMC. The cultures were treated 72h with FXF and osthole. We measured mRNA expression of histamine HRH-1, COX-2, NF-κB-p50, CCR1, IL-1β and CCL5/RANTES with Real-Time PCR (RT-PCR). The present study suggest that osthole may be a potential inhibitor of histamine H 1 receptor activity. We also demonstrated that cells cultured with histamine increase COX-2 mRNA expression and osthole reduce it. Allergy remains one of the most common chronic diseases in Europe and it is rapidly approaching epidemic proportions; with current predictions estimating that the number of allergy-afflicted will equal the healthy population by 2020. It is therefore paramount to find new pharmaceuticals which successfully combat allergic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic and extensive metabolic state-dependent regulation of cytokine expression and circulating levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Pia S.; Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M.; Rodriguez, Susana; Byerly, Mardi S.; Wolfe, Andrew; Whitlock, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play diverse and critical roles in innate and acquired immunity, and several function within the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues to modulate energy metabolism. The extent to which changes in energy balance impact the expression and circulating levels of cytokines (many of which have pleiotropic functions) has not been systematically examined. To investigate metabolism-related changes in cytokine profiles, we used a multiplex approach to assess changes in 71 circulating mouse cytokines in response to acute (fasting and refeeding) and chronic (high-fat feeding) alterations in whole body metabolism. Refeeding significantly decreased serum levels of IL-22, IL-1α, soluble (s)IL-2Rα, and soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR3), but markedly increased granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), IL-1β, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand (CCL2), sIL-1RI, lipocalin-2, pentraxin-3, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), and serum amyloid protein (SAP) relative to the fasted state. Interestingly, only a few of these changes paralleled the alterations in expression of their corresponding mRNAs. Functional studies demonstrated that central delivery of G-CSF increased, whereas IL-22 decreased, food intake. Changes in food intake were not accompanied by acute alterations in orexigenic (Npy and Agrp) and anorexigenic (Pomc and Cart) neuropeptide gene expression in the hypothalamus. In the context of chronic high-fat feeding, circulating levels of chemokine (C-X-C) ligand (CXCL1), serum amyloid protein A3 (SAA3), TIMP-1, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), and A2M were increased, whereas IL-12p40, CCL4, sCD30, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE), CCL12, CCL20, CX3CL1, IL-16, IL-22, and haptoglobin were decreased relative to mice fed a control low-fat diet. These results demonstrate that both short- and long-term changes in whole body metabolism extensively alter cytokine expression and circulating levels

  14. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand...... binding. Attempts to unravel the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors have led to the conclusion that activation involves movements of the transmembrane segments VI and VII in particular, as recently gathered in the Global Toggle Switch Model. However, to understand the activation mechanism completely......, more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  15. Correlation of serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and enzymes with periodontal disease parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panezai, Jeneen; Ghaffar, Ambereen; Altamash, Mohammad; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta; Engström, Per-Erik; Larsson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is characterized by inflammatory tissue destruction in tooth supporting apparatus. Many studies indicate that the underlying pathogenesis is in concordance with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) sharing immune-inflammatory events affect both diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate serum cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, enzymes and costimulatory proteins in association with periodontal conditions in PD and RA subjects. Periodontal examination was performed in RA (n = 38), PD (n = 38) and healthy subjects (n = 14). Bleeding on probing (BOP) and probing pocket depth (PPD) were measured. Marginal bone loss (MBL) for premolars and molars was measured on digital panoramic radiographs. PD was defined as present if the PPD was ≥5mm in ≥ 3 different sites. Serum samples were collected from all subjects. A multiplex proximity extension assay (PEA) was used to analyze the samples for simultaneous measurement of 92 cytokines. Cytokines with ≥ 60% quantitative results were included. A significant positive correlation was seen for ST1A1, FGF-19 and NT-3 whereas EN-RAGE, DNER, CX3CL1 and TWEAK associated inversely with BOP, PPD≥ 5mm and MBL but positively with number of teeth. Several CD markers (CD244, CD40, CDCP1, LIF-R, IL-10RA, CD5 and CD6) were found to be associated with BOP, shallow and deep pockets, MBL and number of teeth, either directly or inversely. Most chemokines (CCL8, CX3CL1, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL11, CCL4, CCL20, CXCL5, CXCL6, and CCL23) were positively associated with number of teeth and some inversely related to MBL (CCL8, CXCL10). Proteins with enzymatic activity (ST1A1, HGF and CASP-8) were directly related to the severity of periodontal conditions and inversely related to number of teeth. Aside from FGF-19, other growth factors were also directly associated with MBL (HGF), number of teeth (VEGF-A, LAP TGF-beta-1) and, inversely to, shallow pockets (LAP TGF-beta-1, TGFA and Beta-NGF). Out of 33 cytokines, 32 associated

  16. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompels Ursula A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Methods Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. Results U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4

  17. CCR5 signalling, but not DARC or D6 regulatory, chemokine receptors are targeted by herpesvirus U83A chemokine which delays receptor internalisation via diversion to a caveolin-linked pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catusse, Julie; Clark, David J; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-07-30

    Herpesviruses have evolved chemokines and chemokine receptors, which modulate the recruitment of human leukocytes during the inflammatory response to infection. Early post-infection, human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) infected cells express the chemokine receptor U51A and chemokine U83A which have complementary effects in subverting the CC-chemokine family thereby controlling anti-viral leukocyte recruitment. Here we show that, to potentiate this activity, the viral chemokine can also avoid clearance by scavenger chemokine receptors, DARC and D6, which normally regulate an inflammatory response. Conversely, U83A delays internalisation of its signalling target receptor CCR5 with diversion to caveolin rich membrane domains. This mechanism can redirect displaced human chemokines to DARC and D6 for clearance of the anti-viral inflammatory response, leaving the viral chemokine unchecked. Cell models for competitive binding assays were established using radiolabeled human chemokines and cold U83A on CCR5, DARC or D6 expressing cells. Flow cytometry was used to assess specific chemotaxis of CCR5 bearing cells to U83A, and internalisation of CCR5 specific chemokine CCL4 after stimulation with U83A. Internalisation analyses were supported by confocal microscopy of internalisation and co-localisation of CCR5 with caveosome marker caveolin-1, after virus or human chemokine stimulation. U83A displaced efficiently human chemokines from CCR5, with a high affinity of 0.01nM, but not from DARC or D6. Signalling via CCR5 resulted in specific chemoattraction of primary human leukocytes bearing CCR5. However, U83A effective binding and signalling to CCR5 resulted in delayed internalisation and recycling up to 2 hours in the absence of continual re-stimulation. This resulted in diversion to a delayed caveolin-linked pathway rather than the rapid clathrin mediated endocytosis previously shown with human chemokines CCL3 or CCL4. U83A diverts human chemokines from signalling, but not

  18. Chemokines and Chemokine Receptors: Accomplices for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small chemotactic cytokines that are involved in the regulation of immune cell migration. Multiple functional properties of chemokines, such as pro-inflammation, immune regulation, and promotion of cell growth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis, have been identified in many pathological and physiological contexts. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection is characterized by persistent inflammation and immune activation during both acute and chronic phases, and the “cytokine storm” is one of the hallmarks of HIV infection. Along with immune activation after HIV infection, an extensive range of chemokines and other cytokines are elevated, thereby generating the so-called “cytokine storm.” In this review, the effects of the upregulated chemokines and chemokine receptors on the processes of HIV infection are discussed. The objective of this review was to focus on the main chemokines and chemokine receptors that have been found to be associated with HIV infection and latency. Elevated chemokines and chemokine receptors have been shown to play important roles in the HIV life cycle, disease progression, and HIV reservoir establishment. Thus, targeting these chemokines and receptors and the other proteins of related signaling pathways might provide novel therapeutic strategies, and the evidence indicates a promising future regarding the development of a functional cure for HIV.

  19. Chemokine CCL2 and chemokine receptor CCR2 in early active multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Ransohoff, R M; Strieter, R M

    2004-01-01

    The chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1/CCL2 and its receptor CCR2 have been strongly implicated in disease pathogenesis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), whereas data on the CCL2-CCR2 axis are scarce in MS. We studied...... the expression of CCR2 on leukocytes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis and MS, and the concentration of CCL2 in the CSF from these patients. Results were compared with the results in non-inflammatory neurological controls and were correlated with other...... parameters (magnetic resonance imaging and CSF data). Our findings suggest a limited role for CCL2/CCR2 in early active MS....

  20. Role of chemokines and their receptors in viral persistence and liver damage during chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrubia, Juan R; Benito-Martínez, Selma; Calvino, Miryam; Sanz-de-Villalobos, Eduardo; Parra-Cid, Trinidad

    2008-01-01

    Chemokines produced in the liver during hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induce migration of activated T cells from the periphery to infected parenchyma. The milieu of chemokines secreted by infected hepatocytes is predominantly associated with the T-helper/T-cytotoxic type-1 cell (Th1/Tc1) response. These chemokines consist of CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; MIP-1α), CCL4 (MIP-1β), CCL5 (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted; RANTES), CXCL10 (interferon-γ−inducible protein-10; IP-10), CXCL11 (interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant; I-TAC), and CXCL9 (monokine induced by interferon γ; Mig) and they recruit T cells expressing either CCR5 or CXCR3 chemokine receptors. Intrahepatic and peripheral blood levels of these chemokines are increased during chronic hepatitis C. The interaction between chemokines and their receptors is essential in recruiting HCV-specific T cells to control the infection. When the adaptive immune response fails in this task, non-specific T cells without the capacity to control the infection are also recruited to the liver, and these are ultimately responsible for the persistent hepatic damage. The modulation of chemokine receptor expression and chemokine secretion could be a viral escape mechanism to avoid specific T cell migration to the liver during the early phase of infection, and to maintain liver viability during the chronic phase, by impairing non-specific T cell migration. Some chemokines and their receptors correlate with liver damage, and CXCL10 (IP-10) and CXCR3 levels have shown a clinical utility as predictors of treatment response outcome. The regulation of chemokines and their receptors could be a future potential therapeutic target to decrease liver inflammation and to increase specific T cell migration to the infected liver. PMID:19084927

  1. Interaction of chemokines with their receptors--from initial chemokine binding to receptor activating steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Stefanie; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    and surveillance. Chemokines are a group of 8-12 kDa large peptides with a secondary structure consisting of a flexible N-terminus and a core-domain usually stabilized by two conserved disulfide bridges. They mainly interact with the extracellular domains of their cognate 7TM receptors. Affinityand activity......-contributing interactions are attributed to different domains and known to occur in two steps. Here, knowledge on chemokine and receptor domains involved in the first binding-step and the second activation-step is reviewed. A mechanism comprising at least two steps seems consistent; however, several intermediate...... interactions possibly occur, resulting in a multi-step process, as recently proposed for other 7TM receptors. Overall, the N-terminus of chemokine receptors is pivotal for binding of all chemokines. During receptor activation, differences between the two major chemokine subgroups occur, as CC-chemokines mainly...

  2. Viral leads for chemokine-modulatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Lüttichau, Hans Rudolf; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine system, which controls leukocyte trafficking, provides several potentially very attractive anti-inflammatory drug targets. However, the complexity and redundancy of this system makes it very difficult to exploit through classical drug discovery. Despite this, viruses have millions...

  3. The human cutaneous chemokine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard eMoser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Irrespective of the immune status, the vast majority of all lymphocytes reside in peripheral tissues whereas those present in blood only amount to a small fraction of the total. It has been estimated that T cells in healthy human skin outnumber those present in blood by at least a factor of two. How lymphocytes within these two compartments relate to each other is not well understood. However, mounting evidence suggest that the study of T cell subsets present in peripheral blood does not reflect the function of their counterparts at peripheral sites. This is especially true under steady-state conditions whereby long-lived memory T cells in healthy tissues, notably those in epithelial tissues at body surfaces, are thought to fulfil a critical immune surveillance function by contributing to the first line of defence against a series of local threats, including microbes, tumours and toxins, and by participating in wound healing. The relative scarcity of information regarding peripheral T cells and the factors regulating their localization is primarily due to inherent difficulties in obtaining healthy tissue for the extraction and study of immune cells on a routine basis. This is most certainly true for humans. Here, we review our current understanding of T cell homing to human skin and discuss candidate chemokines that may account for the tissue selectivity in this process.

  4. Impact of Cytokines and Chemokines on Alzheimer's Disease Neuropathological Hallmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Catarina; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A B; Henriques, Ana Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, neuropathologically characterized by aggregates of β-amyloid peptides, which deposit as senile plaques, and of TAU protein, which forms neurofibrillary tangles. It is now widely accepted that neuroinflammation is implicated in AD pathogenesis. Indeed, inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines and chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can impact on the Alzheimer´s amyloid precursor protein by affecting its expression levels and amyloidogenic processing and/or β -amyloid aggregation. Additionally, cytokines and chemokines can influence kinases' activities, leading to abnormal TAU phosphorylation. To date there is no cure for AD, but several therapeutic strategies have been directed to prevent neuroinflammation. Anti-inflammatory, but also anti-amyloidogenic compounds, such as flavonoids were shown to favourably modulate some pathological events associated with neurodegeneration. This review focuses on the role of cytokines and chemokines in AD-associated pathologies, and summarizes the potential anti-inflammatory therapeutic approaches aimed at preventing or slowing down disease progression. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. CD8 chemokine receptors in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smyth, L J C; Starkey, C; Gordon, F S

    2008-01-01

    Increased lung CD8 cells and their expression of chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR5 have been previously reported in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Alterations of CD8-CCR3 and -CCR4 expression and their ligands in COPD patients have not been fully investigated. The objective...... of this study was to assess in COPD patients: (i) broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) CD8 CCR3 and CCR4 expression in COPD patients; and (ii) airway levels of the CCR3 ligands, CCL11 and CCL5. Multi-parameter flow cytometric analysis was used to assess BAL CD3 and CD8-chemokine receptor expression in COPD patients......, smokers and healthy non-smokers (HNS). CCL5 and CCL11 levels were measured in BAL, and from the supernatants of lung resection explant cultures. CD8-CCR3 and -CCR5 expression (means) were increased in COPD patients (22% and 46% respectively) and smokers (20% and 45%) compared with HNS (3% and 22%); P

  6. Role of atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 in experimental oral squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Janine Mayra; Dos Santos, Tálita Pollyanna Moreira; Saraiva, Adriana Machado; Fernandes de Oliveira, Ana Laura; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Mesquita, Ricardo Alves; Russo, Remo Castro; da Silva, Tarcília Aparecida

    2018-03-14

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors are critical in oral tumourigenesis. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a scavenger of CC chemokines controlling the availability of these molecules at tumour sites, but the role of ACKR2 in the context of oral carcinogenesis is unexplored. In this study, wild-type (WT) and ACKR2 deficient mice (ACKR2 -/- ) were treated with chemical carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) for induction of oral carcinogenesis. Tongues were collected for macro and microscopic analysis and to evaluate the expression of ACKRs, CC chemokines and its receptors, inflammatory cytokines, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components. An increased expression of ACKR2 in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) lesions of 4NQO-treated WT mice was observed. No significant differences were seen in the ACKR1, ACKR3 and ACKR4 mRNA expression comparing SCC lesions from WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. Significantly higher expression of CCL2, IL-6 and IL-17 was detected in ACKR2 -/- treated mice. In contrast, the expression of other CC-chemokines, and receptors, angiogenic factors, adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix components were similarly increased in SCC lesions of both groups. Clinical and histopathological analysis revealed no differences in inflammatory cell recruitment and in the SCC incidence comparing WT and ACKR2 -/- treated mice. The results suggest that ACKR2 expression regulates inflammation in tumour-microenvironment but the absence of ACKR2 does not impact chemically-induced oral carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of MCP-1 chemokine transcription by p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacke, Katrin; Rincon-Orozco, Bladimiro; Buchwalter, Gilles; Siehler, Simone Y; Wasylyk, Bohdan; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Rösl, Frank

    2010-04-20

    Our previous studies showed that the expression of the monocyte-chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, a chemokine, which triggers the infiltration and activation of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, is abrogated in human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive premalignant and malignant cells. In silico analysis of the MCP-1 upstream region proposed a putative p53 binding side about 2.5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start. The aim of this study is to monitor a physiological role of p53 in this process. The proposed p53 binding side could be confirmed in vitro by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays and in vivo by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Moreover, the availability of p53 is apparently important for chemokine regulation, since TNF-alpha can induce MCP-1 only in human keratinocytes expressing the viral oncoprotein E7, but not in HPV16 E6 positive cells, where p53 becomes degraded. A general physiological role of p53 in MCP-1 regulation was further substantiated in HPV-negative cells harboring a temperature-sensitive mutant of p53 and in Li-Fraumeni cells, carrying a germ-line mutation of p53. In both cases, non-functional p53 leads to diminished MCP-1 transcription upon TNF-alpha treatment. In addition, siRNA directed against p53 decreased MCP-1 transcription after TNF-alpha addition, directly confirming a crosstalk between p53 and MCP-1. These data support the concept that p53 inactivation during carcinogenesis also affects immune surveillance by interfering with chemokine expression and in turn communication with cells of the immunological compartment.

  8. CXC-type chemokines promote myofibroblast phenoconversion and prostatic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Gharaee-Kermani

    Full Text Available Recent studies from our group suggest that extracellular matrix (ECM deposition and fibrosis characterize the peri-urethral prostate tissues of some men suffering from Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS and that fibrosis may be a contributing factor to the etiology of LUTS. Fibrosis can generally be regarded as an errant wound-healing process in response to chronic inflammation, and several studies have shown that the aging prostate tissue microenvironment is rich with inflammatory cells and proteins. However, it is unclear whether these same inflammatory proteins, particularly CXC-type chemokines, can mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and the ECM deposition necessary for the development of prostatic tissue fibrosis. To examine this, immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts treated with TGF-β1, CXCL5, CXCL8, or CXCL12 were evaluated morphologically by microscopy, by immunofluorescence and qRT-PCR for αSMA, collagen 1, vimentin, calponin, and tenascin protein and transcript expression, and by gel contraction assays for functional myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies showed that that immortalized and primary prostate stromal fibroblasts are induced to express collagen 1 and 3 and αSMA gene transcripts and proteins and to undergo complete and functional myofibroblast phenoconversion in response to CXC-type chemokines, even in the absence of exogenous TGF-β1. Moreover, CXCL12-mediated myofibroblast phenoconversion can be completely abrogated by inhibition of the CXCL12 receptor, CXCR4. These findings suggest that CXC-type chemokines, which comprise inflammatory proteins known to be highly expressed in the aging prostate, can efficiently and completely mediate myofibroblast phenoconversion and may thereby promote fibrotic changes in prostate tissue architecture associated with the development and progression of male lower urinary tract dysfunction.

  9. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...... analyzed in 109 patients with relapsing-remitting MS treated with IFN-beta who were followed clinically for 1 year. Cellular CCR5 expression was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: Patients with MS had a higher percentage of CCR5-positive monocytes than healthy controls. Increased monocyte expression...... of CCR5 correlated weakly with an increased short-term relapse risk but there was no relationship between CCR5 Delta32 allele and CCR5 promoter polymorphism genotypes and relapse risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support a major role of CCR5 in the pathogenesis of relapses in MS patients treated...

  10. The chemokine receptor CCR5 in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Silvia; Myburgh, Renier; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2011-02-01

    The expression and the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 have been mainly studied in the context of HIV infection. However, this protein is also expressed in the brain, where it can be crucial in determining the outcome in response to different insults. CCR5 expression can be deleterious or protective in controlling the progression of certain infections in the CNS, but it is also emerging that it could play a role in non-infectious diseases. In particular, it appears that, in addition to modulating immune responses, CCR5 can influence neuronal survival. Here, we summarize the present knowledge about the expression of CCR5 in the brain and highlight recent findings suggesting its possible involvement in neuroprotective mechanisms. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Microbial corruption of the chemokine system: an expanding paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, J E; Murphy, P M

    1998-06-01

    The chemokine signaling system includes more than 40 secreted pro-inflammatory peptides and 12 G protein-coupled receptors that together orchestrate specific leukocyte trafficking in the mammalian immune system, ideally for anti- microbial defense and tissue repair processes. Paradoxically and perversely, some chemokines and chemokine receptors are also promicrobial factors and facilitate infectious disease, the result of either exploitation or subversion by specific microbes. Two modes of exploitation are known: usage of cellular chemokine receptors for cell entry by intracellular pathogens, including HIV, and usage of virally-encoded chemokine receptors for host cell proliferation. Likewise, two modes of subversion are known: virally-encoded chemokine antagonists and virally-encoded chemokine scavengers. Understanding how microbes turn the tables on the chemokine system may point to new methods to prevent or treat infection, or, more generally, to treat inappropriate chemokine-mediated inflammation. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  12. Atorvastatin reduces plasma levels of chemokine (CXCL10) in patients with Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grip, Olof; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2009-01-01

    In Crohn's disease high tissue expression and serum levels of chemokines and their receptors are known to correlate with disease activity. Because statins can reduce chemokine expression in patients with coronary diseases, we wanted to test whether this can be achieved in patients with Crohn's disease. We investigated plasma levels of chemokines (CCL2, CCL4, CCL11, CCL13, CCL17, CCL22, CCL26, CXCL8, CXCL10) and endothelial cytokines (sP-selectin, sE-selectin, sICAM-3, thrombomodulin) in ten Crohn's disease patients before and after thirteen weeks' daily treatment with 80 mg atorvastatin. Of the 13 substances investigated, only CXCL10 was found to be significantly reduced (by 34%, p = 0.026) in all of the treated patients. Levels of CXCL10 correlated with C-reactive protein (r = 0.82, pCrohns disease in the future. (ClinicalTrials.gov) NCT00454545.

  13. The viral KSHV chemokine vMIP-II inhibits the migration of Naive and activated human NK cells by antagonizing two distinct chemokine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Yamin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate immune cells able to rapidly kill virus-infected and tumor cells. Two NK cell populations are found in the blood; the majority (90% expresses the CD16 receptor and also express the CD56 protein in intermediate levels (CD56(Dim CD16(Pos while the remaining 10% are CD16 negative and express CD56 in high levels (CD56(Bright CD16(Neg. NK cells also reside in some tissues and traffic to various infected organs through the usage of different chemokines and chemokine receptors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human virus that has developed numerous sophisticated and versatile strategies to escape the attack of immune cells such as NK cells. Here, we investigate whether the KSHV derived cytokine (vIL-6 and chemokines (vMIP-I, vMIP-II, vMIP-III affect NK cell activity. Using transwell migration assays, KSHV infected cells, as well as fusion and recombinant proteins, we show that out of the four cytokine/chemokines encoded by KSHV, vMIP-II is the only one that binds to the majority of NK cells, affecting their migration. We demonstrate that vMIP-II binds to two different receptors, CX3CR1 and CCR5, expressed by naïve CD56(Dim CD16(Pos NK cells and activated NK cells, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the binding of vMIP-II to CX3CR1 and CCR5 blocks the binding of the natural ligands of these receptors, Fractalkine (Fck and RANTES, respectively. Finally, we show that vMIP-II inhibits the migration of naïve and activated NK cells towards Fck and RANTES. Thus, we present here a novel mechanism in which KSHV uses a unique protein that antagonizes the activity of two distinct chemokine receptors to inhibit the migration of naïve and activated NK cells.

  14. The viral KSHV chemokine vMIP-II inhibits the migration of Naive and activated human NK cells by antagonizing two distinct chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Rachel; Kaynan, Noa S; Glasner, Ariella; Vitenshtein, Alon; Tsukerman, Pinchas; Bauman, Yoav; Ophir, Yael; Elias, Shlomo; Bar-On, Yotam; Gur, Chamutal; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2013-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are innate immune cells able to rapidly kill virus-infected and tumor cells. Two NK cell populations are found in the blood; the majority (90%) expresses the CD16 receptor and also express the CD56 protein in intermediate levels (CD56(Dim) CD16(Pos)) while the remaining 10% are CD16 negative and express CD56 in high levels (CD56(Bright) CD16(Neg)). NK cells also reside in some tissues and traffic to various infected organs through the usage of different chemokines and chemokine receptors. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a human virus that has developed numerous sophisticated and versatile strategies to escape the attack of immune cells such as NK cells. Here, we investigate whether the KSHV derived cytokine (vIL-6) and chemokines (vMIP-I, vMIP-II, vMIP-III) affect NK cell activity. Using transwell migration assays, KSHV infected cells, as well as fusion and recombinant proteins, we show that out of the four cytokine/chemokines encoded by KSHV, vMIP-II is the only one that binds to the majority of NK cells, affecting their migration. We demonstrate that vMIP-II binds to two different receptors, CX3CR1 and CCR5, expressed by naïve CD56(Dim) CD16(Pos) NK cells and activated NK cells, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the binding of vMIP-II to CX3CR1 and CCR5 blocks the binding of the natural ligands of these receptors, Fractalkine (Fck) and RANTES, respectively. Finally, we show that vMIP-II inhibits the migration of naïve and activated NK cells towards Fck and RANTES. Thus, we present here a novel mechanism in which KSHV uses a unique protein that antagonizes the activity of two distinct chemokine receptors to inhibit the migration of naïve and activated NK cells.

  15. Molecular piracy of chemokine receptors by herpesviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P M

    1994-01-01

    To succeed as a biological entity, viruses must exploit normal cellular functions and elude the host immune system; they often do so by molecular mimicry. One way that mimicry may occur is when viruses copy and modify host genes. The best studied examples of this are the oncogenes of RNA retroviruses, but a growing number of examples are also known for DNA viruses. So far they all come from just two groups of DNA viruses, the herpesviruses and poxviruses, and the majority of examples are for genes whose products regulate immune responses, such as cytokines, cytokine receptors, and complement control proteins. This review will focus on human and herpesvirus receptors for chemokines, a family of leukocyte chemoattractant and activating factors that are thought to be important mediators of inflammation. Although the biological roles of the viral chemokine receptor homologues are currently unknown, their connection to specific sets of chemokines has suggested a number of possible functions.

  16. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the total...... agonist activity on the virally encoded receptor ORF74 and the direct antibacterial activity of CXCL10 are fully retained. Hence, we have identified furin as a novel chemokine-modifying enzyme in vitro and most probably also in vivo, generating a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, which fully retains its...

  17. A study of chemokines, chemokine receptors and interleukin-6 in patients with panic disorder, personality disorders and their co-morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna M; Just, Marek J; Szromek, Adam R; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2016-08-01

    Stress may induce inflammatory changes in the immune system and activate pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors by activating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. 460 hospitalized patients with panic disorders (PD) and/or personality disorders (P) were studied. The study group comprised subjects with PD, avoidant personality disorder (APD), borderline personality disorder (BPD), obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD), and concomitant (PD+APD; PD+BPD; PD+OCPD). Each study group consisted of 60 subjects (30 females and 30 males). The control group included 20 females and 20 males without any history of mental disorder. ELISA was used to assess the levels of chemokines: CCL-5/RANTES (regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted), CXCL-12/SDF-1 (stromal derived factor), their receptors CXCR-5 (C-C chemokine receptor type-5), CXCR-4 (chemokine C-X-C motif receptor-4), and IL-6. Statistically significant differences in the levels of CCL-5 and CCR-5 were revealed between all study groups. The greatest differences were found between the groups with PD+OCPD and PD+APD. Moreover, concomitance of PD with P significantly increased the level of chemokines and their receptors in all study groups versus the subjects with P alone. The results of the study show differences between the groups. To be specific, inflammatory markers were more elevated in the study groups than the controls. Therefore, chemokines and chemokine receptors may be used as inflammatory markers in patients with PD co-existent with P to indicate disease severity. PD was found to be a factor in maintaining inflammatory activity in the immune system in patients with P. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional characterization of the C—C chemokine-like molecules encoded by molluscum contagiosum virus types 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Krathwohl, Mitchell D.; Hromas, Robert; Brown, Darron R.; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Fife, Kenneth H.

    1997-01-01

    Many viruses have evolved mechanisms for evading the host immune system by synthesizing proteins that interfere with the normal immune response. The poxviruses are among the most accomplished at deceiving their hosts’ immune systems. The nucleotide sequence of the genome of the human cutaneous poxvirus, molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) type 1, was recently reported to contain a region that resembles a human chemokine. We have cloned and expressed the chemokine-like genes from MCV type 1 and ...

  19. New insights in chemokine signaling [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F. Legler

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine signaling is essential for coordinated cell migration in health and disease to specifically govern cell positioning in space and time. Typically, chemokines signal through heptahelical, G protein-coupled receptors to orchestrate cell migration. Notably, chemokine receptors are highly dynamic structures and signaling efficiency largely depends on the discrete contact with the ligand. Promiscuity of both chemokines and chemokine receptors, combined with biased signaling and allosteric modulation of receptor activation, guarantees a tightly controlled recruitment and positioning of individual cells within the local environment at a given time. Here, we discuss recent insights in understanding chemokine gradient formation by atypical chemokine receptors and how typical chemokine receptors can transmit distinct signals to translate guidance cues into coordinated cell locomotion in space and time.

  20. Cytokines and Chemokines as Regulators of Skeletal Muscle Inflammation: Presenting the Case of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel De Paepe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe inherited muscle disease that affects 1 in 3500 boys worldwide. Infiltration of skeletal muscle by inflammatory cells is an important facet of disease pathophysiology and is strongly associated with disease severity in the individual patient. In the chronic inflammation that characterizes Duchenne muscle, cytokines and chemokines are considered essential activators and recruiters of inflammatory cells. In addition, they provide potential beneficiary effects on muscle fiber damage control and tissue regeneration. In this review, current knowledge of cytokine and chemokine expression in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its relevant animal disease models is listed, and implications for future therapeutic avenues are discussed.

  1. Chemokines Responses to Ascaris Lumbricoides Sole Infection and Co-infection with Hookworm among Nigerians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemota, Omorodion Oriri; Nmorsi, O P G; Isaac, C; Odoya, E M; Akinseye, J; Isaac, O

    2014-02-01

    Geohelminth infections are predominant in Nigeria and communities at greatest risks are those with poor environmental/sanitary conditions and unhygienic habits. Chemokine ligands (CXCL) a class under chemokine group play important roles in the immune system by either mediating susceptible or protective immune responses to parasitic infections. This study was to assess the impact of Ascaris lumbricoides sole infection and co-infection on some serum chemokines (CXCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11) in infected Nigerians. A total of 194 individuals attending Agbor general hospital were examined for A. lumbricoides and hookworm infections. Thereafter, sera were obtained from positive volunteers and control group using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to examine the impact of these helminth infections on the serum concentration of some chemokines (CXCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL11). The mean sera levels of CXCL5 and CXCL9 in infected volunteers were higher than the control subjects. Also, positive correlation was recorded for CXCL9 (P > 0.05), while negative responses were seen for CXCL5 and CXCL11 (P > 0.05) in relation to increase in the intensities of infections. CXCL9 was more expressed in A. lumbricoides + hookworm co-infections than single. Furthermore, the mean concentration of CXCL5 was higher in infected females than males (P lumbricoides and hookworm infections could be an indication of the meditating roles of these chemokines in the immune system to either confer some form of host/parasite immunity or susceptibility.

  2. Laminar chemokine mRNA concentrations in horses with carbohydrate overload-induced laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiros, Rafael R; Leise, Britta S; Watts, Mauria; Johnson, Philip J; Black, Samuel J; Belknap, James K

    2011-11-15

    Chemokines play a vital role in leukocyte activation and emigration that reportedly plays a central role in laminar injury in equine laminitis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of laminar chemokine expression in horses in the classical carbohydrate overload (CHO)-model of laminitis. Laminar samples were obtained 24h following water administration in the control group (CON, n=8), and at the onset of fever (≥ 102°F, 12-22 h post CHO, DEV group, n=8) and at the onset of lameness (20-48 h post CHO, LAM group, n=8) in induced horses. Real time quantitative PCR was performed on all samples in order to determine laminar mRNA concentrations of both CXC chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL6, CXCL8) and CC chemokines (CCL2 [MCP-1], CCL3 [MIP-1α], and CCL8 [MCP-2]). Data were subjected to ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls (Plaminitis models. Chemokine antagonists may be considered as possible therapeutic targets to decrease the influx of leukocytes that occurs during the development of equine laminitis. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A highly selective CCR2 chemokine agonist encoded by human herpesvirus 6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, Hans R; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2003-01-01

    calcium mobilization as efficiently as the endogenous chemokine ligand CCL2 through the CCR2 receptor, whereas the virally encoded chemokine did not affect any of the other 17 human chemokine receptors tested. Mutual cross-desensitization between CCL2 and vCCL4 was demonstrated in the CCR2-transfected...... cells. The affinity of vCCL4 for the CCR2 receptor was 79 nm as determined in competition binding against radioactively labeled CCL2. In the murine pre-B lymphocyte cell line L1.2 stably transfected with the CCR2 receptor, vCCL4 acted as a relatively low potency but highly efficacious chemoattractant...... being equally or more efficacious in causing cell migration than CCL2 and CCL7 and considerably more efficacious than CCL8 and CCL13. It is concluded that human herpesvirus 6 encodes a highly selective and efficacious CCR2 agonist, which will attract CCR2 expressing cells, for example macrophages...

  4. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Animesh; Rathore, Anurag; Vidyant, Sanjukta; Kakkar, Kavita; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-01-01

    A multitude of host genetic factors plays a crucial role in susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS, which is highly variable among individuals and populations. This review focuses on the chemokine-receptor and chemokine genes, which were extensively studied because of their role as HIV co-receptor or co-receptor competitor and influences the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS in HIV-1 infected individuals.

  5. Increased replication of T-cell-tropic HIV strains and CXC-chemokine receptor-4 induction in T cells treated with macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES beta-chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolei, A; Biolchini, A; Serra, C; Curreli, S; Gomes, E; Dianzani, F

    1998-01-22

    To study, in T-lymphoid cells, the effects of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES beta-chemokines on the replication of T-cell-tropic HIV-1 strains, since it has been reported that beta-chemokines interfere with the replication of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains, but not T-cell-tropic strains. Freshly phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and cultured PHA-activated T cells from healthy volunteers, as well as the C8166 T-cell line, were treated overnight with beta-chemokines before infection with T-cell-tropic HIV-1 isolates, or human T-lymphotropic virus type IIIB. HIV replication was followed by detecting the production of infectious particles, p24 antigen, and viral sequences. CXC-chemokine receptor (CXCR)-4 expression was followed by detection and quantification of specific transcripts. Pretreatment of T cells with MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta and RANTES affected T-cell-tropic strains, increased the replication of HIV-1beta and HIV-1RPdT strains dose-dependently, as well as virus absorption and provirus DNA accumulation. These findings were associated with increased accumulation of CXCR-4 transcripts, and mediated by the protein tyrosine kinase signalling. Moreover, beta-chemokines stimulated PBL proliferation. Beta-chemokines increase the adsorption and replication of at least some T-cell-tropic HIV-1 strains, and this is related to stimulated expression of the CXCR-4 coreceptor.

  6. The role of CC chemokine receptor 5 in antiviral immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andreasen, Susanne Ørding

    2002-01-01

    response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking CCR5 (CCR5(-/-) mice). This infection is a classical model for studying antiviral immunity, and influx of CCR5-expressing CD8(+) T cells and macrophages is essential for both virus control and associated immunopathology. Results showed......The CC chemokine receptor CCR5 is an important coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and there is a major thrust to develop anti-CCR5-based therapies for HIV-1. However, it is not known whether CCR5 is critical for a normal antiviral T-cell response. This study investigated the immune...... influence of CCR5 was found, not even when viral peptide was used as local trigger instead of live virus. Finally, long-term CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance was efficiently sustained in CCR5(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results indicate that expression of CCR5 is not critical for T cell...

  7. Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) and Chemokines in Colitis-Associated Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaida, Naofumi, E-mail: naofumim@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Sasakki, So-ichiro [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Popivanova, Boryana K. [Division of Molecular Bioregulation, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Present Address, Division of Cellular Signaling, Institute for Advanced Medical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2011-06-27

    The connection between inflammation and tumorigenesis has been well established, based on a great deal of supporting evidence obtained from epidemiological, pharmacological, and genetic studies. One representative example is inflammatory bowel disease, because it is an important risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Moreover, intratumoral infiltration of inflammatory cells suggests the involvement of inflammatory responses also in other forms of sporadic as well as heritable colon cancer. Inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis activate similar sets of transcription factors such as NF-κB, Stat3, and hypoxia inducible factor and eventually enhances the expression of inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and chemokines. The expression of TNF and chemokines is aberrantly expressed in a mouse model of colitis-associated carcinogenesis as well as in inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer in humans. Here, after summarizing the presumed actions of TNF and chemokines in tumor biology, we will discuss the potential roles of TNF and chemokines in chronic inflammation-associated colon cancer in mice.

  8. Are cytokines and chemokines suitable biomarkers for Takayasu arteritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savioli, Bruna; Abdulahad, Wayel H; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Kallenberg, Cees G M; de Souza, Alexandre Wagner Silva

    2017-10-01

    There is a growing need for disease related biomarkers in Takayasu arteritis (TA).The assessment of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in TA may provide a better understanding of its pathophysiology, and circulating levels of these mediators may act as biomarkers of disease activity. Serum level of interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a potential biomarker for TA, which is mostly associated with TA status and disease activity. Associations between TA and serum/plasma levels of other cytokines are less clear. mRNA expression of IL-4 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) are constitutively increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from TA patients and the expression of both cytokines increases even more after PBMC stimulation in vitro, while the expression of IL-10 mRNA decreases. In addition, circulating T cells from TA patients produce increased levels of both Th1- and Th17-related cytokines upon in vitro stimulation. In the aorta from TA patients, an increased expression of interferon γ (IFNγ), IL-6, IL-12 and IL-17 has been described. Regarding circulating chemokines in TA, serum/plasma levels of IL-8 (CXCL8), CCL2 and CCL5 were shown to be elevated in TA patients compared with healthy controls as well as in TA patients with active disease compared with those in remission. Serum IL-6 seems to be the best biomarker for disease state and disease activity in TA and increased Th1 and Th17 responses are predominant in the pathophysiology of TA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of thalidomide on chemokine production by human microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokensgard, J R; Hu, S; van Fenema, E M; Sheng, W S; Peterson, P K

    2000-09-01

    Thalidomide, a psychoactive drug that readily crosses the blood-brain barrier, has been shown to possess immunomodulatory attributes, including the inhibition of cytokine production by monocytes and microglia. In this study, we investigated the effect of thalidomide on chemokine production by human microglial cells. Microglial cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, a key cell-wall component of gram-negative bacteria responsible for meningitis, and production of chemokines (regulated upon activation normally T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES], monocyte chemoattractant protein [MCP]-1, macrophage inflammatory protein [MIP]-1beta, and interleukin [IL]-8) was examined by ELISA. Thalidomide treatment was found to cause potent and selective inhibition of IL-8 production in a dose-responsive manner. This inhibition was associated with decreased intracellular IL-8 staining as well as reduced transcription of IL-8 mRNA. In addition, thalidomide treatment of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglia inhibited the activation of protein NF-kappaB, a transcription factor known to be important for IL-8 production. These results suggest thalidomide could have a therapeutic role in acute bacterial meningitis through inhibition of IL-8-mediated neutrophil chemotaxis.

  10. Prospects for cytokine and chemokine biotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, J J; Murphy, W J; Chertox, O; Schirrmacher, V; Wang, J M

    1997-12-01

    Cytokines with immunostimulating effects have the capacity to induce tumor immunity in animal models, whereas some cytokines interfere with tumor growth based on their angiostatic effects. Despite these capabilities, cytokines, such as IFN-, IFN-, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin (IL)-1, and IL-2, have had limited clinical efficacy and many undesirable side effects. In preclinical models, cytokines can even promote tumor growth and increase metastatic spread. Although chemokines have had limited clinical evaluation, studies of animal models show that they can also have tumor-suppressive or tumor-enhancing effects. In mice, chemokines, such as IP-10, RANTES, and TCA3, have resulted in tumor regression and immunity to subsequent tumor challenge. Those chemokines that are angiostatic (e.g., PF4, IP-10, and MIG) can also induce tumor regression by reducing the tumor blood supply. Conversely, IL-8, which is angiogenic, can promote tumor growth. Our studies show that nasopharyngeal cell line cells (FADU) show a chemotactic as well as a proliferative response to MCP-1. In addition, a variant murine T cell lymphoma cell line Esb-MP, unlike the parental variant Esb, was selectively chemoattracted by murine MCP-1/JE. When injected s.c. into mice, the Esb-MP variant metastasized to the kidney with much higher frequency than the Esb variant. Both cultured kidneys from normal mice and a mesangial cell line constitutively produced chemoattractants that acted on Esb-MP but not Esb parental cells. Purification to homogeneity of these chemoattractants led to the identification of RANTES and JE. These results demonstrate that some chemokines may promote tumor growth and organ-specific metastatic spread of those tumors that have adapted and become responsive to chemokines. Finally, tumors appear to use numerous adaptive mechanisms to subvert and suppress the immune system. More effective therapy with cytokines and chemokines will require better characterization of the means by

  11. Molecular machinations: chemokine signals in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chensue, S W

    2001-10-01

    Chemokines and their G-protein-coupled receptors represent an ancient and complex system of cellular communication participating in growth, development, homeostasis and immunity. Chemokine production has been detected in virtually every microbial infection examined; however, the precise role of chemokines is still far from clear. In most cases they appear to promote host resistance by mobilizing leukocytes and activating immune functions that kill, expel, or sequester pathogens. In other cases, the chemokine system has been pirated by pathogens, especially protozoa and viruses, which have exploited host chemokine receptors as modes of cellular invasion or developed chemokine mimics and binding proteins that act as antagonists or inappropriate agonists. Understanding microbial mechanisms of chemokine evasion will potentially lead to novel antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents.

  12. Migration and chemokine receptor pattern of colitis-preventing DX5+NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung, Matthias; Werner, Jens M; Farkas, Stefan; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K

    2011-11-01

    DX5(+)NKT cells are a subpopulation of NKT cells expressing both T cell receptor and NK cell markers that show an immune-regulating function. Transferred DX5(+)NKT cells from immune competent Balb/c mice can prevent or reduce induced colitis in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Here, we investigated the in vivo migration of DX5(+)NKT cells and their corresponding chemokine receptor patterns. DX5(+)NKT cells were isolated from spleens of Balb/c mice and transferred into Balb/c SCID mice. After 2 and 8 days, in vivo migration was examined using in vivo microscopy. In addition, the chemokine receptor pattern was analyzed with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and the migration assay was performed. Our results show that labeled DX5(+)NKT cells were primarily detectable in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen after transfer. After 8 days, DX5(+)NKT cells were observed in the colonic tissues, especially the appendix. FACS analysis of chemokine receptors in DX5(+)NKT cells revealed expression of CCR3, CCR6, CCR9, CXCR3, CXCR4, and CXCR6, but no CCR5, CXCR5, or the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7. Stimulation upregulated especially CCR7 expression, and chemokine receptor patterns were different between splenic and liver DX5(+)NKT cells. These data indicate that colitis-preventing DX5(+)NKT cells need to traffic through lymphoid organs to execute their immunological function at the site of inflammation. Furthermore, DX5(+)NKT cells express a specific chemokine receptor pattern with an upregulation of the lymphoid homing receptor CCR7 after activation.

  13. Targeting herpesvirus reliance of the chemokine system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Kledal, Thomas N

    2006-01-01

    Viral infections depend on an intimate relationship between the infectious agent and the host cells. Viruses need the host cells for replication, while the innate- and adaptive- immunesystem of the host is fighting to kill the infected cell in order to clear out the pathogen and survive...... the infection. However, since both virus and host exist, the organisms struggle must reach an ecological equilibrium. Among the best-studied interactions between viruses and the host immune system are those between herpesviruses and their hosts. Herpesviruses are known to devote a significant part...... acquired homologs of both chemokines and chemokine receptors belonging to the 7 transmembrane (7TM) spanning, G protein-coupled receptor family. 7TM receptors are very efficient drug targets and are currently the most popular class of investigational drug targets. A notable trait for the virus encoded...

  14. Rosacea: the Cytokine and Chemokine Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Steinhoff, Martin; Homey, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Rosacea is one of the most common dermatoses of adults. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the pathophysiology of rosacea. Current concepts suggest that known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV radiation, heat, cold, stress, spicy food, and microbes modulate Toll-like receptor signaling, induce reactive oxygen species, as well as enhance antimicrobial peptide and neuropeptide production. Downstream of these events cytokines and chemokines orchestrate an inflammatory response that leads to the recruitment and activation of distinct leukocyte subsets and induces the characteristic histopathological features of rosacea. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the cytokine and chemokine network in rosacea and propose pathways that may be of therapeutic interest. PMID:22076326

  15. Structure of CC chemokine receptor 2 with orthosteric and allosteric antagonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Qin, Ling; Ortiz Zacarías, Natalia V.; de Vries, Henk; Han, Gye Won; Gustavsson, Martin; Dabros, Marta; Zhao, Chunxia; Cherney, Robert J.; Carter, Percy; Stamos, Dean; Abagyan, Ruben; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; IJzerman, Adriaan P.; Heitman, Laura H.; Tebben, Andrew; Kufareva, Irina; Handel , Tracy M. (Vertex Pharm); (Leiden-MC); (USC); (BMS); (UCSD)

    2016-12-07

    CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is one of 19 members of the chemokine receptor subfamily of human class A G-protein-coupled receptors. CCR2 is expressed on monocytes, immature dendritic cells, and T-cell subpopulations, and mediates their migration towards endogenous CC chemokine ligands such as CCL2 (ref. 1). CCR2 and its ligands are implicated in numerous inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases2 including atherosclerosis, multiple sclerosis, asthma, neuropathic pain, and diabetic nephropathy, as well as cancer3. These disease associations have motivated numerous preclinical studies and clinical trials4 (see http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) in search of therapies that target the CCR2–chemokine axis. To aid drug discovery efforts5, here we solve a structure of CCR2 in a ternary complex with an orthosteric (BMS-681 (ref. 6)) and allosteric (CCR2-RA-[R]7) antagonist. BMS-681 inhibits chemokine binding by occupying the orthosteric pocket of the receptor in a previously unseen binding mode. CCR2-RA-[R] binds in a novel, highly druggable pocket that is the most intracellular allosteric site observed in class A G-protein-coupled receptors so far; this site spatially overlaps the G-protein-binding site in homologous receptors. CCR2-RA-[R] inhibits CCR2 non-competitively by blocking activation-associated conformational changes and formation of the G-protein-binding interface. The conformational signature of the conserved microswitch residues observed in double-antagonist-bound CCR2 resembles the most inactive G-protein-coupled receptor structures solved so far. Like other protein–protein interactions, receptor–chemokine complexes are considered challenging therapeutic targets for small molecules, and the present structure suggests diverse pocket epitopes that can be exploited to overcome obstacles in drug design.

  16. Allergic rhinitis and CXCR3 chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, V; Fallahi, P

    2017-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of allergic rhinitis involves IgE antibodies attaching to the allergen and causing the release of inflammatory chemicals such as histamine from mast cells. Cytokines are very important in this process. Many data suggest a systemic shift to more intensely type 1-dominated immune responses in non-allergic individuals and, conversely, to more type 2-dominated responses in allergic individuals upon natural re-exposure to grass pollen. However other studies have found that chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)10/ interferon (IFN)-γ-induced protein 10 (IP-10) and CXCL9/monokine induced by IFN-γ (MIG) concentrations are elevated in nasal lavages from allergic patients suggesting that these chemokines may play a role in chronic allergic inflammation. Several studies have also evaluated the effect of different immune-modulating drugs in allergic rhinitis showing local and peripheral increase of IFN-γ and IP-10, associated with a reduction of symptoms. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of T helper (Th)1 chemokines in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis, and to evaluate their role as biomarkers of disease and of response to treatments.

  17. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonists Modulate Neuropathic Pain: a Link to Chemokines?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eFreitag

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain presents a widespread and intractable medical problem. While numerous pharmaceuticals are used to treat chronic pain, drugs that are safe for extended use and highly effective at treating the most severe pain do not yet exist. Chronic pain resulting from nervous system injury (neuropathic pain is common in conditions ranging from multiple sclerosis to HIV-1 infection to type II diabetes. Inflammation caused by neuropathy is believed to contribute to the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Chemokines are key inflammatory mediators, several of which (MCP-1, RANTES, MIP-1α, fractalkine, SDF-1 among others have been linked to chronic, neuropathic pain in both human conditions and animal models. The important roles chemokines play in inflammation and pain make them an attractive therapeutic target. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors are a family of nuclear receptors known for their roles in metabolism. Recent research has revealed that PPARs also play a role in inflammatory gene repression. PPAR agonists have wide-ranging effects including inhibition of chemokine expression and pain behavior reduction in animal models. Experimental evidence suggests a connection between PPAR agonists' pain ameliorating effects and suppression of inflammatory gene expression, including chemokines. In early clinical research, one PPARα agonist, palmitoylethanolamide, shows promise in relieving chronic pain. If this link can be better established, PPAR agonists may represent a new drug therapy for neuropathic pain.

  18. Functional characterization of the C---C chemokine-like molecules encoded by molluscum contagiosum virus types 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krathwohl, M D; Hromas, R; Brown, D R; Broxmeyer, H E; Fife, K H

    1997-09-02

    Many viruses have evolved mechanisms for evading the host immune system by synthesizing proteins that interfere with the normal immune response. The poxviruses are among the most accomplished at deceiving their hosts' immune systems. The nucleotide sequence of the genome of the human cutaneous poxvirus, molluscum contagiosum virus (MCV) type 1, was recently reported to contain a region that resembles a human chemokine. We have cloned and expressed the chemokine-like genes from MCV type 1 and the closely related MCV type 2 to determine a potential role for these proteins in the viral life cycle. In monocyte chemotaxis assays, the viral proteins have no chemotactic activity but both viral proteins block the chemotactic response to the human chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha. Like MIP-1alpha, both viral proteins also inhibit the growth of human hematopoietic progenitor cells, but the viral proteins are more potent in this activity than the human chemokine. These viral chemokines antagonize the chemotactic activity of human chemokines and have an inhibitory effect on human hematopoietic progenitor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of chemotaxis is an immune evasion function of these proteins during molluscum contagiosum virus infection. The significance of hematopoietic progenitor cell inhibition in viral pathogenesis is uncertain.

  19. Virally encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors in the role of viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter J; Lüttichau, Hans R; Schwartz, Thue W

    2003-01-01

    are the acquisition and modification of host-encoded chemokines and chemokine receptors. The described viral molecules leave nothing to chance and have thoroughly and efficiently corrupted the host immune system. Through this process viruses have identified key molecules in antiviral responses by their inhibition...... of these or potent ways to alter an efficient antiviral response to a weak Th2-driven response. Examples here are the chemokine scavenging by US28, attractance of Th2 cells and regulatory cells by vMIP1-3 and the selective engaging of CCR8 by MC148. Important insights into viral pathology and possible targets......Large DNA viruses such as pox- and in particular herpesviruses are notorious in their ability to evade the immune system and to be maintained in the general population. Based on the accumulated knowledge reviewed in this study it is evident that important mechanisms of these actions...

  20. CXC chemokine receptor 4 expression and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha-induced chemotaxis in CD4+ T lymphocytes are regulated by interleukin-4 and interleukin-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinquan, T; Quan, S; Jacobi, H H

    2000-01-01

    -10. IL-4 and IL-10 up- or down-regulated CXCR4 mRNA expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes, respectively, as detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Scatchard analysis revealed a type of CXCR4 with affinity (Kd approximately 6.3 nM), and approximately 70....... The regulation of CXCR4 expression in CD4+ T lymphocytes by IL-4 and IL-10 could be blocked by a selective inhibitor of protein kinase (staurosporine) or by a selective inhibitor of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (H-8), indicating that these cytokines regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes via both c......AMP and cGMP signalling pathways. The fact that cyclosporin A or ionomycin were able to independently change the CXCR4 expression and block the effects of IL-4 and IL-10 on CXCR4 expression implied that the capacity of IL-4 and IL-10 to regulate CXCR4 on CD4+ T lymphocytes is not linked to calcium...

  1. Low expression of activation marker CD69 and chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 on memory T cells after 2009 H1N1 influenza A antigen stimulation in vitro following H1N1 vaccination of HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawansuntati, Kriangkrai; Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Sugandhavesa, Patcharaphan; Aurpibul, Linda; Thetket, Sunida; Kosashunhanan, Natthapol; Supindham, Taweewat; Kaewthip, Oranitcha; Sroysuwan, Piyathida; Sirisanthana, Thira; Suparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Wipasa, Jiraprapa

    2015-01-01

    Unlike well-studied antibody responses to pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus vaccines in human immunodeficiency virus-infected (HIV+) individuals, less well understood are cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to this antigen in this susceptible population. We investigated such influenza-specific CMI responses in 61 HIV+ individuals and in 20 HIV-negative (HIV-) healthy controls. Each was vaccinated with a single licensed dose of inactivated, split-virion vaccine comprised of the influenza A/California/7/2009 (H1N1) virus-like strain. Cells collected just prior to vaccination and at 1 and 3 months afterwards were stimulated in vitro with dialyzed vaccine antigen and assayed by flow cytometry for cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-10, for degranulation marker CD107a, as well as phenotypes of memory T-cell subpopulations. Comparable increases of cytokine-producing and CD107a-expressing T cells were observed in both HIV+ subjects and healthy HIV-controls. However, by 3 months post-vaccination, in vitro antigen stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells induced greater expansion in controls of both CD4 and CD8 central memory and effector memory T cells, as well as higher expression of the activation marker CD69 and chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 than in HIV+ subjects. We concluded CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells produce cytokines at comparable levels in both groups, whereas the expression after in vitro stimulation of molecules critical for cell migration to infection sites are lower in the HIV+ than in comparable controls. Further immunization strategies against influenza are needed to improve the CMI responses in people living with HIV.

  2. Keratinocyte-derived chemokines orchestrate T cell positioning in the epidermis during vitiligo and may serve as biomarkers of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jillian M.; Bangari, Dinesh S.; Essien, Kingsley I.; Currimbhoy, Sharif D.; Groom, Joanna R.; Pandya, Amit G.; Youd, Michele E.; Luster, Andrew D.; Harris, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin that results in the destruction of melanocytes and the clinical appearance of white spots. Disease pathogenesis depends on IFN-γ and IFN-γ-induced chemokines to promote T cell recruitment to the epidermis where melanocytes reside. The skin is a complex organ, with a variety of resident cell types. We sought to better define the microenvironment and distinct cellular contributions during autoimmunity in vitiligo, and found that the epidermis is a chemokine-high niche in both a mouse model and human vitiligo. Analysis of chemokine expression in mouse skin revealed that CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression strongly correlate with disease activity, whereas CXCL10 alone correlates with severity, supporting them as potential biomarkers for following disease progression. Further studies in both our mouse model and human patients revealed that keratinocytes were the major chemokine-producers throughout the course of disease, and functional studies using a conditional STAT1 knockout mouse revealed that IFN-γ signaling in keratinocytes was critical for disease progression and proper autoreactive T cell homing to the epidermis. In contrast, epidermal immune cell populations including endogenous T cells, Langerhans cells, and γδ T cells were not required. These results have important clinical implications, as topical therapies that target IFN-γ signaling in keratinocytes could be safe and effective new treatments, and skin expression of these chemokines could be used to monitor disease activity and treatment responses. PMID:27686391

  3. Identification of Potential Therapeutic Targets Among CXC Chemokines in Breast Tumor Microenvironment Using Integrative Bioinformatics Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erbao Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Breast cancer is a common cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. The cross-talk between cancer cells and interstitial cells exerts significant effects on neoplasia and tumor development and is modulated in part by chemokines. CXC is one of four chemokine families involved in mediating survival, angiogenesis, and immunosensitization by chemoattracting leukocytes, and it incentivizes tumor cell growth, invasion and metastasis in the tumor microenvironment. However, the differential expression profiles and prognostic values of these chemokines remains to be elucidated. Methods: In this study, we compared transcriptional CXC chemokines and survival data of patients with breast carcinoma (BC using the ONCOMINE dataset, Kaplan-Meier Plotter, TCGA and cBioPortal. Results: We discovered increased mRNA levels for CXCL8/10/11/16/17, whereas mRNA expression of CXCL1/2/3/4/5/6/7/12/14 was lower in BC patients compared to non-tumor tissues. Kaplan-Meier plots revealed that high mRNA levels of CXCL1/2/3/4/5/6/7/12/14 correlate with relapse-free survival (RFS in all types of BC patients. Conversely, high CXCL8/10/11 predicted worse RFS in BC patients. Significantly, high transcription levels of CXCL9/12/13/14 conferred an overall survival (OS advantage in BC patients, while high levels of CXCL8 demonstrated shorter OS in all BC sufferers. Conclusions: Integrative bioinformatics analysis suggests that CXCL8/12/14 are potential suitable targets for precision therapy in BC patients compared to other CXC chemokines.

  4. Identification of Potential Therapeutic Targets Among CXC Chemokines in Breast Tumor Microenvironment Using Integrative Bioinformatics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Erbao; Qin, Xuan; Peng, Ke; Xu, Xiaojing; Li, Wei; Cheng, Xi; Tang, Cheng; Cui, Yuehong; Wang, Zhiming; Liu, Tianshu

    2018-02-23

    Breast cancer is a common cause of cancer mortality throughout the world. The cross-talk between cancer cells and interstitial cells exerts significant effects on neoplasia and tumor development and is modulated in part by chemokines. CXC is one of four chemokine families involved in mediating survival, angiogenesis, and immunosensitization by chemoattracting leukocytes, and it incentivizes tumor cell growth, invasion and metastasis in the tumor microenvironment. However, the differential expression profiles and prognostic values of these chemokines remains to be elucidated. In this study, we compared transcriptional CXC chemokines and survival data of patients with breast carcinoma (BC) using the ONCOMINE dataset, Kaplan-Meier Plotter, TCGA and cBioPortal. We discovered increased mRNA levels for CXCL8/10/11/16/17, whereas mRNA expression of CXCL1/2/3/4/5/6/7/12/14 was lower in BC patients compared to non-tumor tissues. Kaplan-Meier plots revealed that high mRNA levels of CXCL1/2/3/4/5/6/7/12/14 correlate with relapse-free survival (RFS) in all types of BC patients. Conversely, high CXCL8/10/11 predicted worse RFS in BC patients. Significantly, high transcription levels of CXCL9/12/13/14 conferred an overall survival (OS) advantage in BC patients, while high levels of CXCL8 demonstrated shorter OS in all BC sufferers. Integrative bioinformatics analysis suggests that CXCL8/12/14 are potential suitable targets for precision therapy in BC patients compared to other CXC chemokines. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. CXC and CC Chemokines as Angiogenic Modulators in Nonhaematological Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally homologous heparin-binding proteins that includes potent inducers and inhibitors of angiogenesis. The imbalance between angiogenic and angiostatic chemokine activities can lead to abnormalities, such as chronic inflammation, dysplastic transformation, and even tumor development and spreading. In this review, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in patients with nonhaematological tumors.

  6. Molecular Machinations: Chemokine Signals in Host-Pathogen Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chensue, Stephen W.

    2001-01-01

    Chemokines and their G-protein-coupled receptors represent an ancient and complex system of cellular communication participating in growth, development, homeostasis and immunity. Chemokine production has been detected in virtually every microbial infection examined; however, the precise role of chemokines is still far from clear. In most cases they appear to promote host resistance by mobilizing leukocytes and activating immune functions that kill, expel, or sequester pathogens. In other case...

  7. Renal Protection by Genetic Deletion of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor ACKR2 in Diabetic OVE Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirong Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In diabetic nephropathy (DN proinflammatory chemokines and leukocyte infiltration correlate with tubulointerstitial injury and declining renal function. The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 is a chemokine scavenger receptor which binds and sequesters many inflammatory CC chemokines but does not transduce typical G-protein mediated signaling events. ACKR2 is known to regulate diverse inflammatory diseases but its role in DN has not been tested. In this study, we utilized ACKR2−/− mice to test whether ACKR2 elimination alters progression of diabetic kidney disease. Elimination of ACKR2 greatly reduced DN in OVE26 mice, an established DN model. Albuminuria was significantly lower at 2, 4, and 6 months of age. ACKR2 deletion did not affect diabetic blood glucose levels but significantly decreased parameters of renal inflammation including leukocyte infiltration and fibrosis. Activation of pathways that increase inflammatory gene expression was attenuated. Human biopsies stained with ACKR2 antibody revealed increased staining in diabetic kidney, especially in some tubule and interstitial cells. The results demonstrate a significant interaction between diabetes and ACKR2 protein in the kidney. Unexpectedly, ACKR2 deletion reduced renal inflammation in diabetes and the ultimate response was a high degree of protection from diabetic nephropathy.

  8. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-08-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5(-/-) mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  10. Systematic review of the neurobiological relevance of chemokines to psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eStuart

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent and disabling conditions of increasing public health relevance. Much recent research has focused on the role of cytokines in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders; however the related family of immune proteins designated chemokines has been relatively neglected. Chemokines were originally identified as having chemotactic function on immune cells, however recent evidence has begun to elucidate novel, brain-specific functions of these proteins of relevance to the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. A systematic review of both human and animal literature in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases was undertaken. After application of all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 157 references were remained for the review. Some early mechanistic evidence does associate select chemokines with the neurobiological processes, including neurogenesis, modulation of the neuroinflammatory response, regulation of the HPA axis, and modulation of neurotransmitter systems. This early evidence however does not clearly demonstrate any specificity for a certain psychiatric disorder, but is primarily relevant to mechanisms which are shared across disorders. Notable exceptions include CCL11 which has recently been shown to impair hippocampal function in aging - of distinct relevance to Alzheimer’s disease and depression in the elderly, and prenatal exposure to CXCL8 that may disrupt early neurodevelopmental periods predisposing to schizophrenia. Pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL7, CCL8, CCL12, CCL13, have been shown to drive chemotaxis of pro-inflammatory cells to the inflamed or injured CNS. Likewise, CX3CL has been implicated in promoting glial cells activation, proinflammatory cytokines secretion, expression of ICAM-1 and recruitment of CD4+ T-cells into the CNS during neuroinflammatory processes. With further translational research, chemokines may present novel diagnostic and/or therapeutic targets in

  11. Systematic Review of the Neurobiological Relevance of Chemokines to Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Michael J; Singhal, Gaurav; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders are highly prevalent and disabling conditions of increasing public health relevance. Much recent research has focused on the role of cytokines in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders; however, the related family of immune proteins designated chemokines has been relatively neglected. Chemokines were originally identified as having chemotactic function on immune cells; however, recent evidence has begun to elucidate novel, brain-specific functions of these proteins of relevance to the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders. A systematic review of both human and animal literature in the PubMed and Google Scholar databases was undertaken. After application of all inclusion and exclusion criteria, 157 references were remained for the review. Some early mechanistic evidence does associate select chemokines with the neurobiological processes, including neurogenesis, modulation of the neuroinflammatory response, regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, and modulation of neurotransmitter systems. This early evidence however does not clearly demonstrate any specificity for a certain psychiatric disorder, but is primarily relevant to mechanisms which are shared across disorders. Notable exceptions include CCL11 that has recently been shown to impair hippocampal function in aging - of distinct relevance to Alzheimer's disease and depression in the elderly, and pre-natal exposure to CXCL8 that may disrupt early neurodevelopmental periods predisposing to schizophrenia. Pro-inflammatory chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL7, CCL8, CCL12, and CCL13, have been shown to drive chemotaxis of pro-inflammatory cells to the inflamed or injured CNS. Likewise, CX3CL has been implicated in promoting glial cells activation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion, expression of ICAM-1, and recruitment of CD4+ T-cells into the CNS during neuroinflammatory processes. With further translational research, chemokines may present novel diagnostic and

  12. CXCR3 and CCR5 chemokines in induced sputum from patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Claudia; Rufino, Rogerio; Traves, Suzanne L; Lapa E Silva, Jose Roberto; Barnes, Peter J; Donnelly, Louise E

    2008-01-01

    COPD is associated with increased numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes and macrophages in the small airways and lung parenchyma. The chemokines regulating T-cell recruitment into the lung are unknown but may involve CXCR3 and CCR5 chemoattractants. The aims of this study were to determine the concentrations of CXCR3 chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and the CCR5 chemokine CCL5 in induced sputum from patients with COPD, smokers, and nonsmokers, and to examine the relationship between chemokine expression, inflammatory cells, and airway obstruction. Differential cell counts were performed and concentrations of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 were measured in induced sputum from nonsmokers (n = 18), smokers (n = 20), and COPD patients (n = 35) using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Concentrations of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 were significantly increased in the sputum of patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers but not smokers without obstruction: CXCL9 (median, 14.3 pg/mL; interquartile range [IQR], 6.5 to 99.3; vs median, 1.4 pg/mL; IQR, 0 to 10.4 [p < 0.001]; vs 8.5 pg/mL; IQR, 0 to 16.0, respectively); CXCL10 (16.9 pg/mL; IQR, 6.2 to 148.8; vs 3.7 pg/mL; IQR, 0 to 18.8 [p < 0.05]; vs 11.3 pg/mL; IQR, 3.7 to 46.7); CXCL11 (58.1 pg/mL; IQR, 34.5 to 85.3; vs 33.5 pg/mL; IQR, 23.2 to 49.7 [p < 0.05]; vs 49.8 pg/mL; IQR, 32.6 to 105.6); and CCL5 (59.9 pg/mL; IQR, 57.1 to 67.8; vs 33.5 pg/mL; IQR, 31.6 to 36.9 [p < 0.001]). CCL5 in sputum from smokers was also significantly increased compared with that from nonsmokers (median, 63.0 pg/mL; IQR, 60.8 to70.2; p < 0.001). There was a negative correlation between FEV(1) percentage of predicted, FEV(1)/FVC ratio, and percentage of macrophages, and all the chemokines analyzed. Neutrophil numbers correlated positively with the concentrations of chemokines. CXCR3 chemokines and CCL5 are increased in sputum from COPD patients compared with nonsmokers, and may be important in COPD pathogenesis.

  13. The herpesvirus 8-encoded chemokine vMIP-II, but not the poxvirus-encoded chemokine MC148, inhibits the CCR10 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Lewis, I C; Gerstoft, J

    2001-01-01

    The viral chemokine antagonist vMIP-II encoded by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8) and MC148 encoded by the poxvirus - Molluscum contagiosum - were tested against the newly identified chemokine receptor CCR10. As the CCR10 ligand ESkine / CCL27 had the highest identity to MC148 and because both...... chemokines are expressed in the skin we suspected MC148 to block CCR10. However, in calcium mobilization assays we found MC148 unable to block CCR10 in micromolar concentrations in contrast to vMIP-II. (125)I-MC148 was only able to bind to CCR8, but not to CCR10, CCR11, CXCR6 / BONZO, APJ, DARC or the orphan...... receptors BOB, EBI-II, GPR4, GPR17, HCR or RDC1. We conclude that MC148 is a highly selective CCR8 antagonist conceivably optimized to interfere with NK cell and monocyte invasion, whereas the broad-spectrum antagonist vMIP-II protects HHV8 by blocking multiple receptors....

  14. Chemokine Involvement in Fetal and Adult Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Swathi; Watson, Carey L.; Ranjan, Rajeev; King, Alice; Bollyky, Paul L.; Keswani, Sundeep G.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Fetal wounds heal with a regenerative phenotype that is indistinguishable from surrounding skin with restored skin integrity. Compared to this benchmark, all postnatal wound healing is impaired and characterized by scar formation. The biologic basis of the fetal regenerative phenotype can serve as a roadmap to recapitulating regenerative repair in adult wounds. Reduced leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated, in part, through changes in the chemokine milieu, is a fundamental feature of fetal wound healing. Recent Advances: The contributions of chemokines to wound healing are a topic of active investigation. Recent discoveries have opened the possibility of targeting chemokines therapeutically to treat disease processes and improve healing capability, including the possibility of achieving a scarless phenotype in postnatal wounds. Critical Issues: Successful wound healing is a complex process, in which there is a significant interplay between multiple cell types, signaling molecules, growth factors, and extracellular matrix. Chemokines play a crucial role in this interplay and have been shown to have different effects in various stages of the healing process. Understanding how these chemokines are locally produced and regulated during wound healing and how the chemokine milieu differs in fetal versus postnatal wounds may help us identify ways in which we can target chemokine pathways. Future Directions: Further studies on the role of chemokines and their role in the healing process will greatly advance the potential for using these molecules as therapeutic targets. PMID:26543680

  15. Neonatal chemokine levels and risk of autism spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna; Grove, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    A potential role of chemokines in the pathophysiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) has been previously suggested. In a recent study we examined levels of three inflammatory chemokines (MCP-1, MIP-1a and RANTES) in samples of amniotic fluid of children diagnosed later in life with ASD...

  16. Viral chemokine-modulatory proteins : tools and targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomker, JM; de Leij, LFMH; The, TH; Harmsen, MC

    The chemokine network is an extensive system that regulates many immune functions such as leukocyte locomotion, T cell differentiation, angiogenesis and mast cell degranulation. Tight control of chemokines is vital for proper immune function. Not surprisingly, viruses have found ways to subvert or

  17. Anti-chemokine small molecule drugs: a promising future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proudfoot, Amanda E I; Power, Christine A; Schwarz, Matthias K

    2010-03-01

    Chemokines have principally been associated with inflammation due to their role in the control of leukocyte migration, but just over a decade ago chemokine receptors were also identified as playing a pivotal role in the entry of the HIV virus into cells. Chemokines activate seven transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors, making them extremely attractive therapeutic targets for the pharmaceutical industry. Although there are now a large number of molecules targeting chemokines and chemokine receptors including neutralizing antibodies in clinical trials for inflammatory diseases, the results to date have not always been positive, which has been disappointing for the field. These failures have often been attributed to redundancy in the chemokine system. However, other difficulties have been encountered in drug discovery processes targeting the chemokine system, and these will be addressed in this review. In this review, the reader will get an insight into the hurdles that have to be overcome, learn about some of the pitfalls that may explain the lack of success, and get a glimpse of the outlook for the future. In 2007, the FDA approved maraviroc, an inhibitor of CCR5 for the prevention of HIV infection, the first triumph for a small-molecule drug acting on the chemokine system. The time to market, 11 years from discovery of CCR5, was fast by industry standards. A second small-molecule drug, a CXCR4 antagonist for hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, was approved by the FDA at the end of 2008. The results of a Phase III trial with a CCR9 inhibitor for Crohn's disease are also promising. This could herald the first success for a chemokine receptor antagonist as an anti-inflammatory therapeutic and confirms the importance of chemokine receptors as a target class for anti-inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  18. IFN-gamma-induced chemokines synergize with pertussis toxin to promote T cell entry to the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Caruso, Maria; Campbell, Iain L

    2007-01-01

    was predominantly localized to meningeal and ependymal cells, and was also seen in astrocytes and microglia. IFN-gamma-induced chemokine expression did not lead to inflammation. However, when pertussis toxin was given i.p. to mice infected with the IFN-gamma vector, there was a dramatic increase in the number of T...... lymphocytes detected in the CNS by flow cytometry. This increase in blood-derived immune cells in the CNS did not occur with pertussis toxin alone, and did not manifest as histologically detectable inflammatory pathology. These results show that IFN-gamma induces a characteristic glial chemokine response...

  19. Chemokines CXCL10 and CCL2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke; Sellebjerg, F; Jensen, C V

    2001-01-01

    leukocyte count, the CSF concentration of neopterin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, and intrathecal IgG and IgM synthesis. The concentration of CCL2 increased between baseline for 3 weeks in both groups, more distinctly so in patients treated with methylprednisolone. CCL2 correlated negatively with MMP-9...... patients in relapse, whilst levels of CCL2 (MCP-1) were reduced. Here, we report a serial analysis of CSF CXCL10 and CCL2 concentrations in 22 patients with attacks of MS or acute optic neuritis (ON) treated with methylprednisolone, and 26 patients treated with placebo in two randomized controlled trials....... Chemokine concentrations were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in CSF obtained at baseline and after 3 weeks, and were compared with other measures of intrathecal inflammation. At baseline CSF concentrations of CCL2 were significantly lower in the patient group than in controls...

  20. Novel Chemokine-Based Immunotoxins for Potent and Selective Targeting of Cytomegalovirus Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Spiess

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotoxins as antiviral therapeutics are largely unexplored but have promising prospective due to their high selectivity potential and their unparalleled efficiency. One recent example targeted the virus-encoded G protein-coupled receptor US28 as a strategy for specific and efficient treatment of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections. US28 is expressed on virus-infected cells and scavenge chemokines by rapid internalization. The chemokine-based fusion-toxin protein (FTP consisted of a variant (F49A of CX3CL1 specifically targeting US28 linked to the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE. Here, we systematically seek to improve F49A-FTP by modifications in its three structural domains; we generated variants with (1 altered chemokine sequence (K14A, F49L, and F49E, (2 shortened and elongated linker region, and (3 modified toxin domain. Only F49L-FTP displayed higher selectivity in its binding to US28 versus CX3CR1, the endogenous receptor for CX3CL1, but this was not matched by a more selective killing of US28-expressing cells. A longer linker and different toxin variants decreased US28 affinity and selective killing. Thereby, F49A-FTP represents the best candidate for HCMV treatment. Many viruses encode internalizing receptors suggesting that not only HCMV but also, for instance, Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus may be targeted by FTPs.

  1. The chemokine receptor CCR5 Δ32 allele in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Søndergaard, H B; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The chemokine receptor CCR5 may be important for the recruitment of pathogenic T cells to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that this chemokine receptor might still be important for T-cell migration during treatment with anti-very late antigen (VLA)-4 antibody. We...... therefore analysed whether natalizumab-treated MS patients carrying the CCR5 Δ32 deletion allele, which results in reduced expression of CCR5 on the cell surface, had lower disease activity. METHODS: CCR5 Δ32 was analysed in 212 natalizumab-treated MS patients. RESULTS: CCR5 Δ32 status had no significant...... impact on the frequency of relapses 1 year prior to natalizumab treatment or during the first 48 weeks of treatment. The multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) was significantly lower at baseline in patients carrying CCR5 Δ32 (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: CCR5 Δ32 is not associated with lower disease...

  2. Chemokines fail to up-regulate beta 1 integrin-dependent adhesion in human Th2 T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clissi, B; D'Ambrosio, D; Geginat, J; Colantonio, L; Morrot, A; Freshney, N W; Downward, J; Sinigaglia, F; Pardi, R

    2000-03-15

    Th1 and Th2 cells are functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T lymphocytes whose tissue-specific homing to sites of inflammation is regulated in part by the differential expression of P- and E-selectin ligands and selected chemokine receptors. Here we investigated the expression and function of beta 1 integrins in Th1 and Th2 cells polarized in vitro. Th1 lymphocytes adhere transiently to the extracellular matrix ligands laminin 1 and fibronectin in response to chemokines such as RANTES and stromal cell-derived factor-1, and this process is paralleled by the activation of the Rac1 GTPase and by a rapid burst of actin polymerization. Selective inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase prevent efficiently all of the above processes, whereas the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide prevents chemokine-induced adhesion without affecting Rac1 activation and actin polymerization. Notably, chemokine-induced adhesion to beta 1 integrin ligands is markedly reduced in Th2 cells. Such a defect cannot be explained by a reduced sensitivity to chemokine stimulation in this T cell subset, nor by a defective activation of the signaling cascade involving phosphoinositide-3 kinase, Rac1, and actin turnover, as all these processes are activated at comparable levels by chemokines in the two subsets. We propose that reduced beta 1 integrin-mediated adhesion in Th2 cells may restrain their ability to invade and/or reside in sites of chronic inflammation, which are characterized by thickening of basement membranes and extensive fibrosis, requiring efficient interaction with organized extracellular matrices.

  3. Tissue-specific regulation of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines in keratinocytes: Implications for oral inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Marshall

    Full Text Available The IFN-γ-inducible chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 play a key role in many inflammatory conditions, particularly those mediated by T cells. Therefore, the production of these chemokines in peripheral tissues could be instrumental in the pathophysiology of tissue-specific immunological diseases such as oral lichen planus (OLP. In the present study, we assessed the production of keratinocyte-derived CXCL9/10/11 under basal and inflammatory conditions and investigated whether these chemokines were involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. We used semi-quantitative PCR, ELISA, chemotaxis assays, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS to assess the expression and functional role of CXCL9/10/11 in oral keratinocytes (three strains of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK, and the H357 oral cancer cell line in the presence or absence of IFN-γ. CXCL9/10/11 were also assessed in tissues from normal patients and those with oral lichen planus (OLP. The time course study in oral keratinocytes treated with IFN-γ showed that expression of CXCL9/10/11 chemokines was significantly enhanced by IFN-γ in a time-dependent manner. In particular, CXCL10, a prominent chemokine that was overexpressed by IFN-γ-stimulated NHOK, was able to effectively recruit CD4 lymphocytes, mainly CD4+CD45RA- cells. Significantly higher levels of CXCL9/10/11 were found in tissues from patients with OLP compared to normal oral mucosa. Taken together, the results demonstrate that normal oral keratinocytes produce chemotactic molecules that mediate T cell recruitment. This study furthers understanding of chemokine production in oral keratinocytes and their role in the pathophysiology of oral mucosa, with particular relevance to OLP.

  4. Impaired chemokine-induced migration during T-cell development in the absence of Jak 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldevila, Gloria; Licona, Ileana; Salgado, Alfonso; Ramírez, Marcela; Chávez, Ramsés; García-Zepeda, Eduardo

    2004-06-01

    The arrival of bone marrow T-cell progenitors to the thymus, and the directed migration of thymocytes, are thought to be regulated by the expression of chemokines and their receptors. Recent data has shown that the Jak/Stat signalling pathway is involved in chemokine receptor signalling. We have investigated the role of Jak 3 in chemokine-mediated signalling in the thymus using Jak 3(-/-) mice. These mice show defects in T-cell development, as well as in peripheral T-cell function, resulting in a hypoplastic thymus and an altered T-cell homeostasis. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that bone marrow progenitors and thymocytes from Jak 3(-/-) mice have decreased chemotactic responses to CXCL12 and CCL25. We also show that Jak 3 is involved in signalling through CCR9 and CXCR4, and that specific inhibition of Jak 3 in wild-type progenitors and thymocytes decreases their chemotactic responses towards CCL25 and CXCL12. Finally, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that thymocytes from Jak 3(-/-) mice express similar levels of CXCR4 and CCR9 compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, deficient CCL25- and CXCL12-induced migration could result in a homing defect of T-cell progenitors to the thymus, as well as in a deficient thymocyte migration through the thymic stroma. Our results strongly suggest that the absence of Jak 3 affects T-cell development, not only through an impaired interleukin-7 receptor (IL-7R)-mediated signalling, but also through impaired chemokine-mediated responses, which are crucial for thymocyte migration and differentiation.

  5. Chemokine-mediated distribution of dendritic cell subsets in renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Werner

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents one of the most immunoresponsive cancers. Antigen-specific vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs in patients with metastatic RCC has been shown to induce cytotoxic T-cell responses associated with objective clinical responses. Thus, clinical trials utilizing DCs for immunotherapy of advanced RCCs appear to be promising; however, detailed analyses concerning the distribution and function of DC subsets in RCCs are lacking. Methods We characterized the distribution of the different immature and mature myeloid DC subsets in RCC tumour tissue and the corresponding normal kidney tissues. In further analyses, the expression of various chemokines and chemokine receptors controlling the migration of DC subsets was investigated. Results The highest numbers of immature CD1a+ DCs were found within RCC tumour tissue. In contrast, the accumulation of mature CD83+/DC-LAMP+ DCs were restricted to the invasive margin of the RCCs. The mature DCs formed clusters with proliferating T-cells. Furthermore, a close association was observed between MIP-3α-producing tumour cells and immature CCR6+ DC recruitment to the tumour bed. Conversely, MIP-3β and SLC expression was only detected at the tumour border, where CCR7-expressing T-cells and mature DCs formed clusters. Conclusion Increased numbers of immature DCs were observed within the tumour tissue of RCCs, whereas mature DCs were found in increased numbers at the tumour margin. Our results strongly implicate that the distribution of DC subsets is controlled by local lymphoid chemokine expression. Thus, increased expression of MIP-3α favours recruitment of immature DCs to the tumour bed, whereas de novo local expression of SLC and MIP-3β induces accumulation of mature DCs at the tumour margin forming clusters with proliferating T-cells reflecting a local anti-tumour immune response.

  6. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2014-05-02

    Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Structure of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 with a Potent Chemokine Antagonist Reveals Mechanisms of Chemokine Recognition and Molecular Mimicry by HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yi; Han, Gye Won; Abagyan, Ruben; Wu, Beili; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M. (USC); (Chinese Aca. Sci.); (UCSD)

    2017-06-01

    CCR5 is the primary chemokine receptor utilized by HIV to infect leukocytes, whereas CCR5 ligands inhibit infection by blocking CCR5 engagement with HIV gp120. To guide the design of improved therapeutics, we solved the structure of CCR5 in complex with chemokine antagonist [5P7]CCL5. Several structural features appeared to contribute to the anti-HIV potency of [5P7]CCL5, including the distinct chemokine orientation relative to the receptor, the near-complete occupancy of the receptor binding pocket, the dense network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the similarity of binding determinants with the FDA-approved HIV inhibitor Maraviroc. Molecular modeling indicated that HIV gp120 mimicked the chemokine interaction with CCR5, providing an explanation for the ability of CCR5 to recognize diverse ligands and gp120 variants. Our findings reveal that structural plasticity facilitates receptor-chemokine specificity and enables exploitation by HIV, and provide insight into the design of small molecule and protein inhibitors for HIV and other CCR5-mediated diseases.

  8. Structure of CC Chemokine Receptor 5 with a Potent Chemokine Antagonist Reveals Mechanisms of Chemokine Recognition and Molecular Mimicry by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Han, Gye Won; Abagyan, Ruben; Wu, Beili; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M

    2017-06-20

    CCR5 is the primary chemokine receptor utilized by HIV to infect leukocytes, whereas CCR5 ligands inhibit infection by blocking CCR5 engagement with HIV gp120. To guide the design of improved therapeutics, we solved the structure of CCR5 in complex with chemokine antagonist [5P7]CCL5. Several structural features appeared to contribute to the anti-HIV potency of [5P7]CCL5, including the distinct chemokine orientation relative to the receptor, the near-complete occupancy of the receptor binding pocket, the dense network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, and the similarity of binding determinants with the FDA-approved HIV inhibitor Maraviroc. Molecular modeling indicated that HIV gp120 mimicked the chemokine interaction with CCR5, providing an explanation for the ability of CCR5 to recognize diverse ligands and gp120 variants. Our findings reveal that structural plasticity facilitates receptor-chemokine specificity and enables exploitation by HIV, and provide insight into the design of small molecule and protein inhibitors for HIV and other CCR5-mediated diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The chemokine CXCL16 and its receptor, CXCR6, as markers and promoters of inflammation-associated cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merav Darash-Yahana

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical observations and mouse models have suggested that inflammation can be pro-tumorigenic. Since chemokines are critical in leukocyte trafficking, we hypothesized that chemokines play essential roles in inflammation-associated cancers. Screening for 37 chemokines in prostate cancer cell lines and xenografts revealed CXCL16, the ligand for the receptor CXCR6, as the most consistently expressed chemokine. Immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence and confocal imaging of 121 human prostate specimens showed that CXCL16 and CXCR6 were co-expressed, both on prostate cancer cells and adjacent T cells. Expression levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 on cancer cells correlated with poor prognostic features including high-stage and high-grade, and expression also correlated with post-inflammatory changes in the cancer stroma as revealed by loss of alpha-smooth muscle actin. Moreover, CXCL16 enhanced the growth of CXCR6-expressing cancer and primary CD4 T cells. We studied expression of CXCL16 in an additional 461 specimens covering 12 tumor types, and found that CXCL16 was expressed in multiple human cancers associated with inflammation. Our study is the first to describe the expression of CXCL16/CXCR6 on both cancer cells and adjacent T cells in humans, and to demonstrate correlations between CXCL16 and CXCR6 vs. poor both prognostic features and reactive changes in cancer stoma. Taken together, our data suggest that CXCL16 and CXCR6 may mark cancers arising in an inflammatory milieu and mediate pro-tumorigenic effects of inflammation through direct effects on cancer cell growth and by inducing the migration and proliferation of tumor-associated leukocytes.

  10. Fractalkine receptor chemokine (CX3CR1) influences on cervical and lumbar disc herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, In-Soo; Suh, Dong-Whan; Park, Sung-Ryeoll; Ha, Kee-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Herniation of nuclear or disc material along with, inflammatory chemokines such as prostaglandin E2, interleukin-6, matrix metalloproteinase and nitric oxide has definite correlation, possibly they are over produced. CX3CL1 and its receptor (CX3CR1) are part of chemokine system involved in leukocyte recruitment and adhesion in chronic inflammatory disease, but its role in spinal herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is unknown. We evaluated the expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in patients with disc herniation to clarify the role of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in the disc degeneration and to compare between cervical and lumbar HNP. Materials and Methods: The mRNA concentrations of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine were analyzed in the surgically obtained disc specimens from C-HNP (n = 13) and L-HNP (n = 13) by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The localization of CX3CL1/CX3CR1 chemokine in the disc of C-HNP and L-HNP patients was determined using immunohistochemical study. Blood samples from patients with C-HNP and L-HNP patients were stained for CX3CR1 with flow cytometric analysis. Results: The CX3CL1 positive cell ratio in the discs was observed in both groups by immunohistochemical study. CX3CR1 was strongly expressed on endothelial cells in C-spine disc, but sparely expressed in L-spine disc. There was greater CX3CR1 mRNA expression in C-HNP patients than in L-HNP patients as quantified by reversal transcription-PCR (P = 0.010). CX3CR1 positive cell frequencies and CX3CR1 expression levels were increased in CD4 (+) T-cells and natural killer (NK) cells from patients with C-HNP (P = 0.210 and P = 0.040). Conclusions: This study identified that increases in CX3CL1 and CX3CR1-expressing cells are significantly related to pathomechanism of HNP for the first time. Especially, CD4 (+) T-cells and NK cells expressing CX3CR1 may play an important role in developing C-HNP. PMID:26015616

  11. Chemokine Signaling during Midline Epithelial Seam Disintegration Facilitates Palatal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan M. Suttorp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Disintegration of the midline epithelial seam (MES is crucial for palatal fusion, and failure results in cleft palate. Palatal fusion and wound repair share many common signaling pathways related to epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk. We postulate that chemokine CXCL11, its receptor CXCR3, and the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO, which are crucial during wound repair, also play a decisive role in MES disintegration. Fetal growth restriction and craniofacial abnormalities were present in HO-2 knockout (KO mice without effects on palatal fusion. CXCL11 and CXCR3 were highly expressed in the disintegrating MES in both wild-type and HO-2 KO animals. Multiple apoptotic DNA fragments were present within the disintegrating MES and phagocytized by recruited CXCR3-positive wt and HO-2 KO macrophages. Macrophages located near the MES were HO-1-positive, and more HO-1-positive cells were present in HO-2 KO mice compared to wild-type. This study of embryonic and palatal development provided evidence that supports the hypothesis that the MES itself plays a prominent role in palatal fusion by orchestrating epithelial apoptosis and macrophage recruitment via CXCL11-CXCR3 signaling.

  12. Evasin-displaying lactic acid bacteria bind different chemokines and neutralize CXCL8 production in Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlec, Katja; Pucer Janež, Anja; Rogelj, Boris; Štrukelj, Borut; Berlec, Aleš

    2017-11-01

    Chemokines are key signals in the immune system and play an important role as proinflammatory mediators in the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer, making them an important target for therapy. Recombinant lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were engineered to bind CC and CXC chemokines by displaying chemokine-binding proteins evasin-1, evasin-3 and evasin-4 on their surface. Evasin genes were cloned into lactococcal surface display vector and overexpressed in L. lactis NZ9000 and NZ9000ΔhtrA in fusion with secretion signal and surface anchor. Evasin-displaying bacteria removed from 15% to 90% of 11 different chemokines from the solution as determined with ELISA and Luminex multiplexing assays, whereby L. lactis NZ9000ΔhtrA proved more efficient. Lactobacillus salivarius ATCC 11741 was coated with L. . lactis-expressed evasin fusion protein, and its ability to bind chemokines was also confirmed. Evasin-3-displaying L. lactis removed 76.0% of IL-1β-induced CXCL8 from the supernatant of Caco-2 epithelial cells. It also prevented secretion of CXCL8 from Caco-2 cells in a time-dependent manner when added before induction with IL-1β. Evasin-displaying LAB have the ability to bind multiple chemokines simultaneously and exert synergistic activity. This innovative treatment approach therefore has the potential for mucosal therapy of inflammatory bowel disease or colorectal cancer. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Optogenetic control of chemokine receptor signal and T-cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuexin; Hyun, Young-Min; Lim, Kihong; Lee, Hyunwook; Cummings, Ryan J.; Gerber, Scott A.; Bae, Seyeon; Cho, Thomas Yoonsang; Lord, Edith M.; Kim, Minsoo

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of ex vivo-generated immune-promoting or tolerogenic T cells to either enhance immunity or promote tolerance in patients has been used with some success. However, effective trafficking of the transferred cells to the target tissue sites is the main barrier to achieving successful clinical outcomes. Here we developed a strategy for optically controlling T-cell trafficking using a photoactivatable (PA) chemokine receptor. Photoactivatable-chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 4 (PA-CXCR4) transmitted intracellular CXCR4 signals in response to 505-nm light. Localized activation of PA-CXCR4 induced T-cell polarization and directional migration (phototaxis) both in vitro and in vivo. Directing light onto the melanoma was sufficient to recruit PA-CXCR4–expressing tumor-targeting cytotoxic T cells and improved the efficacy of adoptive T-cell transfer immunotherapy, with a significant reduction in tumor growth in mice. These findings suggest that the use of photoactivatable chemokine receptors allows remotely controlled leukocyte trafficking with outstanding spatial resolution in tissues and may be feasible in other cell transfer therapies. PMID:24733886

  14. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15 1-0252 TITLE: Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...14 Jul 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Center for Substance Abuse Research Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University 3500 N, Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19140 AND ADDRESS(ES) 8

  15. Chemokine regulation in response to beryllium exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Pardington, Paige E.; Cary, Robert B.; Sauer, Nancy N.; Gupta, Goutam

    2006-01-01

    Exposure to beryllium (Be) induces a delayed-type hypersensitivity immune reaction in the lungs of susceptible individuals, which leads to the onset of Be sensitivity and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Although some mechanistic aspects of CBD have begun to be characterized, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Be activates the host immune response. To gain insight into the cellular response to Be exposure, we have performed global microarray analysis using a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells (PBMC/DCs) from a non-CBD source to identify genes that are specifically upregulated in response to BeSO 4 stimulation, compared to a control metal salt, Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 . We identified a number of upregulated immunomodulatory genes, including several chemokines in the MIP-1 and GRO families. Using PBMC/DCs from three different donors, we demonstrate that BeSO 4 stimulation generally exhibits an increased rate of both chemokine mRNA transcription and release compared to Al 2 (SO 4 ) 3 exposure, although variations among the individual donors do exist. We show that MIP-1α and MIP-1β neutralizing antibodies can partially inhibit the ability of BeSO 4 to stimulate cell migration of PBMC/DCs in vitro. Finally, incubation of PBMC/DCs with BeSO 4 altered the binding of the transcription factor RUNX to the MIP-1α promoter consensus sequence, indicating that Be can regulate chemokine gene activation. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which Be stimulation of PBMC/DCs can modulate the expression and release of different chemokines, leading to the migration of lymphocytes to the lung and the formation of a localized environment for development of Be disease in susceptible individuals

  16. Chemokine regulation in response to beryllium exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-Geller, Elizabeth; Pardington, Paige E; Cary, Robert B; Sauer, Nancy N; Gupta, Goutam

    2006-02-01

    Exposure to beryllium (Be) induces a delayed-type hypersensitivity immune reaction in the lungs of susceptible individuals, which leads to the onset of Be sensitivity and Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Although some mechanistic aspects of CBD have begun to be characterized, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Be activates the host immune response. To gain insight into the cellular response to Be exposure, we have performed global microarray analysis using a mixture of peripheral blood mononuclear and dendritic cells (PBMC/DCs) from a non-CBD source to identify genes that are specifically upregulated in response to BeSO(4) stimulation, compared to a control metal salt, Al(2)(SO(4))(3). We identified a number of upregulated immunomodulatory genes, including several chemokines in the MIP-1 and GRO families. Using PBMC/DCs from three different donors, we demonstrate that BeSO(4) stimulation generally exhibits an increased rate of both chemokine mRNA transcription and release compared to Al(2)(SO(4))(3) exposure, although variations among the individual donors do exist. We show that MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta neutralizing antibodies can partially inhibit the ability of BeSO(4) to stimulate cell migration of PBMC/DCs in vitro. Finally, incubation of PBMC/DCs with BeSO(4) altered the binding of the transcription factor RUNX to the MIP-1 alpha promoter consensus sequence, indicating that Be can regulate chemokine gene activation. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which Be stimulation of PBMC/DCs can modulate the expression and release of different chemokines, leading to the migration of lymphocytes to the lung and the formation of a localized environment for development of Be disease in susceptible individuals.

  17. The DRF motif of CXCR6 as chemokine receptor adaptation to adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Koenen

    Full Text Available The CXC-chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6 is a class A GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs that mediates adhesion of leukocytes by interacting with the transmembrane cell surface-expressed chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16, and also regulates leukocyte migration by interacting with the soluble shed variant of CXCL16. In contrast to virtually all other chemokine receptors with chemotactic activity, CXCR6 carries a DRF motif instead of the typical DRY motif as a key element in receptor activation and G protein coupling. In this work, modeling analyses revealed that the phenylalanine F3.51 in CXCR6 might have impact on intramolecular interactions including hydrogen bonds by this possibly changing receptor function. Initial investigations with embryonic kidney HEK293 cells and further studies with monocytic THP-1 cells showed that mutation of DRF into DRY does not influence ligand binding, receptor internalization, receptor recycling, and protein kinase B (AKT signaling. Adhesion was slightly decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, CXCL16-induced calcium signaling and migration were increased. Vice versa, when the DRY motif of the related receptor CX3CR1 was mutated into DRF the migratory response towards CX3CL1 was diminished, indicating that the presence of a DRF motif generally impairs chemotaxis in chemokine receptors. Transmembrane and soluble CXCL16 play divergent roles in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, which can be beneficial or detrimental. Therefore, the DRF motif of CXCR6 may display a receptor adaptation allowing adhesion and cell retention by transmembrane CXCL16 but reducing the chemotactic response to soluble CXCL16. This adaptation may avoid permanent or uncontrolled recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as cancer metastasis.

  18. (+)-Nootkatone inhibits tumor necrosis factor α/interferon γ-induced production of chemokines in HaCaT cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeon-Jae; Lee, Jin-Hwee [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yi-Sook, E-mail: yisjung@ajou.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression in HaCaT cells. • PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB mediate TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC and MDC expression. • (+)-Nootkatone inhibits TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of PKCζ, p38 MAPK, or NF-κB. • (+)-Nootkatone suppresses chemokine expression by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 pathways. - Abstract: Chemokines are important mediators of cell migration, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17) and macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22) are well-known typical inflammatory chemokines involved in atopic dermatitis (AD). (+)-Nootkatone is the major component of Cyperus rotundus. (+)-Nootkatone has antiallergic, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of (+)-nootkatone on tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α)/interferon γ (IFN-γ)-induced expression of Th2 chemokines in HaCaT cells. We found that (+)-nootkatone inhibited the TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced expression of TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 mRNA in HaCaT cells. It also significantly inhibited TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase Cζ (PKCζ). Furthermore, we showed that PKCζ and p38 MAPK contributed to the inhibition of TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression by blocking IκBα degradation in HaCaT cells. Taken together, these results suggest that (+)-nootkatone may suppress TNF-α/IFN-γ-induced TARC/CCL17 and MDC/CCL22 expression in HaCaT cells by inhibiting of PKCζ and p38 MAPK signaling pathways that lead to activation of NF-κB. We propose that (+)-nootkatone may be a useful therapeutic candidate for inflammatory skin diseases such as AD.

  19. Inulae Flos and Its Compounds Inhibit TNF-α- and IFN-γ-Induced Chemokine Production in HaCaT Human Keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Hoon Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is to investigate which kinds of solvent extracts of Inulae Flos inhibit the chemokine productions in HaCaT cell and whether the inhibitory capacity of Inulae Flos is related with constitutional compounds. The 70% methanol extract showed comparatively higher inhibition of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC/CCL17 in HaCaT cells, therefore this extract was further partitioned with n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, butanol, and water. The ethyl acetate fraction inhibited TARC, macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC/CCL22, and regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES/CCL5 production in HaCaT cells better than the other fractions. The compounds of Inulae Flos, such as 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and luteolin, inhibited TARC, MDC, and RANTES production in HaCaT cells. 1,5-Dicaffeoylquinic acid was contained at the highest concentrations both in the 70% methanol extract and ethyl acetate fraction and inhibited the secretion of chemokines dose-dependently more than the other compounds. Luteolin also represented dose-dependent inhibition on chemokine productions although it was contained at lower levels in 70% methanol extract and solvent fractions. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of Inulae Flos on chemokine production in HaCaT cell could be related with constituent compounds contained, especially 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and luteolin.

  20. Binding of lymphoid chemokines to collagen IV that accumulates in the basal lamina of high endothelial venules: its implications in lymphocyte trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo-Gie; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Jang, Myoung Ho; Bai, Zhongbin; Hayasaka, Haruko; Miyasaka, Masayuki

    2007-10-01

    Certain lymphoid chemokines are selectively and constitutively expressed in the high endothelial venules (HEV) of lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, where they play critical roles in the directional migration of extravasating lymphocytes into the lymphoid tissue parenchyma. How these chemokines are selectively localized and act in situ, however, remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the possibility that basal lamina-associated extracellular matrix proteins in the HEVs are responsible for retaining the lymphoid chemokines locally. Here we show that collagen IV (Col IV) bound certain lymphoid chemokines, including CCL21, CXCL13, and CXCL12, more potently than did fibronectin or laminin-1, but it bound CCL19 and CCL5 only weakly, if at all. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that Col IV bound CCL21 with a low nanomolar K(D), which required the C-terminal region of CCL21. Col IV can apparently hold these chemokines in their active form upon binding, because the Col IV-bound chemokines induced lymphocyte migration efficiently in vitro. We found by immunohistochemistry that Col IV and CCL21, CXCL13, and CXCL12 were colocalized in the basal lamina of HEVs. When injected s.c. into plt/plt mice, CCL21 colocalized at least partially with Col IV on the basal lamina of HEVs in draining lymph nodes. Collectively, our results suggest that Col IV contributes to the creation of a lymphoid chemokine-rich environment in the basal lamina of HEVs by binding an array of locally produced lymphoid chemokines that promote directional lymphocyte trafficking from HEVs into the lymphoid tissue parenchyma.

  1. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Arterial-venous network formation during brain vascularization involves hemodynamic regulation of chemokine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Jeroen; Wolfe, Scot A; Siekmann, Arndt F

    2011-05-01

    During angiogenic sprouting, newly forming blood vessels need to connect to the existing vasculature in order to establish a functional circulatory loop. Previous studies have implicated genetic pathways, such as VEGF and Notch signaling, in controlling angiogenesis. We show here that both pathways similarly act during vascularization of the zebrafish central nervous system. In addition, we find that chemokine signaling specifically controls arterial-venous network formation in the brain. Zebrafish mutants for the chemokine receptor cxcr4a or its ligand cxcl12b establish a decreased number of arterial-venous connections, leading to the formation of an unperfused and interconnected blood vessel network. We further find that expression of cxcr4a in newly forming brain capillaries is negatively regulated by blood flow. Accordingly, unperfused vessels continue to express cxcr4a, whereas connection of these vessels to the arterial circulation leads to rapid downregulation of cxcr4a expression and loss of angiogenic characteristics in endothelial cells, such as filopodia formation. Together, our findings indicate that hemodynamics, in addition to genetic pathways, influence vascular morphogenesis by regulating the expression of a proangiogenic factor that is necessary for the correct pathfinding of sprouting brain capillaries.

  3. Therapeutic T cells induce tumor-directed chemotaxis of innate immune cells through tumor-specific secretion of chemokines and stimulation of B16BL6 melanoma to secrete chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which tumor-specific T cells induce regression of established metastases are not fully characterized. In using the poorly immunogenic B16BL6-D5 (D5 melanoma model we reported that T cell-mediated tumor regression can occur independently of perforin, IFN-γ or the combination of both. Characterization of regressing pulmonary metastases identified macrophages as a major component of the cells infiltrating the tumor after adoptive transfer of effector T cells. This led us to hypothesize that macrophages played a central role in tumor regression following T-cell transfer. Here, we sought to determine the factors responsible for the infiltration of macrophages at the tumor site. Methods These studies used the poorly immunogenic D5 melanoma model. Tumor-specific effector T cells, generated from tumor vaccine-draining lymph nodes (TVDLN, were used for adoptive immunotherapy and in vitro analysis of chemokine expression. Cellular infiltrates into pulmonary metastases were determined by immunohistochemistry. Chemokine expression by the D5 melanoma following co-culture with T cells, IFN-γ or TNF-α was determined by RT-PCR and ELISA. Functional activity of chemokines was confirmed using a macrophage migration assay. T cell activation of macrophages to release nitric oxide (NO was determined using GRIES reagent. Results We observed that tumor-specific T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile also expressed message for and secreted RANTES, MIP-1α and MIP-1β following stimulation with specific tumor. Unexpectedly, D5 melanoma cells cultured with IFN-γ or TNF-α, two type 1 cytokines expressed by therapeutic T cells, secreted Keratinocyte Chemoattractant (KC, MCP-1, IP-10 and RANTES and expressed mRNA for MIG. The chemokines released by T cells and cytokine-stimulated tumor cells were functional and induced migration of the DJ2PM macrophage cell line. Additionally, tumor-specific stimulation of wt or perforin

  4. Truncation of CXCL12 by CD26 reduces its CXC chemokine receptor 4- and atypical chemokine receptor 3-dependent activity on endothelial cells and lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Rik; Mortier, Anneleen; Boff, Daiane

    2017-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 or stromal cell-derived factor 1/SDF-1 attracts hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature leukocytes through the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). In addition, it interacts with atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3 or CXCR7) and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12 ac...

  5. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice deficient in either the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha or its CCR5 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Kuziel, W A; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha is a chemokine that is associated with Th1 cytokine responses. Expression and antibody blocking studies have implicated MIP-1alpha in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We examined the role of MIP-1alpha......-type mice in Th1 cytokine gene expression, the kinetics and severity of disease, and infiltration of the central nervous system by lymphocytes, macrophages and granulocytes. RNase protection assays showed comparable accumulation of mRNA for the chemokines interferon-inducible protein-10, RANTES, macrophage...

  6. Antimycotics suppress the Malassezia extract-induced production of CXC chemokine ligand 10 in human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Carren S; Kanda, Naoko; Makimura, Koichi; Watanabe, Shinichi

    2014-02-01

    Malassezia, a lipophilic yeast, exacerbates atopic dermatitis. Malassezia products can penetrate the disintegrated stratum corneum and encounter subcorneal keratinocytes in the skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Type 1 helper T (Th1) cells infiltrate chronic lesions with atopic dermatitis, and antimycotic agents improve its symptoms. We aimed to identify Malassezia-induced chemokines in keratinocytes and examine whether antimycotics suppressed this induction. Normal human keratinocytes were incubated with a Malassezia restricta extract and antimycotics. Chemokine expression was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)1 activity was examined by luciferase assays. The tyrosine-phosphorylation of STAT1 was analyzed by western blotting. The M. restricta extract increased the mRNA and protein expression of Th1-attracting CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL)10 and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation in keratinocytes, which was suppressed by a Janus kinase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine suppressed M. restricta extract-induced CXCL10 mRNA and protein expression and STAT1 activity and phosphorylation. These effects were similarly induced by 15-deoxy-Δ-(12,14) -prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2 ), a prostaglandin D2 metabolite. Antimycotics increased the release of 15d-PGJ2 from keratinocytes. The antimycotic-induced suppression of CXCL10 production and STAT1 activity was counteracted by a lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase inhibitor. The antimycotics itraconazole, ketoconazole, luliconazole, terbinafine, butenafine and amorolfine may suppress the M. restricta-induced production of CXCL10 by inhibiting STAT1 through an increase in 15d-PGJ2 production in keratinocytes. These antimycotics may block the Th1-mediated inflammation triggered by Malassezia in the chronic phase of atopic dermatitis. © 2014

  7. 15-Lipoxygenases regulate the production of chemokines in human lung macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrial, C; Grassin-Delyle, S; Salvator, H; Brollo, M; Naline, E; Devillier, P

    2015-09-01

    15-Lipoxygenase (15-LOX) activity is associated with inflammation and immune regulation. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the expression of 15-LOX-1 and 15-LOX-2 and evaluate the enzymes' roles in the polarization of human lung macrophages (LMs) in response to LPS and Th2 cytokines (IL-4/-13). LMs were isolated from patients undergoing surgery for carcinoma. The cells were cultured with a 15-LOX inhibitor (PD146176 or ML351), a COX inhibitor (indomethacin), a 5-LOX inhibitor (MK886) or vehicle and then stimulated with LPS (10 ng · mL(-1)), IL-4 (10 ng · mL(-1)) or IL-13 (50 ng · mL(-1)) for 24 h. Levels of ALOX15 (15-LOX-1) and ALOX15B (15-LOX-2) transcripts were determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Immunoassays were used to measure levels of LPS-induced cytokines (TNF-α, CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL8 and CXCL10) and Th2 cytokine-induced chemokines (CCL13, CCL18 and CCL22) in the culture supernatant. Stimulation of LMs with LPS was associated with increased expression of ALOX15B, whereas stimulation with IL-4/IL-13 induced the expression of ALOX15. PD146176 and ML351 (10 μM) reduced the release of the chemokines induced by LPS and Th2 cytokines. The effects of these 15-LOX inhibitors were maintained in the presence of indomethacin and MK886. Furthermore, indomethacin revealed the inhibitory effect of PD146176 on TNF-α release. Inhibition of the 15-LOX pathways is involved in the down-regulation of the in vitro production of chemokines in LMs. Our results suggest that the 15-LOX pathways have a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory lung disorders and may thus constitute a potential drug target. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. Induction of Chemokine Secretion and Monocyte Migration by Human Choroidal Melanocytes in Response to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jehs, Tina; Faber, Carsten; Udsen, Maja S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine to which extent inflammatory cytokines affect chemokine secretion by primary human choroidal melanocytes (HCMs), their capacity to attract monocytes, and whether HCMs are able to influence the proliferation of activated T cells. Methods: Primary cultures of HCMs were...... established from eyes of 13 donors. Human choroidal melanocytes were stimulated with IFN-γ and TNF-α or with supernatant from activated T cells (T-cell–conditioned media [TCM]). Gene expression analysis was performed by using microarrays. Protein levels were quantified with ELISA or cytometric bead array...

  9. Structural basis of ligand interaction with atypical chemokine receptor 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Martin; Wang, Liwen; van Gils, Noortje; Stephens, Bryan S.; Zhang, Penglie; Schall, Thomas J.; Yang, Sichun; Abagyan, Ruben; Chance, Mark R.; Kufareva, Irina; Handel, Tracy M.

    2017-01-18

    Chemokines drive cell migration through their interactions with seven-transmembrane (7TM) chemokine receptors on cell surfaces. The atypical chemokine receptor 3 (ACKR3) binds chemokines CXCL11 and CXCL12 and signals exclusively through β-arrestin-mediated pathways, without activating canonical G-protein signalling. This receptor is upregulated in numerous cancers making it a potential drug target. Here we collected over 100 distinct structural probes from radiolytic footprinting, disulfide trapping, and mutagenesis to map the structures of ACKR3:CXCL12 and ACKR3:small-molecule complexes, including dynamic regions that proved unresolvable by X-ray crystallography in homologous receptors. The data are integrated with molecular modelling to produce complete and cohesive experimentally driven models that confirm and expand on the existing knowledge of the architecture of receptor:chemokine and receptor:small-molecule complexes. Additionally, we detected and characterized ligand-induced conformational changes in the transmembrane and intracellular regions of ACKR3 that elucidate fundamental structural elements of agonism in this atypical receptor.

  10. Chemokines in tuberculosis: The good, the bad and the ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Leticia; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infects about one third of the world’s population, with a majority of infected individuals exhibiting latent asymptomatic infection, while 5–10% of infected individuals progress to active pulmonary disease. Research in the past two decades has elucidated critical host immune mechanisms that mediate Mtb control. Among these, chemokines have been associated with numerous key processes that lead to Mtb containment, from recruitment of myeloid cells into the lung to activation of adaptive immunity, formation of protective granulomas and vaccine recall responses. However, imbalances in several key chemokine mediators can alter the delicate balance of cytokines and cellular responses that promote mycobacterial containment, instead precipitating terminal tissue destruction and spread of Mtb infection. In this review, we will describe recent insights in the involvement of chemokines in host responses to Mtb infection and Mtb containment (the good), chemokines contributing to inflammation during TB (the bad), and the role of chemokines in driving cavitation and lung pathology (the ugly). PMID:25444549

  11. Influence of the CCR2-V64I Polymorphism on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Coreceptor Activity and on Chemokine Receptor Function of CCR2b, CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Benhur; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Rana, Shalini; Yi, Yanji; Mellado, Mario; Frade, Jose M. R.; Martinez-A., Carlos; O’Brien, Stephen J.; Dean, Michael; Collman, Ronald G.; Doms, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are used by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in conjunction with CD4 to infect cells. In addition, some virus strains can use alternative chemokine receptors, including CCR2b and CCR3, for infection. A polymorphism in CCR2 (CCR2-V64I) is associated with a 2- to 4-year delay in the progression to AIDS. To investigate the mechanism of this protective effect, we studied the expression of CCR2b and CCR2b-V64I, their chemokine and HIV-1 coreceptor ...

  12. A Mucosal and Cutaneous Chemokine Ligand for the Lymphocyte Chemoattractant Receptor GPR15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borja Ocón

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemoattractants control lymphocyte recruitment from the blood, contributing to the systemic organization of the immune system. The G protein-linked receptor GPR15 mediates lymphocyte homing to the large intestines and skin. Here we show that the 9 kDa CC-motif containing cationic polypeptide AP57/colon-derived sushi containing domain-2 binding factor (CSBF, encoded by C10orf99 in the human and 2610528A11Rik in the mouse, functions as a chemokine ligand for GPR15 (GPR15L. GPR15L binds GPR15 and attracts GPR15-expressing T cells including lymphocytes in colon-draining lymph nodes and Vγ3+ thymic precursors of dermal epithelial T cells. Patterns of GPR15L expression by epithelial cells in adult mice and humans suggest a homeostatic role for the chemokine in lymphocyte localization to the large intestines, as well as a role in homing to the epidermis during wound healing or inflammation. GPR15L is also significantly expressed in squamous mucosa of the oral cavity and esophagus with still poorly defined regulation. Identification of the chemotactic activity of GPR15L adds to its reported antibacterial and tumor cell growth regulatory functions and suggests the potential of targeting GPR15L–GPR15 interactions for modulation of mucosal and cutaneous inflammation.

  13. Autoantibodies to Chemokines and Cytokines Participate in the Regulation of Cancer and Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Karin

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that predominant expression of key inflammatory cytokines and chemokines at autoimmune sites or tumor sites induces loss of B cells tolerance, resulting in autoantibody production against the dominant cytokine/chemokine that is largely expressed at these sites. These autoantibodies are high-affinity neutralizing antibodies. Based on animal models studies, we suggested that they participate in the regulation of cancer and autoimmunity, albeit at the level of their production cannot entirely prevent the development and progression of these diseases. We have, therefore, named this selective breakdown of tolerance as “Beneficial Autoimmunity.” Despite its beneficial outcome, this process is likely to be stochastic and not directed by a deterministic mechanism, and is likely to be associated with the dominant expression of these inflammatory mediators at sites that are partially immune privileged. A recent study conducted on autoimmune regulator-deficient patients reported that in human this type of breakdown of B cell tolerance is T cell dependent. This explains, in part, why the response is highly restricted, and includes high-affinity antibodies. The current mini-review explores this subject from different complementary perspectives. It also discusses three optional translational aspects: amplification of autoantibody production as a therapeutic approach, development of autoantibody based diagnostic tools, and the use of B cells from donors that produce these autoantibodies for the development of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies.

  14. Carnosol and Related Substances Modulate Chemokine and Cytokine Production in Macrophages and Chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Schwager

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic diterpenes present in Rosmarinus officinalis and Salvia officinalis have anti-inflammatory and chemoprotective effects. We investigated the in vitro effects of carnosol (CL, carnosic acid (CA, carnosic acid-12-methylether (CAME, 20-deoxocarnosol and abieta-8,11,13-triene-11,12,20-triol (ABTT in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells and human chondrocytes. The substances concentration-dependently reduced nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages (i.e., acute inflammation. They significantly blunted gene expression levels of iNOS, cytokines/interleukins (IL-1α, IL-6 and chemokines including CCL5/RANTES, CXCL10/IP-10. The substances modulated the expression of catabolic and anabolic genes in chondrosarcoma cell line SW1353 and in primary human chondrocytes that were stimulated by IL-1β (i.e., chronic inflammation In SW1353, catabolic genes like MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4 that contribute to cartilage erosion were down-regulated, while expression of anabolic genes including Col2A1 and aggrecan were shifted towards pre-pathophysiological homeostasis. CL had the strongest overall effect on inflammatory mediators, as well as on macrophage and chondrocyte gene expression. Conversely, CAME mainly affected catabolic gene expression, whereas ABTT had a more selectively altered interleukin and chemokine gene exprssion. CL inhibited the IL-1β induced nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65, suggesting that it primarily regulated via the NF-κB signalling pathway. Collectively, CL had the strongest effects on inflammatory mediators and chondrocyte gene expression. The data show that the phenolic diterpenes altered activity pattern of genes that regulate acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Since the substances affected catabolic and anabolic gene expression in cartilage cells in vitro, they may beneficially act on the aetiology of osteoarthritis.

  15. The chemokine Bv8/prokineticin 2 is up-regulated in inflammatory granulocytes and modulates inflammatory pain

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, Elisa; Lattanzi, Roberta; Nicotra, Annalisa; Campese, Antonio F.; Grazioli, Paola; Screpanti, Isabella; Balboni, Gianfranco; Salvadori, Severo; Sacerdote, Paola; Negri, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophil migration into injured tissues is invariably accompanied by pain. Bv8/prokineticin 2 (PK2), a chemokine characterized by a unique structural motif comprising five disulfide bonds, is highly expressed in inflamed tissues associated to infiltrating cells. Here, we demonstrate the fundamental role of granulocyte-derived PK2 (GrPK2) in initiating inflammatory pain and driving peripheral sensitization. In animal models of complete Freund's adjuvant-induced paw inflammation the developme...

  16. Similar activation of signal transduction pathways by the herpesvirus-encoded chemokine receptors US28 and ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Katherine A; Holst, Peter J; Martini, Lene

    2004-01-01

    The virally encoded chemokine receptors US28 from human cytomegalovirus and ORF74 from human herpesvirus 8 are both constitutively active. We show that both receptors constitutively activate the transcription factors nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and cAMP response element binding...... viral gene expression similarly. As ORF74 is a known inducer of neoplasia, these findings may have important implications for cytomegalovirus-associated pathogenicity....

  17. Lymphoid follicle cells in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overexpress the chemokine receptor CXCR3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G; Aksoy, Mark O; Georgy, Mary; Hershman, Richard; Ji, Rong; Li, Xiuxia; Hurford, Matthew; Solomides, Charalambos; Chatila, Wissam; Kim, Victor

    2009-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying formation of lung lymphoid follicles (LF) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are unknown. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 regulates immune responses in secondary lymphoid structures elsewhere in the body and is highly expressed by Th1 lymphocytes in the airway in COPD. Because chemokine receptors control inflammatory cell homing to inflamed tissue, we reasoned that CXCR3 may contribute to LF formation in COPD. We assessed the expression of CXCR3 and its ligands (IP-10/CXCL10, Mig/CXCL9, and ITAC/CXCL11) by LF cells in never-smokers, smokers without COPD, and subjects with COPD. CXCR3, IP-10, Mig, and ITAC expression were assessed in lung sections from 46 subjects (never-smokers, smokers without COPD [S], and subjects with COPD in GOLD stages 1-4) by immunohistochemistry. CXCR3-expressing T cells (CD8+ or CD4+) and B cells (CD20+) were topographically distributed at the follicle periphery and center, respectively. The percentage of immunohistochemically identified CXCR3+ cells increased progressively while proceeding from S through GOLD 3-4 (P < 0.01 for GOLD 3-4 vs. S). Moreover, the number of CXCR3+ follicular cells correlated inversely with FEV(1) (r = 0.60). The CXCR3 ligands IP-10 and Mig were expressed by several cell types in and around the follicle, including CD68+ dendritic cells/ macrophages, airway epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and T and B cells. These results suggest that LF form in the COPD lung by recruitment and/or retention of CXCR3-expressing T and B lymphocytes, which are attracted to the region through production of CXCR3 ligands IP-10 and Mig by lung structural and follicular cells.

  18. Rac1 mediates collapse of microvilli on chemokine-activated T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhara, Ruchika; van Hennik, Paula B.; Gignac, Michelle L.; Kruhlak, Michael J.; Hordijk, Peter L.; Delon, Jerome; Shaw, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Lymphocytes circulate in the blood and upon chemokine activation rapidly bind, where needed, to microvasculature to mediate immune surveillance. Resorption of microvilli is an early morphological alteration induced by chemokines that facilitates lymphocyte emigration. However, the antecedent

  19. IFN-gamma shapes immune invasion of the central nervous system via regulation of chemokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Prince, E N; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic interplay between cytokines and chemokines directs trafficking of leukocyte subpopulations to tissues in autoimmune inflammation. We have examined the role of IFN-gamma in directing chemokine production and leukocyte infiltration to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EA...

  20. Dual GPCR and GAG mimicry by the M3 chemokine decoy receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Fremont, Daved H. (WU-MED)

    2008-09-23

    Viruses have evolved a myriad of evasion strategies focused on undermining chemokine-mediated immune surveillance, exemplified by the mouse {gamma}-herpesvirus 68 M3 decoy receptor. Crystal structures of M3 in complex with C chemokine ligand 1/lymphotactin and CC chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 reveal that invariant chemokine features associated with G protein-coupled receptor binding are primarily recognized by the decoy C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) reconfigures to engage divergent basic residue clusters on the surface of chemokines. Favorable electrostatic forces dramatically enhance the association kinetics of chemokine binding by M3, with a primary role ascribed to acidic NTD regions that effectively mimic glycosaminoglycan interactions. Thus, M3 employs two distinct mechanisms of chemical imitation to potently sequester chemokines, thereby inhibiting chemokine receptor binding events as well as the formation of chemotactic gradients necessary for directed leukocyte trafficking.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei [Center for Sickle Cell Disease, Department of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Clouse, Kathleen A. [Division of Monoclonal Antibodies, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wahl, Larry M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [Laboratory of Cell and Development Biology, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Viral Immunology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Division of Emerging and Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  2. Induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice deficient in either the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha or its CCR5 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, E H; Kuziel, W A; Owens, T

    2000-01-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha is a chemokine that is associated with Th1 cytokine responses. Expression and antibody blocking studies have implicated MIP-1alpha in multiple sclerosis (MS) and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We examined the role of MIP-1alpha...

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM

  4. Elevated plasma chemokine CCL18/PARC in beta-thalassemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimitriou, E.; Verhoek, M.; Altun, S.; Karabatsos, F.; Moraitou, M.; Youssef, J.; Boot, R.; Sarafidou, J.; Karagiorga, M.; Aerts, H.; Michelakakis, H.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma CCL18/PARC, a member of the CC chemokine family, has been found to be several ten-fold increased in symptomatic Gaucher type I patients. Elevated plasma chitotriosidase levels are a well-known abnormality in Gaucher patients, however, its diagnostic use is limited by the frequent genetic

  5. Cytokines and Chemokines Involved in Acute Retinal Necrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, JH; de Visser, L; Rijkers, G.; Wiertz, K.; van den Ham, H.J.; van Loon, A.M.; Rothova, Aniki; Mijnes, JDF

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which cytokines and chemokines are involved in the immunopathogenesis of acute retinal necrosis (ARN), and whether cytokine profiles are associated with clinical manifestations, such as visual outcome. Methods: Serum and aqueous humor (AH) samples of 19 patients with ARN were

  6. Cytokines and chemokines involved in acute retinal necrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. De Visser (Lenneke); J.H. de Boer (Joke); G.T. Rijkers; Wiertz, K. (Karin); H.J. van den Ham; de Boer, R. (Rob); van Loon, A.M. (Anton M.); A. Rothová (Aniki); J.D.F. de Groot-Mijnes (Jolanda )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. To investigate which cytokines and chemokines are involved in the immunopatho-genesis of acute retinal necrosis (ARN), and whether cytokine profiles are associated with clinical manifestations, such as visual outcome. METHODS. Serum and aqueous humor (AH) samples of 19 patients

  7. Plasma concentration of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) is responsible for trafficking of T helper 2 lymphocytes into sites of allergic inflammation. However, its role in assessing the severity of acute asthma in children is still unclear. Objective: We sought to evaluate plasma TARC as a marker for monitoring asthma ...

  8. Development of specific cytokine and Chemokine ELISAs for Bottlenose Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlier detection of changes in the health status of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) is expected to further improve their medical care. Cytokines and chemokines are critical mediators of the cellular immune response, and studies have suggested that these molecules may serve as important bio...

  9. Andrographolide attenuates LPS-stimulated up-regulation of C-C and C-X-C motif chemokines in rodent cortex and primary astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Siew Ying; Tan, Michelle G K; Banks, William A; Wong, W S Fred; Wong, Peter T-H; Lai, Mitchell K P

    2016-02-09

    Andrographolide is the major bioactive compound isolated from Andrographis paniculata, a native South Asian herb used medicinally for its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we aimed to assess andrographolide's potential utility as an anti-neuroinflammatory therapeutic. The effects of andrographolide on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chemokine up-regulation both in mouse cortex and in cultured primary astrocytes were measured, including cytokine profiling, gene expression, and, in cultured astrocytes, activation of putative signaling regulators. Orally administered andrographolide significantly attenuated mouse cortical chemokine levels from the C-C and C-X-C subfamilies. Similarly, andrographolide abrogated a range of LPS-induced chemokines as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in astrocytes. In astrocytes, the inhibitory actions of andrographolide on chemokine and TNF-α up-regulation appeared to be mediated by nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. These results suggest that andrographolide may be useful as a therapeutic for neuroinflammatory diseases, especially those characterized by chemokine dysregulation.

  10. Overview of the Mechanisms that May Contribute to the Non-Redundant Activities of Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke Metzemaekers

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammatory chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 are predominantly induced by interferon (IFN-γ and share an exclusive chemokine receptor named CXC chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3. With a prototype function of directing temporal and spatial migration of activated T cells and natural killer cells, and inhibitory effects on angiogenesis, these CXCR3 ligands have been implicated in infection, acute inflammation, autoinflammation and autoimmunity, as well as in cancer. Intense former research efforts led to recent and ongoing clinical trials using CXCR3 and CXCR3 ligand targeting molecules. Scientific evidence has claimed mutual redundancy, ligand dominance, collaboration or even antagonism, depending on the (pathophysiological context. Most research on their in vivo activity, however, illustrates that CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each contribute to the activation and trafficking of CXCR3 expressing cells in a non-redundant manner. When looking into detail, one can unravel a multistep machinery behind final CXCR3 ligand functions. Not only can specific cell types secrete individual CXCR3 interacting chemokines in response to certain stimuli, but also the receptor and glycosaminoglycan interactions, major associated intracellular pathways and susceptibility to processing by particular enzymes, among others, seem ligand-specific. Here, we overview major aspects of the molecular properties and regulatory mechanisms of IFN-induced CXCR3 ligands, and propose that their in vivo non-redundancy is a reflection of the unprecedented degree of versatility that seems inherent to the IFN-related CXCR3 chemokine system.

  11. CXC chemokine receptor 2 contributes to host defense in murine urinary tract infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olszyna, D. P.; Florquin, S.; Sewnath, M.; Branger, J.; Speelman, P.; van Deventer, S. J.; Strieter, R. M.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    CXC chemokines have been implicated in the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of infection. To determine the role of CXC chemokines in the host response to urinary tract infection (UTI), female mice were treated with an antibody against the major CXC chemokine receptor in the mouse, CXCR2, before

  12. Chemokines after human ischemic stroke: From neurovascular unit to blood using protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa García-Berrocoso

    2014-06-01

    From our study, we can conclude that these chemokines do not perform a clear role of outcome biomarkers. Further studies are necessary to assess which mechanisms underlie the association of chemokines with the neurological state at distinct time points since the differences found here could be reflecting the dual role of chemokines in neuroinflammation.

  13. CXC chemokines function as a rheostat for hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C Wilson

    Full Text Available Our previous in vitro studies have demonstrated dose-dependent effects of CXCR2 ligands on hepatocyte cell death and proliferation. In the current study, we sought to determine if CXCR2 ligand concentration is responsible for the divergent effects of these mediators on liver regeneration after ischemia/reperfusion injury and partial hepatectomy.Murine models of partial ischemia/reperfusion injury and hepatectomy were used to study the effect of CXCR2 ligands on liver regeneration.We found that hepatic expression of the CXCR2 ligands, macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC, was significantly increased after both I/R injury and partial hepatectomy. However, expression of these ligands after I/R injury was 30-100-fold greater than after hepatectomy. Interestingly, the same pattern of expression was found in ischemic versus non-ischemic liver lobes following I/R injury with expression significantly greater in the ischemic liver lobes. In both systems, lower ligand expression was associated with increased hepatocyte proliferation and liver regeneration in a CXCR2-dependent fashion. To confirm that these effects were related to ligand concentration, we administered exogenous MIP-2 and KC to mice undergoing partial hepatectomy. Mice received a "high" dose that replicated serum levels found after I/R injury and a "low" dose that was similar to that found after hepatectomy. Mice receiving the "high" dose had reduced levels of hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration whereas the "low" dose promoted hepatocyte proliferation and regeneration.Together, these data demonstrate that concentrations of CXC chemokines regulate the hepatic proliferative response and subsequent liver regeneration.

  14. Deficiency for the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 aggravates tubular damage after renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Stroo

    Full Text Available Temporal expression of chemokines is a crucial factor in the regulation of renal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury and repair. Beside their role in the migration and activation of inflammatory cells to sites of injury, chemokines are also involved in other processes such as angiogenesis, development and migration of stem cells. In the present study we investigated the role of the chemokine MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 or CCL2, the main chemoattractant for monocytes, during renal I/R injury. MCP-1 expression peaks several days after inducing renal I/R injury coinciding with macrophage accumulation. However, MCP-1 deficient mice had a significant decreased survival and increased renal damage within the first two days, i.e. the acute inflammatory response, after renal I/R injury with no evidence of altered macrophage accumulation. Kidneys and primary tubular epithelial cells from MCP-1 deficient mice showed increased apoptosis after ischemia. Taken together, MCP-1 protects the kidney during the acute inflammatory response following renal I/R injury.

  15. HIV-1 exploits CCR5 conformational heterogeneity to escape inhibition by chemokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Philippe; Bénureau, Yann; Staropoli, Isabelle; Wang, Yongjin; Gonzalez, Nuria; Alcami, Jose; Hartley, Oliver; Brelot, Anne; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard

    2013-06-04

    CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and the coreceptor for R5 HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Chemokines exert anti-HIV-1 activity in vitro, both by displacing the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 from binding to CCR5 and by promoting CCR5 endocytosis, suggesting that they play a protective role in HIV infection. However, we showed here that different CCR5 conformations at the cell surface are differentially engaged by chemokines and gp120, making chemokines weaker inhibitors of HIV infection than would be expected from their binding affinity constants for CCR5. These distinct CCR5 conformations rely on CCR5 coupling to nucleotide-free G proteins ((NF)G proteins). Whereas native CCR5 chemokines bind with subnanomolar affinity to (NF)G protein-coupled CCR5, gp120/HIV-1 does not discriminate between (NF)G protein-coupled and uncoupled CCR5. Interestingly, the antiviral activity of chemokines is G protein independent, suggesting that "low-chemokine affinity" (NF)G protein-uncoupled conformations of CCR5 represent a portal for viral entry. Furthermore, chemokines are weak inducers of CCR5 endocytosis, as is revealed by EC50 values for chemokine-mediated endocytosis reflecting their low-affinity constant value for (NF)G protein-uncoupled CCR5. Abolishing CCR5 interaction with (NF)G proteins eliminates high-affinity binding of CCR5 chemokines but preserves receptor endocytosis, indicating that chemokines preferentially endocytose low-affinity receptors. Finally, we evidenced that chemokine analogs achieve highly potent HIV-1 inhibition due to high-affinity interactions with internalizing and/or gp120-binding receptors. These data are consistent with HIV-1 evading chemokine inhibition by exploiting CCR5 conformational heterogeneity, shed light into the inhibitory mechanisms of anti-HIV-1 chemokine analogs, and provide insights for the development of unique anti-HIV molecules.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of AZD5069, a slowly reversible CXC chemokine receptor 2 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, David J; Wiley, Katherine; Dainty, Ian; MacIntosh, Fraser; Phillips, Caroline; Gaw, Alasdair; Mårdh, Carina Kärrman

    2015-05-01

    In normal physiologic responses to injury and infection, inflammatory cells enter tissue and sites of inflammation through a chemotactic process regulated by several families of proteins, including inflammatory chemokines, a family of small inducible cytokines. In neutrophils, chemokines chemokine (CXC motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) and CXCL8 are potent chemoattractants and activate G protein-coupled receptors CXC chemokine receptor 1 (CXCR1) and CXCR2. Several small-molecule antagonists of CXCR2 have been developed to inhibit the inflammatory responses mediated by this receptor. Here, we present the data describing the pharmacology of AZD5069 [N-(2-(2,3-difluorobenzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)[2,4,5,6-(13)C4, 1,3-(15)N2]pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide,[(15)N2,(13)C4]N-(2-(2,3-difluoro-6-[3H]-benzylthio)-6-((2R,3S)-3,4-dihydroxybutan-2-yloxy)pyrimidin-4-yl)azetidine-1-sulfonamide], a novel antagonist of CXCR2. AZD5069 was shown to inhibit binding of radiolabeled CXCL8 to human CXCR2 with a pIC50 value of 9.1. Furthermore, AZD5069 inhibited neutrophil chemotaxis, with a pA2 of approximately 9.6, and adhesion molecule expression, with a pA2 of 6.9, in response to CXCL1. AZD5069 was a slowly reversible antagonist of CXCR2 with effects of time and temperature evident on the pharmacology and binding kinetics. With short incubation times, AZD5069 appeared to have an antagonist profile with insurmountable antagonism of calcium response curves. This behavior was also observed in vivo in an acute lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation model. Altogether, the data presented here show that AZD5069 represents a novel, potent, and selective CXCR2 antagonist with potential as a therapeutic agent in inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  17. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  18. Up-regulation of the chemokine CCL21 in the skin of subjects exposed to irritants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznitzky Raquel

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of murine CCL21 by dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC has been demonstrated to be one of the most important steps in Langerhans cell emigration from skin. Previously, our group and others have found that this chemokine is up-regulated in different human inflammatory skin diseases mediated by diverse specific immune responses. This study was carried out to investigate the involvement of CCL21 in human skin after challenge with irritant agents responsible for inducing Irritant Contact Dermatitis (ICD. Results Eleven normal individuals were challenged with different chemical or physical irritants. Two patients with Allergic Contact Dermatitis (ACD were also challenged with the relevant antigen in order to have a positive control for CCL21 expression. Macroscopic as well as microscopic responses were evaluated. We observed typical ICD responses with mostly mononuclear cells in perivascular areas, but a predominance of polymorphonuclear cells away from the inflamed blood vessels and in the epidermis at 24 hours. Immunohistochemical studies showed up-regulation of CCL21 by lymphatic endothelial cells in all the biopsies taken from ICD and ACD lesions compared to normal skin. Kinetic study at 10, 48, 96 and 168 hours after contact with a classical irritant (sodium lauryl sulphate showed that the expression of CCL21 was increased in lymphatic vessels at 10 hours, peaked at 48 hours, and then gradually declined. There was a strong correlation between CCL21 expression and the macroscopic response (r = 0.69; p = 0.0008, but not between CCL21 and the number of infiltrating cells in the lesions. Conclusions These results provide new evidence for the role of CCL21 in inflammatory processes. Since the up-regulation of this chemokine was observed in ICD and ACD, it is tempting to speculate that this mechanism operates independently of the type of dermal insult, facilitating the emigration of CCR7+ cells.

  19. Platelets as a Novel Source of Pro-Inflammatory Chemokine CXCL14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Witte

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Platelets are a major source of chemokines. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that platelets express significant amounts of CXCL14 and disclose powerful effects of platelet-derived CXCL14 on monocyte and endothelial migration. Methods: The expression of CXCL14 in platelets and in the supernatant of activated platelets was analysed by immunoblotting, ELISA, and flow cytometry. The effect of platelet-derived CXCL14 on monocyte migration was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber. The effect of CXCL14 on monocyte phagocytosis was tested by using fluorochrome-labelled E.coli particles. The effect of platelet-derived CXCL14 on endothelial migration was explored by the use of an endothelial scratch assay. Results: Hitherto unrecognized expression of CXCL14 in human and murine platelets was uncovered by immunoblotting. Activation with platelet agonists such as adenosine-di-phosphate (ADP, collagen-related peptide (CRP, or thrombin-receptor activating peptide (TRAP, increased CXCL14 surface expression (flow cytometry and release into the supernatant (immunoblotting, ELISA. Since CXCL14 is known to be chemotactic for CD14+ monocytes, we investigated the chemotactic potential of platelet-derived CXCL14 on human monocytes. Activated platelet supernatant induced monocyte migration, which was counteracted upon neutralization of platelet-derived CXCL14 as compared to IgG control. Blocking of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, but not CXCR7, reduced the number of migratory monocytes towards recombinant CXCL14, suggesting the involvement of CXCR4 in the CXCL14-directed monocyte chemotaxis. Recombinant CXCL14 enhanced the phagocytic uptake of E.coli particles by monocytes. In scratch assays with cultured endothelial cells (HUVECs, platelet-derived CXCL14 counteracted the pro-angiogenic effects of VEGF, supporting its previously recognized angiostatic potential. Conclusions: Platelets are a relevant source of CXCL14. Platelet-derived CXCL14 at the

  20. Abnormal peritoneal regulation of chemokine activation-The role of IL-8 in pathogenesis of endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Justyna; Smycz-Kubańska, Marta; Mielczarek-Palacz, Aleksandra; Kondera-Anasz, Zdzisława

    2017-04-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with an impairment in immune response. Disorders in the peritoneal fluid and ectopic endometrium macrophage populations and their secretory products create a specific microenvironment inducing the development of the disease. The important factors involved in inflammation associated with endometriosis are chemokines, especially interleukin (IL)-8. For this reason, the current study briefly reviews the role of IL-8 in the pathogenesis of endometriosis. A systematic review was done on all published studies that compared IL-8 expression and concentration in patients with and without endometriosis to evaluate their potential as biomarkers for the disease. IL-8 induces chemotaxis of neutrophils and other immune cells; also, it is a potent angiogenic agent. Most researchers pointed to the increased peritoneal and serum IL-8 levels and showed correlation with the severity of the disease, size and number of the active lesions. IL-8 takes part in all processes during the development of the disease: adhesion, invasion, and implantation of ectopic tissue. Additionally, the chemokine plays a role in growth and maintenance of ectopic endometrial tissue directly affecting endometrial cell proliferation. IL-8 might also protect ectopic cells against death by apoptosis. It may act as an autocrine growth factor in the endometrium and promotes the vicious circle of endometrial cell attachment and, in consequence, may lead to a transformation from acute to chronic inflammation stage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N.; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S.

    2012-01-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15–transduced NKT cells. PMID:22565311

  2. IL-15 protects NKT cells from inhibition by tumor-associated macrophages and enhances antimetastatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daofeng; Song, Liping; Wei, Jie; Courtney, Amy N; Gao, Xiuhua; Marinova, Ekaterina; Guo, Linjie; Heczey, Andras; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Kim, Eugene; Dotti, Gianpietro; Metelitsa, Leonid S

    2012-06-01

    Vα24-invariant NKT cells inhibit tumor growth by targeting tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Tumor progression therefore requires that TAMs evade NKT cell activity through yet-unknown mechanisms. Here we report that a subset of cells in neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines and primary tumors expresses membrane-bound TNF-α (mbTNF-α). These proinflammatory tumor cells induced production of the chemokine CCL20 from TAMs via activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway, an effect that was amplified in hypoxia. Flow cytometry analyses of human primary NB tumors revealed selective accumulation of CCL20 in TAMs. Neutralization of the chemokine inhibited in vitro migration of NKT cells toward tumor-conditioned hypoxic monocytes and localization of NKT cells to NB grafts in mice. We also found that hypoxia impaired NKT cell viability and function. Thus, CCL20-producing TAMs served as a hypoxic trap for tumor-infiltrating NKT cells. IL-15 protected antigen-activated NKT cells from hypoxia, and transgenic expression of IL-15 in adoptively transferred NKT cells dramatically enhanced their antimetastatic activity in mice. Thus, tumor-induced chemokine production in hypoxic TAMs and consequent chemoattraction and inhibition of NKT cells represents a mechanism of immune escape that can be reversed by adoptive immunotherapy with IL-15-transduced NKT cells.

  3. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    as such a paramount role in the antiviral immune responses. It is therefore not surprising that viruses have found ways to exploit and subvert the chemokine system by means of molecular mimicry. By ancient acts of molecular piracy and by induction and suppression of endogenous genes, viruses have utilized chemokines...... and their receptors to serve a variety of roles in viral life-cycle. This review focuses on the pharmacology of virus-encoded chemokine receptors, yet also the family of virus-encoded chemokines and chemokine-binding proteins will be touched upon. Key properties of the virus-encoded receptors, compared...... to their closest endogenous homologs, are interactions with a wider range of chemokines, which can act as agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists, and the exploitation of many signal transduction pathways. High constitutive activity is another key property of some--but not all--of these receptors. The chemokine...

  4. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  5. The human herpes virus 8-encoded chemokine receptor is required for angioproliferation in a murine model of Kaposi's sarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian K; Manfra, Denise J; Grisotto, Marcos G

    2005-01-01

    active G protein-coupled receptor known as vGPCR that binds CXC chemokines with high affinity. In this study, we show that conditional transgenic expression of vGPCR by cells of endothelial origin triggers an angiogenic program in vivo, leading to development of an angioproliferative disease...... that resembles KS. This angiogenic program consists partly in the expression of the angiogenic factors placental growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor B, and inducible NO synthase by the vGPCR-expressing cells. Finally, we show that continued vGPCR expression is essential for progression of the KS......-like phenotype and that down-regulation of vGPCR expression results in reduced expression of angiogenic factors and regression of the lesions. Together, these findings implicate vGPCR as a key element in KS pathogenesis and suggest that strategies to block its function may represent a novel approach...

  6. Dermatophagoides farinae extract induces severe atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice, which is effectively suppressed by the administration of tacrolimus ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Tomoyuki; Sasaki, Yasuharu; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Aizu-Yokota, Eriko; Sonoda, Yoshiko; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2009-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which is accompanied by marked increases in the levels of inflammatory cells, including mast cells and eosinophils as well as T cells and macrophages. To investigate the expression pattern of chemokines in AD, a house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae extracts (DfE)-induced NC/Nga AD model was developed in mice, and this model was used to determine the expression levels of chemokines in atopic lesions using DNA microarrays and RT-PCR. When NC/Nga mice were repeatedly treated with DfE for 4 to 7 weeks on the back skin, the mRNA expression levels of CCL20/LARC, CCL24/eotaxin-2, CCL17/TARC, and CCL11/eotaxin-1 were markedly induced and lesser of CCL2/MCP-1, within the inflammatory lesion of the back skin. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the expression of these chemokines in the epidermis and dermis of DfE-treated NC/Nga mice. Interestingly, repeated application of tacrolimus ointment potently inhibited DfE-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice concomitant with the inhibition of these changes in chemokine gene and protein expression levels particularly of CCL20/LARC, CCL17/TARC, and CCL11/eotaxin-1. These data indicate that severe atopic dermatitis induced by DfE accompanies elevated chemokine levels, and it was proposed that tacrolimus ointment is beneficial for the treatment of severe AD.

  7. Mutational analysis of the extracellular disulphide bridges of the atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 uncovers multiple binding and activation modes for its chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpakowska, Martyna; Meyrath, Max; Reynders, Nathan; Counson, Manuel; Hanson, Julien; Steyaert, Jan; Chevigné, Andy

    2018-03-09

    The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 plays crucial roles in numerous physiological processes but also in viral infection and cancer. ACKR3 shows strong propensity for activation and, unlike classical chemokine receptors, can respond to chemokines from both the CXC and CC families as well as to the endogenous peptides BAM22 and adrenomedullin. Moreover, despite belonging to the G protein coupled receptor family, its function appears to be mainly dependent on β-arrestin. ACKR3 has also been shown to continuously cycle between the plasma membrane and the endosomal compartments, suggesting a possible role as a scavenging receptor. So far, the molecular basis accounting for these atypical binding and signalling properties remains elusive. Noteworthy, ACKR3 extracellular domains bear three disulphide bridges. Two of them lie on top of the two main binding subpockets and are conserved among chemokine receptors, and one, specific to ACKR3, forms an intra-N terminus four-residue-loop of so far unknown function. Here, by mutational and functional studies, we examined the impact of the different disulphide bridges for ACKR3 folding, ligand binding and activation. We showed that, in contrast to most classical chemokine receptors, none of the extracellular disulphide bridges was essential for ACKR3 function. However, the disruption of the unique ACKR3 N-terminal loop drastically reduced the binding of CC chemokines whereas it only had a mild impact on CXC chemokine binding. Mutagenesis also uncovered that chemokine and endogenous non-chemokine ligands interact and activate ACKR3 according to distinct binding modes characterized by different transmembrane domain subpocket occupancy and N-terminal loop contribution, with BAM22 mimicking the binding mode of CC chemokine N terminus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Placental Chemokine Receptor D6 Is Functionally Impaired in Pre-Eclampsia.

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    Chiara Tersigni

    Full Text Available Pre-eclampsia (PE is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is defined by new onset of hypertension and proteinuria after the 20th week of gestation and characterized by systemic exaggerated inflammatory response. D6 is a chemokines scavenger receptor that binds with high affinity CC chemokines, internalizes and targets the ligands for degradation. It is expressed in trophoblast-derived tissues and prevents excessive placenta leukocyte infiltration.The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and function of D6 in human placentae from pre-eclamptic and healthy pregnant women.Plasma levels of D6-binding CC chemokines (CCL-2, CCL-3, CCL-4, CCL-7, CCL-11 and pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, CRP were analyzed in 37 healthy pregnant women and 38 patients with PE by multiplex bead assay. Higher circulating levels of CCL7, CCL11, IL-6, (p<0.0001 and CRP (p<0.05 were observed in PE women compared to controls. Levels of circulating CCL4 were decreased in PE (p<0.001, while no significant differences of CCL2, CCL3 or TNF-α levels were detected. Immunofluorescent staining of placental sections showed higher expression of D6 receptor in the PE syncytiotrophoblast. Confocal and Western blot (WB analyses revealed a prevalent distribution of D6 in trophoblast cells membranes in PE. Increased activation of D6 intracellular pathway was observed by Western blot analyses of p-LIMK and p-cofilin in trophoblast cell lysates. D6 functional assays showed reduced scavenging of CCL2 in PE cells compared to controls. Since actin filaments spatial assembling is essential for D6 intracellular trafficking and scavenging activity, we investigated by confocal microscopy trophoblast cytoskeleton organization and we observed a dramatic disarrangement in PE compared to controls.our results suggest membrane distribution of D6 receptor on trophoblast cell membranes in PE, together with reduced functionality, probably due

  9. Effects of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 on microglial function

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    Akimoto, Nozomi [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Ifuku, Masataka [Laboratory of Integrative Physiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Mori, Yuki [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Noda, Mami, E-mail: noda@phar.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Pathophysiology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •CCR8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia. •Expression of CCR-8 in microglia was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. •CCL-1 increased motility, proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. •CCL-1promoted BDNF and IL-6 mRNA, and the release of NO from microglia. •CCL-1 activates microglia and may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. -- Abstract: Microglia, which constitute the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), are generally considered as the primary immune cells in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial cells respond to various factors which are produced following nerve injury of multiple aetiologies and contribute to the development of neuronal disease. Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and is also produced in various cell types in the CNS, especially in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the role of CCL-1 in the CNS and the effects on microglia remains unclear. Here we showed the multiple effects of CCL-1 on microglia. We first showed that CCR-8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia, as well as on astrocytes and neurons, and was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. CCL-1 at concentration of 1 ng/ml induced chemotaxis, increased motility at a higher concentration (100 ng/ml), and increased proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. CCL-1 also activated microglia morphologically, promoted mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6, and increased the release of nitrite from microglia. These indicate that CCL-1 has a role as a mediator in neuron-glia interaction, which may contribute to the development of neurological diseases, especially in neuropathic pain.

  10. Effects of chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 on microglial function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Nozomi; Ifuku, Masataka; Mori, Yuki; Noda, Mami

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •CCR8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia. •Expression of CCR-8 in microglia was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. •CCL-1 increased motility, proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. •CCL-1promoted BDNF and IL-6 mRNA, and the release of NO from microglia. •CCL-1 activates microglia and may contribute to the development of neuropathic pain. -- Abstract: Microglia, which constitute the resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS), are generally considered as the primary immune cells in the brain and spinal cord. Microglial cells respond to various factors which are produced following nerve injury of multiple aetiologies and contribute to the development of neuronal disease. Chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, has been shown to play an important role in neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury and is also produced in various cell types in the CNS, especially in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, the role of CCL-1 in the CNS and the effects on microglia remains unclear. Here we showed the multiple effects of CCL-1 on microglia. We first showed that CCR-8, a specific receptor for CCL-1, was expressed on primary cultured microglia, as well as on astrocytes and neurons, and was upregulated in the presence of CCL-1. CCL-1 at concentration of 1 ng/ml induced chemotaxis, increased motility at a higher concentration (100 ng/ml), and increased proliferation and phagocytosis of cultured microglia. CCL-1 also activated microglia morphologically, promoted mRNA levels for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and IL-6, and increased the release of nitrite from microglia. These indicate that CCL-1 has a role as a mediator in neuron-glia interaction, which may contribute to the development of neurological diseases, especially in neuropathic pain

  11. CX3CL1/CX3CR1 and CCL2/CCR2 Chemokine/Chemokine Receptor Complex in Patients with AMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Mads Krüger; Singh, Amardeep; Faber, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The chemokine receptors CX3CR1 and CCR2 have been implicated in the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The evidence is mainly derived from experimental cell studies and murine models of AMD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between expression...... of CX3CR1 and CCR2 on different leukocyte subsets and AMD. Furthermore we measured the plasma levels of ligands CX3CL1 and CCL2. METHODS: Patients attending our department were asked to participate in the study. The diagnosis of AMD was based on clinical examination and multimodal imaging techniques...... positive correlation between CCR2 and CX3CR1 expression on CD8+ cells (r = 0.727, p = 0.0001). We found no difference in plasma levels of CX3CL1 and CCL2 among the groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show a down regulation of CX3CR1 on CD8+ cells; this correlated to a low expression of CCR2 on CD8+ cells...

  12. The role of selected chemokines and their receptors in the pathogenesis and destabilisation of atheromatous plaques in the carotid arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Konarska-Król

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are cytokines that act selectively on cells and are capable of inducing selective migration of cells in vitro and in vivo. The term was first coined at the 3rd International Symposium on Chemotactic Cytokines in 1992. The name “chemokine” is a contraction of “chemotactic cytokine,” meaning that these molecules combine features of both cytokines and chemotactic factors. They are a family of low-molecular-mass proteins acting on specific membrane receptors. A cell’s overall sensitivity to chemotaxis depends on the expression profile of chemokine receptors. Atherosclerosis is essentially an excessive inflammatory and proliferative response to the damage of arterial walls. It takes place within the wall and leads to the formation of unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Many chemokines have been studied in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of an atheromatous plaque in the carotid arteries, both in animal models and with the use of human tissue. It  seems that molecules that are the most involved in the formation of atheromas in the carotid arteries include: CCL2, CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5. However, reports are sometimes contradictory, and more research is needed. Finding a marker that could help predict the destabilisation of an atheromatous plaque would be a valuable addition to the standard diagnostic panel of tests used in both the diagnosis and monitoring of vascular pathologies.

  13. ELR chemokine signaling in host defense and disease in a viral model of central nervous system disease

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    Martin P Hosking

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial infection of the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV into the central nervous system (CNS of susceptible strains of mice results in an acute encephalomyelitis, accompanied by viral replication in glial cells and robust infiltration of virus-specific T cells that contribute to host defense through cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity. Mice that survive the acute stage of disease develop an immune-mediated demyelinating diseases characterized by viral persistence in white matter tracts and a chronic neuroinflammatory response dominated by T cells and macrophages. Early following JHMV infection, there is a dynamic expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors that contribute to neuroinflammation by regulating innate and adaptive immune responses as well influencing glial biology. In response to JHMV infection, we have shown that signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR2 contributes to host defense through recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs to the CNS that enhance permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and facilitating entry of virus-specific T cells into the parenchyma. Further, CXCR2 promotes the protection of oligodendroglia from cytokine-induced apoptosis and restricts the severity of demyelination. This review covers aspects related to the role of CXCR2 in host defense and disease in response to JHMV infection.

  14. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Esra Sahingur

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host-microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis.

  15. Novel chemokine-like activities of histones in tumor metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruochan; Xie, Yangchun; Zhong, Xiao; Fu, Yongmin; Huang, Yan; Zhen, Yixiang; Pan, Pinhua; Wang, Haichao; Bartlett, David L; Billiar, Timothy R; Lotze, Michael T; Zeh, Herbert J; Fan, Xue-Gong; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2016-09-20

    Histones are intracellular nucleosomal components and extracellular damage-associated molecular pattern molecules that modulate chromatin remodeling, as well as the immune response. However, their extracellular roles in cell migration and invasion remain undefined. Here, we demonstrate that histones are novel regulators of tumor metastasis with chemokine-like activities. Indeed, exogenous histones promote both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell migration and invasion through toll-like receptor (TLR)4, but not TLR2 or the receptor for advanced glycosylation end product. TLR4-mediated activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is required for histone-induced chemokine (e.g., C-C motif ligand 9/10) production. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TLR4-ERK-NF-κB signaling impairs histone-induced chemokine production and HCC cell migration. Additionally, TLR4 depletion (by using TLR4-/- mice and TLR4-shRNA) or inhibition of histone release/activity (by administration of heparin and H3 neutralizing antibody) attenuates lung metastasis of HCC cells injected via the tail vein of mice. Thus, histones promote tumor metastasis of HCC cells through the TLR4-NF-κB pathway and represent novel targets for treating patients with HCC.

  16. Chemokine Function in Periodontal Disease and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahingur, Sinem Esra; Yeudall, W. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines, comprise a superfamily of polypeptides with a wide range of activities that include recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection and inflammation, as well as stimulation of cell proliferation. As such, they function as antimicrobial molecules and play a central role in host defenses against pathogen challenge. However, their ability to recruit leukocytes and potentiate or prolong the inflammatory response may have profound implications for the progression of oral diseases such as chronic periodontitis, where tissue destruction may be widespread. Moreover, it is increasingly recognized that chronic inflammation is a key component of tumor progression. Interaction between cancer cells and their microenvironment is mediated in large part by secreted factors such as chemokines, and serves to enhance the malignant phenotype in oral and other cancers. In this article, we will outline the biological and biochemical mechanisms of chemokine action in host–microbiome interactions in periodontal disease and in oral cancer, and how these may overlap and contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25999952

  17. CXCL12 chemokine and its receptors as major players in the interactions between immune and nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice eGuyon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine CXCL12/SDF1a has first been described in the immune system where it functions include chemotaxis for lymphocytes and macrophages, migration of hematopoietic cells from fetal liver to bone marrow and the formation of large blood vessels. Among other chemokines, CXCL12 has recently attracted much attention in the brain as it has been shown that it can be produced not only by glial cells but also by neurons. In addition, its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7, which are belonging to the G-protein coupled receptors family, are abundantly expressed in diverse brain area, CXCR4 being a major co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 entry. This chemokine system has been shown to play important roles in brain plasticity processes occurring during development but also in the physiology of the brain in normal and pathological conditions. For example, in neurons, CXCR4 stimulation has been shown regulate the synaptic release of glutamate and GABA. It can also act post-synaptically by activating a G-protein Inward Rectifier K+ (GIRK, a voltage-gated K channel Kv2.1 associated to neuronal survival, and by increasing high voltage activated (HVA Ca2+ currents. In addition, it has been recently evidenced that there are several crosstalks between the CXCL12/CXCR4-7 system and other neurotransmitter systems in the brain (such as GABA, glutamate, opioids ans cannabinoids. Overall, this chemokine system could be one of the key players of the neuro-immune interface that participates in shaping the brain in response to changes in the environment.

  18. Keratinocyte-Derived Chemokines Orchestrate T-Cell Positioning in the Epidermis during Vitiligo and May Serve as Biomarkers of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Jillian M; Bangari, Dinesh S; Essien, Kingsley I; Currimbhoy, Sharif D; Groom, Joanna R; Pandya, Amit G; Youd, Michele E; Luster, Andrew D; Harris, John E

    2017-02-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin that results in the destruction of melanocytes and the clinical appearance of white spots. Disease pathogenesis depends on IFN-γ and IFN-γ-induced chemokines to promote T-cell recruitment to the epidermis where melanocytes reside. The skin is a complex organ, with a variety of resident cell types. We sought to better define the microenvironment and distinct cellular contributions during autoimmunity in vitiligo, and we found that the epidermis is a chemokine-high niche in both a mouse model and human vitiligo. Analysis of chemokine expression in mouse skin showed that CXCL9 and CXCL10 expression strongly correlate with disease activity, whereas CXCL10 alone correlates with severity, supporting them as potential biomarkers for following disease progression. Further studies in both our mouse model and human patients showed that keratinocytes were the major chemokine producers throughout the course of disease, and functional studies using a conditional signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-1 knockout mouse showed that IFN-γ signaling in keratinocytes was critical for disease progression and proper autoreactive T-cell homing to the epidermis. In contrast, epidermal immune cell populations including endogenous T cells, Langerhans cells, and γδ T cells were not required. These results have important clinical implications, because topical therapies that target IFN-γ signaling in keratinocytes could be safe and effective new treatments, and skin expression of these chemokines could be used to monitor disease activity and treatment responses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro characterization and inhibition of the CXCR4/CXCL12 chemokine axis in human uveal melanoma cell lines

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    Antecka Emilia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The CXCR4/CXCL12 chemokine axis may play a critical role in guiding CXCR4+ circulating malignant cells to organ specific locations that actively secrete its ligand CXCL12 (SDF-1 such as bone, brain, liver, and lungs. We sought to characterize the presence of the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in five uveal melanoma (UM cell lines in vitro. The ability of TN14003, a synthetic peptide inhibitor that targets the CXCR4 receptor complex, to inhibit this axis was also assessed. Methods Immunocytochemistry was performed against CXCR4 to confirm expression of this chemokine receptor in all five UM cell lines. Flow cytometry was preformed to evaluate CXCR4 cell surface expression on all five UM cell lines. A proliferation assay was also used to test effects TN14003 would have on cellular proliferation. Inhibition of cellular migration by specifically inhibiting the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis with TN14003 was also investigated. The binding efficacy of TN14003 to the CXCR4 receptor was assessed through flow cytometric methods. Results The CXCR4 receptor was present on all five UM cell lines. All five cell lines expressed different relative levels of surface CXCR4. TN14003 did not affect the proliferation of the five cell lines (p > 0.05. All cell lines migrated towards the chemokine CXCL12 at a level greater than the negative control (p Conclusion Interfering with the CXCR4/CXCL12 axis, using TN14003 was shown to effectively down regulate UM cell migration in vitro. Knowing that UM expresses the CXCR4 receptor, these CXCR4+ cells may be less likely to colonize distant organs that secrete the CXCL12 ligand, if treated with an inhibitor that binds CXCR4. Further studies should be pursued in order to test TN14003 efficacy in vivo.

  20. CCL23: a new CC chemokine involved in human brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simats, A; García-Berrocoso, T; Penalba, A; Giralt, D; Llovera, G; Jiang, Y; Ramiro, L; Bustamante, A; Martinez-Saez, E; Canals, F; Wang, X; Liesz, A; Rosell, A; Montaner, J

    2018-02-07

    CCL23 role in the inflammatory response after acute brain injuries remains elusive. Here, we evaluated whether CCL23 blood levels associate with acquired cerebral lesions and determined CCL23 predictive capacity for assessing stroke prognosis. We used preclinical models to study the CCL23 homologous chemokines in rodents, CCL9 and CCL6. Baseline CCL23 blood levels were determined on 245 individuals, including ischaemic strokes (IS), stroke mimics and controls. Temporal profile of circulating CCL23 was explored from baseline to 24 h in 20 of the IS. In an independent cohort of 120 IS with a 3-month follow-up, CCL23 blood levels were included in logistic regression models to predict IS outcome. CCL9/CCL6 cerebral expression was evaluated in rodent models of brain damage. Both chemokines were also profiled in circulation and histologically located on brain following ischaemia. Baseline CCL23 blood levels did not discriminate IS, but permitted an accurate discrimination of patients presenting acute brain lesions (P = 0.003). IS exhibited a continuous increase from baseline to 24 h in circulating CCL23 (P < 0.001). Baseline CCL23 blood levels resulted an independent predictor of IS outcome at hospital discharge (OR adj : 19.702 [1.815-213.918], P = 0.014) and mortality after 3 months (OR adj : 21.47 [3.434-134.221], P = 0.001). In preclinics, expression of rodent chemokines in neurons following cerebral lesions was elevated. CCL9 circulating levels decreased early after ischaemia (P < 0.001), whereas CCL6 did not alter within the first 24 h after ischaemia. Although preclinical models do not seem suitable to characterize CCL23, it might be a novel promising biomarker for the early diagnosis of cerebral lesions and might facilitate the prediction of stroke patient outcome. © 2018 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  1. Biased signaling of G protein-coupled receptors - From a chemokine receptor CCR7 perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Astrid Sissel; Rosenkilde, Mette M; Hjortø, Gertrud M

    2018-01-01

    findings related to ligand- and tissue-biased signaling of CCR7 and summarize what is known about bias at other chemokine receptors. CCR7 is expressed by a subset of T-cells and by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Together with its two endogenous ligands CCL19 and CCL21, of which the carboxy terminal tail...... of CCL21 displays an extraordinarily strong glycosaminoglycan (GAG) binding, CCR7 plays a central role in coordinating the meeting between mature antigen presenting DCs and naïve T-cells which normally takes place in the lymph nodes (LNs). This process is a prerequisite for the initiation of an antigen......-specific T-cell mediated immune response. Thus CCR7 and its ligands are key players in initiating cell-based immune responses. CCL19 and CCL21 display differential interaction- and docking-modes for CCR7 leading to stabilization of different CCR7 conformations and hereby preferential activation of distinct...

  2. The CXC chemokine cCAF stimulates precocious deposition of ECM molecules by wound fibroblasts, accelerating development of granulation tissue

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    Li Qi-Jing

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During wound repair, fibroblasts orchestrate replacement of the provisional matrix formed during clotting with tenascin, cellular fibronectin and collagen III. These, in turn, are critical for migration of endothelial cells, keratinocytes and additional fibroblasts into the wound site. Fibroblasts are also important in the deposition of collagen I during scar formation. The CXC chemokine chicken Chemotactic and Angiogenic Factor (cCAF, is highly expressed by fibroblasts after wounding and during development of the granulation tissue, especially in areas where extracellular matrix (ECM is abundant. We hypothesized that cCAF stimulates fibroblasts to produce these matrix molecules. Results Here we show that this chemokine can stimulate precocious deposition of tenascin, fibronectin and collagen I, but not collagen III. Studies in culture and in vivo show that tenascin stimulation can also be achieved by the N-terminal 15 aas of the protein and occurs at the level of gene expression. In contrast, stimulation of fibronectin and collagen I both require the entire molecule and do not involve changes in gene expression. Fibronectin accumulation appears to be linked to tenascin production, and collagen I to decreased MMP-1 levels. In addition, cCAF is chemotactic for fibroblasts and accelerates their migration. Conclusions These previously unknown functions for chemokines suggest that cCAF, the chicken orthologue of human IL-8, enhances healing by rapidly chemoattracting fibroblasts into the wound site and stimulating them to produce ECM molecules, leading to precocious development of granulation tissue. This acceleration of the repair process may have important application to healing of impaired wounds.

  3. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  4. 3D profile-based approach to proteome-wide discovery of novel human chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Tomczak

    Full Text Available Chemokines are small secreted proteins with important roles in immune responses. They consist of a conserved three-dimensional (3D structure, so-called IL8-like chemokine fold, which is supported by disulfide bridges characteristic of this protein family. Sequence- and profile-based computational methods have been proficient in discovering novel chemokines by making use of their sequence-conserved cysteine patterns. However, it has been recently shown that some chemokines escaped annotation by these methods due to low sequence similarity to known chemokines and to different arrangement of cysteines in sequence and in 3D. Innovative methods overcoming the limitations of current techniques may allow the discovery of new remote homologs in the still functionally uncharacterized fraction of the human genome. We report a novel computational approach for proteome-wide identification of remote homologs of the chemokine family that uses fold recognition techniques in combination with a scaffold-based automatic mapping of disulfide bonds to define a 3D profile of the chemokine protein family. By applying our methodology to all currently uncharacterized human protein sequences, we have discovered two novel proteins that, without having significant sequence similarity to known chemokines or characteristic cysteine patterns, show strong structural resemblance to known anti-HIV chemokines. Detailed computational analysis and experimental structural investigations based on mass spectrometry and circular dichroism support our structural predictions and highlight several other chemokine-like features. The results obtained support their functional annotation as putative novel chemokines and encourage further experimental characterization. The identification of remote homologs of human chemokines may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms causing pathologies such as cancer or AIDS, and may contribute to the development of novel treatments. Besides

  5. Investigation of proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma promoted by three chemokines, MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu H

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hongxing Chu,1,* Bo Jia,1,* Xiaoling Qiu,2 Jie Pan,1 Xiang Sun,1 Zhiping Wang,1 Jianjiang Zhao1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China; 2Department of Endodontology, Stomatological Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The aim of this work was to investigate the role of chemokines in proliferation and migration of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC. Out of the 80 cytokines surveyed by a human cytokine antibody array, three chemokines, macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β (MIP-1β, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10, showed elevated expression in TSCC cells (CAL-27 and UM-1, compared to the oral mucosal epithelial cells. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the high level of expression of MIP-3α in the TSCC tissues, especially in the high clinical stages. Furthermore, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining indicated that C-C chemokine receptor type 5, C-C chemokine receptor type 6, and C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3, which are the receptors for MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10, respectively, were expressed in the TSCC cells. Viability assay showed MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 led to the proliferation of the CAL-27 cells. Interestingly, MIP-1β and IP-10 also induced apoptosis in the TSCC cells. Transwell invasion assay showed MIP-3α and IP-10 could increase the invasive capability of TSCC cells; consistently, the enzymatic activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 increased in the MIP-3α- and IP-10-treated cells. In summary, our results indicate the expression of MIP-3α, MIP-1β, and IP-10 increased in the TSCC cells. The elevated expression of MIP-3α and IP-10 promoted proliferation and migration of TSCC. These chemokines, along with their receptors, could be potential biomarkers and

  6. Saussurea lappa alleviates inflammatory chemokine production in HaCaT cells and house dust mite-induced atopic-like dermatitis in Nc/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hye-Sun; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Mee-Young; Jin, Seong-Eun; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Jeon, Woo-Young; Shin, Na-Ra; Sok, Dai-Eun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2014-01-01

    Saussurea lappa is a traditional herbal medicine used for to treat various inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of S. lappa against atopic dermatitis using human keratinocyte HaCaT cells, murine mast cell line MC/9 cells, and a house dust mite-induced atopic dermatitis model of Nc/Nga mice. Treatment with the S. lappa caused a significant reduction in the mRNA levels and production of inflammatory chemokines and cytokine, including thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC), regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), and interleukin-8 (IL-8) in tumor necrosis factor-α/interferone-γ-stimulated HaCaT cells. S. lappa exhibited the significant reduction in histamine production in MC/9 cells. In the atopic dermatitis model, S. lappa significantly reduced the dermatitis score and serum IgE and TARC levels. In addition, the back skin and ears of S. lappa-treated Nc/Nga mice exhibited reduced histological manifestations of atopic skin lesions such as erosion, hyperplasia of the epidermis and dermis, and inflammatory cell infiltration. In conclusion, an extract of S. lappa effectively suppressed the development of atopic dermatitis, which was closely related to the reduction of chemokines and cytokine. Our study suggests that S. lappa may be a potential treatment for atopic dermatitis. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NKT cells mediate the recruitment of neutrophils by stimulating epithelial chemokine secretion during colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Enyu; Liu, Ronghua; Lu, Zhou; Liu, Jiajing; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-05-27

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a kind of inflammatory bowel diseases characterized by chronic inflammation and ulcer in colon, and UC patients have increased risk of getting colorectal cancer. NKT cells are cells that express both NK cell markers and semi-invariant CD1d-restricted TCRs, can regulate immune responses via secreting a variety of cytokines upon activation. In our research, we found that the NKT cell-deficient CD1d(-/-) mice had relieved colitis in the DSS-induced colitis model. Further investigations revealed that the colon of CD1d(-/-) mice expressed less neutrophil-attracting chemokine CXCL 1, 2 and 3, and had decreased neutrophil infiltration. Infiltrated neutrophils also produced less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TNF-α, indicating they may cause less epithelial damage. In addition, colitis-associated colorectal cancer was also relieved in CD1d(-/-) mice. During colitis, NKT cells strongly expressed TNF-α, which could stimulate CXCL 1, 2, 3 expressions by the epithelium. In conclusion, NKT cells can regulate colitis via the NKT cell-epithelium-neutrophil axis. Targeting this mechanism may help to improve the therapy of UC and prevent colitis-associated colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Circulating Chemokine Levels in Febrile Infants With Serious Bacterial Infections

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    Hsiu-Lin Chen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis of serious bacterial infections (SBI in febrile young infants based on clinical symptoms and signs is difficult. This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic values of circulating chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP levels in febrile young infants < 3 months of age with suspected SBI. We enrolled 43 febrile young infants < 3 months of age with clinically suspected SBI who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit or complete nursing unit of the pediatric department of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital between December 2006 and July 2007. Blood was drawn from the patients at admission, and complete blood counts, plasma levels of CRP, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, and chemokines, including interleukin-8 (IL-8, macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, monokine induced by interferon-γ, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 were measured. Patients’ symptoms and signs, length of hospital stay, main diagnosis, and results of routine blood tests and microbiological culture results were recorded. Twenty-six infants (60.5% were diagnosed with SBI, while 17 (39.5% had no evidence of SBI based on the results of bacterial cultures. CRP, IL-8 and G-CSF levels were significantly higher in the infants with SBI than in those without SBI. Plasma levels of other chemokines were not significantly different between the groups. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC curve for differentiating between the presence and absence of SBI was 0.79 for CRP level. Diagnostic accuracy was further improved by combining CRP and IL-8, when the area under the ROC curve increased to 0.91. CRP levels were superior to IL-8 and G-CSF levels for predicting SBI in febrile infants at initial survey. IL-8 levels could be used as an additional diagnostic tool in the initial evaluation of febrile young infants, allowing clinicians to treat these patients more appropriately.

  9. Hypothalamic Inflammation and Energy Balance Disruptions: Spotlight on Chemokines

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    Ophélia Le Thuc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a key brain region in the regulation of energy balance as it controls food intake and both energy storage and expenditure through integration of humoral, neural, and nutrient-related signals and cues. Many years of research have focused on the regulation of energy balance by hypothalamic neurons, but the most recent findings suggest that neurons and glial cells, such as microglia and astrocytes, in the hypothalamus actually orchestrate together several metabolic functions. Because glial cells have been described as mediators of inflammatory processes in the brain, the existence of a causal link between hypothalamic inflammation and the deregulations of feeding behavior, leading to involuntary weight loss or obesity for example, has been suggested. Several inflammatory pathways that could impair the hypothalamic control of energy balance have been studied over the years such as, among others, toll-like receptors and canonical cytokines. Yet, less studied so far, chemokines also represent interesting candidates that could link the aforementioned pathways and the activity of hypothalamic neurons. Indeed, chemokines, in addition to their role in attracting immune cells to the inflamed site, have been suggested to be capable of neuromodulation. Thus, they could disrupt cellular activity together with synthesis and/or secretion of multiple neurotransmitters/mediators involved in the maintenance of energy balance. This review discusses the different inflammatory pathways that have been identified so far in the hypothalamus in the context of feeding behavior and body weight control impairments, with a particular focus on chemokines signaling that opens a new avenue in the understanding of the major role played by inflammation in obesity.

  10. Amniotic fluid chemokines and autism spectrum disorders: An exploratory study utilizing a Danish Historic Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna Brink; Grove, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Elevated levels of chemokines have been reported in plasma and brain tissue of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to examine chemokine levels in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of individuals diagnosed with ASD and their controls.......Elevated levels of chemokines have been reported in plasma and brain tissue of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The aim of this study was to examine chemokine levels in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of individuals diagnosed with ASD and their controls....

  11. Therapeutic implications of chemokine-mediated pathways in atherosclerosis: realistic perspectives and utopias.

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    Apostolakis, Stavros; Amanatidou, Virginia; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2010-09-01

    Current perspectives on the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis strongly support the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the establishment and progression of atherosclerostic lesions. Chemokine-mediated mechanisms are potent regulators of such processes by orchestrating the interactions of inflammatory cellular components of the peripheral blood with cellular components of the arterial wall. The increasing evidence supporting the role of chemokine pathways in atherosclerosis renders chemokine ligands and their receptors potential therapeutic targets. In the following review, we aim to highlight the special structural and functional features of chemokines and their receptors in respect to their roles in atherosclerosis, and examine to what extent available data can be applied in disease management practices.

  12. Circulating chemokine ligand levels before and after successful kidney transplantation

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    Hamdi Elmoselhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokine ligands (CCLs play a pivotal role in tissue injury before and after kidney transplantation. Meanwhile, transplantation improves patient’s survival and diminishes morbidity. It is hypothesized, then, that kidney transplantation diminishes pre-transplant (pre-TX levels of circulating inflammatory CCLs. This retrospective study compared circulating levels and profiles of CCLs before transplantation (pre-TX and after transplantation (post-TX. Methods Nineteen CCLs (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, 24, 26, 27, CXCL 5, 8, 10, 12 and 13 were measured in 47 stable post-TX recipients, and their stored pre-TX plasma was analyzed by multiplexed fluorescent bead-based immunoassay. Twenty normal controls were included for comparisons. Normalized data was presented as mean ± SD and non-normalized data as median (5–95 % CI. Significance was measured at p < 0.01. Arbitrary upper and lower margins for each CCL at the 95 % CI or 2SD levels in each group were chosen to calculate the percentile of patients in the other group who exceeded these limits. Significant CCL levels present in more than 75 % of patients in a group that exceeded the arbitrary upper or lower set margins in the other two groups were labeled as preferentially characteristic for the respective group. Results More than 75 % of pre- and post-TX patients had levels that exceeded the upper control for CCL1, 11, 15 and CCL15, CCL26 and CXCL13 levels, respectively. More than 75 % of pre- and post-TX patients exceeded the lower control for CCL3, 21, and CCL5 limits, respectively. More than 75 % of post-TX patients demonstrated elevated levels of CCL2, 3, 21, 26 and CXCL13 above the upper pre-TX cut offs. Meanwhile, more than 75 % of post-TX patients exceeded the lower pre-TX levels for CCL1, 4, 5, 8, 13, 15, 17, 24 and CXCL8 and10. Pre-TX was preferentially characterized by elevated CCL1 and 15 and diminished CCL3 and 21. Post-TX was preferentially

  13. The role of cholesterol and sphingolipids in chemokine receptor function and HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion

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    Puri Anu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 entry into cells is a multifaceted process involving target cell CD4 and the chemokine receptors, CXCR4 or CCR5. The lipid composition of the host cell plays a significant role in the HIV fusion process as it orchestrates the appropriate disposition of CD4 and co-receptors required for HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env-mediated fusion. The cell membrane is primarily composed of sphingolipids and cholesterol. The effects of lipid modulation on CD4 disposition in the membrane and their role in HIV-1 entry have extensively been studied. To focus on the role of lipid composition on chemokine receptor function, we have by-passed the CD4 requirement for HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion by using a CD4-independent strain of HIV-1 Env. Results Cell fusion mediated by a CD4-independent strain of HIV-1 Env was monitored by observing dye transfer between Env-expressing cells and NIH3T3 cells bearing CXCR4 or CCR5 in the presence or absence of CD4. Chemokine receptor signaling was assessed by monitoring changes in intracellular [Ca2+] mobilization induced by CCR5 or CXCR4 ligand. To modulate target membrane cholesterol or sphingolipids we used Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD or 1-phenyl-2-hexadecanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP, respectively. Treatment of the target cells with these agents did not change the levels of CD4 or CXCR4, but reduced levels of CCR5 on the cell surface. Chemokine receptor signalling was inhibited by cholesterol removal but not by treatment with PPMP. HIV-1 Env mediated fusion was inhibited by >50% by cholesterol removal. Overall, PPMP treatment appeared to slow down the rates of CD4-independent HIV-1 Env-mediated Fusion. However, in the case of CXCR4-dependent fusion, the differences between untreated and PPMP-treated cells did not appear to be significant. Conclusion Although modulation of cholesterol and sphingolipids has similar effects on CD4 -dependent HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion, sphingolipid modulation

  14. Elevated Plasma Chemokines for Eosinophils in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders during Remission

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    Yanping Tong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA prominent pathological feature of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD is markedly greater eosinophilic infiltration than that seen in other demyelinating diseases, like multiple sclerosis (MS. Eosinophils express the chemokine receptor CCR3, which is activated by eotaxins (CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL24/eotaxin-2, CCL26/eotaxin-3 and CCL13 [monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-4]. Moreover, CCL13 is part of the chemokine set that activates CCR2. The present study aimed to evaluate plasma levels of eotaxins (CCL11, CCL24, and CCL26 and MCPs (CCL13, CCL2, CCL8, and CCL7 in patients with NMOSD during remission.MethodsHealthy controls (HC; n = 30 and patients with MS (n = 47 and NMOSD (n = 58 in remission were consecutively enrolled in this study between January 2016 and August 2017. Plasma CCL11, CCL24, CCL26, CCL2, CCL8, CCL7, CCL13, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and interleukin (IL-1β levels were detected using the human cytokine multiplex assay.ResultsPlasma CCL13, CCL11, and CCL26 levels were all significantly higher in patients with NMOSD than in HC and patients with MS. No significant differences were found in the CCL13, CCL11, or CCL26 levels between patients with NMOSD receiving and not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. The plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-1β, which stimulate the above chemokines, were higher in patients with NMOSD than in HC. There was no difference in CCL24 levels among the three groups. In most cases, the CCL7 levels were below the threshold value of the human cytokine multiplex assay, which is in line with other studies. Adjusted multiple regression analyses showed a positive association of CCL13 levels with the number of relapses after controlling gender, age, body mass index, and disease duration in patients with NMOSD.ConclusionThe study indicates that in NMOSD, the overproduction of cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α during remission stimulates eosinophilic chemoattractants such as

  15. The scavenging chemokine receptor ACKR2 has a significant impact on acute mortality rate and early lesion development after traumatic brain injury.

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    Thomas M Woodcock

    Full Text Available The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 promotes resolution of acute inflammation by operating as a scavenger receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines in several experimental models of inflammatory disorders, however its role in the brain remains unclear. Based on our previous reports of increased expression of inflammatory chemokines and their corresponding receptors following traumatic brain injury (TBI, we hypothesised that ACKR2 modulates neuroinflammation following brain trauma and that its deletion exacerbates cellular inflammation and chemokine production. We demonstrate increased CCL2 and ACKR2 mRNA expression in post-mortem human brain, whereby ACKR2 mRNA levels correlated with later times post-TBI. This data is consistent with the transient upregulation of ACKR2 observed in mouse brain after closed head injury (CHI. As compared to WT animals, ACKR2-/- mice showed a higher mortality rate after CHI, while the neurological outcome in surviving mice was similar. At day 1 post-injury, ACKR2-/- mice displayed aggravated lesion volume and no differences in CCL2 expression and macrophage recruitment relative to WT mice. Reciprocal regulation of ACKR2 and CCL2 expression was explored in cultured astrocytes, which are recognized as the major source of CCL2 and also express ACKR2. ACKR2 mRNA increased as early as 2 hours after an inflammatory challenge in WT astrocytes. As expected, CCL2 expression also dramatically increased at 4 hours in WT astrocytes but was significantly lower in ACKR2-/- astrocytes, possibly indicating a co-regulation of CCL2 and ACKR2 in these cells. Conversely, in vivo, CCL2 mRNA/protein levels were increased similarly in ACKR2-/- and WT brains at 4 and 12 hours after CHI, in line with the lack of differences in cerebral macrophage recruitment and neurological recovery. In conclusion, ACKR2 is induced after TBI and has a significant impact on mortality and lesion development acutely following CHI, while its role in chemokine

  16. Effect of budesonide and cetirizine hydrochloride on neurotrophic factor, airway function and chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 in patients with allergic rhinitis

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    Xiang Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride on neurotrophic factor, airway function and chemokines CCL17 and CCL12 in patients with allergic rhinitis. Methods: A total of 123 patients with Allergic Rhinitis were randomly divided into three groups, A group treated with budesonide nasal spray, B group treated with cetirizine hydrochloride, C group treated with budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride, then the Neurotrophic factors, airway function indexes and chemokines CCL17 and CCL12 levels in three groups were compared. Results: Before the treatments, the three groups of patients in neurotrophic factor, airway function index and chemokines CCL17, CCL22 have no differences, Compared with before the treatments, after receiving different treatments, the three groups of patients in all indicators were Showed significant differences. In the indexes of neurotrophic factor (NGF, BDNF, NT-3mRNA expression, there was no significant difference between group A and group B, and group C was lower than group A and B. In airway function indexes (FVC, FEV1 and PEF, A group was significantly higher than B group, C group was significantly higher than A group; In the chemokines CCL17 and CCL22 indicators, C group was lower than A group, A group was lower than B group, the difference was significant. Conclusions: Budesonide combined with cetirizine hydrochloride in the treatment of Allergic Rhinitis, can effectively control the patients' neurotrophic factor, pulmonary ventilation and chemokine CC17, CCL22 indicators, the effect is better than Budesonide alone or Cetirizine hydrochloride.

  17. Plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine as an early response marker in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plattel, Wouter J.; van den Berg, Anke; Visser, Lydia; van der Graaf, Anne-Marijn; Pruim, Jan; Vos, Hans; Hepkema, Bouke; Diepstra, Arjan; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.

    BACKGROUND: Plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine is a potential biomarker for classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. To define its value as a marker to monitor treatment response, we correlated serial plasma thymus and activation-regulated chemokine levels with clinical response in newly

  18. Targeting the chemokine receptor CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL10 in the central nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2004-01-01

    focuses on the present data regarding CXCL10 (previously known as IP-10) and CXRC3 in multiple sclerosis, since consistent data has suggested that this chemokine/chemokine receptor pair has a pivotal role in leukocyte recruitment into the central nervous system (CNS) in multiple sclerosis....

  19. Pro-inflammatory functions of carp CXCL8-like and CXCb chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Aa, Lieke M.; Chadzinska, Magdalena; Golbach, Lieke A.; Ribeiro, Carla M. S.; Lidy Verburg-van Kemenade, B. M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CXC chemokines have been identified in fish, however, their role in inflammation is not well established. Here. CXC chemokines of the CXCL8-like (CXCa_Ll and CXCL8_L2) and CXCL9/10/11-like (CXCb) subset were investigated in carp. Recombinant CXCa_L1, CXCL8_12 and CXCb all stimulated

  20. Maternal Plasma and Amniotic Fluid Chemokines Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

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    Piotr Laudanski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Chemokines exert different inflammatory responses which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of selected chemokines in plasma and amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Method. Out of 171 amniocentesis, we had 7 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation. For the purpose of our control, we chose 14 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the concentration of chemokines in the blood plasma and amniotic fluid, we used a protein macroarray, which allows the simultaneous determination of 40 chemokines per sample. Results. We showed significant decrease in the concentration of 4 chemokines, HCC-4, IL-28A, IL-31, and MCP-2, and increase in the concentration of CXCL7 (NAP-2 in plasma of women with fetal Down syndrome. Furthermore, we showed decrease in concentration of 3 chemokines, ITAC, MCP-3, MIF, and increase in concentration of 4 chemokines, IP-10, MPIF-1, CXCL7, and 6Ckine, in amniotic fluid of women with fetal Down syndrome. Conclusion. On the basis of our findings, our hypothesis is that the chemokines may play role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome requires further investigation on larger group of patients.

  1. Targeting spare CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) as a principle to inhibit HIV-1 entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; Colin, Philippe; Staropoli, Isabelle; Lima-Fernandes, Evelyne; Ferret, Cécile; Demir, Arzu; Rogée, Sophie; Hartley, Oliver; Randriamampita, Clotilde; Scott, Mark G H; Marullo, Stefano; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Lagane, Bernard; Brelot, Anne

    2014-07-04

    CCR5 binds the chemokines CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5 and is the major coreceptor for HIV-1 entry into target cells. Chemokines are supposed to form a natural barrier against human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, we showed that their antiviral activity is limited by CCR5 adopting low-chemokine affinity conformations at the cell surface. Here, we investigated whether a pool of CCR5 that is not stabilized by chemokines could represent a target for inhibiting HIV infection. We exploited the characteristics of the chemokine analog PSC-RANTES (N-α-(n-nonanoyl)-des-Ser(1)-[l-thioprolyl(2), l-cyclohexylglycyl(3)]-RANTES(4-68)), which displays potent anti-HIV-1 activity. We show that native chemokines fail to prevent high-affinity binding of PSC-RANTES, analog-mediated calcium release (in desensitization assays), and analog-mediated CCR5 internalization. These results indicate that a pool of spare CCR5 may bind PSC-RANTES but not native chemokines. Improved recognition of CCR5 by PSC-RANTES may explain why the analog promotes higher amounts of β-arrestin 2·CCR5 complexes, thereby increasing CCR5 down-regulation and HIV-1 inhibition. Together, these results highlight that spare CCR5, which might permit HIV-1 to escape from chemokines, should be targeted for efficient viral blockade. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Chemokine receptor allelic polymorphisms: relationships to HIV resistance and disease progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paxton, W. A.; Kang, S.

    1998-01-01

    It is now well established that an array of CC and CXC chemokine receptors, in association with the CD4 molecule, can interact with the HIV-1 gp120 protein to facilitate viral fusion. A 32bp deletion in the CC chemokine receptor CCR5, the major M-tropic viral co-receptor, provides considerable

  3. Structural basis for chemokine recognition and activation of a viral G protein-coupled receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, John S.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Venkatakrishnan, A.J.; Jude, Kevin M.; Dukkipati, Abhiram; Feinberg, Evan N.; Angelini, Alessandro; Waghray, Deepa; Dror, Ron O.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Garcia, K. Christopher (Stanford); (Stanford-MED); (Whitehead); (MIT)

    2015-03-05

    Chemokines are small proteins that function as immune modulators through activation of chemokine G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Several viruses also encode chemokines and chemokine receptors to subvert the host immune response. How protein ligands activate GPCRs remains unknown. We report the crystal structure at 2.9 angstrom resolution of the human cytomegalovirus GPCR US28 in complex with the chemokine domain of human CX3CL1 (fractalkine). The globular body of CX3CL1 is perched on top of the US28 extracellular vestibule, whereas its amino terminus projects into the central core of US28. The transmembrane helices of US28 adopt an active-state-like conformation. Atomic-level simulations suggest that the agonist-independent activity of US28 may be due to an amino acid network evolved in the viral GPCR to destabilize the receptor’s inactive state.

  4. Indole-3-carbinol and 3’, 3’-diindolylmethane modulate androgen effect up-regulation on C-C chemokine ligand 2 and monocyte attraction to prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inflammation has a role in prostate tumorigenesis. Recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the tumor site is mediated by C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) through binding to its receptor CCR2. We hypothesized that androgen could modulate CCL2 expression in hormone-responsive prostate cancer cells, and ...

  5. Platelets and their chemokines in atherosclerosis – clinical applications

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    Philipp evon Hundelshausen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The concept of platelets as important players in the process of atherogenesis has become increasingly accepted due to accumulating experimental and clinical evidence. Despite the progress in understanding the molecular details of atherosclerosis, particularly by using animal models, the inflammatory and thrombotic roles of activated platelet s especially in the human system remain difficult to dissect, as often only the complications of atherosclerosis i.e. stroke and myocardial infarction are definable but not the plaque burden.Platelet indices including platelet count and mean platelet volume and soluble mediators released by activated platelets are associated with atherosclerosis. The chemokine CXCL4 has multiple atherogenic activities e.g. altering the differentiation of T cells and macrophages by inhibiting neutrophil and monocyte apoptosis and by increasing the uptake of oxLDL and synergizing with CCL5. CCL5 is released and deposited on endothelium by activated platelets thereby triggering atherogenic monocyte recruitment, which can be attenuated by blocking the corresponding chemokine receptor CCR5. Atheroprotective and plaque stabilizing properties are attributed to CXCL12, which plays an important role in regenerative processes by attracting progenitor cells. Its release from luminal attached platelets accelerates endothelial healing after injury. Platelet surface molecules GPIIb/IIIa, GP1bα, P-selectin, JAM-A and the CD40/CD40L dyade are crucially involved in the interaction with endothelial cells, leukocytes and matrix molecules affecting atherogenesis. Beyond the effects on the arterial inflammatory infiltrate, platelets affect cholesterol metabolism by binding, modifying and endocytosing LDL particles via their scavenger receptors and contribute to the formation of lipid laden macrophages. Current medical therapies for the prevention of atherosclerotic therapies enable the elucidation of mechanisms linking platelets to inflammation

  6. Distinct Cytokine and Chemokine Profiles in Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yvonne M Y; Cheung, Winnie K Y; Wong, Chun Kwok; Sze, Sophia L; Cheng, Timmy W S; Yeung, Michael K; Chan, Agnes S

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that immunological factors are involved in the pathogenesis of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, this research has been conducted almost exclusively in Western contexts, and only a handful of studies on immune measures have been conducted in Asian populations, such as Chinese populations. The present study examined whether immunological abnormalities are associated with cognitive deficits and problem behaviors in Chinese children with ASD and whether these children show different immunological profiles. Thirteen typically developing (TD) children and 22 children with ASD, aged 6-17 years, participated voluntarily in the study. Executive functions and short-term memory were measured using neuropsychological tests, and behavioral measures were assessed using parent ratings. The children were also assessed on immunological measures, specifically, the levels of cytokines and chemokines in the blood serum. Children with ASD showed greater deficits in cognitive functions, as well as altered levels of immunological measures, including CCL2, CCL5, and CXCL9 levels, compared to TD children, and the cognitive functions and associated behavioral deficits of children with ASD were significantly associated with different immunological measures. The children were further sub-classified into ASD with only autistic features (ASD-only) or ASD comorbid with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ASD + ADHD). The comorbidity results showed that there were no differences between the two groups of ASD children in any of the cognitive or behavioral measures. However, the results pertaining to immunological measures showed that the children with ASD-only and ASD + ADHD exhibited distinct cytokine and chemokine profiles and that abnormal immunologic function was associated with cognitive functions and inattention/hyperactivity symptoms. These results support the notion that altered immune functions may play a role in the selective

  7. C-X-C motif chemokine 12 influences the development of extramedullary hematopoiesis in the spleens of myelofibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Cho, Sool Yeon; Hu, Cing Siang; Chen, Daniel; Roboz, John; Hoffman, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by the constitutive mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. The mechanisms underlying this abnormal HSC/HPC trafficking pattern remain poorly understood. We demonstrated that both splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34(+) cells equally share a defective ability to home to the marrow, but not to the spleens, of NOD/LtSz-Prkdc(scid) mice. This trafficking pattern could not be attributed to discordant expression of integrins or chemokine receptors other than the downregulation of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 by both PB and splenic MF CD34(+) cells. The number of both splenic MF CD34(+) cells and HPCs that migrated toward splenic MF plasma was, however, significantly greater than the number that migrated toward PB MF plasma. The concentration of the intact HSC/HPC chemoattractant C-X-C motif chemokine 12 (CXCL12) was greater in splenic MF plasma than PB MF plasma, as quantified using mass spectrometry. Functionally inactive truncated products of CXCL12, which are the product of proteolytic degradation by serine proteases, were detected at similar levels in both splenic and PB MF plasma. Treatment with an anti-CXCL12 neutralizing antibody resulted in a reduction in the degree of migration of splenic MF CD34(+) cells toward both PB and splenic MF plasma, validating the role of CXCL12 as a functional chemoattractant. Our data indicate that the MF splenic microenvironment is characterized by increased levels of intact, functional CXCL12, which contributes to the localization of MF CD34(+) cells to the spleen and the establishment of extramedullary hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2015 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Primed T cell responses to chemokines are regulated by the immunoglobulin-like molecule CD31.

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    Madhav Kishore

    Full Text Available CD31, an immunoglobulin-like molecule expressed by leukocytes and endothelial cells, is thought to contribute to the physiological regulation T cell homeostasis due to the presence of two immunotyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in its cytoplasmic tail. Indeed, loss of CD31 expression leads to uncontrolled T cell-mediated inflammation in a variety of experimental models of disease and certain CD31 polymorphisms correlate with increased disease severity in human graft-versus-host disease and atherosclerosis. The molecular mechanisms underlying CD31-mediated regulation of T cell responses have not yet been clarified. We here show that CD31-mediated signals attenuate T cell chemokinesis both in vitro and in vivo. This effect selectively affects activated/memory T lymphocytes, in which CD31 is clustered on the cell membrane where it segregates to the leading edge. We provide evidence that this molecular segregation, which does not occur in naïve T lymphocytes, might lead to cis-CD31 engagement on the same membrane and subsequent interference with the chemokine-induced PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. We propose that CD31-mediated modulation of memory T cell chemokinesis is a key mechanism by which this molecule contributes to the homeostatic regulation of effector T cell immunity.

  9. Chemokine (C-X-C Ligand 12 Facilitates Trafficking of Donor Spermatogonial Stem Cells

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    Zhiyv Niu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemokine (C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4 is an early marker of primordial germ cells (PGCs essential for their migration and colonization of the gonads. In spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs, the expression of CXCR4 is promoted by the self-renewal factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF. Here, we demonstrate an important role of CXCR4 during donor mouse SSCs reoccupation of the endogenous niche in recipient testis. Silencing of CXCR4 expression in mouse SSCs dramatically reduced the number of donor stem cell-derived colonies, whereas colony morphology and spermatogenesis were comparable to controls. Inhibition of CXCR4 signaling using a small molecule inhibitor (AMD3100 during the critical window of homing also significantly lowered the efficiency of donor-derived SSCs to establish spermatogenic colonies in recipient mice; however, the self-renewal of SSCs was not affected by exposure to AMD3100. Rather, in vitro migration assays demonstrate the influence of CXCR4-CXCL12 signaling in promoting germ cell migration. Together, these studies suggest that CXCR4-CXCL12 signaling functions to promote homing of SSCs towards the stem cell niche and plays a critical role in reestablishing spermatogenesis.

  10. Enhanced immunogenicity of DNA fusion vaccine encoding secreted hepatitis B surface antigen and chemokine RANTES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Jo; Suh, Dongchul; Park, Sang Eun; Park, Jeong-Sook; Byun, Hyang-Min; Lee, Chan; Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Inho; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2003-01-01

    To increase the potency of DNA vaccines, we constructed genetic fusion vaccines encoding antigen, secretion signal, and/or chemokine RANTES. The DNA vaccines encoding secreted hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) were constructed by inserting HBsAg gene into an expression vector with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-targeting secretory signal sequence. The plasmid encoding secretory HBsAg (pER/HBs) was fused to cDNA of RANTES, generating pER/HBs/R. For comparison, HBsAg genes were cloned into pVAX1 vector with no signal sequence (pHBs), and further linked to the N-terminus of RANTES (pHBs/R). Immunofluorescence study showed the cytoplasmic localization of HBsAg protein expressed from pHBs and pHBs/R, but not from pER/HBs and pER/HBs/R at 48 h after transfection. In mice, RANTES-fused DNA vaccines more effectively elicited the levels of HBsAg-specific IgG antibodies than pHBs. All the DNA vaccines induced higher levels of IgG 2a rather than IgG 1 antibodies. Of RANTES-fused vaccines, pER/HBs/R encoding the secreted fusion protein revealed much higher humoral and CD8 + T cell-stimulating responses compared to pHBs/R. These results suggest that the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines could be enhanced by genetic fusion to a secretory signal peptide sequence and RANTES

  11. Inhibition of chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions in donor tissue reduces mouse allograft vasculopathy and transplant rejection.

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    Erbin Dai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts.Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice. Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1(f/fTekCre(+ heparan sulfate (GAG-deficient (Ndst1(-/-, p<0.044 and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2(-/-, p<0.04 donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT (Ccr2(+/+, p< or =0.003 and Ccr2(-/-, pchemokine-GAG interactions, even in the absence of chemokine-receptor blockade, is a highly effective approach to reduction of

  12. GLP-1 Induces Barrier Protective Expression in Brunner's Glands and Regulates Colonic Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Holm, Thomas L.; Pyke, Charles

    2016-01-01

    , and that prophylactic treatment with 0.6 mg/kg liraglutide improves disease in AdTr colitis. In addition, GLP-1 receptor agonists upregulate IL-33, mucin 5b, and CCL20 in murine Brunner's glands. Taken together, our data indicate that GLP-1 receptor agonists affect gut homeostasis in both proximal and distal parts......Background: Beneficial roles for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1)/GLP-1R signaling have recently been described in diseases, where low-grade inflammation is a common phenomenon. We investigated the effects of GLP-1 in Brunner's glands and duodenum with abundant expression of GLP-1 receptors, as well...... as GLP-1 effect on colonic inflammation.Methods: RNA from Brunner's glands of GLP-1R knockout and wild-type mice were subjected to full transcriptome profiling. Array results were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in wild-type mice and compared with samples from...

  13. Similar chemokine receptor profiles in lymphomas with central nervous system involvement - possible biomarkers for patient selection for central nervous system prophylaxis, a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemma, Siria A; Pasanen, Anna Kaisa; Haapasaari, Kirsi-Maria; Sippola, Antti; Sormunen, Raija; Soini, Ylermi; Jantunen, Esa; Koivunen, Petri; Salokorpi, Niina; Bloigu, Risto; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Kuittinen, Outi

    2016-05-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) relapse occurs in around 5% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cases. No biomarkers to identify high-risk patients have been discovered. We evaluated the expression of lymphocyte-guiding chemokine receptors in systemic and CNS lymphomas. Immunohistochemical staining for CXCR4, CXCR5, CCR7, CXCL12, and CXCL13 was performed on 89 tissue samples, including cases of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), secondary CNS lymphoma (sCNSL), and systemic DLBCL. Also, 10 reactive lymph node samples were included. Immunoelectron microscopy was performed on two PCNSLs, one sCNSL, one systemic DLBCL, and one reactive lymph node samples, and staining was performed for CXCR4, CXCR5, CXCL12, and CXCL13. Chi-square test was used to determine correlations between clinical parameters, diagnostic groups, and chemokine receptor expression. Strong nuclear CXCR4 positivity correlated with systemic DLBCL, whereas strong cytoplasmic CXCR5 positivity correlated with CNS involvement (P = 0.003 and P = 0.039). Immunoelectron microscopy revealed a nuclear CXCR4 staining in reactive lymph node, compared with cytoplasmic and membranous localization seen in CNS lymphomas. We found that CNS lymphoma presented a chemokine receptor profile different from systemic disease. Our findings give new information on the CNS tropism of DLBCL and, if confirmed, may contribute to more effective targeting of CNS prophylaxis among patients with DLBCL. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Up-Regulation of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokine Production in Avian Influenza H9N2 Virus-Infected Human Lung Epithelial Cell Line (A549).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, Hamidreza; Toroghi, Reza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Influenza H9N2 virus mostly infects avian species but poses a potential health risk to humans. Little is known about the mammalian host immune responses to H9N2 virus. To obtain insight into the innate immune responses of human lung epithelial cells to the avian H9N2 virus, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine in the human airway epithelial cells infected with avian H9N2 virus were examined by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). H9N2 virus was able to cultivate in the human lung epithelial cell line (A549) and stimulate production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokine (IL-8). Expressions of cytokine genes were up-regulated to a significantly higher level for IL-1β (p line compared to non-virus-cultured A549 cells and were significant in both IL-1β (p < 0.05 in 18 hours and p < 0.001 in 24-48 hours harvested supernatant) and IL-6 (p < 0.001). Silencing the p65 component of NF-κB in A549 cells suppressed the stimulatory effects of influenza virus on secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. The findings in this study will broaden our understanding of host innate immune mechanisms and the pathogenesis of H9N2 influenza viruses in human respiratory epithelium.

  15. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  16. Modulation of monocyte/macrophage-derived cytokine and chemokine profile by persistent Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection leads to chronic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope Mavromara

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available HCV infection presents a major public health problem, with more than 170 million people infected worldwide. Chronicity and persistence of infection constitute the hallmark of the disease. Although HCV is a hepatotropic virus, subsets of immune cells have been found to be permissive to infection and viral replication. Peripheral blood monocytes, attracted to the site of infection and differentiated into macrophages, and resident hepatic macrophages, known as Kupffer cells, are important mediators of innate immunity, through production of several chemokines and cytokines in addition to their phagocytic activity. HCV proteins have been shown to modulate the cytokine and chemokine production profile of monocytes/macrophages, as it is suggested by both in vitro and clinical studies. This modified expression profile appears crucial for the establishment of aberrant inflammation that leads to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Selective chemokine receptor usage by central nervous system myeloid cells in CCR2-red fluorescent protein knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Saederup

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Monocyte subpopulations distinguished by differential expression of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 are difficult to track in vivo, partly due to lack of CCR2 reagents.We created CCR2-red fluorescent protein (RFP knock-in mice and crossed them with CX3CR1-GFP mice to investigate monocyte subset trafficking. In mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, CCR2 was critical for efficient intrathecal accumulation and localization of Ly6C(hi/CCR2(hi monocytes. Surprisingly, neutrophils, not Ly6C(lo monocytes, largely replaced Ly6C(hi cells in the central nervous system of these mice. CCR2-RFP expression allowed the first unequivocal distinction between infiltrating monocytes/macrophages from resident microglia.These results refine the concept of monocyte subsets, provide mechanistic insight about monocyte entry into the central nervous system, and present a novel model for imaging and quantifying inflammatory myeloid populations.

  18. C-C chemokine receptor-7 mediated endocytosis of antibody cargoes into intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eCharest-Morin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-C chemokine receptor-7 (CCR7 is a G protein coupled receptor that has a role in leukocyte homing, but that is also expressed in aggressive tumor cells. Preclinical research supports that CCR7 is a valid target in oncology. In view of the increasing availability of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that carry cytotoxic cargoes, we studied the feasibility of forcing intact cells to internalize known monoclonal antibodies by exploiting the cycle of endocytosis and recycling triggered by the CCR7 agonist CCL19. Firstly, an anti-CCR7 antibody (CD197; clone 150503 labeled surface recombinant CCR7 expressed in intact HEK 293a cells and the fluorescent antibody was internalized following CCL19 treatment. Secondly, a recombinant myc-tagged CCL19 construction was exploited along the anti-myc monoclonal antibody 4A6. The myc-tagged ligand was produced as a conditioned medium of transfected HEK 293a cells that contained the equivalent of 430 ng/ml of immunoreactive CCL19 (average value, ELISA determination. CCL19-myc, but not authentic CCL19, carried the fluorophore-labeled antibody 4A6 into other recipient cells that expressed recombinant CCR7 (microscopy, cytofluorometry. The immune complexes were apparent in endosomal structures, colocalized well with the small GTPase Rab5 and progressed toward Rab7-positive endosomes. A dominant negative form of Rab5 (GDP-locked inhibited this endocytosis. Further, endosomes in CCL19-myc- or CCL19-stimulated cells were positive for β-arrestin2, but rarely for β-arrestin1. Following treatment with CCL19-myc and the 4A6 antibody, the melanoma cell line A375 that expresses endogenous CCR7 was specifically stained using a secondary peroxidase-conjugated antibody. Agonist-stimulated CCR7 can transport antibody-based cargoes, with possible therapeutic applications in oncology.

  19. [Circulating levels of Th1- and Th2-chemokines increase in patients with early syphilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Anyou; Wang, Chenchen; Sun, Hong; Han, Hongfang; Wang, Fengchao; Zhang, Lunjun; Hu, Jianguo

    2017-03-01

    Objective To study the changes of plasma T helper type I (Th1)-and Th2-chemokine levels and analyze their roles in immune response and pathogenesis of early syphilis. Methods Heparin-anticoagulated peripheral blood was collected from 56 patients with early syphilis (primary syphilis, PS, n=22; secondary syphilis, SS, n=34) and healthy controls (HC, n=20). The levels of plasma Th1 chemokines including monokine induced by interferon-γ (MIG), interferon-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interferon-inducible T-cell α chemoattractant (I-TAC) and Th2 chemokines including thymus-and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), macrophage-derived chemokine (MDC) were examined using ELISA. Meanwhile, the levels of plasma cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-4 and TNF-α) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected. Results The levels of plasma MIG, IP-10 and TARC, MDC in the patients with PS and SS were significantly higher than those in the healthy controls. Moreover, the level of I-TAC in the patients with SS was significantly higher than that in the healthy controls. In particular, the levels of plasma Th1 chemokines (MIG, IP-10 and I-TAC) in the patients with SS significantly increased compared with those with PS. However, no significant difference was observed in the levels of plasma Th2 chemokines (TARC and MDC) between the patients with PS and SS. The correlation analysis showed that there was an obvious positive correlation between IP-10 and MIG, I-TAC, IFN-γ, TNF-α levels in the patients with early syphilis. Furthermore, the levels of MIG and IP-10 were positively associated with plasma CRP in the patients with early syphilis. Conclusion Both Th1 chemokines and Th2 chemokines are involved in immune response of early syphilis.

  20. Circulating levels of Th1 and Th2 chemokines in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianing; Zhao, Qi; Wang, Gaoya; Yang, Chunshu; Xu, Yong; Li, Yujia; Yang, Pingting

    2016-05-01

    Although chemokines are critical elements for the selective attraction and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning T helper (Th) 1 or Th2 chemokines in ankylosing spondylitis (AS). This study was designed to determine whether serum levels of chemokines that are preferentially chemotactic for Th1 (IFN-gamma-inducible protein-10, IP-10/CXCL10) and Th2 (thymus and activation regulated chemokine, TARC/CCL17) and (macrophage derived chemokine, MDC/CCL22) cells were elevated and whether they correlated with the clinical features in patients with AS. Forty-two patients with axial AS and 25 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. Serum levels of chemokines (IP-10, TARC and MDC) and cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-4) were examined using ELISA. The disease activity was evaluated by Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS). Serum levels of IgG, IgA, IgM, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Serum chemokine levels of IP-10, TARC and MDC were significantly higher in patients with AS than those in healthy controls. Serum cytokine levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α were also significantly increased, but the levels of IL-4 were not. Furthermore, IP-10 levels in AS patients correlated with ESP, CRP and ASDAS, while the levels of TARC and MDC did not correlate with these clinic indexes. Correlation analysis between the levels of chemokines and cytokines revealed a positive correlation between IP-10 and TNF-α. The levels of both Th1 and Th2 chemokines decreased under blockade of TNF-α. Our results suggest that both a Th1 chemoattractant IP-10 and Th2 chemoattractants, TARC and MDC, cooperatively play a role in the development of AS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between the chemokine receptor CCR5 and microglia in neurological disorders: consequences of targeting CCR5 on neuroinflammation, neuronal death and regeneration in a model of epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2013-09-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a member of CC-chemokine receptor family that binds several chemokines, including CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, MIP-1alpha), CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, MIP-1beta) and CCL5 (RANTES). The current review examines the relationship between CCR5 and the microglia in different neurological disorders and models of CNS injury. CCR5 expression is upregulated in different neurological diseases, where it is often immunolocalized in microglial cells. A multistep cascade couples CCR5 activation by chemokines to Ca(2+) increases in human microglia. Because changes in [Ca(2+)] (i) affect chemotaxis, secretion, and gene expression, pharmacologic modulation of this pathway may alter inflammatory and degenerative processes in the CNS. Consequently, targeting CCR5 by using CCR5 antagonists may attenuate critical aspects of neuroinflammation in different models of neurological disorders. To illustrate the interaction between CCR5 and microglia in the CNS, we used a model of excitotoxicity, and demonstrate the intimate involvement of CCR5 in neuron injury and inflammation attendant to kainic acid (KA)-induced neurotoxicity. CCR5 participates in neuronal injury caused by the excitotoxin, KA, brings inflammatory cells to the sites of KA-induced CNS injury, defines the extent of tissue loss after KA exposure and limits reparative responses. We used a SV40-derived vector carrying an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Delivered directly to the bone marrow, this vector decreased CCR5 expression in circulating cells. Animals so treated showed greatly reduced expression of CCR5 and its ligands (MIP-1alpha and RANTES) in the CNS, including in the brain vasculature, decreased BBB leakage, demonstrated greater KA-stimulated neurogenesis and increased

  2. Pro-Inflammatory Chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1) Promotes Healing in Diabetic Wounds by Restoring the Macrophage Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Stephen; Jayaraman, Vijayakumar; Huelsmann, Erica J.; Bonish, Brian; Burgad, Derick; Sivaramakrishnan, Gayathri; Qin, Shanshan; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Zloza, Andrew; Zhang, Chunxiang; Shafikhani, Sasha H.

    2014-01-01

    Prior studies suggest that the impaired healing seen in diabetic wounds derives from a state of persistent hyper-inflammation characterized by harmful increases in inflammatory leukocytes including macrophages. However, such studies have focused on wounds at later time points (day 10 or older), and very little attention has been given to the dynamics of macrophage responses in diabetic wounds early after injury. Given the importance of macrophages for the process of healing, we studied the dynamics of macrophage response during early and late phases of healing in diabetic wounds. Here, we report that early after injury, the diabetic wound exhibits a significant delay in macrophage infiltration. The delay in the macrophage response in diabetic wounds results from reduced Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) expression. Importantly, one-time treatment with chemoattractant CCL2 significantly stimulated healing in diabetic wounds by restoring the macrophage response. Our data demonstrate that, rather than a hyper-inflammatory state; the early diabetic wound exhibits a paradoxical and damaging decrease in essential macrophage response. Our studies suggest that the restoration of the proper kinetics of macrophage response may be able to jumpstart subsequent healing stages. CCL2 chemokine-based therapy may be an attractive strategy to promote healing in diabetic wounds. PMID:24618995

  3. Pro-inflammatory chemokine CCL2 (MCP-1 promotes healing in diabetic wounds by restoring the macrophage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wood

    Full Text Available Prior studies suggest that the impaired healing seen in diabetic wounds derives from a state of persistent hyper-inflammation characterized by harmful increases in inflammatory leukocytes including macrophages. However, such studies have focused on wounds at later time points (day 10 or older, and very little attention has been given to the dynamics of macrophage responses in diabetic wounds early after injury. Given the importance of macrophages for the process of healing, we studied the dynamics of macrophage response during early and late phases of healing in diabetic wounds. Here, we report that early after injury, the diabetic wound exhibits a significant delay in macrophage infiltration. The delay in the macrophage response in diabetic wounds results from reduced Chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 expression. Importantly, one-time treatment with chemoattractant CCL2 significantly stimulated healing in diabetic wounds by restoring the macrophage response. Our data demonstrate that, rather than a hyper-inflammatory state; the early diabetic wound exhibits a paradoxical and damaging decrease in essential macrophage response. Our studies suggest that the restoration of the proper kinetics of macrophage response may be able to jumpstart subsequent healing stages. CCL2 chemokine-based therapy may be an attractive strategy to promote healing in diabetic wounds.

  4. C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is a key receptor for chicken primordial germ cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hyo; Park, Jeong-Woong; Kim, Si Won; Park, Joonghoon; Park, Tae Sub

    2017-12-15

    In mammals, germ cells originate outside of the developing gonads and follow a unique migration pattern through the embryonic tissue toward the genital ridges. Many studies have attempted to identify critical receptors and factors involved in germ cell migration. However, relatively few reports exist on germ cell receptors and chemokines that are involved in germ cell migration in avian species. In the present study, we investigated the specific migratory function of C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs). We induced loss-of-function via a frameshift mutation in the CXCR4 gene in chicken PGCs using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) genome editing. The migratory capacity of CXCR4 knockout PGCs was significantly reduced in vivo after transplantation into recipient embryos. However, CXCR4-expressing somatic cell lines, such as chicken DT40 and DF1, failed to migrate into the developing gonads, suggesting that another key factor(s) is necessary for targeting and settlement of PGCs into the genital ridges. In conclusion, we show that CXCR4 plays a critical role in the migration of chicken germ cells.

  5. Involvement of chemokine CXCL11 in the development of morphine tolerance in rats with cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Genhua; Peng, Yawen; Xiong, Bingrui; Liu, Daiqiang; Bu, Huilian; Tian, Xuebi; Yang, Hui; Wu, Zhen; Cao, Fei; Gao, Feng

    2017-05-01

    Morphine is viewed as one of the classical treatments for intractable pain, but its role is limited by side effects, including analgesic tolerance. A few chemokines have been reported to be engaged in the mechanisms of morphine tolerance. However, the exact roles of CXC chemokine 11 (CXCL11) in chronic morphine tolerance remain unknown. In this study, Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells were inoculated into the tibia of rats to provoke cancer-induced bone pain. Then, morphine was intrathecally administered twice daily for seven consecutive days to induce drug tolerance. We found that the level of CXCL11 in lumbar spinal cord was increased during the development of morphine tolerance in cancer-induced bone pain rats. Meanwhile, CXCL11 was co-localized with markers of astrocytes and neurons in the spinal cord. Inhibition of CXCL11 by neutralizing antibodies could remarkably attenuate the degree of morphine tolerance and decrease the activation of astrocytes. Moreover, blocking astrocyte activation by d, l-Fluorocitric acid could distinctly alleviate morphine tolerance and reduce the expression of CXCL11. Finally, morphine stimulation could induce the release of CXCL11 by cultured astrocytes and neurons in vitro. In summary, our results provide evidence that spinal CXCL11 plays a powerful modulatory role in the development of morphine tolerance through cross-talking between astrocytes and neurons. Read the Review series "Pain". © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Investigation of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (ccr4 gene polymorphism in patients with Gestational Trophoblastic diseases (GTD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Naeimi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD consists of a spectrum of disorders that are characterized by an abnormal proliferation of trophoblastic tissue, following an abnormal fertilization. CCR4 is one chemo-attractant receptors preferentially expressed on Th2 cells, and therefore, is likely to participate in the recruitment of antigen-specific Th2 cells to sites of allergen exposure. Variations in CCR4 have been reported. In this study we intended to investigate the relationship between polymorphism of this particular gene at the site of 1014 C/T and GTD. Materials & Methods: In the present study, the polymorphisms of the CCR4 gene at the sites of 1014 C/T was investigated in 100 patients at in 2010 with proved GTD and 120 age-sex matched healthy individuals. Polymorphysm of CC chemokine 4 were investigated in these two groups by PCR-RFLP.These two groups were compared in respect their genotypes and alleles. Results: Frequency of genotype TT, CT, CC patients were 34%, 62% and 4% while the frequency of the control group, were 46.7%, 35.8% and 17.5% respectively. A significant difference was seen in genotype prevalence of 1014 C/T in ccr4 gene in the two mentioned groups (P0.05(. Conclusion: Regarding the relationship between The C-C chemokine receptor type 4 and gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD, it might be possible to use this gene as a prognostic marker in identifying the susceptible patients.

  7. In vitro and in vivo dependency of chemokine generation on C5a and TNF-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Sarma, V; Bless, N M

    1999-01-01

    Under a variety of conditions, alveolar macrophages can generate early response cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1), complement components, and chemotactic cytokines (chemokines). In the current studies, we determined the requirements for TNF-alpha and the complement activation product C5a in chemokine...... production in vitro and in vivo. Two rat CXC chemokines (macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)) as well as three rat CC chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1) were investigated. Chemokine generation in vitro.......v., and effects on chemokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were quantitated by ELISA. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated the requirements for TNF-alpha and C5a for full generation of CXC and CC chemokines. In vitro and in vivo blockade of TNF-alpha or C5a resulted in significantly reduced...

  8. CCR5 levels and expression pattern correlate with infectability by macrophage-tropic HIV-1, in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, L.; Paxton, W. A.; Kassam, N.; Ruffing, N.; Rottman, J. B.; Sullivan, N.; Choe, H.; Sodroski, J.; Newman, W.; Koup, R. A.; Mackay, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    Chemokine receptors serve as coreceptors for HIV entry into CD4+ cells. Their expression is thought to determine the tropism of viral strains for different cell types, and also to influence susceptibility to infection and rates of disease progression. Of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 is the most

  9. Effects of Imatinib Mesylate (Gleevec) on Human Islet NF-kappaB Activation and Chemokine Production In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Dariush; Li, Tingting; Lu, Tao; Welsh, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Imatinib Mesylate (Gleevec) is a drug that potently counteracts diabetes both in humans and in animal models for human diabetes. We have previously reported that this compound in human pancreatic islets stimulates NF-κB signaling and islet cell survival. The aim of this study was to investigate control of NF-κB post-translational modifications exerted by Imatinib and whether any such effects are associated with altered islet gene expression and chemokine production in vitro. Procedures Human islets were either left untreated or treated with Imatinib for different timepoints. IκB-α and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and methylation were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Islet gene expression was assessed using a commercial Pathway Finder microarray kit and RT-PCR. Islet chemokine production was determined by flow cytometric bead array analysis. Findings Human islet IκB-α and Ser276-p65 phosphorylation were increased by a 20 minute Imatinib exposure. Methylation of p65 at position Lys221 was increased after 60 min of Imatinib exposure and persisted for 3 hours. Microarray analysis of islets exposed to Imatinib for 4 hours revealed increased expression of the inflammatory genes IL-4R, TCF5, DR5, I-TRAF, I-CAM, HSP27 and IL-8. The islet release of IL-8 was augmented in islets cultured over night in the presence of Imatinib. Following 30 hours of Imatinib exposure, the cytokine-induced IκB-α and STAT1 phosphorylation was abolished and diminished, respectively. The cytokine-induced release of the chemokines MIG and IP10 was lower in islets exposed to Imatinib for 30 hours. Conclusion Imatinib by itself promotes a modest activation of NF-κB. However, a prolonged exposure of human islets to Imatinib is associated with a dampened response to cytokines. It is possible that Imatinib induces NF-κB preconditioning of islet cells leading to lowered cytokine sensitivity and a mitigated islet inflammation. PMID:21935477

  10. Comparison of chemokines (CCL-5 and SDF-1), chemokine receptors (CCR-5 and CXCR-4) and IL-6 levels in patients with different severities of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogłodek, Ewa A; Szota, Anna; Just, Marek J; Moś, Danuta; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2014-10-01

    Depression can be perceived as a psychoneuroimmunological disorder in which cytokines affecting the body's neurochemical and neuroendocrine functions play an important role. Among cytokines, chemokines participating in activation of the inflammatory response are considered to be crucial. 160 men and women were enrolled in the study. 120 of them were diagnosed with various types of depression. The mean age was 45.2 ± 4.5 years (range: 19-47 years). The control group consisted of 40 healthy individuals. The average age in this group was 42.4 ± 4.1 years. Plasma levels of chemokines and their receptors (CCL-5 - RANTES and CXCR-5, SDF-1 and CXCR-4), as well as of IL-6, were assessed by ELISA. There was an increase in SDF-1 and CCL-5 levels in women and men with different severities of depression, versus the control group. Also, an increase in the IL-6 levels, CXCR4 and CCR-5 receptors was observed in both women and men with all types of depression. Levels of SDF-1 and CCL-5 chemokines, as well as of CCR-5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, were higher in women than in men. The results of this study indicate the need for assessment of CCL-5 and SDF-1 chemokines levels, as they are likely markers of developing depression. Early measurement of these chemokines levels may be helpful in choosing the best pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemokine receptor Ccr1 drives neutrophil-mediated kidney immunopathology and mortality in invasive candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S; Fischer, Brett G; Lim, Jean K; Swamydas, Muthulekha; Wan, Wuzhou; Richard Lee, Chyi-Chia; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Scheinberg, Phillip; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M

    2012-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the 4(th) leading cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection in the US with mortality that exceeds 40% despite administration of antifungal therapy; neutropenia is a major risk factor for poor outcome after invasive candidiasis. In a fatal mouse model of invasive candidiasis that mimics human bloodstream-derived invasive candidiasis, the most highly infected organ is the kidney and neutrophils are the major cellular mediators of host defense; however, factors regulating neutrophil recruitment have not been previously defined. Here we show that mice lacking chemokine receptor Ccr1, which is widely expressed on leukocytes, had selectively impaired accumulation of neutrophils in the kidney limited to the late phase of the time course of the model; surprisingly, this was associated with improved renal function and survival without affecting tissue fungal burden. Consistent with this, neutrophils from wild-type mice in blood and kidney switched from Ccr1(lo) to Ccr1(high) at late time-points post-infection, when Ccr1 ligands were produced at high levels in the kidney and were chemotactic for kidney neutrophils ex vivo. Further, when a 1∶1 mixture of Ccr1(+/+) and Ccr1(-/-) donor neutrophils was adoptively transferred intravenously into Candida-infected Ccr1(+/+) recipient mice, neutrophil trafficking into the kidney was significantly skewed toward Ccr1(+/+) cells. Thus, neutrophil Ccr1 amplifies late renal immunopathology and increases mortality in invasive candidiasis by mediating excessive recruitment of neutrophils from the blood to the target organ.

  12. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc: Medicinal Chemistry and Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc. PMID:25159165

  13. Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability Is Affected by the Chemokine CXCL10 in Both Mice and Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolf Segers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The chemokine CXCL10 is specifically upregulated during experimental development of plaque with an unstable phenotype. In this study we evaluated the functional consequences of these findings in mice and humans. Methods and Results. In ApoE-/- mice, we induced unstable plaque with using a flow-altering device around the carotid artery. From week 1 to 4, mice were injected with a neutralizing CXCL10 antibody. After 9 weeks, CXCL10 inhibition resulted in a more stable plaque phenotype: collagen increased by 58% (P=0.002, smooth muscle cell content increased 2-fold (P=0.03, while macrophage MHC class II expression decreased by 50% (P=0.005. Also, the size of necrotic cores decreased by 41% (P=0.01. In 106 human carotid endarterectomy specimens we found that increasing concentrations of CXCL10 strongly associate with an increase in atheromatous plaque phenotype (ANOVA, P=0.003, with high macrophage, low smooth muscle cell, and low collagen content. Conclusions. In the present study we showed that CXCL10 is associated with the development of vulnerable plaque in human and mice. We conclude that CXCL10 might provide a new lead towards plaque-stabilizing therapy.

  14. A macrophage inflammatory protein homolog encoded by guinea pig cytomegalovirus signals via CC chemokine receptor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, Mark; Miao Zhenhua; Wang Yu; Haggerty, Shannon; Schleiss, Mark R.

    2003-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of cellular immune effector proteins, including chemokines (CKs) and CK receptor-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Sequence of the guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV) genome identified an open reading frame (ORF) which predicted a 101 amino acid (aa) protein with homology to the macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP) subfamily of CC (β) CKs, designated GPCMV-MIP. To assess functionality of this CK, recombinant GPCMV-MIP was expressed in HEK293 cells and assayed for its ability to bind to and functionally interact with a variety of GPCRs. Specific signaling was observed with the hCCR1 receptor, which could be blocked with hMIP -1α in competition experiments. Migration assays revealed that GPCMV-MIP was able to induce chemotaxis in hCCR1-L1.2 cells. Antisera raised against a GST-MIP fusion protein immunoprecipitated species of ∼12 and 10 kDa from GPCMV-inoculated tissue culture lysates, and convalescent antiserum from GPCMV-infected animals was immunoreactive with GST-MIP by ELISA assay. These results represent the first substantive in vitro characterization of a functional CC CK encoded by