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Sample records for cck-b receptor radioligand

  1. Radioligand purification prior to routine receptor assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Goff, J.-M.; Berthois, Y.; Martin, P.-M.

    1988-01-01

    The need to repurify the commercially available radioligands [ 3 H]estradiol and [ 3 H]testosterone before use in routine assays was investigated. Storage of these products for 2 months after delivery led to appreciable degradation of [ 3 H]estradiol compared to [ 3 H]testosterone. Unexpectedly, TLC and even HPLC procedures were ineffective in completely restoring the purity of [ 3 H]-estradiol and the unremoved polar products induced important variations in our estrogen receptor assays. An increase in non-specific binding and a concomitant decrease in total binding were observed resulting in an underestimation of specific binding sites and of the affinity constant. In some cases Scatchard analysis was not possible. The authors therefore strongly recommend the repurification of low-stability radioligands and propose an economic time-saving procedure for the purification of [ 3 H]estradiol by solvent differential partition which requires no high-cost investment in apparatus. (author)

  2. Characterisation of the melanocortin 4 receptor by radioligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schioeth, H.B.; Wikberg, J.E.S. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Pharmaceutical Pharmacology, Uppsala (Sweden); Muceniece, R. [Inst. of Organic Synthesis, Lab. of Pharmacology, Riga (Latvia)

    1996-09-01

    The DNA encoding the human melanocortin 4 receptor was expressed in COS (CV-1 origin, Sv 40) cells and its radioligand binding properties was tested by using the [{sup 124}I](Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}) {alpha}melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). The radioligand was found to bind to a single saturable site with a K{sub d} of 3l84{+-}0.57 nmol/l in the MC4 receptor expressing cells. The order of potency of a number of substance competing for the [{sup 12}25I][Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}] {alpha}MSH binding was the following; [Nle{sup 4}, D-Phe{sup 7}] {alpha}-MSH>[Nle{sup e}]-{alpha}-MSH>{beta}-MSH>desacetyl-{alpha}-MSH >{alpha}-MSH>ACTH (1-39)>ACTH (4-10)>{gamma}2-MSH. This order of potency is unique for the melanocortin 4 receptor when compared to our previously published data for the other melanocortin receptor subtypes. Most notably the melanocortin 4 receptor shows highest affinity for {beta}-MSH, among the endogenous MSH-peptides. Furthermore the melanocortin 4 receptor shows very low affinity for the {gamma}-MSH peptides. This distinguishes the melanocortin 4 receptor from the melanocortin 3 receptor, which is the other major central nervous system melanocortin-receptor, as melanocortin 3 receptor shows high affinity for {gamma}-MSH. Our finding might indicate a specific role for {beta}-MSH for the melanocortin 4 receptor. (au) 31 refs.

  3. Evaluation of PET Radioligands for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenbaechler, R.; Westera, G.; Nan-Horng Lin

    2002-01-01

    Full text: A-186253.1, a compound made by Abbott laboratories, was labelled with carbon-11 and evaluated as a PET ligand for the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). The compound was labelled with C-11 by methylation with 11C-MeI of the desmethyl precursor A-183828.1. The affinity of A-186253.1 for the α4β2 and the α7 subtype of the nAChR was determined in displacement studies. PET-studies were performed in rats and pigs Inhibitory constants (K i ) versus cytsine were 461 ± 99 pM for A-186253.1 and versus α-Bungarotoxin >100 μM. which means a very high selectivity for the α4β2-receptor (>227,000). Highest uptake of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 was observed in the thalamus where an increase in radiotracer uptake was seen until 45 min p.i.. Thereafter, the radiotracer concentration remained constant until the end of the scan indicating slow washout of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Application of cold A-186253.1 (0.5 mg/kg) 40 min p.i. resulted in a decrease in radiotracer concentration in the thalamus and the cortex indicating displacement of [ 11 C]-A-186253.1. Blockade studies with cytisine (0.5 mg/kg), a selective ligand for the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, showed just a slight reduction of the radioligand uptake in the thalamus and in the cortex whereas the blockade with cold A-186253.1 (1 mg/kg) resulted in a 50 % reduction. These results suggest, that 50 % of the [ 11 C]-A-186253.1 in the brain corresponds to specifically bound radioligand, but not to the α4β2 subtype of the nicotinic receptor. (author)

  4. Evaluation of potential agonist radioligands for imaging dopamine D2/3 receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieringen, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Imaging dopamine receptors with PET and SPECT can shed light on the nature of neuropsychiatric disorders which are characterized by disturbances in dopamine D2/3 receptor functioning. Agonist radioligands are considered superior to antagonists because they are more sensitive to detect dopamine

  5. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L.; Crouzel, C.; Nutt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, [N-methyl- 11 C]flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (Author)

  6. [3H]methylcarbamylcholine, a new radioligand for studying brain nicotinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abood, L.G.; Grassi, Susan

    1986-01-01

    A new radioligand, [ 3 H]methylcarbamylcholine, has been developed for the study of the nicotinic cholinergic and nicotine-like binding sites in rat brain membranes. A Scatchard analysis with the radioligand yielded a Ksub(d) of 1.1 x 10 - 9 M and a Bsub(max) of 4.0 x 10 -14 moles/mg protein which compares with a lower affinity site for (-)-[ 3 H]nicotine having a Ksub(d) of 3 x 10 -9 M and a Bsub(max) of 2x 10 -14 moles/mg. Comparable values for the Ksub(d) were obtained from a Hill plot and from calculations based on rate constants for association and dissociation. A comparison of the binding affinities of various nicotine analogues, nicotinic cholinergic agents, and other neurotropic agents revealed a close similarity between the two radioligands, with the exception that quaternization of nicotine or carbamate esters increased affinity by at least an order of magnitude with [ 3 H]methylcarbamylcholine and resulted in a comparable decrease in affinity with [ 3 H]nicotine as the ligand. The binding of [ 3 H]methylcarbamylcholine, like [ 3 H]nicotine, was not displaceable by muscarinic cholinergic antagonists. It was concluded that, although [ 3 H]methylcarbamylcholine and [ 3 H]nicotine bind to a common receptor in brain, the functional and chemical characteristics of the receptor(s) differ in some respects from peripheral nicotinic cholinergic receptors. (author)

  7. Characterization of a neurokinin B receptor site in rat brain using a highly selective radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laufer, R.; Gilon, C.; Chorev, M.; Selinger, Z.

    1986-08-05

    We have recently characterized a tachykinin receptor subtype (SP-N) whose preferred ligand is the mammalian neuropeptide, neurokinin B. To investigate this novel tachykinin receptor, we have now prepared a radiolabeled peptide, N alpha-(( /sup 125/I)desamino-3-iodotyrosyl)-(Asp5,6, N-methyl-Phe8)substance P (5-11) heptapeptide (/sup 125/I-BH-NH-Senktide), which selectively interacts with the SP-N receptor subtype. The binding of /sup 125/I-BH-NH-Senktide to rat cerebral cortex membranes was studied under conditions that minimized nonspecific binding. Unlike other tachykinin receptor probes, this radioligand is not degraded during the binding experiment. Binding of /sup 125/I-BH-NH-Senktide is reversible, saturable, and of high affinity (KD = 0.9 nM). The radioligand labels a single class of binding site (122 fmol binding sites/mg of protein), as indicated by a linear Scatchard plot and a Hill coefficient close to unity (nH = 1.05). The pharmacological specificity of this binding site corresponds to that of the neuronal SP-N receptor in guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus, which was determined by a functional bioassay. Among various rat brain regions, the highest binding was observed in the cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. These results suggest the existence and specific distribution of a neurokinin B receptor site of the SP-N type in rat brain. /sup 125/I-BH-NH-Senktide is the first selective and potent probe for this receptor and is thus an important tool for further studies of its distribution, regulation, and functional role.

  8. Characterization of [3H]LS-3-134, a Novel Arylamide Phenylpiperazine D3 Dopamine Receptor Selective Radioligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Malik, Maninder; Taylor, Michelle; Neve, Kim A.; Mach, Robert H.; Luedtke, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    LS-3-134 is a substituted N-phenylpiperazine derivative that has been reported to exhibit a) high-affinity binding (Ki value 0.2 nM) at human D3 dopamine receptors, b) >100-fold D3 vs. D2 dopamine receptor subtype binding selectivity and c) low-affinity binding (Ki values >5,000 nM) at sigma 1 and sigma 2 receptors. Based upon a forskolin-dependent activation of the adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay, LS-3-134 is a weak partial agonist at both D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes (29% and 35% of full agonist activity, respectively). In this study, [3H]-labeled LS-3-134 was prepared and evaluated to further characterize its use as a D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand. Kinetic and equilibrium radioligand binding studies were performed. This radioligand rapidly reaches equilibrium (10-15 min at 37°C) and binds with high affinity to both human (Kd = 0.06 ± 0.01 nM) and rat (Kd = 0.2 ± 0.02 nM) D3 receptors expressed in HEK-293 cells. Direct and competitive radioligand binding studies using rat caudate and nucleus accumbens tissue indicate that [3H]LS-3-134 selectively binds a homogeneous population of binding sites with a dopamine D3 receptor pharmacological profile. Based upon these studies we propose that [3H]LS-3-134 represents a novel D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand that can be used for studying the expression and regulation of the D3 dopamine receptor subtype. PMID:25041389

  9. Characterization of [(3) H]LS-3-134, a novel arylamide phenylpiperazine D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Malik, Maninder; Taylor, Michelle; Neve, Kim A; Mach, Robert H; Luedtke, Robert R

    2014-11-01

    LS-3-134 is a substituted N-phenylpiperazine derivative that has been reported to exhibit: (i) high-affinity binding (Ki value 0.2 nM) at human D3 dopamine receptors, (ii) > 100-fold D3 versus D2 dopamine receptor subtype binding selectivity, and (iii) low-affinity binding (Ki  > 5000 nM) at sigma 1 and sigma 2 receptors. Based upon a forskolin-dependent activation of the adenylyl cyclase inhibition assay, LS-3-134 is a weak partial agonist at both D2 and D3 dopamine receptor subtypes (29% and 35% of full agonist activity, respectively). In this study, [(3) H]-labeled LS-3-134 was prepared and evaluated to further characterize its use as a D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand. Kinetic and equilibrium radioligand binding studies were performed. This radioligand rapidly reaches equilibrium (10-15 min at 37°C) and binds with high affinity to both human (Kd  = 0.06 ± 0.01 nM) and rat (Kd  = 0.2 ± 0.02 nM) D3 receptors expressed in HEK293 cells. Direct and competitive radioligand binding studies using rat caudate and nucleus accumbens tissue indicate that [(3) H]LS-3-134 selectively binds a homogeneous population of binding sites with a dopamine D3 receptor pharmacological profile. Based upon these studies, we propose that [(3) H]LS-3-134 represents a novel D3 dopamine receptor selective radioligand that can be used for studying the expression and regulation of the D3 dopamine receptor subtype. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Biodistribution and dosimetry of iodine-123-labelled Z-MIVE: an oestrogen receptor radioligand for breast cancer imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijks, L. J.; Busemann Sokole, E.; Stabin, M. G.; de Bruin, K.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1998-01-01

    This study reports on the distribution and radiation dosimetry of iodine-123-labelled cis-11beta-methoxy-17alpha-iodovinyloestradiol (Z-[123I]MIVE), a promising radioligand for imaging of oestrogen receptors (ERs) in human breast cancer. Whole-body scans were performed up to 24 h after intravenous

  11. (11)C-labeling and preliminary evaluation of pimavanserin as a 5-HT2A receptor PET-radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Valdemar L; Hansen, Hanne D; Herth, Matthias M

    2015-01-01

    Pimavanserin is a selective serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) inverse agonist that has shown promise for treatment of psychotic symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease. Here, we detail the (11)C-labeling and subsequently evaluate pimavanserin as a PET-radioligand in pigs. [(11)C]Pimavanserin ...

  12. Experimental strategies for studying G protein-coupled receptor homo- and heteromerization with radioligand binding and signal transduction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Roberto; Rocchi, Cristina; Scarselli, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Before the molecular biology era, functional experiments on isolated organs and radioligand binding and biochemical experiments on animal tissues were widely used to characterize G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The introduction of recombinant cell lines expressing a single GPCR type has been a big step forward for studying both drug-receptor interactions and signal transduction. Before the introduction of the concept of receptor oligomerization, all data generated were attributed to the interaction of drugs with receptor monomers. Now, considerable data must be reinterpreted in light of receptor homo- and heteromerization. In this chapter, we will review some of the methods used to study radioligand binding and signal transduction modifications induced by GPCR homo- and heteromerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pyrethroid insecticides and radioligand displacement from the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crofton, K.M.; Reiter, L.W.; Mailman, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Radioligand binding displacement studies were conducted to determine the effects of Type I and II pyrethroids on /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FLU), /sup 3/H-muscimol (MUS), and (/sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Competition experiments with /sup 3/H-FLU and /sup 3/H-MUS indicate a lack of competition for binding by the pyrethroids. Type I pyrethroids failed to compete for the binding of (/sup 35/S-TBPS at concentrations as high as 50 pM. Type II pyrethroids inhibited (/sup 35/S-TBPS binding to rat brain synaptosomes with Ki values ranging from 5-10 pM. The data presented suggest that the interaction of Type II pyrethroids with the GABA receptor-ionophore complex is restricted to a site near the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site.

  14. Radioiodinated SB 207710 as a radioligand in vivo: imaging of brain 5-HT4 receptors with SPET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; Nobuhara, Kenji; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Karlsson, Per; Olsson, Hans; Larsson, Stig; Schnell, Per-Olof; Farde, Lars; Hiltunen, Julka; Mulligan, Rachel S.; Hume, Susan P.; Hirani, Ella; Whalley, Jaqueline; Pilowsky, Lyn S.; Ell, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) and positron emission tomography (PET), when coupled to suitable radioligands, are uniquely powerful for investigating the status of neurotransmitter receptors in vivo. The serotonin subtype-4 (5-HT 4 ) receptor has discrete and very similar distributions in rodent and primate brain. This receptor population may play a role in normal cognition and memory and is perhaps perturbed in some neuropsychiatric disorders. SB 207710 [(1-butyl-4-piperidinylmethyl)-8-amino-7-iodo-1,4-benzodioxan-5-carboxylate is a selective high-affinity antagonist at 5-HT 4 receptors. We explored radioiodinated SB 207710 as a possible radioligand for imaging 5-HT 4 receptors in vivo. Rats were injected intravenously with iodine-125 labelled SB 207710, euthanised at known times and dissected to establish radioactivity content in brain tissues. Radioactivity entered brain but cleared rapidly and to a high extent from blood and plasma. Between 45 and 75 min after injection, the ratios of radioactivity concentration in each of 12 selected brain tissues to that in receptor-poor cerebellum correlated with previous measures of 5-HT 4 receptor density distribution in vitro. The highest ratio was about 3.4 in striatum. SB 207710 was labelled with iodine-123 by an iododestannylation procedure. A cynomolgus monkey was injected intravenously with [ 123 I]SB 207710 and examined by SPET. Maximal whole brain uptake of radioactivity was 2.3% of the injected dose at 18 min after radioligand injection. Brain images acquired between 9 and 90 min showed high radioactivity uptake in 5-HT 4 receptor-rich regions, such as striatum, and low uptake in receptor-poor cerebellum. At 169 min the ratio of radioactivity concentration in striatum to that in cerebellum was 4.0. In a second SPET experiment, the cynomolgus monkey was pretreated with a selective 5-HT 4 receptor antagonist, SB 204070, at 20 min before [ 123 I]SB 207710 injection. Radioactivity in all brain regions was

  15. Modeling of the Renal Kinetics of the AT1 Receptor Specific PET Radioligand [11C]KR31173

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedim C. M. Gulaldi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The radioligand [11C]KR31173 has been introduced for PET imaging of the angiotensin II subtype 1 receptor (AT1R. The purpose of the present project was to employ and validate a compartmental model for quantification of the kinetics of this radioligand in a porcine model of renal ischemia followed by reperfusion (IR. Procedures. Ten domestic pigs were included in the study: five controls and five experimental animals with IR of the left kidney. To achieve IR, acute ischemia was created with a balloon inserted into the left renal artery and inflated for 60 minutes. Reperfusion was achieved by deflation and removal of the balloon. Blood chemistries, urine specific gravity and PH values, and circulating hormones of the renin angiotensin system were measured and PET imaging was performed one week after IR. Cortical time-activity curves obtained from a 90 min [11C]KR31173 dynamic PET study were processed with a compartmental model that included two tissue compartments connected in parallel. Radioligand binding quantified by radioligand retention (80 min value to maximum value ratio was compared to the binding parameters derived from the compartmental model. A binding ratio was calculated as DVR=DVS/DVNS, where DVS and DVNS represented the distribution volumes of specific binding and nonspecific binding. Receptor binding was also determined by autoradiography in vitro. Results. Correlations between rate constants and binding parameters derived by the convolution and deconvolution curve fittings were significant (r>0.9. Also significant was the correlation between the retention parameter derived from the tissue activity curve (Yret and the retention parameter derived from the impulse response function (fret. Furthermore, significant correlations were found between these two retention parameters and DVR. Measurements with PET showed no significant changes in the radioligand binding parameters caused by IR, and these in vivo findings were

  16. Radiosynthesis and in vitro validation of 3H-NS14492 as a novel high affinity alpha7 nicotinic receptor radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Janus H.; Ettrup, Anders; Donat, Cornelius K.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a homo-pentameric ligand-gated ion channel that is a promising drug target for cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We have previously described 11C-NS14492 as a suitable agonist radioligand for in vivo positron......, these findings show that 3H-NS14492 is a useful new in vitro radioligand for the pig alpha 7 nicotinic receptor. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  17. Detection of Harmful Algal Toxins Using the Radioligand Receptor Binding Assay. A Manual of Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-12-01

    Marine ecosystems and their resources play major roles in sustaining human population and economic growth in coastal developing countries. These ecosystems are subjected to various natural and human-made threats. Among these are harmful algal blooms (HABs), which are natural phenomena that are increasingly being reported around the globe and responsible for human poisoning through the accumulation of potent toxins in marine food products. The impact of HABs may be aggravated by a limited knowledge of the microalgal species that cause toxic outbreaks, their biology, their diversity, their life cycles, and by poor capabilities for predicting the outbreaks and assessing the degree of HAB toxicity. Other negative factors are the lack of recognition of the disease, the lack of epidemiological data, the lack of adequate and specific treatment and low public awareness. Owing to the profound public health and socioeconomic impact of HABs, many countries have developed and implemented HAB related monitoring programmes and regulatory frameworks. Following a request made by the Philippines during the IAEA General Conference in 1997 to identify possible meaures to address the impacts of HABs, the IAEA initiated related Technical Cooperation projects to assist Member States in strengthening their capacities for prevention, management and mitigation of health and socioeconomic impacts of HABs. Since 1998, the IAEA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have undertaken concerted actions to develop and to validate a radioligand based method, the receptor binding assay (RBA). The RBA is now recognized by the AOAC International as an official method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins. Within the IAEA Technical Cooperation programme, the RBA methodology was transferred to over 23 Member States in Africa, Asia, the Pacific region and Latin America. Transfer of knowledge and relevant equipment has enabled the development and strengthening

  18. Biodistribution studies of two 18F-labeled pyridinylphenyl amides as subtype selective radioligands for the dopamine D3 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocke, Carsten; Cumming, Paul; Maschauer, Simone; Kuwert, Torsten; Gmeiner, Peter; Prante, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Dopamine D3 receptors are implicated in various neuropsychiatric diseases, drug abuse and alcoholism, but specific agents for D3 molecular imaging are lacking. We evaluated two in vitro selective fluorine-18-labeled radioligand candidates ([ 18 F]5 and [ 18 F]6) for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of D3 receptor availability in the brain. Methods: Biodistribution was evaluated in Sprague–Dawley rats using ex vivo autoradiography and small-animal PET. Protein binding studies were conducted in human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid. Results: [ 18 F]5 showed rapid blood–brain barrier penetration and fast washout after intravenous injection, whereas the rat brain penetration of [ 18 F]6 was lower. The total distribution volume (V T ) of [ 18 F]5 was 20–26 mL g −1 throughout brain. Co-injection with the D3 antagonist BP897 resulted in globally increased cerebral washout of [ 18 F]5 and [ 18 F]6, but SUV analysis and parametric mapping of binding potential (BP ND ) relative to the cerebellum did not reveal specific binding of either ligand in D3-rich brain regions, i.e. the ventral striatum. However, there was substantial displaceable binding of [ 18 F]5, and to a lesser extent [ 18 F]6, in the pituitary. Conclusion: These radioligands reveal dopamine D3 receptors in the pituitary, but are not suitable for PET imaging of in brain, possibly due to low specific signal relative to the globally high V T

  19. Preclinical Safety Assessment of the 5-HT(2A) Receptor Agonist PET Radioligand [ (11)C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Martin

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: [(11)C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as an agonist radioligand for brain imaging of serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT(2A)) with positron emission tomography (PET). This may be used to quantify the high-affinity state of 5-HT(2A) receptors and may have the potential to quantify changes...... in cerebral 5-HT levels in vivo. We here investigated safety aspects related to clinical use of [(11)C]Cimbi-36, including radiation dosimetry and in vivo pharmacology. PROCEDURES: [(11)C]Cimbi-36 was injected in rats or pigs, and radiation dosimetry was examined by ex vivo dissection or with PET scanning......, respectively. Based on animal data, the Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment software was used to estimate extrapolated human dosimetry for [(11)C]Cimbi-36. The 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist actions of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 in vivo pharmacological effects in mice elicited by increasing doses of Cimbi-36 were assessed...

  20. Characterization of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 as an agonist PET radioligand for the 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(2C) receptors in the nonhuman primate brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Stepanov, Vladimir; Ettrup, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Only recently the first successful serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist PET radioligands have been described, with [(11)C]Cimbi-36 reported as the most promising in the pig brain so far. Agonist radioligands may target specifically the G protein-coupled state of the receptors and thereby provid...

  1. Histamine type I (H1) receptor radioligand binding studies on normal T cell subsets, B cells, and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, W.; Doyle, K.; Rocklin, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A single, specific binding site for [ 3 H]pyrilamine on normal human T helper, T suppressor, B cells, and monocytes was documented. The binding of the radioligand to its receptor is reversible with cold H 1 antagonist, saturates at 40 to 60 nM, and binding equilibrium is achieved in 2 to 4 min. Using a computer program (Ligand), the authors calculated the dissociation constants, binding capacities, and numbers of receptors per cell for each of the different cell types. Monocytes were found to have the highest affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine, followed by T helper cells, B cells and T suppressor cells (K/sub D/ = 44.6 +/- 49.4 nM). T suppressor cells were found to express the higher number of H 1 receptors per cell followed by B cells, T helper cells, and monocytes. The binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine increased over a 48-hr period, whereas the number of receptors per T cell was essentially unchanged. In contrast, T cells stimulated with Con A or PHA were shown to have a greater than fourfold increase in the number of receptors per cell, whereas the binding affinity for [ 3 H]pyrilamine decreased over the 48-hr period. Although the function of H 1 receptors on T cells, B cells, and monocytes has not been completely defined, this receptor has the potential of playing an important role in the modulating the immune response

  2. The Z-isomer of 11 beta-methoxy-17 alpha-[123I]iodovinylestradiol is a promising radioligand for estrogen receptor imaging in human breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijks, L. J.; Boer, G. J.; Endert, E.; de Bruin, K.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1997-01-01

    The potential of both stereoisomers of 11 beta-methoxy-17 alpha-[123I] iodovinylestradiol (E- and Z-[123I]MIVE) as suitable radioligands for imaging of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive human breast tumours was studied. The 17 alpha-[123I]iodovinylestradiol derivatives were prepared stereospecifically

  3. Characterization of P2X4 receptor agonists and antagonists by calcium influx and radioligand binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahman, Aliaa; Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Hinz, Sonja; Schiedel, Anke C; Köse, Meryem; Burton, Maggi; El-Tayeb, Ali; Gillard, Michel; Bajorath, Jürgen; de Ryck, Marc; Müller, Christa E

    2017-02-01

    Antagonists for ATP-activated P2X4 ion channel receptors are currently in the focus as novel drug targets, in particular for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. We stably expressed the human, rat and mouse P2X4 receptors in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, which is devoid of functional nucleotide receptors, by retroviral transfection, and established monoclonal cell lines. Calcium flux assay conditions were optimized for high-throughput screening resulting in a Z'-factor of >0.8. The application of ready-to-use frozen cells did not negatively affect the results of the calcium assays, which is of great advantage for the screening of compound libraries. Species differences were observed, the rat P2X4 receptor being particularly insensitive to many ATP derivatives. Membrane preparations of the cell lines showed high levels of specific [ 35 S]ATPγS binding with low nonspecific binding (antagonist TNP-ATP displaced [ 35 S]ATPγS from its binding site at human P2X4 receptors, the non-nucleotidic antagonists paroxetine and 5-BDBD did not compete with radioligand binding and were therefore characterized as allosteric antagonists. Homology modeling was applied to find an explanation for the observed species differences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of (/sup 11/C)buprenorphine - a potential radioligand for the study of the opiate receptor system in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthra, S.K.; Pike, V.W.; Brady, F.; Horlock, P.L.; Prenant, C.; Crouzel, C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of (/sup 11/C)buprenorphine in high specific activity, based on the reaction of N-(de-cyclopropylmethyl)buprenorphine with ''no carrier added'' (1-/sup 11/C)cyclopropanecarbonyl chloride followed by reduction with lithium aluminium hydride. The (1-/sup 11/C)cyclopropanecarbonyl chloride is itself prepared from cyclotron-produced (/sup 11/C)carbon dioxide. The overall preparation time is 57 min from the end of radionuclide production, and the radiochemical yield is ca 20%, (decay-corrected from (/sup 11/C)-carbon dioxide). (/sup 11/C)Buprenophine has potential as a radio-ligand for the study of the opiate receptor system in vivo by means of position emission tomography.

  5. Test-retest reliability of the novel 5-HT1B receptor PET radioligand [11C]P943

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saricicek, Aybala; Chen, Jason; Ruf, Barbara; Planeta, Beata; Labaree, David; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Huang, Yiyun; Subramanyam, Kalyani; Maloney, Kathleen; Matuskey, David; Deserno, Lorenz; Neumeister, Alexander; Krystal, John H.; Carson, Richard E.; Bhagwagar, Zubin

    2015-01-01

    [ 11 C]P943 is a novel, highly selective 5-HT 1B PET radioligand. The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of [ 11 C]P943 using two different modeling methods and to perform a power analysis with each quantification technique. Seven healthy volunteers underwent two PET scans on the same day. Regions of interest (ROIs) were the amygdala, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, insula, frontal, anterior cingulate, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and cerebellum. Two multilinear radioligand quantification techniques were used to estimate binding potential: MA1, using arterial input function data, and the second version of the multilinear reference tissue model analysis (MRTM2), using the cerebellum as the reference region. Between-scan percent variability and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess test-retest reliability. We also performed power analyses to determine the method that would allow the least number of subjects using within-subject or between-subject study designs. A voxel-wise ICC analysis for MRTM2 BP ND was performed for the whole brain and all the ROIs studied. Mean percent variability between two scans across regions ranged between 0.4 % and 12.4 % for MA1 BP ND , 0.5 % and 11.5 % for MA1 BP P , 16.7 % and 28.3 % for MA1 BP F , and between 0.2 % and 5.4 % for MRTM2 BP ND . The power analyses showed a greater number of subjects were required using MA1 BP F compared with other outcome measures for both within-subject and between-subject study designs. ICC values were the highest using MRTM2 BP ND and the lowest with MA1 BP F in ten ROIs. Small regions and regions with low binding had lower ICC values than large regions and regions with high binding. Reliable measures of 5-HT 1B receptor binding can be obtained using the novel PET radioligand [ 11 C]P943. Quantification of 5-HT 1B receptor binding with MRTM2 BP ND and with MA1 BP P provided the least variability and optimal power for within-subject and

  6. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic: a novel radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poisnel, Geraldine; Oueslati, Farhana; Dhilly, Martine; Delamare, Jerome [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France); Perrio, Cecile [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: perrio@cyceron.fr; Debruyne, Daniele [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)], E-mail: debruyne@cyceron.fr; Barre, Louisa [Groupe de Developpements Methodologiques en Tomographie par Emission de Positons, DSV/DRM UMR CEA 2E, Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie, Centre Cyceron, 14074 Caen Cedex (France)

    2008-07-15

    Introduction: Radiopharmaceuticals that can bind selectively the {kappa}-opioid receptor may present opportunities for staging clinical brain disorders and evaluating the efficiency of new therapies related to stroke, neurodegenerative diseases or opiate addiction. The N-methylated derivative of JDTic (named MeJDTic), which has been recently described as a potent and selective antagonist of {kappa}-opioid receptor in vitro, was labeled with carbon-11 and evaluated for in vivo imaging the {kappa}-opioid receptor in mice. Methods: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic was prepared by methylation of JDTic with [{sup 11}C]-methyl triflate. The binding of [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic to {kappa}-opioid receptor was investigated ex vivo by biodistribution and competition studies using nonfasted male CD1 mice. Results: [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic exhibited a high and rapid distribution in peripheral organs. The uptake was maximal in lung where the {kappa} receptor is largely expressed. [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic rapidly crossed the blood-brain barrier and accumulated in the brain regions of interest (hypothalamus). The parent ligand remained the major radioactive compound in brain during the experiment. Chase studies with U50,488 (a {kappa} referring agonist), morphine (a {mu} agonist) and naltrindole (a {delta} antagonist) demonstrated that this uptake was the result of specific binding to the {kappa}-opioid receptor. Conclusion: These findings suggested that [{sup 11}C]-MeJDTic appeared to be a promising selective 'lead' radioligand for {kappa}-opioid receptor PET imaging.

  7. Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo evaluation of [11C](R)-1-[4-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)phenyl]piperazin-1-yl]-3-(2-pyrazinyloxy)-2-propanol, a potential PET radioligand for the 5-HT7 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Demant; Lacivita, Enza; Di Pilato, Pantaleo

    2014-01-01

    In the search for a novel serotonin 7 (5-HT7) receptor PET radioligand we synthesized and evaluated a new series of biphenylpiperazine derivatives in vitro. Among the studied compounds, (R)-1-[4-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)phenyl]piperazin-1-yl]-3-(2-pyrazinyloxy)-2-propanol ((R)-16), showed the best com......) resulted in limited decrease in the binding of [(11)C](R)-16, suggesting that this radioligand is not optimal for imaging the brain 5-HT7 receptor in vivo but it may serve as a lead compound for the design of novel 5-HT7 receptor PET radioligands....

  8. Synthesis, radiolabelling, and evaluation of [11C]PB212 as a radioligand for imaging sigma-1 receptors using PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Francesco; Haider, Ahmed; Toscano, Annamaria; Pati, Maria Laura; Keller, Claudia; Berardi, Francesco; Colabufo, Nicola Antonio; Abate, Carmen; Ametamey, Simon M

    2018-01-01

    The Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) has been described as a pluripotent modulator of distinct physiological functions and its involvement in various central and peripheral pathological disorders has been demonstrated. However, further investigations are required to understand the complex role of the Sig-1R as a molecular chaperon. A specific PET radioligand would provide a powerful tool in Sig-1R related studies. As part of our efforts to develop a Sig-1R PET radioligand that shows antagonistic properties, we investigated the suitability of 1-(4-(6-methoxynaphthalen-1-yl)butyl)-4-methylpiperidine (designated PB212) for imaging Sig-1R. PB212 is a Sig-1R antagonist and exhibits subnanomolar affinity ( K i = 0.030 nM) towards Sig-1R as well as good to excellent selectivity over Sig-2R. The radiolabelling of [ 11 C]PB212 was accomplished by O-methylation of the phenolic precursor using [ 11 C]MeI. In vitro autoradiography with [ 11 C]PB212 on WT and Sig-1R KO mouse brain tissues revealed high non-specific binding, however using rat spleen tissues from CD1 mice and Wistar rats, high specific binding was observed. The spleen is known to have a high expression of Sig-1R. In vivo PET experiments in Wistar rats also showed high accumulation of [ 11 C]PB212 in the spleen. Injection of Sig-1R binding compounds, haloperidol (1 mg/kg) or fluspidine (1 mg/kg) shortly before [ 11 C]PB212 administration induced a drastic reduction of radiotracer accumulation, confirming the specificity of [ 11 C]PB212 towards Sig-1R in the spleen. The results obtained herein indicate that although [ 11 C]PB212 is not suitable for imaging Sig-1R in the brain, it is a promising candidate for the detection and quantification of Sig-1Rs in the periphery.

  9. Candidate PET radioligands for cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors: [{sup 18}F]AM5144 and related pyrazole compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zizhong [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Gifford, Andrew [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Liu Qian [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Thotapally, Rajesh [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ding Yushin [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Makriyannis, Alexandros [Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Gatley, S. John [Center for Translational Neuroimaging, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States) and Center for Drug Discovery, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)]. E-mail: s.gatley@neu.edu

    2005-05-01

    Introduction: The mammalian brain contains abundant G protein-coupled cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors that respond to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, the active ingredient of cannabis. The availability of a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand would facilitate studies of the addictive and medicinal properties of compounds that bind to this receptor. Among the known classes of ligands for CB{sub 1} receptors, the pyrazoles are attractive targets for radiopharmaceutical development because they are antagonists and are generally less lipophilic than the other classes. Methods: A convenient high-yield synthesis of N-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorophenyl)-5-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)- 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM5144) was devised by coupling the appropriate pyrazole-3-carboxyl chloride compound with 4-[{sup 18}F]fluoroaniline. The labeled precursor was synthesized from 1-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-4-nitrobenzene in 60% radiochemical yield for 10 min using an improved procedure involving sodium borohydride reduction with cobalt chloride catalysis. The product was purified by HPLC to give a specific activity >400 mCi/{mu}mol and a radiochemical purity >95%, and a PET study was conducted in a baboon. Results: Although the regional uptake of AM5144 in baboon brain was consistent with binding to cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors, absolute uptake at <0.003% injected radioactivity per cubic centimeter was lower than the previously reported uptake of the radioiodinated pyrazole AM281. Conclusions: The relatively poor brain uptake of AM5144 and other pyrazole CB{sub 1} receptor ligands is not surprising because of their high lipophilicity as compared with most brain PET radiotracers. However, for nine pyrazole compounds for which rodent data are available, brain uptake and calculated logP values are not correlated. Thus, high logP values should not preclude evaluation of radiotracers for targets such as the CB{sub 1} receptor that may require very lipophilic ligands.

  10. An experimental study on (131I-CHIBA-1001: a radioligand for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play a vital role in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depression. However, there is currently no suitable positron emission tomography (PET or Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT radioligands for imaging α7 nAChRs in brain. Here our aim is to radiosynthesize a novel SPECT radioligand (131I-CHIBA-1001 for whole body biodistribution study and in vivo imaging of α7 nAChRs in brain. METHOD: (131I-CHIBA-1001 was radiosynthesized by chloramine-T method. Different conditions of reaction time and temperature were tested to get a better radiolabeling yield. Radiolabeling yield and radiochemical purities of (131I-CHIBA-1001 were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system. Whole body biodistribution study was performed at different time points post injection of (131I-CHIBA-1001 in KM mice. Monkey subject was used for in vivo SPECT imaging in brain. RESULT: The radiolabeling yield of (131I-CHIBA-1001 reached 96% within 1.5∼2.0 h at 90∼95°C. The radiochemical purity reached more than 99% after HPLC purification. (131I-CHIBA-1001 was highly stable in saline and fresh human serum in room temperature and 37°C separately. The biodistribution data of brain at 15, 30, and 60 min were 11.05±1.04%ID/g, 8.8±0.04%ID/g and 6.28±1.13%ID/g, respectively. In experimental SPECT imaging, the distribution of radioactivity in the brain regions was paralleled with the distribution of α7 nAChRs in the monkey brain. Moreover, in the blocking SPECT imaging study, the selective α7 nAChR agonist SSR180711 blocked the radioactive uptake in the brain successfully. CONCLUSION: The CHIBA-1001 can be successfully radiolabeled with (131I using the chloramine-T method. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can successfully accumulate in the monkey brain and image the α7 acetylcholine receptors. (131I-CHIBA-1001 can be a

  11. Development of a PET radioligand for the central 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor: radiosynthesis and characterization in cynomolgus monkeys of eight radiolabeled compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Jan D., E-mail: j.d.andersson@ki.s [Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Pierson, M. Edward [AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, CNS Discovery, Wilmington, DE 19850 (United States); Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Gulyas, Balazs [Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden); Heys, Richard; Elmore, Charles S. [AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, CNS Discovery, Wilmington, DE 19850 (United States); Farde, Lars [AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals, Neuroscience Clinical, SE-15185 Soedertaelje (Sweden); Halldin, Christer [Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-17176 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-02-15

    Introduction: The serotonin 1B (5-HT{sub 1B}) receptor has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders and is a potential pharmacological target in the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to develop a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor in the primate brain in vivo. Methods: Eight carboxamide radioligands (1-8) from three different core structures were radiolabeled with carbon-11 employing N-methylation with [{sup 11}C]methyl triflate on the piperazine structural moiety. In vivo PET evaluation of each radioligand was performed in cynomolgus monkeys and included analysis of radioactive metabolites measured in plasma using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: In a total of 12 radiosynthesis of the eight radioligands, the mean decay corrected yield was 11%, and the mean specific radioactivity was 299 GBq/{mu}mol (8075 Ci/mmol) at time of administration. Of the eight tested candidates, [{sup 11}C]6 demonstrated the most promising in vivo characteristics, showing high binding in 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor-rich regions and low binding in the cerebellum. When inspecting data from all eight compounds, lipophilicity appeared as a physicochemical property that could be related to favorable in vivo imaging characteristics. Conclusion: Candidate [{sup 11}C]6, i.e., [{sup 11}C]AZ10419369, exhibited high binding potentials in regions known to contain 5-HT{sub 1B} receptors and was nominated for further preclinical characterization and PET examination in human subjects.

  12. Preclinical safety assessment of the 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET radioligand [ 11C]Cimbi-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettrup, Anders; Holm, Søren; Hansen, Martin; Wasim, Muhammad; Santini, Martin Andreas; Palner, Mikael; Madsen, Jacob; Svarer, Claus; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2013-08-01

    [11C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as an agonist radioligand for brain imaging of serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2A) with positron emission tomography (PET). This may be used to quantify the high-affinity state of 5-HT2A receptors and may have the potential to quantify changes in cerebral 5-HT levels in vivo. We here investigated safety aspects related to clinical use of [11C]Cimbi-36, including radiation dosimetry and in vivo pharmacology. [11C]Cimbi-36 was injected in rats or pigs, and radiation dosimetry was examined by ex vivo dissection or with PET scanning, respectively. Based on animal data, the Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment software was used to estimate extrapolated human dosimetry for [11C]Cimbi-36. The 5-HT2A receptor agonist actions of [11C]Cimbi-36 in vivo pharmacological effects in mice elicited by increasing doses of Cimbi-36 were assessed with the head-twitch response (HTR). The effective dose as extrapolated from both rat and pig data was low, 7.67 and 4.88 μSv/MBq, respectively. In addition, the estimated absorbed radiation dose to human target organs did not exceed safety levels. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg Cimbi-36 leads to significant HTR compared to saline, whereas 0.05 mg/kg Cimbi-36 (doses much larger than those given in conjunction with a PET scan) did not elicit a significant HTR. Administration of tracer doses of [11C]Cimbi-36 does not seem to be associated with unusual radiation burden or adverse clinical effects.

  13. Conception, synthesis and evaluation of fluorescent probes and PET radioligands for the oxytocin and vasopressin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, Iuliia

    2014-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of OTR and AVPR in ASD, to reveal new features in its pharmacology and signaling and to establish high-throughput screening method on wild-type G protein-coupled receptors, we developed imaging probes for the oxytocin-vasopressin receptors family, namely radiotracers for positron emission tomography and optical probes for fluorescence detection and imaging. The fluorescent ligands have been used to establish TR-FRET binding assay for OTR and to initiate the development the screening assay for the wild-type oxytocin receptor. The PET radiotracers will be shortly tested in mice and monkeys to evaluate their potency in detecting the central oxytocin receptors. (author)

  14. Cerebellar heterogeneity and its impact on PET data quantification of 5-HT receptor radioligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganz, Melanie; Feng, Ling; Hansen, Hanne Demant

    2017-01-01

    In the quantification of positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer binding, a commonly used method is reference tissue modeling (RTM). RTM necessitates a proper reference and a ubiquitous choice for G-protein coupled receptors is the cerebellum. We investigated regional differences in uptake...

  15. Gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor expression in primary breast cancer: comparison of immunohistochemical, radioligand and Western blot analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangia, Anita; Tommasi, Stefania; Reshkin, Stephan J; Simone, Giovanni; Stea, Baldassarre; Schittulli, Francesco; Paradiso, Angelo

    2002-01-01

    GnRH biological effect is mediated through specific GnRH membrane receptors (GnRH-receptor, GnRH-R) that have been demonstrated in human breast cancer by molecular and biochemical techniques. The A9E4 monoclonal antibody (moAb) against the epitope 1-29 of N-terminal of human GnRH-R has been proposed, suggesting the possibility to perform retrospective studies for the confirmation of clinical relevance of this receptor. The aim of the present study was to verify the performance of the A9E4 moAb when utilised for immunohistochemical analysis in 71 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast cancer samples; furthermore, a comparison with results obtained with the radioligand biochemical assay (GnRH-Rbca) and with Western blot has been performed. The A9E4 specificity was preliminarily demonstrated by Western blot analysis in both MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines. In both cell lines, only a protein of 60-64 kDa was demonstrated in the membrane and nuclear compartments. Immuno-reactivity for A9E4 was detected in the cytoplasm of morphologically normal adjacent glandular epithelia and in tumour cells. Cytoplasmic GnRH-R immuno-staining (GnRH-Rica) was shown in 55% of tumours but only 28% of these had a percentage of positive cells higher than >25%. A correlation between the percentage of positive GnRH-Rica cells and femtomoles of the GnRH-Rbca content was shown (c.c.=0.295, p=0.01). The mean content of GnRH-Rbca in the subgroup of tumours with >25% of cell positive at GnRH-Rica was significantly different with respect to that of negative GnRH-Rica tumours (25 fmol vs 11 fmol, respectively; p=0.03 by t-test). The immunohistochemical analysis of GnRH-R by A9E4 moAb in human breast cancer tissues seems to provide information that correlates with the standard biochemical assay. Retrospective clinical studies with GnRH-Rica on archival samples are strongly suggested to verify the prognostic-predictive relevance of this receptor in human breast cancer.

  16. Brain radioligands. State of the art and new trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halldin, C.; Gulyas, B.; Langer, O.; Farde, L.

    2001-01-01

    Non-invasive radioligand imaging methods for brain receptor studies use either short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as 11 C and 18 F for positron emission tomography (PET) or single photon-emitting radionuclides such as 123 I for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). PET and SPECT use radioligands which are injected intravenously into experimental animals, human volunteers or patients. The main applications of radioligands in brain research concern human neuro psychopharmacology and the discovery and development of novel drugs to be used in the therapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders. A basic problem in PET and SPECT brain receptor studies is the lack of useful radioligands with appropriate binding characteristics. Prerequisite criteria need to be satisfied for a radioligand to reveal target binding sites in vivo. This section will discuss these important criteria and also review recent examples in neuro receptor radioligand development such as selective radioligands for brain monoamine transporters

  17. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule α(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled α(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of α(7)nACh......R binding in humans and to measure α(7)nAChR occupancy of α(7)nAChR drug candidates. Here, we present the radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of (11)C-NS14492 as a selective α(7)nAChR PET radioligand....

  18. 11C-NS14492 as a novel PET radioligand for imaging cerebral alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: in vivo evaluation and drug occupancy measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Lehel, Szabolcs

    2011-01-01

    Small-molecule a(7) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a(7)nAChR) agonists are currently validated for use as treatment for cognitive disturbances in schizophrenia and in Alzheimer disease. A suitable radiolabeled a(7)nAChR PET tracer would be important for in vivo quantification of a(7)nACh......R binding in humans and to measure a(7)nAChR occupancy of a(7)nAChR drug candidates. Here, we present the radiosynthesis and in vivo evaluation of (11)C-NS14492 as a selective a(7)nAChR PET radioligand....

  19. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ([3H]CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that [3H] CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for [3H] CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific [3H]CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid)

  20. ( sup 125 I)-Bolton-Hunter scyliorhinin II: A novel, selective radioligand for the tachykinin NK3 receptor in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussap, C.J.; Burcher, E. (Deakin Univ., Victoria (Australia))

    1990-07-01

    The cyclic tachykinin scyliorhinin II (SCYII) has high affinity for the (neurokinin B (NKB)-preferring) NK3 receptor. SCYII was iodinated using (125I)-Bolton-Hunter reagent and the product BHSCYII purified using reverse phase HPLC. In rat brain membranes, binding of BHSCYII and of the relatively unselective radioligand (125I)-Bolton-Hunter eledoisin (BHELE) was saturable, reversible and to an NK3 site. In competition studies, the rank order of potency in inhibiting binding of BHSCYII and BHELE was: SCYII greater than or equal to (MePhe7)-NKB approximately senktide greater than NKB greater than or equal to kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than (Pro7)-NKB greater than neurokinin A greater than neuropeptide K greater than or equal to substance P greater than (Sar9, Met(O2)11)-substance P. In cold saturation experiments, binding of BHELE occurred to a single class of high affinity sites (KD, 18.6 +/- 0.91 nM). Binding of BHSCYII was of greater affinity than for BHELE and could be resolved into a high (KD, 1.33 +/- 0.98 nM; 27% of sites) and low affinity (KD, 9.84 +/- 2.75; 73% of sites) component. The total number of binding sites was similar for both radioligands (BHSCYII, 8.27 +/- 0.98; BHELE, 7.94 +/- 0.32 fmol/mg wet weight). In vitro autoradiography in slide-mounted sections of rat brain showed identical binding patterns for both radioligands (100 pM), with dense binding localized predominantly to the cortex, Ammon's horn field 1, premammillary nuclei and interpeduncular nucleus.

  1. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of no-carrier-added 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole, a potential dopamine D{sub 4} receptor radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gu-Cai; Zhang, Ru [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Hunan Xiangtan (China). College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Xia, Jiao-yun [Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology (China). School of Chemistry and Biology Engineering

    2016-07-01

    The dopamine D{sub 4} receptor has been shown to play important roles in some central nervous system pathologies. Specific radioligands for the D{sub 4} receptor may be useful to understand the function of the D{sub 4} receptor and its correlations with various disorders. 2-(3-(4-(4-[{sup 18}F]Fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-yl)propyl)benzo[d]thiazole ([{sup 18}F]4) was synthesized through a one-pot two-step procedure with total yield 18.6% (decay corrected). The specific activity of the radioligand was 112 GBq/μmol and its radiochemical purity was >95.0%. Its affinity and selectivity for dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptors were measured through in vitro receptor binding evaluation and the K{sub i} value for the D{sub 4} receptor was determined to be 2.9±0.2 nM, and its selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor is 709-fold versus D{sub 2long} receptor, 823-fold versus D{sub 3} receptor. The partition coefficient (Log D) of it was determined to be 2.6±0.1 through octanol-water partition experiment. The ligand presents desirable combination of lipophilicity, affinity and selectivity for the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor. The results suggested that the radioligand shows promises for the in vivo study of the dopamine D{sub 4} receptor.

  2. The Z-isomer of 11β-methoxy-17α-[123I]iodovinylestradiol is a promising radioligand for estrogen receptor imaging in human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijks, Leonie J. M.; Boer, Gerard J.; Endert, Erik; Bruin, Kora de; Janssen, Anton G. M.; Royen, Eric A. van

    1997-01-01

    The potential of both stereoisomers of 11β-methoxy-17α-[ 123 I]iodovinylestradiol (E- and Z-[ 123 I]MIVE) as suitable radioligands for imaging of estrogen receptor(ER)-positive human breast tumours was studied. The 17α-[ 123 I]iodovinylestradiol derivatives were prepared stereospecifically by oxidative radioiododestannylation of the corresponding 17α-tri-n-butylstannylvinylestradiol precursors. Both isomers of MIVE showed high in vitro affinity for dimethylbenzanthracene-induced rat and fresh human mammary tumour ER, that of Z-MIVE however being manyfold higher than that of E-MIVE. In vivo distribution studies with E- and Z-[ 123 I]MIVE in normal and tumour-bearing female rats showed ER-mediated uptake and retention in uterus, ovaries, pituitary, hypothalamus and mammary tumours, again the highest for Z-[ 123 I]MIVE. The uterus- and tumour-to-nontarget tissue (fat, muscle) uptake ratios were also highest for Z-[ 123 I]MIVE. Additionally, planar whole body imaging of two breast cancer patients 1-2 h after injection of Z-[ 123 I]MIVE showed increased focal uptake at known tumour sites. Therefore, we conclude that Z-[ 123 I]MIVE is a promising radioligand for the diagnostic imaging of ER in human breast cancer

  3. Radioligand assay in reproductive biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenman, S.G.; Sherman, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    Radioligand assays have been developed for the principal reproductive steroids and peptide hormones. Specific binding reagents have included antibodies, plasma binders, and intracellular receptors. In each assay, problems of specificity, sensitivity, and nonspecific inhibitors were encountered. Many features of the endocrine physiology in childhood, during puberty, and in adulthood have been characterized. Hormonal evaluations of endocrine disorders of reproduction are characterized on the basis of their characteristic pathophysiologic alterations. (U.S.)

  4. Selectivity of muscarinic antagonists in radioligand and in vivo experiments for the putative M1, M2 and M3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doods, H N; Mathy, M J; Davidesko, D; van Charldorp, K J; de Jonge, A; van Zwieten, P A

    1987-07-01

    In the present study we investigated the nature of the muscarinic receptors present in the hippocampus, sympathetic ganglia, atria and salivary glands of the rat. The heterogeneity of the muscarinic receptors was examined both in vivo and in radioligand binding experiments. To study whether the receptors present in the investigated tissues are indeed distinct subtypes we determined the potencies of antagonists in both systems. It is proposed that there are three different binding sites present in hippocampal, atrial and submandibular membranes and we suggest to classify them as M1, M2 and M3, respectively. Both in vivo and in vitro pirenzepine appears to possess high affinity for M1 receptors, whereas 4-diphenylacetoxy-N-methylpiperidine methobromide and dicyclomine show high affinity for both M1 and M3 receptors. AF-DX 116 (11-2[[2-[(diethylamino)methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl]-5, 11-dihydro-6H-pyrido[2,3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one) displayed high affinity for M2 receptors.

  5. Evaluation in vitro and in animals of a new {sup 11}C-labeled PET radioligand for metabotropic glutamate receptors 1 in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanotti-Fregonara, Paolo; Liow, Jeih-San; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Clark, David T.; Morse, Cheryl; Pike, Victor W. [National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Barth, Vanessa N.; Rhoads, Emily; Siuda, Edward; Heinz, Beverly A.; Nisenbaum, Eric; Dressman, Bruce; Joshi, Elizabeth; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Fisher, Matthew J.; Masters, John J.; Goebl, Nancy; Kuklish, Steven L.; Tauscher, Johannes [Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States); Innis, Robert B. [National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Two allosteric modulators of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) were evaluated as positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for mGluR1. LY2428703, a full mGluR1 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 8.9 nM) and partial mGluR5 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 118 nM), and LSN2606428, a full mGluR1 and mGluR5 antagonist (IC{sub 50} 35.3 nM and 10.2 nM, respectively) were successfully labeled with {sup 11}C and evaluated as radioligands for mGluR1. The pharmacology of LY2428703 was comprehensively assessed in vitro and in vivo, and its biodistribution was investigated by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, and by PET imaging in the rat. In contrast, LSN2606428 was only evaluated in vitro; further evaluation was stopped due to its unfavorable pharmacological properties and binding affinity. {sup 11}C-LY2428703 showed promising characteristics, including: (1) high potency for binding to human mGluR1 (IC{sub 50} 8.9 nM) with no significant affinity for other human mGlu receptors (mGluR2 through mGluR8); (2) binding to brain displaceable by administration of an mGluR1 antagonist; (3) only one major radiometabolite in both plasma and brain, with a negligible brain concentration (with 3.5 % of the total radioactivity in cerebellum) and no receptor affinity; (4) a large specific and displaceable signal in the mGluR1-rich cerebellum with no significant in vivo affinity for mGluR5, as shown by PET studies in rats; and (5) lack of substrate behavior for efflux transporters at the blood-brain barrier, as shown by PET studies conducted in wild-type and knockout mice. {sup 11}C-LY2428703, a new PET radioligand for mGluR1 quantification, displayed promising characteristics both in vitro and in vivo in rodents. (orig.)

  6. Test-retest reliability of the novel 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor PET radioligand [{sup 11}C]P943

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saricicek, Aybala [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Izmir Katip Celebi University, Department of Psychiatry, Izmir (Turkey); Chen, Jason; Ruf, Barbara [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Planeta, Beata; Labaree, David; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Huang, Yiyun [Yale University, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Subramanyam, Kalyani; Maloney, Kathleen [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Matuskey, David [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Yale University, PET Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States); Deserno, Lorenz [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Campus Charite Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Max-Planck-Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Berlin (Germany); Neumeister, Alexander [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD, West Haven, CT (United States); Krystal, John H. [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); VA Connecticut Healthcare System, Clinical Neuroscience Division, VA National Center for PTSD, West Haven, CT (United States); Carson, Richard E. [Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Bhagwagar, Zubin [Yale University, Department of Psychiatry, New Haven, CT (United States); Connecticut Mental Health Center, Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, New Haven, CT (United States); Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    2014-11-27

    [{sup 11}C]P943 is a novel, highly selective 5-HT{sub 1B} PET radioligand. The aim of this study was to determine the test-retest reliability of [{sup 11}C]P943 using two different modeling methods and to perform a power analysis with each quantification technique. Seven healthy volunteers underwent two PET scans on the same day. Regions of interest (ROIs) were the amygdala, hippocampus, pallidum, putamen, insula, frontal, anterior cingulate, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices, and cerebellum. Two multilinear radioligand quantification techniques were used to estimate binding potential: MA1, using arterial input function data, and the second version of the multilinear reference tissue model analysis (MRTM2), using the cerebellum as the reference region. Between-scan percent variability and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to assess test-retest reliability. We also performed power analyses to determine the method that would allow the least number of subjects using within-subject or between-subject study designs. A voxel-wise ICC analysis for MRTM2 BP{sub ND} was performed for the whole brain and all the ROIs studied. Mean percent variability between two scans across regions ranged between 0.4 % and 12.4 % for MA1 BP{sub ND}, 0.5 % and 11.5 % for MA1 BP{sub P}, 16.7 % and 28.3 % for MA1 BP{sub F}, and between 0.2 % and 5.4 % for MRTM2 BP{sub ND}. The power analyses showed a greater number of subjects were required using MA1 BP{sub F} compared with other outcome measures for both within-subject and between-subject study designs. ICC values were the highest using MRTM2 BP{sub ND} and the lowest with MA1 BP{sub F} in ten ROIs. Small regions and regions with low binding had lower ICC values than large regions and regions with high binding. Reliable measures of 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor binding can be obtained using the novel PET radioligand [{sup 11}C]P943. Quantification of 5-HT{sub 1B} receptor binding with MRTM2 BP{sub ND} and with MA1 BP{sub P

  7. Evaluation of d-amphetamine effects on the binding of dopamine D-2 receptor radioligand, 18F-fallypride in nonhuman primates using positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, J; Yang, Z Y; Lew, R; Brown, T; Kronmal, S; Cooper, M D; Seiden, L S

    1997-09-01

    We have investigated the ability of dopamine to compete with the binding of the high affinity dopamine D2 receptor positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand, 18F-fallypride. In vitro dissociation of 18F-fallypride with dopamine in rat striatal homogenates exhibited a dissociation rate, k(off), of 1.76 x 10(-2) min(-1) while the association rate constant, k(on), was found to be 5.30 x 10(8) M(-1) min(-1). This resulted in a dissociation constant, K(D) of 33 pM for 18F-fallypride. For in vivo studies, we investigated the effects of reserpine and d-amphetamine treatment on 18F-fallypride in an attempt to study competition of endogenous dopamine with the radioligand at the receptor sites in rats and monkeys. PET experiments with 18F-fallypride in two male rhesus monkeys were carried out in a PETT VI scanner. In control experiments, rapid specific uptake of 18F-fallypride in the striata was observed (0.05-0.06% injected dose (ID)/g) while nonspecifically bound tracer cleared from other parts of the brain. Striata/cerebellum ratios for 18F-fallypride were approximately 8 at 80 min postinjection, respectively. The monkeys received various doses (0.25 to 1.50 mg/kg) of d-amphetamine (AMPH) pre- and postinjection of the radioligand. There was a decrease of specifically bound 18F-fallypride as well as evidence of an enhanced clearance of specifically bound 18F-fallypride after administering AMPH in the two monkeys. The dissociation rates, k(off), of 18F-fallypride without AMPH was doses of AMPH (0.25 mg/kg) had a reduced effect on the binding of 18F-fallypride. No effect was seen until about 30 minutes after the injection of AMPH. Studies with various doses indicated that 18F-fallypride has a maximum response at doses of 0.75-1.50 mg/kg, with an approximately 16%/hour reduction in binding. These results indicate that AMPH stimulated release of endogenous dopamine reduces the specific binding of 18F-fallypride.

  8. Radiochemical synthesis and biological evaluation of 3-[4-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-ylmethyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine as dopamine D{sub 4} receptor radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gu-Cai; Zhang, Ru; Jiang, Kai-Jun; Chen, Bo [Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan (China). College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2014-09-01

    A potential dopamine D{sub 4} receptor radioligand, 3-[4-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)piperazin-1-ylmethyl]pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridine was synthesized through a one-pot two-step procedure with total yield 18.5% (decay corrected). The molar radioactivity was 115 GBq/μmol and the radiochemical purity was greater than 95.5%. Its affinity and selectivity for dopamine D{sub 2}-like receptors were measured through in vitro receptor binding experiments and the K{sub i} for D{sub 4} receptor was determined to be 17 ± 0.5 nM. The partition coefficient (Log P) of it was determined to be 2.80 ± 0.10 through octanol experiment. The in vivo biodistribution of it in rat brain exposed that the radioligand penetrates through blood-brain- barrier (BBB) and may specifically bind to dopamine D{sub 4} receptor. The results indicated that the radioligand shows promise for the in vivo study of dopamine D{sub 4} receptor. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of σ-1 receptor radioligand 18F-FTC-146 in rats and squirrel monkeys using PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, Michelle L; Shen, Bin; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    demonstrated accumulation of (18)F-FTC-146 in rat brain regions known to contain S1Rs and that this uptake could be blocked by BD1047 pretreatment. Ex vivo analysis of (18)F-FTC-146 in the brain showed that only intact radiotracer was present at 15, 30, and 60 min, whereas rapid metabolism of residual (18)F......-FTC-146 was observed in rat plasma. Preliminary monkey PET/MRI studies demonstrated specific accumulation of (18)F-FTC-146 in the brain (mainly in cortical structures, cerebellum, and vermis) that could be attenuated by pretreatment with haloperidol. HPLC of monkey plasma suggested radioligand metabolism......, whereas (18)F-FTC-146 appeared to be stable in human serum. Finally, liver microsome studies revealed that (18)F-FTC-146 has a longer half-life in human microsomes, compared with rodents. CONCLUSION: Together, these results indicate that (18)F-FTC-146 is a promising tool for visualizing S1Rs...

  10. Labelling and biological evaluation of [{sup 11}C]methoxy-Sch225336: a radioligand for the cannabinoid-type 2 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evens, Nele [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Bosier, Barbara [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, U.C.L., Brussels 1200 (Belgium); Lavey, Brian J.; Kozlowski, Joseph A. [Schering Plough Research Institute, Kenilworth, NJ 07033 (United States); Vermaelen, Peter [Division of Nuclear Medicine, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Baudemprez, Luc; Busson, Roger [Laboratory of Medicinal Chemistry, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Lambert, Didier M. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Radiopharmacy, U.C.L., Brussels 1200 (Belgium); Van Laere, Koen [Division of Nuclear Medicine, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Verbruggen, Alfons M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Bormans, Guy M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U.Leuven, Leuven 3000 (Belgium)], E-mail: guy.bormans@pharm.kuleuven.be

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: The cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB{sub 2} receptor) is part of the endocannabinoid system and has been suggested as mediator of a number of central and peripheral inflammatory processes. In the present study, we have synthesized N-[(1s)-1-[4-[[4-methoxy-2-[(4-[{sup 11}C]methoxyphenyl)sulfonyl) -phenyl]sulfonyl] phenyl]ethyl]methanesulfonamide ([{sup 11}C]methoxy-Sch225336) and evaluated this new tracer agent as a potential positron emission tomography radioligand for the in vivo visualization of CB{sub 2} receptors. Methods: Sch225336 was demethylated and the resulting phenol precursor was radiolabelled with a carbon-11 methyl group by methylation using [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide, followed by purification by high-performance liquid chromatography. The log P of [{sup 11}C]methoxy-Sch225336 and its biodistribution in normal mice were determined. Enhancement of brain uptake by inhibition of blood-brain barrier (BBB) efflux transporters was studied. Mouse plasma was analysed to quantify the formation of radiometabolites. The affinity of Sch225336 for the human cannabinoid type 1 and type 2 receptor was determined. Results: [{sup 11}C]methoxy-Sch225336 was obtained with a decay corrected radiochemical yield of about 30% and a specific activity of 88.8 GBq/{mu}mol (end of synthesis). After intravenous injection in mice, the compound is rapidly cleared from the blood through the hepatobiliary pathway and does not show particular retention in any of the major organs. Polar metabolites were found in mouse plasma. Brain uptake was low despite the favourable log P value of 2.15, which is partly due to efflux by BBB pumps. Conclusion: [{sup 11}C]methoxy-Sch225336 is a good candidate for in vivo imaging of the CB{sub 2} receptor, although the low blood-brain barrier penetration limits its potential for central nervous system imaging.

  11. Iodine-123 N-methyl-4-iododexetimide: a new radioligand for single-photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial muscarinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Kassiou, M.; Eu, P.; Katsifis, A.G.; Garra, M.; Power, J.; Najdovski, L.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Cardiac muscarinic receptor ligands suitable for positron emission tomography have previously been characterised. Attempts to develop radioligands of these receptors suitable for single-photon emission tomographic (SPET) imaging have not been successful due to high lung retention and high non-specific binding of previously investigated potential tracers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and in vivo imaging characteristics of a new radiopharmaceutical, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide. Biodistribution studies performed in rats showed high cardiac uptake (2.4% ID/g) 10 min after injection with a heart to lung activity ratio of 5:1. Specificity and stereoselectivity of cardiac binding were demonstrated using blocking experiments in rats. Dynamic imaging studies in anaesthetised greyhounds demonstrated rapid and high myocardial uptake and low lung binding with stable heart to lung activity ratios of >2.5:1 between 10 and 30 min, making SPET imaging feasible. Administration of an excess of an unlabelled muscarinic antagonist, methyl-quinuclidinyl benzylate rapidly displaced myocardial activity to background levels and the pharmacologically inactive enantiomer, [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iodolevetimide, had no detectable cardiac uptake, indicating specific and stereoselective muscarinic receptor binding. SPET revealed higher activity in the inferior than in the anterior wall, this being consistent with previously described regional variation of cardiac parasympathetic innervation. [ 123 I]N-methyl-4-iododexetimide shows promise as an imaging agent for muscarinic receptor distribution in the heart and may be helpful in evaluating diverse cardiac diseases associated with altered muscarinic receptor function, including heart failure and diabetic heart disease. (orig.)

  12. Molecular imaging of {sigma} receptors: synthesis and evaluation of the potent {sigma}{sub 1} selective radioligand [{sup 18}F]fluspidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Scheunemann, Matthias; Steinbach, Joerg; Brust, Peter [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Research Site Leipzig, Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Wiese, Christian; Grosse Maestrup, Eva; Schepmann, Dirk; Wuensch, Bernhard [Institut fuer Pharmazeutische und Medizinische Chemie der Westfaelischen Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Neuroimaging of {sigma}{sub 1} receptors in the human brain has been proposed for the investigation of the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. However, there is a lack of suitable {sup 18}F-labelled PET radioligands for that purpose. The selective {sigma}{sub 1} receptor ligand [{sup 18}F]fluspidine (1'-benzyl-3-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)-3H-spiro[[2]benzofuran-1,4'-piperidine]) was synthesized by nucleophilic {sup 18}F{sup -} substitution of the tosyl precursor. In vitro receptor binding affinity and selectivity were assessed by radioligand competition in tissue homogenate and autoradiographic approaches. In female CD-1 mice, in vivo properties of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine were evaluated by ex vivo brain section imaging and organ distribution of intravenously administered radiotracer. Target specificity was validated by organ distribution of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine after treatment with 1 mg/kg i.p. of the {sigma} receptor antagonist haloperidol or the emopamil binding protein (EBP) inhibitor tamoxifen. In vitro metabolic stability and in vivo metabolism were investigated by LC-MS{sup n} and radio-HPLC analysis. [{sup 18}F]Fluspidine was obtained with a radiochemical yield of 35-45%, a radiochemical purity of {>=} 99.6% and a specific activity of 150-350 GBq/{mu}mol (n = 6) within a total synthesis time of 90-120 min. In vitro, fluspidine bound specifically and with high affinity to {sigma}{sub 1} receptors (K{sub i} = 0.59 nM). In mice, [{sup 18}F]fluspidine rapidly accumulated in brain with uptake values of 3.9 and 4.7%ID/g and brain to blood ratios of 7 and 13 at 5 and 30 min after intravenous application of the radiotracer, respectively. By ex vivo autoradiography of brain slices, resemblance between binding site occupancy of [{sup 18}F]fluspidine and the expression of {sigma}{sub 1} receptors was shown. The radiotracer uptake in the brain as well as in peripheral {sigma}{sub 1} receptor expressing organs was significantly

  13. Biodistribution and dosimetry of (iodine-123)-iodomethyl-N,N-diethyltamoxifen, an (anti)oestrogen receptor radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiele, C. van de; Sutter, J. de; Dierckx, R.A.; Vos, F. de; Dumont, F.; Slegers, G.; Thierens, H.

    1999-01-01

    This study reports on the distribution and radiation dosimetry of iodine-123 labelled trans-Z-iodomethyl-N,N-diethyltamoxifen (123-ITX), a promising radioligand for prediction of the therapeutic efficacy of unlabelled tamoxifen in human breast carcinoma. Whole-body scans were performed up to 24 h after intravenous injection of 123-ITX (mean: 146 MBq, range: 142-148 MBq) in five female volunteers, four with and one without thyroid blockade. Blood samples were taken at various times up to 24 h after injection. Urine was also collected up to 24 h after injection, allowing calculation of renal clearance and interpretation of whole-body clearance. Time-activity curves were generated for the thyroid, heart, brain, breasts, liver and gallbladder by fitting the organ-specific geometric mean counts, obtained from regions of interest. The MIRD formulation was applied to calculate the absorbed radiation doses for various organs. The images showed rapid hepatobiliary excretion, resulting in good imaging conditions for the thoracic region, whereas imaging of the abdominal region was impeded by extensive bowel activity. The breast to non-specific uptake ratio increased over time. 123-ITX was cleared by both the kidneys and the gastrointestinal tract. At 50 h p.i. the mean excretion in the urine was 89.4% (SD 5.7%). If the thyroid was not blocked, it was one of the critical organs. The highest absorbed doses were received by the excretory organs, i.e. the urinary bladder wall, the lower and upper large intestine, and the gallbladder wall. The average effective dose of 123-ITX was estimated to be 0.0084 mSv/MBq. The amount of 123-ITX required for adequate imaging of tumoral uptake results in an acceptable effective dose to the patient. (orig.)

  14. Molecular imaging of {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors: design and evaluation of the potent radioligand [{sup 18}F]NS10743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Fischer, Steffen; Hiller, Achim; Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Oestergaard Nielsen, Elsebet; Brunicardi Timmermann, Daniel; Peters, Dan [NeuroSearch A/S, Ballerup (Denmark); Steinbach, Joerg [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany); Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmacy, Dresden (Germany); Sabri, Osama [Universitaet Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    The outstanding diversity of cellular properties mediated by neuronal and nonneuronal {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChR) points to the diagnostic potential of quantitative nuclear molecular imaging of {alpha}7 nAChR in neurology and oncology. It was our goal to radiolabel the {alpha}7 nAChR agonist 4-[5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-[1,3,4]oxadiazol-2-yl]-1,4-diaza-bicyclo[3.2.2]nonane (NS10743) and to assess the selectivity of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 binding site occupancy in animal experiments. [{sup 18}F]NS10743 was synthesized by nucleophilic substitution of the nitro precursor. In vitro receptor affinity and selectivity were assessed by radioligand competition and autoradiography. The radiotracer properties were evaluated in female CD-1 mice by brain autoradiography and organ distribution. Target specificity was validated after treatment with SSR180711 (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), and metabolic stability was investigated using radio-HPLC. The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 exceeded 150 GBq/{mu}mol at a radiochemical purity >99%. In vitro, NS10743 and [{sup 18}F]NS10743 showed high affinity and specificity towards {alpha}7 nAChR. The brain permeation of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 was fast and sufficient with values of 4.83 and 1.60% injected dose per gram and brain to plasma ratios of 3.83 and 2.05 at 5 and 60 min after radiotracer administration. Brain autoradiography and organ distribution showed target-specific accumulation of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 in brain substructures and various {alpha}7 nAChR-expressing organs. The radiotracer showed a high metabolic stability in vivo with a single polar radiometabolite, which did not cross the blood-brain barrier. The good in vitro and in vivo features of [{sup 18}F]NS10743 make this radioligand a promising candidate for quantitative in vivo imaging of {alpha}7 nAChR expression and encourage further investigations. (orig.)

  15. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of 11C-CIMBI-5 as a 5-HT2A receptor agonist radioligand for PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Palner, Mikael; Gillings, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PET brain imaging of the serotonin 2A (5-hydroxytryptamine 2A, or 5-HT(2A)) receptor has been widely used in clinical studies, and currently, several well-validated radiolabeled antagonist tracers are used for in vivo imaging of the cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptor. Access to 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist...... PET tracers would, however, enable imaging of the active, high-affinity state of receptors, which may provide a more meaningful assessment of membrane-bound receptors. In this study, we radiolabel the high-affinity 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist 2-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(11)C-OCH(3...

  16. Development of a high specific activity radioligand, 125I-LSD, and its application to the study of serotonin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadan, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    125 I-Labeled receptor ligands can be synthesized with specific activities exceeding 2000 Ci/mmol, making them nearly 70-fold more sensitive in receptor site assays than (mono) tritiated ligands. We have synthesized and characterized 125 I-lysergic acid diethylamide ( 125 I-LSD), the first radioiodinated ligand for serotonin receptor studies. The introduction of 125 I at the 2 position of LSD increased both the affinity and selectivity of this compound for serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in rat cortex. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD and its high ratio of specific to nonspecific binding make this ligand especially useful for autoradiographic studies of serotonin receptor distribution. We have found that 125 I-LSD binds with high affinity to a class of serotonin receptors in the CNS of the marine mollusk Aplysia californica

  17. Synthesis and In Vitro Evaluation of Oxindole Derivatives as Potential Radioligands for 5-HT7 Receptor Imaging with PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias Manfred; Volk, Balázs; Pallagi, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The most recently discovered serotonin (5-HT) receptor subtype, 5-HT(7), is considered to be associated with several CNS disorders. Noninvasive in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral 5-HT(7) receptors could provide a significant advance in the understanding of the neurobio...

  18. Synthesis and in-vivo evaluation of C-11 p-PVP-MEMA as a PET radioligand for imaging nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, T.; Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Sch Chem, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Dolle, F.; Langle, S.; Roger, G.; Lagnel-de Bruin, B.; Hinnen, F.; Valette, H.; Bottlaender, M. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, Inst Imagerie Biomed, F-91401 Orsay (France); Fulton, R.R.; Henderson, D.J. [Royal Prince Alfred Hosp, Dept PET and Nucl Med, Camperdown, NSW 2050 (Australia); Coster, M.J. [Griffith Univ, Eskitis Inst Cell and Mol Therapies, Nathan, Qld 4121 (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Univ Sydney, Discipline Med Radiat Sci, Sydney, NSW2006 (Australia); Brain and Mind Res Inst, Camperdown, NSW2050 (Australia)

    2008-07-01

    Within the class of (4-pyridinyl)vinyl-pyridines developed by Abbott laboratories as potent neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands, p-PVP-MEMA ({l_brace}oro-5-((E)-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl) pyridin-3-yloxy]-1-methylethyl{r_brace} is the lead compound of a novel series that do not display the traditional nicotinic-like pyrrole-ring but still possessing high sub-nanomolar affinity (K-i 0.077 nm-displacement of [H-3](-)cytisine from whole rat brain synaptic membranes). In the present study, p-PVP-MEMA and its nor-derivative ({l_brace}oro-5-((E)-2-pyridin-4- yl-vinyl) pyridin-3-yloxy]-1-methylethyl{r_brace} as precursor for labelling with the short-lived positron-emitter carbon-11 (T{sub 1/2} = 20.4 min) were synthesized in 10 chemical steps from 2-hydroxy-5-nitropyridine and Boc-D-alanine. N-Alkylation of nor-p-PVP-MEMA with [C-11] methyl iodide afforded [C-11]p-PVP-MEMA ({>=} 98% radiochemically pure, specific activity of 86.4 GBq {mu} mol{sup -1}) in 2% (non-decay corrected and non-optimized) radiochemical yield, in 34 min (including HPLC purification and formulation). Preliminary positron emission tomography PET) results obtained in a Papio hamadryas baboon showed that [C-11] p-PVP-MEMA is not a suitable PET-radioligand. (authors)

  19. Radiosynthesis and preliminary evaluation of 5-[123/125I]iodo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine: a radioligand for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horti, Andrew G.; Koren, Andrei O.; Lee, Kan Sam; Mukhin, Alexey G.; Vaupel, D. Bruce; Kimes, Alane S.; Stratton, Morgan; London, Edythe D.

    1999-01-01

    The radiochemical syntheses of 5-[ 125 I]iodo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[ 125 I]-iodo-A-85380, [ 125 I]1) and 5-[ 123 I]-iodo-A-85380, [ 123 I]1, were accomplished by radioiodination of 5-trimethylstannyl-3-((1-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2(S) -azetidinyl)methoxy)pyridine, 2, followed by acidic deprotection. Average radiochemical yields of [ 125 I]1 and [ 123 I]1 were 40-55%; and the average specific radioactivities were 1,700 and 7,000 mCi/μmol, respectively. Binding affinities of [ 125 I]1 and [ 123 I]1 in vitro (rat brain membranes) were each characterized by a K d value of 11 pM. Preliminary in vivo assay and ex vivo autoradiography of mouse brain indicated that [ 125 I]1 selectively labels nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with very high affinity and specificity. These studies suggest that [ 123 I]1 may be useful as a radioligand for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of nAChRs

  20. Radiosynthesis and preliminary evaluation of 5-[{sup 123/125}I]iodo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine: a radioligand for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horti, Andrew G.; Koren, Andrei O.; Lee, Kan Sam; Mukhin, Alexey G.; Vaupel, D. Bruce; Kimes, Alane S.; Stratton, Morgan; London, Edythe D. E-mail: elondon@intra.nida.nih.gov

    1999-02-01

    The radiochemical syntheses of 5-[{sup 125}I]iodo-3-(2(S)-azetidinylmethoxy)pyridine (5-[{sup 125}I]-iodo-A-85380, [{sup 125}I]1) and 5-[{sup 123}I]-iodo-A-85380, [{sup 123}I]1, were accomplished by radioiodination of 5-trimethylstannyl-3-((1-tert-butoxycarbonyl-2(S) -azetidinyl)methoxy)pyridine, 2, followed by acidic deprotection. Average radiochemical yields of [{sup 125}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]1 were 40-55%; and the average specific radioactivities were 1,700 and 7,000 mCi/{mu}mol, respectively. Binding affinities of [{sup 125}I]1 and [{sup 123}I]1 in vitro (rat brain membranes) were each characterized by a K{sub d} value of 11 pM. Preliminary in vivo assay and ex vivo autoradiography of mouse brain indicated that [{sup 125}I]1 selectively labels nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with very high affinity and specificity. These studies suggest that [{sup 123}I]1 may be useful as a radioligand for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of nAChRs.

  1. Synthesis and in-vivo evaluation of C-11 p-PVP-MEMA as a PET radioligand for imaging nicotinic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, T.; Kassiou, M.; Dolle, F.; Langle, S.; Roger, G.; Lagnel-de Bruin, B.; Hinnen, F.; Valette, H.; Bottlaender, M.; Fulton, R.R.; Henderson, D.J.; Coster, M.J.; Kassiou, M.

    2008-01-01

    Within the class of (4-pyridinyl)vinyl-pyridines developed by Abbott laboratories as potent neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligands, p-PVP-MEMA ({oro-5-((E)-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl) pyridin-3-yloxy]-1-methylethyl} is the lead compound of a novel series that do not display the traditional nicotinic-like pyrrole-ring but still possessing high sub-nanomolar affinity (K-i 0.077 nm-displacement of [H-3](-)cytisine from whole rat brain synaptic membranes). In the present study, p-PVP-MEMA and its nor-derivative ({oro-5-((E)-2-pyridin-4- yl-vinyl) pyridin-3-yloxy]-1-methylethyl} as precursor for labelling with the short-lived positron-emitter carbon-11 (T 1/2 = 20.4 min) were synthesized in 10 chemical steps from 2-hydroxy-5-nitropyridine and Boc-D-alanine. N-Alkylation of nor-p-PVP-MEMA with [C-11] methyl iodide afforded [C-11]p-PVP-MEMA (≥ 98% radiochemically pure, specific activity of 86.4 GBq μ mol -1 ) in 2% (non-decay corrected and non-optimized) radiochemical yield, in 34 min (including HPLC purification and formulation). Preliminary positron emission tomography PET) results obtained in a Papio hamadryas baboon showed that [C-11] p-PVP-MEMA is not a suitable PET-radioligand. (authors)

  2. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of 11C-CIMBI-5 as a 5-HT2A receptor agonist radioligand for PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettrup, Anders; Palner, Mikael; Gillings, Nic; Santini, Martin A; Hansen, Martin; Kornum, Birgitte R; Rasmussen, Lars K; Någren, Kjell; Madsen, Jacob; Begtrup, Mikael; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-11-01

    PET brain imaging of the serotonin 2A (5-hydroxytryptamine 2A, or 5-HT(2A)) receptor has been widely used in clinical studies, and currently, several well-validated radiolabeled antagonist tracers are used for in vivo imaging of the cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptor. Access to 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist PET tracers would, however, enable imaging of the active, high-affinity state of receptors, which may provide a more meaningful assessment of membrane-bound receptors. In this study, we radiolabel the high-affinity 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist 2-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(11)C-OCH(3)]methoxybenzyl)ethanamine ((11)C-CIMBI-5) and investigate its potential as a PET tracer. The in vitro binding and activation at 5-HT(2A) receptors by CIMBI-5 was measured with binding and phosphoinositide hydrolysis assays. Ex vivo brain distribution of (11)C-CIMBI-5 was investigated in rats, and PET with (11)C-CIMBI-5 was conducted in pigs. In vitro assays showed that CIMBI-5 was a high-affinity agonist at the 5-HT(2A) receptor. After intravenous injections of (11)C-CIMBI-5, ex vivo rat studies showed a specific binding ratio of 0.77 ± 0.07 in the frontal cortex, which was reduced to cerebellar levels after ketanserin treatment, thus indicating that (11)C-CIMBI-5 binds selectively to the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the rat brain. The PET studies showed that the binding pattern of (11)C-CIMBI-5 in the pig brain was in accordance with the expected 5-HT(2A) receptor distribution. (11)C-CIMBI-5 gave rise to a cortical binding potential of 0.46 ± 0.12, and the target-to-background ratio was similar to that of the widely used 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist PET tracer (18)F-altanserin. Ketanserin treatment reduced the cortical binding potentials to cerebellar levels, indicating that in vivo (11)C-CIMBI-5 binds selectively to the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the pig brain. (11)C-CIMBI-5 showed a cortex-to-cerebellum binding ratio equal to the widely used 5-HT(2A) antagonist PET tracer (18)F

  3. [18F]F15599, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist, as a radioligand for PET neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemoine, Laetitia; Verdurand, Mathieu; Vacher, Bernard; Blanc, Elodie; Newman-Tancredi, Adrian; Le Bars, Didier; Zimmer, Luc

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin-1A (5-HT 1A ) receptor is implicated in the pathophysiology of major neuropsychiatric disorders. Thus, the functional imaging of 5-HT 1A receptors by positron emission tomography (PET) may contribute to the understanding of its role in those pathologies and their therapeutics. These receptors exist in high- and low-affinity states and it is proposed that agonists bind preferentially to the high-affinity state of the receptor and therefore could provide a measure of the functional 5-HT 1A receptors. Since all clinical PET 5-HT 1A radiopharmaceuticals are antagonists, it is of great interest to develop a 18 F labelled agonist. F15599 (3-chloro-4-fluorophenyl-(4-fluoro-4{ [(5-methyl-pyrimidin-2-ylmethyl)-amino]-methyl}-piperidin-1-yl)-methanone) is a novel ligand with high affinity and selectivity for 5-HT 1A receptors and is currently tested as an antidepressant. In pharmacological tests in rat, it exhibits preferential agonist activity at post-synaptic 5-HT 1A receptors in cortical brain regions. Here, its nitro-precursor was synthesised and radiolabelled via a fluoronucleophilic substitution. Radiopharmacological evaluations included in vitro and ex vivo autoradiography in rat brain and PET scans on rats and cats. Results were compared with simultaneous studies using [ 18 F]MPPF, a validated 5-HT 1A antagonist radiopharmaceutical. The chemical and radiochemical purities of [ 18 F]F15599 were >98%. In vitro [ 18 F ]F15599 binding was consistent with the known 5-HT 1A receptors distribution (hippocampus, dorsal raphe nucleus, and notably cortical areas) and addition of Gpp(NH)p inhibited [ 18 F ]F15599 binding, consistent with a specific binding to G protein-coupled receptors. In vitro binding of [ 18 F]F15599 was blocked by WAY100635 and 8-OH-DPAT, respectively, prototypical 5-HT 1A antagonist and agonist. The ex vivo and in vivo studies demonstrated that the radiotracer readily entered the rat and the cat brain and generated few brain radioactive

  4. PET imaging evaluation of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10, a novel radioligand specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, in nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillmer, Ansel T.; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Li, Songye; Lin, Shu-fei; Holden, Daniel; Labaree, David; Ropchan, Jim; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun [Yale University, PET Center, 801 Howard Ave, PO Box 208048, New Haven, CT (United States); Scheunemann, Matthias; Teodoro, Rodrigo; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Brust, Peter [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands specific to α{sub 7} nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) afford in vivo imaging of this receptor for neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, and substance abuse. This work aims to characterize the kinetic properties of an α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific radioligand, 7-(1,4-diazabicyclo[3.2.2]nonan-4-yl)-2-[{sup 18}F]-fluorodibenzo[b,d]thiophene 5,5-dioxide ([{sup 18}F]DBT-10), in nonhuman primates. [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced via nucleophilic substitution of the nitro-precursor. Four Macaca mulatta subjects were imaged with [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 PET, with measurement of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 parent concentrations and metabolism in arterial plasma. Baseline PET scans were acquired for all subjects. Following one scan, ex vivo analysis of brain tissue was performed to inspect for radiolabeled metabolites in brain. Three blocking scans with 0.69 and 1.24 mg/kg of the α{sub 7}-nAChR-specific ligand ASEM were also acquired to assess dose-dependent blockade of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 binding. Kinetic analysis of PET data was performed using the metabolite-corrected input function to calculate the parent fraction corrected total distribution volume (V{sub T}/f{sub P}). [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 was produced within 90 min at high specific activities of 428 ± 436 GBq/μmol at end of synthesis. Metabolism of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 varied across subjects, stabilizing by 120 min post-injection at parent fractions of 15-55 %. Uptake of [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 in brain occurred rapidly, reaching peak standardized uptake values (SUVs) of 2.9-3.7 within 30 min. The plasma-free fraction was 18.8 ± 3.4 %. No evidence for radiolabeled [{sup 18}F]DBT-10 metabolites was found in ex vivo brain tissue samples. Kinetic analysis of PET data was best described by the two-tissue compartment model. Estimated V{sub T}/f{sub P} values were 193-376 ml/cm{sup 3} across regions, with regional rank order of thalamus > frontal cortex > striatum

  5. Preparation of iodine-123 labeled AM251: a potential SPECT radioligand for the brain cannabinoid CB1 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Ruoxi; Makriyannis, Alexandros [Connecticut Univ., Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Storrs, CT (United States); Gatley, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Medical Dept., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We report the synthesis and labeling with iodine-123 of N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251). This compound is an analog of the recently described cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, in which a 4-chlorophenyl group is replaced by 4-iodophenyl. Labeling in good yield (62%) and radiochemical purity (> 95%), and high specific activity (> 2500 Ci/mmol) was achieved by an iododestannylation reaction using the tributyltin precursor, no carrier added I-123 iodide, and chloramine-T. (author).

  6. Characterisation of the appearance of radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma from the 5-HT1A receptor radioligand, [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 - explanation of high signal contrast in PET and an aid to biomathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Safiye; Lundkvist, Camilla; Pike, Victor W.; Halldin, Christer; McCarron, Julie A.; Swahn, Carl-Gunnar; Farde, Lars; Ginovart, Nathalie; Luthra, Sajinder K.; Gunn, Roger N.; Bench, Christopher J.; Sargent, Peter A.; Grasby, Paul M.

    1998-01-01

    N-(2-(4-(2-Methoxy-phenyl)-1-piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (WAY-100635), labelled in its amido carbonyl group with 11 C (t 1/2 = 20.4 min), is a promising radioligand for the study of brain 5-HT 1A receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Thus, in PET experiments in six cynomolgus monkeys and seven healthy male volunteers, [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 was taken up avidly by brain. Radioactivity was retained in regions rich in 5-HT 1A receptors, such as occipital cortex, temporal cortex and raphe nuclei, but cleared rapidly from cerebellum, a region almost devoid of 5-HT 1A receptors. [Carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 provides about 3- and 10-fold higher signal contrast (receptor-specific to nonspecific binding) than [O-methyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 in receptor-rich areas of monkey and human brain, respectively. To elucidate the effect of label position on radioligand behaviour and to aid in the future biomathematical interpretation of the kinetics of regional cerebral radioactivity uptake in terms of receptor-binding parameters, HPLC was used to measure [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and its radioactive metabolites in plasma at various times after intravenous injection. Radioactivity cleared rapidly from monkey and human plasma. Parent radioligand represented 19% of the radioactivity in monkey plasma at 47 min and 8% of the radioactivity in human plasma at 40 min. [Carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 was below detectable limits in monkey plasma and at most a very minor radioactive metabolite in human plasma. [ 11 C]Cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was identified as a significant radioactive metabolite. In human plasma this maximally represented 21% of the radioactivity at 10 min after radioligand injection. All other major radioactive metabolites in monkey and human plasma were even more polar. No-carrier-added [carbonyl- 11 C]cyclohexanecarboxylic acid was prepared in the laboratory and after intravenous administration into cynomolgus monkey was

  7. Synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a selective antagonist and the corresponding radioligand for the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulven, Trond; Gallen, Michael J; Nielsen, Mads C

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis and preliminary in vitro biological evaluation of a selective high-affinity CRTH2 antagonist is described. The stability of an N-benzyl group facilitated synthesis of the corresponding radioligand by tritiation of a brominated precursor. The compound [(3)H]TRQ11238 represents the first ...

  8. Radiosynthesis of (S)-[18F]T1: The first PET radioligand for molecular imaging of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarasamkan, Jiradanai; Fischer, Steffen; Deuther-Conrad, Winnie; Ludwig, Friedrich-Alexander; Scheunemann, Matthias; Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Vajragupta, Opa; Brust, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Recent pharmacologic data revealed the implication of α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in nicotine and drug addiction. To image α3β4 nAChRs in vivo, we aimed to establish the synthesis of a [ 18 F]-labelled analog of the highly affine and selective α3β4 ligand (S)-3-(4-(4-fluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)quinuclidine ((S)-T1). (S)-[ 18 F]T1 was synthesized from ethynyl-4-[ 18 F]fluorobenzene ([ 18 F]5) and (S)-azidoquinuclidine by click reaction. After a synthesis time of 130 min (S)-[ 18 F]T1 was obtained with a radiochemical yield (non-decay corrected) of 4.3±1.3%, a radiochemical purity of >99% and a molar activity of >158 GBq/μmol. The brain uptake and the brain-to-blood ratio of (S)-[ 18 F]T1 in mice at 30 min post injection were 2.02 (SUV) and 6.1, respectively. According to an ex-vivo analysis, the tracer remained intact (>99%) in brain. Only one major radiometabolite was detected in plasma and urine samples. In-vitro autoradiography on pig brain slices revealed binding of (S)-[ 18 F]T1 to brain regions associated with the expression of α3β4 nAChRs, which could be reduced by the α3β4 nAChR selective drug AT-1001. These findings make (S)-[ 18 F]T1 a potential tool for the non-invasive imaging of α3β4 nAChRs in the brain by PET. - Highlights: • (S)-[ 18 F]T1 is a promising α3ß4 nAChR ligand for PET imaging. • The novel radioligand (S)-[ 18 F]T1 was synthesized by click reaction. • The potential of (S)-[ 18 F]T1 was shown by in vitro autoradiography and in vivo evaluation in mice.

  9. Preclinical evaluation and test-retest studies of [{sup 18}F]PSS232, a novel radioligand for targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu{sub 5})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milicevic Sephton, Selena; Mueller Herde, Adrienne; Keller, Claudia; Ruedisuehli, Sonja; Schibli, Roger; Kraemer, Stefanie D.; Ametamey, Simon M. [Center for Radiopharmaceutical Sciences of ETH, PSI and USZ, Zurich (Switzerland); Mu, Linjing [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zuerich (Switzerland); Auberson, Yves [Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Basel (Switzerland)

    2015-01-15

    A novel, {sup 18}F-labelled metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu{sub 5}) derivative of [{sup 11}C]ABP688 ([{sup 11}C]1), [{sup 18}F]PSS232 ([{sup 18}F]5), was evaluated in vitro and in vivo for its potential as a PET agent and was used in test-retest reliability studies The radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]5 was accomplished via a one-step reaction using a mesylate precursor. In vitro stability was determined in PBS and plasma, and with liver microsomal enzymes. Metabolite studies were performed using rat brain extracts, blood and urine. In vitro autoradiography was performed on horizontal slices of rat brain using 1 and 8, antagonists for mGlu{sub 5} and mGlu{sub 1}, respectively. Small-animal PET, biodistribution, and test-retest studies were performed in Wistar rats. In vivo, dose-dependent displacement studies were performed using 6 and blocking studies with 7. [{sup 18}F]5 was obtained in decay-corrected maximal radiochemical yield of 37 % with a specific activity of 80 - 400 GBq/μmol. Treatment with rat and human microsomal enzymes in vitro for 60 min resulted in 20 % and 4 % of hydrophilic radiometabolites, respectively. No hydrophilic decomposition products or radiometabolites were found in PBS or plasma. In vitro autoradiography on rat brain slices showed a heterogeneous distribution consistent with the known distribution of mGlu{sub 5} with high binding to hippocampal and cortical regions, and negligible radioactivity in the cerebellum. Similar distribution of radioactivity was found in PET images. Under displacement conditions with 6, reduced [{sup 18}F]5 binding was found in all brain regions except the cerebellum. 7 reduced binding in the striatum by 84 % on average. Test-retest studies were reproducible with a variability ranging from 6.8 % to 8.2 %. An extended single-dose toxicity study in Wistar rats showed no compound-related adverse effects. The new mGlu{sub 5} radiotracer, [{sup 18}F]5, showed specific and selective in vitro and in vivo

  10. Guanidine-acylguanidine bioisosteric approach in the design of radioligands: synthesis of a tritium-labeled N(G)-propionylargininamide ([3H]-UR-MK114) as a highly potent and selective neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Max; Pop, Nathalie; Hutzler, Christoph; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Bernhardt, Günther; Buschauer, Armin

    2008-12-25

    Synthesis and characterization of (R)-N(alpha)-(2,2-diphenylacetyl)-N-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-N(omega)-([2,3-(3)H]-propanoyl)argininamide ([(3)H]-UR-MK114), an easily accessible tritium-labeled NPY Y(1) receptor (Y(1)R) antagonist (K(B): 0.8 nM, calcium assay, HEL cells) derived from the (R)-argininamide BIBP 3226, is reported. The radioligand binds with high affinity (K(D), saturation: 1.2 nM, kinetic experiments: 1.1 nM, SK-N-MC cells) and selectivity for Y(1)R over Y(2), Y(4), and Y(5) receptors. The title compound is a useful pharmacological tool for the determination of Y(1)R ligand affinities, quantification of Y(1)R binding sites, and autoradiography.

  11. The Z-isomer of 11{beta}-methoxy-17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinylestradiol is a promising radioligand for estrogen receptor imaging in human breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rijks, Leonie J. M.; Boer, Gerard J.; Endert, Erik; Bruin, Kora de; Janssen, Anton G. M.; Royen, Eric A. van

    1997-01-01

    The potential of both stereoisomers of 11{beta}-methoxy-17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinylestradiol (E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE) as suitable radioligands for imaging of estrogen receptor(ER)-positive human breast tumours was studied. The 17{alpha}-[{sup 123}I]iodovinylestradiol derivatives were prepared stereospecifically by oxidative radioiododestannylation of the corresponding 17{alpha}-tri-n-butylstannylvinylestradiol precursors. Both isomers of MIVE showed high in vitro affinity for dimethylbenzanthracene-induced rat and fresh human mammary tumour ER, that of Z-MIVE however being manyfold higher than that of E-MIVE. In vivo distribution studies with E- and Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE in normal and tumour-bearing female rats showed ER-mediated uptake and retention in uterus, ovaries, pituitary, hypothalamus and mammary tumours, again the highest for Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE. The uterus- and tumour-to-nontarget tissue (fat, muscle) uptake ratios were also highest for Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE. Additionally, planar whole body imaging of two breast cancer patients 1-2 h after injection of Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE showed increased focal uptake at known tumour sites. Therefore, we conclude that Z-[{sup 123}I]MIVE is a promising radioligand for the diagnostic imaging of ER in human breast cancer.

  12. (D-Pen2,4 prime -125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin: A selective high affinity radioligand for delta opioid receptors with exceptional specific activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, R.J.; Sharma, S.D.; Toth, G.; Duong, M.T.; Fang, L.; Bogert, C.L.; Weber, S.J.; Hunt, M.; Davis, T.P.; Wamsley, J.K. (Department of Pharmacology, University of Arizona, College of Medicine, Tucson (United States))

    1991-09-01

    (D-Pen2,4{prime}-125I-Phe4,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((125I)DPDPE) is a highly selective radioligand for the delta opioid receptor with a specific activity (2200 Ci/mmol) that is over 50-fold greater than that of tritium-labeled DPDPE analogs. (125I)DPDPE binds to a single site in rat brain membranes with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) value of 421 {plus minus} 67 pM and a receptor density (Bmax) value of 36.4 {plus minus} 2.7 fmol/mg protein. The high affinity of this site for delta opioid receptor ligands and its low affinity for mu or kappa receptor-selective ligands are consistent with its being a delta opioid receptor. The distribution of these sites in rat brain, observed by receptor autoradiography, is also consistent with that of delta opioid receptors. Association and dissociation binding kinetics of 1.0 nM (125I) DPDPE are monophasic at 25 degrees C. The association rate (k + 1 = 5.80 {plus minus} 0.88 {times} 10(7) M-1 min-1) is about 20- and 7-fold greater than that measured for 1.0 nM (3H) DPDPE and 0.8 nM (3H) (D-Pen2,4{prime}-Cl-Phe4, D-Pen5)enkephalin, respectively. The dissociation rate of (125I)DPDPE (0.917 {plus minus} 0.117 {times} 10(-2) min-1) measured at 1.0 nM is about 3-fold faster than is observed for either of the other DPDPE analogs. The rapid binding kinetics of (125I)DPDPE is advantageous because binding equilibrium is achieved with much shorter incubation times than are required for other cyclic enkephalin analogs. This, in addition to its much higher specific activity, makes (125I)DPDPE a valuable new radioligand for studies of delta opioid receptors.

  13. The use of a modified [3H]4-DAMP radioligand binding assay with increased selectivity for muscarinic M3 receptor shows that cortical CHRM3 levels are not altered in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Won Je; Gibbons, Andrew S; Dean, Brian

    2013-12-02

    [(3)H]4-DAMP is a radioligand that has been used to quantify levels of the muscarinic receptor CHRM3 protein in situ. However, in addition to high affinity binding to CHRM3, [(3)H]4-DAMP binds with low affinity to CHRM1 confounding the potential to discriminate between changes in these two muscarinic receptors. We have developed a [(3)H]4-DAMP binding assay, optimised for measuring CHRM3 protein levels in the cortex, with minimal selectivity towards CHRM1. The selectivity of our assay towards CHRM3 was confirmed using recombinant receptor-expressing, cell lysate preparations. [(3)H]4-DAMP binding levels were similar between wildtype and CHRM1 knockout mice, confirming that the amount of [(3)H]4-DAMP binding to CHRM1 was negligible. We used this assay to measure CHRM3 protein levels in the frontal pole, obtained post-mortem from subjects with bipolar disorder (n = 15), major depressive disorder (n = 15) and matched controls (n = 20) and showed that [(3)H]4-DAMP binding was not altered in either bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. Western blotting confirmed that CHRM3 protein levels were unchanged in these subjects. © 2013.

  14. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of 11C-CIMBI-5 as a 5-HT2A receptor agonist radioligand for PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Palner, Mikael; Gillings, Nic

    2010-01-01

    PET brain imaging of the serotonin 2A (5-hydroxytryptamine 2A, or 5-HT(2A)) receptor has been widely used in clinical studies, and currently, several well-validated radiolabeled antagonist tracers are used for in vivo imaging of the cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptor. Access to 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist...... PET tracers would, however, enable imaging of the active, high-affinity state of receptors, which may provide a more meaningful assessment of membrane-bound receptors. In this study, we radiolabel the high-affinity 5-HT(2A) receptor agonist 2-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(11)C-OCH(3...

  15. Design, synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo evaluation of potential positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands for brain imaging of the 5-HT7 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacivita, Enza; Niso, Mauro; Hansen, Hanne D.

    2014-01-01

    in order to maintain affinity for the target receptor and to improve the selectivity over 5-HT1A and adrenergic α1 receptors. The synthesized compounds have chemical features that could enable labeling with a positron emitter radioisotope (carbon-11 or fluorine-18) and lipophilicity within the range...

  16. Synthesis and in vitro affinities of various MDL 100907 derivatives as potential F-18-radioligands for 5-HT2A receptor imaging with PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias Manfred; Kramer, Vasko; Piel, Markus

    2009-01-01

    (i)-values in the nanomolar range towards the 5-HT(2A) receptor and insignificant binding to other 5-HT receptor subtypes or receptors. Interestingly, compounds MA-1 (53), MH.MZ (55) and (R)-MH.MZ (56) provide a receptor selectivity profile similar to MDL 100907. These compounds could possibly be preferable antagonistic (18......)F-tracers for visualization of the 5-HT(2A) receptor status. Medium affine compounds (VK-1 (32), (51), (52), (54)) were synthesized and have K(i) values between 30 and 120 nM. All promising compounds show logP values between 2 and 3, that is, within the range of those for the established...... radiotracers altanserin and MDL 100907. The novel compounds MA-1 (53) and (R)-MH.MZ (56) thus appear to be promising high affine and selective tracers of (18)F-labelled analogues for 5-HT(2A) imaging with PET....

  17. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors. Localization by light microscopic autoradiography in rat brain using [3H][3-Me-His2]TRH as the radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantyh, P.W.; Hunt, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the central and peripheral nervous system. In the present report, we have used autoradiography coupled with densitometric analysis of tritium-sensitive film to investigate the distribution of [ 3 H][3-Me-His2]TRH [( 3 H]MeTRH)-binding sizes in the rat brain. Previous pharmacological reports have established that many of these [ 3 H]MeTRH-binding sites have a structure-activity profile consistent with being a physiological TRH receptor. A high level of TRH receptors were observed in the accessory olfactory bulb, lateral nucleus of the amygdala, dentate gyrus, and entorhinal cortex. Moderate levels of TRH receptors were observed in the rhinal cortex, hypothalamus, superior colliculus, several brainstem motor nuclei, and lamina I of the spinal trigeminal nucleus pars candalis, while low concentrations of receptors are present in the cerebral cortex, striatum and ventral horn of the spinal cord. Very low levels of receptors were observed in the globus pallidus and in most nuclei of the dorsal thalamus. Comparisons of the distribution of TRH receptors to TRH-immunoreactive content indicates that, while in some areas of the brain there is a rough correlation between levels of TRH peptide and its receptor, in most brain areas there is little obvious correlation between the two. While such a discrepancy has been observed for other peptides and their receptors, the extensive distribution of TRH receptors in the central nervous system does provide an explanation for the variety of behavioral effects observed when TRH is infused into the central nervous system

  18. Metal-Based PSMA Radioligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Gourni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies for which great progress has been made in identifying appropriate molecular targets that would enable efficient in vivo targeting for imaging and therapy. The type II integral membrane protein, prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA is overexpressed on prostate cancer cells in proportion to the stage and grade of the tumor progression, especially in androgen-independent, advanced and metastatic disease, rendering it a promising diagnostic and/or therapeutic target. From the perspective of nuclear medicine, PSMA-based radioligands may significantly impact the management of patients who suffer from prostate cancer. For that purpose, chelating-based PSMA-specific ligands have been labeled with various diagnostic and/or therapeutic radiometals for single-photon-emission tomography (SPECT, positron-emission-tomography (PET, radionuclide targeted therapy as well as intraoperative applications. This review focuses on the development and further applications of metal-based PSMA radioligands.

  19. Human biodistribution and dosimetry of ¹¹C-CUMI-101, an agonist radioligand for serotonin-1a receptors in brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Hines

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: As a reported agonist, ¹¹C-CUMI-101 is believed to selectively bind the G-protein-coupled state of the serotonin-1A (5-HT(1A receptor, thereby providing a measure of the active subset of all 5-HT(1A receptors in brain. Although ¹¹C-CUMI-101 has been successfully used to quantify 5-HT(1A receptors in human and monkey brain, its radiation exposure has not previously been reported. The purpose of this study was to calculate the radiation exposure to organs of the body based on serial whole-body imaging with positron emission tomography (PET in human subjects. METHODS: Nine healthy volunteers were injected with 428±84 MBq (mean ± SD (11C-CUMI-101 and then imaged with a PET-only device for two hours from head to mid-thigh. Eleven source organs (brain, heart, liver, pancreas, stomach, spleen, lungs, kidneys, lumbar spine L1-5, thyroid, and urinary bladder were identified on whole body images and used to calculate radiation doses using the software program OLINDA/EXM 1.1. To confirm that we had correctly identified the pancreas, a tenth subject was imaged on a PET/CT device. RESULTS: Brain had high uptake (∼11% of injected activity (IA at 10 min. Although liver had the highest uptake (∼35% IA at 120 min, excretion of this activity was not visible in gall bladder or intestine during the scanning session. Organs which received the highest doses (microSv/MBq were pancreas (32.0, liver (18.4, and spleen (14.5. The effective dose of ¹¹C-CUMI-101 was 5.3±0.5 microSv/MBq. CONCLUSION: The peak brain uptake (∼11% IA of ¹¹C-CUMI-101 is the highest among more than twenty ¹¹C-labeled ligands reported in the literature and provides good counting statistics from relatively low injected activities. Similar to that of other ¹¹C-labeled ligands for brain imaging, the effective dose of ¹¹C-CUMI-101 is 5.3±0.5 microSv/MBq, a value that can now be used to estimate the radiation risks in future research studies.

  20. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 11}C]p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A. as a PET radioligand for imaging nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langle, S.; Roger, G.; Lagnel-de Bruin, B.; Hinnen, F.; Bottlaender, M.; Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot 91 - Orsay (France); Fulton, R.; Henderson, D. [RPAH, NSW (Australia); Kassiou, M. [Sydney Univ., NSW (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (n.A.Ch.R.) are crucial to many brain physiological functions and they are involved in a wide range of diseases of the brain making them attractive targets for tomographic imaging. Of particular interest, (((R)-2- [6-chloro-5-((E)-2-pyridin-4-yl-vinyl)-pyridin-3-yloxy]-1- methyl-ethyl)-methyl-amine) (p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A.) displayed an affinity of Ki 0.077 nM for n.A.Ch.R. when using [{sup 3}H]cytisine and whole rat brain membrane [1]. p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A. and its corresponding nor-methyl derivative where obtained using a multistep synthesis. [{sup 11}C]p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A. prepared from the nor-methyl derivative as precursor and labeled with carbon-(T1/2 = 20.4 min) using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. The reaction was conducted in D.M.F. using tetra-butyl ammonium hydroxide (T.B.A.H.) as base and allowed to react at room temperature for 2 min, followed by heating at 80 degrees C for 5 min. The reaction mixture was diluted with 0.5 m L of a solution of 0.1 M NH{sub 4}Ac (pH 10):A.C.N. (70:30; v:v) and injected onto a HPLC X Terra R.P. C-18 (7.8 x 300 mm, 10 mm) semi preparative reversed-phase column. Using a mobile phase of 0.1 M NH{sub 4}Ac (pH 10):A.C.N. (70:30; v:v) and a flow rate of 6.0 m L/min, the retention time (t.R.) of [{sup 11}C]p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A. was 8.6 min. [{sup 11}C]p-P.V.P.-M.E.M.A. was isolated in a 1.5% (n = 4) non decay corrected radiochemical yield based on starting [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I in an average synthesis time of 33.6 min (including H.P.L.C. purification and formulation). In the final product solution, radiochemical and chemical purity was greater than 99% with a specific activity of 86.4 GBq/mmol (2334 mCi/mmol). (authors)

  1. 5-HT radioligands for human brain imaging with PET and SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paterson, Louise M; Kornum, Birgitte R; Nutt, David J

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic system plays a key modulatory role in the brain and is the target for many drug treatments for brain disorders either through reuptake blockade or via interactions at the 14 subtypes of 5-HT receptors. This review provides the history and current status of radioligands used for p...

  2. Novel selective catalytic reduction with tritium: synthesis of the GABAA receptor radioligand 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-[2,3-3H2]propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2 ]octane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, C.J.; Casida, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Protection of the terminal alkyne function in 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-(prop-2-enyl)-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2] octane with a trimethylsilyl group permits the selective catalytic reduction of the olefin moiety with tritium gas to give after deprotection 1-(4-ethynylphenyl)-4-[2,3- 3 H 2 ] propyl-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo-[2.2.2] octane. The labeled product at high specific activity is an improved radioligand for the GABA-gated chloride channel of insects and mammals and the intermediate 4-[2,3- 3 H 2 ]propyl-1-[4-[(trimethylsilyl)ethynyl]phenyl]-2,6,7-trioxabicyclo[2.2.2]octane is useful for studies on the metabolic activation of this selective proinsecticide. (author)

  3. Evaluation of the agonist PET radioligand [¹¹C]GR103545 to image kappa opioid receptor in humans: kinetic model selection, test-retest reproducibility and receptor occupancy by the antagonist PF-04455242.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naganawa, Mika; Jacobsen, Leslie K; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lin, Shu-Fei; Banerjee, Anindita; Byon, Wonkyung; Weinzimmer, David; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Grimwood, Sarah; Badura, Lori L; Carson, Richard E; McCarthy, Timothy J; Huang, Yiyun

    2014-10-01

    Kappa opioid receptors (KOR) are implicated in several brain disorders. In this report, a first-in-human positron emission tomography (PET) study was conducted with the potent and selective KOR agonist tracer, [(11)C]GR103545, to determine an appropriate kinetic model for analysis of PET imaging data and assess the test-retest reproducibility of model-derived binding parameters. The non-displaceable distribution volume (V(ND)) was estimated from a blocking study with naltrexone. In addition, KOR occupancy of PF-04455242, a selective KOR antagonist that is active in preclinical models of depression, was also investigated. For determination of a kinetic model and evaluation of test-retest reproducibility, 11 subjects were scanned twice with [(11)C]GR103545. Seven subjects were scanned before and 75 min after oral administration of naltrexone (150 mg). For the KOR occupancy study, six subjects were scanned at baseline and 1.5 h and 8 h after an oral dose of PF-04455242 (15 mg, n=1 and 30 mg, n=5). Metabolite-corrected arterial input functions were measured and all scans were 150 min in duration. Regional time-activity curves (TACs) were analyzed with 1- and 2-tissue compartment models (1TC and 2TC) and the multilinear analysis (MA1) method to derive regional volume of distribution (V(T)). Relative test-retest variability (TRV), absolute test-retest variability (aTRV) and intra-class coefficient (ICC) were calculated to assess test-retest reproducibility of regional VT. Occupancy plots were computed for blocking studies to estimate occupancy and V(ND). The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of PF-04455242 was determined from occupancies and drug concentrations in plasma. [(11)C]GR103545 in vivo K(D) was also estimated. Regional TACs were well described by the 2TC model and MA1. However, 2TC VT was sometimes estimated with high standard error. Thus MA1 was the model of choice. Test-retest variability was ~15%, depending on the outcome measure. The blocking

  4. The cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist CI-988 failed to affect CCK-4 induced symptoms in panic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMegen, HJGM; Westenberg, HGM; denBoer, JA; Slaap, B; vanEsRadhakishun, F; Pande, AC

    The effects of the cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptor antagonist CI-988 on symptoms elicited by the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK4) were studied in DSM-IIIR patients with panic disorder. The study employed a double-blind, two-period incomplete block design. Patients (n = 14) received two

  5. Interference of anaesthetics with radioligand binding in neuroreceptor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfving, Betina; Knudsen, Gitte Moos [Neurobiology Research Unit N9201, University hospital Rigshospitalet, 9 Blegdamsvej, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bjoernholm, Berith [Department of Computational Chemistry, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen-Valby (Denmark)

    2003-06-01

    Evaluations of new emission tomography ligands are usually carried out in animals. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during the scan session, anaesthesia is almost inevitable. In ex vivo rat studies we investigated the interference of ketamine/xylazine, zoletile mixture, isoflurane and halothane with the serotonin re-uptake site, the serotonin{sub 2A} receptor and the dopamine re-uptake site by use of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram, [{sup 18}F]altanserin and [{sup 125}I]PE2I, respectively. Ketamine/xylazine decreased the target-to-background ratio (mean {+-} SD) of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 0.81{+-}0.19 (P<0.05), whereas isoflurane and halothane increased the ratio from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 1.9{+-}0.24 and 2.1{+-}0.13 (P<0.05), respectively. Only with the zoletile mixture did the ratio remain unaltered. None of the tested anaesthetics affected the target-to-background ratio of [{sup 18}F]altanserin. The [{sup 125}I]PE2I target-to-background ratio decreased with both ketamine/xylazine (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 10.1{+-}1.4, P<0.05) and isoflurane (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 9.5{+-}1.1, P<0.05) treated rats, whereas treatment with zoletile mixture and halothane left the ratio unaltered. It is concluded that prior to performance of neuroreceptor radioligand studies, the possible interaction between radioligands and anaesthetics should be carefully evaluated. (orig.)

  6. Chemical development of radioligands for PET studies of central neurotransmitters in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this research were to identify potential receptor or binding site radioligands for imaging in vivo with PET (positron emission tomography) and to develop methods for their labelling with cyclotron-produced radioisotopes (carbon-11, t 1/2 = 20.4 min; bromine-76, t 1/2 = 966 min) at high specific radioactivity. PK 11195 (N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-isoquinoline-3-carboxamide) is a selective ligand for the 'so-called' peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PK binding site). [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 is widely used as a radioligand with PET for the detection of PK binding sites in vivo (e.g. in stroke). However, this radioligand is racemic and gives a low signal. Two alternatives were identified based on their potency and lower lipophilicity, namely PK 11211 (the 2'-fluoro analogue of PK 11195) and PK 14105 (the 2'-fluoro-5'-nitro analogue of PK 11195). Homochiral nor analogues of PK 11195, PK 11211 and PK 14105 were synthesised, via the reaction of homochiral sec-butylamines with activated carboxylic acids, prepared via acylation, azlactone synthesis and Freidel-Crafts reactions. Conditions were found for the efficient N-methylation of these precursors with [ 11 C]iodomethane to provide the labelled R- and S-enantiomers of each radioligand. The enantiomers of [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 were produced for comparison in rats. The R-enantiomer was found to be the superior radioligand. Effective radioligands are required for imaging the serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake site in neuropsychiatric disorders. The potent 5-HT reuptake site ligand, WY 27587 (N[[[1-[(6-fluoro-2-naphthalenyl)methyl]-4-piperdinyl]aminolcarbonyl] -3-pyridine carboxamide) was identified as a candidate radioligand for the 5-HT reuptake site, and many possibilities for labelling with different positron-emitters (e.g. 11 C and 76 Br) were explored. (γ-Emitting bromine-77 was used as a surrogate for bromine-76). [ 77 Br]1-Bromo-WY 27587 was successfully prepared from the

  7. Chemical development of radioligands for PET studies of central neurotransmitters in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, F

    1999-07-01

    The aims of this research were to identify potential receptor or binding site radioligands for imaging in vivo with PET (positron emission tomography) and to develop methods for their labelling with cyclotron-produced radioisotopes (carbon-11, t{sub 1/2} = 20.4 min; bromine-76, t{sub 1/2} = 966 min) at high specific radioactivity. PK 11195 (N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-isoquinoline-3-carboxamide) is a selective ligand for the 'so-called' peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PK binding site). [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]PK 11195 is widely used as a radioligand with PET for the detection of PK binding sites in vivo (e.g. in stroke). However, this radioligand is racemic and gives a low signal. Two alternatives were identified based on their potency and lower lipophilicity, namely PK 11211 (the 2'-fluoro analogue of PK 11195) and PK 14105 (the 2'-fluoro-5'-nitro analogue of PK 11195). Homochiral nor analogues of PK 11195, PK 11211 and PK 14105 were synthesised, via the reaction of homochiral sec-butylamines with activated carboxylic acids, prepared via acylation, azlactone synthesis and Freidel-Crafts reactions. Conditions were found for the efficient N-methylation of these precursors with [{sup 11}C]iodomethane to provide the labelled R- and S-enantiomers of each radioligand. The enantiomers of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]PK 11195 were produced for comparison in rats. The R-enantiomer was found to be the superior radioligand. Effective radioligands are required for imaging the serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake site in neuropsychiatric disorders. The potent 5-HT reuptake site ligand, WY 27587 (N[[[1-[(6-fluoro-2-naphthalenyl)methyl]-4-piperdinyl]aminolcarbonyl] -3-pyridine carboxamide) was identified as a candidate radioligand for the 5-HT reuptake site, and many possibilities for labelling with different positron-emitters (e.g. {sup 11}C and {sup 76}Br) were explored. ({gamma}-Emitting bromine-77 was used as a surrogate for bromine-76). [{sup 77}Br

  8. Radioligand assay for biotin in liver tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rettenmaier, R.

    1979-01-01

    A radioligand assay for biotin in liver tissue is described. 3 H-biotin is used as tracer and avidin as binder. The biotin-loaded avidin is separated from free biotin on dextran-coated charcoal, which leaves the avidin-biotin complex in the supernatant liquid. Thus, the avidin-biotin complex can easily be utilized for determination of the radioactivity. Calibration with known additions of biotin in the range 0.25-8.0 ng per assay sample yields a linear logit-log plot. The biotin is extracted from liver tissues by enzymatic proteolysis with papain. This treatment is optimized to liberate the bound forms of the vitamin. Microbiological parallel assays with Lactobacillus plantarum were in good agreement with the radioligand assay giving a regression coefficient of 0.974(n=44). The coefficient of variation was found to be 4.2% in the range 500-1200 ng of biotin per g of liver tissue (n=46). The method is simple and reliable and allows the simultaneous analysis of a considerable number of samples. (Auth.)

  9. Radiosynthesis and characterisation of a potent and selective GPR139 agonist radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhne, Sebastiaan; Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Marek, AleŠ

    2016-01-01

    Compound 1 is a selective and potent agonist of the G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 (EC50 = 39 nM). In this study, we describe the synthesis, radiolabelling and in vitro evaluation of [3H]-1 for the characterisation of GPR139 and its spatial expression in the brain using autoradiography. Two...... to discriminate [3H]-1 binding to wildtype mice brains from GPR139 knockout mice brains and total binding from non-specific binding in CHO-k1 cells stably expressing human GPR139 receptor. Based on these experiments we conclude that [3H]-1 is not a suitable radioligand for the characterisation of GPR139....

  10. Electrophysiological study, biodistribution in mice, and preliminary PET evaluation in a rhesus monkey of 1-amino-3-[18F]fluoromethyl-5-methyl-adamantane (18F-MEM): a potential radioligand for mapping the NMDA-receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samnick, S; Ametamey, S; Leenders, K L; Vontobel, P; Quack, G; Parsons, C G; Neu, H; Schubiger, P A

    1998-05-01

    The effect of the fluorinated memantine derivative and NMDA receptor antagonist, 1-amino-3-fluoromethyl-5-methyl-adamantane (19F-MEM), at the NMDA receptor ion channel was studied by patch clamp recording. The results showed that 19F-MEM is a moderate NMDA receptor channel blocker. A procedure for the routine preparation of the 18F-labelled analog 18F-MEM has been developed using a two-step reaction sequence. This involves the no-carrier-added nucleophilic radiofluorination of 1-[N-(tert-butyloxy)carbamoyl]-3-(toluenesulfonyloxy)methyl- 5-methyl-adamantane and the subsequent cleavage of the BOC-protecting group using aqueous HCI. The 18F-MEM was obtained in 22 +/- 7% radiochemical yield (decay-corrected to EOB) in a total synthesis time including HPLC purification of 90 min. A biodistribution study after i.v. injection of 18F-MEM in mice showed a fast clearance of radioactivity from blood and relatively high initial uptake in the kidney and in the lung, which gradually decreased with time. The brain uptake was high (up to 3.6% ID/g, 60 min postinjection) with increasing brain-blood ratios: 2.40, 5.10, 6.33, and 9.27 at 5, 30, 60, and 120 min, respectively. The regional accumulation of the radioactivity in the mouse brain was consistent with the known distribution of the PCP recognition site. Preliminary PET evaluation of the radiotracer in a rhesus monkey demonstrated good uptake and prolonged retention in the brain, with a plateau from 35 min onwards p.i. in the NMDA receptor-rich regions (frontal cortex, striata, and temporal cortex). Delineation of the hippocampus, a region known to contain a high density of NMDA receptors, was not possible owing to the resolution of the PET tomograph. The regional brain uptake of 18F-MEM was changed by memantine and by a pharmacological dose of (+)-MK-801, indicating competition for the same binding sites. In a preliminary experiment, haloperidol, a dopamine D2 and sigma receptor antagonist, decreased the binding of 18F

  11. Synthesis and in vivo evaluation of (E)-N-[11C]Methyl-4- (3-pyridinyl)-3-butene-1-amine ([11C]metanicotine) as a nicotinic receptor radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Proctor, Clive; Snyder, Scott E.; Sherman, Phillip S.; Kilbourn, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    (E)-N-[ 11 C]Methyl-4-(3-pyridinyl)-3-butene-1-amine ([ 11 C]metanicotine), a high affinity (K i =16 nM) CNS-selective nicotinic agonist, was prepared by the [ 11 C]alkylation of the desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl trifluoromethanesulfonate. In vivo distribution studies in mice demonstrated good blood brain permeability but essentially uniform regional brain distribution and no evidence of specific binding to nicotinic cholinergic receptors. Identical results were obtained in an imaging study performed in a monkey brain. Therefore, despite literature reports supporting the use of metanicotine as a cognition enhancing nicotinic agonist, (E)-N-[ 11 C]methyl-4-(3-pyridinyl)-3-butene-1-amine does not appear to be a suitable candidate for in vivo imaging studies of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the mammalian brain

  12. Fenfluramine Reduces [11C]Cimbi-36 Binding to the 5-HT2A Receptor in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Kai-Chun; Stepanov, Vladimir; Martinsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background: [11C]Cimbi-36 is a serotonin 2A receptor agonist positron emission tomography radioligand that has recently been examined in humans. The binding of agonist radioligand is expected to be more sensitive to endogenous neurotransmitter concentrations than antagonist radioligands. In the c...

  13. Quantification of the radio-metabolites of the serotonin-1A receptor radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635 in human plasma: An HPLC-assay which enables measurement of two patients in parallel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nics, L.; Hahn, A.; Zeilinger, M.; Vraka, C.; Ungersboeck, J.; Haeusler, D.; Hartmann, S.; Wagner, K-H.; Lanzenberger, R.; Wadsak, W.; Mitterhauser, M.

    2012-01-01

    [Carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 is a potent and effective antagonist for the 5-HT 1A receptor subtype. We aimed to assess the status of [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635 and its main radio-metabolites, [carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 and [carbonyl- 11 C]cyclohexanecarboxylic acid, on the basis of an improved radio-HPLC method. Common methods were characterized by preparative HPLC columns with long runtimes and/or high flow rates. Considering the short half-life of C-11, we developed a more rapid and solvent saving HPLC assay, allowing a fast, efficient and reliable quantification of these major metabolites. - Highlights: ► We developed a HPLC assay which allows the measurement of two patients in parallel. ► It allows a fast and efficient quantification of WAY-100635 and its metabolites. ► Better counting statistics with late samples for modeling the input function is achieved. ► The fastest assay so far is about 40% slower in comparison to the presented method.

  14. A kinetic analysis of kappa-opioid agonist binding using the selective radioligand (/sup 3/H)U69593

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.A.; Hunter, J.C.; Hill, R.G.; Hughes, J.

    1989-07-01

    The interaction of the nonselective opioid ligand (3H)bremazocine and of the kappa-opioid (3H)U69593 with the kappa-receptor was investigated in guinea-pig cortical membranes. Each radioligand bound to a single population of high-affinity sites, although (3H)U69593 apparently recognised only 70% of those sites labelled by (3H)bremazocine. Naloxone and the kappa-selective ligands U69593 and PD117302 exhibited full inhibition of the binding of both radioligands. Kinetic analysis demonstrated biphasic rates of association and dissociation for both (3H)bremazocine and (3H)U69593. Detailed analysis of the binding of (3H)U69593 revealed that the fast rate of association was dependent on radioligand concentration, in contrast to the slow rate, which was independent of ligand concentration. Guanylyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited binding of (3H)U69593; saturation analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of GppNHp resulted in a decrease in affinity without any significant change in binding capacity. GppNHp attenuated the formation of the slow component of (3H)U69593 binding, while accelerating the fast component. The data are consistent with the formation of a high-affinity complex between the kappa-receptor and a guanine nucleotide binding protein. Guanine nucleotides promote the dissociation of this ternary complex and the stabilisation of a lower-affinity state of the receptor.

  15. Kinetics of the metabolism of four PET radioligands in living minipigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillings, N M; Bender, D; Falborg, L

    2001-01-01

    Most radioligands are substantially metabolised in peripheral organs during the course of positron emission tomography (PET) recordings. Accurate determination of plasma concentrations of unmetabolised radioligands is often important for quantification of data from PET studies. The fractions...

  16. Radioligantes para neurorreceptores benzodiazepínicos Radioligands for benzodiazepine neuroreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibila Roberta Marques Grallert

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Os inúmeros avanços técnico-científicos das últimas décadas possibilitaram identificar e caracterizar a estrutura de uma variedade de neurotransmissores e de seus receptores no cérebro, bem como estudar suas interações. Nesse artigo serão relacionados os radiofármacos utilizados em medicina nuclear diagnóstica para acesso a neurorreceptores. Radioligantes cerebrais são moléculas marcadas com isótopos emissores de pósitron ou emissores de fótons (gama emissores que se ligam seletivamente a sítios receptores específicos no SNC (Sistema Nervoso Central. Para utilizaçãoin vivoesses radioligantes não devem apresentar toxicidade e, também, não devem apresentar atividade farmacológica na dose administrada. Utilizando-se ligantes marcados com nuclídeos radioativos, em técnicas como tomografia por emissão de pósitron (PET e tomografia por emissão de fóton único (SPECT, é possível gerar imagens que auxiliam eficazmente no diagnóstico de doenças neuropsiquiátricas, tanto pela visualização da distribuição e função dos inúmeros tipos de neurorreceptores como pela investigação de anormalidades neuroquímicas. Salienta-se que a utilização dessas técnicas constitui-se em ferramenta de fundamental importância para a exploração funcional do SNC.In the last decade several technological advances allowed the biochemical characterization of many specific transmitters and receptors in the brain and the study of the respective interactions. This review focuses the most important radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine to access neuroreceptors. In this case, radioligands are molecules labeled with positron or photon emission (gamma radioisotopes that interact with a specific neuroreceptor. For in vivoapplication, these radioligands must present no toxicity and pharmacological properties in the administered dose. The visualization of the neuroreceptors distribution in brain and the study of the

  17. Biological screening of selected medicinal Panamanian plants by radioligand-binding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-George, C; Vanderheyden, P M; Solis, P N; Pieters, L; Shahat, A A; Gupta, M P; Vauquelin, G; Vlietinck, A J

    2001-01-01

    Nineteen plants from the Republic of Panama were selected by their traditional uses in the treatment of hypertension, cardiovascular, mental and feeding disorders and 149 extracts were screened using radioligand-receptor-binding assays. The methanol:dicloromethane extracts of the bark and leaves of Anacardium occidentale L., the leaves of Begonia urophylla Hook., the roots of Bocconia frutescens L., the stems and leaves of Cecropia cf.obtusifolia Bertol., the branches of Clusia coclensis Standl., the bark of Cochlospermum vitifolium (Willd.)Spreng., the roots of Dimerocostus strobilaceus Kuntze, the bark of Guazuma ulmifolia Lam., the leaves of Persea americana Mill. and the branches of Witheringia solanaceae L'Her. inhibited the [3H]-AT II binding (angiotensin II AT1 receptor) more than 50%. Only extracts of the roots of Dimerocostus strobilaceus Kuntze and the stems of Psychotria elata (Sw.) Hammel were potent inhibitors of the [3H] NPY binding (neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor) more than 50% and the ethanolic extracts of the leaves of Cecropia cf. obtusifolia Bertol., the leaves of Hedyosmum bonplandianum H.B.K., the roots of Bocconia frutescens L., the stem of Cecropia cf. obtusifolia Bertol. and the branches of Psychotria elata (Sw.) Hammel showed high inhibition of the [3H] BQ-123 binding (endothelin-1 ET(A) receptor) in a preliminary screening. These results promote the further investigation of these plants using the same assays.

  18. In vivo evaluation of [18F]FECIMBI-36, an agonist 5-HT2A/2Creceptor PET radioligand in nonhuman primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Jaya; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Zanderigo, Francesca; Rubin-Falcone, Harry; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Kaplan, Jay R; Tooke, Katharine I; Mintz, Akiva; Mann, J John; Kumar, J S Dileep

    2017-01-01

    We recently reported the radiosynthesis and in vitro evaluation of [ 18 F]-2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)ethanamine, ([ 18 F]FECIMBI-36) or ([ 18 F]1), an agonist radioligand for 5HT 2A/2C receptors in postmortem samples of human brain. Herein we describe the in vivo evaluation of [ 18 F]FECIMBI-36 in vervet/African green monkeys by PET imaging. PET images show that [ 18 F]FECIMBI-36 penetrates the blood-brain barrier and a low retention of radioactivity is observed in monkey brain. Although the time activity curves indicate a somehow heterogeneous distribution of the radioligand in the brain, the low level of [ 18 F]FECIMBI-36 in brain may limit the use of this tracer for quantification of 5-HT 2A/2C receptors by PET. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of PET and the radioligand [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635 in psychotropic drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andree, Bengt; Halldin, Christer; Thorberg, Seth-Olov; Sandell, Johan; Farde, Lars

    2000-07-01

    Positron-emission tomography (PET) provides potential in neuropsychiatric drug development by expanding knowledge of drug action in the living human brain and reducing time consumption and costs. The 5-hydroxytryptamine{sub 1A} (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptor is of central interest as a target for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. Research on the clinical significance of the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor now benefits from the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635 (WAY) for quantitative determination of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in the primate and human brain in vivo using PET. In this paper, three studies are reviewed to demonstrate the suitability of WAY as radioligand for quantification of central 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in brain and as an applicable tool for drug development. In the first study a monkey model was used to characterize WAY binding. It was confirmed that the reference ligand 8-OH-DPAT and psychoactive drugs such as buspirone and pindolol occupies 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in the primate brain. Pindolol is an {beta}-adrenoreceptor antagonist with a high affinity to 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors. This drug has been suggested in combination with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for the treatment of depression and was given to healthy males in the second study. Pindolol induced a marked inhibition of central 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors as calculated by the ratio-analysis method and simplified reference tissue model, 2 h after administration of 10 mg as a single oral dose. This observation suggests that pindolol may have a role for the suggested potentiation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment of depression. The third study was on robalzotan (NAD-299), a recently developed 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor antagonist and putative drug with implications for the treatment of depression. In the cynomolgus monkey brain, robalzotan in the dose range 2-100 {mu}g/kg IV occupied 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors in a dose-dependent and saturable

  20. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  1. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled DOTA-derivatized cyclic minigastrin analogs for targeting cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Rangger, C.; Sosabowski, J.; Laverman, P.; Reubi, J.C.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeting of cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies such as medullary thyroid carcinoma is currently limited by low in vivo stability of radioligands. To increase the stability, we have developed and preclinically evaluated two cyclic

  2. Radioligand binding assays for high affinity binders in the presence of endogenous ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, H.B. III; McGahan, T.

    1986-01-01

    Endogenous ligands complicate radioligand-binding assays of high-affinity binding proteins by obscuring binding sites or by diluting the labeled ligand. They have developed a mathematical model for such systems where structurally identical radioligand and endogenous ligand can be equilibrated on the binding site and bound radioligand measured. A double-reciprocal plot of bound radioligand, *L/sub B/, versus sample volume, V, yields a straight line. Introduction of scaling factors for sample dilution, F, and total radioligand available, *L/sub T/, produces a plot in which the x-intercept yields the endogenous ligand concentration, [L/sub T/]; the slope is the reciprocal of the binding protein concentration, [P/sub T/] -1 ; and the y-intercept is the fractional saturation of the high-affinity binder, L/sub T//P/sub T/. This type of analysis has been applied to the assay of high-affinity biotin-binding proteins in egg yolk. Its use led to the detection of a second biotin-binding protein which is heat labile. The conceptual approach can be applied to the assay of other high-affinity binders

  3. Use of [125I]-iodohistamine-labelled steroid derivatives as radioligands for radioimmunoassay of natural and synthetic steroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanczyk, F.Z.; Goebelsmann, U.

    1981-01-01

    [ 125 I]-Iodohistamine-labelled steroid derivatives were prepared and utilized as radioligands in radioimmunoassays of progesterone, testosterone, estradiol, estriol, estriol-16α-glucuronide, levonorgestrel, norethindrone and medroxyprogesterone acetate. The binding of these iodinated radioligands was compared to that of the corresponding tritiated steroids and their effect on the sensitivity and slope of standard curves was examined. The results demonstrate that much higher antibody dilutions could be used with iodinated than with tritiated radioligands. In general, standard curves obtained with iodinated radioligands were more sensitive than those obtained with tritiated steroids, but standard curves had steeper slopes when tritiated rather than iodinated radioligands were used. The data, summarizing our 5-year experience with steroid-[ 125 I]-iodohistamine derivatives, indicate that these tracers play an important role in radioimmunoassay systems for both natural and synthetic steroids. (author)

  4. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalization assays: cell viability and radioligand integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Sosabowski, Jane K; Nagra, Saeed Ahamad; Ishfaq, Malik M; Mather, Stephen J; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalization assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalized peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalized peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiopeptide internalisation and externalisation assays: Cell viability and radioligand integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza Naqvi, Syed Ali; Sosabowski, Jane K.; Ahamad Nagra, Saeed; Ishfaq, Malik M.; Mather, Stephen J.; Matzow, Torkjel

    2011-01-01

    Various aspects of radiopeptide receptor-mediated cell internalisation and externalisation assays were assessed, including the integrity of externalised peptides and the effect of varying the pH and incubation time of the acid wash step (to remove surface receptor-bound ligand) on efficacy and cell viability. The observed intact proportion of externalised peptide was 5-10%, and acid wash buffers with pH 2.8 or below were found to be detrimental to cell viability and integrity, particularly following prolonged incubation times.

  6. Considerations for dosimetry calculations with neuroreceptor binding radioligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.F.; Bice, A.N.; Beck, T.; Dannals, R.F.; Links, J.M.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Neuroreceptor binding radiotracers have unique characteristics which must be considered in absorbed dose calculations. In this article the authors outline some of the important issues to be considered such as the high specific binding to various receptor bearing tissue regions, the receptor kinetics, the specific activity of the injected ligand and the presence of competing unlabeled substances. As an example of these considerations they have shown the outline of the measurements for animal and human biodistribution data of the D2 dopamine receptor binding ligand 11 C-3N-methylspiperone (NMSP) and they calculated the absorbed doses for the important body organs. This includes dose estimates using various species including mice, followed by primate and human data. Because of the selective uptake of NMSP to brain regions such as the basal ganglia they calculated values specifically for these areas in the cerebellum. Since kinetic modeling and therapeutic drug monitoring employ competing unlabeled ligands such as haloperidol which alter the NMSP distribution they estimated the dose in both unblocked and cases blocked with haloperidol. In such cases the doses were about 50% lower in the blocked cases for the basal ganglia. Target organs such as the bladder using external probes and a model based upon changing urine volumes suggests a 30% decrease from mouse estimates. 13 references, 4 figures, 7 tables

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchamp, A.; Moyse, E.; Delaleu, J.-C.; Coronas, V.; Duchamp-Viret, P.

    1997-01-01

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D 2 type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D 2 -like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [ 125 I]iodosulpride-labelled D 2 binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D 2 antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D 2 -like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights

  8. Sleep Deprivation Decreases [11C]Raclopride’s Binding to Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in the Human Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher; Ma, Jim; Pradhan, Kith; Tomasi, Dardo; Thanos, Peter K.; Ferré, Sergi; Jayne, Millard

    2008-01-01

    Sleep deprivation can markedly impair human performance contributing to accidents and poor productivity. The mechanisms underlying this impairment are not well understood but brain dopamine systems have been implicated. Here we test whether one night of sleep deprivation changes dopamine brain activity. We studied fifteen healthy subjects using positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (dopamine D2/3 receptor radioligand) and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand). Subjects we...

  9. A New Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Radioligand for Imaging Sigma-1 Receptors in Living Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    James, Michelle L; Shen, Bin; Zavaleta, Cristina L

    2012-01-01

    ]13 was synthesized by nucleophilic fluorination, affording a product with >99% radiochemical purity (RCP) and specific activity (SA) of 2.6 ± 1.2 Ci/µmol (n = 13) at end of synthesis (EOS). Positron emission tomography (PET) and ex vivo autoradiography studies of [(18)F]13 in mice showed high uptake...

  10. Synthesis of [3H]WIN 35,065-2; a new radioligand for cocaine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naseree, T.M.; Abraham, P.; Kepler, J.A.; Carroll, F.I.; Lewin, A.H.; Kuhar, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of methyl (-)-3β-phenylnortropane-2β-carboxylate with [ 3 H]CH 3 I afforded [ 3 H]WIN 35,065-2 with specific activity of 25 Ci/mmol, a new ligand for the cocaine recognition site. (author)

  11. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  12. Preclinical evaluation of [{sup 18}F]2FNQ1P as the first fluorinated serotonin 5-HT{sub 6} radioligand for PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Guillaume [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS INSERM, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Lyon (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Colomb, Julie [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Villeurbanne (France); Sgambato-Faure, Veronique; Tremblay, Leon [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Cognitive Neuroscience Center, Bron (France); Billard, Thierry [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS, Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Villeurbanne (France); CERMEP-Imaging Platform, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Lyon (France); Zimmer, Luc [Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS INSERM, Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Lyon (France); Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); CERMEP-Imaging Platform, Groupement Hospitalier Est, Lyon (France)

    2014-10-21

    Brain serotonin 6 receptor (5-HT{sub 6}) is one of the most recently identified serotonin receptors. It is a potent therapeutic target for psychiatric and neurological diseases, e.g. schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Since no specific fluorinated radioligand has yet been successfully used to study this receptor by positron emission tomography (PET) neuroimaging, the objective of the present study was to study the first 5-HT{sub 6} {sup 18}F-labelled radiotracer. 2FNQ1P, inspired by the quinolone core of a previous radiotracer candidate, GSK215083, was selected according its 5-HT{sub 6} affinity and selectivity and was radiolabelled by {sup 18}F nucleophilic substitution. The cerebral distribution of [{sup 18}F]2FNQ1P was studied in vivo in rats, cats and macaque monkeys. The chemical and radiochemical purities of [{sup 18}F]2FNQ1P were >98 %. In rats, in vitro competition with the 5-HT{sub 6} antagonist, SB258585, revealed that the radioligand was displaced dose dependently. Rat microPET studies showed low brain uptake of [{sup 18}F]2FNQ1P, reversed by the P-glycoprotein inhibitor, cyclosporin. On the contrary, PET scans in cats showed good brain penetration and specific striatal binding blocked after pretreatment with unlabelled 2FNQ1P. PET scans in macaque monkeys confirmed high specific binding in both cortical and subcortical regions, specifically decreased by pretreatment with the 5-HT{sub 6} receptor antagonist, SB258585. 2FNQ1P was initially selected because of its suitable characteristics for 5-HT{sub 6} receptor probing in vitro in terms of affinity and specificity. Although in vivo imaging in rats cannot be considered as predictive of the clinical characteristics of the radiotracer, [{sup 18}F]2FNQ1P appeared to be a suitable 5-HT{sub 6} PET tracer in feline and primate models. These preclinical results encourage us to pursue the clinical development of this first fluorinated 5-HT{sub 6} PET radiotracer. (orig.)

  13. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, A.; da Cunha-Bang, S.; McMahon, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    [C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely ....... Thus, we here describe [C]Cimbi-36 as the first agonist PET radioligand to successfully image and quantify 5-HT receptors in the human brain.Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism advance online publication, 30 April 2014; doi:10.1038/jcbfm.2014.68.......[C]Cimbi-36 was recently developed as a selective serotonin 2A (5-HT) receptor agonist radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging. Such an agonist PET radioligand may provide a novel, and more functional, measure of the serotonergic system and agonist binding is more likely...... than antagonist binding to reflect 5-HT levels in vivo. Here, we show data from a first-in-human clinical trial with [C]Cimbi-36. In 29 healthy volunteers, we found high brain uptake and distribution according to 5-HT receptors with [C]Cimbi-36 PET. The two-tissue compartment model using arterial input...

  14. The potential of carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry: illustration through the development of positron emission tomography radioligands targeting the translocator protein 18 kDa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damont, Annelaure; Roeda, Dirk; Dolle, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    The TSPO (translocator protein), also known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is up-regulated in the brain of subjects suffering from neuro-degenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's disease. Moreover, this overexpression has been proved to be linked to micro-glia activation making thus the TSPO a marker of choice of neuro-inflammatory processes and therefore a potential target for the development of radioligands for positron emission tomography imaging. The discovery of selective TSPO ligands and their labelling with the short-lived positron-emitter isotopes carbon-11 and fluorine-18 emerged in the mid-1980's with the preparation of the 3-iso-quinolinecarboxamide [ 11 C]PK11195. To date, an impressive number of promising compounds - [ 11 C]PK11195-challengers - have been developed; some radioligands - for example, [ 11 C]PBR28, [ 11 C]DPA-713, [ 18 F]FEDAA1106 and [ 18 F]DPA-714 - are currently used in clinical trials. As illustrated in this review, the methodologies applied for the preparation of these compounds remain mainly [ 11 C]methylations using [ 11 C]MeI or [ 11 C]MeOTf and SN2- type nucleophilic aliphatic [ 18 F]fluorinations - two processes illustrating the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions that involves these two short-lived radioisotopes - but alternative processes, such as [ 11 C]carbonylations using [ 11 C]CO and [ 11 C]COCl 2 as well as SNAr-type nucleophilic [ 18 F]fluorinations, have also been reported and as such, reviewed herein. (authors)

  15. PET imaging of adenosine A2A receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Xiaoyun

    2017-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and evaluation of [11C]preladenant as a novel radioligand for in vivo imaging of adenosine A2A receptors in the brain with positron-emission tomography (PET). The 11C-labeled drug [11C]preladenant was produced with high radiochemical yield and specific activity.

  16. Mass dose effects and in vivo affinity in brain PET receptor studies--a study of cerebral 5-HT4 receptor binding with [11C]SB207145

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Marner, Lisbeth; Haahr, Mette

    2011-01-01

    Attention to tracer dose principles is crucial in positron emission tomography (PET), and deviations can induce serious errors. In this study, we devise a method for determining receptor occupancy of the mass dose of the radioligand itself and the in vivo affinity.......Attention to tracer dose principles is crucial in positron emission tomography (PET), and deviations can induce serious errors. In this study, we devise a method for determining receptor occupancy of the mass dose of the radioligand itself and the in vivo affinity....

  17. (11)C-labeling and preliminary evaluation of vortioxetine as a PET radioligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Valdemar L; Hansen, Hanne D; Herth, Matthias M

    2014-01-01

    Vortioxetine is a new multi-modal drug against major depressive disorder with high affinity for a range of different serotonergic targets in the CNS. We report the (11)C-labeling of vortioxetine with [(11)C]MeI using a Suzuki-protocol that allows for the presence of an unprotected amine. Prelimin...... after 60min and with limited wash-out from the brain. Further studies are needed but this radioligand may prove to be a valuable tool in unraveling the clinical effects of vortioxetine....

  18. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of new α1-adrenoceptor antagonists as PET radioligands for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airaksinen, Anu J.; Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Balle, Thomas; Varnäs, Katarina; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Gulyás, Balázs; Farde, Lars; Halldin, Christer

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of the α 1 -adrenoceptors in relation to brain pathophysiology and drug treatment has been hindered by lack of α 1 -adrenoceptor specific radioligands with sufficient brain exposure. Our aim was to develop an α 1 -adrenoceptor specific PET radioligand for brain imaging. Methods: Two sertindole analogues 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-(1-methyl-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-3-(1-[ 11 C] methylpiperidin-4-yl)-1H-indole [ 11 C]3 and 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-(1-[ 11 C]methylpiperidin-4-yl)-5-(pyrimidin-5-yl) -1H-indole ([ 11 C]Lu AA27122) [ 11 C]4 were synthesized and evaluated as α 1 -adrenoceptor PET radioligands in cynomolgus monkey. Compounds 3 and 4 were selected due to their promising in vitro preclinical profile; high affinity and selectivity for the α 1 -adrenoceptor, favourable blood brain barrier permeability rates in Caco-2 monolayers and promising brain tissue/plasma ratio, assessed by equilibrium dialysis of free fraction in plasma and brain homogenate. Results: Compounds [ 11 C]3 and [ 11 C]4 were synthesized from their desmethyl piperidine precursors with high specific radioactivity (> 370 GBq/μmol) using [ 11 C]methyl iodide. The 1,2,4-triazole analogue [ 11 C]3 exhibited poor brain uptake, but the corresponding pyrimidyl analogue [ 11 C]4 exhibited high brain exposure and binding in α 1 -adrenoceptor rich brain regions. However, the binding could not be inhibited by pretreatment with prazosin (0.1 mg/kg and 0.3 mg/kg). The results were extended by autoradiography of [ 11 C]4 binding in human brain sections and competition with antagonists from different structural families, revealing that only a minor portion of the observed binding of [ 11 C]4 in brain was α 1 -adrenoceptor specific. Conclusion: Though [ 11 C]3 and [ 11 C]4 proved not suitable as PET radioligands, the study provided further understanding of structural features influencing brain exposure of the chemical class of compounds related to the antipsychotic drug sertindole. It

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of [11C]Cimbi-806 as a potential PET ligand for 5-HT7 receptor imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias Manfred; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Ettrup, Anders Janusz

    2012-01-01

    )-N,N-dimethylethanamine ([(11)C]Cimbi-806) as a radioligand for imaging brain 5-HT(7) receptors with positron emission tomography (PET). Precursor and reference compound was synthesized and subsequent (11)C-labelling with [(11)C]methyltriflate produced [(11)C]Cimbi-806 in specific activities ranging from 50 to 300 GBq...... of appropriate in vivo blocking with a 5-HT(7) receptor selective compounds renders the conclusion that [(11)C]Cimbi-806 is not an appropriate PET radioligand for imaging the 5-HT(7) receptor in vivo....

  20. Synthesis and preliminary pharmacological evaluation of a new putative radioiodinated AMPA receptor ligand for molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, T.L.; Sihver, W.; Ermert, J.; Coenen, H.H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-5) - Nuclear Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    A new (radio)iodinated AMPA receptor ligand has been developed and pharmacologically evaluated in vitro and ex vivo using rodents. The new radioligand was directly labeled by electrophilic radioiodo-destannylation with iodine-131 in high radiochemical yields of 97% within 2 min. The new radioligand showed an excellent initial brain uptake of 2.1%ID/g at 10 min post injection, but a fast wash-out reduced the uptake by about 10-fold at 60 min post injection. Due to high nonspecific binding accompanied with a uniform distribution in brain tissue, however, the new radiotracer appears not suitable for AMPA receptor imaging in vivo.

  1. Application of 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders and brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Chun; Guan Yihui

    2011-01-01

    In the central nervous system, the widely distributed 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)receptors are involved in regulating a large number of psychological and physiological functions, including mood, sleep, endocrine and autonomic nervous system. Abnormal 5-HT transmission has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as pain, depression and epilepsy. With the development of radioligands, non-invasive nuclear imaging technique with exquisite sensitivity and specificity has been applied for delineation of neurotransmitter function in vivo. It does great benefit for researches of these diseases and development of drugs. This review provided an overview of 5-HT receptors radioligands and recent findings. (authors)

  2. Bovine parathyroid hormone-(41-84), a hormone fragment with desirable properties for use as radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallette, L.E.; Bradley, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Radioiodinated bPTH has been widely used as the labeled ligand in the radioimmunoassay of PTH. We now report the properties of a carboxyterminal fragment of bPTH that has several favorable characteristics when used as radioligand. This peptide, the chief component of a commercial preparation of bPTH, was isolated by gel filtration, where it migrated more slowly than did authentic bPTH-(1-84). It yielded lower nonspecific binding values and more sensitive hPTH assays than were seen with the intact hormone. By immunological criteria this peptide lacked the aminoterminal region of PTH, since hPTH-(1-34) did not inhibit its binding to any of 11 different antisera with known ability to recognize the aminoterminal region of PTH. The peptide did not contain most or all of the carboxyterminal region, however, since its binding to anti-PTH sera was inhibited by hPTH-(44-68) or hPTH-(53-84). Sequential Edman degradation of the iodinated peptide released iodotyrosine at the third cycle, suggesting the structure, bPTH-(41-84). The lower nonspecific binding and enhanced assay sensitivity provided by this peptide suggest that the use of other natural or synthetic fragments of PTH as radioligands might enhance the performance of PTH assays

  3. GLUTAMATE-DEHYDROGENASE IMPROVES BINDING OF [H-3] CGP39653 TO NMDA RECEPTORS IN THE AUTORADIOGRAPHIC ASSAY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    The novel high-affinity competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP39653, is employed as radioligand to autoradiographically label the NMDA receptor in rat and human brain. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GlDH; E.C.1.4.1.3) was added to the incubation buffer to degrade residual endogenous L-glutamate, which

  4. Evaluation of 4-oxo-quinoline-based CB2 PET radioligands in R6/2 chorea huntington mouse model and human ALS spinal cord tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ahmed; Spinelli, Francesco; Herde, Adrienne Müller; Mu, Boshuai; Keller, Claudia; Margelisch, Markus; Weber, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Mu, Linjing; Ametamey, Simon M

    2018-02-10

    The cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has been implicated in a series of neurodegenerative disorders and has emerged as an interesting biological target for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purposes. In the present work, we describe an improved radiosynthetic approach to obtain the previously reported CB2-specific PET radioligand [ 18 F]RS-126 in higher radiochemical yields and molar activities. Additionally, the study revealed that prolongation of the [ 18 F]RS-126 fluoroalkyl side chain ultimately leads to an improved stability towards mouse liver enzymes but is accompanied by a reduction in selectivity over the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1). Huntington-related phenotypic changes as well as striatal D2R downregulation were confirmed for the transgenic R6/2 mouse model. CB2 upregulation in R6/2 Chorea Huntington mice was observed in hippocampus, cortex, striatum and cerebellum by qPCR, however, these results could not be confirmed at the protein level by PET imaging. Furthermore, we evaluated the utility of the newly developed [ 11 C]RS-028, a potent [ 18 F]RS-126 derivative with increased polarity and high selectivity over CB1 in post-mortem human ALS spinal cord and control tissue. Applying in vitro autoradiography, the translational relevance of CB2 imaging was demonstrated by the specific binding of [ 11 C]RS-028 to post-mortem human ALS spinal cord tissue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of 18F-labeled 5-HT2A receptor agonists as PET ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herth, Matthias M; Petersen, Ida Nymann; Hansen, Hanne Demant

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) is the most abundant excitatory 5-HT receptor in the human brain and implicated in various brain disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to image specific proteins...... and processes in the human brain and several 5-HT2AR PET antagonist radioligands are available. In contrast to an antagonist radioligand, an agonist radioligand should be able to image the population of functional receptors, i.e., those capable of inducing neuroreceptor signaling. Recently, we successfully...... in bone was also observed. No blocking effect was detected during a competition experiment with a 5-HT2AR selective antagonist. [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 showed very low brain uptake. CONCLUSION: None of the investigated (18)F-labeled Cimbi-36 derivatives [(18)F]1, [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 show suitable tracer...

  6. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  7. Preparation of steroid radioligands for ultrafiltration assays by a solid-phase transport globulin method using concanavalin A-Sepharose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiramatsu, R.; Nisula, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    Concanavalin A-Sepharose (Con A-Sepharose) was applied to separate non-protein-bound and albumin-bound radioactive impurities from steroid radioligands. Con A-Sepharose gel, plasma, and steroid radioligand were mixed, incubated, and then washed with buffer. This method was compared with an affinity diafiltration method which separates non-protein-bound radioactive impurities with a filter membrane. 3 H-Water and 3 H-estrone sulfate, chosen to serve as molecules representative of non-protein-bound and albumin-bound impurities, were removed quite effectively by the Con A-Sepharose method, while 85% of 3 H-estrone sulfate could not be removed by the diafiltration method. Plasma unbound cortisol (F) and testosterone (T) values determined by ultrafiltration using 3 H-F and 3 H-T prepared by the Con A-Sepharose method were significantly lower than those determined using the radioligands unprocessed or prepared by the diafiltration method. The whole procedure of the Con A-Sepharose method takes only 3-4 hours. This method is a simple, rapid, and effective technique for preparation of steroid radioligands for plasma protein binding studies

  8. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  9. Radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist binds to GLP-1 receptor-expressing human tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, PO Box 62, Berne (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. For the somatostatin receptor targeting of tumours, however, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers. The present study therefore evaluated various forms of the {sup 125}iodinated-Bolton-Hunter (BH)-exendin(9-39) antagonist tracer for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in rats and humans and compared it with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in human and rat tissues. The antagonist {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) labelled at lysine 19 identifies all human and rat GLP-1 target tissues and GLP-1 receptor-expressing tumours. Binding is of high affinity and is comparable in all tested tissues in its binding properties with the agonist tracer {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide. For comparison, {sup 125}I-BH-exendin(9-39) with the BH labelled at lysine 4 did identify the GLP-1 receptor in rat tissues but not in human tissues. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) labelled with {sup 125}I-BH at lysine 19 is an excellent GLP-1 radioligand that identifies human and rat GLP-1 receptors in normal and tumoural tissues. It may therefore be the molecular basis to develop suitable GLP-1 receptor antagonist radioligands for in vivo imaging of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in patients. (orig.)

  10. One-step preparation of [2,3-3H]1-aminocyclo-propanecarboxylic acid: a useful ligand for strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, A.H.; Lamb, P.B.; Popik, P.; Skolnick, P.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of 1-aminocyclopropenecarboxylic acid under tritium gas afforded [2,3- 3 H]1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid with specific activity 26 Ci/mmol, determined by a combination of 1 H and 3 H NMR. Pilot radioligand binding assays indicate this compound will be a useful prove for the NMDA receptor-associated strychnine-insensitive glycine receptor. (author)

  11. One-step preparation of [2,3-{sup 3}H]1-aminocyclo-propanecarboxylic acid: a useful ligand for strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewin, A.H.; Lamb, P.B. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Popik, P.; Skolnick, P. [National Insts. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of 1-aminocyclopropenecarboxylic acid under tritium gas afforded [2,3-{sup 3}H]1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid with specific activity 26 Ci/mmol, determined by a combination of {sup 1}H and {sup 3}H NMR. Pilot radioligand binding assays indicate this compound will be a useful prove for the NMDA receptor-associated strychnine-insensitive glycine receptor. (author).

  12. Assay of oestrogen and progestin receptors in human meningioma cytosols using immunological methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankenstein, M.A.; Meulen-Dijk, C. van der; Thijssen, J.H.H.

    1987-01-01

    Oestrogen (ER) and progestin receptors (PR) were assayed in human meningioma cytosol by radioligand binding assay with Scatchard plot analysis and by monoclonal antibody based enzyme immunoassays. For comparison, human breast cancer tissues were used. Results of both assays agreed very well. For

  13. A simple robust assay for testosterone in male plasma using an 125I-radioligand and a solid-phase separation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyas, J.; Read, G.F.; Riad-Fahmy, D.

    1979-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for testosterone in male plasma utilising a gamma-emitting radioligand and a solid-phase antiserum is described. The radioligand was testosterone-3-(O-carboxymethyl)-oxime coupled to 125 I-iodohistamine, and the solid-phase antersum was prepared by coupling anti-testosterone-3-bovine serum albumin to cyanogen bromide activated cellulose. The new procedure retained much of the specificity associated with a published, specific radioimmunoassay using an antiserum raised against testosterone-11 α-BSA and a tritium radioligand and incorporating a dextran-coated charcoal separation procedure; values obtained by the two procedures were in excellent agreement (r = 0.98, n = 20). The combination of an 125 I-radioligand and a solid-phase separation technique greatly increased sample throughput and had the further advantage of reduced running costs and a greater potential for automation. The method gave satisfactory levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. (author)

  14. Biodistribution and dosimetry in humans of two inverse agonists to image cannabinoid CB1 receptors using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, Garth E.; Hirvonen, Jussi; Liow, Jeih-San; Seneca, Nicholas; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B.; Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C.; Halldin, Christer

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB 1 ) receptors are found in nearly every organ in the body, may be involved in several neuropsychiatric and metabolic disorders, and are therefore an active target for pharmacotherapy and biomarker development. We recently reported brain imaging of CB 1 receptors with two PET radioligands: 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . Here we describe the biodistribution and dosimetry estimates for these two radioligands. Seven healthy subjects (four men and three women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 120 min after injection with 11 C-MePPEP. Another seven healthy subjects (two men and five women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 300 min after injection with 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . Residence times were acquired from regions of interest drawn on tomographic images of visually identifiable organs for both radioligands and from radioactivity excreted in urine for 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 . The effective doses of 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 are 4.6 and 19.7 μSv/MBq, respectively. Both radioligands demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in liver, lung, and brain shortly after injection and accumulated radioactivity in bone marrow towards the end of the scan. After injection of 11 C-MePPEP, radioactivity apparently underwent hepatobiliary excretion only, while radioactivity from 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 showed both hepatobiliary and urinary excretion. 11 C-MePPEP and 18 F-FMPEP-d 2 yield an effective dose similar to other PET radioligands labeled with either 11 C or 18 F. The high uptake in brain confirms the utility of these two radioligands to image CB 1 receptors in brain, and both may also be useful to image CB 1 receptors in the periphery. (orig.)

  15. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  16. A New Nonlinear Regression Approach That Allows Detection of Inter-Individual Differences in Single-Point Radioligand Binding Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Georgetown U. Med. Ctr., 3900 Reservoir Rd., Washington, DC 20007; 2Applied Mathematics Program, Johns Hopkins University, 9601 Medical Center Dr., Rockville...TERMS Nonlinear regresion , Monte-Carlo 15. NUMBER OF PAGES randomization, Scheffe’s test, radioligand binding 16. PRICE CODE 24 17. SECURITY 18...appropriate for this situation. Indeed, here it is necessary to formulate this problem as a multiple linear regression model expressed with the aid of

  17. Cerebral 5-HT release correlates with [11C]Cimbi36 PET measures of 5-HT2A receptor occupancy in the pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Louise M; Weikop, Pia; Villadsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can, when used with appropriate radioligands, non-invasively generate temporal and spatial information about acute changes in brain neurotransmitter systems. We for the first time evaluate the novel 5-HT2A receptor agonist PET radioligand, [11C]Cimbi-36, for its......-HT level in the pig brain and the 5-HT2A receptor occupancy indicates that [11C]Cimbi-36 binding is sensitive to changes in endogenous 5-HT levels, although only detectable with PET when the 5- HT release is sufficiently high....

  18. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  19. Preparation of a potential positron emission tomographic radioligand for the dopamine transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, L.; Halldin, C.; Foged, C.; Karlsson, P.; Hall, H.; Swahn, C.G.; Suzdak, P.D.; Hohlweg, R.; Nielsen, E.B.; Frade, L.

    1994-01-01

    NNC 12-0722 (1-[2-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)-methoxy)ethyl]-4-methyl piperazine) is a new selective inhibitor of the dopamine transporter. [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 was prepared by N-methylation of the desmethyl compound with [ 11 C]methyl iodide. The total radiochemical yield of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 was 40%-50% with an overall synthesis time of 30-35 min. The radiochemical purity was higher than 99% and the specific radioactivity about 1500 Ci/mmol (55 GBq/μmol). Autoradiographic examination of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 binding on whole hemisphere cryosections from human brain post mortem demonstrated specific binding in the caudate nucleus and putamen. In a positron emission tomographic examination of [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 in a cynomolgus monkey there was a rapid uptake of radioactivity in the brain. In the striatum, a region with a high density of dopamine transporters, the radioactivity was two times higher than in the cerebellum. These results indicate that [ 11 C]NNC 12-0722 may be a useful radioligand for labelling of the dopamine transporter in man. (orig.)

  20. Synthesis of [O-methyl-11C]fluvoxamine - a potential serotonin uptake site radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matarrese, M.; Soloviev, D.; Fazio, F.; Todde, S.; Magni, F.; Colombo, D.; Galli Kienle, M.

    1997-01-01

    5-Methoxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-(2-amin oethyl)oxime (fluvoxamine), a potent clinically used antidepressant, was labelled with carbon-11 (t 1/2 = 20.4 min) as a potential radioligand for the non-invasive assessment of serotonin uptake sites in the human brain with positron emission tomography (PET). The two-step radiochemical synthesis consisted of 0-methylation of an amino-protected desmethyl precursor with [ 11 C]methyl iodide under mild conditions in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in acetonitrile, followed by deprotection with trifluoroacetic acid. 5-[ 11 C]Methoxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-(2-a minoethyl)oxime was obtained in > 98% radiochemical purity in 40 min with a radiochemical yield of 4 ± 2% (non-decay corrected) and a specific radioactivity of 1 ± 0.5 Ci/μmol. 5-Hydroxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-[2-(tert-bu toxycarbonylamino)ethyl]oxime, the precursor for the radiosynthesis of [ 11 C]fluvoxamine, was prepared by a convenient three-set synthesis from the pharmaceutical form of fluvoxamine maleate by converting it into the free base, demethylation by trimethyliodosilane and introduction of the BOC-protective group with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate. (author)

  1. Synthesis of [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]fluvoxamine - a potential serotonin uptake site radioligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matarrese, M.; Soloviev, D.; Fazio, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Todde, S.; Magni, F.; Colombo, D.; Galli Kienle, M. [Department of Medical Chemistry and Biochemistry, Milan (Italy)

    1997-06-01

    5-Methoxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-(2-amin oethyl)oxime (fluvoxamine), a potent clinically used antidepressant, was labelled with carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2} = 20.4 min) as a potential radioligand for the non-invasive assessment of serotonin uptake sites in the human brain with positron emission tomography (PET). The two-step radiochemical synthesis consisted of 0-methylation of an amino-protected desmethyl precursor with [{sup 11}C]methyl iodide under mild conditions in the presence of tetrabutylammonium hydroxide in acetonitrile, followed by deprotection with trifluoroacetic acid. 5-[{sup 11}C]Methoxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-(2-a minoethyl)oxime was obtained in > 98% radiochemical purity in 40 min with a radiochemical yield of 4 {+-} 2% (non-decay corrected) and a specific radioactivity of 1 {+-} 0.5 Ci/{mu}mol. 5-Hydroxy-1-[4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl]-1-pentanone-0-[2-(tert-bu toxycarbonylamino)ethyl]oxime, the precursor for the radiosynthesis of [{sup 11}C]fluvoxamine, was prepared by a convenient three-set synthesis from the pharmaceutical form of fluvoxamine maleate by converting it into the free base, demethylation by trimethyliodosilane and introduction of the BOC-protective group with di-tert-butyl dicarbonate. (author).

  2. Tweaking subtype-selectivity and agonist efficacy at (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in a small series of BnTetAMPA analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Shuang-Yan; Larsen, Younes; Navarrete, Cristina V.

    2016-01-01

    A series of analogues of the (S)-2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonist BnTetAMPA (5b) were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in radioligand binding assays at native and cloned AMPA receptors and functionally by two-electrode voltage clamp...

  3. The distribution of multiple opiate receptors in bovine brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Hunt, S.P.; Emson, P.C.; Iversen, L.L.

    1981-01-01

    The distribution of μ and delta opiate receptors in bovine brain has been investigated using the selective radioligands [ 3 H]morphine and D-[ 3 H]Ala 2 , D-Leu 5 -enkephalin. Their distributions were found to vary independently through different brain areas with up to a 10-fold difference between the ratio of μ to delta binding sites for the substantia nigra and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. (Auth.)

  4. Evaluation of the novel 5-HT4 receptor PET ligand [11C]SB207145 in the Gottingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, B.R.; Lind, N.M.; Gillings, N.

    2009-01-01

    for hippocampus where PET-measurements significantly underestimate the 5-HT(4) receptor binding, probably because of partial volume effects. This study validates the use of [(11)C]SB207145 as a promising PET radioligand for in vivo brain imaging of the 5-HT(4) receptor in humans Udgivelsesdato: 2009/1......This study investigates 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor binding in the minipig brain with positron emission tomography (PET), tissue homogenate-binding assays, and autoradiography in vitro. The cerebral uptake and binding of the novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 in vivo...... model provides stable and precise estimates of the binding potential in all regions. The binding potentials calculated for striatum, midbrain, and cortex from the PET data were highly correlated with 5-HT(4) receptor concentrations determined in brain homogenates from the same regions, except...

  5. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [{sup 18}F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A. [Nuclear Medicine Section, Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd., NC 27157, Winston-Salem (United States); Calles-Escandon, J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Mach, R.H. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2004-02-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  6. Neurofunctional imaging of the pancreas utilizing the cholinergic PET radioligand [18F]4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, P.B.; Gage, H.D.; Brown-Proctor, C.; Buchheimer, N.; Morton, K.A.; Calles-Escandon, J.; Mach, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    The pancreas is one of the most heavily innervated peripheral organs in the body. Parasympathetic and sympathetic neurons terminate in the pancreas and provide tight control of endocrine and exocrine functions. The aim of this study was to determine whether the pancreas can be imaged with a radioligand that binds to specific neuroreceptors. Using fluorine-18 4-fluorobenzyltrozamicol (FBT), which binds to the presynaptic vesicular acetylcholine transporter, positron emission tomography scans were performed in four adult mice, two adult rhesus monkeys, and one adult human. In these mammals, the pancreas is intensely FBT avid, with uptake greater than in any other organ at 30, 60, and 90 min. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) ratios of pancreas to liver, for example, ranged from 1.4 to 1.7 in rhesus monkeys (mean 1.6; median 1.7) and from 1.9 to 4.7 (mean 3.24; median 3.02) in mice. The maximum SUV ratio of pancreas to liver in the human was 1.8. These data suggest that neuroreceptor imaging of the pancreas in vivo is feasible in animal models and humans. This imaging could allow researchers to interrogate functions under control of the autonomic nervous system in the pancreas, with applications possible in transplanted and native pancreata. Also, as beta cell function is intimately related to parasympathetic cholinergic input, FBT activity in the pancreas may correlate with insulin-producing beta cell mass. This could ultimately provide a method of in vivo imaging in animal models and humans for diabetes research. (orig.)

  7. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  8. Biodistribution and dosimetry in humans of two inverse agonists to image cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, Garth E. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Hirvonen, Jussi; Liow, Jeih-San; Seneca, Nicholas; Morse, Cheryl L.; Pike, Victor W.; Innis, Robert B. [National Institute of Mental Health, Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD (United States); Tauscher, Johannes T.; Schaus, John M.; Phebus, Lee; Felder, Christian C. [Lilly Research Laboratories, Lilly Corporate Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-08-15

    Cannabinoid subtype 1 (CB{sub 1}) receptors are found in nearly every organ in the body, may be involved in several neuropsychiatric and metabolic disorders, and are therefore an active target for pharmacotherapy and biomarker development. We recently reported brain imaging of CB{sub 1} receptors with two PET radioligands: {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Here we describe the biodistribution and dosimetry estimates for these two radioligands. Seven healthy subjects (four men and three women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 120 min after injection with {sup 11}C-MePPEP. Another seven healthy subjects (two men and five women) underwent whole-body PET scans for 300 min after injection with {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. Residence times were acquired from regions of interest drawn on tomographic images of visually identifiable organs for both radioligands and from radioactivity excreted in urine for {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2}. The effective doses of {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} are 4.6 and 19.7 {mu}Sv/MBq, respectively. Both radioligands demonstrated high uptake of radioactivity in liver, lung, and brain shortly after injection and accumulated radioactivity in bone marrow towards the end of the scan. After injection of {sup 11}C-MePPEP, radioactivity apparently underwent hepatobiliary excretion only, while radioactivity from {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} showed both hepatobiliary and urinary excretion. {sup 11}C-MePPEP and {sup 18}F-FMPEP-d{sub 2} yield an effective dose similar to other PET radioligands labeled with either {sup 11}C or {sup 18}F. The high uptake in brain confirms the utility of these two radioligands to image CB{sub 1} receptors in brain, and both may also be useful to image CB{sub 1} receptors in the periphery. (orig.)

  9. Preclinical evaluation of an 18F-labelled beta1-adrenoceptor selective radioligand based on ICI 89,406.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Marilyn P; Wagner, Stefan; Kopka, Klaus; Renner, Christiane; Pike, Victor W; Schober, Otmar; Schäfers, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Radioligand binding studies indicate a down-regulation of myocardial beta(1)-adrenoceptors (beta(1)-AR) in cardiac disease which may or may not be associated with a decrease in beta(2)-ARs. We have chosen ICI 89,406, a beta(1)-selective AR antagonist, as the lead structure to develop new beta(1)-AR radioligands for PET and have synthesised a fluoro-ethoxy derivative (F-ICI). (S)-N-[2-[3-(2-Cyano-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-propylamino]-ethyl]-N'-[4-(2-[(18)F]fluoro-ethoxy)-phenyl]-urea ((S)-[(18)F]F-ICI) was synthesised. Myocardial uptake of radioactivity after intravenous injection of (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI into adult CD(1) mice or Wistar rats was assessed with positron emission tomography (PET) and postmortem dissection. Metabolism was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of plasma and urine. The heart was visualised with PET after injection of (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI but neither unlabelled F-ICI nor propranolol (non-selective beta-AR antagonist) injected 15 min after (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI affected myocardial radioactivity. Ex vivo dissection demonstrated that predosing with propranolol or CGP 20712 (beta(1)-selective AR-antagonist) did not affect myocardial radioactivity. Radiometabolites rapidly appeared in plasma and both (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI and radiometabolites accumulated in urine. Myocardial uptake of (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI after intravenous injection was mainly at sites unrelated to beta(1)-ARs. (S)-[(18)F]F-ICI is not a suitable beta(1)-selective-AR radioligand for PET. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel radioligand for glycine transporter 1: characterization and use in autoradiographic and in vivo brain occupancy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)], E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; O' Brien, Julie A. [Sleep and Psychiatric Disorders, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lemaire, Wei [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); O' Malley, Stacey S.; Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Zhao Zhijian [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Wallace, Michael A. [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065 (United States); Raab, Conrad [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lindsley, Craig W. [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Departments of Pharmacology and Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Sur, Cyrille; Williams, David L. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: In an effort to develop agents to test the NMDA hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, benchmark compounds from a program to discover potent, selective, competitive glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) inhibitors were radiolabeled in order to further study the detailed pharmacology of these inhibitors and the distribution of GlyT1 in brain. We here report the in vitro characterization of [{sup 35}S](S)-2-amino-4-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl) ethyl)benzamide ([{sup 35}S]ACPPB), a radiotracer developed from a potent and selective non-sarcosine-derived GlyT1 inhibitor, its use in autoradiographic studies to localize (S)-2-amino-6-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl)ethyl) benzamide (ACPPB) binding sites in rat and rhesus brain and for in vivo occupancy assays of competitive GlyT1 inhibitors. Methods: Functional potencies of unlabeled compounds were characterized by [{sup 14}C]glycine uptake into JAR (human placental choriocarcinoma) cells and synaptosomes. Radioligand binding studies were performed with tissue homogenates. Autoradiographic studies were performed on tissue slices. Results: ACPPB is a potent (K{sub d}=1.9 nM), selective, GlyT1 inhibitor that, when radiolabeled with [{sup 35}S], is a well-behaved radioligand with low nondisplaceable binding. Autoradiographic studies of rat and rhesus brain slices with this ligand showed that specific binding sites were plentiful and nonhomogeneously distributed, with high levels of binding in the brainstem, cerebellar white matter, thalamus, cortical white matter and spinal cord gray matter. In vivo studies demonstrate displaceable binding of [{sup 35}S]ACPPB in rat brain tissues following iv administration of this radioligand. Conclusions: This is the first report of detailed anatomical localization of GlyT1 using direct radioligand binding, and the first demonstration that an in vivo occupancy assay is feasible, suggesting that it may also be feasible to develop

  11. Immunoprecipitation of the parathyroid hormone receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.S.; Tyler, G.A.; O'Brien, R.; Caporale, L.H.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1987-01-01

    An 125 I-labeled synthetic analog of bovine parathyroid hormone, [8-norleucine,18-norleucine,34-tyrosine]PTH-(1-34) amide ([Nle]PTH-(1-34)-NH 2 ), purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), was employed to label the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor in cell lines derived from PTH target tissues: the ROS 17/2.8 rat osteosarcoma of bone and the CV1 and COS monkey kidney lines. After incubation of the radioligand with intact cultured cells, the hormone was covalently attached to receptors by using either a photoaffinity technique or chemical (affinity) crosslinking. In each case, covalent labeling was specific, as evidenced by a reduction of labeling when excess competing nonradioactive ligand was present. After covalent attachment of radioligand, membranes were prepared form the cells and solubilized in the nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40 or octyl glucoside. Analysis of the immunoprecipitate on NaDod-SO 4 /polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by autoradiography revealed the presence of a doublet of apparent molecular mass 69-70 kDa. Specifically labeled bands of approximate molecular mass 95 and 28 kDa were also observed. The anti-PTH IgG was affinity purified by passage over a PTH-Sepharose column and used to made an immunoaffinity column. These studies suggest that the use of an anti-PTH antiserum that binds receptor-bound hormone is likely to be a useful step in the further physicochemical characterization and purification of the PTH receptor

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of two novel 2-nitroimidazole derivatives as potential PET radioligands for tumor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zha Zhihao; Zhu Lin [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Beijing Normal University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19014 (United States); Liu Yajing; Du Fenghua; Gan Hongmei; Qiao Jinping [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Beijing Normal University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Kung, Hank F., E-mail: kunghf@gmail.co [Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals, Beijing Normal University, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100875 (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19014 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    }F]7) and NEFT ([{sup 19}F]8). Conclusions: In this research, two new fluorine-18 labeled 2-nitroimidazole derivatives, [{sup 18}F]7 and [{sup 18}F]8, both of which containing in vivo hydrolyzable group, were successfully prepared. Further biological evaluations are warranted to investigate their potential as PET radioligands for imaging tumor.

  13. 18F-labeled FECNT: a selective radioligand for PET imaging of brain dopamine transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Kilts, Clinton D.; Keil, Robert; Shi Bing; Martarello, Laurent; Xing Dongxia; Votaw, John; Ely, Timothy D.; Lambert, Philip; Owens, Michael J.; Camp, Vernon M.; Malveaux, Eugene; Hoffman, John M.

    2000-01-01

    metabolites capable of entering the brain. In equilibrium displacement experiments with CIT in rhesus monkeys, radioactivity in the putamen was displaced with an average half-time of 10.2 min. These results indicate that [ 18 F]FECNT is a radioligand that is superior to 11 C-WIN 35,428, [ 11 C]CIT/RTI-55, [ 18 F]β-CIT-FP, and [ 18 F]FPCT for mapping brain DAT in humans using PET

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of I-125/I-123-labelled analogues of citalopram and escitalopram as potential radioligands for imaging of the serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Elfving, Betina; Frokjaer, Vibe G.

    2011-01-01

    Two novel radioligands for the serotonin transporter (SERT), [I-125]{3-[5-iodo-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl]-propyl}-dimethylamine ([I-125]-2) and S-[I-125]{3-[5-iodo-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran-1-yl]-propyl}-dimethylamine ([I-125]-(S)-2) were synthesized in a ...... of the radioligand in imaging cortical SERT distribution in vivo. These data suggest that the iodine-labelled derivatives of citalopram and escitalopram are not superior to another SPECT tracer for the SERT, namely [I-123] ADAM....

  15. Evaluation of the superselective radioligand [123I]PE2I for imaging of the dopamine transporter in SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Imaging of the dopamine transporter (DAT) with Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography (SPECT) has increasingly been used as a biomarker for the integrity of presynaptic dopaminergic nerve cells in patients with movement disorders. 123-I-labelled N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2-ß-carbomethoxy-3ß-(4......-methylphenyl) nortropane, named PE2I, is a relatively new radioligand that has about 10-fold higher in vitro selectivity for the DAT than for the serotonin transporter (SERT) compared to the slightly older but very used and licensed radioligand [123I]FP-CIT (DaTSCAN). Further [123I]PE2I has faster kinetics...... a B/I ratio of [123I]PE2I. This B/I ratio (2.7h) gave rise to steady state conditions and excellent reproducibility. Further, manual delineation of ROI directly on SPECT images performed equally well to a MRI-defined probability map based ROI delineation in terms of intrasubject variability of binding...

  16. Age and sex effects on 5-HT(4) receptors in the human brain: a [(11)C]SB207145 PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karine; Haahr, Mette T; Marner, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    . This study aimed to investigate sex and age effects on 5-HT(4) receptor-binding potentials in striatum, the limbic system, and neocortex. Positron-emission tomographic scans were conducted using the radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 in a cohort of 30 healthy subjects (mean age 44 years; range 20 to 86 years; 14...

  17. Evaluation of the novel 5-HT4 receptor PET ligand [11C]SB207145 in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Lind, Nanna M; Gillings, Nic

    2009-01-01

    for hippocampus where PET-measurements significantly underestimate the 5-HT(4) receptor binding, probably because of partial volume effects. This study validates the use of [(11)C]SB207145 as a promising PET radioligand for in vivo brain imaging of the 5-HT(4) receptor in humans.......This study investigates 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor binding in the minipig brain with positron emission tomography (PET), tissue homogenate-binding assays, and autoradiography in vitro. The cerebral uptake and binding of the novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand [(11)C]SB207145 in vivo...... model provides stable and precise estimates of the binding potential in all regions. The binding potentials calculated for striatum, midbrain, and cortex from the PET data were highly correlated with 5-HT(4) receptor concentrations determined in brain homogenates from the same regions, except...

  18. Genetic variation in 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter expression causes adaptive changes in 5-HT4 receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennings, Katie Ann; Licht, Cecilie Löe; Bruce, Aynsley

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) expression is a key risk factor for psychiatric disorder and has been linked to changes in the expression of certain 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study investigated the effect of variation in 5-HTT expression on 5-HT4 receptor levels in both 5-HTT...... knockout (KO) and overexpressing (OE) mice using autoradiography with the selective 5-HT4 receptor radioligand, [3H]SB207145. Compared to wild-type (5-HTT+/+) controls, homozygous 5-HTT KO mice (5-HTT-/-) had reduced 5-HT4 receptor binding site density in all brain regions examined (35-65% of 5-HTT...

  19. Evaluation of stereoisomers of 4-fluoroalkyl analogues of 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate in in vivo competition studies for the M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptor subtypes in brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Eckelman, William C.; Jaetae, Lee; Paik, Chang H.; Park, Seok G.

    1995-01-01

    To develop a subtype selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) antagonist for PET, fluorine-19 labeled alkyl analogues of quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) were synthesized by stereoselective reactions. To investigate these analogues for tissue subtype specificity, in vivo competitive binding studies were performed in rat brain using (R)-3-quinuclidinyl (R)-4-[ 125 I]Iodobenzilate (IQNB). Five, fifty, or five-hundred nmol of the non-radioactive ligands were coinjected intravenously with 8 pmol of the radioligand. Cold (R,R)-IQNB blocked (R,R)-[ 125 I]IQNB in a dose-dependent manner, without showing regional specificity. For the (R,S)-fluoromethyl, -fluoroethyl, and -fluoropropyl derivatives, a higher percent blockade was seen at 5 and 50 nmol levels in M2 predominant tissues (medulla, pons, and cerebellum) than in M1 predominant tissues (cortex, striatum and hippocampus). The blockade pattern of the radioligand also correlated qualitatively with the percentage of M2 receptors in the region. The S-quinuclidinyl analogues showed M2 selectivity but less efficient blockade of the radioligand, indicating lower affinities. Radioligand bound to the medulla was inversely correlated to the M2 relative binding affinity of the fluoroalkyl analogues. These results indicate that the nonradioactive ligand blocks the radioligand based on the affinity of the nonradioactive ligand for a particular receptor subtype compared to the affinity of the radioligand for the same receptor subtype. Of the seven compounds evaluated, (R,S)-fluoromethyl-QNB appears to show the most selectivity for the M2 subtypes in competition studies in vivo

  20. Amiloride interacts with renal α- and β-adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, M.J.; Mullen, M.D.; Insel, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have used radioligand binding techniques to assess whether amiloride and certain analogues of amiloride (ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil) can bind to adrenergic receptors in the kidney. They found that amiloride could compete for [ 3 H]rauwolscine (α 2 -adrenergic receptors), [ 3 H]prazosin (α 1 -adrenergic receptors), and [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol (β-adrenergic receptors) binding in rat renal cortical membranes with inhibitor constants of 13.6 /plus minus/ 5.7, 24.4 /plus minus/ 7.4, and 8.36 /plus minus/ 13.5 μM, respectively. Ethylisopropyl amiloride and benzamil were from 2- to 25-fold more potent than amiloride in competing for radioligand binding sites in studies with these membranes. In addition, amiloride and the two analogues competed for [ 3 H]prazosin sites on intact Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and amiloride blocked epinephrine-stimulated prostaglandin E 2 production in these cells. They conclude that amiloride competes for binding to several classes of renal adrenergic receptors with a rank order of potency of α 2 > α 1 > β. Binding to, and antagonism of, adrenergic receptors occurs at concentrations of amiloride that are lower than previously observed nonspecific interactions of this agent

  1. Radiosynthesis, evaluation and preclinical studies of a new 5HT2A radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, J.; Terriere, D.; Baeken, C.; D'Haenan, H.; Flamen, P.; Bossuyt, A.; Leysen, J.

    1998-01-01

    123 I-5-I-R91150, a radioiodinated analogue of R91150 (a ligand (antagonist) of Janssen Research Foundation), showing high affinity and selectivity for 5HT 2A receptors, was developed as a potential in vivo 5HT 2A receptor tracer for SPECT. The applied radiochemistry, whereby the radioiodine was substituted on the 5 - position of the benzamide ring, allowed to obtain the tracer with high specific activity and high purity. In vitro and in vivo rat studies revealed that the new tracer bound reversibly with the required high affinity (Kd=0.1 nM) and high selectivity (a factor ranging from 10000 to at least 50 vis a vis other receptors) to 5HT 2A receptors. In young normal subjects the major part of the 123 I-5-I-R91150 radioactivity in the brain is present in cortical areas. Cortical area to cerebellum activity ratio reaches an equilibrium value of about 1.8 around 90 min. till 4 hours p.i.. This binding was specific and reversible. The cortical activity reflects a distribution in the brain similar to that of the mapping of 5HT 2A receptors from post mortem studies. These findings suggested that 123 I-5-I-R91150 allows imaging and quantitative estimation with SPECT and could be used for further clinical studies. The radiobromine analogue was synthetised as a potential PET tracer. (author)

  2. Species differences in blood-brain barrier transport of three positron emission tomography radioligands with emphasis on P-glycoprotein transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syvanen, S.; Lindhe, O.; Palner, M.

    2009-01-01

    . The fraction of the unbound radioligand in plasma was studied along with its metabolism. The effect of P-gp inhibition was investigated by administering cyclosporin A (CsA). Pronounced species differences were found in the brain and brain-to-plasma concentrations of [(11)C]verapamil, [(11)C]GR205171, and [(18...

  3. 5-HT2A and mGlu2 receptor binding levels are related to differences in impulsive behavior in the Roman Low- (RLA) and High- (RHA) avoidance rat strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, A B; Ultved, L; Adamsen, D

    2014-01-01

    of serotonin transporter (SERT), 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT(1A) receptor binding using highly specific radioligands ((3)H-escitalopram, (3)H-MDL100907 and (3)H-WAY100635) and mGlu2/3 receptor binding ((3)H-LY341495) using receptor autoradiography in fronto-cortical sections from RLA-I (n=8) and RHA-I (n=8) male rats...

  4. Radiosynthesis and characterisation of a potent and selective GPR139 agonist radioligand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuhne, S.; Nohr, A. C.; Marek, Aleš; Elbert, Tomáš; Klein, A. B.; Bräuner-Osborne, H.; Wellendorph, P.; Pedersen, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 2 (2016), s. 947-952 ISSN 2046-2069 Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1207 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : protein-coupled receptors * amino acids Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2016/ra/c5ra21326f

  5. [Clinical significance of tumor content of epidermal growth factor receptor in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulero, M; Fernández Raigoso, P; Vázquez, J; Lamelas, M L; Corte, D; Allende, M T; Rodríguez, J C; Vizoso, F

    2003-11-01

    To determine the content of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) using a radioligand method in breast cancer and to analyze the relationship between the EGFR levels and the characteristics of patients and tumors. Prognostic significance was also analyzed. EGFR was measured by a single point radioligand assay in 265 invasive breast carcinomas tissues. In addition, estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR) were measured by enzymatic immunoassays. We analyze the relationship of EGFR levels with the different clinico-pathologic parameters. EGFR levels in breast carcinomas varied widely (0.1 to 403) with a median at 4 fmol/mg prot. The significantly higher concentrations of EGFR were detected in patients under 60 years old (p = 0.042), undifferentiated tumors (p = 0.04), and carcinomas with negative ER and PR (p aggresive characteristics of the tumor.

  6. The stereoisomers of 17alpha-[123I]iodovinyloestradiol and its 11beta-methoxy derivative evaluated for their oestrogen receptor binding in human MCF-7 cells and rat uterus, and their distribution in immature rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijks, L. J.; Boer, G. J.; Endert, E.; de Bruin, K.; van den Bos, J. C.; van Doremalen, P. A.; Schoonen, W. G.; Janssen, A. G.; van Royen, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the potential of both stereoisomers of 17alpha-[123I]iodovinyloestradiol (E- and Z-[123I]IVE) and of 11beta-methoxy-17alpha-[123I]iodovinyloestradiol (E- and Z-[123I]MIVE) as suitable radioligands for the imaging of oestrogen receptor(ER)-positive human breast tumours. The

  7. Combinatorial selection of aptamers: new radioligands for in vivo molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestourie, C.

    2005-10-01

    Aptamers are oligonucleotide structures selected for their capacity to bind to a desired target. The first part of this work focuses on the selection of aptamers directed against the oncogenic form of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret (RetC634Y). We compared different selection protocols: i) selection against the purified RetC634Y recombinant protein, ii) selection against whole living cells which express RetC634Y and iii) a crossover selection alternating between cells and recombinant protein. One aptamer, D4, was found to be able to inhibit Ret and to reverse the cell phenotype induced by the activation of the receptor. Then, we developed the in vivo use of the selected aptamers. Finally, we used the whole living cells selection protocol to develop aptamers against HLA-G. This protein is characterised by its function in immuno tolerance. Taken together, these studies should pave the way for the in vivo use of aptamers as new therapeutic and diagnostic agents for in vivo PET imaging. (author)

  8. Affinity of Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea extracts on different cerebral receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Cavallo, Federica; Bruni, Giancarlo; Capasso, Anna; De Feo, Vincenzo; De Martino, Laura; Giorgi, Giorgio; Micheli, Lucia

    2006-05-24

    Iresine herbstii Hook. (Amaranthaceae) and Brugmansia arborea (L.) Lagerheim (Solanaceae) are used in the northern Peruvian Andes for magic-therapeutical purposes. The traditional healers use Iresine herbstii with the ritual aim to expel bad spirits from the body. Furthermore, Iresine herbstii was used in association with other plants, such as Trichocereus pachanoi Britt. et Rose, for divination, to diagnose diseases, and to take possession of another identity. Also, species of Brugmansia have been reported to be used during ritual practices for magical and curative purposes. Given the above evidence, the aim of the present study is to evaluate if the central effects of Iresine herbstii and Brugmansia arborea could be associated with interaction with SNC receptors. Two Iresine herbstii extracts (methanolic and aqueous) and one Brugmansia arborea aqueous extract were tested for in vitro affinity on 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2C), D1, D2, alpha(1), and alpha(2) receptors by radioligand binding assays. The biological materials for binding assay (cerebral cortex) were taken from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extracts affinity for receptors is definite as inhibition percentage of radioligand/receptor binding and measured as the radioactivity of remaining complex radioligand/receptor. The data obtained for Iresine extracts have shown a low affinity for the 5-HT(1A) receptor and no affinity for 5-HT(2A) receptor. Otherwise the methanolic extract showed affinity for 5-HT(2C) receptor (IC(50): 34.78 microg/ml) and for D1 receptor (IC(50): 19.63 microg/ml), instead the Iresine aqueous extract displayed a lower affinity for D1 (48.3% at the maximum concentration tested) and a higher value of affinity for D2 receptors (IC(50): 32.08 microg/ml). The Brugmansia aqueous extract displayed affinity for D1 receptors (IC(50): 17.68 microg/ml), D2 receptors (IC(50): 15.95 microg/ml) and weak affinity for the serotoninergic receptors. None of the three extracts showed relevant affinity

  9. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase: high affinity tetrahydrophthalimide radioligand for the inhibitor/herbicide-binding site in mouse liver mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchfield, N B; Casida, J E

    1996-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox), the last common enzyme in heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis, is the target of several classes of herbicides acting as inhibitors in both plants and mammals. N-(4-Chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)phenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro phthalimide (a potent protox inhibitor referred to as THP) was synthesized as a candidate radioligand ([3H]-THP) by selective catalytic reduction of 3,6-dihydrophthalic anhydride (DHPA) with tritium gas followed by condensation in 45% yield with 4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)aniline. Insertion of tritium at the 3 and 6 carbons of DHPA as well as the expected 4 and 5 carbons resulted in high specific activity [3H]THP (92 Ci/mmol). This radioligand undergoes rapid, specific, saturable, and reversible binding to the inhibitor/herbicide binding site of the protox component of cholate-solubilized mouse liver mitochondria with an apparent Kd of 0.41 nM and Bmax of 0.40 pmol/mg of protein. In the standard assay, mouse preparation (150 micrograms of protein) and [3H]THP (0.5 nM) are incubated in 500 microL of phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 for 15 min at 25 degrees C followed by addition of ammonium sulfate and filtration with glass fiber filters. The potencies of five nitrodiphenyl ethers and two other herbicides as inhibitors of [3H]THP binding correlate well with those for inhibition of protox activity (r2 = 0.97, n = 7), thus validating the binding assay as relevant to enzyme inhibition. It is also suitable to determine in vivo block as illustrated by an approximately 50% decrease in [3H]THP binding in liver mitochondria from mice treated ip with oxyfluorfen at 4 mg/kg. This is the first report of a binding assay for protox in mammals. The high affinity and specific activity of [3H]THP facilitate quantitation of protox and therefore research on a sensitive inhibition site for porphyrin biosynthesis.

  10. In vivo imaging of neuroinflammation in the rodent brain with [{sup 11}C]SSR180575, a novel indoleacetamide radioligand of the translocator protein (18 kDa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauveau, Fabien [CEA, DSV, IBM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Universite Paris Sud, INSERM U1023, Orsay (France); Universite Lyon 1, Creatis, CNRS UMR 5220, INSERM U630, INSA Lyon, Lyon (France); Boutin, Herve [CEA, DSV, IBM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Universite Paris Sud, INSERM U1023, Orsay (France); University of Manchester, Faculty of Life Sciences, Manchester (United Kingdom); Camp, Nadja van; Tavitian, Bertrand [CEA, DSV, IBM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Universite Paris Sud, INSERM U1023, Orsay (France); Thominiaux, Cyrille; Dolle, Frederic [CEA, DSV, IBM, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, Orsay (France); Hantraye, Philippe [CEA, DSV, IBM, MIRCEN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rivron, Luc [Sanofi-Aventis, GMPK-Global Isotope Chemistry and Metabolite Synthesis Department (ICMS), Paris (France); Marguet, Frank; Castel, Marie-Noelle; Rooney, Thomas; Benavides, Jesus [Sanofi-Aventis, CNS Department, Paris (France)

    2011-03-15

    Neuroinflammation is involved in neurological disorders through the activation of microglial cells. Imaging of neuroinflammation with radioligands for the translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) could prove to be an attractive biomarker for disease diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation. The indoleacetamide-derived 7-chloro-N,N,5-trimethyl-4-oxo-3-phenyl-3,5-dihydro-4H-pyridazino[4,5-b]indole-1-acetamide, SSR180575, is a selective high-affinity TSPO ligand in human and rodents with neuroprotective effects. Here we report the radiolabelling of SSR180575 with {sup 11}C and in vitro and in vivo imaging in an acute model of neuroinflammation in rats. The image contrast and the binding of [{sup 11}C]SSR180575 are higher than that obtained with the isoquinoline-based TSPO radioligand, [{sup 11}C]PK11195. Competition studies demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]SSR180575 has high specific binding for the TSPO. [{sup 11}C]SSR180575 is the first PET radioligand for the TSPO based on an indoleacetamide scaffold designed for imaging neuroinflammation in animal models and in the clinic. (orig.)

  11. High specific activity tritiation of the pyridazin-3-one histamine H{sub 3} receptor inverse agonist CEP-27088

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Joseph R. [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Filer, Crist N., E-mail: crist.filer@perkinelmer.com [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Maniscalco, Mario [PerkinElmer Health Sciences, Inc. 940 Winter St. Waltham, MA 02451 (United States); Becknell, Nadine C.; Hudkins, Robert L. [Discovery Research, Cephalon, Inc. 145 Brandywine Parkway, West Chester, PA 19380 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Methods are presented to tritiate and characterize radioligand (3). - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper addresses a useful compound to study the histamine-3 receptor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compound is a member of the pyridazin-3-one heterocycle class. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the paper describes the installation of tritium in the compound of interest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Furthermore, tritium NMR has been employed to characterize the tritiated compound.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RECEPTOR FOR GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE IN THE PITUITARY OF THE AFRICAN CATFISH, CLARIAS-GARIEPINUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, R.; Conn, P. M.; van't Veer, C.; Goos, H. J.; van Oordt, P. G.

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) were characterized using a radioligand prepared from a superactive analog of salmon GnRH (sGnRH), D-Arg(6)-Pro(9)-sGnRH-NEt (sGnRHa). Binding of(125)I-sGnRHa to catfish pituitary membrane fractions reached equilibrium after 2 h incubation at 4°C.

  13. Role of Conserved Disulfide Bridges and Aromatic Residues in Extracellular Loop 2 of Chemokine Receptor CCR8 for Chemokine and Small Molecule Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, Line; Rummel, Pia C; Lückmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    and aromatic residues in extracellular loop 2 (ECL2) for ligand binding and activation in the chemokine receptor CCR8. We used IP3 accumulation and radioligand binding experiments to determine the impact of receptor mutagenesis on both chemokine and small molecule agonist and antagonist binding and action...... in CCR8. We find that the 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptor conserved disulfide bridge (7TM bridge) linking transmembrane helix (TM)III and ECL2 is crucial for chemokine and small molecule action, whereas the chemokine receptor conserved disulfide bridge between the N terminus and TMVII is needed only...

  14. Application of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptor imaging for study of neuropsychiatric disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Weiqi; Qiu Chun; Guan Yihui

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors are heterogeneous polypeptide pentamers widely spread in the central nervous system on the neuron membrane. Different subunit combinations educe various neuro-inhibitory pharmacological effects such as sedative, hypnosis, anticonvulsion and anxiolysis. PET can be utilized to study the binding of the receptors in vivo. PET radioligands of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A-benzodiazepine receptors can be classified into 3 types: antagonists,agonists and reverse agonists, of which antagonist radiotracer 11 C-flumazenil is the most commonly applied in epilepsy, anxiety disorders, depression, vegetative state,addiction and other neuro-psychiatric disorders. (authors)

  15. Opioid research in amphibians: an alternative pain model yielding insights on the evolution of opioid receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes the work from our laboratory investigating mechanisms of opioid analgesia using the Northern grass frog, Rana pipiens. Over the last dozen years, we have accumulated data on the characterization of behavioral effects after opioid administration on radioligand binding by using opioid agonist and antagonist ligands in amphibian brain and spinal cord homogenates, and by cloning and sequencing opioid-like receptor cDNA from amphibian central nervous system (CNS) tissues. The relative analgesic potency of mu, delta, and kappa opioids is highly correlated between frogs and other mammals, including humans. Radioligand binding studies using selective opioid agonists show a similar selectivity profile in amphibians and mammals. In contrast, opioid antagonists that are highly selective for mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors were not selective in behavioral and binding studies in amphibians. Three opioid-like receptor cDNAs were cloned and sequenced from amphibian brain tissues and are orthologs to mammalian mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. Bioinformatics analysis of the three types of opioid receptor cDNAs from all vertebrate species with full datasets gave a pattern of the molecular evolution of opioid receptors marked by the divergence of mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptor sequences during vertebrate evolution. This divergence in receptor amino acid sequence in later-evolved vertebrates underlies the hypothesis that opioid receptors are more type-selective in mammals than in nonmammalian vertebrates. The apparent order of receptor type evolution is kappa, then delta, and, most recently, the mu opioid receptor. Finally, novel bioinformatics analyses suggest that conserved extracellular receptor domains determine the type selectivity of vertebrate opioid receptors. PMID:15464208

  16. NGA/Insulin receptor scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtaran, A.; Virgolini, I.

    1994-01-01

    Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is one of the first receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals which specifically recognizes the hepatic binding protein (HBP) located on the surface of the hepatocytes. The exclusive interactin of NGA with HBP provided the basis for a kinetic model for the evaluation hepatocellular function. During the last years we have used NGA in more than 300 patients with various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis (Stages Child A to Child C), viral hepatitis, and carcinomas. In these studies, the calculated HBP densities, after i.v.-injection of Tc-99m-NGA, significantly correlated with the clinical course of the diseases. Furthermore, similar to conventional Tc-colloid, NGA provided excellent demonstration of 'cold spots' for hepatic masses. In a further approach we used another hepatocyte receptor-seeking radioligand, I-123-Tyr-A14- insulin, and found, that its in vitro-binding to hepatocellular carcinomas is greatly enhanced over normal hepatic tissue. On this basis, we developed a double-tracer method using NGA and insulin in a single study. Thus, areas of 'cold spots' identifying hepatic masses on NGA scans, take up I-123-Tyr-A14-insulin immediately after i.v.-injection. This was true for hepatocellular hepatomas, but not for adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, NGA/insulin receptor scanning could be a novel and save method for the demonstration of hepatocellular hepatomas. (author)

  17. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  18. The contribution of endogenous benzodiazepine receptor ligands to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, A.S. (National Institutes of Health, Betheda, MD (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The involvement of the gamma-aminobutyric acid A(GABAA) receptor complex in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) was examined in galactosamine-treated rabbits with HE caused by fulminant hepatic failure. Radioligand binding to the constituent components of the GABAA receptor complex was unchanged in rabbits with HE. However, partially purified extracts from encephalopathic rabbit brain were approximately three times more potent in inhibiting ({sup 3}H)Ro 15-1788 binding to benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors than extracts from control rabbits. The inhibition of radioligand binding to the BZ receptor produced by these extracts was competitive and reversible and was significantly enhanced by GABA. Further purification of these extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that the inhibitory activity was localized in several peaks, some of which had retention times corresponding to 1,4-benzodiazepine standards. The presence of diazepam in these extracts was confirmed using mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques demonstrated that the concentration of diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rabbits was approximately 4 times greater than control extracts. These findings link the presence of BZ receptor agonists to the development of a neuropathological condition, thereby providing a rational basis for the use of BZ receptor antagonists in the management of HE in man.

  19. Autoradiography of P2x ATP receptors in the rat brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Balcar, V. J.; Li, Y.; Killinger, S.; Bennett, M. R.

    1995-01-01

    1. Binding of a P2x receptor specific radioligand, [3H]-alpha,beta-methylene adenosine triphosphate ([3H]-alpha,beta-MeATP) to sections of rat brain was reversible and association/dissociation parameters indicated that it consisted of two saturable components. Non-specific binding was very low (< 7% at 10 nM ligand concentration). 2. The binding was completely inhibited by suramin (IC50 approximately 14-26 microM) but none of the ligands specific for P2y receptors such as 2-methylthio-adenosi...

  20. Repeated PSMA-targeting radioligand therapy of metastatic prostate cancer with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Haberkorn, Uwe [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Clinical Cooperation Unit Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Zechmann, Christian; Mier, Walter; Spohn, Fabian; Debus, Nils; Kratochwil, Clemens [Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Armor, Thomas [Progenics Pharmaceuticals, Inc., New York, NY (United States); Holland-Letz, Tim [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Biostatistics, Heidelberg (Germany); Babich, John [Weill Cornell Medicine, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Citigroup Biomedical Imaging Center, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medicine, Meyer Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeting radioligand therapy (RLT) was introduced in 2011. The first report described the antitumor and side effects of a single dose. The aim of this analysis was to evaluate toxicity and antitumor activity after single and repetitive therapies. Thirty-four men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer received PSMA-RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095. Twenty-three patients received a second, and three patients a third dose, timed at PSA progression after an initial response to the preceding therapy. The applied doses were separated in three groups: <3.5, 3.5-5.0 and >5.0 GBq. Antitumor and side-effects were analyzed by blood samples and other clinical data. Follow-up was conducted for up to 5 years. The best therapeutic effect was achieved by the first therapy. A PSA decline of ≥50% was achieved in 70.6% of the patients. The second and third therapies were significantly less effective. There was neither an association between the applied activity and PSA response or the time-to-progression. Hematologic toxicities were less prevalent but presented in a higher percentage of patients with increasing number of therapies. After hematologic toxicities, xerostomia was the second most frequent side effect and presented more often and with higher intensity after the second or third therapy. The first dose of RLT with {sup 131}I-MIP-1095 presented with low side effects and could significantly reduce the tumor burden in a majority of patients. The second and third therapies were less effective and presented with more frequent and more intense side effects, especially hematologic toxicities and xerostomia. (orig.)

  1. In vivo evaluation of [123I]mZIENT as a SPECT radioligand for the serotonin transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batis, Jeffery; Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Koren, Andrei O.; Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Cosgrove, Kelly; Goodman, Mark; Seibyl, John; Tamagnan, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In vivo imaging of the serotonin transporter continues to be a valuable tool in drug development and in monitoring diseases that alter serotonergic function. The purposes of this study were to: 1) evaluate the test/retest reproducibility of [ 123 I] 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(3′-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane ([ 123 I]mZIENT); and 2) to assess displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT following administration of SERT specific drugs. Methods: Six female baboons (Papio anubis) were scanned following i.v. administration of [ 123 I]mZIENT. The regional binding potential (BP nd ) was determined using a simplified reference tissue model, with the cerebellum used as a reference region. The test/retest reproducibility of BP nd was determined following repeated injection of [ 123 I]mZIENT on a different day. To assess the displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT from SERT, citalopram (0.01–5 mg/kg) or sertraline (0.01–0.5 mg/kg) was given as iv bolus at ∼ 4 h following administration of [ 123 I]mZIENT. Results: The test/retest variability of BP nd was less than 10% for all SERT-rich brain regions. Estimates of ED50 for displacement of [ 123 I]mZIENT in SERT-rich regions were consistent with previous reports for the [ 11 C] analog of [ 123 I]mZIENT. Both citalopram and sertraline displaced [ 123 I]mZIENT from SERT in a dose-dependent manner, with maximal observed displacements of greater than 80% in the diencephalon and greater than 75% in brainstem for both citalopram and sertraline. Conclusions: [ 123 I] mZIENT demonstrates good test–retest reproducibility; and initial displacement studies suggest that this compound is highly selective for SERT. Overall, this radioligand has favorable characteristics for use in drug development studies and/or longitudinal studies interrogating SERT.

  2. Photolabeling and radioligand binding of human erythrocyte NaK-ATPase with 125I-derivatives of cymarin and digitoxigenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    NaK-ATPase is an enzyme which maintains Na + and K + gradients across the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, and is specifically inhibited by cardiac glycosides. The cardiac glycoside binding site is located primarily on the catalytic α subunit but the glycoprotein β and proteolipid-γ subunits may also contribute to the structure of the site. In order to label the cardiac glycoside binding site of human erythrocytes, four photoaffinity ligands with very high specific radioactivity were synthesized. The compounds, which are abbreviated [ 125 I]AISC, [ 125 I]AIPP-GluD, [ 125 I]AIPP-GalD and [ 125 I]IA-GalD, were all effective photolabels for NaK-ATPase as shown by ouabain-protectable, covalent labeling of the α, β, and proteolipid-γ subunits. In order to study the possible existence of a very high affinity binding site in erythrocyte NaK-ATPase, a carrier-free radioligand, [ 125 I]I-TASC, was synthesized; this compound had the same structure as [ 125 I]AISC except that a light-sensitive azide group was replaced with a hydroxyl group. Competitive binding assays with cymarin against 0.2 nM [ 125 I]I-TASC suggested two classes of erythrocyte binding sites. Scatchard analysis of direct [ 125 I]I-TASC binding indicated that the very high affinity, low capacity class of erythrocyte bindings sites had a K D of 54 pM and a B max of 23 fmol/mg protein

  3. Effects of antidepressant drugs on different receptors in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, H.; Oegren, S.-O.

    1981-01-01

    Radioligand receptor binding techniques were used to characterize the effects of different structural types of antidepressant drugs on neurotransmitter receptors. The tricyclic antidepressants more or less potently inhibited the binding to rat brain preparations of several different radiolabelled ligands ([ 3 H]WB4101, [ 3 H]QNB, [ 3 H]d-LSD, [ 3 H]mepyramine). The potency of the nontricyclic antidepressants varied greatly. Mianserin, potently displaced [ 3 H]mepyramine, [ 3 H]d-LSD and [ 3 H]WB4101 while it was very weak on [ 3 H]QNB-binding. Nomifensine and the specific 5-HT uptake inhibitors zimelidine and alaproclate had very low affinity for these receptors. All the antidepressants tested were practically devoid of activity on [ 3 H]DHA binding, [ 3 H]spiroperidol binding, [ 3 H]flunitrazepam binding, [ 3 H]muscimol binding and [ 3 H]naloxone binding. The implications of these findings for biogenic amine theories of affective disorders are discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Physiology and physiopathology of central type Benzodiazepine receptors: Study in the monkey and in human brain using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hantraye, P.

    1987-01-01

    A new non-invasive technique that allows to study in a living subject central type benzodiazepine receptors is developed. A combined approach is applied using a specific positron-emitting radiotracer for the in vivo labelling of the receptors and positron emission tomography allowing, by external detection, a quantitative determination of tissue radioactivity. The radioligand used for the in vivo labelling of benzodiazepine receptors is the antagonist RO 15-1788 labelled with carbon 11. The various stages of the study are described: in vivo characterization in the monkey of central type benzodiazepine receptors; characterization of central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain using selective molecules for the BZ1 benzodiazepine subclass; demonstration of the heterogeneity of central type benzodiazepine receptors in the brain; study of pathological alteration of benzodiazepine receptors in experimental epilepsy [fr

  5. Parametric mapping of 5HT1A receptor sites in the human brain with the Hypotime method: theory and normal values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette; Rodell, Anders; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The radioligand [carbonyl-(11)C]WAY-100635 ((11)C-WAY) is a PET tracer of the serotonin 5HT(1A) receptors in the human brain. It is metabolized so rapidly in the circulation that it behaves more as a chemical microsphere than as a tracer subject to continuous exchange between the circulation...... and brain tissue. Although reference tissue methods are useful as analyses of uptake of some radioligands with indeterminate arterial input functions, their use to analyze (11)C-WAY uptake and binding is challenged by the rapid plasma metabolism, which violates the assumption that regions of interest...... of the Hypotime method were compared with the simplified but multilinearized reference tissue method (MLSRTM). The distribution of receptor BP(ND) obtained with Hypotime was consistent with previous autoradiography of postmortem brain tissue, with the highest values of BP(ND) recorded in the medial temporal lobe...

  6. [123I]epidepride binding to cerebellar dopamine D2/D3 receptors is displaceable: implications for the use of cerebellum as a reference region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, Lars H; Videbaek, Charlotte; Ziebell, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The low density of cerebellar dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors provides the basis for using the cerebellum as a representation of free- and non-specifically bound radioligand in positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies. With the development....... The paired distribution volumes were reduced by 22+/-15% (mean+/-SD) after antipsychotic treatment (p0.76) and the plasma [(123)I]epidepride concentration (p>0.45) were unchanged after antipsychotic treatment (paired Student's t-test). These results strongly suggest the presence of "non-negligible" specific...... [(123)I]epidepride binding to dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptors in the cerebellum. Using the cerebellum as a representation of free and non-specifically bound radioligand and neglecting the specifically bound component may lead to results that erroneously imply that antipsychotic drugs bind to extrastriatal...

  7. Functional characteristics of the naked mole rat μ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Busch-Dienstfertig

    Full Text Available While humans and most animals respond to µ-opioid receptor (MOR agonists with analgesia and decreased aggression, in the naked mole rat (NMR opioids induce hyperalgesia and severe aggression. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1 can underlie altered behavioral responses to opioids. Therefore, we hypothesized that the primary structure of the NMR MOR may differ from other species. Sequencing of the NMR oprm1 revealed strong homology to other mammals, but exposed three unique amino acids that might affect receptor-ligand interactions. The NMR and rat oprm1 sequences were cloned into mammalian expression vectors and transfected into HEK293 cells. Radioligand binding and 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP enzyme immunoassays were used to compare opioid binding and opioid-mediated cAMP inhibition. At normalized opioid receptor protein levels we detected significantly lower [3H]DAMGO binding to NMR compared to rat MOR, but no significant difference in DAMGO-induced cAMP inhibition. Strong DAMGO-induced MOR internalization was detectable using radioligand binding and confocal imaging in HEK293 cells expressing rat or NMR receptor, while morphine showed weak or no effects. In summary, we found minor functional differences between rat and NMR MOR suggesting that other differences e.g. in anatomical distribution of MOR underlie the NMR's extreme reaction to opioids.

  8. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors

  9. {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 radioligand therapy and outcome in patients with metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braeuer, Axel; Grubert, Lena Sophie; Roll, Wolfgang; Schaefers, Michael; Rahbar, Kambiz [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Muenster (Germany); Schrader, Andres Jan; Boegemann, Martin [University Hospital Muenster, Department of Urology, Muenster (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Radioligand therapies targeting prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been established for the treatment of metastasized castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in the last decade and show promising response rates and a favourable toxicity profile. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall survival (OS) and to identify parameters predicting outcome in mCRPC patients treated with {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617. Between December 2014 and January 2017, 59 consecutive patients (median age 72 years); interquartile range, (IQR, 66-76 years) with mCRPC, who had been treated with at least one next-generation antihormonal drug as well as chemotherapy, were included in this study. Biochemical response was evaluated using Prostate Cancer Working Group 3 (PCWG3) criteria. Survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox regression proportional hazards model. Toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The study was approved by the local ethics committee. The 59 patients were treated with a total of 159 cycles (median 3 cycles, range 1-7) of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617 (median dose 6.11 GBq, IQR 5.9-6.3 GBq). The median follow-up was 24 weeks (IQR 15-36 weeks). Follow-up data for at least 12 weeks (PCWG3) were available in 76% (45) of the patients. For outcome results data from all patients treated with at least one cycle were analysed. A decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of ≥50% occurred in 53%, and a decline in PSA of any amount in 91% of patients. The estimated median OS was 32 weeks. An initial alkaline phosphatase (ALP) level <220 U/L and a PSA decline after the first cycle were associated with a longer OS (56 vs. 28 weeks, p < 0.01, and 56 vs. 29 weeks, p = 0.04, respectively). The median estimated PSA progression-free survival (PPFS) was 18 weeks. Only ALP level <220 U/L was significantly associated with a longer PPFS (41 vs. 18 weeks, p < 0.01). A PSA decline after the first cycle of {sup 177}Lu-PSMA-617

  10. Improved receptor analysis in PET using a priori information from in vitro binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litton, J.-E.; Hall, H.; Blomqvist, G. [Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    An accurate determination of non-specific binding is required for the analysis of in vitro and in vivo receptor binding data. For some radioligands the non-specific binding is of the same magnitude as the specific binding. Furthermore, in vitro measurements have shown that the non-specific binding can be different in different brain regions. If this is the case in a PET study for determining B{sub max} and K{sub d}, a correction for the non-specific binding has to be applied. The aim of the present communication is to present a means for determining corrected B{sub max} and K{sub d} with Scatchard analysis using in vitro binding studies. The influence of non-specific binding on the free and specifically bound radioligand is expressed with the aid of a correction factor, which can be calculated from measurable quantities. Introduction of the corrected free and specifically bound radioligand should give binding parameters closer to reality than previously obtained results. (author)

  11. Development and utilization of a fluorescence-based receptor-binding assay for the site 5 voltage-sensitive sodium channel ligands brevetoxin and ciguatoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Jennifer R; Jacocks, Henry M; Niven, Susan C; Poli, Mark A; Baden, Daniel G; Bourdelais, Andrea J

    2014-01-01

    Brevetoxins are a family of ladder-frame polyether toxins produced during blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. Consumption of fish exposed to K. brevis blooms can lead to the development of neurotoxic shellfish poisoning. The toxic effects of brevetoxins are due to activation of voltage-sensitive sodium channels (VSSCs) in cell membranes. Binding of toxins has historically been measured using a radioligand competition assay that is fraught with difficulty. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based binding assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Several fluorophores were conjugated to polyether brevetoxin-2 and used as the labeled ligand. Brevetoxin analogs were able to compete for binding with the fluorescent ligands. This assay was qualified against the standard radioligand receptor assay for the brevetoxin receptor. Furthermore, the fluorescence-based assay was used to determine relative concentrations of toxins in raw extracts of K. brevis culture, and to determine ciguatoxin affinity to site 5 of VSSCs. The fluorescence-based assay was quicker, safer, and far less expensive. As such, this assay can be used to replace the current radioligand assay and will be a vital tool for future experiments examining the binding affinity of various ligands for site 5 on sodium channels.

  12. CGRP Receptor Family and Accessory Protein Localization: Implications for Predicted Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.R. Oliver

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, adrenomedullin, amylin, and calcitonin are functionally related neuropeptides. Certain of these peptides mediate their action through receptors which have common components, such as the receptor activity modifying proteins (RAMPs and CGRP-receptor component protein, as well as possibly through other distinct receptors. Specifically, the molecular pharmacology of CGRP and adrenomedullin is determined by coexpression of one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs with calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR. Additionally, through formation of another hetero-oligomer, RAMPs also govern the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor, which in association with RAMP1 or RAMP3, binds amylin with high affinity. We have used multiple approaches to discern the regional and cellular expression of these various receptor components and binding sites for the above neuropeptides in multiple species and in different tissues. Techniques applied include in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and radioligand autoradiography. These data allow further understanding of both the complexity of receptor-receptor component and receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. Interestingly, these localization data suggest that RAMPs may interact with receptors additional to those already identified for the CGRP family and may be involved in binding innate neuropeptides or other neurotransmitters which are not members of the calcitonin gene-related peptide fam

  13. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding, but not mGluR2, is increased in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 decrease-of-function mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna Vangsgaard; Jacobsen, Jacob P; Caron, Marc G

    2013-01-01

    interesting as a putative translational model of low endogenous 5-HT function that allows for assessment of adaptive changes in different anatomical regions. Here, we determined 5-HT2A receptor binding in several brain regions using in vitro receptor autoradiography and two different radioligands. When using...... the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist radioligand (3)H-MDL100907, we found higher binding in the prefrontal cortex (10%, P=0.009), the striatum (26%, P=0.005), and the substantia nigra (21%, P=0.027). The increase was confirmed in the same regions with the 5-HT2A/C receptor agonist, (3)H-CIMBI-36 (2......-(4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)ethanamine). 5-HT2A receptors establish heteromeric receptor complexes with metabotropic glutamate 2 receptors (mGluR2), but binding levels of the mGluR2/3 ligand (3)H-LY341495 were unaltered in brain areas with increased 5-HT2A receptor levels. These data...

  14. Evaluation of in vivo selective binding of [11C]doxepin to histamine H1 receptors in five animal species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang Weifang; Tsukada, Hideo; Harada, Norihiro; Mochizuki, Hideki; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishii, Kenji; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    The specific binding of [ 11 C]doxepin, which has been used as a radioligand for mapping histamine H 1 receptors in human brain by positron emission tomography, was evaluated in five animal species. In mice the [ 11 C]doxepin uptake was reduced by treatment with cold doxepin and two H 1 receptor antagonists, but not with H 2 /H 3 antagonists. The specific binding evaluated with treatment with (+)-chlorpheniramine (H 1 antagonist) was in the range of 10-30% in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey, but was not detected in guinea pig

  15. Convergent [18]F-labeling and evaluation of N-benzyl-phenethylamines as 5-HT2A receptor PET ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ida Nymann; Villadsen, Jonas; Hansen, Hanne Demant

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) investigations of the 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) system can be used as a research tool in diseases such as depression, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. We have previously developed a (11)C-labeled agonist PET ligand ([(11)C]Cimbi-36), and the aim...... the pig brain. However, since within-scan intervention with ketanserin, a known orthosteric 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, did not result in significant blocking, the radioligands seem unsuitable for neuroimaging of the 5-HT2AR in vivo....

  16. Prospects of Targeting the Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor and Somatostatin Receptor 2 for Nuclear Imaging and Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone U Dalm

    Full Text Available The gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR and the somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2 are overexpressed on primary breast cancer (BC, making them ideal candidates for receptor-mediated nuclear imaging and therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether these receptors are also suitable targets for metastatic BC.mRNA expression of human BC samples were studied by in vitro autoradiography and associated with radioligand binding. Next, GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels of 60 paired primary BCs and metastases from different sites were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor mRNA expression levels were associated with clinico-pathological factors and expression levels of primary tumors and corresponding metastases were compared.Binding of GRPR and SSTR radioligands to tumor tissue correlated significantly with receptor mRNA expression. High GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels were associated with estrogen receptor (ESR1-positive tumors (p<0.001 for both receptors. There was no significant difference in GRPR mRNA expression of primary tumors versus paired metastases. Regarding SSTR2 mRNA expression, there was also no significant difference in the majority of cases, apart from liver and ovarian metastases which showed a significantly lower expression compared to the corresponding primary tumors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively.Targeting the GRPR and SSTR2 for nuclear imaging and/or treatment has the potential to improve BC care in primary as well as metastatic disease.

  17. Acetylcholine receptors in dementia and mild cognitive impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, Osama; Kendziorra, Kai [University of Leipzig, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Wolf, Henrike; Gertz, Hermann-Josef [University of Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    To clarify whether changes in the cholinergic transmission occur early in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we carried out positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, which is supposed to be specific for {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We included patients with moderate to severe AD and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), presumed to present preclinical AD. Both patients with AD and MCI showed significant reductions in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs in brain regions typically affected by AD pathology. These findings indicate that a reduction in {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChRs occurs during early symptomatic stages of AD. The {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR availability in these regions correlated with the severity of cognitive impairment, indicating a stage sensitivity of the {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR status. Together, our results provide evidence for the potential of 2-[{sup 18}]F-A-85380 nAChR PET in the diagnosis of patients at risk for AD. Because of the extraordinary long acquisition time with 2-[{sup 18}F]F-A-85380, we developed the new {alpha}4{beta}2 nAChR-specific radioligands (+)- and (-)-[{sup 18}F]norchloro-fluoro-homoepibatidine (NCFHEB) and evaluated them preclinically. (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB shows twofold higher brain uptake and significantly shorter acquisition times. Therefore, (-)-[{sup 18}F]NCFHEB should be a suitable radioligand for larger clinical investigations. (orig.)

  18. Characterization of dopamine D2 receptors in the pituitary of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Asselt, L.A.; Goos, H.J.; De Leeuw, R.; Peter, R.E.; Hol, E.M.; Wassenberg, F.P.; Van Oordt, P.G. (Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-10-01

    Dopamine receptors in the pituitary of the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, were characterized using ({sup 3}H)spiperone as radioligand. Specific binding of ({sup 3}H)spiperone to pituitary membranes reached equilibrium within 60 min of incubation. The binding of the radioligand was tissue specific since the amount of binding was linear with pituitary membrane content in the incubations. In addition, pituitary membranes were observed to bind considerably more ({sup 3}H)spiperone, compared to membrane preparation of various other tissues. Saturation experiments revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity/low capacity binding sites. The binding characteristics, estimated by Scatchard analysis, were: Kd = 3.2 +/- 0.5 x 10(-9) M and Bmax = 105 +/- 5 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding was displaceable with dopamine and with various specific D2 agonists and antagonists. The nature of displacement curves resembles those observed in studies on mammalian dopamine receptors. Binding experiments with cell fractions, obtained after centrifugation of dispersed pituitary cells over a Percoll density gradient, showed that most ({sup 3}H)spiperone binding was obtained in an enriched gonadotropic cell fraction. This observation indicates that the receptor characteristics, estimated with the ({sup 3}H)spiperone assay, are representative for dopamine receptors on the gonadotropic cells.

  19. The effect of the sigma-1 receptor selective compound LS-1-137 on the DOI-induced head twitch response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Maninder; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Mach, Robert H; Luedtke, Robert R

    2016-09-01

    Several receptor mediated pathways have been shown to modulate the murine head twitch response (HTR). However, the role of sigma receptors in the murine (±)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI)-induced HTR has not been previously investigated. We examined the ability of LS-1-137, a novel sigma-1 vs. sigma-2 receptor selective phenylacetamide, to modulate the DOI-induced HTR in DBA/2J mice. We also assessed the in vivo efficacy of reference sigma-1 receptor antagonists and agonists PRE-084 and PPCC. The effect of the sigma-2 receptor selective antagonist RHM-1-86 was also examined. Rotarod analysis was performed to monitor motor coordination after LS-1-137 administration. Radioligand binding techniques were used to determine the affinity of LS-1-137 at 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. LS-1-137 and the sigma-1 receptor antagonists haloperidol and BD 1047 were able to attenuate a DOI-induced HTR, indicating that LS-1-137 was acting in vivo as a sigma-1 receptor antagonist. LS-1-137 did not compromise rotarod performance within a dose range capable of attenuating the effects of DOI. Radioligand binding studies indicate that LS-1-137 exhibits low affinity binding at both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. Based upon the results from these and our previous studies, LS-1-137 is a neuroprotective agent that attenuates the murine DOI-induced HTR independent of activity at 5-HT2 receptor subtypes, D2-like dopamine receptors, sigma-2 receptors and NMDA receptors. LS-1-137 appears to act as a sigma-1 receptor antagonist to inhibit the DOI-induced HTR. Therefore, the DOI-induced HTR can be used to assess the in vivo efficacy of sigma-1 receptor selective compounds. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Somatostatin receptors in rat hippocampus: localization to intrinsic neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, J.M.; Reubi, J.C.; Maurer, R.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of neurotoxic chemical and electrolytical lesions on somatostatin (SS) receptor binding in the septo-hippocampal afferents, pyramidal and granule cells of the rat hippocampus was examined by autoradiography using the stable SS analogue 125 I-204-090 as radioligand. Electrolytical lesions of the septum did not result in modification of SS binding in the hippocampus. In contrast, both granule cell lesion with colchicine and pyramidal or pyramidal and granule cell lesions with increasing kainic acid doses did result in a specific decrease of binding in the dentate gyrus and hippocampus (CA 1 and CA 3 ). These results suggest that SS receptors in the hippocampus are probably associated with elements from intrinsic neurons. (Author)

  1. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  2. Leptin receptor in peripheral adipose tissues of obese subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Zizheng; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei; Han Liu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between leptin receptor and obesity by studying the leptin receptor density B max and dissociation constant K d in peripheral adipose tissue in subjects with different body weight mass (BMI). Methods: Leptin receptor density B max and K d were assayed via radioligand method in 71 cases, including 32 classified as obese, 19 over-weight and 20 normal control. Results: With the escalating of BMI, the leptin receptor density significantly decreased in obese and over-weight group compared with that in normal control (both P d values were of no differences among all three groups suggesting no correlation between the binding ability of leptin to its receptor and BMI. A negative correlation between BMI and B max (r=-0.76, P<0.01) displayed after all. Conclusion: Leptin receptor density correlates with the BMI in obese cases and it suggests that the down-regulation of leptin receptor may contribute to the occurrence of leptin resistance and obesity after-wards

  3. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passchier, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2001-01-01

    The 5-HT 1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT 1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl- 11 C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl- 11 C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[ 18 F]MPPF and [ 11 C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT 1A receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  4. Serotonin transporters in dopamine transporter imaging: a head-to-head comparison of dopamine transporter SPECT radioligands 123I-FP-CIT and 123I-PE2I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebell, Morten; Holm-Hansen, Signe; Thomsen, Gerda

    2010-01-01

    Current SPECT radioligands available for in vivo imaging of the dopamine transporter (DAT) also show affinity for monoamine transporters other than DAT, especially the serotonin transporter (SERT). The effect of this lack of selectivity for in vivo imaging is unknown. In this study, we compared...

  5. Dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2 and dopamine transporter (DAT densities in aged human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Sun

    Full Text Available The dopamine D(1, D(2, D(3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2, and dopamine transporter (DAT densities were measured in 11 aged human brains (aged 77-107.8, mean: 91 years by quantitative autoradiography. The density of D(1 receptors, VMAT2, and DAT was measured using [(3H]SCH23390, [(3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [(3H]WIN35428, respectively. The density of D(2 and D(3 receptors was calculated using the D(3-preferring radioligand, [(3H]WC-10 and the D(2-preferring radioligand [(3H]raclopride using a mathematical model developed previously by our group. Dopamine D(1, D(2, and D(3 receptors are extensively distributed throughout striatum; the highest density of D(3 receptors occurred in the nucleus accumbens (NAc. The density of the DAT is 10-20-fold lower than that of VMAT2 in striatal regions. Dopamine D(3 receptor density exceeded D(2 receptor densities in extrastriatal regions, and thalamus contained a high level of D(3 receptors with negligible D(2 receptors. The density of dopamine D(1 linearly correlated with D(3 receptor density in the thalamus. The density of the DAT was negligible in the extrastriatal regions whereas the VMAT2 was expressed in moderate density. D(3 receptor and VMAT2 densities were in similar level between the aged human and aged rhesus brain samples, whereas aged human brain samples had lower range of densities of D(1 and D(2 receptors and DAT compared with the aged rhesus monkey brain. The differential density of D(3 and D(2 receptors in human brain will be useful in the interpretation of PET imaging studies in human subjects with existing radiotracers, and assist in the validation of newer PET radiotracers having a higher selectivity for dopamine D(2 or D(3 receptors.

  6. Calcium-dependent displacement of haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor binding in rat hippocampal slices following tissue depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumaier, J F; Chavkin, C

    1989-10-23

    To evaluate the possible existence of an endogenous ligand for the haloperidol-sensitive sigma receptor, we developed an in vitro competition assay to measure endogenous ligand release. Depolarization of in vitro hippocampal slices by either veratridine or potassium reduced [3H]ditolylguanidine binding in a calcium-dependent and transient manner. None of the drugs or iron substitutions directly affected [3H]ditolylguanidine binding to rat brain membranes. Veratridine-induced depolarization also reduced the binding of [3H](+)3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine, another sigma radioligand, in a calcium-dependent manner. Radioligand displacement was not associated with alteration in sigma receptor dissociation kinetics or receptor degradation in the hippocampal slice. In contrast, KC1 depolarization had no effect on [3H]ditolyguanidine binding to sigma receptors in liver slices. The results suggest that a calcium-dependent, depolarization-induced reduction in sigma receptor binding may have been caused by the release of an endogenous sigma ligand in rat hippocampal tissue.

  7. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-[4-(2-[2-[(4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino]ethylaminocarbonyl]- ethyl)phenyl]ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-[(R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl]adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-[(S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl]adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate

  8. Phytohemagglutinin induced proliferation by aged lymphocytes: reduced expression of high affinity interluekin-2 receptors and interleukin-2 secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froelich, C.J.; Burkett, J.S.; Guiffaut, S.; Kingsland, R.; Brauner, D.

    1988-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from elderly and young donors were cultured with phytohemagglutinin. Cultures from two groups of aged donors, recruited respectively from the authors ambulatory clinic and a nursing home, incorporated less tritiated thymidine ( 3 H-TdR) and secreted less interleukin-2 than did young donors. Furthermore, as determined for the first time by a radioligand binding receptor assay, the aged lymphoblasts possessed significantly fewer high affinity IL-2 receptors per cell. Despite a decrease in the number of high affinity receptor cells the dissociation constant (Kd) was comparable for the three groups. It was also shown that the amounts of soluble IL-2 receptors that were released into the supernatants by mitogen stimulated cells did not differ for the aged and young donors. These data suggest that defects in IL-2 production and high affinity IL-2 receptor generation may both be responsible for immune deficiency in the elderly

  9. Ligands for expression cloning and isolation of GABA(B) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froestl, Wolfgang; Bettler, Bernhard; Bittiger, Helmut; Heid, Jakob; Kaupmann, Klemens; Mickel, Stuart J; Strub, Dietrich

    2003-03-01

    The scope of the plenary lecture at the occasion of the Xth Meeting on Heterocyclic Structures in Medicinal Chemistry, Palermo 2002, is considerably larger than that of the main lecture at the XVIth International Symposium on Medicinal Chemistry, Bologna 2000, described by Froestl et al. in Farmaco 56 (2001) 101. Additional information is presented, in particular, on the reaction conditions for the 31 step synthesis of the combined affinity chromatography and photoaffinity radioligand [125I]CGP84963 and on the recent developments of the molecular biology of GABA(B) receptors. Copyright 2003 Editions scienctifiques et médicales Elsevier SAS

  10. The synthesis of glycine receptor radioligands [21, 22-3H] dihydrostrychnine and [2-3H] strychnine at high specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filer, C.N.; Ahern, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    Strychnine (1a) was reduced with tritium gas via heterogeneous catalysis to yield [21, 22- 3 H] dihydrostrychnine (2b) at 31 Ci/mmol and via homogeneous catalysis to yield 2b at 50 Ci/mmol. [2- 3 H] Strychnine (1b) at 25 Ci/mmol was prepared by the catalytic reductive tritiation of 2-iodostrychnine. Other polyhalo strychnine analogues were synthesized in an attempt to prepare [ 3 H] strychnine at even higher specific activity. (author)

  11. PET-derived biodistribution and dosimetry of the benzodiazepine receptor-binding radioligand (11)C-(R)-PK11195 in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Muzik, Otto; Chugani, Diane; Chakraborty, Pulak; Chugani, Harry T

    2010-01-01

    The PET tracer (11)C-(R)-PK11195 (PK) is an antagonist of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site and allows the noninvasive imaging of microglial activation seen in several neurologic disorders affecting the mature and developing brain. The objective of this study was to derive the biodistribution and in vivo radiation dose estimates of PK in children studied for brain inflammatory conditions and in healthy adults. Twenty-two children (mean age +/- SD, 9.5 +/- 4 y; range, 4-17 y; 10 girls) who underwent dynamic PK PET for conditions involving brain inflammation were studied. Seven healthy adults (age, 27.4 +/- 7.5 y; range, 22-41 y; 3 women) were evaluated using the same protocol. Normal-organ time-activity curves and residence times were derived and absorbed doses then calculated using the OLINDA software. Two other healthy young adults (1 man, 1 woman) also underwent sequential whole-body PET using a PET/CT scanner to obtain corresponding CT images and PK pharmacokinetics. PK uptake was highest in the gallbladder and urinary bladder, followed by the liver, kidney, bone marrow, salivary gland, and heart wall, with minimal localization in all other organs including normal brain and lungs. PK was excreted through the hepatobiliary and renal systems. The average effective dose equivalent was 11.6 +/- 0.6 microSv/MBq (mean +/- SD) for young children (age, 4-7 y), 7.7 +/- 1.0 microSv/MBq for older children (age, 8-12 y), 5.3 +/- 0.5 muSv/MBq for adolescents (age, 13-17 y), and 4.6 +/- 2.7 microSv/MBq for adults. The gallbladder wall received the highest radiation dose in children younger than 12 y, whereas the urinary bladder wall received the highest dose in older children and adults. For an administered activity of 17 MBq/kg (0.45 mCi/kg), the effective dose equivalent was about 5 mSv or below for all age groups. At clinically practical administered activities, the radiation dose from (11)C-PK11195 in both children and adults is comparable to that from other clinical PET tracers and diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals in routine clinical use.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of the racemate and individual enantiomers of C-11 labeled methylphenidate as radioligands for the presynaptic dopaminergic neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Y.S.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    Methylphenidate (MP, ritalin) is a psychostimulant drug widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Its therapeutic properties are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine (DA) transporter enhancing synaptic DA. MP has two chiral centers and is marketed as the dl-threo racemic form. However, its pharmacological activity is believed due solely to the d-enantiomer. We have synthesized [{sup 11}C]d,l-threo-methylphenidate ([{sup 11}C]MP) in order to examine its pharmacokinetics in vivo and to examine its suitability as a radioligand for PET studies of the presynaptic DA neuron. [{sup 11}C]MP was prepared by O-{sup 11}C-alkylation of a protected derivative of ritalinic acid with labeled methyl iodide. Serial studies at baseline and after treatment with methylphenidate (0.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior); GBR 12909 (1.5 mg/kg; 30 min prior); tomoxetine (1.5 mg/kg, 20 min prior) and citalopram (2.0 mg/kg, 30 min prior) were performed to assess non-specific binding and binding to the DA, norepinephrine and serotonin transporters respectively. Only MP and GBR 12909 changed the SR/CB distribution volume ratio (decrease of 38 and 37% respectively) demonstrating selectivity for DA transporters over other monoamine transporters. We then pursued the synthesis of enantiomerically pure C-{sup 11} labeled d- and l-MP by using enantiomerically pure protected d- and l-ritalinic acids as precursors. A striking difference in SR/CB ratio (3.3 and 1.1 for d- and l-respectively at 1 hr. after i.v. injections) strongly suggests that the pharmacological specificity of MP resides entirely in the d-isomer and the binding of l-isomer was mostly non-specific. Further evaluations are underway. Radioligand reversibility, selectivity and the fact that MP is an approved drug are advantages of using [{sup 11}C]MP.

  13. Whole-body distribution and radiation dosimetry of the dopamine transporter radioligand [11C]PE2I in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Maria-Joao; Ricard, Marcel; Lievre, Marie-Angele; Bourgeois, Sandrine; Emond, Patrick; Gervais, Philippe; Dolle, Frederic; Syrota, Andre

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: This study reports on the biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a cocaine analog, the (E)-N-(3-iodoprop-2-enyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4'-tolyl)nortropane (PE2I), labeled with carbon 11 ([ 11 C]PE2I). [ 11 C]PE2I is used in positron emission tomography (PET) for examination of the dopamine neuronal transporter (DAT). DAT radioligands are often used to evaluate the progression of Parkinson's disease or the efficiency of neuroprotective therapeutics, and, typically, these studies required several successive PET scans. Methods: In three healthy male volunteers, whole-body scans were performed up to 2 h following intravenous injection of 321±6 MBq of [ 11 C]PE2I. For each subject, regions of interest were defined over all visible organs to generate time-activity curves and calculate the percentage of injected activity. Time-activity data were fitted to a monoexponential model, as an uptake phase followed by a mono-exponential washout, or bi-exponential model to obtain residence times. With the use of the MIRD method, several source organs were considered in estimating residence time and mean effective radiation absorbed doses. Results: Blood pressure and ECG findings remained unchanged after radioligand injection. The primary route of clearance was renal. Ten minutes after injection, high activities were observed in the kidneys, urinary-bladder, stomach, liver, salivary glands and brain. The urine bladder wall, stomach and liver received the highest absorbed doses. The average effective dose of [ 11 C]PE2I was estimated to be 6.4±0.6 μSv/MBq. Conclusion: The amount of [ 11 C]PE2I required for adequate DAT PET imaging results in an acceptable effective dose equivalent permitting two or three repeated cerebral PET studies, with the injection of 222 MBq for each study

  14. Voxel level quantification of [11C]CURB, a radioligand for Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase, using high resolution positron emission tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M Rusjan

    Full Text Available [11C]CURB is a novel irreversible radioligand for imaging fatty acid amide hydrolase in the human brain. In the present work, we validate an algorithm for generating parametric map images of [11C]CURB acquired with a high resolution research tomograph (HRRT scanner. This algorithm applies the basis function method on an irreversible two-tissue compartment model (k4 = 0 with arterial input function, i.e., BAFPIC. Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess bias and variability of the binding macroparameters (Ki and λk3 as a function of the voxel noise level and the range of basis functions. The results show that for a [11C]CURB time activity curve with noise levels corresponding to a voxel of an image acquired with the HRRT and reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm, the implementation of BAFPIC requires the use of a constant vascular fraction of tissue (5% and a cutoff for slow frequencies (0.06 min-1. With these settings, BAFPIC maintains the probabilistic distributions of the binding macroparameters with approximately Gaussian shape and minimizes the bias and variability for large physiological ranges of the rate constants of [11C]CURB. BAFPIC reduces the variability of Ki to a third of that given by Patlak plot, the standard graphical method for irreversible radioligands. Application to real data demonstrated an excellent correlation between region of interest and BAFPIC parametric data and agreed with the simulations results. Therefore, BAFPIC with a constant vascular fraction can be used to generate parametric maps of [11C]CURB images acquired with an HRRT provided that the limits of the basis functions are carefully selected.

  15. Voxel level quantification of [11C]CURB, a radioligand for Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase, using high resolution positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusjan, Pablo M; Knezevic, Dunja; Boileau, Isabelle; Tong, Junchao; Mizrahi, Romina; Wilson, Alan A; Houle, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    [11C]CURB is a novel irreversible radioligand for imaging fatty acid amide hydrolase in the human brain. In the present work, we validate an algorithm for generating parametric map images of [11C]CURB acquired with a high resolution research tomograph (HRRT) scanner. This algorithm applies the basis function method on an irreversible two-tissue compartment model (k4 = 0) with arterial input function, i.e., BAFPIC. Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess bias and variability of the binding macroparameters (Ki and λk3) as a function of the voxel noise level and the range of basis functions. The results show that for a [11C]CURB time activity curve with noise levels corresponding to a voxel of an image acquired with the HRRT and reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm, the implementation of BAFPIC requires the use of a constant vascular fraction of tissue (5%) and a cutoff for slow frequencies (0.06 min-1). With these settings, BAFPIC maintains the probabilistic distributions of the binding macroparameters with approximately Gaussian shape and minimizes the bias and variability for large physiological ranges of the rate constants of [11C]CURB. BAFPIC reduces the variability of Ki to a third of that given by Patlak plot, the standard graphical method for irreversible radioligands. Application to real data demonstrated an excellent correlation between region of interest and BAFPIC parametric data and agreed with the simulations results. Therefore, BAFPIC with a constant vascular fraction can be used to generate parametric maps of [11C]CURB images acquired with an HRRT provided that the limits of the basis functions are carefully selected.

  16. Dopamine receptors in the Parkinsonian brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, U.K.; Loennberg, P.; Koskinen, V.

    1981-01-01

    Striatal dopamine receptors were studied in 44 patients with Parkinson disease by the radioligand-binding technique using 3 H-spiroperidol. The specific binding of 3 H-spiroperidol was either significantly increased or reduced in the caudate nucleus and putamen of parkinsonian patients without levodopa therapy. Scatchard analysis showed that there were corresponding changes in the receptor number, but no significant changes in the mean dissociation constant. The increased binding of 3 H-spiroperidol in the basal ganglia was also found in parkinsonian patients suffering from psychotic episodes and treated with neuroleptic drugs. Normal and low binding of 3 H-spiroperidol was found in patients treated with levodopa. Clinically, the patient with low binding were more disabled and had lost the beneficial response to levodopa. Thus in Parkinson disease in some patients a denervation supersensitivity seemed to develop and in some others a loss of postsynaptic dopamine receptor sites in the neostriatium. The latter alteration may contribute to the decreased response of parkinsonian patients to chronic levodopa therapy. (author)

  17. Demonstration of specific dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Masafumi; Nakao, Haruyoshi; Arao, Masayo; Sato, Bunzo; Noma, Keizo; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Kishimoto, Susumu; Mori, Shintaro; Uozumi, Toru

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine receptors on human pituitary adenoma membranes were characterized using [ 3 H]spiperone as the radioligand. The specific [ 3 H]spiperone binding sites on prolactin (PRL)-secreting adenoma membranes were recognized as a dopamine receptor, based upon the data showing high affinity binding, saturability, specificity, temperature dependence, and reversibility. All of 14 PRL-secreting adenomas had high affinity dopamine receptors, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.85±0.11 nmol/l (mean±SEM) and a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 428±48.6 fmol/mg protein. Among 14 growth hormone (GH)-secreting adenomas examined, 8 (57%) had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.90±0.47 nmol/l and a Bmax of 131±36.9 fmol/mg protein. Furthermore, 15 of 24 (58%) nonsecreting pituitary adenomas also had dopamine receptors with a Kd of 1.86±0.37 nmol/l and a Bmax of 162±26.0 fmol/mg protein. These results indicate that some GH-secreting adenomas as well as some nonsecreting pituitary adenomas contain dopamine receptors. But their affinity and number of binding sites are significantly lower (P<0.05) and fewer (P<0.001) respectively, than those in PRL-secreting adenomas. (author)

  18. Evaluation of in vivo selective binding of [{sup 11}C]doxepin to histamine H{sub 1} receptors in five animal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi E-mail: ishiwata@pet.tmig.or.jp; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang Weifang; Tsukada, Hideo; Harada, Norihiro; Mochizuki, Hideki; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishii, Kenji; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2004-05-01

    The specific binding of [{sup 11}C]doxepin, which has been used as a radioligand for mapping histamine H{sub 1} receptors in human brain by positron emission tomography, was evaluated in five animal species. In mice the [{sup 11}C]doxepin uptake was reduced by treatment with cold doxepin and two H{sub 1} receptor antagonists, but not with H{sub 2}/H{sub 3} antagonists. The specific binding evaluated with treatment with (+)-chlorpheniramine (H{sub 1} antagonist) was in the range of 10-30% in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey, but was not detected in guinea pig.

  19. The effect of heart-and kidney-benefiting Chinese herbal medicines on the function of adrenergic receptors in brain tissues of analogue dementia rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Bin; Mo Qizhong; Fang Jun

    1992-01-01

    Analogue dementia model of rats was produced by electrolytic lesion of brain. α-adrenergic receptors were assayed by radioligand binding assay (RRBA). It was found that B max of α1 receptors was decreased obviously in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of analogue dementia rats and was raised obviously by Heart-and Kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herbs as well as by Hydergin. The electrolytic lesion did not change the activity of MAO-B in model rat brains. Neither Heart-and Kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herb Medicines nor Hydergin showed marked effect on brain MAO-B activity of the model rats

  20. A preliminary PET evaluation of the new dopamine D2 receptor agonist [11C]MNPA in cynomolgus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J.; Seneca, Nicholas; Farde, Lars; Shchukin, Evgeny; Sovago, Judit; Gulyas, Balazs; Wikstroem, Hakan V.; Innis, Robert B.; Neumeyer, John L.; Halldin, Christer

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the preliminary positron emission tomography (PET) evaluation of a dopamine D 2 -like receptor agonist (R)-2- 11 CH 3 O-N-n-propylnorapomorphine ([ 11 C]MNPA), as a potential new radioligand for in vivo imaging of the high-affinity state of the dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R). MNPA is a selective D 2 -like receptor agonist with a high affinity (K i =0.17 nM). [ 11 C]MNPA was successfully synthesized by direct O-methylation of (R)-2-hydroxy-NPA using [ 11 C]methyl iodide and was evaluated in cynomolgus monkeys. This study included baseline PET experiments and a pretreatment study using unlabeled raclopride (1 mg/kg). High uptake of radioactivity was seen in regions known to contain high D 2 R, with a maximum striatum-to-cerebellum ratio of 2.23±0.21 at 78 min and a maximum thalamus-to-cerebellum ratio of 1.37±0.06 at 72 min. The pretreatment study demonstrated high specific binding to D 2 R by reducing the striatum-to-cerebellum ratio to 1.26 at 78 min. This preliminary study indicates that the dopamine agonist [ 11 C]MNPA has potential as an agonist radioligand for the D 2 -like receptor and has potential for examination of the high-affinity state of the D 2 R in human subjects and patients with neuropsychiatric disorders

  1. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands 3 H-N-methylscopolamine ( 3 H-NMS), 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB), and 3 H-pirenzepine. 3 H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, 3 H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by 3 H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for 3 H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure

  2. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  3. Receptors for substance P on isolated intestinal smooth muscle cells of the guinea pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souquet, J.C.; Bitar, K.N.; Grider, J.R.; Makhlouf, G.M.

    1987-11-01

    Two radioligands, /sup 125/I-labeled substance P (/sup 125/I-SP) and /sup 125/I-labeled substance K (/sup 125/I-SK), were used to characterize the kinetics and stoichiometry of binding of mammalian tachykinins (substance P (SP), substance K (SK), and neuromedin K (NK)) to smooth muscle cells isolated from the longitudinal muscle layer of guinea pig intestine. Specific binding of /sup 125/I-SP and /sup 125/I-SK was rapid, saturable, reversible, and temperature dependent. Binding attained 63-70% of steady-state binding within 1 min, coincidentally with the time of optimal contraction. The order of potency with which mammalian tachykinins and the SP antagonist, (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, inhibited the binding of both radioligands was identical: SP greater than SK greater than NK greater than (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP, implying preferential interaction with a site that had highest affinity for SP. SK was 2-3 times, NK 3-4 times, and (D-Pro2, D-Trp7,9)SP 7-23 times less potent than SP (IC50 0.36 nM). Except for NK, the order of potency was similar to that for contraction of isolated muscle cells. The existence of binding sites with even higher affinity was suggested by the ability of muscle cells to contract in response to concentrations as low as 10(-13) M. These binding sites were not detectable at the concentration of radioligands used. It was concluded that a SP receptor is the only tachykinin receptor subtype present on intestinal muscle cells of the guinea pig.

  4. Combinatorial selection of aptamers: new radioligands for in vivo molecular imaging; Selection d'aptameres par approche combinatoire: de nouveaux radioligands pour l'imagerie moleculaire in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pestourie, C.

    2005-10-15

    Aptamers are oligonucleotide structures selected for their capacity to bind to a desired target. The first part of this work focuses on the selection of aptamers directed against the oncogenic form of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret (RetC634Y). We compared different selection protocols: i) selection against the purified RetC634Y recombinant protein, ii) selection against whole living cells which express RetC634Y and iii) a crossover selection alternating between cells and recombinant protein. One aptamer, D4, was found to be able to inhibit Ret and to reverse the cell phenotype induced by the activation of the receptor. Then, we developed the in vivo use of the selected aptamers. Finally, we used the whole living cells selection protocol to develop aptamers against HLA-G. This protein is characterised by its function in immuno tolerance. Taken together, these studies should pave the way for the in vivo use of aptamers as new therapeutic and diagnostic agents for in vivo PET imaging. (author)

  5. Disturbance of serotonin 5HT2 receptors in remitted patients suffering from hereditary depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larisch, R; Klimke, A; Mayoral, F; Hamacher, K; Herzog, H R; Vosberg, H; Tosch, M; Gaebel, W; Rivas, F; Coenen, H H; Müller-Gärtner, H W

    2001-08-01

    The characteristics of 5HT2 receptor binding were investigated in major depression in vivo using positron emission tomography and the radioligand F-18-altanserin. Twelve patients from families with high loading of depression living in a geographically restricted region were examined and compared with normal control subjects. At the time of the PET measurement all patients were remitted; in some of them remission was sustained by antidepressive medication. Binding potential was assessed by Logan's graphical analysis method. The binding of F-18-altanserin was about 38% lower in patients than in healthy controls (p depression rather than by medication. The data suggest that 5HT2 receptors are altered in depression. We present evidence for a reduction of the receptor density, which might be usable as trait marker of subjects susceptible for depressive illness.

  6. Disturbance of serotonin 5HT2 receptors in remitted patients suffering from hereditary depressive disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larisch, R.; Vosberg, H.; Tosch, M.; Mueller-Gaertner, H.W.; Klimke, A.; Gaebel, W.; Mayoral, F.; Rivas, F.; Hamacher, K.; Coenen, H.H.; Herzog, H.R.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The characteristics of 5HT 2 receptor binding were investigated in major depression in vivo using positron emission tomography and the radioligand F-18-altanserin. Methods: Twelve patients from families with high loading of depression living in a geographically restricted region were examined and compared with normal control subjects. At the time of the PET measurement all patients were remitted; in some of them remission was sustained by antidepressive medication. Binding potential was assessed by Logan's graphical analysis method. Results: The binding of F-18-altanserin was about 38% lower in patients than in healthy controls (p 2 receptors are altered in depression. We present evidence for a reduction of the receptor density, which might be usable as trait marker of subjects susceptible for depressive illness. (orig.) [de

  7. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...... be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...

  8. Muscarinic toxin selective for m4 receptors impairs memory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, D; Kornisiuk, E; Alfaro, P; Quillfeldt, J; Alonso, M; Verde, E R; Cerveñansky, C; Harvey, A

    1998-05-11

    The selectivity of the muscarinic toxin MT3 from green mamba snake venom was corroborated by inhibition of the binding of [3H]NMS, a classical muscarinic radioligand, to native and cloned muscarinic receptors, showing 214-fold higher affinity for m4 than for m1 subtype, without significant binding to the others. The highest concentrations of MT3 sites (putative m4 receptors) in the rat brain were found in striatum and olfactory tubercle, intermediate concentration in dentate gyrus and CA1, and lower but still conspicuous levels in CA3 and frontal cortex. MT3 caused retrograde amnesia of an inhibitory avoidance task, when injected into the dorsal hippocampus of rats after training, suggesting a positive role of these MT3 sensitive sites, which are probably m4 muscarinic receptors, in memory consolidation of this task.

  9. Characterisation of the human NMDA receptor subunit NR3A glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Duan, J; Mo-Boquist, L-L

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we characterise the binding site of the human N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. Saturation radioligand binding of the NMDA receptor agonists [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-glutamate showed that only glycine binds to human NR3A (hNR3A) with high affinity (K(d)=535nM (277......-793nM)). Eight amino acids, which correspond to amino acids that are critical for ligand binding to other NMDA receptor subunits, situated within the S1S2 predicted ligand binding domain of hNR3A were mutated, which resulted in complete or near complete loss of [(3)H]-glycine binding to hNR3A. The NMDA...

  10. The effect of heart-and kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herbal Medicine on the function of cholinergic M-and Gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) receptor in brain tissues of analogue dementia rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mo Qizhong; Gong Bin; Fang Jun

    1993-01-01

    3 H-QNB and 3 H-GABA were used as radioactive ligand for M-and GABA receptors respectively. M-and GABA receptors were assayed by radioligand binding assay (RBA) in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. It was found that R t of M receptor was decreased in cerebral cortex and hippocampus and R t of GABA receptor was decreased in cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. The dissociation constant (K D ) of M-receptor was decreased significantly in cerebral cortex and K D value of (GABA) receptor was decreased in cerebellum of analogue dementia rats. The decreased R t of M-and GABA receptor in brain tissue of analogue dementia rats was raised by Heart- and Kidney-Benefiting Chinese Herbs as well as hydergin

  11. Somatostatin receptors ligands in radionuclide diagnosis and therapy in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cholewinski, W.; Tarkowska, A.

    2002-01-01

    Various tumors, referred to as either neuroendocrine or non-neuroendocrine, express a high number of somatostatin receptors. The presence of these receptors has been shown to be of clinical importance since radio-labeled somatostatin analogues have been used for tumor diagnosis and radiotherapy while non-radioactive analogues are applied for the treatment of tumour-associated symptoms. Recently, five different types of human somatostatin receptors have been identified and named sst1-sst5. Each sst is the product of single gene and the expression of receptor subtypes has been reported to be dependent on the origin and type of tumor. A great majority of studies on sst receptors are based on molecular in vitro identification methods such as the very sensitive RY-PCR technique. A majority of tumors predominantly express the sst2 receptor subtype while only few express other subtypes alone.The introduction of labeled somatostatin analogues, more resistant to degradation than somatostatin itself, enabled in vivo visualization of tumors with high expression of somatostatin receptors. Recently many new stable somatostatin analogues, such as octreotide, lanreotide, vapreotide and depreotide have been introduced as diagnostic tracers. Pharmacological studies have shown a high affinity of somatostatin to all receptor subtypes, whereas somatostatin analogues bind to different subtypes with different affinity. The first studies used radioiodinated octreotide as the radioligand. Presently, indium-labeled octreotide is considered the golden standard. However new technetium-labeled analogues have been already used in clinical investigations. High expression of somatostatin receptors presented by certain tumors can be used for a receptor-mediated radiotherapy. Such therapy with high doses of indium-labeled analogues or with yttrium-labeled somatostatin analogues has been reported to be a promising method of treatment not only in case of neuroendocrine tumors. (author)

  12. GABAA receptors, but not dopamine, serotonin or NMDA receptors, are increased in the frontal cortex from schizophrenic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daen, B.; Hussain, T.; Scarr, E.; Tomaskovic, E.; Kitsoulis, S.; Pavey, G.; Hill, C.; Keks, N.; Opeskin, K.; Copolov, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Having shown changed 5HT 2A receptor density in the frontal cortex (FC) from schizophrenic subjects (1) we now report on further studies of the molecular neuroanatomy of the FC in schizophrenia. We used in situ radioligand binding and autoradiography to measure the density of [ 3 H]8OH-DPAT (1 nM) binding (5HT 1A receptors) and [ 3 H]GR113808 (2.4nM) binding (5HT 4 receptors) in Brodmann's areas (BA) 8, 9 and 10 from 10 schizophrenic and 10 controls subjects. In addition, [ 3 H]muscimol (100 nM) binding (GABA A receptors), [ 3 H]TCP (20nM) binding (NMDA receptors), [ 3 H]SCH 23390 (3nM) binding (DA D 1 like receptors) and [ 3 H]YM-09151-2 (4nM) binding (DA D 2 -like receptors) was measured in BA 9 from 17 schizophrenic and 17 control subjects. Subjects were matched for age and sex and the post-mortem interval for tissue collection did not differ. There was a significant increase (18%) in the density of GABA A receptors in BA 9 from subjects with schizophrenia (p<0.05) with no change in NMDA, dopamine or serotonin receptors. These data support the hypothesis that there are selective changes in neurotransmitter receptors in the FC of subjects with schizophrenia. It is not yet clear if such changes contribute to the pathology of the illness. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  13. Kinetic modeling of 11C-SB207145 binding to 5-HT4 receptors in the human brain in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Comley, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin 4 receptor (5-HT(4) receptor) is known to be involved in learning and memory. We evaluated for the first time the quantification of a novel 5-HT(4) receptor radioligand, (11)C-SB207145, for in vivo brain imaging with PET in humans. METHODS: For evaluation of reproducibility, 6...... region devoid of specific binding, and that nonspecific binding was constant across brain regions. CONCLUSION: In vivo imaging of cerebral 5-HT(4) receptors can be determined reliably using (11)C-207145 PET with arterial input in humans. SRTM showed high reproducibility and reliability but bias....... Regions of interest were delineated automatically on the individual's MR images coregistered to the PET images, and regional time-activity curves were extracted. Quantitative tracer kinetic modeling was investigated with 1- and 2-tissue-compartment models using plasma input functions and the simplified...

  14. Intact coupling of M1 receptors and preserved M2 and M4 receptors in the cortex in progressive supranuclear palsy: contrast with other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Naomi M; Piggott, Margaret A; Lees, Andrew J; Perry, Elaine K; Burn, David J

    2008-05-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative disease characterised clinically by motor and cognitive symptoms. Cholinergic dysfunction is thought to be responsible for much of the cognitive symptomatology. To date, however, cholinergic replacement therapies have been ineffective. We used receptor specific radioligand autoradiography to measure M1, M2, and M4 receptor density, and the functional status of the principal cortical subtype, M1, in the frontal cortex in post-mortem brain tissue of PSP patients (n=14). Results were compared to normal controls (n=17) and patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n=12) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=15). In PSP there were no changes in M1, M2, or M4 muscarinic receptor densities or M1 coupling. DLB cases showed a non-significant increase in M1 receptors. In AD there was a reduction in M1 receptors and coupling in most frontal cortical areas which reached significance, compared to DLB, for M1 receptors in the cingulate (p<0.05). We conclude from this first systematic study of cortical muscarinic receptors in PSP that functioning cortical muscarinic receptors are preserved. A further, larger trial of cholinergic therapy, such as an M1 agonist, may be warranted.

  15. Visualisation of serotonin-1A (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptors in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passchier, J.; Waarde, A. van [PET Center, University Hospital Groningen (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    The 5-HT{sub 1A} subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain and is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy. Here, we review the radioligands which are available for visualisation and quantification of this important neuroreceptor in the human brain, using positron emission tomography (PET) or single-photon emission tomography (SPET). More than 20 compounds have been labelled with carbon-11 (half-life 20 min), fluorine-18 (half-life 109.8 min) or iodine-123 (half-life 13.2 h): structural analogues of the agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, structural analogues of the antagonist, WAY 100635, and apomorphines. The most successful radioligands thus far are [carbonyl-{sup 11}C] WAY-100635 (WAY), [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]desmethyl-WAY-100635 (DWAY), p-[{sup 18}F]MPPF and [{sup 11}C]robalzotan (NAD-299). The high-affinity ligands WAY and DWAY produce excellent images of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor distribution in the brain (even the raphe nuclei are visualised), but they cannot be distributed to remote facilities and they probably cannot be used to measure changes in endogenous serotonin. Binding of the moderate-affinity ligands MPPF and NAD-299 may be more sensitive to serotonin competition and MPPF can be distributed to PET centres within a flying distance of a few hours. Future research should be directed towards: (a) improvement of the metabolic stability in primates; (b) development of a fluorinated radioligand which can be produced in large quantities and (c) production of a radioiodinated or technetium-labelled ligand for SPET. (orig.)

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of (18)F-labeled 5-HT2A receptor agonists as PET ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herth, Matthias M; Petersen, Ida Nymann; Hansen, Hanne Demant; Hansen, Martin; Ettrup, Anders; Jensen, Anders A; Lehel, Szabolcs; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Gillings, Nic; Knudsen, Gitte M; Kristensen, Jesper L

    2016-08-01

    The serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2AR) is the most abundant excitatory 5-HT receptor in the human brain and implicated in various brain disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to image specific proteins and processes in the human brain and several 5-HT2AR PET antagonist radioligands are available. In contrast to an antagonist radioligand, an agonist radioligand should be able to image the population of functional receptors, i.e., those capable of inducing neuroreceptor signaling. Recently, we successfully developed and validated the first 5-HT2AR agonist PET tracer, [(11)C]Cimbi-36, for neuroimaging in humans and herein disclose some of our efforts to develop an (18)F-labeled 5-HT2AR agonist PET-ligand. Three fluorine containing derivatives of Cimbi-36 were synthesized and found to be potent 5-HT2A agonists. (18)F-labeling of the appropriate precursors was performed using [(18)F]FETos, typically yielding 0.2-2.0GBq and specific activities of 40-120GBq/μmol. PET studies in Danish landrace pigs revealed that [(18)F]1 displayed brain uptake in 5-HT2AR rich regions. However, high uptake in bone was also observed. No blocking effect was detected during a competition experiment with a 5-HT2AR selective antagonist. [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 showed very low brain uptake. None of the investigated (18)F-labeled Cimbi-36 derivatives [(18)F]1, [(18)F]2 and [(18)F]3 show suitable tracer characteristics for in vivo PET neuroimaging of the 5-HT2AR. Although for [(18)F]1 there was reasonable brain uptake, we suggest that a large proportion radioactivity in the brain was due to radiometabolites, which would explain why it could not be displaced by a 5-HT2AR antagonist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ontogeny of serotonin and serotonin2A receptors in rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Abbas, Atheir I; O'Donohue, Heather; Lauder, Jean M; Roth, Bryan L; Walker, Paul D; Manis, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    Maturation of the mammalian cerebral cortex is, in part, dependent upon multiple coordinated afferent neurotransmitter systems and receptor-mediated cellular linkages during early postnatal development. Given that serotonin (5-HT) is one such system, the present study was designed to specifically evaluate 5-HT tissue content as well as 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels within the developing auditory cortex (AC). Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), 5-HT and the metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), was measured in isolated AC, which demonstrated a developmental dynamic, reaching young adult levels early during the second week of postnatal development. Radioligand binding of 5-HT(2A) receptors with the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist, (125)I-DOI ((+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl; in the presence of SB206553, a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, also demonstrated a developmental trend, whereby receptor protein levels reached young adult levels at the end of the first postnatal week (P8), significantly increased at P10 and at P17, and decreased back to levels not significantly different from P8 thereafter. Immunocytochemical labeling of 5-HT(2A) receptors and confocal microscopy revealed that 5-HT(2A) receptors are largely localized on layer II/III pyramidal cell bodies and apical dendrites within AC. When considered together, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT, likely through 5-HT(2A) receptors, may play an important role in early postnatal AC development.

  18. On the use of cells or membranes for receptor binding: growth hormone secretagogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinyot, A; Nikolovski, Z; Bosch, J; Segura, J; Gutiérrez-Gallego, R

    2010-04-15

    Receptor binding techniques have been widely used in different biochemical applications, with isolated membranes being the most used receptor preparation in this type of assays. In this study, intact cells were compared with isolated membranes as receptor support for radioligand receptor binding assay. The growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHSR-1a) expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells was used as a model of G-protein-coupled receptors. Differences between using intact cells in suspension and using isolated membranes were evaluated for different aspects of the receptor binding assay: total binding variations while both receptor preparations remain on ice, modifications in incubation conditions, saturation, and competition using different agonists. Intact cells are more prone to variability. Although under optimized settings both preparations were equivalent, the K(d) value for intact cells was three times higher than that using isolated membranes. However, no significant differences were observed in competition assays obtaining practically identical K(i) values for all ligands tested. For the GHSR-1a, isolated membranes are the better choice if particular incubation conditions are required (less variability), whereas intact cells yield easy, fast, and physiological conditions for receptor binding assays. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of muscarinic m3 and m4 receptor antibodies with pharmacological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Zeng, S J; Qiu, P X

    1998-11-01

    To investigate the feasibility of developing subtype-selective anti-receptor antibodies with pharmacological activities for the study of subtypes of receptors. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with synthesized subtype-selective peptide segments of m3 and m4 receptors to develop antibodies. The effects of the antibodies on ligand-binding to muscarinic receptors were studied by competitive radioligand assay. The effects of the prepared antibodies on the contraction or relaxation activity of ACh in isolated rat ilea and aortic rings were studied. Antibodies against synthesized m3 and m4 receptor subtype-selective peptides were successfully prepared. Both antibodies inhibited [3H]QNB binding to muscarinic receptors with different maximal inhibitions which may be the proportions of m3 or m4 subtypes among the total muscarinic receptors in the tissues. The maximal inhibitory rates in rat cerebral cortex, myocardium, and salivary glands were 12.1% +/- 2.1%, 15.7% +/- 1.1%, and 63.6% +/- 2.8% for m3 antibodies, whereas 28% +/- 6%, 19.3% +/- 2.6%, and 1.6% +/- 1.4% for m4 antibodies respectively. The m3 antibodies inhibited the contraction activity of ACh in isolated rat ilea and the relaxation activity of ACh in isolated rat aortic rings. It is feasible to develop subtype-selective anti-receptor antibodies as new tools in the study of the functions of m3 and m4 subtypes of muscarinic receptors.

  20. Cardiovascular receptor binding affinity of aqueous extracts from Allium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nencini, Cristina; Franchi, Gian Gabriele; Micheli, Lucia

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate whether the antihypertensive effect of garlic could to be associated to interactions with adrenergic and dopaminergic receptors involved in regulating blood pressure and to compare these data with those obtained from wild Allium species. The aqueous extracts of bulbs or leaves of Allium sativum L. (garlic), Allium neapolitanum Cyr., Allium subhirsutum L., and Allium roseum L. were tested for their in vitro affinity for the adrenergic (alpha(1), alpha(2), beta(1) and beta(2)) and dopaminergic (D(1) and D(2)) receptors by radioligand binding assays. Interesting results were shown by bulbs extracts of A. neapolitanum and A. subhirsutum with higher affinities for the beta(2) receptors and by bulbs extract of A. roseum for D(2) receptors. The known antihypertensive activity of Allium sativum cannot be correlated with binding to receptors involved in blood pressure regulation. However, aqueous extracts of the wild-type species of Allium show much higher affinities, warranting further explorations.

  1. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  2. Synthesis of [[sup 123]I]tert-Butyl 8-iodo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiaze pine 3-carboxylate, a potential SPECT imaging agent for diazepam-intensive (DI) benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoshu He; Matecka, Dorota; Ziqiang Gu; Rice, K.C.; Costa, B.R. de (National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Lee, K.S. (National Inst. of Mental Health, Washington, DC (United States)); Wong, Garry; Skolnick, Phil (National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Neuroscience)

    1994-01-01

    [[sup 123]I]tert-Butyl 8-iodo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5-a] [1,4]benzodiazepine 3-carboxylate ([[sup 123]I]3), a high affinity and selective radioligand for the diazepam insensitive (DI) benzodiazepine receptor was synthesized in 2 steps from tert-butyl 8-bromo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiaz epine 3-carboxylate. (Author).

  3. Evaluation of radioiodinated (2S,{alpha}S)-2-({alpha}-(2-iodophenoxy)benzyl)morpholine as a radioligand for imaging of norepinephrine transporter in the heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyono, Yasushi [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Radioisotopes Research Laboratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)], E-mail: ykiyono@u-fukui.ac.jp; Sugita, Taku [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ueda, Masashi [Radioisotopes Research Laboratory, Kyoto University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawashima, Hidekazu [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kanegawa, Naoki; Kuge, Yuji [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa [Biomedical Imaging Research Center, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-1193 (Japan); Saji, Hideo [Department of Pathofunctional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is located presynaptically on noradrenergic nerve terminals and plays a critical role in the regulation of the synaptic norepinephrine (NE) concentration via the reuptake of NE. Changes in NET have been recently reported in several cardiac failures. Therefore, a NET-specific radioligand is useful for in vivo assessment of changes in NET density in various cardiac disorders. Recently, we developed a radioiodinated reboxetine analogue, (2S,{alpha}S)-2-({alpha}-(2-iodophenoxy)benzyl)morpholine ((S,S)-IPBM), for NET imaging. In the current study, we assessed the applicability of radioiodinated (S,S)-IPBM to NET imaging in the heart. Methods: The NET affinity and selectivity were measured from the ability to displace specific [{sup 3}H]nisoxetine and (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM binding to rat heart membrane, respectively. To evaluate the distribution of (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM in vivo, biodistribution experiment was performed in rats. With the use of several monoamine transporter binding agents, pharmacological blocking experiments were performed in rats. Results: In vitro binding assays showed that the affinity of (S,S)-IPBM to NET was similar to those of the well-known NET-specific binding agents, nisoxetine and desipramine. Furthermore, (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM binding was inhibited by nisoxetine and desipramine, but not by dopamine or serotonin transporter binding agents. These data indicated that (S,S)-IPBM had high affinity and selectivity for NET in vitro. Biodistribution studies in rats showed rapid and high uptake of (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM by the heart and rapid clearance from the blood. The heart-to-blood ratio was 31.9 at 180 min after the injection. The administration of nisoxetine and desipramine decreased (S,S)-[{sup 125}I]IPBM accumulation in the heart, but injection of fluoxetine and GBR12909 had little influence. Conclusions: Radioiodinated (S,S)-IPBM is a potential radioligand for NET imaging in the heart.

  4. [18F]altanserin binding to human 5HT2A receptors is unaltered after citalopram and pindolol challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinborg, L. H.; Adams, K. H.; Yndsgaard, S

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop an experimental paradigm for the study of serotonergic neurotransmission in humans using positron emission tomography and the 5-HT2A selective radioligand [18F]altanserin. [18F]altanserin studies were conducted in seven subjects using the bolus...... challenge, even after pindolol pretreatment. The biochemical and cellular events possibly affecting the unsuccessful translation of the citalopram/pindolol challenge into a change in 5-HT2A receptor binding of [18F]altanserin are discussed...

  5. Muscarinic M2 and M4 receptors in anterior cingulate cortex: relation to neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teaktong, Thanasak; Piggott, Margaret A; Mckeith, Ian G; Perry, Robert H; Ballard, Clive G; Perry, Elaine K

    2005-06-20

    Alterations in cholinergic functions have been reported to be associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia. Increased M1 muscarinic receptor binding in temporal cortex is associated with delusions in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) patients and increased M2/M4 receptor binding with psychosis in Alzheimer's disease. However, the relation between M2 and M4 muscarinic receptor and psychotic symptoms in DLB is unknown. The aim of this study was to measure M2 and M4 receptors in the anterior cingulate cortex in DLB and to correlate the neurochemical findings with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Muscarinic M2 and M4 receptor levels in the anterior cingulate cortex and adjacent cortex (Brodmann's area [BA] 32) were measured separately by using a radioligand binding protocol based on binding of [(3)H]AF-DX 384 in the presence and absence of dicyclomine, a potent M4 receptor antagonist. M2 receptor binding was significantly increased, while M4 receptor binding was unchanged in the cingulate cortex and BA32 of DLB patients compared with age-matched controls. Impaired consciousness was significantly associated with increased M4 binding and delusions were significantly associated with increased M2 binding. Increased M2 and M4 receptor binding in DLB was also associated with visual hallucinations. Upregulation of M2 and M4 muscarinic receptors in cingulate and adjacent cortex may thus contribute to the development of psychosis in DLB, with potential implications for treatments with drugs acting on these receptors.

  6. 8-Azaxanthine derivatives as antagonists of adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchetti, P; Messini, L; Cappellacci, L; Grifantini, M; Lucacchini, A; Martini, C; Senatore, G

    1994-09-02

    A series of 1,3-dimethyl- and 1,3-dipropyl-8-azaxanthines, substituted at the N8 or N7 position with substituents which usually increase the affinity of the xanthines for the adenosine receptors, was synthesized and studied in radioligand binding experiments. The substitution of CH with N at the 8-position of both theophylline and caffeine dramatically reduced the affinity, as demonstrated by the fact that 8-azatheophylline and 8-azacaffeine were inert. The introduction of a methyl group at 8-position of 8-azatheophylline restored the antagonistic activity at A2 receptors, while a 8-cycloalkyl substituent increased the affinity for both receptor subtypes. A more favorable effect on affinity was produced by the substitution of the 7-methyl group in 8-azacaffeine with cycloalkyl groups. 7-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethyl-8-azaxanthine was 3 times more potent than caffeine at A1 receptors and 6 times less active at A2 receptors. On the contrary, the 7-cyclohexyl-1,3-dimethyl-8-azaxanthine was more potent than caffeine at A2 receptors. The substitution of 1- and 3-methyl groups with propyl in both 7- and 8-substituted 8-azatheophylline increased remarkably the affinity for A1 receptors. The 7-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropyl-8-azaxanthine appears to be one of the most potent and selective among 7-alkyl-substituted xanthines at A1 receptors so far known. Because the 8-aza analogues of 8-substituted 1,3-dialkylxanthine were in any case less active than the corresponding xanthine derivatives, it was confirmed that the hydrogen atom at the 7-position of xanthines plays an important role in the binding to adenosine receptors.

  7. Clathrin-dependent internalization of the angiotensin II AT₁A receptor links receptor internalization to COX-2 protein expression in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinelli, Thomas A; Walker, Linda P; Velez, Juan Carlos Q; Ullian, Michael E

    2015-02-05

    The major effects of Angiotensin II (AngII) in vascular tissue are mediated by AngII AT1A receptor activation. Certain effects initiated by AT1A receptor activation require receptor internalization. In rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC), AngII stimulates cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. We have previously shown this is mediated by β-arrestin-dependent receptor internalization and NF-κB activation. In this study, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), pitstop-2, was used to test the hypothesis that clathrin-dependent internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates NF-κB activation and subsequent cyclooxygenase 2 expression. Radioligand binding assays, real time qt-PCR and immunoblotting were used to document the effects of pitstop-2 on AngII binding and signaling in RASMC. Laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) was used to image pitstop-2׳s effects on AT1 receptor/GFP internalization in HEK-293 cells and p65 NF-κB nuclear localization in RASMC. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited internalization of AT1A receptor (44.7% ± 3.1% Control vs. 13.2% ± 8.3% Pitstop-2; n=3) as determined by radioligand binding studies in RASMC. Studies utilizing AT1A receptor/GFP expressed in HEK 293 cells and LSCM confirmed these findings. Pitstop-2 significantly inhibited AngII-induced p65 NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear localization, COX-2 message and protein expression in RASMC without altering activation of p42/44 ERK or TNFα signaling. Pitstop-2, a specific inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, confirms that internalization of activated AT1A receptor mediates AngII activation of cyclooxygenase 2 expression in RASMC. These data provide support for additional intracellular signaling pathways activated through β-arrestin mediated internalization of G protein-coupled receptors, such as AT1A receptors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of in vivo binding of [[sup 3]H]RX 821002 in rat brain: evaluation as a radioligand for central [alpha][sub 2]-adrenoceptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hume, S.P.; Lammertsma, A.A.; Opacka-Juffry, J.; Ahier, R.G.; Myers, R., Cremer, J.E.; Pike, V.W. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom). M.R.C. Cyclotron Unit); Hudson, A.L.; Nutt, D.J. (Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom). Reckitt and Coleman Psychopharmacology Unit)

    1992-11-01

    On the basis of its established in vitro characteristics, [[sup 3]H]RX 821002 was evaluated in rats as an in vivo radioligand for central [alpha][sub 2]-adrenoceptors. Estimates for in vivo binding potential, obtained by compartmental analyses of time-radioactivity data, ranged between 1.9 for hypothalamus and 0.2 for cerebellum, with a regional distribution in brain which was similar to that observed in vitro. Selectivity and specificity of the signal were checked by predosing with either the [alpha][sub 2]-antagonists, idazoxan or yohimbine, the [alpha][sub 2]-agonist, clonidine, or the [alpha][sub 1]-antagonist, prazosin. Pretreatment of the rats with the selective neurotoxin, DSP-4, had no significant effect on [[sup 3]H]RX 821002 binding, suggesting that the majority of labelled sites were situated post-junctionally. The studies indicate that [[sup 3]H]RX 821002 can be used experimentally as an in vivo marker for central [alpha][sub 2]-adrenoceptors. The size and rate of expression of the specific signal encourage the development and assessment of [[sup 11]C]RX 821002 for clinical PET studies. (author).

  9. Identification and Profiling of a Selective and Brain Penetrant Radioligand for in Vivo Target Occupancy Measurement of Casein Kinase 1 (CK1) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Travis T; Galatsis, Paul; Chandrasekaran, Ramalakshmi Y; Butler, Todd W; Li, Jianke; Zhang, Lei; Mente, Scot; Subramanyam, Chakrapani; Liu, Shenping; Doran, Angela C; Chang, Cheng; Fisher, Katherine; Grimwood, Sarah; Hedde, Joseph R; Marconi, Michael; Schildknegt, Klaas

    2017-09-20

    To enable the clinical development of our CNS casein kinase 1 delta/epsilon (CK1δ/ε) inhibitor project, we investigated the possibility of developing a CNS positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand. For this effort, we focused our design and synthesis efforts on the initial CK1δ/ε inhibitor HTS hits with the goal of identifying a compound that would fulfill a set of recommended PET ligand criteria. We identified [ 3 H]PF-5236216 (9) as a tool ligand that meets most of the key CNS PET attributes including high CNS MPO PET desirability score and kinase selectivity, CNS penetration, and low nonspecific binding. We further used [ 3 H]-9 to determine the binding affinity for PF-670462, a literature CK1δ/ε inhibitor tool compound. Lastly, [ 3 H]-9 was used to measure in vivo target occupancy (TO) of PF-670462 in mouse and correlated TO with CK1δ/ε in vivo pharmacology (circadian rhythm modulation).

  10. [123I]Iodobenzamide binding to the rat dopamine D2 receptor in competition with haloperidol and endogenous dopamine - an in vivo imaging study with a dedicated small animal SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Wirrwar, Andreas; Jamdjeu-Noune, Marlyse; Antke, Christina; Beu, Markus; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Schramm, Nils

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding to the rat dopamine D 2 receptor in competition with haloperidol and endogenous dopamine using a high-resolution small animal SPECT. Subsequent to baseline quantifications of D 2 receptor binding, imaging studies were performed on the same animals after pre-treatment with haloperidol and methylphenidate, which block D 2 receptors and dopamine transporters, respectively. Striatal baseline equilibrium ratios (V 3 '' ) of [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding were 1.42±0.31 (mean±SD). After pre-treatment with haloperidol and methylphenidate, V 3 '' values decreased to 0.54±0.46 (p 123 I]iodobenzamide binding induced by pre-treatment with haloperidol reflects D 2 receptor blockade, whereas the decrease in receptor binding induced by pre-treatment with methylphenidate can be interpreted in terms of competition between [ 123 I]IBZM and endogenous dopamine. Findings show that multiple in vivo measurements of [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding to D 2 receptors in competition with exogenous and endogenous ligands are feasible in the same animal. This may be of future relevance for the in vivo evaluation of novel radioligands as well as for studying the interrelations between pre- and/or postsynaptic radioligand binding and different levels of endogenous dopamine. (orig.)

  11. Establishment of Radiolabelling Method for the Development of Neurodegenerative Disease Imaging Agent Using 5-HT{sub 1A} Subtype of Receptor Anatagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Choi, Sang Mu; Kim, On Hee; Hong, Young Don; Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The 5-HT1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain. And it is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy and diagnosis of diseases. Serotonin is synthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan by sequential hydroxylation and decarboxylation. It is stored in presynaptic vesicles and released from nerve terminals during neuronal firing. One of the best-characterised binding sites for serotonin is the 5-HT1A receptor. This is mainly due to the relatively early discovery of a selective ligand, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) for this subpopulation. Thus, many researchers have tried to develop a radioligand capable of assessing in vivo changes in 5-HT1A receptors in depressed subjects, people with anxiety disorders, patients with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenics. In present study, we studied the radioligands which would play a role in visualization and quantification of this important neuroreceptor for single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

  12. Establishment of Radiolabelling Method for the Development of Neurodegenerative Disease Imaging Agent Using 5-HT1A Subtype of Receptor Anatagonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Choi, Sang Mu; Kim, On Hee; Hong, Young Don; Park, Kyung Bae

    2005-01-01

    The 5-HT1A subtype of receptors for the neurotransmitter serotonin is predominantly located in the limbic forebrain. And it is involved in the modulation of emotion and the function of the hypothalamus. Since 5-HT1A receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety, depression, hallucinogenic behaviour, motion sickness and eating disorders, they are an important target for drug therapy and diagnosis of diseases. Serotonin is synthesized from the amino acid L-tryptophan by sequential hydroxylation and decarboxylation. It is stored in presynaptic vesicles and released from nerve terminals during neuronal firing. One of the best-characterised binding sites for serotonin is the 5-HT1A receptor. This is mainly due to the relatively early discovery of a selective ligand, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) for this subpopulation. Thus, many researchers have tried to develop a radioligand capable of assessing in vivo changes in 5-HT1A receptors in depressed subjects, people with anxiety disorders, patients with Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenics. In present study, we studied the radioligands which would play a role in visualization and quantification of this important neuroreceptor for single-photon emission tomography (SPET)

  13. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor binding, but not mGluR2, is increased in tryptophan hydroxylase 2 decrease-of-function mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Jacobsen, Jacob P; Caron, Marc G; Klein, Anders B; Knudsen, Gitte M; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2013-10-25

    Transgenic mice with a knock-in (KI) of a tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) R439H mutation, analogous to the Tph2 R441H single-nucleotide polymorphism originally identified in a late life depression cohort, have markedly reduced levels of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). These Tph2KI mice are therefore interesting as a putative translational model of low endogenous 5-HT function that allows for assessment of adaptive changes in different anatomical regions. Here, we determined 5-HT2A receptor binding in several brain regions using in vitro receptor autoradiography and two different radioligands. When using the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist radioligand (3)H-MDL100907, we found higher binding in the prefrontal cortex (10%, P=0.009), the striatum (26%, P=0.005), and the substantia nigra (21%, P=0.027). The increase was confirmed in the same regions with the 5-HT2A/C receptor agonist, (3)H-CIMBI-36 (2-(4-Bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)ethanamine). 5-HT2A receptors establish heteromeric receptor complexes with metabotropic glutamate 2 receptors (mGluR2), but binding levels of the mGluR2/3 ligand (3)H-LY341495 were unaltered in brain areas with increased 5-HT2A receptor levels. These data show that in distinct anatomical regions, 5-HT2A receptor binding sites are up-regulated in 5-HT deficient mice, and this increase is not associated with changes in mGluR2 binding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  15. Mapping adenosine A1 receptors in the cat brain by positron emission tomography with [11C]MPDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yuhei; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kiyosawa, Motohiro; Nariai, Tadashi; Oda, Keiichi; Toyama, Hinako; Suzuki, Fumio; Ono, Kenichirou; Senda, Michio

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of [ 11 C]MPDX as a radioligand for mapping adenosine A 1 receptors in comparison with previously proposed [ 11 C]KF15372 in cat brain by PET. Two tracers showed the same brain distribution. Brain uptake of [ 11 C]MPDX (Ki=4.2 nM) was much higher and washed out faster than that of [ 11 C]KF15372 (Ki=3.0 nM), and was blocked by carrier-loading or displaced with an A 1 antagonist. The regional A 1 receptor distribution evaluated with kinetic analysis is consistent with that previously measured in vitro. [ 11 C]MPDX PET has a potential for mapping adenosine A 1 receptors in brain

  16. Cortical and subcortical 5-HT2A receptor binding in neuroleptic-naive first-episode schizophrenic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Rasmussen, Hans; Kristiansen, Klaus Nyegaard

    2008-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is suspected to be involved in a number of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. In particular, atypical antipsychotics have antagonistic effects on the 5-HT(2A) receptors, supporting a specific role of the 5-HT(2A) receptor in the pathophysiology...... of this disease. The aim of this study is to investigate cortical and subcortical 5-HT(2A) binding in neuroleptic-naive schizophrenic patients. Fifteen neuroleptic-naive patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (age 27.5+/-4.5 years), 11 men and 4 women, and 15 healthy control subjects matched for age (28.......5+/-5.7 years) and gender underwent a 40 min positron emission tomography (PET) study using the 5-HT(2A) antagonist, [(18)F]altanserin, as a radioligand. PET images were co-registered to 3 T magnetic resonance images (MRIs) for each individual subject, and ROIs were applied automatically onto the individual...

  17. Analysis of binding centers in nicotinic receptors with the aid of synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasheverov, I E; Kryukova, E V; Kudryavtsev, D S; Ivanov, I A; Egorova, N V; Zhmak, M N; Spirova, E N; Shelukhina, I V; Odinokov, A V; Alfimov, M V; Tsetlin, V I

    2016-09-01

    We studies the receptor-binding specificity of the synthetic peptide HAP (High Affinity Peptide) and its analogues, which are regarded as a model of the orthosteric site nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Using radioligand analysis, electrophysiology tests, and calcium imaging, we assessed the ability of HAP to interact with nAChR antagonists: long α-neurotoxins and α-conotoxins. A high affinity of HAP for α-bungarotoxin and the absence of its interaction with α-cobratoxin and α-conotoxins was found. The synthesized analogues of HAP in general retained the properties of the original peptide. Thus, HAP cannot be a model of a ligand-binding site.

  18. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, [ 3 H] dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for [ 3 H] [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites

  19. Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of new selective GluR5 ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, L; Johansen, T H; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Two hybrid analogues of the kainic acid receptor agonists, 2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA) and (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid ((2S,4R)-4-Me-Glu), were designed, synthesized, and characterized in radioligand binding assays using cloned ionotropic and metabotropic...... glutamic acid receptors. The (S)-enantiomers of E-4-(2,2-dimethylpropylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-1) and E-4-(3,3-dimethylbutylidene)glutamic acid ((S)-2) were shown to be selective and high affinity GluR5 ligands, with Ki values of 0.024 and 0.39 microM, respectively, compared to Ki values at GluR2 of 3...

  20. Stereocontrolled synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of azetidine-2,3-dicarboxylic acids at NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaprakasam, Mangaleswaran; Hansen, Kasper Bø; David, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    azetidinic amino acids were characterized in a radioligand binding assay ([(3)H]CGP39653) at native NMDA receptors: L-trans-ADC showed the highest affinity (K(i)=10 microM) followed by the D-cis-ADC stereoisomer (21 microM). In contrast, the two analogues L-cis-ADC and D-trans-ADC were low-affinity ligands...... (>100 and 90 microM, respectively). Electrophysiological characterization of the ADC compounds at the four NMDA receptor subtypes NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, NR1/NR2C, and NR1/NR2D expressed in Xenopus oocytes showed that L-trans-ADC displayed the highest agonist potency at NR1/NR2D (EC(50)=50 microM), which...

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 - a promising target in drug development and neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, Rajapillai L.I.; Tipre, Dnyanesh N. [Stony Brook University Health Science Center, Department of Psychiatry, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This review summarizes the contributions by various teams of scientists in assessing the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) as a biomarker in neuropsychiatric disorders and diseases. Development of positive and negative allosteric modulators of mGluR5 is reviewed, as is the development of PET radioligands that have the potential to measure mGluR5 receptor density in neurological disorders and during therapeutic interventions. PET imaging provides an effective tool to assess the specificity of new drugs, select dose regimens in clinical trials, and study drug mechanisms of action. We summarize and deliver comparative analyses of mGluR5-specific PET radiotracers and their applications in understanding the pathophysiology of mGluR5-related nervous system disorders and to speed up drug development. (orig.)

  2. Structure-Affinity Relationships and Structure-Kinetic Relationships of 1,2-Diarylimidazol-4-carboxamide Derivatives as Human Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lizi; de Vries, Henk; Lenselink, Eelke B; Louvel, Julien; Waring, Michael J; Cheng, Leifeng; Pahlén, Sara; Petersson, Maria J; Schell, Peter; Olsson, Roine I; Heitman, Laura H; Sheppard, Robert J; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2017-12-14

    We report on the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of 1,2-diarylimidazol-4-carboxamide derivatives developed as CB 1 receptor antagonists. These were evaluated in a radioligand displacement binding assay, a [ 35 S]GTPγS binding assay, and in a competition association assay that enables the relatively fast kinetic screening of multiple compounds. The compounds show high affinities and a diverse range of kinetic profiles at the CB 1 receptor and their structure-kinetic relationships (SKRs) were established. Using the recently resolved hCB 1 receptor crystal structures, we also performed a modeling study that sheds light on the crucial interactions for both the affinity and dissociation kinetics of this family of ligands. We provide evidence that, next to affinity, additional knowledge of binding kinetics is useful for selecting new hCB 1 receptor antagonists in the early phases of drug discovery.

  3. Cyclopentadienyl tricarbonyl complexes of 99mTc for the in vivo imaging of the serotonin 5-HT 1a receptor in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, Mouldi; Trabelsi, Adel; MEKNI, Abdelkader; Kretzschmar, M.; Sefert, S.; Bergmann, R.; Pietzsch, H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    The present interest in the 5-HT 1a receptor is due to its implicated role in several major neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, eating disorders and anxiety. For the diagnosis of these pathophysiological processes it is important to have radioligands in hand able to specifically bind on the 5-HT 1a receptor in order to allow brain imaging. due to the optimal radiation properties of 99mTc there is a considerable interest in the development of 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for imaging serotonergic CNS receptors using single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Here we introduce two cyclopentadienyl technitium tricarbonyl conjugates of piperidine derivatives which show high accumulation of radioactivity in brain areas rich in 5-HT 1a receptors

  4. Structure–Affinity Relationships and Structure–Kinetic Relationships of 1,2-Diarylimidazol-4-carboxamide Derivatives as Human Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We report on the synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of 1,2-diarylimidazol-4-carboxamide derivatives developed as CB1 receptor antagonists. These were evaluated in a radioligand displacement binding assay, a [35S]GTPγS binding assay, and in a competition association assay that enables the relatively fast kinetic screening of multiple compounds. The compounds show high affinities and a diverse range of kinetic profiles at the CB1 receptor and their structure–kinetic relationships (SKRs) were established. Using the recently resolved hCB1 receptor crystal structures, we also performed a modeling study that sheds light on the crucial interactions for both the affinity and dissociation kinetics of this family of ligands. We provide evidence that, next to affinity, additional knowledge of binding kinetics is useful for selecting new hCB1 receptor antagonists in the early phases of drug discovery. PMID:29111736

  5. Structural basis for modulation of a G-protein-coupled receptor by allosteric drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Ron O.; Green, Hillary F.; Valant, Celine; Borhani, David W.; Valcourt, James R.; Pan, Albert C.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Canals, Meritxell; Lane, J. Robert; Rahmani, Raphaël; Baell, Jonathan B.; Sexton, Patrick M.; Christopoulos, Arthur; Shaw, David E.

    2013-11-01

    The design of G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) allosteric modulators, an active area of modern pharmaceutical research, has proved challenging because neither the binding modes nor the molecular mechanisms of such drugs are known. Here we determine binding sites, bound conformations and specific drug-receptor interactions for several allosteric modulators of the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor), a prototypical family A GPCR, using atomic-level simulations in which the modulators spontaneously associate with the receptor. Despite substantial structural diversity, all modulators form cation-π interactions with clusters of aromatic residues in the receptor extracellular vestibule, approximately 15Å from the classical, `orthosteric' ligand-binding site. We validate the observed modulator binding modes through radioligand binding experiments on receptor mutants designed, on the basis of our simulations, either to increase or to decrease modulator affinity. Simulations also revealed mechanisms that contribute to positive and negative allosteric modulation of classical ligand binding, including coupled conformational changes of the two binding sites and electrostatic interactions between ligands in these sites. These observations enabled the design of chemical modifications that substantially alter a modulator's allosteric effects. Our findings thus provide a structural basis for the rational design of allosteric modulators targeting muscarinic and possibly other GPCRs.

  6. Higher levels of different muscarinic receptors in the cortex and hippocampus from subjects with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Elizabeth; McLean, Catriona; Dean, Brian

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggest that drugs specifically targeting muscarinic receptors will be useful in treating Alzheimer's disease. We decided to determine if the response to such drugs may be altered, because of changes in the levels of muscarinic receptors in the CNS from subjects with the disorder. We used in situ radioligand binding with autoradiography to measure the levels of [ 3 H]pirenzepine binding to muscarinic M1 receptors, [ 3 H]AF-DX 386 binding to muscarinic M1, M2, and M4 receptors, and [ 3 H]4-DAMP binding to muscarinic M1 and M3 receptors in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and hippocampus from subjects with Alzheimer's and age/sex-matched controls. Compared with controls, [ 3 H]pirenzepine binding was higher in the dentate gyrus from subjects with Alzheimer's disease. [ 3 H]AF-DX 386 binding was higher in the subiculum and parahippocampal gyrus from subjects with the disorder. In Alzheimer's disease, [ 3 H]-DAMP binding was higher in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex but not different in the hippocampus. Our data show complex changes in the levels of muscarinic receptors in the CNS from subjects with Alzheimer's disease which may affect clinical response to treatment with drugs-targeting these receptors.

  7. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmi, S.M.; Mishra, R.K.

    1989-02-15

    The existence of specific alpha 2-adrenergic receptor sites has been shown in human retinoblastoma (Y-79) and neuroblastoma (SH-SH5Y) cells using direct radioligand binding. (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, exhibited high affinity, saturable binding to both Y-79 and SH-SY5Y cell membranes. The binding of alpha 1 specific antagonist, (/sup 3/H)Prazocine, was not detectable in either cell type. Competition studies with antagonists yielded pharmacological characteristics typical of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors: rauwolscine greater than yohimbine greater than phentolamine greater than prazocine. Based on the affinity constants of prazocine and oxymetazoline, it appears that Y-79 cells contain alpha 2A receptor, whereas SH-SY5Y cells probably represent a mixture of alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptors. alpha 2-agonists clonidine and (-)epinephrine inhibition curves yielded high and low affinity states of the receptor in SH-SY5Y cells. Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions reduced the proportion of high affinity sites of alpha 2 receptors. These two neuronal cell lines of human origin would prove useful in elucidating the action and regulation of human alpha 2-adrenergic receptors and their interaction with other receptor systems.

  8. Overall survival and response pattern of castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer to multiple cycles of radioligand therapy using [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Wegen, Simone; Yordanova, Anna; Kuerpig, Stefan; Eppard, Elisabeth; Wei, Xiao; Schlenkhoff, Carl; Essler, Markus [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Fimmers, Rolf [University of Bonn, Institute for Medical Biometry, Informatics and Epidemiology, Bonn (Germany); Hauser, Stefan [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Urology, Bonn (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    Up to 30% of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) do not show any response to the first cycle of radioligand therapy (RLT) with [{sup 177}Lu]Lu-PSMA-617 (Lu-PSMA). We evaluated patient response to the second and third cycles of RLT in patients that underwent at least three cycles. The second aim of this study was to calculate the median overall survival (OS) of responders and non-responders after the first cycle and after all three cycles of RLT. CRPC patients were treated with Lu-PSMA, with a median interval of 8 weeks between each cycle. The tumour marker prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was used as the marker for response evaluation. Fifty-two patients underwent a total of 190 cycles of RLT (3-6 cycles per patient). Of these, 80.8% showed a decline in PSA 2 months after the first cycle, with 44.2% showing a PSA decline of ≥50%. When compared to baseline PSA, 73.1% showed a PSA decline after the third cycle. 50% of patients that did not show any response to the first cycle also did not respond to the second and third cycles. The median OS was 60 weeks in all patients. The median OS was significantly longer for patients that showed any PSA decline after the first cycle compared to patients without PSA decline (68 vs. 33 weeks). There was a significant difference in median OS between responders and non-responders for a change in PSA after the third cycle compared to baseline PSA. Patients with a positive response to RLT, regardless of the rate of decline, had a significantly longer median OS. Of the patients that did not show any response to the first cycle, 50% responded to the second or third cycles. (orig.)

  9. Quantification of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT studies with 123I-labelled radioligands. A comparison between different imaging systems and data acquisition protocols using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Cristina; Gallego, Judith; Cot, Albert; Falcón, Carles; Bullich, Santiago; Pareto, Deborah; Aguiar, Pablo; Sempau, Josep; Lomeña, Francisco; Calviño, Francisco; Pavía, Javier; Ros, Domènec

    2008-07-01

    (123)I-labelled radioligands are commonly used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the dopaminergic system to study the dopamine transporter binding. The aim of this work was to compare the quantitative capabilities of two different SPECT systems through Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The SimSET MC code was employed to generate simulated projections of a numerical phantom for two gamma cameras equipped with a parallel and a fan-beam collimator, respectively. A fully 3D iterative reconstruction algorithm was used to compensate for attenuation, the spatially variant point spread function (PSF) and scatter. A post-reconstruction partial volume effect (PVE) compensation was also developed. For both systems, the correction for all degradations and PVE compensation resulted in recovery factors of the theoretical specific uptake ratio (SUR) close to 100%. For a SUR value of 4, the recovered SUR for the parallel imaging system was 33% for a reconstruction without corrections (OSEM), 45% for a reconstruction with attenuation correction (OSEM-A), 56% for a 3D reconstruction with attenuation and PSF corrections (OSEM-AP), 68% for OSEM-AP with scatter correction (OSEM-APS) and 97% for OSEM-APS plus PVE compensation (OSEM-APSV). For the fan-beam imaging system, the recovered SUR was 41% without corrections, 55% for OSEM-A, 65% for OSEM-AP, 75% for OSEM-APS and 102% for OSEM-APSV. Our findings indicate that the correction for degradations increases the quantification accuracy, with PVE compensation playing a major role in the SUR quantification. The proposed methodology allows us to reach similar SUR values for different SPECT systems, thereby allowing a reliable standardisation in multicentric studies.

  10. Species differences in blood-brain barrier transport of three positron emission tomography radioligands with emphasis on P-glycoprotein transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvänen, Stina; Lindhe, Orjan; Palner, Mikael; Kornum, Birgitte R; Rahman, Obaidur; Långström, Bengt; Knudsen, Gitte M; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2009-03-01

    Species differences occur in the brain concentrations of drugs, but the reasons for these differences are not yet apparent. This study was designed to compare brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrates across species using positron emission tomography. Brain concentrations and brain-to-plasma ratios were compared; [(11)C]verapamil in rats, guinea pigs, and monkeys; [(11)C](S)-(2-methoxy-5-(5-trifluoromethyltetrazol-1-yl)-phenylmethylamino)-2(S)-phenylpiperidine (GR205171) in rats, guinea pigs, monkeys, and humans; and [(18)F]altanserin in rats, minipigs, and humans. The fraction of the unbound radioligand in plasma was studied along with its metabolism. The effect of P-gp inhibition was investigated by administering cyclosporin A (CsA). Pronounced species differences were found in the brain and brain-to-plasma concentrations of [(11)C]verapamil, [(11)C]GR205171, and [(18)F]altanserin with higher brain distribution in humans, monkeys, and minipigs than in rats and guinea pigs. For example, the brain-to-plasma ratio of [(11)C]GR205171 was almost 9-fold higher in humans compared with rats. The species differences were still present after P-gp inhibition, although the increase in brain concentrations after P-gp inhibition was somewhat greater in rats than in the other species. Differences in plasma protein binding and metabolism did not explain the species-related differences. The findings are important for interpretation of brain drug delivery when extrapolating preclinical data to humans. Compounds found to be P-gp substrates in rodents are likely to also be substrates in higher species, but sufficient blood-brain barrier permeability may be retained in humans to allow the compound to act at intracerebral targets.

  11. The translocator protein radioligand 18F-DPA-714 monitors antitumor effect of erufosine in a rat 9L intracranial glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awde, Ali R.; Boisgard, Raphael; Theze, Benoit; Dubois, Albertine; Zheng, Jinzi; Winkeler, Alexandra; Dolle, Frederic; Jacobs, Andreas H.; Tavitian, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    On the one hand, the translocator protein (TSPO) radioligand N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2- 18 F-fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide ( 18 F-DPA-714) has been suggested to serve as an alternative radiotracer to image human glioma, and on the other hand the alkyl-phosphocholine erufosine (ErPC3) has been reported to induce apoptosis in otherwise highly apoptosis resistant glioma cell lines. The induction of apoptosis by ErPC3 requires TSPO, a mitochondrial membrane protein highly expressed in malignant gliomas. In this preclinical study, we monitored the effect of ErPC3 treatment in vivo using 18 F-DPA-714 PET. Methods: In vitro studies investigated the antitumor effect of ErPC3 in 9L rat gliosarcoma cells. In vivo, glioma-bearing rats were imaged with 18 F-DPA-714 for the time of treatment. Results: A significant decrease in 9L cell proliferation and viability and a significant increase in apoptosis and caspase-3 activation were demonstrated on ErPC3 treatment in cell culture. In the rat model, ErPC3 administration resulted in significant changes in 18 F-DPA-714 tumor uptake over the course of the treatment. Immunohistochemistry revealed reduced tumor volume and increased cell death in ErPC3-treated animals accompanied by infiltration of the tumor core by CD11b-positive micro-glia/macrophages and glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrate a potent antitumor effect of ErPC3 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. PET imaging of TSPO expression using 18 F-DPA-714 allows effective monitoring and quantification of disease progression and response to ErPC3 therapy in intracranial 9L gliomas. (authors)

  12. Quantification of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT studies with 123I-labelled radioligands. A comparison between different imaging systems and data acquisition protocols using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespo, Cristina; Aguiar, Pablo; Gallego, Judith; Cot, Albert; Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domenec; Bullich, Santiago; Pareto, Deborah; Sempau, Josep; Lomena, Francisco; Calvino, Francisco; Pavia, Javier

    2008-01-01

    123 I-labelled radioligands are commonly used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the dopaminergic system to study the dopamine transporter binding. The aim of this work was to compare the quantitative capabilities of two different SPECT systems through Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The SimSET MC code was employed to generate simulated projections of a numerical phantom for two gamma cameras equipped with a parallel and a fan-beam collimator, respectively. A fully 3D iterative reconstruction algorithm was used to compensate for attenuation, the spatially variant point spread function (PSF) and scatter. A post-reconstruction partial volume effect (PVE) compensation was also developed. For both systems, the correction for all degradations and PVE compensation resulted in recovery factors of the theoretical specific uptake ratio (SUR) close to 100%. For a SUR value of 4, the recovered SUR for the parallel imaging system was 33% for a reconstruction without corrections (OSEM), 45% for a reconstruction with attenuation correction (OSEM-A), 56% for a 3D reconstruction with attenuation and PSF corrections (OSEM-AP), 68% for OSEM-AP with scatter correction (OSEM-APS) and 97% for OSEM-APS plus PVE compensation (OSEM-APSV). For the fan-beam imaging system, the recovered SUR was 41% without corrections, 55% for OSEM-A, 65% for OSEM-AP, 75% for OSEM-APS and 102% for OSEM-APSV. Our findings indicate that the correction for degradations increases the quantification accuracy, with PVE compensation playing a major role in the SUR quantification. The proposed methodology allows us to reach similar SUR values for different SPECT systems, thereby allowing a reliable standardisation in multicentric studies. (orig.)

  13. Quantification of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT studies with {sup 123}I-labelled radioligands. A comparison between different imaging systems and data acquisition protocols using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, Cristina; Aguiar, Pablo [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); Gallego, Judith [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cot, Albert [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Seccio d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Barcelona (Spain); Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domenec [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Bullich, Santiago [Hospital del Mar, Center for Imaging in Psychiatry, CRC-MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Pareto, Deborah [CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); PRBB, Institut d' Alta Tecnologia, Barcelona (Spain); Sempau, Josep [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Lomena, Francisco [IDIBAPS, Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Calvino, Francisco [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Seccio d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Barcelona (Spain); Pavia, Javier [CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); IDIBAPS, Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled radioligands are commonly used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the dopaminergic system to study the dopamine transporter binding. The aim of this work was to compare the quantitative capabilities of two different SPECT systems through Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The SimSET MC code was employed to generate simulated projections of a numerical phantom for two gamma cameras equipped with a parallel and a fan-beam collimator, respectively. A fully 3D iterative reconstruction algorithm was used to compensate for attenuation, the spatially variant point spread function (PSF) and scatter. A post-reconstruction partial volume effect (PVE) compensation was also developed. For both systems, the correction for all degradations and PVE compensation resulted in recovery factors of the theoretical specific uptake ratio (SUR) close to 100%. For a SUR value of 4, the recovered SUR for the parallel imaging system was 33% for a reconstruction without corrections (OSEM), 45% for a reconstruction with attenuation correction (OSEM-A), 56% for a 3D reconstruction with attenuation and PSF corrections (OSEM-AP), 68% for OSEM-AP with scatter correction (OSEM-APS) and 97% for OSEM-APS plus PVE compensation (OSEM-APSV). For the fan-beam imaging system, the recovered SUR was 41% without corrections, 55% for OSEM-A, 65% for OSEM-AP, 75% for OSEM-APS and 102% for OSEM-APSV. Our findings indicate that the correction for degradations increases the quantification accuracy, with PVE compensation playing a major role in the SUR quantification. The proposed methodology allows us to reach similar SUR values for different SPECT systems, thereby allowing a reliable standardisation in multicentric studies. (orig.)

  14. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing......- and heterodimerisation, let alone oligomerisation. Theoretically, this phenomenon adds a novel series of functional megareceptors/super-receptors, with varied pharmacological profiles, to the catalogue of monomeric receptor subtypes isolated and cloned in the past. SRIF analogues include both peptides and non......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of carbon-11- and fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivatives for type 2 cannabinoid receptor positron emission tomography imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evens, Nele [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Muccioli, Giulio G. [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, U.C. Louvain, 1200 Bruxelles (Belgium); Houbrechts, Nele [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Lambert, Didier M. [Unite de Chimie Pharmaceutique et de Radiopharmacie, U.C. Louvain, 1200 Bruxelles (Belgium); Verbruggen, Alfons M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Van Laere, Koen [Division of Nuclear Medicine, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Bormans, Guy M. [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, K.U. Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: guy.bormans@pharm.kuleuven.be

    2009-05-15

    Introduction: The type 2 cannabinoid (CB{sub 2}) receptor is part of the endocannabinoid system and has been suggested as a mediator of several central and peripheral inflammatory processes. Imaging of the CB{sub 2} receptor has been unsuccessful so far. We synthesized and evaluated a carbon-11- and a fluorine-18-labeled 2-oxoquinoline derivative as new PET tracers with high specificity and affinity for the CB{sub 2} receptor. Methods: Two 2-oxoquinoline derivatives were synthesized and radiolabeled with either carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Their affinity and selectivity for the human CB{sub 2} receptor were determined. Biological evaluation was done by biodistribution, radiometabolite and autoradiography studies in mice. Results: In vitro studies showed that both compounds are high affinity CB{sub 2}-specific inverse agonists. Biodistribution study of the tracers in mice showed a high in vivo initial brain uptake and fast brain washout, in accordance with the low CB{sub 2} receptor expression levels in normal brain. A persistently high in vivo binding to the spleen was observed, which was inhibited by pretreatment with two structurally unrelated CB{sub 2} selective inverse agonists. In vitro autoradiography studies with the radioligands confirmed CB{sub 2}-specific binding to the mouse spleen. Conclusion: We synthesized two novel CB{sub 2} receptor PET tracers that show high affinity/selectivity for CB{sub 2} receptors. Both tracers show favourable characteristics as radioligands for central and peripheral in vivo visualization of the CB{sub 2} receptor and are promising candidates for primate and human CB{sub 2} PET imaging.

  16. Affinities and densities of high-affinity [3H]muscimol (GABA-A) binding sites and of central benzodiazepine receptors are unchanged in autopsied brain tissue from cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, R.F.; Lavoie, J.; Giguere, J.F.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    1988-01-01

    The integrity of GABA-A receptors and of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated in membrane preparations from prefrontal cortex and caudate nuclei obtained at autopsy from nine cirrhotic patients who died in hepatic coma and an equal number of age-matched control subjects. Histopathological studies revealed Alzheimer Type II astrocytosis in all cases in the cirrhotic group; controls were free from neurological, psychiatric or hepatic diseases. Binding to GABA-A receptors was studied using [ 3 H]muscimol as radioligand. The integrity of central benzodiazepine receptors was evaluated using [ 3 H]flunitrazepam and [ 3 H]Ro15-1788. Data from saturation binding assays was analyzed by Scatchard plot. No modifications of either affinities (Kd) or densities (Bmax) of [ 3 H]muscimol of central benzodiazepine binding sites were observed. These findings do not support recent suggestions that alterations of either high-affinity GABA or benzodiazepine receptors play a significant role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy

  17. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [11C]Cimbi-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Svarer, Claus; McMahon, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    BPNDs measured with [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin (mean Pearson's r: 0.95 ± 0.04) suggesting similar cortical binding of the radioligands. Relatively higher binding with [(11)C]Cimbi-36 as compared to [(18)F]altanserin was found in the choroid plexus and hippocampus in the human brain......INTRODUCTION: [(11)C]Cimbi-36 is a recently developed serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand that has been successfully applied for human neuroimaging. Here, we investigate the test-retest variability of cerebral [(11)C]Cimbi-36 PET and compare [(11)C...... test-retest variability in [(11)C]Cimbi-36 binding measures, and another eight were scanned after a bolus plus constant infusion with [(18)F]altanserin. Regional differences in the brain distribution of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin were assessed with a correlation of regional binding measures...

  18. Deoxycholic acid conjugates are muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre; Chen, Ying; Zimniak, Piotr; Cheng, Kunrong

    2002-08-01

    In the course of examining the actions of major human bile acids on cholinergic receptors, we discovered that conjugates of lithocholic acid are partial muscarinic agonists. In the present communication, we report that conjugates of deoxycholic acid (DC) act as cholinergic muscarinic receptor antagonists. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing rat M3-muscarinic receptors were used to test bile acids for inhibition of radioligand [N- (3)H-methylscopolamine ((3)H-NMS)] binding; alteration of inositol phosphate (IP) formation; mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation and cell toxicity. We observed approximately 18.8, 30.3 and 37.1% inhibition of (3)H-NMS binding with DC and its glycine (DCG) and taurine (DCT) conjugates, respectively (all 100 micromol/l, p exclusion or lactate dehydrogenase release from CHO-M3 cells. We observed the following rank order of potency (IC(50) micromol/l) for inhibition of (3)H-NMS by muscarinic antagonists and bile acids: NMS (0.0004) > 4-DAMP (0.009) > atropine (0.012) > DCT (170) > DCG (250). None of the bile acids tested were hydrolyzed by recombinant cholinesterase. At concentrations achieved in human bile, DC derivatives are natural muscarinic antagonists. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Discovery of Novel Proline-Based Neuropeptide FF Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Decker, Ann M; Langston, Tiffany L; Mathews, Kelly M; Siemian, Justin N; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Runyon, Scott P; Zhang, Yanan

    2017-10-18

    The neuropeptide FF (NPFF) system has been implicated in a number of physiological processes including modulating the pharmacological activity of opioid analgesics and several other classes of drugs of abuse. In this study, we report the discovery of a novel proline scaffold with antagonistic activity at the NPFF receptors through a high throughput screening campaign using a functional calcium mobilization assay. Focused structure-activity relationship studies on the initial hit 1 have resulted in several analogs with calcium mobilization potencies in the submicromolar range and modest selectivity for the NPFF1 receptor. Affinities and potencies of these compounds were confirmed in radioligand binding and functional cAMP assays. Two compounds, 16 and 33, had good solubility and blood-brain barrier permeability that fall within the range of CNS permeant candidates without the liability of being a P-glycoprotein substrate. Finally, both compounds reversed fentanyl-induced hyperalgesia in rats when administered intraperitoneally. Together, these results point to the potential of these proline analogs as promising NPFF receptor antagonists.

  20. Molecular interactions between general anesthetics and the 5HT2B receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Felipe; Gao, Lu; Huang, Xi-Ping; Saven, Jeffery G; Roth, Bryan L; Liu, Renyu

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin modulates many processes through a family of seven serotonin receptors. However, no studies have screened for interactions between general anesthetics currently in clinical use and serotonergic G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Given that both intravenous and inhalational anesthetics have been shown to target other classes of GPCRs, we hypothesized that general anesthetics might interact directly with some serotonin receptors and thus modify their function. Radioligand binding assays were performed to screen serotonin receptors for interactions with propofol and isoflurane as well as for affinity determinations. Docking calculations using the crystal structure of 5-HT2B were performed to computationally confirm the binding assay results and locate anesthetic binding sites. The 5-HT2B class of receptors interacted significantly with both propofol and isoflurane in the primary screen. The affinities for isoflurane and propofol were determined to be 7.78 and .95 μM, respectively, which were at or below the clinical concentrations for both anesthetics. The estimated free energy derived from docking calculations for propofol (-6.70 kcal/mol) and isoflurane (-5.10 kcal/mol) correlated with affinities from the binding assay. The anesthetics were predicted to dock at a pharmacologically relevant binding site of 5HT2B. The molecular interactions between propofol and isoflurane with the 5-HT2B class of receptors were discovered and characterized. This finding implicates the serotonergic GPCRs as potential anesthetic targets.

  1. Prostaglandin E/sub 2/ localization and receptor identification within the developing murine secondary palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    1986-01-01

    Transient elevations in murine secondary palatal adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) levels occur during palate ontogeny. Since palatal processes exposed to dibutyryl cAMP differentiate precociously, increases in palatal cAMP levels are of interest. Prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/), which is synthesized by murine embryonic palate mesenchyme cells (MEPM), regulates cAMP levels in adult tissues via specific membrane bound receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Therefore, a PGE/sub 2/ receptor-adenylate cyclase systems was proposed in the developing murine secondary palate. Utilizing a radioligand binding assay, it was determined that murine palatal tissue on day 13 of gestation contained PGE/sub 2/ receptors that were saturable, of high affinity and low capacity. Specific (/sup 3/H)-PGE/sub 2/ binding was reversible by 30 min. The order of prostanoid binding affinity at specific PGE/sub 2/ binding sites was E/sub 2/ > F/sub 2//sub ..cap alpha../ > A/sub 2/ > E/sub 1/ = D/sub 2/ indicating specificity of the receptor for PGE/sub 2/. The ability of MEPM cells to respond to PGE/sub 2/ with dose-dependent accumulations of intracellular cAMP demonstrated the functional nature of these binding sites. Analysis of palatal PGE/sub 2/ receptor characteristics on days 12 and 14 of palate development indicated temporal alterations in receptor affinity and density during palate ontogeny.

  2. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  3. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  4. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of the dog P2X7 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, S; Cusdin, F S; Fonfria, E; Goodwin, J A; Reeves, J; Lappin, S C; Chambers, L; Walter, D S; Clay, W C; Michel, A D

    2009-11-01

    Human and rodent P2X7 receptors exhibit differences in their sensitivity to antagonists. In this study we have cloned and characterized the dog P2X7 receptor to determine if its antagonist sensitivity more closely resembles the human or rodent orthologues. A cDNA encoding the dog P2X7 receptor was isolated from a dog heart cDNA library, expressed in U-2 OS cells using the BacMam viral expression system and characterized in electrophysiological, ethidium accumulation and radioligand binding studies. Native P2X7 receptors were examined by measuring ATP-stimulated interleukin-1beta release in dog and human whole blood. The dog P2X7 receptor was 595 amino acids long and exhibited high homology (>70%) to the human and rodent orthologues although it contained an additional threonine at position 284 and an amino acid deletion at position 538. ATP possessed low millimolar potency at dog P2X7 receptors. 2'-&3'-O-(4benzoylbenzoyl) ATP had slightly higher potency but was a partial agonist. Dog P2X7 receptors possessed relatively high affinity for a number of selective antagonists of the human P2X7 receptor although there were some differences in potency between the species. Compound affinities in human and dog blood exhibited a similar rank order of potency as observed in studies on the recombinant receptor although absolute potency was considerably lower. Dog recombinant and native P2X7 receptors display a number of pharmacological similarities to the human P2X7 receptor. Thus, dog may be a suitable species for assessing target-related toxicity of antagonists intended for evaluation in the clinic.

  5. Stability of the neurotensin receptor NTS1 free in detergent solution and immobilized to affinity resin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim F White

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Purification of recombinant membrane receptors is commonly achieved by use of an affinity tag followed by an additional chromatography step if required. This second step may exploit specific receptor properties such as ligand binding. However, the effects of multiple purification steps on protein yield and integrity are often poorly documented. We have previously reported a robust two-step purification procedure for the recombinant rat neurotensin receptor NTS1 to give milligram quantities of functional receptor protein. First, histidine-tagged receptors are enriched by immobilized metal affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA resin. Second, remaining contaminants in the Ni-NTA column eluate are removed by use of a subsequent neurotensin column yielding pure NTS1. Whilst the neurotensin column eluate contained functional receptor protein, we observed in the neurotensin column flow-through misfolded NTS1.To investigate the origin of the misfolded receptors, we estimated the amount of functional and misfolded NTS1 at each purification step by radio-ligand binding, densitometry of Coomassie stained SDS-gels, and protein content determination. First, we observed that correctly folded NTS1 suffers damage by exposure to detergent and various buffer compositions as seen by the loss of [(3H]neurotensin binding over time. Second, exposure to the neurotensin affinity resin generated additional misfolded receptor protein.Our data point towards two ways by which misfolded NTS1 may be generated: Damage by exposure to buffer components and by close contact of the receptor to the neurotensin affinity resin. Because NTS1 in detergent solution is stabilized by neurotensin, we speculate that the occurrence of aggregated receptor after contact with the neurotensin resin is the consequence of perturbations in the detergent belt surrounding the NTS1 transmembrane core. Both effects reduce the yield of functional receptor protein.

  6. Kinetic properties of 'dual' orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Elizabeth Callander

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various ‘dual’ orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [3H]-BBAC ((S-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthioacetylpyrrolidine-2-carboxamide. In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-ylmethyl-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in both binding and / or functional assays. Overall, the dual antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the dual antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo.

  7. In vitro and in vivo characterisation of nor-β-CIT: a potential radioligand for visualisation of the serotonin transporter in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, K.A.; Halldin, C.; Hall, H.; Lundkvist, C.; Ginovart, N.; Swahn, C.G.; Farde, L.

    1997-01-01

    Radiolabelled 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane (β-CIT) has been used in clinical studies for the imaging of dopamine and serotonin transporters with single-photon emission tomography (SPET). 2β-Carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (nor-β-CIT) is a des-methyl analogue of β-CIT, which in vitro has tenfold higher affinity (IC 50 =0.36 nM) to the serotonin transporter than β-CIT (IC 50 =4.2 nM). Nor-β-CIT may thus be a useful radioligand for imaging of the serotonin transporter. In the present study iodine-125 and carbon-11 labelled nor-β-CIT were prepared for in vitro autoradiographic studies on post-mortem human brain cryosections and for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) studies in Cynomolgus monkeys. Whole hemisphere autoradiography with [ 125 I[nor-β-CIT demonstrated high binding in the striatum, the thalamus and cortical regions of the human brain. Addition of a high concentration (1 μM) of citalopram inhibited binding in the thalamus and the neocortex, but not in the striatum. In PET studies with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT there was rapid uptake of radioactivity in the monkey brain (6% of injected dose at 15 min) and high accumulation of radioactivity in the striatum, thalamus and neocortex. Thalamus to cerebellum and cortex to cerebellum ratios were 2.5 and 1.8 at 60 min, respectively. The ratios obtained with [ 11 C[nor-β-CIT were 20%-40% higher than those previously obtained with [ 11 C[β-CIT. Radioactivity in the thalamus and the neocortex but not in the striatum was displaceable with citalopram (5 mg/kg). In conclusion, nor-β-CIT binds to the serotonin transporter in the primate brain in vitro and in vivo and has potential for PET and SPET imaging of the serotonin transporter in human brain. (orig.). With 4 figs

  8. Characterization of [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 as a PET radioligand for phosphodiesterase 10A in the nonhuman primate brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kai-Chun; Stepanov, Vladimir; Amini, Nahid; Martinsson, Stefan; Takano, Akihiro; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Nielsen, Jacob [H. Lundbeck A/S, Synaptic Transmission, Valby (Denmark); Bundgaard, Christoffer; Bang-Andersen, Benny [H. Lundbeck A/S, Discovery Chemistry and DMPK, Valby (Denmark); Grimwood, Sarah [Pfizer Inc., Neuroscience and Pain Research Unit, Cambridge, MA (United States); Farde, Lars [Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); AstraZeneca PET Science Center at Karolinska Institutet, Personalized Health Care and Biomarkers, Stockholm (Sweden); Finnema, Sjoerd J. [Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Yale University, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-02-15

    [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 is a positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand that has recently been validated for examining phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) in the human striatum. [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 has high affinity for PDE10A (IC{sub 50} = 0.39 nM) and may also be suitable for examination of the substantia nigra, a region with low density of PDE10A. Here, we report characterization of regional [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 binding to PDE10A in the nonhuman primate (NHP) brain. A total of 11 PET measurements, seven baseline and four following pretreatment with unlabeled Lu AE92686 or the structurally unrelated PDE10A inhibitor MP-10, were performed in five NHPs using a high resolution research tomograph (HRRT). [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 binding was quantified using a radiometabolite-corrected arterial input function and compartmental and graphical modeling approaches. Regional time-activity curves were best described with the two-tissue compartment model (2TCM). However, the distribution volume (V{sub T}) values for all regions were obtained by the Logan plot analysis, as reliable cerebellar V{sub T} values could not be derived by the 2TCM. For cerebellum, a proposed reference region, V{sub T} values increased by ∝30 % with increasing PET measurement duration from 63 to 123 min, while V{sub T} values in target regions remained stable. Both pretreatment drugs significantly decreased [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 binding in target regions, while no significant effect on cerebellum was observed. Binding potential (BP{sub ND}) values, derived with the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM), were 13-17 in putamen and 3-5 in substantia nigra and correlated well to values from the Logan plot analysis. The method proposed for quantification of [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 binding in applied studies in NHP is based on 63 min PET data and SRTM with cerebellum as a reference region. The study supports that [{sup 11}C]Lu AE92686 can be used for PET examinations of PDE10A binding also in substantia

  9. Prediction of the Clinical SUV Ratio in Amyloid PET Imaging Using a Biomathematic Modeling Approach Toward the Efficient Development of a Radioligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Yuma; Nai, YingHwey; Shidahara, Miho; Furumoto, Shozo; Seki, Chie; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Tashiro, Manabu; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Gonda, Kohsuke; Watabe, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    Our study aimed to develop a method to mathematically predict the kinetic parameters K 1 (influx rate constant), k 2 (efflux rate constant), and BP ND (nondisplaceable binding potential) of amyloid PET tracers and obtain SUV ratios (SUVRs) from predicted time-activity curves of target and reference regions. Methods: We investigated 10 clinically applied amyloid PET radioligands: 11 C-Pittsburgh compound B, 11 C-BF-227, 11 C-AZD2184, 11 C-SB-13, 18 F-FACT, 18 F-florbetapir, 18 F-florbetaben, 18 F-flutemetamol, 18 F-FDDNP, and 18 F-AZD4694. For each tracer, time-activity curves of both target and reference regions were generated using a simplified 1-tissue-compartment model, with an arterial plasma input function and the predicted kinetic parameters. K 1 , k 2 , and BP ND were derived from the lipophilicity (log P ), apparent volume, free fraction in plasma, free fraction in tissue, dissociation constant, and density of amyloid β using biomathematic modeling. Density was fixed at 3 nM to represent healthy control conditions and 50 nM to represent severe Alzheimer disease (AD). Predicted SUVRs for the healthy and AD groups were then obtained by dividing the integrated time-activity curve of the target region by that of the reference region. To validate the presented method, the predicted K 1 , k 2 , BP ND , and SUVR for the healthy and AD groups were compared with the respective clinically observed values. Results: The correlation between predicted and clinical kinetic parameters had an R 2 value of 0.73 for K 1 in the healthy group, 0.71 for K 1 in the AD group, 0.81 for k 2 in the healthy group, 0.85 for k 2 in the AD group, and 0.63 for BP ND in the AD group. The regression relationship between the predicted SUVR ( y ) and the clinical SUVR ( x ) for the healthy and the AD groups was y = 2.73 x - 2.11 ( R 2 = 0.72). Conclusion: The proposed method showed a good correlation between predicted and clinical SUVR for the 10 clinically applied amyloid tracers. © 2017

  10. Measurement of the {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand 2-[{sup 18}F]Fluoro-A-85380 and its metabolites in human blood during PET investigation: a methodological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorger, Dietlind [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany)]. E-mail: sord@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Becker, Georg A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Patt, Marianne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Schildan, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Grossmann, Udo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Schliebs, Reinhard [Paul Flechsig Institute of Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04109 (Germany); Seese, Anita [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Kendziorra, Kai [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Kluge, Magnus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany); Brust, Peter [Institute of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research of the University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04318 (Germany); Mukhin, Alexey G. [Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 (United States); Sabri, Osama [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig, 04103 (Germany)

    2007-04-15

    2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (2-[{sup 18}F]FA) is a new radioligand for noninvasive imaging of {alpha}4{beta}2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by positron emission tomography (PET) in human brain. In most cases, quantification of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA receptor binding involves measurement of free nonmetabolized radioligand concentration in blood. This requires an efficient and reliable method to separate radioactive metabolites from the parent compound. In the present study, three analytical methods, thin layer chromatography (TLC), high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and solid phase extraction (SPE) have been tested. Reversed-phase TLC of deproteinized aqueous samples of plasma provides good estimates of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA and its metabolites. However, because of the decreased radioactivity in plasma samples, this method can be used in humans over the first 2 h after radioligand injection only. Reliable quantification of the parent radioligand and its main metabolites was obtained using reversed-phase HPLC, followed by counting of eluted fractions in a well gamma counter. Three main and five minor metabolites of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA were detected in human blood using this method. On average, the unchanged 2-[{sup 18}F]FA fraction in plasma of healthy volunteers measured at 14, 60, 120, 240 and 420 min after radioligand injection was 87.3{+-}2.2%, 74.4{+-}3%, 68.8{+-}5%, 62.3{+-}8% and 61.0{+-}8%, respectively. In patients with neurodegenerative disorders, the values corresponding to the three last time points were significantly lower. The fraction of nonmetabolized 2-[{sup 18}F]FA in plasma determined using SPE did not differ significantly from that obtained by HPLC (+gamma counting) (n=73, r=.95). Since SPE is less time-consuming than HPLC and provides comparable results, we conclude that SPE appears to be the most suitable method for measurement of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA parent fraction during PET investigations.

  11. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine; Erritzoe, David; Baaré, William F C; Svarer, Claus; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-04-15

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy subjects (20-45 years, 8 males) using the simplified reference tissue model. We tested within our population the effect of age and other demographic factors on the endpoint. In seven subjects, we tested the vulnerability of radioligand binding to a pharmacolological challenge with citalopram, which is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B(max) was in accordance with post-mortem brain studies (Spearman's r=0.83, p=0.04), and the regional binding potentials, BP(ND), were on average 2.6 in striatum, 0.42 in prefrontal cortex, and 0.91 in hippocampus. We found no effect of sex but a decreased binding with age (p=0.046). A power analysis showed that, given the low inter-and intrasubject variation, use of the present method will enable detection of a 15% difference in striatum with only 7-13 subjects in a 2-sample test and with only 4-5 subjects in a paired test. The citalopram challenge did not discernibly alter [(11)C]SB207145 binding. In conclusion, the 5-HT(4) receptor binding in human brain can be reliably assessed with [(11)C]SB207145, which is encouraging for future PET studies of drug occupancy or patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dopamine D2-receptor imaging with 123I-iodobenzamide SPECT in migraine patients abusing ergotamine: does ergotamine cross the blood brain barrier?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verhoeff, N.P.; Visser, W.H.; Ferrari, M.D.; Saxena, P.R.; Royen, E.A. van

    1993-01-01

    Two migraine patients were studied by in vivo SPECT using the dopamine D2-receptor specific radioligand 123 I-3-iodo-6-methoxybenzamide ( 123 I-IBZM) during ergotamine abuse and after withdrawal. Results were compared with 15 healthy controls. Striatum/cerebellum and striatum/occipital cortex ratios of count rate density were calculated as a semiquantitative measurement for striatal dopamine D2-receptor binding potential. No differences were found in striatal uptake of 123 I-IBZM between healthy controls and the patients when on or off ergotamine. Preliminary evidence suggests that ergotamine may not occupy striatal dopamine D2-receptors to a large extent and thus may not cross the blood brain barrier in large quantities. 23 refs., 3 figs

  13. Synthesis and structure-activity relationships of 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane ligands, potent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Jennifer M; Bunnelle, William H; Tietje, Karin R; Anderson, David J; Rueter, Lynne E; Curzon, Peter; Surowy, Carol S; Ji, Jianquo; Daanen, Jerome F; Kohlhaas, Kathy L; Buckley, Michael J; Henry, Rodger F; Dyhring, Tino; Ahring, Philip K; Meyer, Michael D

    2006-12-28

    A series of potent neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) ligands based on a 3,8-diazabicyclo[4.2.0]octane core have been synthesized and evaluated for affinity and agonist efficacy at the human high affinity nicotine recognition site (halpha4beta2) and in a rat model of persistent nociceptive pain (formalin model). Numerous analogs in this series exhibit picomolar affinity in radioligand binding assays and nanomolar agonist potency in functional assays, placing them among the most potent nAChR ligands known for the halpha4beta2 receptor. Several of the compounds reported in this study (i.e., 24, 25, 28, 30, 32, and 47) exhibit equivalent or greater affinity for the halpha4beta2 receptor relative to epibatidine, and like epibatidine, many exhibit robust analgesic efficacy in the rat formalin model of persistent pain.

  14. Resolution, configurational assignment, and enantiopharmacology at glutamate receptors of 2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) and demethyl-ACPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Stensbøl, T B; Nielsen, B

    2001-01-01

    We have previously described (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) as a potent agonist at the (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptor subtype of (S)-glutamic acid (Glu) receptors. We now report the chromatographic resolution...... of ACPA and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-carboxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (demethyl-ACPA) using a Sumichiral OA-5000 column. The configuration of the enantiomers of both compounds have been assigned based on X-ray crystallographic analyses, supported by circular dichroism spectra and elution orders on chiral HPLC...... columns. Furthermore, the enantiopharmacology of ACPA and demethyl-ACPA was investigated using radioligand binding and cortical wedge electrophysiological assay systems and cloned metabotropic Glu receptors. (S)-ACPA showed high affinity in AMPA binding (IC(50) = 0.025 microM), low affinity in kainic acid...

  15. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  16. New quinoline derivatives as nicotinic receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetti, Dina; Bellucci, Cristina; Dei, Silvia; Teodori, Elisabetta; Varani, Katia; Spirova, Ekaterina; Kudryavtsev, Denis; Shelukhina, Irina; Tsetlin, Victor; Romanelli, Maria Novella

    2016-03-03

    As a continuation of previous work on quinoline derivatives, which showed some preference (2-3 times) for the α7 with respect to α4β2 acetylcholine nicotinic receptors (nAChRs), we synthesized a series of novel azabicyclic or diazabicyclic compounds carrying a quinoline or isoquinoline ring, with the aim of searching for more selective α7 nAChR compounds. Radioligand binding studies on α7* and α4β2* nAChRs (rat brain homogenate) revealed one compound (7) with a 2-fold higher affinity for the α4β2*-subtype, and four compounds (11, 13, 14 and 16) with at least 3-fold higher affinity for α7* nAChR. The most promising was 11, showing Ki∼100 nM and over 10-fold selectivity for α7* nAChR. Compounds 7, 11, 13 and 16 at 50 μM suppressed ion currents induced in the rat α4β2 nAChR and the chimeric nAChR composed of the ligand-binding domain of the chick α7 and transmembrane domain of the α1 glycine receptor, expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Calcium imaging experiments on the human α7 nAChR expressed in the Neuro2a cells and potentiated by PNU-120596 confirmed the antagonistic activity for 7; on the contrary, 11, 13 and 16 were agonists with the EC50 values in the range of 1.0-1.6 μM. Thus, the introduced modifications allowed us to enhance the selectivity of quinolines towards α7 nAChR and to get novel compounds with agonistic activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Oxytocin and vasopressin: distinct receptors in myometrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, G.; Balestre, M.N.; Roberts, J.M.; Bottari, S.P.

    1987-06-01

    The binding characteristics of (/sup 3/H)oxytocin (( /sup 3/H)OT) and (/sup 3/H)lysine vasopressin (( /sup 3/H)LVP) to nonpregnant human myometrium were investigated. Binding of both radioligands was saturable, time dependent, and reversible. Whereas (/sup 3/H)OT was found to bind to a single class of sites with high affinity (Kd, 1.5 +/- 0.4 (+/- SEM) nM) and low capacity (maximum binding (Bmax), 34 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein), (/sup 3/H)LVP bound to two classes of sites, one with high affinity (Kd, 2.2 +/- 0.1 nM) and low capacity (Bmax, 198 +/- 7 fmol/mg protein) and another with low affinity (Kd, 655 +/- 209 nM) and high capacity (Bmax, 5794 +/- 1616 fmol/mg protein). The binding of the labeled peptides also displayed a marked difference in sensitivity to Mg2+ and guanine nucleotides. These differences in binding characteristics as well as the differences in potency of analogs in competing for (/sup 3/H)OT and (/sup 3/H)LVP binding indicate the presence of distinct receptors for OT and vasopressin in human myometrium. Pharmacological characterization of the high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)LVP indicated that these are of the V1 subtype. Although, as suggested by others, vasopressin and OT can bind to the same sites, the presence of distinct receptors for both peptides provides an explanation for the previously reported difference in myometrial responsiveness to OT and vasopressin.

  18. Preclinical studies on [{sup 11}C]MPDX for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kimura, Yuichi; Oda, Keiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology (Japan). Positron Medical Center; Nariai, Tadashi; Wakabayashi, Shinichi [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimada, Junichi [Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Pharmaceutical Research Inst.

    2002-09-01

    In previous in vivo studies with mice, rats and cats, we have demonstrated that [{sup 11}C]MPDX ([1-methyl-{sup 11}C]8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-methyl-3-propylxanthine) is a potential radioligand for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors of the brain by positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, we performed a preclinical study. The radiation absorbed-dose by [{sup 11}C]MPDX in humans estimated from the tissue distribution in mice was low enough for clinical use, and the acute toxicity and mutagenicity of MPDX were not found. The monkey brain was clearly visualized by PET with [{sup 11}C]MPDX. We have concluded that [{sup 11}C]MPDX is suitable for mapping adenosine A{sub 1} receptors in the human brain by PET. (author)

  19. 125I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated 125 I-iomazenil ( 125 I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of 125 I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that 125 I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p 125 I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress

  20. Anesthesia increases in vivo N-([{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl)piperidinyl benzilate binding to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilbourn, Michael R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States)]. E-mail: mkilbour@umich.edu; Ma Bing [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Butch, Elizabeth R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Quesada, Carole [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States); Sherman, Phillip S. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0552 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The in vivo binding of N-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl-piperidinyl benzilate ([{sup 18}F]FEPB) to the muscarinic cholinergic receptor was measured in awake and anesthetized rats. Studies were done using an equilibrium infusion technique to provide estimates of specific binding as distribution volume ratios. Anesthesia with either isoflurane or sodium pentobarbital produced a significant (65-90%) increase of radiotracer binding in receptor-rich brain regions (striatum, cortex, hippocampus) relative to awake controls. Pretreatment of anesthetized animals with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor phenserine produced no further increases in radioligand binding, in contrast to the large (>70%) increases previously observed in awake animals following drug treatment. These studies demonstrate that anesthesia can produce significant changes in baseline biochemical measures that can obscure even very large effects of pharmacological challenges.

  1. Novel Alexa Fluor-488 labeled antagonist of the A(2A) adenosine receptor: Application to a fluorescence polarization-based receptor binding assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskés, Miklós; Kumar, T Santhosh; Yoo, Lena; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2010-08-15

    Fluorescence polarization (FP) assay has many advantages over the traditional radioreceptor binding studies. We developed an A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) FP assay using a newly synthesized fluorescent antagonist of the A(2A)AR (MRS5346), a pyrazolo[4,3-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidin-5-amine derivative conjugated to the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor-488. MRS5346 displayed a K(i) value of 111+/-16nM in radioligand binding using [(3)H]CGS21680 and membranes prepared from HEK293 cells stably expressing the human A(2A)AR. In a cyclic AMP functional assay, MRS5346 was shown to be an A(2A)AR antagonist. MRS5346 did not show any effect on A(1) and A(3) ARs in binding or the A(2B)AR in a cyclic AMP assay at 10microM. Its suitability as a fluorescent tracer was indicated in an initial observation of an FP signal following A(2A)AR binding. The FP signal was optimal with 20nM MRS5346 and 150microg protein/mL HEK293 membranes. The association and dissociation kinetic parameters were readily determined using this FP assay. The K(d) value of MRS5346 calculated from kinetic parameters was 16.5+/-4.7nM. In FP competition binding experiments using MRS5346 as a tracer, K(i) values of known AR agonists and antagonists consistently agreed with K(i) values from radioligand binding. Thus, this FP assay, which eliminates using radioisotopes, appears to be appropriate for both routine receptor binding and high-throughput screening with respect to speed of analysis, displaceable signal and precision. The approach used in the present study could be generally applicable to other GPCRs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Synthesis and binding characteristics of N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-[{sup 125}I]-iodophenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261): a potential SPECT agent for imaging NMDA receptor activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, Jonathan E-mail: j.owens@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Tebbutt, Andrew A.; McGregor, Ailsa L.; Kodama, K.; Magar, Sharad S.; Perlman, Michael E.; Robins, David J.; Durant, Graham J.; McCulloch, James

    2000-06-01

    N-(1-Naphthyl)-N'-(3-[{sup 125}I]-iodophenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261) was synthesized as a potential radioligand to image N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. [{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261 was prepared by radioiodination of N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-tributylstannylphenyl)-N'-methylguanidine using Na{sup 125}I and peracetic acid. [{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261 uptake in vivo reflected NMDA receptor distribution in normal rat brain, whereas in ischemic rat brain, uptake was markedly increased in areas of NMDA receptor activation. Radiolabeled CNS 1261 appears to be a good candidate for further development as a single photon emission computed tomography tracer in the investigation of NMDA receptor activation in cerebral ischemia.

  3. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S; Kanui, Titus I; Abelson, Klas S P

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1-5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies with [(3)H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg/kg in the formalin test. Administration of 50 mg/kg VU0152100 resulted in a non-significant tendency towards antinociception. The antinociceptive effects were reversed by the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist atropine. Binding studies indicated presence of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors with a radioligand affinity comparable to that reported in mice. In conclusion, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes are present in the naked mole-rat and contribute to antinociception in the naked mole-rat.

  4. Selective down-regulation of α4β2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain of uremic rats with cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesta, Juan J; del Pozo, Carlos; Castelló-Banyuls, Juan; Faura, Clara C

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in patients with chronic kidney disease. Brain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors modulate cognitive functions, such as learning and memory. Pharmacological cholinergic enhancement is useful in patients with cognitive dysfunction. The major nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes in the brain are heteromeric α4β2 and homomeric α7 receptors. To study the involvement of neuronal acetylcholine receptors in cognitive impairment in uremic rats, bilateral nephrectomy was performed. 24 weeks after nephrectomy, memory was assessed using the one trial step-down inhibitory avoidance test. Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain were studied by radioligand binding, immunoprecipitation, Western blot and sucrose gradient experiments. We demonstrated that rats with severe renal failure show disorders of short term memory. Long term memory was not altered in these rats. The number of functional α4β2 heteromeric neuronal nicotinic receptors was decreased in the brains of rats with severe renal failure. There was a significant correlation between the degree of renal impairment and the number of heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain. The down-regulation of functional α4β2 receptors in the brains of rats with severe renal failure was not due to a reduction of α4 or β2 subunit proteins. The number of α7 homomeric neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors was not altered. These findings may have important clinical significance for the management of cognitive impairment in patients with chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. α- and β-adrenergic receptors in proximal tubules of rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Fortin, T.L.; Kelvie, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    Proximal tubules were isolated from the rat kidney by collagenase digestion of the cortical tissue followed by Percoll gradient centrifugation. Microscopic and hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity studies proved the purity of the preparation. [ 3 H]Prazosin, [ 3 H]rauwolscine, and [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol were used to identify and quantitate respectively the α 1 -, α 2 - and β-adrenergic receptors. Proximal tubular (F 4 ) particulate fraction was compared against other cortical nephron segment (F 1 ,F 2 ) fractions and the total collagenase-digested cortex particulate suspension (F t ). Proximal tubules were enriched in α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptors compared with. The fractions enriched in glomeruli and distal tubular segments had relatively low concentrations of α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptors. Isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities in the different fractions corroborated well with the pattern suggested by the [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol binding studies. The results suggest that whole-cortex preparation radioligand binding studies may reflect proximal tubular α 1 - and α 2 -adrenergic receptor changes quite well. They may, however, miss or give erroneous impressions about β-adrenergic receptor changes occurring in different cortical nephron segments

  6. Improved delineation of human dopamine receptors using [18F]-N-methylspiroperidol and PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, C.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Shiue, C.Y.; Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Christman, D.R.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    The brain uptake of [18F]-N-methylspiroperidol, a butyrophenone neuroleptic with high selectivity for the dopamine receptor, has been measured in three normal human volunteers using positron emission tomography for times up to 12 hr postinjection. These studies demonstrated two unique findings concerning the in vivo distribution of this neuroleptic: (a) it is tightly bound to dopamine D-2 receptors in the caudate-putamen brain regions, and (b) these regions are the only large brain structures which exhibit appreciable long-term retention. In addition, radioactivity clears rapidly from plasma, and the percentage of unchanged [18F]-N-methylspiroperidol in plasma declines rapidly. These results suggest that this compound binds irreversibly to dopamine D-2 receptors, and that there are few if any dopamine D-2 receptors in the human frontal cortex. These studies emphasize not only the importance of characterizing neurotransmitter receptors in living human brain using a ligand labeled with a positron emitting nuclide of sufficiently long half-life to allow monitoring of brain radioactivity distribution for several hours after the injection of radioligand, but also of accurately determining the amount of unchanged tracer in plasma for tracer kinetic modeling

  7. Hemin inhibits internalization of transferrin by reticulocytes and promotes phosphorylation of the membrane transferrin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, T.M.; O'Donnell, M.W.; Aisen, P.; London, I.M.

    1985-01-01

    Addition of hemin to reticulocytes inhibits incorporation of iron from transferrin. Heme also regulates protein synthesis in immature erythroid cells through its effects on phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF-2. The authors have examined its effects on endocytosis of iron-transferrin and phosphorylation of the transferrin receptor. Hemin reduced iron transport but increased cell-associated transferrin. During uptake of 125 I-labeled transferrin in the steady state, the use of a washing technique to dissociate bound transferrin on the cell membrane showed that radioligand accumulated on the surface of hemin-treated cells. Receptor phosphorylation was investigated by immunoprecipitation of reticulocyte extracts after metabolic labeling with [ 32 P]P/sub i/. In the absence of ligand, phosphorylated receptor was chiefly localized on cell stroma. Exposure to transferrin increased cytosolic phosphorylated receptor from 15-30% to approximately 50% of the total, an effect overcome by hemin treatment. The findings suggest a possible relationship of phosphorylation to endocytosis of the transferrin receptor in reticulocytes

  8. Neurochemical, pharmacological, and developmental studies on cerebellar receptors for dicarboxylic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, N.A.; Roberts, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding of L-[ 3 H]glutamate ([ 3 H]Glu) and L[ 3 H]Asp) to cerebellar membranes represented a time-, temperature-, pH- and protein-dependent interaction which was both saturable and reversible. Binding sites for both radioligands appeared maximally enriched in synaptosomal fractions isolated by gradient centrifugation. Kinetically derived dissociation constant (K/sub off//K/sub on/ . K/sub d/) for [ 3 H]Glu binding to this fraction indicated high-affinity (433 nM). Competition experiments employing analogs of excitatory amino acids, including new antagonists, helped identify binding sites for [ 3 H]Glu and [ 3 H]Asp as receptors with differential pharmacological specificities. Membrane freezing reduced numbers of both receptor types, but binding activity could be recovered partially by incubation at 37 degrees C. Glu receptors exhibited a pronounced deleterious sensitivity to thiol modifying reagents and L-Glu (50-1000 microM) provided protection against these compounds during co-incubation with cerebellar membranes. It is suggested that cold storage may induce partially reversible receptor inactivation by promoting sulfhydryl group/bond modification. Rat cerebellar glutamatergic function (endogenous Glu content, Glu uptake and receptor sites) exhibited an apparent ontogenetic peak between days 8-12 postpartum with a plateauing profile from day 30 to adulthood. The accelerated development (days 8-12) coincides with the first demonstrable Glu release and kainic acid neurotoxicity, as described previously

  9. Changes in 5-HT2A receptor expression in untreated, de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melse, Maartje; Tan, Sonny K H; Temel, Yasin; van Kroonenburgh, Marinus J P G; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been implied in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor is associated with the regulation of motor function and mood. To assess regional 5-HT2A receptor expression in unmedicated patients with de novo PD. Eight de novo, drug naïve patients with PD and eight healthy control subjects underwent a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan with the highly selective 5-HT2A radioligand 123I-5-I-R91150. In de novo PD patients 5-HT2A receptor binding was significantly reduced in the anterior striatum and the premotor cortex in PD patients compared to controls. In addition, occipital binding was elevated in PD patients. No changes in 5-HT2A receptor binding were found in the prefrontal and parietal cortex. In de novo PD patients, 5-HT2A receptor expression is changed in key areas of the basal ganglia-thalamocortical motor circuit and occipital cortex. This suggests altered 5-HT neurotransmission to contribute to development of PD motor and non-motor symptoms.

  10. Identification of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in chicken pineal gland using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bylund, D.B.; Rudeen, P.K.; Petterborg, L.J.; Ray-Prenger, C.

    1988-07-01

    The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of avian pineal N-acetyltransferase activity appears to be mediated by alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. In this study, alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the chicken pineal gland were directly identified by radioligand binding. Membrane preparations of pineal glands from chickens from 1 to 6 weeks of age were examined using (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, to characterize the binding sites. The results indicate no ontological change in either the affinity (KD) or density of receptor binding sites (Bmax) during the time span examined. The binding was saturable and of high affinity with a mean KD of 0.27 +/- 0.01 nM and a mean Bmax of 242 +/- 12 fmol/mg protein. Further characterization of these binding sites indicated that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor is of the alpha 2A subtype, since prazosin and ARC-239 bound with low affinities and oxymetazoline bound with high affinity.

  11. (+)Lysergic acid diethylamide, but not its nonhallucinogenic congeners, is a potent serotonin 5HT1C receptor agonist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, K.D.; Breeding, M.; Sanders-Bush, E.

    1991-01-01

    Activation of central serotonin 5HT2 receptors is believed to be the primary mechanism whereby lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and other hallucinogens induce psychoactive effects. This hypothesis is based on extensive radioligand binding and electrophysiological and behavioral studies in laboratory animals. However, the pharmacological profiles of 5HT2 and 5HT1C receptors are similar, making it difficult to distinguish between effects due to activation of one or the other receptor. For this reason, it was of interest to investigate the interaction of LSD with 5HT1C receptors. Agonist-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in rat choroid plexus was used as a direct measure of 5HT1C receptor activation. (+)LSD potently stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in intact choroid plexus and in cultures of choroid plexus epithelial cells, with EC50 values of 9 and 26 nM, respectively. The effect of (+)LSD in both systems was blocked by 5HT receptor antagonists with an order of activity consistent with interaction at 5HT1C receptors. Neither (+)-2-bromo-LSD nor lisuride, two nonhallucinogenic congeners of LSD, were able to stimulate 5HT1C receptors in cultured cells or intact choroid plexus. In contrast, lisuride, like (+)LSD, is a partial agonist at 5HT2 receptors in cerebral cortex slices and in NIH 3T3 cells transfected with 5HT2 receptor cDNA. The present finding that (+)LSD, but not its nonhallucinogenic congeners, is a 5HT1C receptor agonist suggests a possible role for these receptors in mediating the psychoactive effects of LSD

  12. Autoradiography of 3H-pirenzepine and 3H-AFDX-384 in Mouse Brain Regions: Possible Insights into M1, M2, and M4 Muscarinic Receptors Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Valuskova; Vladimir Farar; Sandor Forczek; Iva Krizova; Jaromir Myslivecek

    2018-01-01

    Autoradiography helps to determine the distribution and density of muscarinic receptor (MR) binding sites in the brain. However, it relies on the selectivity of radioligands toward their target. 3H-Pirenzepine is commonly believed to label predominantly M1MR, 3H-AFDX-384 is considered as M2MR selective ligand. Here we performed series of autoradiographies with 3H-AFDX-384 (2 nM), and 3H-pirenzepine (5 nM) in WT, M1KO, M2KO, and M4KO mice to address the ligand selectivity. Labeling with 3H-pir...

  13. Expression of dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus of the rat: characterization using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores, G.; Liang, J.J.; Sierra, A.; Martinez-Fong, D.; Quirion, R.; Aceves, J.; Srivastava, L.K.

    1999-01-01

    We analysed the expression of dopamine receptor subtypes in the subthalamic nucleus by means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. We also studied, using autoradiography, all pharmacologically characterized dopamine receptors in four subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. For comparison, dopamine receptor subtypes were also evaluated in brain regions where they are more abundant and well characterized. The radioligands used were: [ 3 H]SCH-23390, [ 3 H]emonapride and [ 3 H]2-dipropylamino-7-hydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene for dopamine D 1 , D 2 and D 3 receptors, respectively; and [ 3 H]YM-09151-2 in the presence of raclopride for dopamine D 4 receptors. Finally, we also evaluated the effect of unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine injection into the medial forebrain bundle on dopamine receptor levels expressed in the ipsilateral subthalamic nucleus. The lesion was estimated by decrease in the binding of [ 3 H]WIN-35428, a specific dopamine transporter label. D 1 , D 2 and D 3 receptor messenger RNAs and binding sites were present in the subthalamic nucleus, but no messenger RNA for D 4 receptors was found, although specific binding sites for these receptors were observed. As compared to the intact side, the 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not change D 1 receptors, increased D 2 receptors, and decreased D 3 receptors and the dopamine transporter. The results suggest that postsynaptic D 1 , D 2 or D 3 receptors can mediate the effect of dopamine on subthalamic nucleus neuronal activity. D 4 receptors would mediate exclusively presynaptic effects.These results reinforce the idea that dopamine receptors in the subthalamic nucleus may play an important role in the physiology of the basal ganglia and in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  14. The effect of ZMS on brain M receptor in aged rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Mei; Hu Yaer; Zhang Wei; Xia Zongqin

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this work was to study the effect of ZMS, an active component of Yin tonic, Zhimu, on brain M 2 receptor density of aged animals and its correlation with the effect on learning/memory ability. Methods: A dual-site competitive binding assay using 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) as non selective radioligand and unlabelled Methoctramine as selective competitive agent was established for measuring M 2 receptor density in aged rats. Results: In addition to the change of total density of M receptors, the density of a subtype of M receptors, M 2 receptor in brain was significantly decreased in aged rats [(231.8 +- 115.9) fmol·mg -1 (x-bar +- s) in young rats and (97.9 +- 46.3) fmol·mg -1 in aged rats]. When the aged rats were treated with ZMS for two months, in addition to the up-regulation of total M receptors, the M 2 receptor was up-regulated significantly [being (213 +- 77) mg at a ZMS dose of 3.6 mg·kg -1 ·d - '1, and (212 +- 72) mg at a ZMS dose of 18 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 ]. When the correlation between M 2 or total M receptor densities and the learning/memory ability measured by Y-maze performance was examined with linear regression, the correlation coefficient was remarkable (0.721 and 0.505, respectively). Conclusions: ZMS has the ability of up-regulating M 2 receptor and this may be an important factor for the improvement of learning and memory by ZMS

  15. Safety Pharmacology assessment of drugs with biased 5-HT(2B) receptor agonism mediating cardiac valvulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Icilio; Guillon, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    The rhythmic opening and tightly closing of cardiac valve leaflets are cardiac cyclic events imposing to blood a unidirectional course along the vascular tree. Drugs with 5-HT2B agonism properties can seriously compromise this biological function critical for hemodynamic efficiency as their intrinsic pro-fibrotic effects can, with time, make valvular coaptation blood regurgitant. Cardiac valve anatomy, physiology and pathology as well as 5-HT2B receptor properties (coupling, effects mediated, biased agonism) are briefly exposed. Approaches to unveil 5-HT2B receptor liability of drug candidates are detailed. In silico computational models can rapidly probe molecules for chemical signatures associated with 5-HT2B receptor affinity. In vitro radioligand competition assays allow quantifying receptor binding capacity (Ki, IC50), the pharmacological nature (agonism, antagonism) of which can be ascertained from cytosolic second messenger (inositol phosphates, Ca(++), MAPK2) changes. Potencies calculated from the latter data may exhibit variability as they are dependent upon the readout measured and the experimental conditions (e.g., receptor density level of cell material expressing human 5-HT2B receptors). The in vivo valvulopathy effects of 5-HT2B receptor agonists can be assessed by echocardiographic measurements and valve histology in rats chronically treated with the candidate drug. Finally, safety margins derived from from nonclinical and clinical data are evaluated in terms of the readout, usefulness and scientific reliability. The Safety Pharmacology toolbox for detecting possible 5-HT2B receptor agonism liabilities of candidate drugs requires meticulous optimization and validation of all its (in silico, in vitro and in vivo) components to perfect its human predictability power. In particular, since 5-HT2B receptor agonism is biased in nature, the most predictive readout(s) of valvular liability should be identified and prioritized in keeping with best scientific

  16. [{sup 11}C]S.L.(25.1188), a new radioligand to study the monoamine oxidase type B with PET: preclinical characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saba, W.; Valette, H.; Peyronneau, M.A.; Bramoulle, Y.; Coulon, C.; Dolle, F.; Bottlaender, M. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, IIBM/DSV, 91 - Orsay (France); Curet, O.; George, P. [Sanofi-Aventis, 92 - Bagneux (France)

    2008-02-15

    Introduction. - Monoamine oxidase (M.A.O.) is a flavin containing enzyme, that catalyzes the oxidative deamination of various amines and neurotransmitters. Two isoforms exist, M.A.O.-A and M.A.O.-B. Variations in M.A.O. activity may be associated to human disease such as Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Few radiotracers have been developed for M.A.O. PET studies such as [{sup 11}C]deprenyl, an irreversible M.A.O.-B inhibitor. Recently an oxazolidinone derivative, S.L.- 25.1188 ((S)-5-methoxy-methyl-3-[6-(4,4,4-tri-fluoro butoxy)- benzo[d]isoxazol-3-yl]-oxazolidin-2-one), belonging to a new generation of selective and reversible M.A.O.-B inhibitors was developed and showed in vitro a high selectivity for M.A.O.B. [1]. The aim of this study was to characterize [{sup 11}C]S.L.- 25.1188 as radioligand for in vivo PET examination of M.A.O.-B. Materials and methods. - PET studies of the brain distribution were carried out in male Papio anubis baboons. Selectivity and reversibility of [{sup 11}C]S.L.-25.1188 binding for M.A.O.-B was assessed by pre-treatment or displacement experiments (30 min before and after tracer injection, respectively) using reference ligands for M.A.O.-B (deprenyl: 2 mg/kg i.v. and lazabemide: 0.5 mg/kg i.v.) or by displacement experiments using unlabelled S.L.-25.1188 (1 mg/kg, i.v., 30 min after tracer injection). Distribution volume (D.V.) was calculated using 2-tissue-compartment model. The saturable binding following pre-treatment with deprenyl was considered as the specific binding. Results. - After injection, [1{sup 1C}]S.L.-25.1188 presents a rapid phase of distribution in blood (about 5 min), followed by a elimination with T1/2 of 75 min. The Blood to plasma concentration ratio was constant during the experimentation (0.9 {+-} .04) consistent with a similar kinetic of [{sup 11}C]S.L.- 25.1188 in both blood and plasma. Metabolism analysis showed that [{sup 11}C]S.L.-25.1188 is stable in vivo. In the brain, uptake in different areas was

  17. Demonstration of pulmonary {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor binding in vivo with [{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl-fenoterol in a guinea pig model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helisch, A.; Schirrmacher, E.; Schirrmacher, R.; Buchholz, H.G.; Bartenstein, P. [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Mainz (Germany); Thews, O.; Dillenburg, W.; Tillmanns, J. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Mainz (Germany); Hoehnemann, S.; Roesch, F. [University of Mainz, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Mainz (Germany); Wessler, I. [University of Mainz, Institute of Pharmacology, Mainz (Germany); Buhl, R. [University Hospital, Pulmonary Division, Mainz (Germany)

    2005-11-01

    The new {beta}{sub 2} radioligand (R,R)(S,S) 5-(2-(2-[4-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy)phenyl]-1-methylethylamino)-1-hydroxyethyl)-benzene-1,3-diol ([{sup 18}F]FE-fenoterol; [{sup 18}F]FEFE), a fluoroethylated derivative of racemic fenoterol, was evaluated in vivo and ex vivo using a guinea pig model. Dynamic PET studies over 60 min with [{sup 18}F]FEFE were performed in nine Hartley guinea pigs in which a baseline (group 1, n=3), a predose (group 2, n=3; 2 mg/kg fenoterol 5 min prior to injection of [{sup 18}F]FEFE) or a displacement study (group 3, n=3; 2 mg/kg fenoterol 5 min post injection of [{sup 18}F]FEFE) was conducted. In all animal groups, the lungs could be visualised and semi-quantified separately by calculating uptake ratios to non-specific binding in the neck area. Premedication with non-radioactive fenoterol and displacement tests showed significant reduction of lung uptake, by 94% and 76%, respectively. These data demonstrate specific binding of the new radioligand to the pulmonary {beta}{sub 2}-receptors in accordance with ex vivo measurements. Therefore, [{sup 18}F]FEFE seems to be suitable for the in vivo visualisation and quantification of the pulmonary {beta}{sub 2}-receptor binding in this animal model. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral 5-HT release correlates with [11C]Cimbi36 PET measures of 5-HT2A receptor occupancy in the pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Louise M; Weikop, Pia; Villadsen, Jonas; Visnapuu, Tanel; Ettrup, Anders; Hansen, Hanne D; Baandrup, Anders O; Andersen, Flemming L; Bjarkam, Carsten R; Thomsen, Carsten; Jespersen, Bo; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-02-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can, when used with appropriate radioligands, non-invasively generate temporal and spatial information about acute changes in brain neurotransmitter systems. We for the first time evaluate the novel 5-HT 2A receptor agonist PET radioligand, [ 11 C]Cimbi-36, for its sensitivity to detect changes in endogenous cerebral 5-HT levels, as induced by different pharmacological challenges. To enable a direct translation of PET imaging data to changes in brain 5-HT levels, we calibrated the [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET signal in the pig brain by simultaneous measurements of extracellular 5-HT levels with microdialysis and [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 PET after various acute interventions (saline, citalopram, citalopram + pindolol, fenfluramine). In a subset of pigs, para-chlorophenylalanine pretreatment was given to deplete cerebral 5-HT. The interventions increased the cerebral extracellular 5-HT levels to 2-11 times baseline, with fenfluramine being the most potent pharmacological enhancer of 5-HT release, and induced a varying degree of decline in [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 binding in the brain, consistent with the occupancy competition model. The observed correlation between changes in the extracellular 5-HT level in the pig brain and the 5-HT 2A receptor occupancy indicates that [ 11 C]Cimbi-36 binding is sensitive to changes in endogenous 5-HT levels, although only detectable with PET when the 5-HT release is sufficiently high.

  19. Estimates of regional cerebral blood flow and 5-HT2A receptor density in impulsive, aggressive dogs with 99mTc-ECD and 123I-5-I-R91150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremans, Kathelijne; Coopman, Frank; Verschooten, Francis; Bree, Henri van; Audenaert, Kurt; Heeringen, Kees van; Blanckaert, Peter; Slegers, Guido; Jacobs, Filip; Otte, Andreas; Dierckx, Rudi; Mertens, John

    2003-01-01

    Impulsive aggression in dogs has an important impact on human public health. Better insight into the pathophysiology of this phenomenon could lead to more adequate diagnosis and treatment. Indirect in vivo research on peripheral body fluids and post-mortem studies in impulsive animals and humans indicate a deficient serotonergic system in general and disturbances in the serotonin-2A (5-HT2A) receptor in particular. In this study, brain perfusion and the 5-HT2A receptors were examined in impulsive, aggressive dogs, in comparison with a group of normally behaving animals. In order to decide which dogs to include in this study, owners were asked to describe the general behaviour of the dogs, the circumstances in which aggression occurred and their conduct during aggressive acts. Finally, 19 dogs were retained for this study, showing, according to different behavioural specialists, disinhibited dominance aggression. Functional imaging studies were performed on all these dogs. Single-photon emission tomography (SPET) was used to measure regional brain perfusion using technetium-99m labelled ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD). The 5-HT2A receptor binding properties were investigated using the selective radioligand iodine-123 labelled 5-I-R91150. A significant increase in uptake of the 5-HT2A radioligand was noted in all cortical areas. No significant alterations were found in regional cortical perfusion, indicating that the increased binding index was not a consequence of increased tracer delivery. This study supports a role for the serotonergic system in canine impulsive aggression. (orig.)

  20. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptors in a novel cell line (SUP1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivins, K.J.; Luedtke, R.R.; Artymyshyn, R.P.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    A prolactin-secreting cell line, SUP1, has been established from rat pituitary tumor 7315a. In radioligand binding experiments, the D2 receptor antagonist (S)-(-)-3- 125 I iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-[(1-ethyl-2- pyrrolidinyl)methyl]benzamide ( 125 I IBZM) labeled a single class of sites in homogenates of SUP1 cells (Kd = 0.6 nM; Bmax = 45 fmol/mg of protein). The sites displayed a pharmacological profile consistent with that of D2 receptors. Inhibition of the binding of 125 I IBZM by dopamine was sensitive to GTP, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are coupled to guanine nucleotide-binding protein(s). In the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine, dopamine decreased the level of cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells. Dopamine also inhibited prolactin secretion from SUP1 cells. Both the inhibition of cAMP accumulation and the inhibition of prolactin secretion were blocked by D2 receptor antagonists, suggesting that these effects of dopamine were mediated by an interaction with D2 receptors. The regulation of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells by D2 receptor agonists was investigated. Exposure of SUP1 cells to dopamine or to the D2 receptor agonist N-propylnorapomorphine led to increased expression of D2 receptors, with no change in the affinity of the receptors for 125 I IBZM. An increase in the density of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells was evident within 7 hr of exposure to dopamine. Spiroperidol, a D2 receptor antagonist, blocked the effect of dopamine on receptor density. These results suggest that exposure of D2 receptors in SUP1 cells to agonists leads to an up-regulation of D2 receptors. Dopamine retained the ability to inhibit cAMP accumulation in SUP1 cells exposed to dopamine for 24 hr, suggesting that D2 receptors in SUP1 cells are not desensitized by prolonged exposure to agonist

  1. Neuroanatomical patterns of the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain as determined by quantitative in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tempel, A.; Zukin, R.S.

    1987-01-01

    Highly specific radioligands and quantitative autoradiography reveal strikingly different neuroanatomical patterns for the mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors of rat brain. The mu receptors are most densely localized in patches in the striatum, layers I and III of the cortex, the pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampal formation, specific nuclei of the thalamus, the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. In contrast, delta receptors are highly confined, exhibiting selective localization in layers I, II, and VIa of the neocortex, a diffuse pattern in the striatum, and moderate concentration in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra and in the interpeduncular nucleus. delta receptors are absent in most other brain structures. This distribution is unexpected in that the enkephalins, the putative endogenous ligands of the delta receptor, occur essentially throughout the brain. The kappa receptors of rat brain exhibit a third pattern distinct from that of the mu and delta receptors. kappa receptors occur at low density in patches in the striatum and at particularly high density in the nucleus accumbens, along the pyramidal and molecular layers of the hippocampus, in the granular cell layer of the dentate gyrus, specific midline nuclei of the thalamus, and hindbrain regions. kappa receptors appear to be uniformly distributed across regions in the neocortex with the exception of layer III, which revealed only trace levels of binding. An important conclusion of the present study is that delta receptors occur at high density only in the forebrain and in two midbrain structures, whereas mu and kappa receptors exhibit discrete patterns in most major brain regions

  2. Differential Contribution of Subunit Interfaces to α9α10 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffi, Juan Carlos; Marcovich, Irina; Gill-Thind, JasKiran K.; Corradi, Jeremías; Collins, Toby; Lipovsek, María Marcela; Moglie, Marcelo; Plazas, Paola V.; Craig, Patricio O.; Millar, Neil S.; Bouzat, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors can be assembled from either homomeric or heteromeric pentameric subunit combinations. At the interface of the extracellular domains of adjacent subunits lies the acetylcholine binding site, composed of a principal component provided by one subunit and a complementary component of the adjacent subunit. Compared with neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine cholinergic receptors (nAChRs) assembled from α and β subunits, the α9α10 receptor is an atypical member of the family. It is a heteromeric receptor composed only of α subunits. Whereas mammalian α9 subunits can form functional homomeric α9 receptors, α10 subunits do not generate functional channels when expressed heterologously. Hence, it has been proposed that α10 might serve as a structural subunit, much like a β subunit of heteromeric nAChRs, providing only complementary components to the agonist binding site. Here, we have made use of site-directed mutagenesis to examine the contribution of subunit interface domains to α9α10 receptors by a combination of electrophysiological and radioligand binding studies. Characterization of receptors containing Y190T mutations revealed unexpectedly that both α9 and α10 subunits equally contribute to the principal components of the α9α10 nAChR. In addition, we have shown that the introduction of a W55T mutation impairs receptor binding and function in the rat α9 subunit but not in the α10 subunit, indicating that the contribution of α9 and α10 subunits to complementary components of the ligand-binding site is nonequivalent. We conclude that this asymmetry, which is supported by molecular docking studies, results from adaptive amino acid changes acquired only during the evolution of mammalian α10 subunits. PMID:28069778

  3. Decreased GABAA receptor binding in the medullary serotonergic system in the sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbelt, Kevin G; Paterson, David S; Belliveau, Richard A; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Haas, Elisabeth A; Stanley, Christina; Krous, Henry F; Kinney, Hannah C

    2011-09-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons in the medulla oblongata help regulate homeostasis, in part through interactions with the medullary serotonergic (5-HT) system. Previously, we reported abnormalities in multiple 5-HT markers in the medullary 5-HT system of infants dying from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggesting that 5-HT dysfunction is involved in its pathogenesis. Here, we tested the hypothesis that markers of GABAA receptors are decreased in the medullary 5-HT system in SIDS cases compared with controls. Using tissue receptor autoradiography with the radioligand H-GABA, we found 25% to 52% reductions in GABAA receptor binding density in 7 of 10 key nuclei sampled of the medullary 5-HT system in the SIDS cases (postconceptional age [PCA] = 51.7 ± 8.3, n = 28) versus age-adjusted controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 13.5, n = 8) (p ≤ 0.04). By Western blotting, there was 46.2% reduction in GABAAα3 subunit levels in the gigantocellularis (component of the medullary 5-HT system) of SIDS cases (PCA = 53.9 ± 8.4, n = 24) versus controls (PCA = 55.3 ± 8.3, n = 8) (56.8% standard in SIDS cases vs 99.35% in controls; p = 0.026). These data suggest that medullary GABAA receptors are abnormal in SIDS infants and that SIDS is a complex disorder of a homeostatic network in the medulla that involves deficits of the GABAergic and 5-HT systems.

  4. Expression and function of β-adrenergic receptors in human hematopoietic cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeki, T.; Andersson, L.C.; Kontula, K.K.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the expression and functional characteristics of β-adrenoceptors in a panel of 10 phenotypically different human hematopoietic cell lines. A binding assay with [ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol as the ligand revealed that cell lines of myelomonocytic or histiocytic derivation (HL-60, ML-2, RC-2A, U-937) expressed high numbers of β-adrenoceptors. An intermediate density of receptors was found in a non-T, non-B cell leukemia line (Nall-1), whereas T-cell (JM, CCRF-CEM), B-cell (Raji) or erythroleukemic cell lines (K-562, HEL) displayed minimala or undetectable binding of the radioligand. Isoprenaline-stimulated cAMP production by the cells correlated to their extent of β-adrenoceptor expression. Southern blot hybridization analysis of genomic DNA from the cell lines with a 32 P-labelled β 2 -adrenoceptor cDNA probe revealed no evidence for major rearrangement or amplification of the receptor gene. Incubation with isoprenaline in vitro suppressed the proliferation of the receptor-rich RC-2A cells but did not affect the growth rate of the receptor-deficient K-562 cells. Treatment with propranolol slightly enhanced the proliferation of the RC-2A cells but did not markedly alter the growth rate of two other cell lines, regardless of their β-adrenoceptor status. These findings indicate a regulatory influence by the sympathoadrenergic system on selected cells of the myelomonocytic lineage. (au)

  5. Demonstration of beta1-adrenergic receptors in human placenta by (-)I125 Iodocyanopindolol binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paci, A.; Cocci, F.; Niedermeyer, H.P.; Matteucci, E.; Vitali, C.; Ciarimboli, G.; Bombardieri, S.

    1989-01-01

    The highly specific β-adrenergic radioligand (-) 125 I Iodocyanopindolol (ICYP) was used to characterize the β-adrenergic receptor subtype present in human placenta. Binding of ICYP to membranes from human placenta was saturable with time and ligand concentration, of high affinity, and demonstrated appropriate stereoselectivity and agonist rank order of potency for binding to a β-adrenergic receptor. From saturation binding curves, the K D and B max values for ICYP binding were 233±51 pM and 690±139 fmol/mg of proteins, respectively.Analysis of inhibition of ICYP binding by β 1 - and β 2 -selective adrenergic antagonists via Hofstee analysis resulted in linear plots, indicating the existence of a homogeneous population of β-adrenergic receptors. From the resulting K I -values for the β 1 -selective drugs practolol (4.0±0.9 μM) and metoprolol (0.19±0.07 μM) and for the β 2 -selective drug ICI 118,551 (0.30)±0.06 μM) it is concluded that the β-adrenergic receptor in human placenta is of the β 1 -subtype. This is further supported by the fact that (-)-noradrenaline and (-)-adrenaline were equipotent in inhibiting ICYP binding

  6. p-( sup 125 I)iodoclonidine, a novel radiolabeled agonist for studying central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, B.M.; Siegel, B.W. (Merrell Dow Research Institute, Cincinnati, OH (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Unlabeled p-iodoclonidine was efficacious in attenuating forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells. Maximal attenuation was 76 +/- 3%, with an EC50 of 347 +/- 60 nM. Comparable values of epinephrine were 72 +/- 3% and 122 +/- 22 nM. Responses to both agonists were abolished by 10 microM phentolamine. Therefore, p-iodoclonidine is an agonist in a cell culture model system of the neuronal alpha 2-adrenergic receptor. p-(125I)Iodoclonidine binding to membranes were measured using various regions of the rat brain. The agonist labeled a single population of sites present on cerebral cortical membranes, which was saturable (Bmax = 230 fmol/mg of protein) and possessed high affinity for the ligand (Kd = 0.6 nM). Binding was largely specific (93% at 0.6 nM). A variety of alpha 2-adrenergic agonists and antagonists were shown to compete for the binding of the radioligand. The binding of p-(125I)iodoclonidine was much less sensitive to agents that interact with alpha 1-adrenergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic receptors. Approximately 65% of the binding was sensitive to guanine nucleotides. Association kinetics using 0.4 nM radioligand were biphasic (37% associate rapidly, with kobs = 0.96 min-1, with the remainder binding more slowly, with kobs = 0.031 min-1) and reached a plateau by 90 min at 25 degrees. Dissociation kinetics were also biphasic, with 30% of the binding dissociating rapidly (k1 = 0.32 min-1) and the remainder dissociating 50-fold more slowly (k2 = 0.006 min-1). Agonist binding is, therefore, uniquely complex and probably reflects the conformational changes that accompany receptor activation.

  7. Radiosynthesis and preliminary evaluation of Z.W.-90 and Z.W.-110, two novel acetylenic pyridines for imaging the nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassiou, M.; Giboureau, N. [Sydney Univ., Brain and Mind Research Institute, NSW (Australia); Chellapan, S.; Wei, Z.L.; Kozikowski, A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, IL (United States); Henderson, D.; Fulton, R. [RPAH Sydney, Dept. PET and Nuclear Medicine (Australia); Xiao, Y.; Kellar, K. [Georgetown Univ., Dept. of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Guilloteau, D.; Emond, P. [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), U619, 37 - Tours (France); Dolle, F. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA/DSV, Institut d' Imagerie BioMedicale, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2008-02-15

    Central nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (n.A.Ch.R.s) have been implicated in learning memory processes and neuro-psychiatric disorders. Recently it was reported that the introduction of a substituted alkynyl group into the C-5 position of the pyridinyl ring of A-84543, significantly increased the selectivity for the n.A.Ch.R. containing {beta}{sub 2} subunits over {beta}{sub 4} subunits. Two selected candidates, Z.W.-90 and Z.W.-110 were labelled with carbon{sup 11} and evaluated in vivo.{sup 11}C Z.W.-90 penetrated rapidly into the brain, with maximum uptake in the thalamus and cerebellum 2 min post injection followed by clearance. The washout from cerebellum was faster than from thalamus, suggesting that specific binding can be optimally measured at 20 min post injection; Pretreatment of the baboon with nicotine resulted in markedly decreased uptake of the radioligand. {sup 11}C Z.W.-110 also penetrated rapidly into the brain, with a high evident uptake in the thalamus within 5 min. Surprisingly there was also considerable uptake in the striatum. Pretreatment with nicotine resulted in inhibition of uptake of 8 and 1%, in the thalamus and cerebellum, respectively. In pretreatment studies using unlabelled Z.W.-110, 32% inhibition of radioligand uptake was observed in the thalamus and striatum while uptake in the cerebellum was reduced by 24 %.While further work will be necessary in the development of optimal imaging agents for n.A.Ch.Rs, efforts will be made to examine the potential of these newly developed radioligands to serve diagnostic agents in the early detection of neurological disorders. (N.C.)

  8. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  9. Radioiodinated ligands for the estrogen receptor: Effect of different 7-cyanoalkyl chains on the binding affinity of novel iodovinyl-6-dehydroestradiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Carina; Oliveira, Maria Cristina; Gano, Lurdes; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel; Morais, Goreti Ribeiro; Yasuda, Takumi; Thiemann, Thies; Botelho, Filomena; Oliveira, Carlos F.

    2009-01-01

    Three novel 17α-ethynyl-Δ 6,7 -estra-3,17β-diols and their 17α-[ 125 I]-iodovinyl derivatives, containing different C7-cyanoalkyl chains, were studied as potential radioligands for the estrogen receptor. The influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of the compounds was assessed through in vitro ER binding assays of the ethynyl derivatives and breast cancer cell uptake studies of the 17α-[ 125 I]-iodovinyl-Δ 6,7 -estra-3,17β-diols. A difference in alkyl chain induced a decrease in ER binding affinities of substances, however, the receptor-binding affinities (RBA) of all compounds were lower than that of estradiol itself. In addition, a non-specific cell binding was observed which is in accordance with the encountered ethynyl RBA values suggesting that the uptake is not ER mediated

  10. Radioiodinated ligands for the estrogen receptor: Effect of different 7-cyanoalkyl chains on the binding affinity of novel iodovinyl-6-dehydroestradiols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Carina [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Oliveira, Maria Cristina [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal)], E-mail: cmelo@itn.pt; Gano, Lurdes; Marques, Fernanda; Santos, Isabel [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Morais, Goreti Ribeiro [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lisbon, Lisbon (Portugal); Yasuda, Takumi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Thiemann, Thies [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Botelho, Filomena [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Instituto de Biofisica/Biomatematica, IBILI, FMUC, Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, Carlos F. [Centro de Investigacao em Meio Ambiente Genetica e Oncobiologia (CIMAGO) (Portugal); Clinica Ginecologica, FMUC, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2009-02-15

    Three novel 17{alpha}-ethynyl-{delta}{sup 6,7}-estra-3,17{beta}-diols and their 17{alpha}-[{sup 125}I]-iodovinyl derivatives, containing different C7-cyanoalkyl chains, were studied as potential radioligands for the estrogen receptor. The influence of the chain length on the biological behaviour of the compounds was assessed through in vitro ER binding assays of the ethynyl derivatives and breast cancer cell uptake studies of the 17{alpha}-[{sup 125}I]-iodovinyl-{delta}{sup 6,7}-estra-3,17{beta}-diols. A difference in alkyl chain induced a decrease in ER binding affinities of substances, however, the receptor-binding affinities (RBA) of all compounds were lower than that of estradiol itself. In addition, a non-specific cell binding was observed which is in accordance with the encountered ethynyl RBA values suggesting that the uptake is not ER mediated.

  11. Differential regulation of collagen secretion by kinin receptors in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalán, Mabel; Smolic, Christian; Contreras, Ariel; Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Copaja, Miguel; Boza, Pía; Vivar, Raúl; Avalos, Yennifer; Lavandero, Sergio; Velarde, Victoria; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2012-01-01

    Kinins mediate their cellular effects through B1 (B1R) and B2 (B2R) receptors, and the activation of B2R reduces collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblasts (CF). However, the question of whether B1R and/or B2R have a role in cardiac myofibroblasts remains unanswered. Methods: CF were isolated from neonate rats and myofibroblasts were generated by an 84 h treatment with TGF-β1 (CMF). B1R was evaluated by western blot, immunocytochemistry and radioligand assay; B2R, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cyclooxygenases 1and 2 (COX-1, and COX-2) were evaluated by western blot; intracellular Ca +2 levels were evaluated with Fluo-4AM; collagen secretion was measured in the culture media using the picrosirius red assay kit. Results: B2R, iNOS, COX-1 and low levels of B1R but not eNOS, were detected by western blot in CF. Also, B1R, B2R, and COX-2 but not iNOS, eNOS or COX-1, were detected by western blot in CMF. By immunocytochemistry, our results showed lower intracellular B1R levels in CF and higher B1R levels in CMF, mainly localized on the cell membrane. Additionally, we found B1R only in CMF cellular membrane through radioligand displacement assay. Bradykinin (BK) B2R agonist increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels and reduced collagen secretion both in CF and CMF. These effects were blocked by HOE-140, and inhibited by L-NAME, 1400W and indomethacin. Des-Arg-kallidin (DAKD) B1R agonist did not increase intracellular Ca 2+ levels in CF; however, after preincubation for 1 h with DAKD and re-stimulation with the same agonist, we found a low increase in intracellular Ca 2+ levels. Finally, DAKD increased intracellular Ca 2+ levels and decreased collagen secretion in CMF, being this effect blocked by the B1R antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-kallidin and indomethacin, but not by L-NAME or 1400 W. Conclusion: B1R, B2R, iNOS and COX-1 were expressed differently between CF and CMF, and collagen secretion was regulated differentially by

  12. Adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor imaging with [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET in the rat brain after quinolinic acid lesion. Comparison with the dopamine receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Ogi, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Nobutaka [Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Gerontology, Tokyo (Japan). Positron Medical Center] [and others

    2002-11-01

    We proposed [{sup 11}C]KF18446 as a selective radioligand for mapping the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors being highly enriched in the striatum by positron emission tomography (PET). In the present study, we investigated whether [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET can detect the change in the striatal adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in the rat after unilateral injection of an excitotoxin quinolinic acid into the striatum, a Huntington's disease model, to demonstrate the usefulness of [{sup 11}C]KF18446. The extent of the striatal lesion was identified based on MRI, to which the PET was co-registered. The binding potential of [{sup 11}C]KF18446 significantly decreased in the quinolinic acid-lesioned striatum. The decrease was comparable to the decrease in the potential of [{sup 11}C] raclopride binding to dopamine D{sub 2} receptors in the lesioned striatum, but seemed to be larger than the decrease in the potential of [{sup 11}C]SCH23390 binding to dopamine D{sub 1} receptors. Ex vivo and in vitro autoradiography validated the PET signals. We concluded that [{sup 11}C]KF18446 PET can detect change in the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptors in the rat model, and will provide a new diagnostic tool for characterizing post-synaptic striatopallidal neurons in the stratum. (author)

  13. Mefloquine and psychotomimetics share neurotransmitter receptor and transporter interactions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowsky, Aaron; Eshleman, Amy J; Johnson, Robert A; Wolfrum, Katherine M; Hinrichs, David J; Yang, Jongtae; Zabriskie, T Mark; Smilkstein, Martin J; Riscoe, Michael K

    2014-07-01

    Mefloquine is used for the prevention and treatment of chloroquine-resistant malaria, but its use is associated with nightmares, hallucinations, and exacerbation of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. We hypothesized that potential mechanisms of action for the adverse psychotropic effects of mefloquine resemble those of other known psychotomimetics. Using in vitro radioligand binding and functional assays, we examined the interaction of (+)- and (-)-mefloquine enantiomers, the non-psychotomimetic anti-malarial agent, chloroquine, and several hallucinogens and psychostimulants with recombinant human neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Hallucinogens and mefloquine bound stereoselectively and with relatively high affinity (K i = 0.71-341 nM) to serotonin (5-HT) 2A but not 5-HT1A or 5-HT2C receptors. Mefloquine but not chloroquine was a partial 5-HT2A agonist and a full 5-HT2C agonist, stimulating inositol phosphate accumulation, with similar potency and efficacy as the hallucinogen dimethyltryptamine (DMT). 5-HT receptor antagonists blocked mefloquine's effects. Mefloquine had low or no affinity for dopamine D1, D2, D3, and D4.4 receptors, or dopamine and norepinephrine transporters. However, mefloquine was a very low potency antagonist at the D3 receptor and mefloquine but not chloroquine or hallucinogens blocked [(3)H]5-HT uptake by the 5-HT transporter. Mefloquine, but not chloroquine, shares an in vitro receptor interaction profile with some hallucinogens and this neurochemistry may be relevant to the adverse neuropsychiatric effects associated with mefloquine use by a small percentage of patients. Additionally, evaluating interactions with this panel of receptors and transporters may be useful for characterizing effects of other psychotropic drugs and for avoiding psychotomimetic effects for new pharmacotherapies, including antimalarial quinolines.

  14. Acute induction of anxiety in humans by delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol related to amygdalar cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Egerton, Alice; Kim, Euitae; Rosso, Lula; Riano Barros, Daniela; Hammers, Alexander; Brammer, Michael; Turkheimer, Federico E; Howes, Oliver D; McGuire, Philip

    2017-11-03

    Use of Cannabis, the most widely used illicit drug worldwide, is associated with acute anxiety, and anxiety disorders following regular use. The precise neural and receptor basis of these effects have not been tested in man. Employing a combination of functional MRI (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated whether the effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC), the main psychoactive ingredient of cannabis, on anxiety and on amygdala response while processing fearful stimuli were related to local availability of its main central molecular target, cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptors in man. Fourteen healthy males were studied with fMRI twice, one month apart, following an oral dose of either delta-9-THC (10 mg) or placebo, while they performed a fear-processing task. Baseline availability of the CB1 receptor was studied using PET with [ 11 C]MePPEP, a CB1 inverse agonist radioligand. Relative to the placebo condition, delta-9-THC induced anxiety and modulated right amygdala activation while processing fear. Both these effects were positively correlated with CB1 receptor availability in the right amygdala. These results suggest that the acute effects of cannabis on anxiety in males are mediated by the modulation of amygdalar function by delta-9-THC and the extent of these effects are related to local availability of CB1 receptors.

  15. Reelin influences the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M J; Lage, S; Caruncho, H J; Cadavid, M I; Loza, M I; Brea, J

    2015-04-02

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in neuronal guidance during brain neurodevelopment and in synaptic plasticity in adults and has been associated with schizophrenia. Reelin mRNA and protein levels are reduced in various structures of post-mortem schizophrenic brains, in a similar way to those found in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM). Reelin is involved in protein expression in dendritic spines that are the major location where synaptic connections are established. Thus, we hypothesized that a genetic deficit in reelin would affect the expression and function of dopamine D2 and serotonin 5-HT2A receptors that are associated with the action of current antipsychotic drugs. In this study, D2 and 5-HT2A receptor expression and function were quantitated by using radioligand binding studies in the frontal cortex and striatum of HRM and wild-type mice (WTM). We observed increased expression (pHT2A receptors from HRM compared to WTM. Our results show parallel alterations of D2 and 5-HT2A receptors that are compatible with a possible hetero-oligomeric nature of these receptors. These changes are similar to changes described in schizophrenic patients and provide further support for the suitability of using HRM as a model for studying this disease and the effects of antipsychotic drugs. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Existence of Brain 5-HT1A-5-HT2A Isoreceptor Complexes with Antagonistic Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions Regulating 5-HT1A Receptor Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O; Li, Xiang; Tarakanov, Alexander O; Savelli, David; Narváez, Manuel; Shumilov, Kirill; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Jimenez-Beristain, Antonio; Pomierny, Bartosz; Díaz-Cabiale, Zaida; Cuppini, Riccardo; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Lindskog, Maria; Fuxe, Kjell

    2017-08-31

    Studies on serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors have established that disturbances in the ascending 5-HT neuron systems and their 5-HT receptor subtypes and collateral networks to the forebrain contribute to the etiology of major depression and are targets for treatment. The therapeutic action of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors is of proven effectiveness, but the mechanisms underlying their effect are still unclear. There are many 5-HT subtypes involved; some need to be blocked (e.g., 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7), whereas others need to be activated (e.g., postjunctional 5-HT1A and 5-HT4). These state-of-the-art developments are in line with the hypothesis that the development of major depression can involve an imbalance of the activity between different types of 5-HT isoreceptors. In the current study, using in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA), we report evidence for the existence of brain 5-HT1A-5-HT2A isoreceptor complexes validated in cellular models with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET 2 ) assay. A high density of PLA-positive clusters visualizing 5-HT1A-5-HT2A isoreceptor complexes was demonstrated in the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1-CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. A marked reduction in the density of PLA-positive clusters was observed in the CA1 and CA2 regions 24 h after a forced swim test session, indicating the dynamics of this 5-HT isoreceptor complex. Using a bioinformatic approach, previous work indicates that receptors forming heterodimers demonstrate triplet amino acid homologies. The receptor interface of the 5-HT1A-5-HT2A isoreceptor dimer was shown to contain the LLG and QNA protriplets in the transmembrane and intracellular domain, respectively. The 5-HT2A agonist TCB2 markedly reduced the affinity of the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone for the 5-HT1A agonist binding sites in the frontal lobe using the 5-HT1A radioligand binding assay. This action was blocked by the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. It is proposed that

  17. Decreased Brain Neurokinin-1 Receptor Availability in Chronic Tennis Elbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clas Linnman

    Full Text Available Substance P is released in painful and inflammatory conditions, affecting both peripheral processes and the central nervous system neurokinin 1 (NK1 receptor. There is a paucity of data on human brain alterations in NK1 expression, how this system may be affected by treatment, and interactions between central and peripheral tissue alterations. Ten subjects with chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis were selected out of a larger (n = 120 randomized controlled trial evaluating graded exercise as a treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis. These ten subjects were examined by positron emission tomography (PET with the NK1-specific radioligand 11C-GR205171 before, and eight patients were followed up after treatment with graded exercise. Brain binding in the ten patients before treatment, reflecting NK1-receptor availability (NK1-RA, was compared to that of 18 healthy subjects and, longitudinally, to the eight of the original ten patients that agreed to a second PET examination after treatment. Before treatment, patients had significantly lower NK1-RA in the insula, vmPFC, postcentral gyrus, anterior cingulate, caudate, putamen, amygdala and the midbrain but not the thalamus and cerebellum, with the largest difference in the insula contralateral to the injured elbow. No significant correlations between brain NK1-RA and pain, functional severity, or peripheral NK1-RA in the affected limb were observed. In the eight patients examined after treatment, pain ratings decreased in everyone, but there were no significant changes in NK1-RA. These findings indicate a role for the substance P (SP / NK1 receptor system in musculoskeletal pain and tissue healing. As neither clinical parameters nor successful treatment response was reflected in brain NK1-RA after treatment, this may reflect the diverse function of the SP/NK1 system in CNS and peripheral tissue, or a change too small or slow to capture over the three-month treatment.

  18. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations

  19. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-01-01

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa

  20. Single prostacyclin receptor of gel-filtered platelets provides a correlation with antiaggregatory potency of PGI2 mimics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggerman, T.L.; Hartzell, C.J.; Selfe, S.; Andersen, N.H.

    1987-01-01

    Gel-filtered human platelets (GFP) display only a single binding site for [ 3 H]-PGI2: KD = 61nM, 234 fmol/10(8) platelets (1410 sites/platelet). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) displays the same receptor density but the KD value increases to 123 nM due to protein binding of PGI2 which lowers its effective concentration. The [ 3 H]-PGI2/GFP binding assay has been used to evaluate the molecular basis of aggregation inhibition for prostacyclin analogs and mimics, three PGE type structures, and PGD2. Antiaggregatory IC50s and radioligand binding IC50s correlate for PGE2, E1, and six PGI2 analogs. PGD2, and to a lesser extent 6-oxo-PGE1, display greater antiaggregatory potency than expected based on PGI2-binding site affinity data

  1. [3H] 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid, a high affinity ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine regulatory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, S.D.; Baron, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    The NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors is allosterically linked to a strychnine-insensitive glycine regulatory site. Kynurenic acid and its halogenated derivatives are non-competitive NMDA antagonists acting at the glycine site. The authors have prepared [3H] 5,7-dichlorokyrurenic acid (DCKA) as an antagonist radioligand and have characterized its binding. 3-Bromo-5,7-DCKA was catalytically dehalogenated in the presence of tritium gas and HPLC purified to yield [3H] 5,7-DCKA with a specific activity of 17.6 Ci/mmol. [3H] 5,7-DCKA bound to rat brain synaptosomes with a Kd of 69 ± 23 nM and Bmax = 14.5 ± 3.2 pmoles/mg protein. Binding was 65-70% specific at 10 nM [3H] 5,7-DCKA. This ligand is thus more selective and has higher affinity than [3H] glycine, in addition to being an antagonist

  2. Functional characterization of 5-HT1B receptor drugs in nonhuman primates using simultaneous PET-MR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne D.; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Sander, Christin Y.

    2017-01-01

    (n = 3), we used positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the radioligand [11C]AZ10419369 administered as a bolus followed by constant infusion to measure changes in 5-HT1BR occupancy. Simultaneously, we measured changes in cerebral blood volume (CBV) as a proxy of drug effects on neuronal...... activity. The 5-HT1BR partial agonist AZ10419369 elicited a dose-dependent biphasic hemodynamic response that was related to the 5-HT1BRoccupancy. The magnitude of the response was spatially overlapping with high cerebral 5-HT1BR densities. High doses of AZ10419369 exerted an extracranial tissue...... the knowledge we have of the 5-HT1BR and its function and distribution in the brain, the hemodynamic response informs us about the functionality of the given drug: changes in CBV are only produced when the receptor is stimulated by the partial agonist AZ10419369 and not by the antagonist GR127935, consistent...

  3. Beta-emitting radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parus, J L; Mikolajczak, R

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the β-emitting radionuclides which might be useful for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, PRRT. For the effective design of the radiopharmaceutical, the choice of radionuclide will depend on the purpose for which the radioligand is being used and on the physicochemical properties of the radionuclide. The important factor is also the availability and the cost of production. The physical characteristics of several radionuclides which are currently used or can be considered as potential candidates for PRRT is provided, followed by short description of production methods and chemical aspects of their use in preparation of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals. Somatostatin analogues labeled with radionuclides have been a successful example of PRRT. For treatment of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors, somatostatin analogues labeled with the radioisotopes (111)In, (90)Y and (177)Lu have been used so far. Labeling with (111)In, mainly an Auger electron emitter, resulted in no reduction of tumor size while somatostatin analogues labeled with (90)Y and (177)Lu gave overall positive response and improved the patients' quality of life. These promising results together with the increasing availability of other β-emitting radionuclides are a good basis for further studies.

  4. Receptor visualization and the atomic bomb. A historical account of the development of the chemical neuroanatomy of receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs during the Cold War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, J M; Mengod, G

    2018-03-01

    chemical concept to their physical reality as gene products. Important steps were the introduction in the 70's of radioligand binding techniques and the cloning of receptor genes in the 80's. Receptors were first visualized using radioligands and autoradiography, and analyzed with the newly developed computer-assisted image analysis systems. Using Positron Emission Tomography transmitters and receptors were visualized in living human brain. The cloning of receptor genes allowed the use of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to visualize with the light and electron microscopes the receptor mRNAs and proteins. The results showed the wide heterogeneity of receptors and the diversity of mode of signal transmission, synaptic and extra-synaptic, again radically modifying the early views of neurotransmission. During the entire period the interplay between basic science and Psychopharmacology and Psychiatry generated different transmitter or receptor-based theories of brain drug action. These concepts and technologies also changed the way new drugs were discovered and developed. At the end of the period, a number of declines in these theories, the use of certain tools and the ability to generate new diagnostics and treatments, the end of an era and the beginning of a new one in the research of how the brain functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dopamine receptors in the guinea-pig heart. A binding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrini, M.; Benelli, A.; Baraldi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists to guinea-pig myocardial membrane preparations was studied using 3 H-dopamine and 3 H-spiperone as radioligand. 3 H-Dopamine bound specifically to heart membranes while 3 H-spiperone did not. A Scatchard analysis of 3 H-dopamine binding showed a curvilinear plot indicating the presence of two dopamine receptor populations that we have termed high- (K/sub d/ = 1.2 nM, B/sub mx/ = 52.9 fmol/mg prot.) and low- (K/sub d/ = 11.8 nM, B/sub mx/ = 267.3 fmol/gm prot.) affinity binding sites, respectively. The charactization of the high-affinity component of 3 H-dopamine binding indicated that the binding is rapid, saturable, stereospecific, pH- and temperature-dependent, and displaced by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists known to act similarly in vivo. The finding that pretreatment with dibenamine (which has been described as an α-adrenoceptor irreversible blocker) did not affect the binding of dopamine to cardiac membrane preparations suggests that α-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors have separate recognition sites in the heart. It is concluded that 3 H-dopamine binds to specific dopamine receptors in the heart of guinea-pigs

  6. In vivo cellular distribution and endocytosis of the somatostatin receptor - ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukinius, A. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Genetics and Pathology; Oehrvall, U. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Surgery; Westlin, J.E. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology; Oeberg, K.; Tiensuu Janson, E. [University Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Sciences

    1999-11-01

    Radioactive tumor targeting agents are highly interesting and for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptors, radiolabeled somatostatin analogues (including [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide) has been tried in a small number of patients with encouraging results. To increase our knowledge about the in vivo processing of administered [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide we have examined tumor and normal tissue material from a patient with a midgut carcinoid tumor. By ultrastructural autoradiography, silver grains indicating the presence of [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide could be identified within tumor cells, both in the primary tumor and in the mesenteric metastases. Silver grains were also found in leukocytes and in blood vessels. However, normal enterocytes did not show any specific radioligand uptake. This study indicates that the binding and endocytosis of [{sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1}]-octreotide is a specific process that takes place in cells expressing somatostatin receptors. However, the importance of the number of somatostatin receptors and subtypes expressed will have to be further studied. (orig.)

  7. Study on measurement of free ligand concentration in blood and quantitative analysis of brain benzodiazepine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Goromaru, Tsuyoshi; Inoue, Osamu; Itoh, Takashi; Yamasaki, Toshiro.

    1988-01-01

    We developed the method to determine rapidly the free ligand concentration in the blood as an input function for the purpose of quantitative analysis of binding potential (B max /K d ) of brain benzodiazepine receptor in vivo. It was found that the unmetabolized radioligand in the blood after intravenous administration of 3 H-Ro 15 - 1788 could be extracted by chloroform, whereas the radioactive metabolites could not be extracted. And the plasma protein binding of 3 H-Ro 15 - 1788 was determined using an ultrafiltration method. The biodistribution of 3 H-Ro 15 - 1788 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla after intravenous administration of the radiotracer in the control and forced-swimmed mice was examined. And the time course of the free ligand concentration in the blood was determined as described above. Further, the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was analyzed using a simple mathematical model. It was suggested that the binding potential of benzodiazepine receptor in the mouse brain was significantly decreased by forced-swimming. In conclusion, it was found that these methods would be useful for quantitative analysis of clinical data in the human brain using 11 C-Ro 15 - 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). (author)

  8. Characterization of central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in rat salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, H; Kawaguchi, M

    1998-01-15

    Benzodiazepines have been shown to inhibit salivary secretion from the rat salivary gland. This action is mediated by specific benzodiazepine binding sites in the glands. The presence and characteristics of central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in rat parotid and submandibular glands were examined employing [3H]Ro15-1788 and [3H]PK11195 as radioligands. [3H]Ro15-1788 and [3H]PK11195 bound with high affinity for both salivary glands ([3H]Ro15-1788: 24.5 and 37.4 mM, [3H]PK11195: 1.37 and 1.88 nM, for parotid and submandibular glands, respectively). [3H]Ro15-1788 binding sites occupied only 0.22 to 0.43% of the total binding for benzodiazepine receptors in the glands. The rank order of the competing potency of [3H]Ro15-1788 binding (Ro15-1788 = clonazepam > diazepam > flunitrazepam > PK11195 > Ro5-4864) and [3H]PK11195 binding (Ro5-4864 = PK11195 > diazepam = flunitrazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that [3H]Ro15-1788 and [3H]PK11195 binding sites were characteristic of the central and peripheral type, respectively. These studies show that both central- and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors exist in rat parotid and submandibular glands.

  9. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K. (Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine, (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ({sup 125}I-BH-NPY) and {sup 125}I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and {sup 125}I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system.

  10. Involvement of nicotinic receptors in methamphetamine- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity: pharmacological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escubedo, E; Camarasa, J; Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Pubill, D

    2009-01-01

    During the last years, we have focused on the study of the neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) on the central nervous system (CNS) and their pharmacological prevention methods. In the process of this research, we have used a semipurified synaptosomal preparation from striatum of mice or rats as a reliable in vitro model to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by these amphetamine derivatives, which is well-correlated with their dopaminergic injury in in vivo models. Using this preparation, we have demonstrated that blockade of alpha7 nicotinic receptors with methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevents ROS production induced by MDMA and METH. Consequently, in vivo, MLA significantly prevents MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic level (mouse striatum), without affecting hyperthermia induced by these amphetamines. Additionally, when neuroprotection was assayed with memantine (MEM), a dual antagonist of NMDA and alpha7 receptors, an effective neuroprotection was obtained also ahead of serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rats. MEM also prevents MDMA effect on serotonin transporter functionality and METH effect on dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting that behavioral effects of these psychostimulants can also be modulated by MEM. Finally, we have demonstrated that MEM prevents the impaired memory function induced by MDMA, and also, using binding studies with radioligands, we have characterized the interaction of these substances with nicotinic receptors. Studies at molecular level showed that both MDMA and METH displaced competitively the binding of radioligands with homomeric alpha7 and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), indicating that they can directly interact with them. In all the cases, MDMA displayed higher affinity than METH and it was higher for heteromeric than for alpha7 subtype. Pre-incubation of differentiated PC12 cells with MDMA or METH induces nAChR upregulation

  11. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K.

    1990-01-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with 125 I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ( 125 I-BH-NPY) and 125 I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of 125 I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and 125 I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with 125 I-BH-NPY and 125 I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system

  12. Increased NMDA and AMPA receptor densities in the anterior cingulate cortex in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavitsanou, K.; Huang, X.-F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is a brain area of potential importance to our understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Since a disturbed balance between excitatory and inhibitory activity is suggested to occur in the ACC in schizophrenia, the present study has focused on the analysis of binding of [ 3 H]MK801, [ 3 H]AMPA and [ 3 H]kainate, radioligands which respectively label the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family in the ACC of 10 schizophrenia patients and 10 matched controls, using quantitative autoradiography. AMPA receptor densities were higher in cortical layer II whereas NMDA receptor densities were higher in cortical layers II-III in the ACC of both control and schizophrenia group. In contrast, kainate receptors displayed the highest density in cortical layer V. [ 3 H]AMPA binding was significantly increased by 25% in layer II in the schizophrenia group as compared to the control group. Similarly, a significant 17% increase of [ 3 H]MK801 binding was observed in layers II-III in the schizophrenia group. No statistically significant differences were observed for [ 3 H] kainate binding between the two groups. These results suggest that ionotropic glutamate receptors are differentially altered in the ACC of schizophrenia. The increase in [ 3 H]AMPA and [ 3 H]MK801 binding points to a postsynaptic compensation for impaired glutamatergic neurotransmission in the ACC in schizophrenia. Such abnormality could lead to an imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in this brain area that may contribute to the emergence of some schizophrenia symptoms. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  13. Selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari-Dileo, G; Waelbroeck, M; Mash, D C; Flynn, D D

    1994-12-01

    We report here a novel strategy for the selective labeling and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype, based on the distinct kinetics of the muscarinic antagonists dexetimide and N-methylscopolamine (NMS) and on the selectivity profile of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 for the m1-m5 muscarinic receptor subtypes expressed in CHO-K1 cells. Incubation with 10 nM dexetimide, a nonselective antagonist, resulted in > 90% occupancy of each of the m1-m5 receptor subtypes. The relatively rapid rates of dexetimide dissociation from the m1, m2, and m4 receptor subtypes (t1/2 values of m4 receptor subtypes with short incubations with [3H]NMS. Inclusion of 200 nM guanylpirenzepine and 250 nM AF-DX 116 prevented the binding of [3H]NMS to the majority of the m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively, resulting in primary labeling of the m4 receptor subtype. Brief dissociation of the radioligand in the presence of 1 microM atropine improved the ratio of m4 to m2 labeling by selectively removing [3H]NMS from the m2 subtype. Under these conditions, the ratio of [3H]NMS binding to the m4 versus m1, m2, m3, and m5 receptor subtypes was 4:1. In vitro autoradiography combined with these m4-selective labeling conditions demonstrated that the M4 (m4) receptor subtype was localized to the primary visual area (V1, area 17, occipital cortex) and the basal ganglia, a distribution distinct from that demonstrated for the M1 (m1), M2 (m2), and M3 (m3) receptor subtypes. These results demonstrate that a combination of the distinct kinetics of dexetimide and NMS and the receptor subtype selectivity of guanylpirenzepine and AF-DX 116 provides a valuable labeling strategy to examine the distribution and localization of the M4 (m4) muscarinic receptor subtype in brain, peripheral tissues, and cell lines.

  14. Rat striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity: potent block by the selective m4 ligand muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Adem, A; Karlsson, E; Onali, P

    1996-05-01

    1. In rat striatal membranes, muscarinic toxin 3 (MT3), a selective ligand of the cloned m4 receptor subtype, antagonized the acetylcholine (ACh) inhibition of forskolin- and dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activities with pA2 values of 8.09 and 8.15, respectively. 2. In radioligand binding experiments, MT3 increased the Kd but did not change the Bmax value of [3H]-N-methylscopolamine (3H]-NMS) binding to rat striatal muscarinic receptors. The toxin displaced the major portion of the [3H]-NMS binding sites with a Ki of 8.0 nM. 3. In rat myocardium, MT3 antagonized the ACh inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with a Ki value of 860 nM. 4. In rat cerebral cortical membranes prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol, MT3 counteracted the methacholine stimulation of [3H]-inositol phosphates formation with a Ki value of 113 nM. 5. The present study shows that MT3 is a potent antagonist of the striatal muscarinic receptors coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity. This finding provides strong evidence for the classification of these receptors as pharmacologically equivalent to the m4 gene product (M4). On the other hand, the weaker potencies of MT3 in antagonizing the muscarinic responses in cerebral cortex and in the heart are consistent with the reported lower affinities of the toxin for the cloned m1 and m2 receptor subtypes, respectively.

  15. Imaging micro-glial/macrophage activation in spinal cords of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis rats by Positron Emission Tomography using the mitochondrial 18 kDa translocator protein radioligand [18F]DPA-714

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abourbeh, Galith; Theze, Benoit; Dubois, Albertine; Tavitian, Bertrand; Boisgard, Raphael; Maroy, Renaud; Brulon, Vincent; Fontyn, Yoann; Dolle, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. Activated micro-glia/macrophages play a key role in the immuno-pathogenesis of MS and its corresponding animal models, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Micro-glia activation begins at early stages of the disease and is associated with elevated expression of the 18 kDa mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO). Thus, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of micro-glial activation using TSPO-specific radioligands could be valuable for monitoring disease-associated neuro-inflammatory processes. EAE was induced in rats using a fragment of myelin basic protein, yielding acute clinical disease that reflects extensive spinal cord inflammation. Enhanced TSPO expression in spinal cords of EAE rats versus those of controls was confirmed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Biodistribution studies in control and EAE rats were performed using the TSPO radioligand [ 18 F]DPA-714 [N,N-diethyl-2-(2-(4-(2-fluoroethoxy)phenyl)-5,7-dimethylpyrazolo[1,5- a]pyrimidin-3-yl)acetamide]. At 1 h after injection, almost fivefold higher levels of [ 18 F]DPA-714 were measured in spinal cords of EAE rats versus controls. The specific binding of [ 18 F]DPA-714 to TSPO in spinal cords was confirmed in competition studies, using unlabeled (R,S)-PK11195 [(R,S)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl) - isoquinoline-3-carboxamide)] or DPA-714 in excess. MicroPET studies affirm that this differential radioactivity uptake in spinal cords of EAE versus control rats could be detected and quantified. Using [ 18 F]DPA-714, neuro-inflammation in spinal cords of EAE-induced rats could be visualized by PET, offering a sensitive technique for monitoring neuro-inflammatory lesions in the CNS and particularly in the spinal cord. In addition to current MRI protocols, this approach could provide molecular images of neuro-inflammation for detection, monitoring, and research in MS. (authors)

  16. Lack of Genotype Effect on D1, D2 Receptors and Dopamine Transporter Binding in Triple MOP-, DOP-, and KOP-Opioid Receptor Knockout Mice of Three Different Genetic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Ji-Hoon; Bailey, Alexis; Ansonoff, Micheal; Pintar, John E.; Matifas, Audrey; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Kitchen, Ian

    2015-01-01

    We investigated D1, D2 receptors and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding levels in mice lacking all three opioid receptors and wild-type (WT) mice on three different genetic backgrounds. Quantitative autoradiography was used to determine the level of radioligand binding to the D1 and D2 receptors and DAT labeled with [3H]SCH23390, [3H]raclopride, and [3H]mazindol, respectively in triple-opioid receptor knockout (KO) and WT maintained on C57BL/6 (B6) and 129/SvEvTac (129) as well as C57BL/6 × 129/SvPas (B6 × 129) strains. No significant genotype effect was observed in D1, D2 receptors and DAT binding in any regions analyzed in any of the strains studied, suggesting that a lack of all three opioid receptors does not influence D1, D2 receptors and DAT expression, irrespective of their genetic strain background. However, strain differences were observed in D1 binding between the three strains of mice studied. Lower levels of D1 binding were observed in the substantia nigra of B6 × 129 WT mice compared with the 129 WT mice and in the olfactory tubercle of B6 × 129 WT compared with B6 WT and 129 WT mice. Lower levels of D1 binding were observed in the caudate putamen of B6 × 129 KO mice compared with 129 KO mice. In contrast, no significant strain differences were observed in D2 and DAT binding between the three strains of mice in any regions analyzed. Overall, these results indicate a lack of modulation of the dopaminergic system by the deletion of all three opioid receptors regardless of different background strains. PMID:20196137

  17. The Dual Orexin Receptor Antagonist Almorexant Induces Sleep and Decreases Orexin-Induced Locomotion by Blocking Orexin 2 Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Géraldine M.; Dürst, Thomas; Bürki, Hugo; Imobersteg, Stefan; Abramowski, Dorothee; Schuepbach, Edi; Hoyer, Daniel; Fendt, Markus; Gee, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Orexin peptides activate orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors (OX1R and OX2R), regulate locomotion and sleep-wake. The dual OX1R/OX2R antagonist almorexant reduces activity and promotes sleep in multiple species, including man. The relative contributions of the two receptors in locomotion and sleep/wake regulation were investigated in mice. Design: Mice lacking orexin receptors were used to determine the contribution of OX1R and OX2R to orexin A-induced locomotion and to almorexant-induced sleep. Setting: N/A. Patients or Participants: C57BL/6J mice and OX1R+/+, OX1R-/-, OX2R+/+, OX2R-/- and OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Interventions: Intracerebroventricular orexin A; oral dosing of almorexant. Measurements and Results: Almorexant attenuated orexin A-induced locomotion. As in other species, almorexant dose-dependently increased rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and nonREM sleep in mice. Almorexant and orexin A were ineffective in OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Both orexin A-induced locomotion and sleep induction by almorexant were absent in OX2R-/- mice. Interestingly, almorexant did not induce cataplexy in wild-type mice under conditions where cataplexy was seen in mice lacking orexins and in OX1R-/-/OX2R-/- mice. Almorexant dissociates very slowly from OX2R as measured functionally and in radioligand binding. Under non equilibrium conditions in vitro, almorexant was a dual antagonist whereas at equilibrium, almorexant became OX2R selective. Conclusions: In vivo, almorexant specifically inhibits the actions of orexin A. The two known orexin receptors mediate sleep induction by almorexant and orexin A-induced locomotion. However, OX2R activation mediates locomotion induction by orexin A and antagonism of OX2R is sufficient to promote sleep in mice. Citation: Mang GM; Dürst T; Bürki H; Imobersteg S; Abramowski D; Schuepbach E; Hoyer D; Fendt M; Gee CE. The dual orexin receptor antagonist almorexant induces sleep and decreases orexin-induced locomotion by blocking orexin

  18. Regional brain uptake of the muscarinic ligand, [18F]FP-TZTP, is greatly decreased in M2 receptor knockout mice but not in M1, M3 and M4 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, E M; Kiesewetter, D O; Shimoji, K; Ravasi, L; Yamada, M; Gomeza, J; Wess, J; Eckelman, W C

    2003-04-01

    A muscarinic receptor radioligand, 3-(3-(3-fluoropropyl)thio) -1,2,5,thiadiazol-4-yl)-1,2,5,6-tetrahydro-1-methylpyridine (fP-TZTP) radiolabeled with the positron emitting radionuclide (18)F ([(18)F]FP-TZTP) displayed regional brain distribution consistent with M2 receptor densities in rat brain. The purpose of the present study is to further elucidate the subtype selectivity of [(18)F]FP-TZTP using genetically engineered mice which lacked functional M1, M2, M3, or M4 muscarinic receptors. Using ex vivo autoradiography, the regional brain localization of [(18)F]FP-TZTP in M2 knockout (M2 KO) was significantly decreased (51.3 to 61.4%; Pcortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, superior colliculus, and thalamus. In similar studies with M1KO, M3KO and M4KO compared to their WT mice, [(18)F]FP-TZTP uptakes in the same brain regions were not significantly decreased at P<0.01. However, in amygdala and hippocampus small decreases of 19.5% and 22.7%, respectively, were observed for M1KO vs WT mice at P<0.05. Given the fact that large decreases in [(18)F]FP-TZTP brain uptakes were seen only in M2 KO vs. WT mice, we conclude that [(18)F]FP-TZTP preferentially labels M2 receptors in vivo.

  19. NK1 receptor fused to beta-arrestin displays a single-component, high-affinity molecular phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Holst, Birgitte; Fraile-Ramos, Alberto; Marsh, Mark; Schwartz, Thue W

    2002-07-01

    Arrestins are cytosolic proteins that, upon stimulation of seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors, terminate signaling by binding to the receptor, displacing the G protein and targeting the receptor to clathrin-coated pits. Fusion of beta-arrestin1 to the C-terminal end of the neurokinin NK1 receptor resulted in a chimeric protein that was expressed to some extent on the cell surface but also accumulated in transferrin-labeled recycling endosomes independently of agonist stimulation. As expected, the fusion protein was almost totally silenced with respect to agonist-induced signaling through the normal Gq/G11 and Gs pathways. The NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion construct bound nonpeptide antagonists with increased affinity but surprisingly also bound two types of agonists, substance P and neurokinin A, with high, normal affinity. In the wild-type NK1 receptor, neurokinin A (NKA) competes for binding against substance P and especially against antagonists with up to 1000-fold lower apparent affinity than determined in functional assays and in homologous binding assays. When the NK1 receptor was closely fused to G proteins, this phenomenon was eliminated among agonists, but the agonists still competed with low affinity against antagonists. In contrast, in the NK1-beta-arrestin1 fusion protein, all ligands bound with similar affinity independent of the choice of radioligand and with Hill coefficients near unity. We conclude that the NK1 receptor in complex with arrestin is in a high-affinity, stable, agonist-binding form probably best suited to structural analysis and that the receptor can display binding properties that are nearly theoretically ideal when it is forced to complex with only a single intracellular protein partner.

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MDOM-04-0625 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MDOM-04-0625 ref|NP_001013868.1| cholecystokinin B receptor [Canis lupus famil...iaris] gb|AAB87706.1| gastrin/CCK-B receptor [Canis lupus familiaris] NP_001013868.1 1e-164 74% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-MEUG-01-2527 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MEUG-01-2527 ref|NP_001013868.1| cholecystokinin B receptor [Canis lupus famil...iaris] gb|AAB87706.1| gastrin/CCK-B receptor [Canis lupus familiaris] NP_001013868.1 1e-165 73% ...

  2. The sigma-2 receptor as a therapeutic target for drug delivery in triple negative breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makvandi, Mehran; Tilahun, Estifanos D.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Anderson, Redmond-Craig; Zeng, Chenbo; Xu, Kuiying; Hou, Catherine; McDonald, Elizabeth S.; Pryma, Daniel A.; Mach, Robert H., E-mail: rmach@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2015-11-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is associated with high relapse rates and increased mortality when compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In contrast to receptor positive breast cancers, there are no approved targeted therapies for TNBC. Identifying biomarkers for TNBC is of high importance for the advancement of patient care. The sigma-2 receptor has been shown to be overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer in vivo and has been characterized as a marker of proliferation. The aim of the present study was to define the sigma-2 receptor as a target for therapeutic drug delivery and biomarker in TNBC. Methods: Three TNBC cell lines were evaluated: MDA-MB-231, HCC1937 and HCC1806. Sigma-2 compounds were tested for pharmacological properties specific to the sigma-2 receptor through competitive inhibition assays. Sigma-2 receptor expression was measured through radioligand receptor saturation studies. Drug sensitivity for taxol was compared to a sigma-2 targeting compound conjugated to a cytotoxic payload, SW IV-134. Cell viability was assessed after treatments for 2 or 48 h. Sigma-2 blockade was assessed to define sigma-2 mediated cytotoxicity of SW IV-134. Caspase 3/7 activation induced by SW IV-134 was measured at corresponding treatment time points. Results: SW IV-134 was the most potent compound tested in two of the three cell lines and was similarly effective in all three. MDA-MB-231 displayed a statistically significant higher sigma-2 receptor expression and also was the most sensitive cell line evaluated to SW IV-134. Conclusion: Targeting the sigma-2 receptor with a cytotoxic payload was effective in all the three cell lines evaluated and provides the proof of concept for future development of a therapeutic platform for the treatment of TNBC. - Highlights: • TNBC cells are sensitive to sigma-2 receptor targeted drug conjugate SW IV-134. • MDA-MB-231 displayed the highest amount of sigma-2 receptors and corresponded well with

  3. Changes in /sup 3/H-substance P receptor binding in the rat brain after kainic acid lesion of the corpus striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantyh, P.W.; Hunt, S.P.

    1986-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the substantia nigra contains the highest concentration of substance P-like immunoreactivity (SPLI) in the brain. Paradoxically, it also appears to contain one of the lowest concentrations of substance P receptors in the brain. One possibility is that the massive amount of SPLI blocks the binding of the radioligand to the substance P receptor and/or down-regulates the number of substance P receptors present in this structure. Since greater than 95% of the SPLI within the substantia nigra originates from the corpus striatum, we have lesioned this area and measured the changes in substance P receptor concentration in the substantia nigra and other corpus striatal projection areas. A semiquantitative autoradiographic technique for measuring the binding of /sup 3/H-substance P to substance P receptors was used in conjunction with tritium-sensitive film. 3H-substance P binding was measured in both the corpus striatum and its projection areas after kainic acid lesion of the corpus striatum. At either 4 or 21 d after the lesion there was approximately a 90% loss of substance P receptors in the rostral striatum, a 74% loss in the globus pallidus, a 57% increase in receptor number in lamina I and II of the ipsilateral somatosensory cortex, and no apparent change in the number of receptors in the substantia nigra pars reticulata, superior colliculus, and central gray. These findings suggest that the low concentration of substance P receptors found within the substantia nigra is not due the massive SPLI innervation, since removal of greater than 95% of the SPLI had no measurable effect on the concentration of substance P receptors.

  4. Equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling on the human adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong; Dijksteel, Gabrielle S; van Duijl, Tirsa; Heezen, Maxime; Heitman, Laura H; IJzerman, Adriaan P

    2016-04-01

    Classical evaluation of target selectivity is usually undertaken by measuring the binding affinity of lead compounds against a number of potential targets under equilibrium conditions, without considering the kinetics of the ligand-receptor interaction. In the present study we propose a combined strategy including both equilibrium- and kinetics-based selectivity profiling. The adenosine receptor (AR) was chosen as a prototypical drug target. Six in-house AR antagonists were evaluated in a radioligand displacement assay for their affinity and in a competition association assay for their binding kinetics on three AR subtypes. One of the compounds with a promising kinetic selectivity profile was also examined in a [(35)S]-GTPγS binding assay for functional activity. We found that XAC and LUF5964 were kinetically more selective for the A1R and A3R, respectively, although they are non-selective in terms of their affinity. In comparison, LUF5967 displayed a strong equilibrium-based selectivity for the A1R over the A2AR, yet its kinetic selectivity thereon was less pronounced. In a GTPγS assay, LUF5964 exhibited insurmountable antagonism on the A3R while having a surmountable effect on the A1R, consistent with its kinetic selectivity profile. This study provides evidence that equilibrium and kinetic selectivity profiling can both be important in the early phases of the drug discovery process. Our proposed combinational strategy could be considered for future medicinal chemistry efforts and aid the design and discovery of different or even better leads for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synthesis and 11C-labelling of two selective high affinity nicotinic cholinergic agonists for evaluation as radioligands for PET studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, F.; Dolci, L.; Valette, H.; Bottlaender, M.; Fournier, D.; Fuseau, C.; Vaufrey, F.; Crouzel, C.

    1996-01-01

    ABT-418 ((S)-3-methyl-5- [1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl]isoxazole) and N-methylcytisine (N-methyl-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexahydro-1,5-methano -8H-pyrido-[1,2-a] [1,5]diazocin-8-one) are two high affinity nicotinic cholinergic agonists. ABT-418 was synthesized in 7 steps from commercially available (S)-Boc-proline in 35% overall yield. Methylation of commercial cytisine cleanly gave N-methyl-cytisine. ABT-418 and N-methylcytisine were labelled using [ 11 C]methyl iodide by methylation of the corresponding nor-precursors for their in vivo evaluation as positron emission tomography (PET) probes of the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in baboon brain. As for [ 11 C]nicotine, specific binding in vivo could not be demonstrated for ABT-418. Therefore, further experiments are needed to determine the full PET pharmacological profile and the subsequent potential clinical applications of ABT-418 as a tracer for PET experiments. For labelled N-methyl-cytisine, radioactivity in the cerebral cortex and in the blood were similar. Thus, 11 C-labelled N-methylcytisine does not appear to be a suitable ligand for mapping brain nAChR. (author)

  6. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude

    2011-01-01

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist 125 I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic β-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic β-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC 50 approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse β-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist 125 I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic β-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  7. Value of the radiolabelled GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) for targeting of GLP-1 receptor-expressing pancreatic tissues in mice and humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Division of Cell Biology and Experimental Cancer Research, Institute of Pathology, P.O. Box 62, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Radiolabelled glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists have recently been shown to successfully image benign insulinomas in patients. Moreover, it was recently reported that antagonist tracers were superior to agonist tracers for somatostatin and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor targeting of tumours. The present preclinical study determines therefore the value of an established GLP-1 receptor antagonist for the in vitro visualization of GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues in mice and humans. Receptor autoradiography studies with {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist or {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) antagonist radioligands were performed in mice pancreas and insulinomas as well as in human insulinomas; competition experiments were performed in the presence of increasing concentration of GLP-1(7-36)amide or exendin(9-39). The antagonist {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter-exendin(9-39) labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells and mouse insulinomas, but it does not label human pancreatic {beta}-cells and insulinomas. High affinity displacement (IC{sub 50} approximately 2 nM) is observed in mouse {beta}-cells and insulinomas with either the exendin(9-39) antagonist or GLP-1(7-36)amide agonist. For comparison, the agonist {sup 125}I-GLP-1(7-36)amide intensively labels mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells, mouse insulinoma and human insulinomas; high affinity displacement is observed for the GLP-1(7-36)amide in all tissues; however, a 5 and 20 times lower affinity is found for exendin(9-39) in the mouse and human tissues, respectively. This study reports a species-dependent behaviour of the GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin(9-39) that can optimally target GLP-1 receptors in mice but not in human tissue. Due to its overly low binding affinity, this antagonist is an inadequate targeting agent for human GLP-1 receptor-expressing tissues, as opposed to the GLP-1 receptor agonist, GLP-1(7-36)amide. (orig.)

  8. PET analysis of the 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist ACP-103 in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Anna-Lena; Mansson, Mattias; Jovanovic, Hristina; Karlsson, Per; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Vanover, Kimberly E; Hacksell, Uli; Brann, Mark R; Davis, Robert E; Weiner, David M

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms underlying the clinical properties of atypical antipsychotics have been postulated to be mediated, in part, by interactions with the 5-HT2A receptor. Recently, it has been recognized that clinically effective antipsychotic drugs are 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonists rather than neutral antagonists. In the present study, which is part of the clinical development of the novel, selective 5-HT2A receptor inverse agonist ACP-103, we applied positron emission tomography (PET) with the radioligand [11C]N-methylspiperone ([11C]NMSP) to study the relationship between oral dose, plasma level, and uptake of ACP-103 in living human brain. The safety of drug administration was also assessed. Four healthy volunteers were examined by PET at baseline, and after the oral administration of various single doses of ACP-103. Two subjects each received 1, 5, and 20 mg doses, and two subjects each received 2, 10, and 100 mg doses, respectively. ACP-103 was well tolerated. Detectable receptor binding was observed at very low ACP-103 serum levels. Cortical [11C]NMSP binding was found to be dose-dependent and fitted well to the law of mass action. A reduction in binding was detectable after an oral dose of ACP-103 as low as 1 mg, and reached near maximal displacement following the 10-20 mg dose. In conclusion, administration of ACP-103 to healthy volunteers was found to be safe and well tolerated, and single oral doses as low as 10 mg were found to fully saturate 5-HT2A receptors in human brain as determined by PET.

  9. Altered Sympathetic-to-Immune Cell Signaling via β2-Adrenergic Receptors in Adjuvant Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne Lorton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA differentially affects norepinephrine concentrations in immune organs, and in vivo β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR agonist treatment distinctly regulates ex vivo cytokine profiles in different immune organs. We examined the contribution of altered β-AR functioning in AA to understand these disparate findings. Twenty-one or 28 days after disease induction, we examined β2-AR expression in spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLNs for the arthritic limbs using radioligand binding and western blots and splenocyte β-AR-stimulated cAMP production using enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA. During severe disease, β-AR agonists failed to induce splenocyte cAMP production, and β-AR affinity and density declined, indicating receptor desensitization and downregulation. Splenocyte β2-AR phosphorylation (pβ2-AR by protein kinase A (pβ2-ARPKA decreased in severe disease, and pβ2-AR by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (pβ2-ARGRK increased in chronic disease. Conversely, in DLN cells, pβ2-ARPKA rose during severe disease, but fell during chronic disease, and pβ2-ARGRK increased during both disease stages. A similar pβ2-AR pattern in DLN cells with the mycobacterial cell wall component of complete Freund’s adjuvant suggests that pattern recognition receptors (i.e., toll-like receptors are important for DLN pβ2-AR patterns. Collectively, our findings indicate lymphoid organ- and disease stage-specific sympathetic dysregulation, possibly explaining immune compartment-specific differences in β2-AR-mediated regulation of cytokine production in AA and rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Altered Sympathetic-to-Immune Cell Signaling via β 2-Adrenergic Receptors in Adjuvant Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Denise L.; Schaller, Jill A.; Osredkar, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant-induced arthritic (AA) differentially affects norepinephrine concentrations in immune organs, and in vivo β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) agonist treatment distinctly regulates ex vivo cytokine profiles in different immune organs. We examined the contribution of altered β-AR functioning in AA to understand these disparate findings. Twenty-one or 28 days after disease induction, we examined β 2-AR expression in spleen and draining lymph nodes (DLNs) for the arthritic limbs using radioligand binding and western blots and splenocyte β-AR-stimulated cAMP production using enzyme-linked immunoassay (EIA). During severe disease, β-AR agonists failed to induce splenocyte cAMP production, and β-AR affinity and density declined, indicating receptor desensitization and downregulation. Splenocyte β 2-AR phosphorylation (pβ 2-AR) by protein kinase A (pβ 2-ARPKA) decreased in severe disease, and pβ 2-AR by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (pβ 2-ARGRK) increased in chronic disease. Conversely, in DLN cells, pβ 2-ARPKA rose during severe disease, but fell during chronic disease, and pβ 2-ARGRK increased during both disease stages. A similar pβ 2-AR pattern in DLN cells with the mycobacterial cell wall component of complete Freund's adjuvant suggests that pattern recognition receptors (i.e., toll-like receptors) are important for DLN pβ 2-AR patterns. Collectively, our findings indicate lymphoid organ- and disease stage-specific sympathetic dysregulation, possibly explaining immune compartment-specific differences in β 2-AR-mediated regulation of cytokine production in AA and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24194774

  11. Valerian extract and valerenic acid are partial agonists of the 5-HT5a receptor in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Birgit M.; Mahady, Gail B.; Pauli, Guido F.; Farnsworth, Norman R.

    2018-01-01

    Insomnia is the most frequently encountered sleep complaint worldwide. While many prescription drugs are used to treat insomnia, extracts of valerian (Valeriana officinalis L., Valerianaceae) are also used for the treatment of insomnia and restlessness. To determine novel mechanisms of action, radioligand binding studies were performed with valerian extracts (100% methanol, 50% methanol, dichloromethane [DCM], and petroleum ether [PE]) at the melatonin, glutamate, and GABAA receptors, and 8 serotonin receptor subtypes. Both DCM and PE extracts had strong binding affinity to the 5-HT5a receptor, but only weak binding affinity to the 5-HT2b and the serotonin transporter. Subsequent binding studies focused on the 5-HT5a receptor due to the distribution of this receptor in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain, which is implicated in the sleep–wake cycle. The PE extract inhibited [3H]lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) binding to the human 5-HT5a receptor (86% at 50 μg/ml) and the DCM extract inhibited LSD binding by 51%. Generation of an IC50 curve for the PE extract produced a biphasic curve, thus GTP shift experiments were also performed. In the absence of GTP, the competition curve was biphasic (two affinity sites) with an IC50 of 15.7 ng/ml for the high-affinity state and 27.7 μg/ml for the low-affinity state. The addition of GTP (100 AM) resulted in a right-hand shift of the binding curve with an IC50 of 11.4 μg/ml. Valerenic acid, the active constituent of both extracts, had an IC50 of 17.2 AM. These results indicate that valerian and valerenic acid are new partial agonists of the 5-HT5a receptor. PMID:15921820

  12. Cartography of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A Receptor Subtypes in Prefrontal Cortex and Its Projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengod, Guadalupe; Palacios, José M; Cortés, Roser

    2015-07-15

    Since the development of chemical neuroanatomical tools in the 1960s, a tremendous wealth of information has been generated on the anatomical components of the serotonergic system, at the microscopic level in the brain including the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The PFC receives a widespread distribution of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) terminals from the median and dorsal raphe nuclei. 5-HT receptors were first visualized using radioligand autoradiography in the late 1980s and early 1990s and showed, in contrast to 5-HT innervation, a differential distribution of binding sites associated with different 5-HT receptor subtypes. Due to the cloning of the different 5-HT receptor subtype genes in the late 1980s and early 1990s, it was possible, using in situ hybridization histochemistry, to localize cells expressing mRNA for these receptors. Double in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry allowed for the chemical characterization of the phenotype of cells expressing 5-HT receptors. Tract tracing technology allowed a detailed cartography of the neuronal connections of PFC and other brain areas. Based on these data, maps have been constructed that reflect our current understanding of the different circuits where 5-HT receptors can modulate the electrophysiological, pharmacological, and behavioral functions of the PFC. We will review current knowledge regarding the cellular localization of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in mammalian PFC and their possible functions in the neuronal circuits of the PFC. We will discuss data generated in our laboratory as well as in others, focusing on localization in the pyramidal and GABAergic neuronal cell populations in different mammalian species using molecular neuroanatomy and on the connections with other brain regions.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of tricarbonyl-Re/Tc(I chelate probes targeting the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER/GPR30.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritwik Burai

    Full Text Available The discovery of the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPER (also GPR30 and the resulting development of selective chemical probes have revealed new aspects of estrogen receptor biology. The potential clinical relevance of this receptor has been suggested from numerous studies that have identified GPER expression in breast, endometrial, ovarian and other cancers. Thus GPER can be considered a candidate biomarker and target for non-invasive imaging and therapy. We have designed and synthesized a series of organometallic tricarbonyl-rhenium complexes conjugated to a GPER-selective small molecule derived from tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline. The activity and selectivity of these chelates in GPER-mediated signaling pathways were evaluated. These results demonstrate that GPER targeting characteristics depend strongly on the structure of the chelate and linkage. Ethanone conjugates functioned as agonists, a 1,2,3-triazole spacer yielded an antagonist, and derivatives with increased steric volume exhibited decreased activities. Promising GPER selectivity was observed, as none of the complexes interacted with the nuclear estrogen receptors. Radiolabeling with technetium-99m in aqueous media was efficient and gave radioligands with high radiochemical yields and purity. These chelates have favorable physicochemical properties, show excellent stability in biologically relevant media, exhibit receptor specificity and are promising candidates for continuing development as diagnostic imaging agents targeting GPER expression in cancer.

  14. The effect of prolonged exposure to morphine on canine cerebral 5-HT2A receptors measured with (123)I-R91150 SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, Antita; Polis, Ingeborgh; Vermeire, Simon; Waelbers, Tim; Croubels, Siska; Duchateau, Luc; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Eersels, Jos; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2014-07-01

    Down-stream neuronal alterations, including changes in the 5-HT-2A receptor system, play an important role in the etiology and treatment of depression. The present study examined the effect of prolonged opioid treatment on cerebral 5-HT2A receptors. Cerebral 5-HT2A receptor availability was estimated in seven healthy five-year-old female neutered Beagle dogs pre and post 10-day morphine treatment (oral sustained release morphine 20mg twice daily for 10 days) with (123)I-R-91150, a 5-HT2A selective radioligand, and SPECT. 5-HT2A receptor binding indices (BI) for the frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital cortex and the subcortical region were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear mixed-effect model with treatment as fixed effect and dog as random effect. Morphine treatment significantly (P≤0.05) lowered 5-HT2A BIs in the right and left frontal cortex, the right and left temporal cortex, the right and left parietal cortex, and the subcortical region. The decreased cerebral 5-HT2A receptor availability following prolonged morphine exposure provides further evidence for an interaction between the opioid and serotonergic system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystal structure and pharmacological characterization of a novel N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist at the GluN1 glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Steffensen, Thomas Bielefeldt; Greenwood, Jeremy R

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. They are tetrameric complexes composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and GluN3 subunits together with glutamate-binding GluN2 subunits. Subunit-selective antagonists that discriminate between the glycine...... sites of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits would be valuable pharmacological tools for studies on the function and physiological roles of NMDA receptor subtypes. In a virtual screening for antagonists that exploit differences in the orthosteric binding site of GluN1 and GluN3 subunits, we identified a novel...... displayed >100-fold selectivity for GluN1/N2 NMDA receptors over GluN3A- and GluN3B-containing NMDA receptors and no appreciable effects at AMPA receptors. Binding experiments on rat brain membranes and the purified GluN1 ligand-binding domain using glycine site GluN1 radioligands further confirmed...

  16. The role of 5-HT2A, 5-HT 2C and mGlu2 receptors in the behavioral effects of tryptamine hallucinogens N,N-dimethyltryptamine and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Theresa M; Eshleman, Amy J; Forster, Michael J; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Gatch, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors are thought to be the primary pharmacological mechanisms for serotonin-mediated hallucinogenic drugs, but recently there has been interest in metabotropic glutamate (mGluR2) receptors as contributors to the mechanism of hallucinogens. The present study assesses the role of these 5-HT and glutamate receptors as molecular targets for two tryptamine hallucinogens, N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) and N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (DiPT). Drug discrimination, head twitch, and radioligand binding assays were used. A 5-HT2AR inverse agonist (MDL100907), 5-HT2CR antagonist (SB242084), and mGluR2/3 agonist (LY379268) were tested for their ability to attenuate the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT and DiPT; an mGluR2/3 antagonist (LY341495) was tested for potentiation. MDL100907 was used to attenuate head twitches induced by DMT and DiPT. Radioligand binding studies and inosital-1-phosphate (IP-1) accumulation were performed at the 5-HT2CR for DiPT. MDL100907 fully blocked the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT, but only partially blocked DiPT. SB242084 partially attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of DiPT, but produced minimal attenuation of DMT's effects. LY379268 produced potent, but only partial blockade of the discriminative stimulus effects of DMT. LY341495 facilitated DMT- and DiPT-like effects. Both compounds elicited head twitches (DiPT>DMT) which were blocked by MDL1000907. DiPT was a low-potency full agonist at 5-HT2CR in vitro. The 5-HT2AR likely plays a major role in mediating the effects of both compounds. 5-HT2C and mGluR2 receptors likely modulate the discriminative stimulus effects of both compounds to some degree.

  17. Validation of In Vitro Cell-Based Human Blood-Brain Barrier Model Using Clinical Positron Emission Tomography Radioligands To Predict In Vivo Human Brain Penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabondzo, A.; Guyot, A.C.; Bottlaender, M.; Deverre, J.R.; Tsaouin, K.; Balimane, P.V.

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated a novel in vitro cell-based human blood-brain barrier (BBB) model that could predict in vivo human brain penetration for compounds with different BBB permeabilities using the clinical positron emission tomography (PET) data. Comparison studies were also performed to demonstrate that the in vitro cell-based human BBB model resulted in better predictivity over the traditional permeability model in discovery organizations, Caco-2 cells. We evaluated the in vivo BBB permeability of [ 18 F] and [ 11 C]-compounds in humans by PET imaging. The in vivo plasma-brain exchange parameters used for comparison were determined in humans by PET using a kinetic analysis of the radiotracer binding. For each radiotracer, the parameters were determined by fitting the brain kinetics of the radiotracer using a two-tissue compartment model of the ligand-receptor interaction. Bidirectional transport studies with the same compounds as in in vivo studies were carried out using the in vitro cell-based human BBB model as well as Caco-2 cells. The in vitro cell-based human BBB model has important features of the BBB in vivo and is suitable for discriminating between CNS and non-CNS marketed drugs. A very good correlation (r 2 =0.90; P≤0.001) was demonstrated between in vitro BBB permeability and in vivo permeability coefficient. In contrast, a poor correlation (r 2 = 0.17) was obtained between Caco-2 data and in vivo human brain penetration. This study highlights the potential of this in vitro cell-based human BBB model in drug discovery and shows that it can be an extremely effective screening tool for CNS programs. (authors)

  18. 5-HT2A receptors in the feline brain: 123I-5-I-R91150 kinetics and the influence of ketamine measured with micro-SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waelbers, Tim; Polis, Ingeborgh; Vermeire, Simon; Dobbeleir, André; Eersels, Jos; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Audenaert, Kurt; Slegers, Guido; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2013-08-01

    Subanesthetic doses of ketamine can be used as a rapid-acting antidepressant in patients with treatment-resistant depression. Therefore, the brain kinetics of (123)I-5-I-R91150 (4-amino-N-[1-[3-(4-fluorophenyl)propyl]-4-methylpiperidin-4-yl]-5-iodo-2-methoxybenzamide) and the influence of ketamine on the postsynaptic serotonin-2A receptor (5-hydroxytryptamine-2A, or 5-HT2A) status were investigated in cats using micro-SPECT. This study was conducted on 6 cats using the radioligand (123)I-5-I-R91150, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, as the imaging probe. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with a continuous-rate infusion of propofol (8.4 ± 1.2 mg kg(-1) followed by 0.22 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) 75 min after tracer administration, and acquisition of the first image began 15 min after induction of anesthesia. After this first acquisition, propofol (0.22 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) was combined with ketamine (5 mg kg(-1) followed by 0.023 mg kg(-1) min(-1)), and the second acquisition began 15 min later. Semiquantification, with the cerebellum as a reference region, was performed to calculate the 5-HT2A receptor binding indices (parameter for available receptor density) in the frontal and temporal cortices. The binding indices were analyzed with Wilcoxon signed ranks statistics. The addition of ketamine to the propofol continuous-rate infusion resulted in decreased binding indices in the right frontal cortex (1.25 ± 0.22 vs. 1.45 ± 0.16; P = 0.028), left frontal cortex (1.34 ± 0.15 vs. 1.49 ± 0.10; P = 0.028), right temporal cortex (1.30 ± 0.17 vs. 1.45 ± 0.09; P = 0.046), and left temporal cortex (1.41 ± 0.20 vs. 1.52 ± 0.20; P = 0.046). This study showed that cats can be used as an animal model for studying alterations of the 5-HT2A receptor status with (123)I-5-I-R91150 micro-SPECT. Furthermore, an interaction between ketamine and the 5-HT2A receptors resulting in decreased binding of (123)I-5-I-R91150 in the frontal and temporal cortices was demonstrated. Whether the

  19. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  20. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy...... is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B......(max) was in accordance with post-mortem brain studies (Spearman's r=0.83, p=0.04), and the regional binding potentials, BP(ND), were on average 2.6 in striatum, 0.42 in prefrontal cortex, and 0.91 in hippocampus. We found no effect of sex but a decreased binding with age (p=0.046). A power analysis showed that, given...

  1. Radiosynthesis of the adenosine A{sub 3} receptor ligand 5-(2-[{sup 18}F]fluoroethyl) 2,4-diethyl-3-(ethylsulfanylcarbonyl)-6-phenylpyridine-5-carboxylate ([{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsak, W. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Mien, L.K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Shanab, K.; Spreitzer, H. [Dept. of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Weber, K.; Schmidt, B.; Haeusler, D. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Sindelar, K.M.; Ettlinger, D.E.; Dudczak, R.; Kletter, K. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Keppler, B.K.; Viernstein, H. [Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Dept. of Pharmaceutical Technology and Biopharmaceutics, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Hospital Pharmacy of the General Hospital of Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    Since to date very limited information on the distribution and function of the adenosine A{sub 3} receptor is available, the development of a suitable radioligand is needed. Such a selective radioligand can then be used for quantitative autoradiography, preclinical studies in animals and subsequent human PET applications. Recently, a promising candidate compound, 5-(2-fluoroethyl) 2,4-diethyl-3-(ethylsulfanylcarbonyl)-6-phenylpyridine-5-carboxylate (FE rate at SUPPY), has been presented. The successful preparation of a suitable labelling precursor and the evaluation and optimization of the radiosynthesis of [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY is presented herewith. For satisfactory yields, a reaction temperature of 75 C has to be applied for at least 20 min using 8-10 mg of precursor. Until now, 15 complete high-scale radiosyntheses were performed. Starting from an average of 51 {+-} 12 GBq (average {+-}SD; range: 30-67 GBq) [{sup 18}F]fluoride, 9.4 {+-} 3.6 GBq of formulated [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY (32.3 {+-} 12.4%, based on [{sup 18}F]fluoride, corrected for decay) were prepared in < 105 min. (orig.)

  2. Reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor binding in the dorsal brain stem after cognitive behavioural therapy of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Mikael; Rück, Christian; Forsberg, Anton; Varrone, Andrea; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Lundberg, Johan

    2014-08-30

    Major depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease, and its pathophysiology is largely unknown. The serotonin hypothesis is, however, the model with most supporting data, although the details are only worked out to some extent. Recent clinical imaging measurements indeed imply a role in major depressive disorder (MDD) for the inhibitory serotonin autoreceptor 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (5-HT1B). The aim of the current study was to examine 5-HT1B receptor binding in the brain of MDD patients before and after psychotherapy. Ten patients with an ongoing untreated moderate depressive episode were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369, before and after treatment with internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. All of the patients examined responded to treatment, and 70% were in remission by the time of the second PET measurement. A statistically significant 33% reduction of binding potential (BPND) was found in the dorsal brain stem (DBS) after treatment. No other significant changes in BPND were found. The DBS contains the raphe nuclei, which regulate the serotonin system. This study gives support for the importance of serotonin and the 5-HT1B receptor in the biological response to psychological treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. α2 adrenergic receptor dysregulation in depressive disorders: implications for the neurobiology of depression and antidepressant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottingham, Christopher; Wang, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunction in noradrenergic neurotransmission has long been theorized to occur in depressive disorders. The α2 adrenergic receptor (AR) family, as a group of key players in regulating the noradrenergic system, has been investigated for involvement in the neurobiology of depression and mechanisms of antidepressant therapies. However, a clear picture of the α2ARs in depressive disorders has not been established due to the existence of apparently conflicting findings in the literature. In this article, we report that a careful accounting of methodological differences within the literature can resolve the present lack of consensus on involvement of α2ARs in depression. In particular, the pharmacological properties of the radioligand (e.g. agonist versus antagonist) utilized for determining receptor density are crucial in determining study outcome. Upregulation of α2AR density detected by radiolabeled agonists but not by antagonists in patients with depressive disorders suggests a selective increase in the density of high-affinity conformational state α2ARs, which is indicative of enhanced G protein coupling to the receptor. Importantly, this high-affinity state α2AR upregulation can be normalized with antidepressant treatments. Thus, depressive disorders appear to be associated with increased α2AR sensitivity and responsiveness, which may represent a physiological basis for the putative noradrenergic dysfunction in depressive disorders. In addition, we review changes in some key α2AR accessory proteins in depressive disorders and discuss their potential contribution to α2AR dysfunction. PMID:22910678

  4. Imaging of sigma receptors in tumors by PET with [C-11]SA4503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Oda, K.; Ishiwata, K.; Kubota, K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Sigma receptors are implicated in some diseases in the central nervous system (CNS), such as schizophrenia, depression, dementia and ischemia, and are also expressed in a variety of human tumors, such as melanoma, carcinoma of the breast, lung and prostate, and the brain tumor. Therefore, several radioligands have been proposed for imaging of sigma receptors by positron emission tomography (PET) and by single photon emission computed tomography. Recently, we have applied [C-11]labeled 1-(3,4-dimethoxyphenethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine ([C-11]SA4503) to mapping sigma1 receptors in the brain of monkeys and human. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of the [C-11]SA4503 PET for imaging of sigma receptors using the AH109A bearing rats, and the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits. Materials and Methods: [C-11]SA4503 was injected i.v. into AH109A bearing rats, and the tissue distribution was measured by tissue dissection. To determine the receptor-specific uptake, cold SA4503 or haloperidol was co-injected into the other group of rats. The PET scanning were performed in the rats in the baseline condition and after pretreatment with haloperidol. In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, PET scanning was also performed in the baseline and blockade conditions. The sigma receptors in the AH109A and VX-2 were measured in vitro by the standard membrane binding assays. Results: The sigma receptors were found in AH109A and VX-2. The density was much higher in VX-2 than in AH109A. In the tissue dissection study, the AH109A uptake of [C-11]SA4503 increased for 60 min after injection. By the co-injection of SA4503 or haloperidol, the AH109A uptake was enhanced. The PET study also confirmed that the radioactivity level in the AH109A was enhanced by the pretreatment with haloperidol. On the other hand, In the VX-2 carcinoma bearing rabbits, the radioactivity level of in VX-2 remained constant after initial uptake in the baseline PET measurement, but the VX-2 uptake was

  5. Ketamine and ketamine metabolites as novel estrogen receptor ligands: Induction of cytochrome P450 and AMPA glutamate receptor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Fen; Correia, Cristina; Ingle, James N; Kaddurah-Daouk, Rima; Wang, Liewei; Kaufmann, Scott H; Weinshilboum, Richard M

    2018-04-03

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most common psychiatric illness worldwide, and it displays a striking sex-dependent difference in incidence, with two thirds of MDD patients being women. Ketamine treatment can produce rapid antidepressant effects in MDD patients, effects that are mediated-at least partially-through glutamatergic neurotransmission. Two active metabolites of ketamine, (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) and (2S,6S)-HNK, also appear to play a key role in ketamine's rapid antidepressant effects through the activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors. In the present study, we demonstrated that estrogen plus ketamine or estrogen plus active ketamine metabolites displayed additive effects on the induction of the expression of AMPA receptor subunits. In parallel, the expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) was also significantly upregulated. Even more striking, radioligand binding assays demonstrated that [ 3 H]-ketamine can directly bind to ERα (K D : 344.5 ± 13 nM). Furthermore, ketamine and its (2R,6R)-HNK and (2S,6S)-HNK metabolites displayed similar affinity for ERα (IC 50 : 2.31 ± 0.1, 3.40 ± 0.2, and 3.53 ± 0.2 µM, respectively) as determined by [ 3 H]-ketamine displacement assays. Finally, induction of AMPA receptors by either estrogens or ketamine and its metabolites was lost when ERα was knocked down or silenced pharmacologically. These results suggest a positive feedback loop by which estrogens can augment the effects of ketamine and its (2R,6R)-HNK and (2S,6S)-HNK metabolites on the ERα-induced transcription of CYP2A6 and CYP2B6, estrogen inducible enzymes that catalyze ketamine's biotransformation to form the two active metabolites. These observations provide novel insight into ketamine's molecular mechanism(s) of action and have potential implications for the treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 5-HT1B receptor imaging and cognition: a positron emission tomography study in control subjects and Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrone, Andrea; Svenningsson, Per; Marklund, Petter; Fatouros-Bergman, Helena; Forsberg, Anton; Halldin, Christer; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Farde, Lars

    2015-07-01

    The serotonin 5-HT1B receptor subtype is involved in the modulation of serotonin release and is a target of interest for neuroreceptor imaging. Previous studies have shown that the serotonin system is affected in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cognitive function, frequently impaired in PD, has been linked to the serotonin system. The aim of this study was to examine whether 5-HT1B receptor availability in the brain of healthy subjects and PD patients is associated with measures of cognitive function. Twelve control subjects and ten PD patients with normal mini-mental state examination scores were included in this study. Cognitive function was evaluated by assessment of semantic, episodic, and working memory, as well as fluency and visual attention. Creative ability, a measure of divergent thinking, was examined with the alternative uses of objects task. PET measurements were performed with the 5-HT1B receptor-radioligand [(11) C]AZ10419369 using the HRRT system. PD patients showed statistically significant lower measures of semantic and episodic memory, as well as creative ability, compared with control subjects. Statistically significant positive correlations were found in control subjects between creative ability and average 5-HT1B receptor availability in grey matter, and in PD patients between scores of Beck Depression Inventory-II and creative ability. Though creativity has been conventionally linked to dopamine function, our findings in control subjects suggest a link between 5-HT1B receptor availability and creative ability. In PD patients, creative ability was significantly associated with depressive symptoms but not with 5-HT1B receptor availability. This finding deserves further investigation in future studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Global decrease of serotonin-1A receptor binding after electroconvulsive therapy in major depression measured by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzenberger, R; Baldinger, P; Hahn, A; Ungersboeck, J; Mitterhauser, M; Winkler, D; Micskei, Z; Stein, P; Karanikas, G; Wadsak, W; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent therapy in severe treatment-refractory depression. Although commonly applied in psychiatric clinical routine since decades, the exact neurobiological mechanism regarding its efficacy remains unclear. Results from preclinical and clinical studies emphasize a crucial involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A) in the mode of action of antidepressant treatment. This includes associations between treatment response and changes in 5-HT1A function and density by antidepressants. Further, alterations of the 5-HT1A receptor are consistently reported in depression. To elucidate the effect of ECT on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 12 subjects with severe treatment-resistant major depression underwent three positron emission tomography (PET) measurements using the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635, twice before (test–retest variability) and once after 10.08±2.35 ECT sessions. Ten patients (∼83%) were responders to ECT. The voxel-wise comparison of the 5-HT1A receptor binding (BPND) before and after ECT revealed a widespread reduction in cortical and subcortical regions (P<0.05 corrected), except for the occipital cortex and the cerebellum. Strongest reductions were found in regions consistently reported to be altered in major depression and involved in emotion regulation, such as the subgenual part of the anterior cingulate cortex (−27.5%), the orbitofrontal cortex (−30.1%), the amygdala (−31.8%), the hippocampus (−30.6%) and the insula (−28.9%). No significant change was found in the raphe nuclei. There was no significant difference in receptor binding in any region comparing the first two PET scans conducted before ECT. This PET study proposes a global involvement of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor binding in the effect of ECT. PMID:22751491

  8. Analysis of changes of serum leptin, C-peptide levels and peripheral fat tissue leptin receptor expression in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of obesity and obesity accompanied type two diabetes mellitus by investigating changes of serum leptin, C-peptide (C-P) levels and leptin receptor expression in peripheral adipose tissues. Methods: Peripheral leptin receptor density was measured via radio-ligand binding method, serum leptin and C - P levels were measured via radioimmunoassay in 91 cases (38 in obesity group, 23 in over weight, and 30 in normal controls). Results: With the increase of body mass index (BMI), the peripheral leptin receptor density of the over weight and obese cases decreased and was mash less than that of normal cases (both p<0.01, respectively). There was no statistical differences for Kd value among the three groups, suggesting no associated change between the binding ability of leptin receptor to its ligand. There was a negative correlation between BMI and leptin receptor density (r = -0.70, p < 0.01). The serum leptin and C-P levels in weight excess and obese subjects with type two DM were both increased, but significantly higher in obese group than those in weight excess group (p < 0.01). The increase of C-P was much marked than that of leptin. Serum C-P level was positively correlated with BMI. Conclusion: Changes of serum leptin, C-P levels and peripheral leptin receptor expression in cases with simple obesity and obesity accompanied with type two DM were related closely with BMI. Type 2 DM in obese subjects was related with leptin resistance and insulin resistance

  9. Homologous desensitization of human histamine H₃ receptors expressed in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Espinoza, Angélica; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Histamine H₃ receptors (H₃Rs) modulate the function of the nervous system at the pre- and post-synaptic levels. In this work we aimed to determine whether, as other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), H₃Rs desensitize in response to agonist exposure. By using CHO-K1 cells stably transfected with the human H₃R (hH3R) we show that functional responses (inhibition of forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation in intact cells and stimulation of [(35)S]-GTPγS binding to cell membranes) were markedly reduced after agonist exposure. For cAMP accumulation assays the effect was significant at 60 min with a maximum at 90 min. Agonist exposure resulted in decreased binding sites for the radioligand [(3)H]-N-methyl-histamine ([(3)H]-NMHA) to intact cells and modified the sub-cellular distribution of H₃Rs, as detected by sucrose density gradients and [(3)H]-NMHA binding to cell membranes, suggesting receptor internalization. The reduction in the inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation observed after agonist pre-incubation was prevented by incubation in hypertonic medium or in ice-cold medium. Agonist-induced loss in binding sites was also prevented by hypertonic medium or incubation at 4 °C, but not by filipin III, indicating clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Immunodetection showed that CHO-K1 cells express GPCR kinases (GRKs) 2/3, and both the GRK general inhibitor ZnCl₂ and a small interfering RNA against GRK-2 reduced receptor desensitization. Taken together these results indicate that hH₃Rs experience homologous desensitization upon prolonged exposure to agonists, and that this process involves the action of GRK-2 and internalization via clathrin-coated vesicles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Elevated Brain Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Availability in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeister, Alexander; Normandin, Marc D.; Pietrzak, Robert H.; Piomelli, Daniele; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Gujarro-Anton, Ana; Potenza, Marc N.; Bailey, Christopher R.; Lin, Shu-fei; Najafzadeh, Soheila; Ropchan, Jim; Henry, Shannan; Corsi-Travali, Stefani; Carson, Richard E.; Huang, Yiyun

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and their attending cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1) have been implicated in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, their specific role has not been studied in people with PTSD. Herein, we present an in vivo imaging study using positron emission tomography (PET) and the CB1-selective radioligand [11C]OMAR in individuals with PTSD, and healthy controls with lifetime histories of trauma (trauma controls [TC]) and those without such histories (healthy controls [HC]). Untreated individuals with PTSD (N=25) with non-combat trauma histories, and TC (N=12) and HC (N=23) participated in a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging scan and a resting PET scan with the CB1 receptor antagonist radiotracer [11C]OMAR, which measures volume of distribution (VT) linearly related to CB1 receptor availability. Peripheral levels of anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), and cortisol were also assessed. In the PTSD group, relative to the HC and TC groups, we found elevated brain-wide [11C]OMAR VT values (F(2,53)=7.96, p=.001; 19.5% and 14.5% higher, respectively) which were most pronounced in women (F(1,53)=5.52, p=.023). Anandamide concentrations were reduced in the PTSD relative to the TC (53.1% lower) and HC (58.2% lower) groups. Cortisol levels were lower in the PTSD and TC groups relative to the HC group. Three biomarkers examined collectively—OMAR VT, anandamide, and cortisol—correctly classified nearly 85% of PTSD cases. These results suggest that abnormal CB1 receptor-mediated anandamide signaling is implicated in the etiology of PTSD, and provide a promising neurobiological model to develop novel, evidence-based pharmacotherapies for this disorder. PMID:23670490

  11. Modes of Action, Resistance and Toxicity of Insecticides Targeting Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Makoto; Buckingham, Steven D; Matsuda, Kazuhiko; Sattelle, David B

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) of insects play a key role in fast excitatory neurotransmission. Several classes of insecticides target insect nAChRs, which are composed of subunit members of a family of multiple subunit encoding genes. Alternative splicing and RNA A-to-I editing can add further to receptor diversity. Native and recombinant receptors have been explored as sites of insecticide action using radioligands, electrophysiology and site-directed mutagenesis. We have reviewed the properties of native and recombinant insect nAChRs, the challenges of functional recombinant insect nAChR expression, nAChR interactions with ligands acting at orthosteric and allosteric sites and in particular their interactions with insecticides. Actions on insect nAChRs of cartap, neonicotinoids, spinosyns, sulfoxamines, butenolides and mesoionic insecticides are reviewed and current knowledge of their modes of action are addressed. Mutations that add to our understanding of insecticide action and those leading to resistance are discussed. Co-crystallisation of neonicotinoids with the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a surrogate for the nAChR ligand binding domain, has proved instructive. Toxicity issues relating to insecticides targeting nAChRs are also considered. An overview of insecticide classes targeting insect nAChRs has enhanced our understanding of these important receptors and their insecticide binding sites. However, the subunit composition of native nAChRs remains poorly understood and functional expression still presents difficulties. These topics together with improved understanding of the precise sites of insecticide actions on insect nAChRs will be the subject of future research. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum disrupts corticosterone receptor signalling in a tissue-specific manner in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Christine R; Romero, L Michael

    2014-01-01

    Stress-induced concentrations of glucocorticoid hormones (including corticosterone, CORT) can be suppressed by chronic exposure to a low dose of ingested petroleum. However, endocrine-disrupting chemicals could interfere with CORT signalling beyond the disruption of hormone titres, including effects on receptors in different target tissues. In this study, we examined the effects of 6 weeks of exposure to a petroleum-laced diet (1% oil weight:food weight) on tissue mass and intracellular CORT receptors in liver, fat, muscle and kidney (metabolic tissues), spleen (an immune tissue) and testes (a reproductive tissue). In the laboratory, male house sparrows were fed either a 1% weathered crude oil (n = 12) or a control diet (n = 12); glucocorticoid receptors and mineralocorticoid receptors were quantified using radioligand binding assays. In oil-exposed birds, glucocorticoid receptors were lower in one metabolic tissue (liver), higher in another metabolic tissue (fat) and unchanged in four other tissues (kidney, muscle, spleen and testes) compared with control birds. We saw no differences in mineralocorticoid receptors between groups. We also saw a trend towards reduced mass of the testes in oil-exposed birds compared with controls, but no differences in fat, kidney, liver, muscle or spleen mass between the two groups. This is the first study to examine the effects of petroleum on CORT receptor density in more than one or two target tissues. Given that a chronic low dose of ingested petroleum can affect stress-induced CORT titres as well as receptor density, this demonstrates that oil can act at multiple levels to disrupt an animal's response to environmental stressors. This also highlights the potential usefulness of the stress response as a bioindicator of chronic crude oil exposure.

  13. Greater adenosine A2A receptor densities in cardiac and skeletal muscle in endurance-trained men: a [11C]TMSX PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Masaki; Kimura, Yuichi; Tokizawa, Ken; Ishii, Kenji; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Nakamura, Yoshio; Muraoka, Isao; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2005-01-01

    We examined the densities of adenosine A 2A receptors in cardiac and skeletal muscles between untrained and endurance-trained subjects using positron emission tomography (PET) and [7-methyl- 11 C]-(E)-8-(3,4,5-trimethoxystyryl)-1,3,7-trimethylxanthine ([ 11 C]TMSX), a newly developed radioligand for mapping adenosine A 2A receptors. Five untrained and five endurance-trained subjects participated in this study. The density of adenosine A 2A receptors was evaluated as the distribution volume of [ 11 C]TMSX in cardiac and triceps brachii muscles in the resting state using PET. The distribution volume of [ 11 C]TMSX in the myocardium was significantly greater than in the triceps brachii muscle in both groups. Further, distribution volumes [ 11 C]TMSX in the trained subjects were significantly grater than those in untrained subjects (myocardium, 3.6±0.3 vs. 3.1±0.4 ml g -1 ; triceps brachii muscle, 1.7±0.3 vs. 1.2±0.2 ml g -1 , respectively). These results indicate that the densities of adenosine A 2A receptors in the cardiac and skeletal muscles are greater in the endurance-trained men than in the untrained men

  14. Binding of imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and N-desmethylthiamethoxam to nicotinic receptors of Myzus persicae: pharmacological profiling using neonicotinoids, natural agonists and antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Hartmut; Lehmann, Katrin; Gomes, Marilyne; Schleicher, Wolfgang; Dotzauer, Karin; Moron, Margarethe; Maienfisch, Peter

    2016-11-01

    The increasing structural diversity of the neonicotinoid class of insecticides presently used in crop protection calls for a more detailed analysis of their mode of action at their cellular targets, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Comparative radioligand binding studies using membranes of Myzus persicae (Sulzer) and representatives of the chloropyridyl subclass (imidacloprid), the chlorothiazolyl subclass (thiamethoxam), the tetrahydrofuranyl subclass (dinotefuran), as well as the novel sulfoximine type (sulfoxaflor), which is not a neonicotinoid, reveal significant differences in the number of binding sites, the displacing potencies and the mode of binding interference. Furthermore, the mode of interaction of [ 3 H]thiamethoxam and the nicotinic antagonists methyllycaconitine and dihydro-β-erythroidine is unique, with Hill values of >1, clearly different to the values of around unity for [ 3 H]imidacloprid and [ 3 H]N-desmethylthiamethoxam. The interaction of [ 3 H]N-desmethylthiamethoxam with the agonist (-)nicotine is also characterised by a Hill value of >1. There is no single conserved site or mode of binding of neonicotinoids and related nicotinic ligands to their target receptor, but a variety of binding pockets depending on the combination of receptor subunits, the receptor subtype, its functional state, as well as the structural flexibility of both the binding pockets and the ligands. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Thinking outside a less intact box: thalamic dopamine D2 receptor densities are negatively related to psychometric creativity in healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orjan de Manzano

    Full Text Available Several lines of evidence support that dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a role in creative thought and behavior. Here, we investigated the relationship between creative ability and dopamine D2 receptor expression in healthy individuals, with a focus on regions where aberrations in dopaminergic function have previously been associated with psychotic symptoms and a genetic liability to schizophrenia. Scores on divergent thinking tests (Inventiveness battery, Berliner Intelligenz Struktur Test were correlated with regional D2 receptor densities, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography, and the radioligands [(11C]raclopride and [(11C]FLB 457. The results show a negative correlation between divergent thinking scores and D2 density in the thalamus, also when controlling for age and general cognitive ability. Hence, the results demonstrate that the D2 receptor system, and specifically thalamic function, is important for creative performance, and may be one crucial link between creativity and psychopathology. We suggest that decreased D2 receptor densities in the thalamus lower thalamic gating thresholds, thus increasing thalamocortical information flow. In healthy individuals, who do not suffer from the detrimental effects of psychiatric disease, this may increase performance on divergent thinking tests. In combination with the cognitive functions of higher order cortical networks, this could constitute a basis for the generative and selective processes that underlie real life creativity.

  16. Thinking outside a less intact box: thalamic dopamine D2 receptor densities are negatively related to psychometric creativity in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manzano, Orjan; Cervenka, Simon; Karabanov, Anke; Farde, Lars; Ullén, Fredrik

    2010-05-17

    Several lines of evidence support that dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a role in creative thought and behavior. Here, we investigated the relationship between creative ability and dopamine D2 receptor expression in healthy individuals, with a focus on regions where aberrations in dopaminergic function have previously been associated with psychotic symptoms and a genetic liability to schizophrenia. Scores on divergent thinking tests (Inventiveness battery, Berliner Intelligenz Struktur Test) were correlated with regional D2 receptor densities, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography, and the radioligands [(11)C]raclopride and [(11)C]FLB 457. The results show a negative correlation between divergent thinking scores and D2 density in the thalamus, also when controlling for age and general cognitive ability. Hence, the results demonstrate that the D2 receptor system, and specifically thalamic function, is important for creative performance, and may be one crucial link between creativity and psychopathology. We suggest that decreased D2 receptor densities in the thalamus lower thalamic gating thresholds, thus increasing thalamocortical information flow. In healthy individuals, who do not suffer from the detrimental effects of psychiatric disease, this may increase performance on divergent thinking tests. In combination with the cognitive functions of higher order cortical networks, this could constitute a basis for the generative and selective processes that underlie real life creativity.

  17. The ketamine analogue methoxetamine and 3- and 4-methoxy analogues of phencyclidine are high affinity and selective ligands for the glutamate NMDA receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan L Roth

    Full Text Available In this paper we determined the pharmacological profiles of novel ketamine and phencyclidine analogues currently used as 'designer drugs' and compared them to the parent substances via the resources of the National Institute of Mental Health Psychoactive Drug Screening Program. The ketamine analogues methoxetamine ((RS-2-(ethylamino-2-(3-methoxyphenylcyclohexanone and 3-MeO-PCE (N-ethyl-1-(3-methoxyphenylcyclohexanamine and the 3- and 4-methoxy analogues of phencyclidine, (1-[1-(3-methoxyphenylcyclohexyl]piperidine and 1-[1-(4-methoxyphenylcyclohexyl]piperidine, were all high affinity ligands for the PCP-site on the glutamate NMDA receptor. In addition methoxetamine and PCP and its analogues displayed appreciable affinities for the serotonin transporter, whilst the PCP analogues exhibited high affinities for sigma receptors. Antagonism of the NMDA receptor is thought to be the key pharmacological feature underlying the actions of dissociative anaesthetics. The novel ketamine and PCP analogues had significant affinities for the NMDA receptor in radioligand binding assays, which may explain their psychotomimetic effects in human users. Additional actions on other targets could be important for delineating side-effects.

  18. Long-Term Activation upon Brief Exposure to Xanomleline Is Unique to M1 and M4 Subtypes of Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantrůčková, Eva; Doležal, Vladimír; El-Fakahany, Esam E.; Jakubík, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Xanomeline is an agonist endowed with functional preference for M1/M4 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. It also exhibits both reversible and wash-resistant binding to and activation of these receptors. So far the mechanisms of xanomeline selectivity remain unknown. To address this question we employed microfluorometric measurements of intracellular calcium levels and radioligand binding to investigate differences in the short- and long-term effects of xanomeline among muscarinic receptors expressed individually in Chinese hamster ovary cells. 1/One-min exposure of cells to xanomeline markedly increased intracellular calcium at hM1 and hM4, and to a lesser extent at hM2 and hM3 muscarinic receptors for more than 1 hour. 2/Unlike the classic agonists carbachol, oxotremorine, and pilocarpine 10-min exposure to xanomeline did not cause internalization of any receptor subtype. 3/Wash-resistant xanomeline selectively prevented further increase in intracellular calcium by carbachol at hM1 and hM4 receptors. 4/After transient activation xanomeline behaved as a long-term antagonist at hM5 receptors. 5/The antagonist N-methylscopolamine (NMS) reversibly blocked activation of hM1 through hM4 receptors by xanomeline. 6/NMS prevented formation of xanomeline wash-resistant binding and activation at hM2 and hM4 receptors and slowed them at hM1, hM3 and hM5 receptors. Our results show commonalities of xanomeline reversible and wash-resistant binding and short-time activation among the five muscarinic receptor subtypes. However long-term receptor activation takes place in full only at hM1 and hM4 receptors. Moreover xanomeline displays higher efficacy at hM1 and hM4 receptors in primary phasic intracellular calcium release. These findings suggest the existence of particular activation mechanisms specific to these two receptors. PMID:24558448

  19. Radio-peptides targeting g-protein coupled receptors in cancer: from bench to bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maecke, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    be discussed. They appear to have better imaging properties than agonists. How (coordination) chemistry affects pharmacology will be an important focus of this lecture. Another important aspect will be to discuss the different properties of agonistic radioligands which cause signaling and internalisation (transfer of the receptor ligand complex into the cell) and antagonists which block the action of agonists and are not internalised but may recognise more receptor binding sites. Finally early and extended human use studies will be presented for the 2 tumor entities mentioned above. It will be demonstrated how improved peptide and chelate chemistry improves diagnostic accuracy and therapeutic outcome in tumor treatment. (author)

  20. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    physiology and develop- mental biology of silkworms, and use of silk in industrial applications. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), one of the best characterized cell-surface receptors, mediates cholesterol ho- meostasis and other functions in mammals. The members of the LDLR superfamily are structurally related ...

  1. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/08/0748-0755. Keywords. Low-density lipoprotein receptor; lipophorin; lipophorin receptor; insects. Author Affiliations. G Ravikumar1 N B Vijayaprakash1. Seri-biotech Research Laboratory Central Silk Board Kodathi, Carmelaram Post Bangalore 560 035, India.

  2. The opioid receptors of the rat periaqueductal gray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedynyshyn, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The opioid binding characteristics of the rat (PAG) and the signal transduction mechanisms of the opioid receptors were examined with in vitro radioligand binding, GTPase, adenylyl cyclase, and inositol phosphate assays. The nonselective ligand {sup 3}H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), the {mu} and {delta} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Ala{sup 2}, D-Leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE), the {mu} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Ala{sup 2}, N-methyl Phe{sup 4}, Glyol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAGO), and the {delta} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) were separately used as tracer ligands to label opioid binding sites in rat PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane in competition with unlabeled DADLE, DAGO, DPDPE, or the {kappa} selective ligand trans-3,4-dichloro-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide, methane sulfonate, hydrate (U50, 488H). Only {mu} selective high affinity opioid binding was observed. No high affinity {delta} or {kappa} selective binding was detected. {sup 3}H-DAGO was used as a tracer ligand to label {mu} selective high affinity opioid binding sites in PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane in competition with unlabeled {beta}-endorphin, dynorphin A (1-17), BAM-18, methionine enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-8), and leucine enkephalin. Of these endogenous opioid peptides only those with previously reported high affinity {mu} type opioid binding activity competed with {sup 3}H-DAGO for binding sites in rat PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane with affinities similar to that of unlabeled DAGO.

  3. Synthesis and radiofluorination of putative NMDA receptor ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, U.

    2011-01-01

    In the course of this work on the synthesis of radioligands for the NMDA receptor the authentic standards and labeling precursors of four compounds with an amidine structure was performed. Synthesis of the precursors followed reaction conditions given in the literature and was successful. The imidoesters used for the synthesis were obtained from their nitriles in a Pinner synthesis, while 2-hydroxybenzylamine was synthesized in a reduction of 2-hydroxybenzonitrile using borane as a reducing agent. After a coupling reaction of the amine and the imidoester in DMF using triethylamine as base the precursors were obtained in good yields and purified by crystallization from methanol. The cyclic standard compound was synthesized directly from 2-(bromomethyl)- benzonitrile and 2-hydroxybenzylamine in a ring closing reaction. Similar to the other precursors, crystallization from methanol produced a pure compound. The authentic standards were synthesized starting from salicylaldehyde. In a four step synthesis the desired ortho-fluoroethoxybenzylamine was obtained in good yield. Coupling of the amine with the respective imidoester or in the case of the cyclic compound 2-(bromomethyl)-benzonitrile gave the desired product which was then purified by column chromatography or by crystallization from ethanol and water. For the labeling procedure 1-bromo-2-[ 18 F]fluoroethane was synthesized following a previously published pathway starting from 1,2-dibromoethane. An alternative route of radiosynthesis for this prosthetic group was tested using ethyleneglycole- 1,2-ditosylate. The labeling reaction was performed on one of the precursors testing both DMF and DMSO as solvents and using NaOH as base. Yields of N-(2-fluoroethoxybenzyl)- cinnamamidine were about 78 % at 80 C after 30 minutes in DMSO. The desired product can now be synthesized in sufficient yields for in vitro and in vivo evaluation studies. Labeling on the cyclic precursor was attempted utilizing DMSO as solvent, but no

  4. Synthesis and radiofluorination of putative NMDA receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, U.

    2011-01-15

    In the course of this work on the synthesis of radioligands for the NMDA receptor the authentic standards and labeling precursors of four compounds with an amidine structure was performed. Synthesis of the precursors followed reaction conditions given in the literature and was successful. The imidoesters used for the synthesis were obtained from their nitriles in a Pinner synthesis, while 2-hydroxybenzylamine was synthesized in a reduction of 2-hydroxybenzonitrile using borane as a reducing agent. After a coupling reaction of the amine and the imidoester in DMF using triethylamine as base the precursors were obtained in good yields and purified by crystallization from methanol. The cyclic standard compound was synthesized directly from 2-(bromomethyl)- benzonitrile and 2-hydroxybenzylamine in a ring closing reaction. Similar to the other precursors, crystallization from methanol produced a pure compound. The authentic standards were synthesized starting from salicylaldehyde. In a four step synthesis the desired ortho-fluoroethoxybenzylamine was obtained in good yield. Coupling of the amine with the respective imidoester or in the case of the cyclic compound 2-(bromomethyl)-benzonitrile gave the desired product which was then purified by column chromatography or by crystallization from ethanol and water. For the labeling procedure 1-bromo-2-[{sub 18}F]fluoroethane was synthesized following a previously published pathway starting from 1,2-dibromoethane. An alternative route of radiosynthesis for this prosthetic group was tested using ethyleneglycole- 1,2-ditosylate. The labeling reaction was performed on one of the precursors testing both DMF and DMSO as solvents and using NaOH as base. Yields of N-(2-fluoroethoxybenzyl)- cinnamamidine were about 78 % at 80 C after 30 minutes in DMSO. The desired product can now be synthesized in sufficient yields for in vitro and in vivo evaluation studies. Labeling on the cyclic precursor was attempted utilizing DMSO as solvent

  5. Incretin physiology beyond glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide: cholecystokinin and gastrin peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, J F

    2011-01-01

    and neonatal islets express significant amounts of gastrin, and human as well as porcine islet cells express the gastrin/CCK-B receptor abundantly. Therefore, exogenous gastrin and CCK peptides stimulate insulin and glucagon secretion in man. Accordingly, endogenous hypergastrinaemia is accompanied by islet...

  6. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  7. Synthesis and pharmacological properties of new antihypertensive compounds, the [(benzodioxan - 1,4,)yl-5]-1 alkylamino-2 ethanols. Synthesis and properties of reversible ligands of central serotoninergic receptors: oxygenated isosteres of hydroxy-8 di-n-propylamino- 3 tetralin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Christine

    1988-01-01

    After some recalls on hypertension and on its various treatments, the first part of this thesis in pharmaceutical sciences addresses the synthesis of new molecules, the [(benzodioxan - 1,4,)yl-5]-1 alkylamino-2 ethanols. The author also explains the choice for this structure, and addresses the pharmacological activity of these molecules. The experimental study notably comprises the study of proton NMR spectra and of mass spectra, percentage analyses, fusion point measurements, and liquid-solid chromatography. Pharmacological tests have been performed on rats and on dogs, and did not completely gave the expected results. Therefore, the second part reports other researches related to the central nervous system with the study of the synthesis of radioactive ligands which allows a better knowledge on central serotoninergic receptors. The author reports the development of a new radio-ligand which selectively labels receptor sites of serotonin in the central nervous system [fr

  8. Sleep deprivation decreases binding of [11C]raclopride to dopamine D2/D3 receptors in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Fowler, Joanna S; Logan, Jean; Wong, Christopher; Ma, Jim; Pradhan, Kith; Tomasi, Dardo; Thanos, Peter K; Ferré, Sergi; Jayne, Millard

    2008-08-20

    Sleep deprivation did not affect dopamine transporters (target for most wake-promoting medications) and thus dopamine increases are likely to reflect increases in dopamine cell firing and/or release rather than decreases in dopamine reuptake. Because dopamine-enhancing drugs increase wakefulness, we postulate that dopamine increases after sleep deprivation is a mechanism by which the brain maintains arousal as the drive to sleep increases but one that is insufficient to counteract behavioral and cognitive impairment. Sleep deprivation can markedly impair human performance contributing to accidents and poor productivity. The mechanisms underlying this impairment are not well understood, but brain dopamine systems have been implicated. Here, we test whether one night of sleep deprivation changes dopamine brain activity. We studied 15 healthy subjects using positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand) and [11C]cocaine (dopamine transporter radioligand). Subjects were tested twice: after one night of rested sleep and after one night of sleep deprivation. The specific binding of [11C]raclopride in the striatum and thalamus were significantly reduced after sleep deprivation and the magnitude of this reduction correlated with increases in fatigue (tiredness and sleepiness) and with deterioration in cognitive performance (visual attention and working memory). In contrast, sleep deprivation did not affect the specific binding of [11C]cocaine in the striatum. Because [11C]raclopride competes with endogenous dopamine for binding to D2/D3 receptors, we interpret the decreases in binding to reflect dopamine increases with sleep deprivation. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that decreased [11C]raclopride binding reflects decreases in receptor levels or affinity. Sleep deprivation did not affect dopamine transporters (target for most wake-promoting medications) and thus dopamine increases are likely to reflect increases in

  9. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  10. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A. O.; Kuiper, G. G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van Rooij, H. C.; Romalo, G.; Trifiro, M.; Mulder, E.; Pinsky, L.; Schweikert, H. U.; Trapman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of the genomic organization of the

  11. The Target Residence Time of Antihistamines Determines Their Antagonism of the G Protein-Coupled Histamine H1 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reggie Bosma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacodynamics of drug-candidates is often optimized by metrics that describe target binding (Kd or Ki value or target modulation (IC50. However, these metrics are determined at equilibrium conditions, and consequently information regarding the onset and offset of target engagement and modulation is lost. Drug-target residence time is a measure for the lifetime of the drug-target complex, which has recently been receiving considerable interest, as target residence time is shown to have prognostic value for the in vivo efficacy of several drugs. In this study, we have investigated the relation between the increased residence time of antihistamines at the histamine H1 receptor (H1R and the duration of effective target-inhibition by these antagonists. Hela cells, endogenously expressing low levels of the H1R, were incubated with a series of antihistamines and dissociation was initiated by washing away the unbound antihistamines. Using a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye and a label free, dynamic mass redistribution based assay, functional recovery of the H1R responsiveness was measured by stimulating the cells with histamine over time, and the recovery was quantified as the receptor recovery time. Using these assays, we determined that the receptor recovery time for a set of antihistamines differed more than 40-fold and was highly correlated to their H1R residence times, as determined with competitive radioligand binding experiments to the H1R in a cell homogenate. Thus, the receptor recovery time is proposed as a cell-based and physiologically relevant metric for the lead optimization of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists, like the H1R antagonists. Both, label-free or real-time, classical signaling assays allow an efficient and physiologically relevant determination of kinetic properties of drug molecules.

  12. The Target Residence Time of Antihistamines Determines Their Antagonism of the G Protein-Coupled Histamine H1 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Reggie; Witt, Gesa; Vaas, Lea A. I.; Josimovic, Ivana; Gribbon, Philip; Vischer, Henry F.; Gul, Sheraz; Leurs, Rob

    2017-01-01

    The pharmacodynamics of drug-candidates is often optimized by metrics that describe target binding (Kd or Ki value) or target modulation (IC50). However, these metrics are determined at equilibrium conditions, and consequently information regarding the onset and offset of target engagement and modulation is lost. Drug-target residence time is a measure for the lifetime of the drug-target complex, which has recently been receiving considerable interest, as target residence time is shown to have prognostic value for the in vivo efficacy of several drugs. In this study, we have investigated the relation between the increased residence time of antihistamines at the histamine H1 receptor (H1R) and the duration of effective target-inhibition by these antagonists. Hela cells, endogenously expressing low levels of the H1R, were incubated with a series of antihistamines and dissociation was initiated by washing away the unbound antihistamines. Using a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye and a label free, dynamic mass redistribution based assay, functional recovery of the H1R responsiveness was measured by stimulating the cells with histamine over time, and the recovery was quantified as the receptor recovery time. Using these assays, we determined that the receptor recovery time for a set of antihistamines differed more than 40-fold and was highly correlated to their H1R residence times, as determined with competitive radioligand binding experiments to the H1R in a cell homogenate. Thus, the receptor recovery time is proposed as a cell-based and physiologically relevant metric for the lead optimization of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists, like the H1R antagonists. Both, label-free or real-time, classical signaling assays allow an efficient and physiologically relevant determination of kinetic properties of drug molecules. PMID:29033838

  13. Regulation of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum of DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianjun; Kouranova, Evguenia; Cui, Xiaoxia; Mach, Robert H.; Xu, Jinbin

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic autosomal recessive mutations in the DJ-1 (Park7) or the PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (Pink1 or PARK6) genes are associated with familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). It is not well known regarding the pathological mechanisms involving the DJ-1 and Pink1 mutations. Here we characterized DJ-1 and Pink1 knockout rats both through expression profiling and using quantitative autoradiography to measure the densities of the dopamine D1, D2, D3 receptors, vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) in the striatum of transgenic rats and wild type controls. Expression profiling with a commercially available array of 84 genes known to be involved in PD indicated that only the target gene was significantly downregulated in each transgenic rat model. D1 receptor, VMAT2, and DAT were measured using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. No significant changes were observed in the density of DAT in either model. Although the densities of VMAT2 and D1 receptor were unchanged in Pink1 knockout, but both were increased in DJ-1 knockout rats. The densities of D2 and D3 receptors, determined by mathematical analysis of binding of radioligands [3H]WC-10 and [3H]raclopride, were significantly increased in both knockout models. These distinctive changes in the expression of dopamine presynaptic markers and receptors in the striatum may reflect different compensatory regulation of dopamine system in DJ-1 versus Pink1 knockout rat models of familial PD. PMID:24157858

  14. The Target Residence Time of Antihistamines Determines Their Antagonism of the G Protein-Coupled Histamine H1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Reggie; Witt, Gesa; Vaas, Lea A I; Josimovic, Ivana; Gribbon, Philip; Vischer, Henry F; Gul, Sheraz; Leurs, Rob

    2017-01-01

    The pharmacodynamics of drug-candidates is often optimized by metrics that describe target binding (K d or K i value) or target modulation (IC 50 ). However, these metrics are determined at equilibrium conditions, and consequently information regarding the onset and offset of target engagement and modulation is lost. Drug-target residence time is a measure for the lifetime of the drug-target complex, which has recently been receiving considerable interest, as target residence time is shown to have prognostic value for the in vivo efficacy of several drugs. In this study, we have investigated the relation between the increased residence time of antihistamines at the histamine H 1 receptor (H 1 R) and the duration of effective target-inhibition by these antagonists. Hela cells, endogenously expressing low levels of the H 1 R, were incubated with a series of antihistamines and dissociation was initiated by washing away the unbound antihistamines. Using a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye and a label free, dynamic mass redistribution based assay, functional recovery of the H 1 R responsiveness was measured by stimulating the cells with histamine over time, and the recovery was quantified as the receptor recovery time . Using these assays, we determined that the receptor recovery time for a set of antihistamines differed more than 40-fold and was highly correlated to their H 1 R residence times, as determined with competitive radioligand binding experiments to the H 1 R in a cell homogenate. Thus, the receptor recovery time is proposed as a cell-based and physiologically relevant metric for the lead optimization of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists, like the H 1 R antagonists. Both, label-free or real-time, classical signaling assays allow an efficient and physiologically relevant determination of kinetic properties of drug molecules.

  15. The serotonin-1A receptor distribution in healthy men and women measured by PET and [carbonyl-11C]WAY-100635

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, Patrycja; Savli, Markus; Fink, Martin; Spindelegger, Christoph; Moser, Ulrike; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt; Mitterhauser, Markus; Mien, Leonhard-Key

    2008-01-01

    The higher prevalence rates of depression and anxiety disorders in women compared to men have been associated with sexual dimorphisms in the serotonergic system. The present positron emission tomography (PET) study investigated the influence of sex on the major inhibitory serotonergic receptor subtype, the serotonin-1A (5-HT 1A ) receptor. Sixteen healthy women and 16 healthy men were measured using PET and the highly specific radioligand [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635. Effects of age or gonadal hormones were excluded by restricting the inclusion criteria to young adults and by controlling for menstrual cycle phase. The 5-HT 1A receptor BP ND was quantified using (1) the 'gold standard' manual delineation approach with ten regions of interest (ROIs) and (2) a newly developed delineation method using a PET template normalized to the Montreal Neurologic Institute space with 45 ROIs based on automated anatomical labeling. The 5-HT 1A receptor BP ND was found equally distributed in men and women applying both the manual delineation method and the automated delineation approach. Women had lower mean BP ND values in every region investigated, with a borderline significant sex difference in the hypothalamus (p=0.012, uncorrected). There was a high intersubject variability of the 5-HT 1A receptor BP ND within both sexes compared to the small mean differences between men and women. To conclude, when measured in the follicular phase, women do not differ from men in the 5-HT 1A receptor binding. To explain the higher prevalence of affective disorders in women, further studies are needed to evaluate the relationship between hormonal status and the 5-HT 1A receptor expression. (orig.)

  16. Correlation of stable elevations in striatal mu-opioid receptor availability in detoxified alcoholic patients with alcohol craving: a positron emission tomography study using carbon 11-labeled carfentanil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Andreas; Reimold, Matthias; Wrase, Jana; Hermann, Derik; Croissant, Bernhard; Mundle, Götz; Dohmen, Bernhard M; Braus, Dieter F; Braus, Dieter H; Schumann, Gunter; Machulla, Hans-Jürgen; Bares, Roland; Mann, Karl

    2005-01-01

    The pleasant effects of food and alcohol intake are partially mediated by mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, a central area of the brain reward system. Blockade of mu-opiate receptors with naltrexone reduces the relapse risk among some but not all alcoholic individuals. To test the hypothesis that alcohol craving is pronounced among alcoholic individuals with a high availability of mu-opiate receptors in the brain reward system. Patients and comparison sample. The availability of central mu-opiate receptors was measured in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) and the radioligand carbon 11-labeled carfentanil in the ventral striatum and compared with the severity of alcohol craving as assessed by the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS). Hospitalized care. Volunteer sample of 25 male alcohol-dependent inpatients assessed after detoxification of whom 12 underwent PET again 5 weeks later. Control group of 10 healthy men. After 1 to 3 weeks of abstinence, the availability of mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, was significantly elevated in alcoholic patients compared with healthy controls and remained elevated when 12 alcoholic patients had these levels measured 5 weeks later (P<.05 corrected for multiple testing). Higher availability of mu-opiate receptors in this brain area correlated significantly with the intensity of alcohol craving as assessed by the OCDS. Abstinent alcoholic patients displayed an increase in mu-opiate receptors in the ventral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens, which correlated with the severity of alcohol craving. These findings point to a neuronal correlate of alcohol urges.

  17. The serotonin-1A receptor distribution in healthy men and women measured by PET and [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Patrycja; Savli, Markus; Fink, Martin; Spindelegger, Christoph; Moser, Ulrike; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Wadsak, Wolfgang; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, Markus; Mien, Leonhard-Key [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-12-15

    The higher prevalence rates of depression and anxiety disorders in women compared to men have been associated with sexual dimorphisms in the serotonergic system. The present positron emission tomography (PET) study investigated the influence of sex on the major inhibitory serotonergic receptor subtype, the serotonin-1A (5-HT{sub 1A}) receptor. Sixteen healthy women and 16 healthy men were measured using PET and the highly specific radioligand [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635. Effects of age or gonadal hormones were excluded by restricting the inclusion criteria to young adults and by controlling for menstrual cycle phase. The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor BP{sub ND} was quantified using (1) the 'gold standard' manual delineation approach with ten regions of interest (ROIs) and (2) a newly developed delineation method using a PET template normalized to the Montreal Neurologic Institute space with 45 ROIs based on automated anatomical labeling. The 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor BP{sub ND} was found equally distributed in men and women applying both the manual delineation method and the automated delineation approach. Women had lower mean BP{sub ND} values in every region investigated, with a borderline significant sex difference in the hypothalamus (p=0.012, uncorrected). There was a high intersubject variability of the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor BP{sub ND} within both sexes compared to the small mean differences between men and women. To conclude, when measured in the follicular phase, women do not differ from men in the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor binding. To explain the higher prevalence of affective disorders in women, further studies are needed to evaluate the relationship between hormonal status and the 5-HT{sub 1A} receptor expression. (orig.)

  18. Cellular localization of kinin B1 receptor in the spinal cord of streptozotocin-diabetic rats with a fluorescent [Nα-Bodipy]-des-Arg9-bradykinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudreau Pierrette

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, bacterial endotoxins and hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. In animal models of diabetes, it contributes to pain polyneuropathy. This study aims at defining the cellular localization of B1R in thoracic spinal cord of type 1 diabetic rats by confocal microscopy with the use of a fluorescent agonist, [Nα-Bodipy]-des-Arg9-BK (BdABK and selective antibodies. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg, i.p.. Four days post-STZ treatment, B1R expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and autoradiography. The B1R selectivity of BdABK was determined by assessing its ability to displace B1R [125I]-HPP-desArg10-Hoe140 and B2R [125I]-HPP-Hoe 140 radioligands. The in vivo activity of BdABK was also evaluated on thermal hyperalgesia. Results B1R was increased by 18-fold (mRNA and 2.7-fold (binding sites in the thoracic spinal cord of STZ-treated rats when compared to control. BdABK failed to displace the B2R radioligand but displaced the B1R radioligand (IC50 = 5.3 nM. In comparison, IC50 values of B1R selective antagonist R-715 and B1R agonist des-Arg9-BK were 4.3 nM and 19 nM, respectively. Intraperitoneal BdABK and des-Arg9-BK elicited dose-dependent thermal hyperalgesia in STZ-treated rats but not in control rats. The B1R fluorescent agonist was co-localized with immunomarkers of microglia, astrocytes and sensory C fibers in the spinal cord of STZ-treated rats. Conclusion The induction and up-regulation of B1R in glial and sensory cells of the spinal cord in STZ-diabetic rats reinforce the idea that kinin B1R is an important target for drug development in pain processes.

  19. Adenosine receptors as markers of brain iron deficiency: Implications for Restless Legs Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Gulyani, Seema; Ruiqian, Wan; Bonaventura, Jordi; Cutler, Roy; Pearson, Virginia; Allen, Richard P.; Earley, Christopher J.; Mattson, Mark P.; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-01-01

    Deficits of sensorimotor integration with periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and hyperarousal and sleep disturbances in Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) constitute two pathophysiologically distinct but interrelated clinical phenomena, which seem to depend mostly on alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. Brain iron deficiency is considered as a main pathogenetic mechanism in RLS. Rodents with brain iron deficiency represent a valuable pathophysiological model of RLS, although they do not display motor disturbances. Nevertheless, they develop the main neurochemical dopaminergic changes found in RLS, such as decrease in striatal dopamine D2 receptor density. On the other hand, brain iron deficient mice exhibit the characteristic pattern of hyperarousal in RLS, providing a tool to find the link between brain iron deficiency and sleep disturbances in RLS. The present study provides evidence for a role of the endogenous sleep-promoting factor adenosine. Three different experimental preparations, long-term (22 weeks) severe or moderate iron-deficient (ID) diets (3- or 7-ppm iron diet) in mice and short-term (3 weeks) severe ID diet (3-ppm iron diet) in rats, demonstrated a significant downregulation (Western blotting in mouse and radioligand binding saturation experiments in rat brain tissue) of adenosine A1 receptors (A1R) in the cortex and striatum, concomitant to striatal D2R downregulation. On the other hand, the previously reported upregulation of adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) was only observed with severe ID in both mice and rats. The results suggest a key role for A1R downregulation in the PLMS and hyperarousal in RLS. PMID:27600688

  20. Adenosine receptors as markers of brain iron deficiency: Implications for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, César; Gulyani, Seema; Ruiqian, Wan; Bonaventura, Jordi; Cutler, Roy; Pearson, Virginia; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J; Mattson, Mark P; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-12-01

    Deficits of sensorimotor integration with periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) and hyperarousal and sleep disturbances in Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) constitute two pathophysiologically distinct but interrelated clinical phenomena, which seem to depend mostly on alterations in dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurotransmission, respectively. Brain iron deficiency is considered as a main pathogenetic mechanism in RLS. Rodents with brain iron deficiency represent a valuable pathophysiological model of RLS, although they do not display motor disturbances. Nevertheless, they develop the main neurochemical dopaminergic changes found in RLS, such as decrease in striatal dopamine D 2 receptor density. On the other hand, brain iron deficient mice exhibit the characteristic pattern of hyperarousal in RLS, providing a tool to find the link between brain iron deficiency and sleep disturbances in RLS. The present study provides evidence for a role of the endogenous sleep-promoting factor adenosine. Three different experimental preparations, long-term (22 weeks) severe or moderate iron-deficient (ID) diets (3- or 7-ppm iron diet) in mice and short-term (3 weeks) severe ID diet (3-ppm iron diet) in rats, demonstrated a significant downregulation (Western blotting in mouse and radioligand binding saturation experiments in rat brain tissue) of adenosine A 1 receptors (A1R) in the cortex and striatum, concomitant to striatal D2R downregulation. On the other hand, the previously reported upregulation of adenosine A 2A receptors (A2AR) was only observed with severe ID in both mice and rats. The results suggest a key role for A1R downregulation in the PLMS and hyperarousal in RLS. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Selectivity optimization of substituted 1,2,3-triazoles as α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunrungvichian, Kuntarat; Fokin, Valery V; Vajragupta, Opa; Taylor, Palmer

    2015-08-19

    Three series of substituted anti-1,2,3-triazoles (IND, PPRD, and QND), synthesized by cycloaddition from azide and alkyne building blocks, were designed to enhance selectivity and potency profiles of a lead α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR) agonist, TTIn-1. Designed compounds were synthesized and screened for affinity by a radioligand binding assay. Their functional characterization as agonists and antagonists was performed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay using cell lines expressing transfected cDNAs, α7-nAChRs, α4β2-nAChRs, and 5HT3A receptors, and a fluorescence cell reporter. In the IND series, a tropane ring of TTIn-1, substituted at N1, was replaced by mono- and bicyclic amines to vary length and conformational flexibility of a carbon linker between nitrogen atom and N1 of the triazole. Compounds with a two-carbon atom linker optimized binding with Kd's at the submicromolar level. Further modification at the hydrophobic indole of TTIn-1 was made in PPRD and QND series by fixing the amine center with the highest affinity building blocks in the IND series. Compounds from IND and PPRD series are selective as agonists for the α7-nAChRs over α4β2-nAChRs and 5HT3A receptors. Lead compounds in the three series have EC50's between 28 and 260 nM. Based on the EC50, affinity, and selectivity determined from the binding and cellular responses, two of the leads have been advanced to behavioral studies described in the companion article (DOI: 10.1021/acschemneuro.5b00059).

  2. {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding and serum corticosterone level during psychological stress in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi E-mail: GZL13162@nifty.ne.jp; Ogi, Shigeyuki; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Mori, Yutaka

    2004-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that benzodiazepine receptor density decreases in response to stress, we correlated {sup 125}I-iomazenil ({sup 125}I-IMZ) binding with serum corticosterone levels in a rat model. Wistar male rats were divided into four groups; control group (CON, 10 rats), no physical or psychological stress; and one-, three-, and five-day stress groups of 12 rats each (1-DAY, 3-DAY, and 5-DAY, respectively), receiving psychological stress for the given number of days. Psychological stress were given to rats with a communication box. The standardized uptake value (SUV) of {sup 125}I-iomazenil of the 3-DAY and 5-DAY showed that {sup 125}I-iomazenil - benzodiazepine receptor binding was significantly reduced in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen (p<0.05). Serum corticosterone level ratio appeared to be slightly elevated in 3-DAY and 5-DAY, although this elevation was not significant. These data suggest that {sup 125}I-IMZ is a useful radioligand to reflect received stress and its binding in the cortices, accumbens nuclei, amygdala and caudate putamen is strongly affected by psychological stress.

  3. Adenosine A1 receptors in human sleep regulation studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process. However, the functions of sleep and the endogenous mechanisms involved in sleep regulation are only partially understood. Convergent lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the build-up of sleep propensity during wakefulness and its decline during sleep are associated with alterations in brain adenosine levels and adenosine receptor concentrations. The non-selective A 1 and A 2A adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine stimulates alertness and is known to attenuate changes in the waking and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) typically observed after prolonged waking. Several findings point to an important function of the adenosine A 1 receptor (A 1 AR) in the modulation of vigilance states. The A 1 AR is densely expressed in brain regions involved in sleep regulation, and pharmacological manipulations affecting the A 1 AR were shown to influence sleep propensity and sleep depth. However, an involvement of the A 2A adenosine receptor (A 2A AR) is also assumed. The distinct functions of the A 1 and A 2A receptor subtypes in sleep-wake regulation and in mediating the effects of caffeine have not been identified so far. The selective adenosine A 1 receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-3-(3- 18 Ffluoropropyl)- 1-propylxanthine ( 18 F-CPFPX), offers the opportunity to get further insights into adenosinergic mechanisms by in vivo imaging of the A 1 AR subtype with positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this thesis was to elucidate the role of adenosine A 1 receptors in human sleep regulation, combining 18 F-CPFPX PET brain imaging and EEG recordings, the gold standard in sleep research. It was hypothesized that sleep deprivation would induce adenosine accumulation and/or changes in A 1 AR density. Thus, the question was addressed whether these effects of prolonged wakefulness can be visualized by altered 18 F-CPFPX binding. Moreover, it was investigated whether radioligand uptake might be influenced by caffeine, since

  4. Emotional Eating Phenotype is Associated with Central Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding Independent of Body Mass Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Sarah A.; Bischoff, Allison N.; Gredysa, Danuta M.; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V.; Koller, Jonathan M.; Al-Lozi, Amal; Pepino, Marta Y.; Klein, Samuel; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Black, Kevin J.; Hershey, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    PET studies have provided mixed evidence regarding central D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding and its relationship with obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI). Other aspects of obesity may be more tightly coupled to the dopaminergic system. We characterized obesity-associated behaviors and determined if these related to central D2 receptor (D2R) specific binding independent of BMI. Twenty-two obese and 17 normal-weight participants completed eating- and reward-related questionnaires and underwent PET scans using the D2R-selective and nondisplaceable radioligand (N-[11C]methyl)benperidol. Questionnaires were grouped by domain (eating related to emotion, eating related to reward, non-eating behavior motivated by reward or sensitivity to punishment). Normalized, summed scores for each domain were compared between obese and normal-weight groups and correlated with striatal and midbrain D2R binding. Compared to normal-weight individuals, the obese group self-reported higher rates of eating related to both emotion and reward (p obese participants, self-reported emotional eating and non-food reward behavior positively correlated with striatal (p emotional eating phenotype may reflect altered central D2R function better than other commonly used obesity-related measures such as BMI. PMID:26066863

  5. Emotional Eating Phenotype is Associated with Central Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding Independent of Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Sarah A; Bischoff, Allison N; Gredysa, Danuta M; Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V; Koller, Jonathan M; Al-Lozi, Amal; Pepino, Marta Y; Klein, Samuel; Perlmutter, Joel S; Moerlein, Stephen M; Black, Kevin J; Hershey, Tamara

    2015-06-12

    PET studies have provided mixed evidence regarding central D2/D3 dopamine receptor binding and its relationship with obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI). Other aspects of obesity may be more tightly coupled to the dopaminergic system. We characterized obesity-associated behaviors and determined if these related to central D2 receptor (D2R) specific binding independent of BMI. Twenty-two obese and 17 normal-weight participants completed eating- and reward-related questionnaires and underwent PET scans using the D2R-selective and nondisplaceable radioligand (N-[(11)C]methyl)benperidol. Questionnaires were grouped by domain (eating related to emotion, eating related to reward, non-eating behavior motivated by reward or sensitivity to punishment). Normalized, summed scores for each domain were compared between obese and normal-weight groups and correlated with striatal and midbrain D2R binding. Compared to normal-weight individuals, the obese group self-reported higher rates of eating related to both emotion and reward (pobese participants, self-reported emotional eating and non-food reward behavior positively correlated with striatal (pemotional eating phenotype may reflect altered central D2R function better than other commonly used obesity-related measures such as BMI.

  6. Autoradiographic characterization of (+-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-[125I] iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane ([125I]DOI) binding to 5-HT2 and 5-HT1c receptors in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Garlick, R.K.; Glennon, R.A.; Teitler, M.; De Souza, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The 5-HT2 (serotonin) receptor has traditionally been labeled with antagonist radioligands such as [3H]ketanserin and [3H]spiperone, which label both agonist high-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-sensitive) and agonist low-affinity (guanyl nucleotide-insensitive) states of this receptor. The hallucinogen 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane (DOI) is an agonist which labels the high-affinity guanyl nucleotide-sensitive state of brain 5-HT2 receptors selectively. In the present study, conditions for autoradiographic visualization of (+/-)-[125I]DOI-labeled 5-HT2 receptors were optimized and binding to slide-mounted sections was characterized with respect to pharmacology, guanyl nucleotide sensitivity and anatomical distribution. In slide-mounted rat brain sections (+/-)-[125I]DOI binding was saturable, of high affinity (KD approximately 4 nM) and displayed a pharmacologic profile typical of 5-HT2 receptors. Consistent with coupling of 5-HT2 receptors in the high-affinity state to a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein, [125I]DOI binding was inhibited by guanyl nucleotides but not by adenosine triphosphate. Patterns of autoradiographic distribution of [125I]DOI binding to 5-HT2 receptors were similar to those seen with [3H]ketanserin- and [125I]-lysergic acid diethylamide-labeled 5-HT2 receptors. However, the density of 5-HT2 receptors labeled by the agonist [125I]DOI was markedly lower (30-50%) than that labeled by the antagonist [3H]ketanserin. High densities of [125I]DOI labeling were present in olfactory bulb, anterior regions of cerebral cortex (layer IV), claustrum, caudate putamen, globus pallidus, ventral pallidum, islands of Calleja, mammillary nuclei and inferior olive. Binding in hippocampus, thalamus and hypothalamus was generally sparse

  7. PET radioligand injection for pig neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Munk, Ole Lajord; Landau, Anne M.

    2018-01-01

    Pigs are useful models in neuroimaging studies with positron emission tomography. Radiolabeled ligands are injected intravenously at the start of the scan and in pigs, the most easily accessible route of administration is the ear vein. However, in brain studies the short distance between the brai...

  8. Radioligand assays - method and application. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, M.; Keilacker, H.; Woltanski, K.P.; Besch, W.; Schubert, J.

    1980-01-01

    Glucagon antibodies were produced in rabbits using three immunogenic glucagon conjugates. Glucagon was coupled to bovine serum albumin by difluorodinitrobenzene (DFDNB), carbodiimide or glutardialdehyde. Rabbits immunized with glucagon conjugated to albumin using DFDNB produced sensitive antisera for radioimmunoassay specific for pancreatic glucagon. The affinity constant of the best antiserum was approximately 10 11 l/mol. Antisera raised against the two other glucagon conjugates were significantly less affine. All of these antisera showed inverse binding curves of 125 I-glucagon caused by positive cooperativity in dependence upon the antigen/antibody ratio. The race of rabbits used for immunization was without influence on the immune response. (author)

  9. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized 125 I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ([ 125 I]R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10 7 cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with [ 125 I]R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of [ 125 I]R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC

  10. Characterization of putative receptors specific for quercetin on bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S.C.; Becker, C.G.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have reported that tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), rutin-bovine serum albumin conjugates (R-BSA), quercetin, and chlorogenic acid are mitogenic for bovine aortic smooth-muscle cells (SMC). To investigate whether there are binding sites or receptors for these polyphenol-containing molecules on SMC, the authors have synthesized /sup 125/I-labeled rutin-bovine serum albumin ((/sup 125/I)R-BSA) of high specific activity (20 Ci/mmol). SMC were isolated from a bovine thoracic aorta and maintained in Eagle's minimum essential medium with 10% calf serum in culture. These SMC at early subpassages were suspended (3-5 x 10/sup 7/ cells/ml) in phosphate-buffered saline and incubated with (/sup 125/I)R-BSA (10 pmol) in the presence or absence of 200-fold unlabeled R-BSA, TGP, BSA, rutin, quercetin or related polyphenols, and catecholamines. Binding of (/sup 125/I)R-BSA to SMC was found to be reproducible and the radioligand was displaced by R-BSA, and also by TGP, rutin, quercetin, and chlorogenic acid, but not by BSA, ellagic acid, naringin, hesperetin, dopamine, epinephrine, or isoproterenol. The binding was saturable, reversible, and pH-dependent. These results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for quercetinon arterial SMC.

  11. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  12. Panel discussion: cCinical pet neurotransmitter metabolism and receptor binding studies of brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Following presentations on applications and results of PET imaging in Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), and refractory temporal lobe epilepsy, additional aspects of PET use in evaluating neurologic disease were discussed. Several questions addressed imaging of the dopamine (DA) synapse in PD. Discussion centered around reasons for focal hypometabolism of the association cortex in AD but not of the striatum in PD as well as potential applications of metabolic and presynaptic DA measurements in the diagnostic evaluation of Parkinsonian syndromes. The specificity of fluoroDOPA (FD) uptake following PD treatment by adrenal or substantia nigra transplantation was addressed. Blood-brain-barrier disruption and the metabolic instability of FD were discussed as underlying causes of increased tracer accumulation reported in the literature. The session then turned to dementia and the problem of establishing a definite diagnosis.The roles of PET and SPECT imaging in these areas is relatively new but is very promising. The session concluded with discussion of the possibility of activation studies with neurotransmitter ligands. The design and interpretation of such studies are quite complex. Physiologic stimulation studies frequently result in altered local cerebral perfusion; it will be necessary to distinguish differences in ligand distribution arising form blood flow changes from possible alterations in receptor availability. These interactions may also confound radioligand studies following pharmacologic interventions with unlabeled drugs

  13. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta 8 THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta- 8 THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [ 3 H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta- 8 THC ([ 3 H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [ 3 H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [ 3 H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  14. Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Amphetamine-Induced Oxidative Damage and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Escubedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphetamine derivatives such as methamphetamine (METH and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy” are widely abused drugs in a recreational context. This has led to concern because of the evidence that they are neurotoxic in animal models and cognitive impairments have been described in heavy abusers. The main targets of these drugs are plasmalemmal and vesicular monoamine transporters, leading to reverse transport and increased monoamine efflux to the synapse. As far as neurotoxicity is concerned, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production seems to be one of the main causes. Recent research has demonstrated that blockade of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR inhibits METH- and MDMA-induced ROS production in striatal synaptosomes which is dependent on calcium and on NO-synthase activation. Moreover, a7 nAChR antagonists (methyllycaconitine and memantine attenuated in vivo the neurotoxicity induced by METH and MDMA, and memantine prevented the cognitive impairment induced by these drugs. Radioligand binding experiments demonstrated that both drugs have affinity to a7 and heteromeric nAChR, with MDMA showing lower Ki values, while fluorescence calcium experiments indicated that MDMA behaves as a partial agonist on a7 and as an antagonist on heteromeric nAChR. Sustained Ca increase led to calpain and caspase-3 activation. In addition, modulatory effects of MDMA on a7 and heteromeric nAChR populations have been found.

  15. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DosSantos Marcos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc, an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system.

  16. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  17. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  18. Binding properties of the cerebral {alpha}4{beta}2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 to plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorger, Dietlind [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)]. E-mail: sord@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Becker, Georg Alexander [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Hauber, Katharina; Schildan, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Patt, Marianne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Birkenmeier, Gerd [Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Otto, Andreas [Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meyer, Philipp [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Kluge, Magnus [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Schliebs, Reinhard [Paul Flechsig Institute of Brain Research, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Sabri, Osama [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    Introduction: To determine the availability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in different human brain regions using the positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-A-85380 (2-[{sup 18}F]FA) and invasive approaches for quantification, it is important to correct the arterial input function as well for plasma protein binding (PPB) of the radioligand as for radiolabeled metabolites accumulating in blood. This study deals with some aspects of PPB of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA. Methods: Patients with different neurological disorders (n=72), such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, and a group of healthy volunteers (n=15) subjected for PET imaging were analyzed for their PPB level of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA using ultrafiltration. Protein gel electrophoresis of plasma samples was performed to identify the binding protein of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA. The dependency of PPB on time and on free ligand concentration was analyzed to obtain the binding parameters B {sub max} and K {sub d}. Results: Albumin was identified to be the binding protein of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA. PPB of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA was low at 17{+-}4% and did not show significant differences between the groups of patients. Corresponding to this, a narrow range of plasma albumin of 0.62{+-}0.05 mM was observed. B {sub max} was determined as twice the albumin concentration, which indicates two binding sites for 2-[{sup 18}F]FA on the protein. No time dependence of the PPB could be observed. By relating PPB to B {sub max}, an average K {sub d} value of 6.0{+-}1.5 mM was obtained. Conclusion: This study shows the dependency of PPB of 2-[{sup 18}F]FA on human albumin plasma concentration. An equation utilizing B {sub max} and K {sub d} to easily estimate PPB is presented.

  19. Differential regulation of collagen secretion by kinin receptors in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalán, Mabel; Smolic, Christian [Centro de estudios moleculares de la célula, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Contreras, Ariel [Instituto Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Ayala, Pedro; Olmedo, Ivonne; Copaja, Miguel; Boza, Pía; Vivar, Raúl; Avalos, Yennifer [Centro de estudios moleculares de la célula, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Lavandero, Sergio [Centro de estudios moleculares de la célula, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Instituto Ciencias Biomédicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Department of Internal Medicine (Cardiology Division), University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Velarde, Victoria [Departamento de Ciencias Fisiológicas, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Díaz-Araya, Guillermo, E-mail: gadiaz@ciq.uchile.cl [Centro de estudios moleculares de la célula, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad de Chile (Chile)

    2012-06-15

    Kinins mediate their cellular effects through B1 (B1R) and B2 (B2R) receptors, and the activation of B2R reduces collagen synthesis in cardiac fibroblasts (CF). However, the question of whether B1R and/or B2R have a role in cardiac myofibroblasts remains unanswered. Methods: CF were isolated from neonate rats and myofibroblasts were generated by an 84 h treatment with TGF-β1 (CMF). B1R was evaluated by western blot, immunocytochemistry and radioligand assay; B2R, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cyclooxygenases 1and 2 (COX-1, and COX-2) were evaluated by western blot; intracellular Ca{sup +2} levels were evaluated with Fluo-4AM; collagen secretion was measured in the culture media using the picrosirius red assay kit. Results: B2R, iNOS, COX-1 and low levels of B1R but not eNOS, were detected by western blot in CF. Also, B1R, B2R, and COX-2 but not iNOS, eNOS or COX-1, were detected by western blot in CMF. By immunocytochemistry, our results showed lower intracellular B1R levels in CF and higher B1R levels in CMF, mainly localized on the cell membrane. Additionally, we found B1R only in CMF cellular membrane through radioligand displacement assay. Bradykinin (BK) B2R agonist increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels and reduced collagen secretion both in CF and CMF. These effects were blocked by HOE-140, and inhibited by L-NAME, 1400W and indomethacin. Des-Arg-kallidin (DAKD) B1R agonist did not increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels in CF; however, after preincubation for 1 h with DAKD and re-stimulation with the same agonist, we found a low increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels. Finally, DAKD increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} levels and decreased collagen secretion in CMF, being this effect blocked by the B1R antagonist des-Arg9-Leu8-kallidin and indomethacin, but not by L-NAME or 1400 W. Conclusion: B1R, B2R, iNOS and COX-1 were expressed differently between CF and CMF, and collagen secretion was

  20. The effect of citalopram hydrobromide on 5-HT2A receptors in the impulsive-aggressive dog, as measured with 123I-5-I-R91150 SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peremans, K.; Hoybergs, Y.; Gielen, I.; Audenaert, K.; Vervaet, M.; Heeringen, C. van; Otte, A.; Goethals, I.; Dierckx, R.; Blankaert, P.

    2005-01-01

    Involvement of the serotonergic system in impulsive aggression has been demonstrated in both human and animal studies. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of citalopram hydrobromide (a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor) on the 5-HT 2A receptor and brain perfusion in impulsive-aggressive dogs by means of single-photon emission computed tomography. The binding index of the radioligand 123 I-5-I-R91150 was measured before and after treatment with citalopram hydrobromide in nine impulsive-aggressive dogs. Regional perfusion was measured with 99m Tc-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD). Behaviour was assessed before treatment and again after 6 weeks of treatment. A correlation was found between decreased binding and behavioural improvement in eight out of nine dogs. The 5-HT 2A receptor binding index was significantly reduced after citalopram hydrobromide treatment in all cortical regions but not in the subcortical area. None of the dogs displayed alterations in perfusion on the post-treatment scans. This study supports previous findings regarding the involvement of the serotonergic system in impulsive aggression in dogs in general. More specifically, the effect of treatment on the 5-HT 2A receptor binding index could be demonstrated and the decreased binding index correlated with behavioural improvement. (orig.)

  1. Cellular localization and adaptive changes of the cardiac delta opioid receptor system in an experimental model of heart failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskatsch, Sascha; Feldheiser, Aarne; Shaqura, Mohammed; Dehe, Lukas; Habazettl, Helmut; Röpke, Torsten K; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael; Spies, Claudia D; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2016-02-01

    The role of the cardiac opioid system in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not fully understood. Therefore, this project investigated the cellular localization of delta opioid receptors (DOR) in left ventricle (LV) myocardium and adaptive changes in DOR and its endogenous ligand, the precursor peptide proenkephalin (PENK), during CHF. Following IRB approval, DOR localization was determined by radioligand binding using [H(3)]Naltrindole and by double immunofluorescence confocal analysis in the LV of male Wistar rats. Additionally, 28 days following an infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) the extent of CHF and adaptions in left ventricular DOR and PENK expression were examined by hemodynamic measurements, RT-PCR, and Western blot. DOR specific membrane binding sites were identified in LV myocardium. DOR were colocalized with L-type Ca(2+)-channels (Cav1.2) as well as with intracellular ryanodine receptors (RyR) of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Following ACF severe congestive heart failure developed in all rats and was accompanied by up-regulation of DOR and PENK on mRNA as well as receptor proteins representing consecutive adaptations. These findings might suggest that the cardiac delta opioid system possesses the ability to play a regulatory role in the cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis, especially in response to heart failure.

  2. Regional specific binding of [11C]RO 15 1788 to central type benzodiazepine receptors in human brain: quantitative evaluation by PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pappata, S.; Samson, Y.; Chavoix, C.; Prenant, C.; Maziere, M.; Baron, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The central type benzodiazepine receptors were studied in 17 healthy human subjects with 11 C-RO 15 1788 and positron emission tomography (PET). The brain regional distribution of the tracer in eight control studies performed after injection of trace doses of 11 C-RO 15 1788 was consistent with that of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation studies with co-injected cold RO 15 1788 in the remaining subjects showed a dose-dependent decrease of brain radiotracer until full inhibition of specific binding was achieved with doses above 0.1 mg/kg (four studies). Based on the results, a simple method to estimate the specifically bound 11 C-RO 15 1788 regionally in a single PET study is proposed, using the data from the full-saturation studies as a stable estimate of the nondisplaceable radioligand concentration. Using this method, it was found that quasiequilibrium between the estimated specifically bound and nondisplaceable components was achieved at times equal to or longer than 20 min after tracer administration. The validity of this method was partly supported by further results, showing a good agreement between the regional specific binding so calculated and postmortem data of receptor density

  3. Islet-selectivity of G-protein coupled receptor ligands evaluated for PET imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cell mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, Gary W., E-mail: gary.cline@yale.edu [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Zhao, Xiaojian [Yale University School of Medicine (United States); Jakowski, Amy B.; Soeller, Walter C.; Treadway, Judith L. [Pfizer Global Research and Development, Pfizer Inc., Groton CT (United States)

    2011-09-02

    Highlights: {yields} We screened G-protein coupled receptors for imaging pancreatic. {yields} Database mining and immunohistochemistry identified GPCRs enriched in {beta}-cells. {yields} In vitro and in vivo assays were used to determine exocrine vs endocrine specificity. {yields} GPCR candidates for imaging of {beta}-cell mass are Prokineticin-1R, mGluR5, and GLP-1R. -- Abstract: A critical unmet need exists for methods to quantitatively measure endogenous pancreatic {beta}-cell mass (BCM) for the clinical evaluation of therapies to prevent or reverse loss of BCM and diabetes progression. Our objective was to identify G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are expressed with a high degree of specificity to islet {beta}-cells for receptor-targeted imaging of BCM. GPCRs enriched in pancreatic islets relative to pancreas acinar and hepatic tissue were identified using a database screen. Islet-specific expression was confirmed by human pancreas immunohistochemistry (IHC). In vitro selectivity assessment was determined from the binding and uptake of radiolabeled ligands to the rat insulinoma INS-1 832/13 cell line and isolated rat islets relative to the exocrine pancreas cell-type, PANC-1. Tail-vein injections of radioligands into rats were used to determine favorable image criteria of in vivo biodistribution to the pancreas relative to other internal organs (i.e., liver, spleen, stomach, and lungs). Database and IHC screening identified four candidate receptors for further in vitro and in vivo evaluation for PET imaging of BCM: prokineticin-1 receptor (PK-1R), metabotropic glutamate receptor type-5 (mGluR5), neuropeptide Y-2 receptor (NPY-2R), and glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R). In vitro specificity ratios gave the following receptor rank order: PK-1R > GLP-1R > NPY-2R > mGluR5. The biodistribution rank order of selectivity to the pancreas was found to be PK-1R > VMAT2 {approx} GLP-1R > mGluR5. Favorable islet selectivity and biodistribution

  4. Existence of Brain 5-HT1A–5-HT2A Isoreceptor Complexes with Antagonistic Allosteric Receptor–Receptor Interactions Regulating 5-HT1A Receptor Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Studies on serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors have established that disturbances in the ascending 5-HT neuron systems and their 5-HT receptor subtypes and collateral networks to the forebrain contribute to the etiology of major depression and are targets for treatment. The therapeutic action of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors is of proven effectiveness, but the mechanisms underlying their effect are still unclear. There are many 5-HT subtypes involved; some need to be blocked (e.g., 5-HT2A, 5-HT3, and 5-HT7), whereas others need to be activated (e.g., postjunctional 5-HT1A and 5-HT4). These state-of-the-art developments are in line with the hypothesis that the development of major depression can involve an imbalance of the activity between different types of 5-HT isoreceptors. In the current study, using in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA), we report evidence for the existence of brain 5-HT1A–5-HT2A isoreceptor complexes validated in cellular models with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET2) assay. A high density of PLA-positive clusters visualizing 5-HT1A–5-HT2A isoreceptor complexes was demonstrated in the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1–CA3 regions of the dorsal hippocampus. A marked reduction in the density of PLA-positive clusters was observed in the CA1 and CA2 regions 24 h after a forced swim test session, indicating the dynamics of this 5-HT isoreceptor complex. Using a bioinformatic approach, previous work indicates that receptors forming heterodimers demonstrate triplet amino acid homologies. The receptor interface of the 5-HT1A–5-HT2A isoreceptor dimer was shown to contain the LLG and QNA protriplets in the transmembrane and intracellular domain, respectively. The 5-HT2A agonist TCB2 markedly reduced the affinity of the 5-HT1A agonist ipsapirone for the 5-HT1A agonist binding sites in the frontal lobe using the 5-HT1A radioligand binding assay. This action was blocked by the 5-HT2A antagonist ketanserin. It is proposed

  5. Macrocyclic chelator-coupled gastrin-based radiopharmaceuticals for targeting of gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, Stephan; Wang, Xuejuan; Maecke, Helmut R.; Walter, Martin A.; Mueller-Brand, Jan; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean-Claude; Behe, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)-coupled minigastrins are unsuitable for therapeutic application with the available β-emitting radiometals due to low complex stability. Low tumour-to-kidney ratio of the known radiopharmaceuticals is further limiting their potency. We used macrocyclic chelators for coupling to increase complex stability, modified the peptide sequence to enhance radiolytic stability and studied tumour-to-kidney ratio and metabolic stability using 111 In-labelled derivatives. Gastrin derivatives with decreasing numbers of glutamic acids were synthesised using 111 In as surrogate for therapeutic radiometals for in vitro and in vivo studies. Gastrin receptor affinities of the nat In-metallated compounds were determined by receptor autoradiography using 125 I-CCK as radioligand. Internalisation was evaluated in AR4-2J cells. Enzymatic stability was determined by incubating the 111 In-labelled peptides in human serum. Biodistribution was performed in AR4-2J-bearing Lewis rats. IC 50 values of the nat In-metallated gastrin derivatives vary between 1.2 and 4.8 nmol/L for all methionine-containing derivatives. Replacement of methionine by norleucine, isoleucine, methionine-sulfoxide and methionine-sulfone resulted in significant decrease of receptor affinity (IC 50 between 9.9 and 1,195 nmol/L). All cholecystokinin receptor affinities were >100 nmol/L. All 111 In-labelled radiopeptides showed receptor-specific internalisation. Serum mean-life times varied between 2.0 and 72.6 h, positively correlating with the number of Glu residues. All 111 In-labelled macrocyclic chelator conjugates showed higher tumour-to-kidney ratios after 24 h (0.37-0.99) compared to 111 In-DTPA-minigastrin 0(0.05). Tumour wash out between 4 and 24 h was low. Imaging studies confirmed receptor-specific blocking of the tumour uptake. Reducing the number of glutamates increased tumour-to-kidney ratio but resulted in lower metabolic stability. The properties of the macrocyclic

  6. Autroadiographic characterization of 125I-labeled 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenylisopropylamine (DOI): A phenylisopropylamine derivative labeling both 5HT2 and 5HT1c receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, N.M.; Mitchell, W.M.; Garlick, R.K.; Glennon, R.A.; Titeler, M.; De Souza, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The best-characterized 5HT 2 radioligands, such as [ 3 H]ketanserin and [ 3 H]spiperone, are antagonists that label both high- and low-affinity states of this receptor. Recently, the radiolabeled phenylisopropylamine hallucinogens DOB and DOI, which are agonists at 5HT 2 receptors, have been demonstrated to label selectively the high-affinity state of brain 5HT 2 receptors. In the present study, the authors determined optimum conditions for autoradiographic visualization of [ 125 I]DOI binding and characterized its pharmacology and guanine nucleotide sensitivity under those conditions. In slide-mounted tissue sections (rat forebrain; two 10 μm sections/slide), (±)[ 125 I]DOI binding was saturable, of high affinity (K D ∼4nM) and displayed a pharmacological profile [R(-)DOI > spiperone > DOB > (±)DOI > ketanserin > S(+)DOI > 5HT > DOM] comparable to that seen in homogenate assays. Consistent with coupling of 5HT 2 receptors to a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, [ 125 I]DOI binding was inhibited by guanine nucleotides but not by ATP. In autoradiograms, high densities of [ 125 I]DOI binding sites were present in frontal cortex, olfactory tubercle, claustrum, caudate/putamen and mamillary nuclei with lower densities in trigeminal and solitary nuclei. The highest density of [ 125 l]DOI binding was observed in choroid plexus; these binding sites displayed a pharmacological profile characteristic of 5HT 1C receptors. These data suggest that [ 125 I]DOI labels both 5HT 2 and 5HT 1C receptors

  7. Discovery of indolylpiperazinylpyrimidines with dual-target profiles at adenosine A2A and dopamine D2 receptors for Parkinson's disease treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ming Shao

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the human brain, leading to depletion of dopamine production. Dopamine replacement therapy remains the mainstay for attenuation of PD symptoms. Nonetheless, the potential benefit of current pharmacotherapies is mostly limited by adverse side effects, such as drug-induced dyskinesia, motor fluctuations and psychosis. Non-dopaminergic receptors, such as human A2A adenosine receptors, have emerged as important therapeutic targets in potentiating therapeutic effects and reducing the unwanted side effects. In this study, new chemical entities targeting both human A2A adenosine receptor and dopamine D2 receptor were designed and evaluated. Two computational methods, namely support vector machine (SVM models and Tanimoto similarity-based clustering analysis, were integrated for the identification of compounds containing indole-piperazine-pyrimidine (IPP scaffold. Subsequent synthesis and testing resulted in compounds 5 and 6, which acted as human A2A adenosine receptor binders in the radioligand competition assay (Ki = 8.7-11.2 μM as well as human dopamine D2 receptor binders in the artificial cell membrane assay (EC50 = 22.5-40.2 μM. Moreover, compound 5 showed improvement in movement and mitigation of the loss of dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila models of PD. Furthermore, in vitro toxicity studies on compounds 5 and 6 did not reveal any mutagenicity (up to 100 μM, hepatotoxicity (up to 30 μM or cardiotoxicity (up to 30 μM.

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of [90Y]-Bz-DTPA-oct: a yttrium-90-labelled octreotide analogue for radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith-Jones, Peter M.; Stolz, Barbara; Albert, Rainer; Ruser, Gerd; Briner, Ulrich; Maecke, Helmut R.; Bruns, Christian

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the in vitro behaviour of two yttrium-90-labelled somatostatin analogues was performed. Further in vivo characterisation was performed with the most promising agent. A new DTPA-octreotide analogue (Bz-DTPA-oct) was synthesised by coupling a bifunctional DTPA chelator to the N-terminal amine of the D-Phe 1 of Tyr 3 -octreotide. This new SRIF analogue and DTPA-octreotide (OctreoScan) were radiolabelled with 90 Y prior to serum stability being evaluated. Receptor binding assays were also performed on the two radioligands using rat cortex membranes. The [ 90 Y]-Bz-DTPA-oct was further evaluated in vivo using tumour-bearing rats. The first conjugate (DTPA-octreotide) bound with a high affinity to SRIF receptors and the 90 Y complex was relatively stable in human serum (t 1/2 3.8 d for 90 Y lost to serum proteins). The second conjugate (Bz-DTPA-oct) also exhibited a high binding affinity to SRIF receptors, but it demonstrated an even slower loss of 90 Y to serum proteins (t 1/2 12.1 d). The in vivo evaluation of the more stable [ 90 Y]-Bz-DTPA-oct showed a very rapid and high accumulation in somatostatin receptor-positive tumours, which after 1 h resulted in tumour/nontumour ratios of 3.8, 21, and 4.9 (for blood, muscle, and liver, respectively). These tumour/nontumour ratios increased, and were by 24 h postinjection 138, 285, and 6.1 (for blood, muscle, and liver). Yttrium-90-labelled Bz-DTPa-oct is rapidly and selectively accumulated in somatostatin receptor-positive tissue. Octadentate Bz-DTPA-oct could be ligand for 90 Y radiotherapy of somatostatin receptor-positive tumours and their metastases

  9. 5-HT2A Receptor Binding in the Frontal Cortex of Parkinson's Disease Patients and Alpha-Synuclein Overexpressing Mice: A Postmortem Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Olesen, Mikkel Vestergaard; Brudek, Tomasz; Plenge, Per; Klein, Anders Bue; Westin, Jenny E; Fog, Karina; Wörtwein, Gitta; Aznar, Susana

    2016-01-01

    The 5-HT2A receptor is highly involved in aspects of cognition and executive function and seen to be affected in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and related to the disease pathology. Even though Parkinson's disease (PD) is primarily a motor disorder, reports of impaired executive function are also steadily being associated with this disease. Not much is known about the pathophysiology behind this. The aim of this study was thereby twofold: (1) to investigate 5-HT2A receptor binding levels in Parkinson's brains and (2) to investigate whether PD associated pathology, alpha-synuclein (AS) overexpression, could be associated with 5-HT2A alterations. Binding density for the 5-HT2A-specific radioligand [(3)H]-MDL 100.907 was measured in membrane suspensions of frontal cortex tissue from PD patients. Protein levels of AS were further measured using western blotting. Results showed higher AS levels accompanied by increased 5-HT2A receptor binding in PD brains. In a separate study, we looked for changes in 5-HT2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex in 52-week-old transgenic mice overexpressing human AS. We performed region-specific 5-HT2A receptor binding measurements followed by gene expression analysis. The transgenic mice showed lower 5-HT2A binding in the frontal association cortex that was not accompanied by changes in gene expression levels. This study is one of the first to look at differences in serotonin receptor levels in PD and in relation to AS overexpression.

  10. Position 5.46 of the serotonin 5-HT2A receptor contributes to a species-dependent variation for the 5-HT2C agonist (R)-9-ethyl-1,3,4,10b-tetrahydro-7-trifluoromethylpyrazino[2,1-a]isoindol-6(2H)-one: impact on selectivity and toxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Keith J; Wu, Ginger Y; Varnes, Jeffrey G; Levesque, Paul; Li, Julia; Li, Danshi; Robl, Jeffrey A; Rossi, Karen A; Wacker, Dean A

    2009-12-01

    Successful development of 5-HT(2C) agonists requires selectivity versus the highly homologous 5-HT(2A) receptor, because agonism at this receptor can result in significant adverse events. (R)-9-Ethyl-1,3,4,10b-tetrahydro-7-trifluoromethylpyrazino[2,1-a]isoindol-6(2H)-one (compound 1) is a potent 5-HT(2C) agonist exhibiting selectivity over the human 5-HT(2A) receptor. Evaluation of the compound at the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor, however, revealed potent binding and agonist functional activity. The physiological consequence of this higher potency was the observation of a significant increase in blood pressure in conscious telemeterized rats that could be prevented by ketanserin. Docking of compound 1 in a homology model of the 5-HT(2A) receptor indicated a possible binding mode in which the ethyl group at the 9-position of the molecule was oriented toward position 5.46 of the 5-HT(2A) receptor. Within the human 5-HT(2A) receptor, position 5.46 is Ser242; however, in the rat 5-HT(2A) receptor, it is Ala242, suggesting that the potent functional activity in this species resulted from the absence of the steric bulk provided by the -OH moiety of the Ser in the human isoform. We confirmed this hypothesis using site-directed mutagenesis through the mutation of both the human receptor Ser242 to Ala and the rat receptor Ala242 to Ser, followed by radioligand binding and second messenger studies. In addition, we attempted to define the space allowed by the alanine by evaluating compounds with larger substitutions at the 9-position. The data indicate that position 5.46 contributed to the species difference in 5-HT(2A) receptor potency observed for a pyrazinoisoindolone compound, resulting in the observation of a significant cardiovascular safety signal.

  11. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  12. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  13. Evaluation of (+)-p-[11C]methylvesamicol for mapping sigma1 receptors: a comparison with [11C]SA4503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yajima, Kazuyoshi; QingGeLeTu; Mori, Hirofumi; Shiba, Kazuhiro

    2006-01-01

    Vesamicol is a leading compound for positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers for mapping the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Recently, we found that (+)-p-methylvesamicol ((+)-PMV) has low affinity for VAChT (K i =199 nM), but has moderate to high affinity for sigma receptors: K i =3.0 nM for sigma 1 and K i =40.7 nM for sigma 2 , and that sigma 1 -selective SA4503 (K i =4.4 nM for sigma 1 and K i =242 nM for sigma 2 ) has moderate affinity for VAChT (K i =50.2 nM). In the present study, we examined the potential of (+)-[ 11 C]PMV as a PET radioligand for mapping sigma 1 receptors as compared with [ 11 C]SA4503. In rat brain, similar regional distribution patterns of (+)-[ 11 C]PMV and [ 11 C]SA4503 were shown by tissue dissection and by ex vivo autoradiography. Blocking experiments using (±)-PMV (-)-vesamicol, SA4503, haloperidol and (±)-pentazocine showed that the two tracers specifically bound to sigma 1 receptors, and that [ 11 C]SA4503 exhibited greater specific binding than (+)-[ 11 C]PMV. No sign of VAChT-specific binding by [ 11 C]SA4503 was observed in the striatum, which is rich in VAChT sites. In conclusion, (+)-[ 11 C]PMV specifically bound to sigma 1 receptors in the brain, but to a lesser extent than [ 11 C]SA4503, suggesting that (+)-[ 11 C]PMV is a less preferable PET ligand than [ 11 C]SA4503. On the other hand, the moderate affinity of [ 11 C]SA4503 for VAChT is negligible in vivo

  14. In vivo binding of 125I-LSD to serotonin 5-HT2 receptors in mouse brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartig, P.R.; Scheffel, U.; Frost, J.J.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The binding of 125 I-LSD (2-[ 125 I]-lysergic acid diethylamide) was studied in various mouse brain regions following intravenous injection of the radioligand. The high specific activity of 125 I-LSD enabled the injection of low mass doses (14ng/kg), which are well below the threshold for induction of any known physiological effect of the probe. The highest levels of 125 I-LSD binding were found in the frontal cortex, olfactory tubercles, extra-frontal cortex and striatum while the lowest level was found in the cerebellum. Binding was saturable in the frontal cortex but increased linearly in the cerebellum with increasing doses of 125 I-LSD. Serotonergic compounds potently inhibited 125 I-LSD binding in cortical regions, olfactory tubercles, and hypothalamus but had no effect in the cerebellum. Dopaminergic compounds caused partial inhibition of binding in the striatum while adrenergic compounds were inactive. From these studies the authors conclude that 125 I-LSD labels serotonin 5-HT 2 receptor sites in cortical regions with no indication that other receptor sites are labeled. In the olfactory tubercles and hypothalamus, 125 I-LSD labeling occurs predominantly or entirely at serotonic 5-HT 2 sites. In the striatum, 125 I-LSD labels approximately equal proportions of serotonergic and dopaminergic sites. These data indicate that 125 I-LSD labels serotonin receptors in vivo and suggests that appropriate derivatives of 2I-LSD may prove useful for tomographic imaging of serotonin 5-HT 2 receptors in the mammalian cortex

  15. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Croft Thomas

    Full Text Available The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White