WorldWideScience

Sample records for ccfr biospecimen core

  1. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  2. Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  3. New Funding Opportunity: Biospecimen Core Resource - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this notice is to notify the community that the National Cancer Institute's (NCI’s) Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is seeking sources to establish a Biospecimen Core Resource (BCR), capable of receiving, qualifying, processing, and distributing annotated biospecimens.

  4. Recent Structure Function Results from CCFR

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, B T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    A new structure function analysis of CCFR deep inelastic nu-N and nubar-N scattering data is presented for previously unexplored kinematic regions down to Bjorken x=0.0045 and Q^2=0.3 GeV^2. Comparisons to charged lepton scattering data from NMC and E665 experiments are made and the behavior of the structure function F2_nu is studied in the limit Q^2 -> 0

  5. Measuring muon momenta with the CCFR neutrino detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.J.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bachmann, K.T.; Blair, R.E.; Foudas, C.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H. (Columbia Univ., New York (USA)); Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA)); Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA))

    1991-04-15

    We report on muon spectrometry at the CCFR neutrino detector. The muon spectrometer and momentum-fitting analysis code are described, and results presented from the calibration of the spectrometer with test beams of momentum-analyzed muons. (orig.).

  6. Recent QCD results from NuTeV/CCFR collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Arroyo, C. G.; Avvakumov, S.; Barbaro, L. de; Barbaro, P. de; Bazarko, A. O.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J. M.; Drucker, R. B.; Formaggio, J. A.; Frey, R.; Goldman, J.; Goncharov, M.; Harris, D. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Kim, J. H.; King, B. J.; Kinnel, T.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Lamm, M. J.; Marsh, W.; Mason, D.; McFarland, K. S.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S. R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Romosan, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Schellman, H. M.; Sculli, F. J.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Smith, W. H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E. G.; Tamminga, B. M.; Vakili, M.; Vaitaitis, A.; Wu, V.; Yang, U. K.; Yu, J.; Zeller, G.P

    2000-06-01

    Fermilab experiments CCFR and its successor NuTeV study nucleon structure through deep inelastic scattering of neutrino beams off an iron target. We report on the most recent CCFR measurement of the {nu}N differential cross section and resulting structure functions {delta}{kappa}F{sub 3} = {kappa}F{sub 3}{sup {nu}} - {kappa}F{sub 3}{sup {nu}}{sup -bar}, and R{sub long} = {sigma}L/{sigma}T, in the framework of massive charm quark. {delta}{kappa}F{sub 3} is sensitive to strange and charm content of the nucleon. NuTeV's preliminary direct measurement of the strange sea, from dimuon charged-current production, and nucleon charm content probed by neutral-current {nu}N interaction, are also presented.

  7. Biotrust: a comprehensive system for acquiring and distributing biospecimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nicholas; Ponko, Stefan; Black, Tony; Prosser, Justin; Stein, Barbara; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Porter, Peggy

    2013-01-01

    The Biotrust resource provides a web-accessible method to coordinate discovery and request of annotated biospecimens for research. The system is built on an open-source web-application framework, and has a modular approach to defining education on process, study registration and feasibility review, patient identification and cohort forwarding, consent tracking, and biospecimen processing/distribution. The architecture has been designed as a "pass through" system that provides annotated deidentified biospecimens for investigator use in a restricted time window of 4-7 days, and does not maintain biobanking facilities. As a core institutional resource, the system integrates seven vertical service arms, each of which can be accessed independently to support flexible and independent use in translational research. The system will be described in terms of requirements for use, metrics of evaluation, and lessons learned in integrating this into clinical and operational environments. PMID:24303285

  8. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly Ph.D., Andrea; Jewell Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan M.D., Renata; Hayes M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut Ph.D.,, Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova Ph.D., Olga; Riegman Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo M.S., Edward; Somiari Ph.D., Stella; Watson M.B., Peter; Weier Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu Ph.D., Claire; Vaught Ph.D., Jim

    2011-04-26

    Human biospecimens are subject to a number of different collection, processing, and storage factors that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research utilizing human tissues it is critical that information regarding the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications around biospecimen-related research and help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that the contributions are valued and respected.

  9. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    National Cancer Institute; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; B.Chir., M.B.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., M.S., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson, Peter

    2010-09-02

    Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

  10. Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ph.D., Helen M.; Kelly, Ph.D., Andrea B.; Jewell, Ph.D., Scott D.; McShane, Ph.D., Lisa M.; Clark, M.D., Douglas P.; Greenspan, M.D., Renata; Hayes, M.D., Daniel F.; Hainaut, Ph.D., Pierre; Kim, Paula; Mansfield, Ph.D., Elizabeth A.; Potapova, Ph.D., Olga; Riegman, Ph.D., Peter; Rubinstein, Ph.D., Yaffa; Seijo, M.S., Edward; Somiari, Ph.D., Stella; Chir., B; Weier, Ph.D., Heinz-Ulrich; Zhu, Ph.D., Claire; Vaught, Ph.D., Jim; Watson,M.B., Peter

    2010-12-27

    Human biospecimens are subjected to collection, processing, and storage that can significantly alter their molecular composition and consistency. These biospecimen preanalytical factors, in turn, influence experimental outcomes and the ability to reproduce scientific results. Currently, the extent and type of information specific to the biospecimen preanalytical conditions reported in scientific publications and regulatory submissions varies widely. To improve the quality of research that uses human tissues, it is crucial that information on the handling of biospecimens be reported in a thorough, accurate, and standardized manner. The Biospecimen Reporting for Improved Study Quality (BRISQ) recommendations outlined herein are intended to apply to any study in which human biospecimens are used. The purpose of reporting these details is to supply others, from researchers to regulators, with more consistent and standardized information to better evaluate, interpret, compare, and reproduce the experimental results. The BRISQ guidelines are proposed as an important and timely resource tool to strengthen communication and publications on biospecimen-related research and to help reassure patient contributors and the advocacy community that their contributions are valued and respected.

  11. Biospecimen Repository Access and Data Sharing (BRADS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — BRADS is a repository for data and biospecimens from population health research initiatives and clinical or interventional trials designed and implemented by...

  12. A practical tool for modeling biospecimen user fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Lise; Dee, Simon; Bartlett, John; Damaraju, Sambasivarao; Graham, Kathryn; Johnston, Randal; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Murphy, Leigh; Shepherd, Lois; Schacter, Brent; Watson, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    The question of how best to attribute the unit costs of the annotated biospecimen product that is provided to a research user is a common issue for many biobanks. Some of the factors influencing user fees are capital and operating costs, internal and external demand and market competition, and moral standards that dictate that fees must have an ethical basis. It is therefore important to establish a transparent and accurate costing tool that can be utilized by biobanks and aid them in establishing biospecimen user fees. To address this issue, we built a biospecimen user fee calculator tool, accessible online at www.biobanking.org . The tool was built to allow input of: i) annual operating and capital costs; ii) costs categorized by the major core biobanking operations; iii) specimen products requested by a biobank user; and iv) services provided by the biobank beyond core operations (e.g., histology, tissue micro-array); as well as v) several user defined variables to allow the calculator to be adapted to different biobank operational designs. To establish default values for variables within the calculator, we first surveyed the members of the Canadian Tumour Repository Network (CTRNet) management committee. We then enrolled four different participants from CTRNet biobanks to test the hypothesis that the calculator tool could change approaches to user fees. Participants were first asked to estimate user fee pricing for three hypothetical user scenarios based on their biobanking experience (estimated pricing) and then to calculate fees for the same scenarios using the calculator tool (calculated pricing). Results demonstrated significant variation in estimated pricing that was reduced by calculated pricing, and that higher user fees are consistently derived when using the calculator. We conclude that adoption of this online calculator for user fee determination is an important first step towards harmonization and realistic user fees.

  13. Custodianship as an Ethical Framework for Biospecimen-Based Research

    OpenAIRE

    Yassin, Rihab; Lockhart, Nicole; Riego, Mariana González del; Pitt, Karen; Thomas, Jeffrey W.; Weiss, Linda; Compton, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Human biological specimens (biospecimens) are increasingly important for research that aims to advance human health. Yet, despite significant proliferation in specimen-based research and discoveries during the past decade, researchremains challenged by the inequitable access to high quality biospecimens that are collected under rigorous ethical standards. This is primarily caused by the complex level of control and ownership exerted by the myriad of stakeholders involved in the biospecimen re...

  14. International efforts to develop biospecimen best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jimmie B; Caboux, Elodie; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-04-01

    Variables introduced during the processes involved in biospecimen collection, processing, storage, and analysis are among the potential sources of bias in biomarker research. International efforts are under way to develop best practices to standardize biospecimen handling protocols. In general, documents on best practices address three major recurring themes: technical best practices on infrastructure and specimen handling, recommendations on informatics and data management, and recommendations on ethical, legal, and social issues. There are many areas of agreement among various international efforts, but no single set of practices has emerged as a unifying document. The ethical, legal, and social issues are particularly difficult to harmonize due to the many country-specific issues that are governed by a variety of local and federal rules and regulations. Given the increasingly international nature of research involving biomarkers and biospecimens, it will be necessary to continue to cooperate in the development of harmonized evidence-based best practices. Several international organizations including the International Cancer Genome Consortium are engaged in such efforts.

  15. Measurements of the longitudinal structure function and |$V_{cs}$| in the CCFR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, U K; Arroyo, C G; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Budd, H S; Conrad, J; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Lamm, M J; Lefmann, W C; Marsh, W; McFarland, K S; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Quintas, P Z; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino nucleon interactions in the CCFR detector are used to extract the structure functions, F_2, xF_3(nu), xF_3(nubar) and R(longitudinal) in the kinematic region 0.01

  16. Low $Q^{2}$ low $\\times$ structure function analysis of CCFR data for $F_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Tamminga, B H; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; Barbaro, L; Barbaro, P D; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D A; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of structure functions (SFs) from neutrino and muon deep inelastic scattering data have shown discrepancies in F2 for x < 0.1. A new SF analysis of the CCFR collaboration data examining regions in x down to x=.0015 and 0.4 < Q^2 < 1.0 is presented. Comparison to corrected charged lepton scattering results for F2 from the NMC and E665 experiments are made. Differences between muon and neutrino scattering allow that the behavior of F2 from muon scattering could be different from F2 from neutrino scattering as Q^2 approaches zero. Comparisons between F2 muon and F2 neutrino are made in this limit.

  17. Preanalytical Variables Affecting the Integrity of Human Biospecimens in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Vaught, Jim

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most errors in a clinical chemistry laboratory are due to preanalytical errors. Preanalytical variability of biospecimens can have significant effects on downstream analyses, and controlling such variables is therefore fundamental for the future use of biospecimens in personalized...... medicine for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. CONTENT: The focus of this review is to examine the preanalytical variables that affect human biospecimen integrity in biobanking, with a special focus on blood, saliva, and urine. Cost efficiency is discussed in relation to these issues. SUMMARY: The quality...

  18. Study of Womens Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Biospecimen Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SWAN Repository is the biospecimen bank of the SWAN study. All stored specimens are from the 3,302 SWAN participants, collected across the 14 clinic visits...

  19. Tests of perturbative QCD using CCFR data for measurements of nucleon structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Leung, W.C.; Quintas, P.Z.; Sciulli, F.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Blair, R.E.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-04-01

    We present measurements of nucleon structure functions, F[sub 2](x, Q[sup 2]) and xF[sub 3](x, Q[sup 2]), from the high-statistics, high-energy neutrino-iron scattering experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The existing high-statistics xF[sub 3] determination by the CDHSW collaboration is compared to our data. The data presented here constitute the first corroboration of the QCD prediction of xF[sub 3] evolution at low-x, and yields [Lambda][anti M][anti S] = 210 [+-] 28 [+-] 41 MeV, and a determination of the GLS sum rule at Q[sup 2] = 3 GeV[sup 2], S[sub GLS] = [integral][sup 1][sub x] xF[sub 3]/x dx = 2.50 [+-] 0.018(stat.) [+-]0.078 (syst.). Our value of [Lambda][anti M][anti S] yields [alpha][sub s](M[sub z]) = .111 [+-] .002 [+-] .003 [+-] .003 (scale). Comparison of the neutrino determination of F[sub 2](x, Q[sup 2]) with that obtained from the charged-lepton (e or [mu]) scattering leads to a precise test of the mean-square charge prediction by the Quark Parton Model. The SLAC-CCFR and BCDMS structure function provide a consistent and precise set of structure functions over a large range of Q[sup 2]. (orig.)

  20. The CAS Bio-specimen Centers in Sound Progress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liangqian; QIAO Gexia; YAO Yijian

    2010-01-01

    @@ Bio-specimen centers, including herbaria and zoological museums, are the most integrated places for the storage of specimens, which are real samples and the most important vouchers for taxonomic and biodiversity studies.The information carried by the specimens is of substantial reference for research on species distribution, history, status, phylogeny and evolution, etc.

  1. Biobanking Comes of Age: The Transition to Biospecimen Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Biobanking involves the collection, processing, storage, and distribution of biological specimens and the policies and procedures necessary to accomplish those aims successfully. Although biobanking may also involve collections for environmental studies or museum archives, most efforts to standardize biobanking practices have been directed toward human biomedical research. Initially focused primarily on collecting samples for diagnostic purposes in pathology settings, biobanks have evolved into complex organizations engaged in advancing personalized (or precision) medicine and translational research. This evolution has involved the development of biobanking best practices and the transformation of a field driven by empirical approaches into the emerging area of biospecimen science. It has become increasingly important to develop evidence-based practices for collecting biospecimens and data that can be shared with confidence with international collaborators. Aside from these technical approaches, other factors play crucial roles, such as ethical and regulatory issues, business planning and sustainability, and approaches to data collection and sharing. PMID:26514206

  2. TRWG developmental pathway for biospecimen-based assessment modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Translational Research Working Group; Srivastava, Sudhir; Gray, Joe W.; Reid, Brian J.; Grad, Oren; Greenwood, Addison; Hawk, Ernest T.

    2008-09-03

    The Translational Research Working Group (TRWG) was created as a national initiative to evaluate the current status of NCI's investment in translational research and envision its future. The TRWG conceptualized translational research as a set of six developmental processes or pathways focused on various clinical goals. One of those pathways describes the development of biospecimen-based assays that utilize biomarkers for the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of response to cancer treatment. The biospecimen-based assessment modality (BM) pathway was conceived not as comprehensive description of the corresponding real-world processes, but rather as a tool designed to facilitate movement of a candidate assay through the translational process to the point where it can be handed off for definitive clinical testing. This paper introduces the pathway in the context of prior work and discusses key challenges associated with the biomarker development process in light of the pathway.

  3. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  4. 75 FR 51830 - National Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Cancer Institute's Best Practices for Biospecimen... best practices, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) is seeking public comment on a revised version of the NCI Best Practices for Biospecimen Resources. This revised version of the NCI Best Practices...

  5. 76 FR 38191 - New Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's Study SUMMARY: In... comment questioned the cost and utility of the study and federally funded biomedical research in general...: Title: Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the...

  6. 76 FR 23609 - New Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Biospecimen and Physical Measures Formative Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... questionnaires, storage and information management processes, and assay procedures, thereby informing data... formative research activities relating to the collection, storage, management, and assay of biospecimen and... Physical Measures Formative Research Methodology Studies for the National Children's Study SUMMARY:...

  7. Review: The procurement, storage and quality assurance of frozen blood and tissue biospecimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj S. Charde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The preserved frozen biospecimens are ideal for evaluating the genome, transcriptome, and proteome. Here we present a current overview of experimental data regarding procurement, storage, and quality assurance that can informthe handling of frozen biospecimens. Degradation of frozen biospecimens can be affected by collecting methodology, premortem agonal changes and warm ischemic time during surgery.  Tissue storage at− 80 °C can preserve DNA and protein but RNA show degradation at 5 years, therefore storage at − 150 °C provides significant advantages.  Histologic quality assurance of tissue biospecimens is typically performed at the time of surgery but should also be conducted on the aliquot to be distributed because of tissue heterogeneity.Additional qualityassurance testing should be dictated by the anticipated downstream applications.

  8. Next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the revised CCFR data for $xF_3$ structure function and the higher twist contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kataev, A L; Parente, G; Sidorov, A V

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the recently revised experimental data of the CCFR collaboration for the $xF_3$ structure function using the Jacobi polynomial expansion method. The effects of the higher twist contributions are included into the fits following the infrared renormalon motivated model. The special attention is paid to the checks of the predictive abilities of the infrared renormalon model and to the independent extraction of the $x$-shape of the twist-4 contributions to the $xF_3$ structure function in the process of the leading order, next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order fits of the revised CCFR data. We stress that at the next-to-next-to-leading order the results for We obtain the following result $\\alpha_s(M_Z)^{NNLO}=0.117 \\pm 0.002(stat) \\pm 0.005 (syst)\\pm 0.003 (theory)$. The comparison of the outcomes of our next-to-leading order and next-to-next-to-leading order analysis indicate that the theoretical QCD uncertainties were u...

  9. The Jacobi polynomials QCD analysis of the CCFR data for xF$_{3}$ and the Q$^{2}$-dependence of the Gross - Llewellyn Smith sum rule

    CERN Document Server

    Kataev, A L; Andrei L Kataev; Aleksander V Sidorov

    1994-01-01

    We present the results of our QCD analysis of the recent CCFR data for the structure function $xF_3 (x,Q^2)$ of the deep-inelastic neutrino--nucleon scattering. The analysis is based on the Jacobi polynomials expansion of the structure functions. The concrete results for the parameter $\\Lambda_{\\overline {MS}}^{(4)}$ and the shape of quark distributions are determined. At the reference scale $|Q_0 ^2|$=3 $GeV^2$ our results are in satisfactory agreement with the ones obtained by the CCFR group with the help of another method. The $Q_0^{2}$-dependence of the experimental data for the Gross--Llewellyn Smith sum rule is extracted in the wide region of high-momentum transfer. Within systematical experimental uncertainties the results obtained are consistent with the perturbative QCD predictions. We reveal the effect of the discrepancy between our results and the analysed perturbative QCD predictions at the level of the statistical error bars. The importance of taking account, in our procedure, of a still unknown ...

  10. World Endometriosis Research Foundation Endometriosis Phenome and Biobanking Harmonization Project: III. Fluid biospecimen collection, processing, and storage in endometriosis research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Fassbender, Amelie; Vitonis, Allison F.;

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo harmonize standard operating procedures (SOPs) and standardize the recording of associated data for collection, processing, and storage of fluid biospecimens relevant to endometriosis.......ObjectiveTo harmonize standard operating procedures (SOPs) and standardize the recording of associated data for collection, processing, and storage of fluid biospecimens relevant to endometriosis....

  11. Lessons from HeLa Cells: The Ethics and Policy of Biospecimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskow, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Human biospecimens have played a crucial role in scientific and medical advances. Although the ethical and policy issues associated with biospecimen research have long been the subject of scholarly debate, the story of attention of a much broader audience. The story has been a catalyst for policy change, including major regulatory changes proposed in the United States surrounding informed consent. These proposals are premised in part on public opinion data, necessitating a closer look at what such data tell us. The development of biospecimen policy should be informed by many considerations—one of which is public input, robustly gathered, on acceptable approaches that optimize shared interests, including access for all to the benefits of research. There is a need for consent approaches that are guided by realistic aspirations and a balanced view of autonomy within an expanded ethical framework. PMID:26979405

  12. A Measurement of xF{sup {nu}}{sub 3}-xF{nu}-bar{sub 3} and R with the CCFR Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, U.K.; Avvakumov, S.; Barbaro, P. de; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Johnson, R.A.; Vakili, M.; Wu, V.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bazarko, A.O.; Conrad, J.M.; Formaggio, J.A.; Kim, J.H.; King, B.J.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Lefmann, W.C.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S.R.; Romosan, A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; Tamminga, B.M.; Vaitaitis, A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bugel, L.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Nienaber, P.; Yu, J.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Bolton, T.; Goldman, J.; Goncharov, M.; Naples, D.; Barbaro, L. de; Buchholz, D.; Schellman, H.; Zeller, G.P.; Brau, J.; Drucker, R.B.; Frey, R.; Mason, D.; Kinnel, T.; Smith, W.H

    1999-10-01

    We report on a measurement of the neutrino-nucleon and antineutrino-nucleon differential cross sections in the CCFR detector. The measurement of the differential cross sections over a wide range of energies allows {delta}xF{sub 3} = xF{sup {nu}}{sub 3}-xF{nu}-bar{sub 3} and R to be extracted. {delta}xF{sub 3} is related to the difference between the contributions of the strange and charm seas in the nucleon to production of massive charm quark. The results for {delta}xF{sub 3} are compared to various massive charm NLO QCD models. The Q{sup 2} dependence of R for x < 0.1 has been measured for the first time.

  13. The Future of Biobanking: A Conceptual Look at How Biobanks Can Respond to the Growing Human Biospecimen Needs of Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somiari, Stella B; Somiari, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    Biobanking of human biological specimens has evolved from the simple private collection of often poorly annotated residual clinical specimens, to well annotated and organized collections setup by commercial and not-for-profit organizations. The activities of biobanks is now the focus of international and government agencies in recognition of the need to adopt best practices and provide scientific, ethical and legal guidelines for the industry. The demand for more, high quality and clinically annotated biospecimens will increase, primarily due to the unprecedented level of genomic, post genomic and personalized medicine research activities going on. Demand for more biospecimens provides new challenges and opportunities for developing strategies to build biobanking into a business that is better able to supply the biospecimen needs of the future. A paradigm shift is required particularly in organization and funding, as well as in how and where biospecimens are collected, stored and distributed. New collection sites, organized as Research Ready Hospitals (RRHs) and new public-private partnership models are needed for sustainability and increased biospecimen availability. Biobanks will need to adopt industry-wide standard operating procedures, better and "non-destructive" methods for quality assessment, less expensive methods for sample storage/distribution, and objective methods to manage scarce biospecimens. Ultimately, the success of future biobanks will rely greatly on the success of public-private partnerships, number and diversity of available biospecimens, cost management and the realization that an effective biobank is one that provides high quality and affordable biospecimens to drive research that leads to better health and quality of life for all.

  14. Knowledge and willingness to provide research biospecimens among foreign-born Latinos using safety-net clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffredo, Christopher A; Luta, Gheorghe; Wallington, Sherrie; Makgoeng, Solomon B; Selsky, Claire; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S; Adams-Campbell, Lucile L

    2013-08-01

    Latinos tend to be under-represented in cancer research and in bio-repositories. We conducted a Spanish-language, interviewer-administered cross-sectional survey of 331 foreign-born Latinos from Central and South America attending safety-net clinics in order to describe factors associated with knowledge about and intention to provide bio-specimens for research purposes. We used logistic regression and multiple imputation methods to evaluate associations between socio-cultural measures, medical trust, demographics, as well as knowledge about and intentions to provide bio-specimens. Almost half (47 %) of respondents knew what bio-specimens were, and 67 % said that they would provide a specimen after being given information about what this involved; this increased to 72 % among those with prior knowledge. Controlling for covariates, Latinos with a high school education and above were more likely to know what a bio-specimen was and to say they would provide bio-specimens than were those with lower levels of education [adjusted OR (aOR) 2.85, 95 % CI 1.37-5.96; and 3.49, 95 % CI 1.41-8.63, p ≤ 0.01, respectively]. Those with greater social integration were more likely to know about bio-specimens than those with less integration (aOR 2.54, 95 % CI 1.45-4.46, p = 0.001). Higher endorsement of family values was independently associated with intent to give bio-specimens (aOR 1.11, 95 % CI 1.02-1.20, p = 0.017 per five-point increase in "familism" score). Medical mistrust was not related to intentions to provide specimens. Our results suggest that interventions to increase willingness to provide bio-specimens could leverage trusted clinics or social networks and should consider individuals' education and socio-cultural perspectives.

  15. Biospecimen quality program in the biobank of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Paltiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological material collected, processed and stored in biobanks are important research tools and it is important to minimize preanalytical variations to provide researchers with high quality biological material that will give reproducible results. Methods: To minimize the preanalytical variations caused by sample collection, processing and storage, we have established a biospecimen quality program. It consists of quality assurance aspects as well as quality control programs to measure adherence to protocols and sample integrity. The quality control program includes measurements and evaluation of the DNA quality and quantity before storage, i.e. concentration, purity, fragmentation and PCR success, and long term storage programs for plasma, urine and RNA. Conclusions: The Biobank at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health has established a biospecimen quality program that ensures high quality specimens and provides the documentation required to use the biomaterial in a best possible way.

  16. Predictors of biospecimen donation in the Black Women’s Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams-Campbell, Lucile L.; Dash, Chiranjeev; Palmer, Julie R.; Wiedemeier, Manuela V.; Russell, Cordelia W.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Cozier, Yvette C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Although African-Americans experience higher cancer morbidity and mortality rates compared to their White counterparts, their participation in biospecimen research is lower than that of their white peers. This study investigated the prevalence and predictors of biospecimen donation in a large, cohort study of Black women. Methods The BWHS is a follow-up study of U.S. Black women aged 21–69 years enrolled through postal health questionnaires. Between January 2004 and December 2007, participants were sent a consent form with a postage-paid return envelope, and a mouthwash collection kit. Univariate and age- and educational status-adjusted logistic regression models were used to estimate the association of socio-demographic, lifestyle and medical factors with donation of biospecimens. Results Buccal cells with consent forms were obtained from 26,790 women, for a response rate of 51 %. The strongest predictors of biospecimen donation were age: response increased from 48.6 % among those aged <40 to 63.1 % among those aged 60 and older [RR 1.30 (95 % CI 1.27, 1.34)]; multivitamin use [RR (95 % CI) 1.32 (1.30, 1.34)]; physician visit in the previous 2 years [RR (95 % CI) 1.61 (1.58, 1.65)], and a history of breast [RR (95 % CI) 1.59 (1.56, 1.63)], colon [RR (95 % CI) 1.18 (1.16, 1.20)], and cervical [RR (95 % CI) 1.63 (1.60, 1.67)] cancer screening. Conclusions We found that 51 % of women in the geographically-dispersed Black Women’s Health Study cohort were willing to provide mouthwash samples to be used for genetic analyses. The response in this study is encouraging given published findings of low overall participation rates of African-Americans in genetic studies. PMID:27106577

  17. Leveraging a clinical research information system to assist biospecimen data and workflow management: a hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Large multi-center clinical studies often involve the collection and analysis of biological samples. It is necessary to ensure timely, complete and accurate recording of analytical results and associated phenotypic and clinical information. The TRIBE-AKI Consortium http://www.yale.edu/tribeaki supports a network of multiple related studies and sample biorepository, thus allowing researchers to take advantage of a larger specimen collection than they might have at an individual institution. Description We describe a biospecimen data management system (BDMS) that supports TRIBE-AKI and is intended for multi-center collaborative clinical studies that involve shipment of biospecimens between sites. This system works in conjunction with a clinical research information system (CRIS) that stores the clinical data associated with the biospecimens, along with other patient-related parameters. Inter-operation between the two systems is mediated by an interactively invoked suite of Web Services, as well as by batch code. We discuss various challenges involved in integration. Conclusions Our experience indicates that an approach that emphasizes inter-operability is reasonably optimal in allowing each system to be utilized for the tasks for which it is best suited. PMID:21884570

  18. A Federated Network for Translational Cancer Research Using Clinical Data and Biospecimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Rebecca S; Becich, Michael J; Bollag, Roni J; Chavan, Girish; Corrigan, Julia; Dhir, Rajiv; Feldman, Michael D; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Legowski, Elizabeth; Maihle, Nita J; Mitchell, Kevin; Murphy, Monica; Sakthivel, Mayurapriyan; Tseytlin, Eugene; Weaver, JoEllen

    2015-12-15

    Advances in cancer research and personalized medicine will require significant new bridging infrastructures, including more robust biorepositories that link human tissue to clinical phenotypes and outcomes. In order to meet that challenge, four cancer centers formed the Text Information Extraction System (TIES) Cancer Research Network, a federated network that facilitates data and biospecimen sharing among member institutions. Member sites can access pathology data that are de-identified and processed with the TIES natural language processing system, which creates a repository of rich phenotype data linked to clinical biospecimens. TIES incorporates multiple security and privacy best practices that, combined with legal agreements, network policies, and procedures, enable regulatory compliance. The TIES Cancer Research Network now provides integrated access to investigators at all member institutions, where multiple investigator-driven pilot projects are underway. Examples of federated search across the network illustrate the potential impact on translational research, particularly for studies involving rare cancers, rare phenotypes, and specific biologic behaviors. The network satisfies several key desiderata including local control of data and credentialing, inclusion of rich phenotype information, and applicability to diverse research objectives. The TIES Cancer Research Network presents a model for a national data and biospecimen network.

  19. A Federated Network for Translational Cancer Research Using Clinical Data and Biospecimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Rebecca S; Becich, Michael J; Bollag, Roni J; Chavan, Girish; Corrigan, Julia; Dhir, Rajiv; Feldman, Michael D; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Legowski, Elizabeth; Maihle, Nita J; Mitchell, Kevin; Murphy, Monica; Sakthivel, Mayurapriyan; Tseytlin, Eugene; Weaver, JoEllen

    2015-12-15

    Advances in cancer research and personalized medicine will require significant new bridging infrastructures, including more robust biorepositories that link human tissue to clinical phenotypes and outcomes. In order to meet that challenge, four cancer centers formed the Text Information Extraction System (TIES) Cancer Research Network, a federated network that facilitates data and biospecimen sharing among member institutions. Member sites can access pathology data that are de-identified and processed with the TIES natural language processing system, which creates a repository of rich phenotype data linked to clinical biospecimens. TIES incorporates multiple security and privacy best practices that, combined with legal agreements, network policies, and procedures, enable regulatory compliance. The TIES Cancer Research Network now provides integrated access to investigators at all member institutions, where multiple investigator-driven pilot projects are underway. Examples of federated search across the network illustrate the potential impact on translational research, particularly for studies involving rare cancers, rare phenotypes, and specific biologic behaviors. The network satisfies several key desiderata including local control of data and credentialing, inclusion of rich phenotype information, and applicability to diverse research objectives. The TIES Cancer Research Network presents a model for a national data and biospecimen network. PMID:26670560

  20. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin;

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  1. Statistical design for biospecimen cohort size in proteomics-based biomarker discovery and verification studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skates, Steven J; Gillette, Michael A; LaBaer, Joshua; Carr, Steven A; Anderson, Leigh; Liebler, Daniel C; Ransohoff, David; Rifai, Nader; Kondratovich, Marina; Težak, Živana; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Oberg, Ann L; Wright, Ian; Barnes, Grady; Gail, Mitchell; Mesri, Mehdi; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Rodriguez, Henry; Boja, Emily S

    2013-12-01

    Protein biomarkers are needed to deepen our understanding of cancer biology and to improve our ability to diagnose, monitor, and treat cancers. Important analytical and clinical hurdles must be overcome to allow the most promising protein biomarker candidates to advance into clinical validation studies. Although contemporary proteomics technologies support the measurement of large numbers of proteins in individual clinical specimens, sample throughput remains comparatively low. This problem is amplified in typical clinical proteomics research studies, which routinely suffer from a lack of proper experimental design, resulting in analysis of too few biospecimens to achieve adequate statistical power at each stage of a biomarker pipeline. To address this critical shortcoming, a joint workshop was held by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), and American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) with participation from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). An important output from the workshop was a statistical framework for the design of biomarker discovery and verification studies. Herein, we describe the use of quantitative clinical judgments to set statistical criteria for clinical relevance and the development of an approach to calculate biospecimen sample size for proteomic studies in discovery and verification stages prior to clinical validation stage. This represents a first step toward building a consensus on quantitative criteria for statistical design of proteomics biomarker discovery and verification research.

  2. Factors that Affect Willingness to Donate Blood for the Purpose of Biospecimen Research in the Korean American Community

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Glorian P.; Davey, Adam; Grace X. Ma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Biorepositories have been key resources in examining genetically-linked diseases, particularly cancer. Asian Americans contribute to biorepositories at lower rates than other racial groups, but the reasons for this are unclear. We hypothesized that attitudes toward biospecimen research mediate the relationship between demographic and healthcare access factors, and willingness to donate blood for research purposes among individuals of Korean heritage.

  3. [Current modalities and concepts on access and use of biospecimen samples and associated data for research from human biobanks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Roman; Semler, Sebastian Claudius

    2016-03-01

    It is accepted worldwide that biospecimen and data sharing (BDS) play an essential role for the future of medical research to improve diagnostics and prognostics, e.g. by validated biomarkers. BDS is also pivotal to the development of new therapeutic treatments and for the improvement of population health. Human biobanks can generate an added value to this need by providing biospecimens and/or associated data to researchers. An inspection of several examples of epidemiological as well as clinical/disease-oriented biobanks in Germany shows that best practice procedures (BPP) that are internationally agreed on are being installed for biospecimen and/or data access. In general, fair access is aimed at requiring a written application by the requesting scientist, which is then peer-reviewed for scientific and ethical validity by the Biobank. Applied BPP take into account (i) patient education/agreement according to the informed consent model, (ii) privacy protection, (iii) intellectual property rights, the (iv) notification obligation of health-related findings (including incidental findings), the (v) use of material (MTA) and data transfer agreements (DTA) for mutual legal security, the avoidance of conflicts of interests, as well as for cost recovery/fee for service as a basis for sustainability of the biobank. BPP are rooted in the self-regulation efforts of life sciences and are supported by parent ethics committees in Germany. Central biobank registries displaying aggregated information on biospecimens stored and the research foci constitute an important tool to make biobanks that are scattered across the country visible to each other, and, can thus promote access to hitherto unknown biospecimen and data resources. PMID:26809822

  4. A review of room temperature storage of biospecimen tissue and nucleic acids for anatomic pathology laboratories and biorepositories

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Jerry J.; Mirsadraei, Leili; Sanchez, Desiree E.; Wilson, Ryan W.; Shabihkhani, Maryam; Gregory M Lucey; Wei, Bowen; Singer, Elyse J.; Mareninov, Sergey; Yong, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Frozen biospecimens are crucial for translational research and contain well preserved nucleic acids and protein. However, the risk for catastrophic freezer failure as well as space, cost, and environmental concerns argue for evaluating long-term room temperature storage alternatives. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissues have great value but their use is limited by cross-linking and fragmentation of nucleic acids, as well as loss of enzymatic activity. Stabilization solutions can no...

  5. Biospecimen Retrieval from NASA's Rodent Research-1: Maximizing Science Return from Flight Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. Y.; Chen, Y.- C.; Reyes, A.; Verma, V.; Dinh, M.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed to support long duration missions on the International Space Station. After 37 days in microgravity twenty mice were euthanized and frozen on orbit. Upon return to Earth the carcasses were dissected and yielded 32 different types of tissues from each mouse and over 3200 tissue aliquots. Many tissues were distributed to the Space Life and Physical Sciences (SLPS) Biospecimen Sharing Program (BSP) Principal Investigators (PIs) through the Ames Life Science Data Archive (ALSDA). A second round of dissections was performed to collect additional tissues from the remaining carcasses thawed for a second time for additional BSP PIs. Tissues retrieved included vaginal walls, aorta, pelvis, brown adipose tissue, tail, spine and forearms. Although the analyses are still in progress, some of the PIs have reported that the quality of the tissues was acceptable for their study. In a separate experiment we tested the RNA quality of the tissues that were dissected from frozen carcasses that were subjected to euthanasia, freezing, first and second thaw dissections. Timelines simulated the on-orbit RR-1 procedures to assess the quality of the tissues retrieved from the second thaw dissections. We analyzed the RIN values of select tissues including kidney, brain, white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT). Overall the RIN values from the second thaw were lower compared to those from the first by about a half unit; however, the tissues yielded RNA that are acceptable quality for some quantitative gene expression assays. Interestingly, RIN values of brain tissues were 8.4+/-0.6 and 7.9+/-0.7 from first and second round dissections, respectively (n=5). Kidney and WAT yielded RIN values less than 8 but they can still be used for qPCR. BAT yielded higher quality RNA (8.2+/-0.5) than WAT (5.22+/-0.9), possibly due to the high fat content. Together, these

  6. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min-1 with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels-1.

  7. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J., E-mail: tmuldoon@uark.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 120 Engineering Hall, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  8. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min−1 with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels−1

  9. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A; Majid, Aneeka A; Powless, Amy J; Muldoon, Timothy J

    2015-09-01

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min(-1) with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels(-1). PMID:26429450

  10. A Tissue Retrieval and Postharvest Processing Regimen for Rodent Reproductive Tissues Compatible with Long-Term Storage on the International Space Station and Postflight Biospecimen Sharing Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayalaxmi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Collection and processing of tissues to preserve space flight effects from animals after return to Earth is challenging. Specimens must be harvested with minimal time after landing to minimize postflight readaptation alterations in protein expression/translation, posttranslational modifications, and expression, as well as changes in gene expression and tissue histological degradation after euthanasia. We report the development of a widely applicable strategy for determining the window of optimal species-specific and tissue-specific posteuthanasia harvest that can be utilized to integrate into multi-investigator Biospecimen Sharing Programs. We also determined methods for ISS-compatible long-term tissue storage (10 months at −80°C that yield recovery of high quality mRNA and protein for western analysis after sample return. Our focus was reproductive tissues. The time following euthanasia where tissues could be collected and histological integrity was maintained varied with tissue and species ranging between 1 and 3 hours. RNA quality was preserved in key reproductive tissues fixed in RNAlater up to 40 min after euthanasia. Postfixation processing was also standardized for safe shipment back to our laboratory. Our strategy can be adapted for other tissues under NASA’s Biospecimen Sharing Program or similar multi-investigator tissue sharing opportunities.

  11. A tissue retrieval and postharvest processing regimen for rodent reproductive tissues compatible with long-term storage on the international space station and postflight biospecimen sharing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vijayalaxmi; Holets-Bondar, Lesya; Roby, Katherine F; Enders, George; Tash, Joseph S

    2015-01-01

    Collection and processing of tissues to preserve space flight effects from animals after return to Earth is challenging. Specimens must be harvested with minimal time after landing to minimize postflight readaptation alterations in protein expression/translation, posttranslational modifications, and expression, as well as changes in gene expression and tissue histological degradation after euthanasia. We report the development of a widely applicable strategy for determining the window of optimal species-specific and tissue-specific posteuthanasia harvest that can be utilized to integrate into multi-investigator Biospecimen Sharing Programs. We also determined methods for ISS-compatible long-term tissue storage (10 months at -80°C) that yield recovery of high quality mRNA and protein for western analysis after sample return. Our focus was reproductive tissues. The time following euthanasia where tissues could be collected and histological integrity was maintained varied with tissue and species ranging between 1 and 3 hours. RNA quality was preserved in key reproductive tissues fixed in RNAlater up to 40 min after euthanasia. Postfixation processing was also standardized for safe shipment back to our laboratory. Our strategy can be adapted for other tissues under NASA's Biospecimen Sharing Program or similar multi-investigator tissue sharing opportunities.

  12. Contrasting the ethical perspectives of biospecimen research among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer and biomedical researchers: implications for researcher training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Koskan, Alexis; Sehovic, Ivana; Pal, Tuya; Meade, Cathy; Gwede, Clement K

    2014-07-01

    While ethical concerns about participating in biospecimen research have been previously identified, few studies have reported the concerns among individuals with familial risk for hereditary cancer (IFRs). At the same time, biomedical researchers often lack training in discussing such concerns to potential donors. This study explores IFRs' and biomedical researchers' perceptions of ethical concerns about participating in biobanking research. In separate focus groups, IFRs and biomedical researchers participated in 90-min telephone focus groups. Focus group questions centered on knowledge about laws that protect the confidentiality of biospecimen donors, understanding of informed consent and study procedures, and preferences for being recontacted about potential incidental discovery and also study results. A total of 40 IFRs and 32 biomedical researchers participated in the focus groups. Results demonstrated discrepancies between the perceptions of IFRs and researchers. IFRs' concerns centered on health information protection; potential discrimination by insurers and employers; and preferences for being recontacted upon discovery of gene mutations or to communicate study results. Researchers perceived that participants understood laws protecting donors' privacy and (detailed study information outlined in the informed consent process), study outcomes were used to create a training tool kit to increase researchers' understanding of IFRs' concerns about biobanking.

  13. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in...

  14. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  15. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  16. Core strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  17. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    The Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is a language for expressing business process behaviour based on web services. The language is intentionally not minimal but provides a rich set of constructs, allows omission of constructs by relying on defaults, and supports language....... To make the results of this work directly usable for practical purposes, we provide an XML Schema for Core BPEL and a set of XSLT 1.0 transformations that will transform any standard compliant WS-BPEL process into a Core BPEL process. We also provide an online service where one can apply...... the transformation. This work is part of the initial considerations on the implementation of a WS-BPEL engine within the Computer Supported Mobile Adaptive Business Processes (CosmoBiz) research project at the IT University of Copenhagen....

  18. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters. PMID:27464191

  19. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters.

  20. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  1. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  2. Banded transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  3. K-core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Wolman, Alexander L.

    2011-01-01

    K-core inflation is a new class of underlying inflation measures. The two most popular measures of underlying inflation are core inflation and trimmed mean inflation. The former removes fixed categories of goods and services (food and energy) from the inflation calculation, and the latter removes fixed percentiles of the weighted distribution of price changes. In contrast, k-core inflation specifies a size of relative price change to be removed from the inflation calculation. Thus, the catego...

  4. The core paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  5. Main: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE S000001 10-May-2006 (last modified) kehi TGTAAAG core motif in -300 elemen...ts of alpha-zein genes of maize; -300 element core; prolamin box by Vicente-Carbajosa et al. (Proc Natl Acad... a DNA-binding protein of the DOF class of transcription factors; zein; core moti...f; maize; -300 element; promoter; prolamin-box; P-box; seed; endosperm; maize (Zea mays); wheat (Triticum aestivum); barley (Hordeum vulgare); tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) TGTAAAG ...

  6. Core Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  7. Mercury's core evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  8. Ice Core Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  9. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  10. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  11. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  12. Core shroud corner joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  13. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  14. Reference: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE Forde BG, Heyworth A, Pywell J, Kreis M Nucleotide sequence of a B1 hordein gene and the identifica...tion of possible upstream regulatory elements in endosperm storage protein genes fr

  15. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...

  16. Focusing on Core Business

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China is regulating state-owned enterprises that are investing outside of their core business realms, concerned that poor investment decisions could lead to loss of state-owned assets, but some doubt the effect of the new regulation

  17. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  18. Reference: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE Mena M, Vicente-Carbajosa J, Schmidt RJ, Carbonero P An endosperm-specific... DOF protein from barley, highly conserved in wheat, binds to and activates transcription from the prolamin-

  19. NICHD Zebrafish Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The core[HTML_REMOVED]s goal is to help researchers of any expertise perform zebrafish experiments aimed at illuminating basic biology and human disease mechanisms,...

  20. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  1. Optically clearing tissue as an initial step for 3D imaging of core biopsies to diagnose pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ronnie; Agrawal, Aishwarya; Upton, Melissa P.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The pancreas is a deeply seated organ requiring endoscopically, or radiologically guided biopsies for tissue diagnosis. Current approaches include either fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNA) for cytologic evaluation, or core needle biopsies (CBs), which comprise of tissue cores (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.4-2.0 mm) for examination by brightfield microscopy. Between procurement and visualization, biospecimens must be processed, sectioned and mounted on glass slides for 2D visualization. Optical information about the native tissue state can be lost with each procedural step and a pathologist cannot appreciate 3D organization from 2D observations of tissue sections 1-8 μm in thickness. Therefore, how might histological disease assessment improve if entire, intact CBs could be imaged in both brightfield and 3D? CBs are mechanically delicate; therefore, a simple device was made to cut intact, simulated CBs (L = 1-2 cm, D = 0.2-0.8 mm) from porcine pancreas. After CBs were laid flat in a chamber, z-stack images at 20x and 40x were acquired through the sample with and without the application of an optical clearing agent (FocusClear®). Intensity of transmitted light increased by 5-15x and islet structures unique to pancreas were clearly visualized 250-300 μm beneath the tissue surface. CBs were then placed in index matching square capillary tubes filled with FocusClear® and a standard optical clearing agent. Brightfield z-stack images were then acquired to present 3D visualization of the CB to the pathologist.

  2. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  3. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  4. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  5. Open Core -rajapinnan mahdollisuudet

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkinen, Iina

    2014-01-01

    Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on tutkia Open Core -rajapintaa ja sen käyttömahdollisuuksia automaatioteknologiassa. Se on osa Bosch Rexrothin kehittämää Open Core Engineering -konseptia ja on suunniteltu yhdistämään korkeamman tason kielet PLC-ohjelmoinnin kanssa mahdollistaen edistyneempien ratkaisujen muodostamista ohjelmistotekniikassa. Opinnäytetyö koostuu kolmesta osa-alueesta, joista ensimmäinen käsittelee automaatioteollisuutta yleisellä tasolla ja kertoo lyhyesti Bosch Rex...

  6. Conglutinating complex fixation test (CCFR) as a method alternate to enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has proved to be the most versatile and sensitive method for the serological diagnosis of infectious animal diseases. However, other assays offer similar advantages. This has been shown by our research through the development of a conglutinating complex fixation test (CCFT). This is analogous to the complement fixation test (CFT) and is based on the phenomenon of conglutination. The limiting factor in this test is the source in cattle blood

  7. Some Core Contested Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  8. The core and cosmopolitans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlander, Linus; Frederiksen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Users often interact and help each other solve problems in communities, but few scholars have explored how these relationships provide opportunities to innovate. We analyze the extent to which people positioned within the core of a community as well as people that are cosmopolitans positioned...

  9. Schumpeter's core works revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2012-01-01

    This paper organises Schumpeter’s core books in three groups: the programmatic duology,the evolutionaryeconomic duology,and the socioeconomic synthesis. By analysing these groups and their interconnections from the viewpoint of modern evolutionaryeconomics,the paper summarises resolved problems...

  10. From Context to Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  11. Reference: -300CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -300CORE Colot V, Robert LS, Kavanagh TA, Bevan MW, Thompson RD Localization of seq...uences in wheat endosperm protein genes which confer tissue-specific expression in tobacco. EMBO J 6:3559-3564 (1987) PubMed: 15467781 ...

  12. Core calculations of JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In material testing reactors like the JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) of 50 MW in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of irradiated samples show complex distributions. It is necessary to assess the neutron flux and neutron energy spectra of an irradiation field by carrying out the nuclear calculation of the core for every operation cycle. In order to advance core calculation, in the JMTR, the application of MCNP to the assessment of core reactivity and neutron flux and spectra has been investigated. In this study, in order to reduce the time for calculation and variance, the comparison of the results of the calculations by the use of K code and fixed source and the use of Weight Window were investigated. As to the calculation method, the modeling of the total JMTR core, the conditions for calculation and the adopted variance reduction technique are explained. The results of calculation are shown. Significant difference was not observed in the results of neutron flux calculations according to the difference of the modeling of fuel region in the calculations by K code and fixed source. The method of assessing the results of neutron flux calculation is described. (K.I.)

  13. Languages for Dublin Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Focusing on languages for the Dublin Core, examines the experience of some related ways to seek semantic interoperability through simplicity: planned languages, interlingua constructs, and pidgins. Also defines the conceptual and organizational problem of maintaining a metadata standard in multiple languages. (AEF)

  14. A Multidisciplinary Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Trace

    2002-01-01

    Describes New York University's commitment to general mathematics and science education for undergraduate students, embodied in the College of Arts and Science's core curriculum, the Morse Academic Plan, which includes a three-course sequence, Foundations of Scientific Inquiry, specifically designed for non-majors. (EV)

  15. Life from the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  16. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  17. Inflation targeting and core inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Julie Smith

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the interaction of core inflation and inflation targeting as a monetary policy regime. Interest in core inflation has grown because of inflation targeting. Core inflation is defined in numerous ways giving rise to many potential measures; this paper defines core inflation as the best forecaster of inflation. A cross-country study finds before the start of inflation targeting, but not after, core inflation differs between non-inflation targeters and inflation targeters. Thr...

  18. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  19. CORE annual report 2006; CORE Jahresbericht 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gut, A

    2007-04-15

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed.

  20. Critical CRBR core pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container

  1. In core monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention monitors abnormality in an FBR type reactor, especially in the vicinity of a portion above the reactor core. That is, a standard target which reflects ultrasonic waves is previously disposed to an internal cylinder or an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) stand pipe in the reactor at a portion which is large and less undergoes thermal deformation. In addition, a similar monitoring target which reflects ultrasonic waves is disposed to the structure, for which deformation and displacement are to be confirmed. With such a constitution, the relative distance between the standard target and the monitoring target can be measured by ultrasonic waves. Accordingly, deformation of in core structures can be monitored being free from the installation accuracy of the driving device. Further, the slacking of bolts can be monitored by disposing a monitoring target at the top of the bolt and disposing a standard target to the material to be monitored. (I.S.)

  2. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs. PMID:25420936

  3. Core Labor Rights

    OpenAIRE

    Sinaga, Hariati; Scherrer, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The working paper’s main objective is to explore the extent to which non-compliance to international labor rights is caused by global competition. From the perspective of institutional economics, compliance with core labor rights is beneficial for sustainable development. Nonetheless, violations of these rights occur on a massive scale. The violators usually blame competitive pressures. A number of studies have come to the conclusion that non-compliance does not provide for a c...

  4. Some core contested concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  5. Variable depth core sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  6. Ice Cores of the National Ice Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. National Ice Core Laboratory (NICL) is a facility for storing, curating, and studying ice cores recovered from the polar regions of the world. It provides...

  7. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  8. Core-seis: a code for LMFBR core seismic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chellapandi, P.; Ravi, R.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Reactor Group

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with a computer code CORE-SEIS specially developed for seismic analysis of LMFBR core configurations. For demonstrating the prediction capability of the code, results are presented for one of the MONJU reactor core mock ups which deals with a cluster of 37 subassemblies kept in water. (author). 3 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  10. Optimizing performance by improving core stability and core strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Angela E; Thompson, Kevin G; French, Duncan; Wrigley, Allan; Spears, Iain

    2008-01-01

    Core stability and core strength have been subject to research since the early 1980s. Research has highlighted benefits of training these processes for people with back pain and for carrying out everyday activities. However, less research has been performed on the benefits of core training for elite athletes and how this training should be carried out to optimize sporting performance. Many elite athletes undertake core stability and core strength training as part of their training programme, despite contradictory findings and conclusions as to their efficacy. This is mainly due to the lack of a gold standard method for measuring core stability and strength when performing everyday tasks and sporting movements. A further confounding factor is that because of the differing demands on the core musculature during everyday activities (low load, slow movements) and sporting activities (high load, resisted, dynamic movements), research performed in the rehabilitation sector cannot be applied to the sporting environment and, subsequently, data regarding core training programmes and their effectiveness on sporting performance are lacking. There are many articles in the literature that promote core training programmes and exercises for performance enhancement without providing a strong scientific rationale of their effectiveness, especially in the sporting sector. In the rehabilitation sector, improvements in lower back injuries have been reported by improving core stability. Few studies have observed any performance enhancement in sporting activities despite observing improvements in core stability and core strength following a core training programme. A clearer understanding of the roles that specific muscles have during core stability and core strength exercises would enable more functional training programmes to be implemented, which may result in a more effective transfer of these skills to actual sporting activities. PMID:19026017

  11. Waves in the core and mechanical core-mantle interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jault, D.; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    the motions in the direction parallel to the Earth'srotation axis. This property accounts for the signicance of the core-mantle topography.In addition, the stiening of the uid in the direction parallel to the rotation axis gives riseto a magnetic diusion layer attached to the core-mantle boundary, which would...... otherwisebe dispersed by Alfven waves. This Chapter complements the descriptions of large-scaleow in the core (8.04), of turbulence in the core (8.06) and of core-mantle interactions(8.12), which can all be found in this volume. We rely on basic magnetohydrodynamictheory, including the derivation...

  12. Core Formation Process and Light Elements in the Planetary Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, E.; Sakairi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Kamada, S.; Sakamaki, T.; Hirao, N.

    2015-12-01

    Si, O, and S are major candidates for light elements in the planetary core. In the early stage of the planetary formation, the core formation started by percolation of the metallic liquid though silicate matrix because Fe-S-O and Fe-S-Si eutectic temperatures are significantly lower than the solidus of the silicates. Therefore, in the early stage of accretion of the planets, the eutectic liquid with S enrichment was formed and separated into the core by percolation. The major light element in the core at this stage will be sulfur. The internal pressure and temperature increased with the growth of the planets, and the metal component depleted in S was molten. The metallic melt contained both Si and O at high pressure in the deep magma ocean in the later stage. Thus, the core contains S, Si, and O in this stage of core formation. Partitioning experiments between solid and liquid metals indicate that S is partitioned into the liquid metal, whereas O is weakly into the liquid. Partitioning of Si changes with the metallic iron phases, i.e., fcc iron-alloy coexisting with the metallic liquid below 30 GPa is depleted in Si. Whereas hcp-Fe alloy above 30 GPa coexisting with the liquid favors Si. This contrast of Si partitioning provides remarkable difference in compositions of the solid inner core and liquid outer core among different terrestrial planets. Our melting experiments of the Fe-S-Si and Fe-O-S systems at high pressure indicate the core-adiabats in small planets, Mercury and Mars, are greater than the slope of the solidus and liquidus curves of these systems. Thus, in these planets, the core crystallized at the top of the liquid core and 'snowing core' formation occurred during crystallization. The solid inner core is depleted in both Si and S whereas the liquid outer core is relatively enriched in Si and S in these planets. On the other hand, the core adiabats in large planets, Earth and Venus, are smaller than the solidus and liquidus curves of the systems. The

  13. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  14. Models of the Earth's Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    1981-11-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with the following properties. Core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and laboratory data. PMID:17839632

  15. Complex coacervate core micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voets, Ilja K; de Keizer, Arie; Cohen Stuart, Martien A

    2009-01-01

    In this review we present an overview of the literature on the co-assembly of neutral-ionic block, graft, and random copolymers with oppositely charged species in aqueous solution. Oppositely charged species include synthetic (co)polymers of various architectures, biopolymers - such as proteins, enzymes and DNA - multivalent ions, metallic nanoparticles, low molecular weight surfactants, polyelectrolyte block copolymer micelles, metallo-supramolecular polymers, equilibrium polymers, etcetera. The resultant structures are termed complex coacervate core/polyion complex/block ionomer complex/interpolyelectrolyte complex micelles (or vesicles); i.e., in short C3Ms (or C3Vs) and PIC, BIC or IPEC micelles (and vesicles). Formation, structure, dynamics, properties, and function will be discussed. We focus on experimental work; theory and modelling will not be discussed. Recent developments in applications and micelles with heterogeneous coronas are emphasized.

  16. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  17. CORE annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed

  18. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully. PMID:14712545

  19. Growth outside the core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris; Allen, James

    2003-12-01

    Growth in an adjacent market is tougher than it looks; three-quarters of the time, the effort fails. But companies can change those odds dramatically. Results from a five-year study of corporate growth conducted by Bain & Company reveal that adjacency expansion succeeds only when built around strong core businesses that have the potential to become market leaders. And the best place to look for adjacency opportunities is inside a company's strongest customers. The study also found that the most successful companies were able to consistently, profitably outgrow their rivals by developing a formula for pushing out the boundaries of their core businesses in predictable, repeatable ways. Companies use their repeatability formulas to expand into any number of adjacencies. Some companies make repeated geographic moves, as Vodafone has done in expanding from one geographic market to another over the past 13 years, building revenues from $1 billion in 1990 to $48 billion in 2003. Others apply a superior business model to new segments. Dell, for example, has repeatedly adapted its direct-to-customer model to new customer segments and new product categories. In other cases, companies develop hybrid approaches. Nike executed a series of different types of adjacency moves: it expanded into adjacent customer segments, introduced new products, developed new distribution channels, and then moved into adjacent geographic markets. The successful repeaters in the study had two common characteristics. First, they were extraordinarily disciplined, applying rigorous screens before they made an adjacency move. This discipline paid off in the form of learning curve benefits, increased speed, and lower complexity. And second, in almost all cases, they developed their repeatable formulas by studying their customers and their customers' economics very, very carefully.

  20. Advances in core drilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, G.

    Some notable technical advances in drill design were reported at the meeting, held in Canada August 30-September 1, 1982, at the University of Calgary. Chief amongst these was a battery powered, computer assisted electromechanical core drill which has recently been used by the Danes in Greenland to continuously core to the base of the ice sheet at 2038 m. This is the deepest coring operation so far on the Greenland ice sheet. (The record for deep glacier drilling is held by the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory for the continuous coring through 2164 m of ice to bedrock at Byrd Station, Antarctica, in 1968). In early 1982, a current Soviet core drilling operation was reported to be at a depth of 2000 m at Vostok station, Antarctica, where the total ice thickness is about 4000 m; the goal of core drilling the entire ice thickness there could be achieved before the end of 1983.

  1. Gundremmingen's new core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear core monitoring system KSIM (KernSIMulator) was developed for the Gundremmingen nuclear power station and commissioned in June 1994. It replaces the old core monitoring system (P1) running on the station's process computer, and helps the operators further exploit the operational limits of the core. In this way KSIM can make a substantial contribution to operational safety and reactor flexibility and, in consequence, provide a tangible financial benefit. (author)

  2. Characterizing the Core via K-Core Covers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, S.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Estevez, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  3. The Noncommutative Bion Core

    CERN Document Server

    Constable, N R; Tafjord, O Yu; Constable, Neil R.; Myers, Robert C.; Tafjord, Oyvind

    2000-01-01

    We examine new noncommutative solutions of the nonabelian theory on the world-volume of N coincident D-strings. These solutions can be interpreted in terms of noncommutative geometry as funnels describing the nonabelian D-string expanding out into an orthogonal D3-brane. These configurations are `dual' to the bion solutions in the abelian world-volume theory of the D3-brane. In the latter, an charge N magnetic monopole describes N D-strings attached to the D3-brane with a spike deformation of the world-volume. The noncommutative D-string solutions give a reliable account of physics at the core of the monopole, where the bion description is expected to breakdown. In the large N limit, we find good agreement between the two points of view, including the energy, couplings to background fields, and the shape of the funnel. We also study fluctuations traveling along the D-string, again obtaining agreement in the large N limit. At finite N, our results give a limit on the number of modes that can travel to infinity...

  4. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  5. Common Core: Victory Is Yours!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Jennifer L. W.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to implement the Common Core State Standards in the classroom. She presents examples and activities that will leave teachers feeling "rosy" about tackling the new standards. She breaks down important benchmarks and shows how other teachers are doing the Core--and loving it!

  6. The INTEGRAL Core Observing Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, C.; Gehrels, N.; Lund, Niels;

    1999-01-01

    The Core Programme of the INTEGRAL mission is defined as the portion of the scientific programme covering the guaranteed time observations for the INTEGRAL Science Working Team. This paper describes the current status of the Core Programme preparations and summarizes the key elements...

  7. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  8. Core design and fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This lecture reports on the experience with operating power reactors rather than on theoretical methods of core design. The principles of fuel management will be demonstrated in more detail for a PWR while the basis of core analysis will be shown in a greater extent for a BWR. (orig.)

  9. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F W Giacobbe

    2003-03-01

    An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is described in this paper. The method employed depends, in part, upon an estimate of the true relativistic mass increase experienced by electrons within a highly compressed iron core, just prior to core collapse, and is significantly different from a more typical Chandrasekhar mass limit approach. This technique produced a maximum stellar iron core mass value of 2.69 × 1030 kg (1.35 solar masses). This mass value is very near to the typical mass values found for neutron stars in a recent survey of actual neutron star masses. Although slightly lower and higher neutron star masses may also be found, lower mass neutron stars are believed to be formed as a result of enhanced iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large stars. And, higher mass neutron stars are likely to be formed as a result of fallback or accretion of additional matter after an initial collapse event involving an iron core having a mass no greater than 2.69 × 1030 kg.

  10. Radio Galaxies in Cooling Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Eilek, J A

    2003-01-01

    A currently active radio galaxy sits at the center of almost every strong cooling core. What effect does it have on the cooling core? Could its effect be strong enough to offset the radiative cooling which should be occuring in these cores? In order to answer these questions we need to know how much energy the radio jet carries to the cooling core; but we have no way to measure the jet power directly. We therefore need to understand how the radio source evolves with time, and how it radiates, in order to use the data to determine the jet power. When some simple models are compared to the data, we learn that cluster-center radio galaxies probably are energetically important -- but not necessarily dominant -- in cooling cores.

  11. SCORPIO - VVER core surveillance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Halden Project has developed the core surveillance system SCORPIO which has two parallel modes of operation: the Core Follow Mode and the Predictive Mode. The main motivation behind the development of SCORPIO is to make a practical tool for reactor operators which can increase the quality and quantity of information presented on core status and dynamic behavior. This can first of all improve plant safety as undesired core conditions are detected and prevented. Secondly, more flexible and efficient plant operation is made possible. So far the system has only been implemented on western PWRs but the basic concept is applicable to a wide range of reactor including WWERs. The main differences between WWERs and typical western PWRs with respect to core surveillance requirements are outlined. The development of a WWER version of SCORPIO was initiated in cooperation with the Nuclear Research Institute at Rez and industry partners in the Czech Republic. The first system will be installed at the Dukovany NPP. (author)

  12. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  13. Inner Core Structure Behind the PKP Core Phase Triplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, N.; Paulssen, H.; Deuss, A. F.; Waszek, L.

    2015-12-01

    Despite its small size, the Earth's inner core plays an important role in the Earth's dynamics. Because it is slowly growing, its structure - and the variation thereof with depth - may reveal important clues about the history of the core, its convection and the resulting geodynamo. Learning more about this structure has been a prime effort in the past decades, leading to discoveries about anisotropy, hemispheres and heterogeneity in the inner core in general. In terms of detailed structure, mainly seismic body waves have contributed to these advances. However, at depths between ~100-200 km, the seismic structure is relatively poorly known. This is a result of the PKP core phase triplication and the existence of strong precursors to PKP phases, whose simultaneous arrival hinders the measurement of inner core waves PKIKP at epicentral distances between roughly 143-148°. As a consequence, the interpretation of deeper structure also remains difficult. To overcome these issues, we stack seismograms in slowness and time, separating PKP and PKIKP phases which arrive simultaneously, but with different slowness. We apply this method to study the inner core's Western hemisphere between South and Central America using paths travelling in the quasi-polar direction between epicentral distances of 140-150°. This enables us to measure PKiKP-PKIKP differential travel times up to greater epicentral distance than has previously been done. The resulting differential travel time residuals increase with epicentral distance, indicating a marked increase in seismic velocity with depth compared to reference model AK135 for the studied polar paths. Assuming a homogeneous outer core, these findings can be explained by either (i) inner core heterogeneity due to an increase in isotropic velocity, or (ii) increase in anisotropy over the studied depth range. Our current data set cannot distinguish between the two hypotheses, but in light of previous work we prefer the latter interpretation.

  14. Multi-Core Cache Hierarchies

    CERN Document Server

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    A key determinant of overall system performance and power dissipation is the cache hierarchy since access to off-chip memory consumes many more cycles and energy than on-chip accesses. In addition, multi-core processors are expected to place ever higher bandwidth demands on the memory system. All these issues make it important to avoid off-chip memory access by improving the efficiency of the on-chip cache. Future multi-core processors will have many large cache banks connected by a network and shared by many cores. Hence, many important problems must be solved: cache resources must be allocat

  15. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  16. Core Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James

    2011-01-01

    The Recursive Hierarchical Image Segmentation (RHSEG) software has been repackaged to provide a version of the RHSEG software that is not subject to patent restrictions and that can be released to the general public through NASA GSFC's Open Source release process. Like the Core HSEG Software Package, this Core RHSEG Software Package also includes a visualization program called HSEGViewer along with a utility program HSEGReader. It also includes an additional utility program called HSEGExtract. The unique feature of the Core RHSEG package is that it is a repackaging of the RHSEG technology designed to specifically avoid the inclusion of the certain software technology. Unlike the Core HSEG package, it includes the recursive portions of the technology, but does not include processing window artifact elimination technology.

  17. Lunar Core Drive Tubes Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Contains a brief summary and high resolution imagery from various lunar rock and core drive tubes collected from the Apollo and Luna missions to the moon.

  18. Continuous Chemistry in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Helle Astrid

    Ice cores provide high resolution records of past climate and environment. In recent years the use of continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems has increased the measurement throughput, while simultaneously decreasing the risk of contaminating the ice samples. CFA measurements of high temporal....... The method was applied to a firn core from the North East Greenland Ice Stream (NEGIS) and to glacial sections of the Greenland NEEM ice core. In the NEGIS firn core concentrations were about 2.7 nM PO3−4 and there was no evidence of any recent anthropogenic impact during the past 300 years. Sources of DRP...... into the ice due to scattering by individual snow grains at the very surface and by air bubbles in the upper part of the ice. However light is produced in situ by Cherenkov radiation from cosmic rays. As part of this thesis the penetration of light on surface layers of snow at NEEM was determined andthe 1/e...

  19. Lunar magnetism. [primordial core model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, M. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown, for a very simple model of the moon, that the existence of a primordial core magnetic field would give rise to a present day nonzero dipole external field. In the investigation a uniformly magnetized core embedded in a permeable mantle is considered. The significance of the obtained results for the conclusions reported by Runcorn (1975) is discussed. Comments provided by Runcorn to the discussion are also presented.

  20. Nanoporous polymer liquid core waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Ndoni, Sokol;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented.......We demonstrate liquid core waveguides defined by UV to enable selective water infiltration in nanoporous polymers, creating an effective refractive index shift Δn=0.13. The mode confinement and propagation loss in these waveguides are presented....

  1. Fuzzy Cores and Fuzzy Balancedness

    OpenAIRE

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (1963) and Shapley (1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations where the fuzzy game is continuous. Our main result shows that any fuzzy game has a non-empty core if and only if it satisfies all (fuzzy) balanced inequalities. We also consider deposit games to illustrate the use of the main result.

  2. Bonding core mating surfaces improves transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1978-01-01

    Modifications to assembly procedures for C-core transformers virtually eliminates changes in core end gaps due to temperature cycling during impregnation and potting stages, thus stabilizing magnetization properties of core.

  3. Beyond The Cores Of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, E. J.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    We will present the results of cosmological hydro/N-body adaptive mesh refinement simulations in a concordance LCDM cosmology with a peak resolution of approximately 16 kpc. These simulations include radiative cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback. We find that there are very significant differences between cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) galaxy clusters in their properties beyond the cores (r>100 kpc). For example, the shapes and outer slopes of the synthetic X-ray surface brightness and the temperature profiles are strikingly different between NCC and CC clusters. Beta models are poor fits for r>500 kpc in CC clusters leading to inaccurate global mass estimates and strong deviations from scaling relations in contrast to NCC clusters. We will discuss possible explanations involving differences in the local environments in which these clusters form and evolve.

  4. Core and Off-Core Processes in Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidenthal, Julian; Forsberg, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    An emerging methodology of organizing systems-engineering plans is based on a concept of core and off-core processes or activities. This concept has emerged as a result of recognition of a risk in the traditional representation of systems-engineering plans by a Vee model alone, according to which a large system is decomposed into levels of smaller subsystems, then integrated through levels of increasing scope until the full system is constructed. Actual systems-engineering activity is more complicated, raising the possibility that the staff will become confused in the absence of plans which explain the nature and ordering of work beyond the traditional Vee model.

  5. Core formation in silicate bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, F.; O'Brien, D. P.; Kleine, T.

    2008-12-01

    Differentiation of a body into a metallic core and silicate mantle occurs most efficiently if temperatures are high enough to allow at least the metal to melt [1], and is enhanced if matrix deformation occurs [2]. Elevated temperatures may occur due to either decay of short-lived radio-isotopes, or gravitational energy release during accretion [3]. For bodies smaller than the Moon, core formation happens primarily due to radioactive decay. The Hf-W isotopic system may be used to date core formation; cores in some iron meteorites and the eucrite parent body (probably Vesta) formed within 1 My and 1-4~My of solar system formation, respectively [4]. These formation times are early enough to ensure widespread melting and differentiation by 26Al decay. Incorporation of Fe60 into the core, together with rapid early mantle solidification and cooling, may have driven early dynamo activity on some bodies [5]. Iron meteorites are typically depleted in sulphur relative to chondrites, for unknown reasons [6]. This depletion contrasts with the apparently higher sulphur contents of cores in larger planetary bodies, such as Mars [7], and also has a significant effect on the timing of core solidification. For bodies of Moon-size and larger, gravitational energy released during accretion is probably the primary cause of core formation [3]. The final stages of accretion involve large, stochastic collisions [8] between objects which are already differentiated. During each collision, the metallic cores of the colliding objects merge on timescales of a few hours [9]. Each collision will reset the Hf-W isotopic signature of both mantle and core, depending on the degree to which the impactor core re-equilibrates with the mantle of the target [10]. The re-equilibration efficiency depends mainly on the degree to which the impactor emulsifies [11], which is very uncertain. Results from N-body simulations [8,12] suggest that significant degrees of re- equilibration are required [4,10]. Re

  6. Viscosity of Earth's Outer Core

    CERN Document Server

    Smylie, D E

    2007-01-01

    A viscosity profile across the entire fluid outer core is found by interpolating between measured boundary values, using a differential form of the Arrhenius law governing pressure and temperature dependence. The discovery that both the retrograde and prograde free core nutations are in free decay (Palmer and Smylie, 2005) allows direct measures of viscosity at the top of the outer core, while the reduction in the rotational splitting of the two equatorial translational modes of the inner core allows it to be measured at the bottom. We find 2,371 plus/minus 1,530 Pa.s at the top and 1.247 plus/minus 0.035 x 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom. Following Brazhkin (1998) and Brazhkin and Lyapin (2000) who get 10^2 Pa.s at the top, 10^11 Pa.s at the bottom, by an Arrhenius extrapolation of laboratory experiments, we use a differential form of the Arrhenius law to interpolate along the melting temperature curve to find a viscosity profile across the outer core. We find the variation to be closely log-linear between the meas...

  7. Core-meltdown experimental review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of the experimental evidence having a bearing on hypothetical core meltdowns in light-water reactors are presented. The first objective of the study was to obtain a compendium of the experimental evidence applicable to the analysis of a hypothetical core meltdown. Literature from the nuclear power field and from other scientific disciplines and industrial sources was reviewed. Investigators and other persons knowledgeable in the subject were interviewed. A second objective was to determine what data are required and to determine the adequacy of existing data. In core-meltdown studies only land-based plants have been examined. A third, and final, task of this study was to examine offshore plants to determine applicability of onshore plant analysis to particular areas therein and to determine what information peculiar to meltdown accidents in offshore plants was needed. (U.S.)

  8. Distributed k-Core Decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Montresor, Alberto; Miorandi, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Among the novel metrics used to study the relative importance of nodes in complex networks, k-core decomposition has found a number of applications in areas as diverse as sociology, proteinomics, graph visualization, and distributed system analysis and design. This paper proposes new distributed algorithms for the computation of the k-core decomposition of a network, with the purpose of (i) enabling the run-time computation of k-cores in "live" distributed systems and (ii) allowing the decomposition, over a set of connected machines, of very large graphs, that cannot be hosted in a single machine. Lower bounds on the algorithms complexity are given, and an exhaustive experimental analysis on real-world graphs is provided.

  9. Atmospheric Methane in Ice Cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The reconstruction of air trapped in ice cores provides us the most direct information about atmospheric CH4 variations in the past history. Ice core records from the "Three Poles (Antarctica, Greenland and Tibetan Plateau)" reveal the detailed fluctuations of atmospheric CH4 concentration with time and are allowed to quantify the CH4 differences among latitudes. These data are indispensably in the farther study of the relationship between greenhouse gases and climatic change, and of the past changes in terrestrial CH4 emissions. Ice cores reconstruction indicates that atmospheric CH4 concentration has increased quickly since industrialization, and the present day's level of atmospheric CH4 (1800 ppbv) is unprecedented during the past Glacial-Interglacial climate cycles.

  10. Core shapes and orientations of core-Sersic galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Dullo, Bililign T

    2014-01-01

    The inner and outer shapes and orientations of core-Sersic galaxies may hold important clues to their formation and evolution. We have therefore measured the central and outer ellipticities and position angles for a sample of 24 core-Sersic galaxies using archival HST images and data. By selecting galaxies with core-Sersic break radii R_b---a measure of the size of their partially depleted core---that are > 0".2, we find that the ellipticities and position angles are quite robust against HST seeing. For the bulk of the galaxies, there is a good agreement between the ellipticities and position angles at the break radii and the average outer ellipticities and position angles determined over R_e/2 < R < R_e, where R_e is the spheroids' effective half light radius. However there are some interesting differences. We find a median "inner" ellipticity at R_b of e_med = 0.13 +- 0.01, rounder than the median ellipticity of the "outer" regions e_med = 0.20 +- 0.01, which is thought to reflect the influence of the...

  11. Core seismic methods verification report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the description and validation of the analytical methods for calculation of the seismic loads on an HTGR core and the core support structures. Analytical modeling, integration schemes, parameter assignment, parameter sensitivity, and correlation with test data are key topics which have been covered in detail. Much of the text concerns the description and the results of a series of scale model tests performed to obtain data for code correlation. A discussion of scaling laws, model properties, seismic excitation, instrumentation, and data reduction methods is also presented, including a section on the identification and calculation of statistical errors in the test data

  12. HD depletion in starless cores

    OpenAIRE

    Sipilä, O.; Caselli, P.; Harju, J.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the abundances of light deuterium-bearing species such as HD, H2D+ and D2H+ in a gas-grain chemical model including an extensive description of deuterium and spin state chemistry, in physical conditions appropriate to the very centers of starless cores. Methods: We combine a gas-grain chemical model with radiative transfer calculations to simulate density and temperature structure in starless cores. The chemical model includes deuterated forms of species with up to...

  13. City Core - detecting the anthropocene in urban lake cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaer, K. H.; Ilsøe, P.; Andresen, C. S.; Rasmussen, P.; Andersen, T. J.; Frei, R.; Schreiber, N.; Odgaard, B.; Funder, S.; Holm, J. M.; Andersen, K.

    2011-12-01

    Here, we presents the preliminary results from lake cores taken in ditches associated with the historical fortifications enclosing the oldest - central Copenhagen to achieve new knowledge from sediment deposits related to anthropogenic activities. We have examined sediment cores with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzers to correlate element patterns from urban and industrial emissions. Thus, we aim to track these patterns back in time - long before regular routines of recording of atmospheric environment began around 1978. Furthermore, we compare our data to alternative sources of information in order to constrain and expand the temporal dating limits (approximately 1890) achieved from 210Pb activity. From custom reports and statistic sources, information on imported volumes from coal, metal and oil was obtained and related contaminants from these substances to the sediment archives. Intriguingly, we find a steep increase in import of coal and metals matching the exponential increase of lead and zinc counts from XRF-recordings of the sediment cores. In this finding, we claim to have constrain the initiation of urban industrialization. In order to confirm the age resolution of the lake cores, DNA was extracted from sediments, sedaDNA. Thus we attempt to trace plantation of well documented exotic plants to, for instance, the Botanical Garden. Through extraction and sampling of sedaDNA from these floral and arboreal specimens we intend to locate their strataigraphic horizons in the sediment core. These findings may correlate data back to 1872, when the garden was established on the area of the former fortification. In this line of research, we hope to achieve important supplementary knowledge of sedaDNA-leaching frequencies within freshwater sediments.

  14. Multi-core Architectures and Streaming Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerard J.M.; Kokkeler, André B.J.; Wolkotte, Pascal T.; Burgwal, van de Marcel D.; Mandoiu, I.; Kennings, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we focus on algorithms and reconfigurable multi-core architectures for streaming digital signal processing (DSP) applications. The multi-core concept has a number of advantages: (1) depending on the requirements more or fewer cores can be switched on/off, (2) the multi-core structure f

  15. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  16. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  17. Visual Feedback for Rover-based Coring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Paul; Helmick, Daniel; Bajracharya, Max

    2008-01-01

    Technology for coring from a low-mass rover has been developed to enable core sample acquisition where a planetary rover experiences moderate slip during the coring operation. A new stereo vision technique, Absolute Motion Visual Odometry, is used to measure rover slip during coring and the slip is accommodated through corresponding arm pose updating. Coring rate is controlled by feedback of themeasured force of the coring tool against the environment. Test results in the JPL Marsyard show for the first time that coring from a low-mass rover with slip is feasible.

  18. Common Core: Solve Math Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Erich

    2012-01-01

    The new common core standards for mathematics demand that students (and teachers!) exhibit deeper conceptual understanding. That's music to the ears of education professor John Tapper, who says teachers have overemphasized teaching procedures--and getting right answers. In his new book, "Solving for Why," he makes a powerful case for moving beyond…

  19. LBNL high field core program

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S

    2011-01-01

    The LBNL Superconducting Magnet Group mission is to develop and establish the technologies associated with high field superconducting magnets in order to provide cost-effective options for the next-generation high-energy physics accelerators. The research effort is part of the group core program and the development is part of the LARP program discussed elsewhere at this workshop.

  20. Fuzzy Cores and Fuzzy Balancedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulick, G.; Norde, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation between the fuzzy core and balancedness for fuzzy games. For regular games, this relation has been studied by Bondareva (1963) and Shapley (1967). First, we gain insight in this relation when we analyse situations where the fuzzy game is continuous. Our main result shows that a

  1. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  2. Main: GT1CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GT1CORE S000125 15-Oct-1999 (last modified) kehi Critical for GT-1 binding to box I...I of rbcS; See S000051 GT1MOTIF1; For a compilation of related GT elements and factors, see Villain et al. (

  3. Competition for cores in remanufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulmus, Serra Caner; Zhu, Stuart X.; Teunter, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    We study competition between an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and an independently operating remanufacturer (IO). Different from the existing literature, the OEM and IO compete not only for selling their products but also for collecting returned products (cores) through their acquisition pri

  4. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting “One Health” approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  5. Stability of Molten Core Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

  6. Reference: GT1CORE [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GT1CORE Green PJ, Yong M-H, Cuozzo M, Kano-Murakami Y, Silverstein P, Chua N-H Binding site require...ments for pea nuclear protein factor GT-1 correlate with sequences required for light-depend

  7. Common Core: Fact vs. Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Despite students' interest in informational text, it has played second fiddle in literacy instruction for years. Now, though, nonfiction is getting its turn in the spotlight. The Common Core State Standards require that students become thoughtful consumers of complex, informative texts--taking them beyond the realm of dry textbooks and…

  8. CopperCore Service Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Nadolski, Rob; Tattersall, Colin; van Rosmalen, Peter; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    In an e-learning environment there is a need to integrate various e-learning services like assessment services, collaboration services, learning design services and communication services. In this article we present the design and implementation of a generic integrative service framework, called CopperCore Service Integration (CCSI). We will…

  9. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches. PMID:27679794

  10. Biospecimen Solicitation - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A funding opportunity in support of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) seeks to prospectively procure tumor samples, collected for proteomics investigation.

  11. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BEACON operational core support system was developed for use in pressurized water reactors to provide an integrated system to perform reactor core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. It is based on the very fast and accurate three-dimensional SPNOVA nodal program. The experience to date has shown the importance of an accurate integrated system. The benefits accrued are greater for the total system than the benefits that are possible separately

  12. RETRAC, Reactor Core Accident Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The RETRAC code uses a set of coupled neutron point-kinetics equations and thermal-hydraulic conservation laws to simulate nuclear reactor core behaviour under transient or accident conditions. The reactor core is represented by single equivalent unit cells composed of three regions: fuel, clad, and moderator (coolant). 2 - Method of solution: At each time step, core thermal power is calculated by solving a set of six delayed neutron group kinetics equations with adjusted reactivity feedbacks. The numerical resolution is performed by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method. The externally inserted reactivity is specified in the input data file, whereas Doppler, fuel, clad, and water temperature reactivity feedbacks are calculated by the code itself. Core cooling is treated as a homogeneous one-dimensional fluid flow through a representative unit cell composed of three successive regions: fuel, clad, and coolant. Several flow regime models are considered for both single- and two-phase states of the coolant. The conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics coupled with an implicit finite difference scheme to ensure stability and convergence of the numerical algorithm. Validation tests of the RETRAC code were performed by using the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores, for protected transients. Further assessment studies are in progress using experimental data. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The RETRAC code uses steady-state thermal-hydraulic correlations. Their use is not always justified, but it seems to be quite useful in quasi-steady cases such as as loss-of-flow transients

  13. Core-core and core-valence correlation energy atomic and molecular benchmarks for Li through Ar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Duminda S; Frisch, Michael J; Petersson, George A

    2015-12-01

    We have established benchmark core-core, core-valence, and valence-valence absolute coupled-cluster single double (triple) correlation energies (±0.1%) for 210 species covering the first- and second-rows of the periodic table. These species provide 194 energy differences (±0.03 mEh) including ionization potentials, electron affinities, and total atomization energies. These results can be used for calibration of less expensive methodologies for practical routine determination of core-core and core-valence correlation energies. PMID:26646872

  14. Logging-while-coring method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, David S.; Myers, Gregory J.

    2007-11-13

    A method and apparatus for downhole coring while receiving logging-while-drilling tool data. The apparatus includes core collar and a retrievable core barrel. The retrievable core barrel receives core from a borehole which is sent to the surface for analysis via wireline and latching tool The core collar includes logging-while-drilling tools for the simultaneous measurement of formation properties during the core excavation process. Examples of logging-while-drilling tools include nuclear sensors, resistivity sensors, gamma ray sensors, and bit resistivity sensors. The disclosed method allows for precise core-log depth calibration and core orientation within a single borehole, and without at pipe trip, providing both time saving and unique scientific advantages.

  15. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs

  16. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, Keung Ku; Joo, Hyung Kuk; Kim, Young Il; Noh, Jae Man; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Taek Kyum; Yoo, Yon Jong

    1997-09-01

    The purpose of this project is for developing and verifying the core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies for core analyses. From the study of the sate-of-art of foreign advanced reactor cores, we developed core concepts such as soluble boron free, high convertible and enhanced safety core loaded semi-tight lattice hexagonal fuel assemblies. To analyze this hexagonal core, we have developed and verified some neutronic and T/H analysis methodologies. HELIOS code was adopted as the assembly code and HEXFEM code was developed for hexagonal core analysis. Based on experimental data in hexagonal lattices and the COBRA-IV-I code, we developed a thermal-hydraulic analysis code for hexagonal lattices. Using the core analysis code systems developed in this project, we designed a 600 MWe core and studied the feasibility of the core concepts. Two additional scopes were performed in this project : study on the operational strategies of soluble boron free core and conceptual design of large scale passive core. By using the axial BP zoning concept and suitable design of control rods, this project showed that it was possible to design a soluble boron free core in 600 MWe PWR. The results of large scale core design showed that passive concepts and daily load follow operation could be practiced. (author). 15 refs., 52 tabs., 101 figs.

  17. Whole Core Transport Calculation Methodology for a Hexagonal Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Lee, C. C.; Zee, S. Q.; Joo, H. G

    2007-07-15

    This report discusses the hexagonal module implemented to the DeCART code and the performance of them. The implemented hexagonal module includes the hexagonal ray tracing and the CMFD acceleration modules. The performance of the implemented hexagonal module is examined for 4 tests of: (1) CMFD acceleration test, (2) the accuracy test of the hexagonal module, (3) the performance test for 2-D NGNP problem and (4) the applicability test for 3-D NGNP problem. The features of the implemented hexagonal modules are: (1) The Modular ray tracing scheme based on a hexagonal assembly and a path linking scheme between the modular rays. (2) Segment generation based on the structure unit. (3) Cell ray approximation: This feature is developed to reduce the memory required to store the segment information. (4) Modified cycle ray scheme that begins the ray tracing at a given surface and finishes if the reflected ray meets the starting surface. This feature is developed to reduce the memory required for the angular flux at the core boundary. (5) Fixed assembly geometry. The pin geometry of the single pin per assembly problem is different from that of the multi-pin problem. The core geometry of a single assembly problem is also different from that of the multi-assembly problem. (6) CMFD module based on unstructured cell. This feature is to deal with the irregular gap cells that are positioned at the assembly boundaries. The examination results of the 4 tests can be summarized as: (1) The CMFD acceleration test shows that the CMFD module speedups about greater than 200 for the core problem. (2) The accuracy test shows that the hexagonal MOC module produces an accurate solution of less than 60 pcm of eigenvalue and less than 2 % of local pin power errors. (3) The performance test for 2-D NGNP problem shows that the implemented hexagonal module works soundly and produces a reasonable solution by cooperating with the existing DeCART library and the other modules. (4) The applicability

  18. CORE CULTURE IN LANGUAGE LEARNING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jane Orton

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the essential role of culture in the creation of meaning of language-inuse, showing it to be the source of both the contextual shaping of a particular text and the fundamental core of beliefs and values from which contemporary contextual features derive. As a result of this essential relationship, it is argued, modern language learners need to master the cultural system as well as the linguistic system of their new language if they are to be able to use it competently in real life, as mo st intend today. Samples of texts are examined to show how the meanings of both context and core culture are naturally embedded in ordinary language and suggestions are provided for how these might be successfully brought to students' attention and mastery in a classroom.

  19. Neutronics computational methods for cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This engineering-oriented publication contains a detailed presentation of neutronics computational methods for cores. More precisely, it presents neutronics equations: Boltzmann equation for neutron transport, resolution principles, use of high performance computing. The next parts present the problematic (values to be computed, computation software and methods), nuclear data and their processing. Then the authors describe the application of the Monte Carlo method to reactor physics: resolution of the transport equation by the Monte Carlo method, convergence of a Monte Carlo calculation and notion of quality factor, and software. Deterministic methods are then addressed: discretization, processing of resonant absorption, network calculations, core calculation, deterministic software, fuel evolution, and kinetics. The next chapter addresses multi-physical aspects: necessity of a coupling, principles of neutronic/thermal hydraulic coupling, example of an accidental transient. The last part addresses the checking approach, and neutronics computational code validation

  20. Core and Lumbopelvic Stabilization in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Carlos E

    2016-02-01

    Core muscles provide stability that allows generation of force and motion in the lower extremities, as well as distributing impact forces and allowing controlled and efficient body movements. Imbalances or deficiencies in the core muscles can result in increased fatigue, decreased endurance, and injury in runners. Core strengthening should incorporate the intrinsic needs of the core for flexibility, strength, balance, and endurance, and the function of the core in relation to its role in extremity function and dysfunction. Specific exercises are effective in strengthening the core muscles.

  1. Finding your next core business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zook, Chris

    2007-04-01

    How do you know when your core needs to change? And how do you determine what should replace it? From an in-depth study of 25 companies, the author, a strategy consultant, has discovered that it's possible to measure the vitality of a business's core. If it needs reinvention, he says, the best course is to mine hidden assets. Some of the 25 companies were in deep crisis when they began the process of redefining themselves. But, says Zook, management teams can learn to recognize early signs of erosion. He offers five diagnostic questions with which to evaluate the customers, key sources of differentiation, profit pools, capabilities, and organizational culture of your core business. The next step is strategic regeneration. In four-fifths of the companies Zook examined, a hidden asset was the centerpiece of the new strategy. He provides a map for identifying the hidden assets in your midst, which tend to fall into three categories: undervalued business platforms, untapped insights into customers, and underexploited capabilities. The Swedish company Dometic, for example, was manufacturing small absorption refrigerators for boats and RVs when it discovered a hidden asset: its understanding of, and access to, customers in the RV market. The company took advantage of a boom in that market to refocus on complete systems for live-in vehicles. The Danish company Novozymes, which produced relatively low-tech commodity enzymes such as those used in detergents, realized that its underutilized biochemical capability in genetic and protein engineering was a hidden asset and successfully refocused on creating bioengineered specialty enzymes. Your next core business is not likely to announce itself with fanfare. Use the author's tools to conduct an internal audit of possibilities and pinpoint your new focus. PMID:17432154

  2. Dynamics deep from the core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Carbone

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In van der Veen et al., [Struct. Dyn. 2, 024302 (2015], femtosecond and nanosecond electron energy loss spectroscopy of deep core-levels are demonstrated. These results pave the way to the investigation of materials and molecules with combined energy, time, and spatial resolution in a transmission electron microscope. Furthermore, the authors elucidate the role of the electron phonon coupling in the band-gap renormalization that takes place in graphite upon photo-excitation.

  3. Rich-cores in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Athen

    2014-01-01

    A core is said to be a group of central and densely connected nodes which governs the overall behavior of a network. Profiling this meso--scale structure currently relies on a limited number of methods which are often complex, and have scalability issues when dealing with very large networks. As a result, we are yet to fully understand its impact on network properties and dynamics. Here we introduce a simple method to profile this structure by combining the concepts of core/periphery and rich-club. The key challenge in addressing such association of the two concepts is to establish a way to define the membership of the core. The notion of a "rich-club" describes nodes which are essentially the hub of a network, as they play a dominating role in structural and functional properties. Interestingly, the definition of a rich-club naturally emphasizes high degree nodes and divides a network into two subgroups. Our approach theoretically couples the underlying principle of a rich-club with the escape time of a rand...

  4. Core shifts in blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Pjanka, Patryk; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of core shift in jets, which is the dependence of the position of the jet radio core on the frequency. We derive a new method to measure the jet magnetic field based on both the value of the shift and the observed flux, which compliments the standard method assuming equipartition. Using both methods, we re-analyse the blazar sample of Zamaninasab et al. We find that equipartition is satisfied only if the jet opening angle in the radio core region is close to the values found observationally, $\\simeq$0.1--0.2 divided by the bulk Lorentz factor, $\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$. Larger values, e.g., $1/\\Gamma_{\\rm j}$, would imply very strong departures from equipartition. A small jet opening angle implies in turn the magnetization parameter of $\\ll 1$. We determine the jet magnetic flux taking this effect into account. We find that the average jet magnetic flux is compatible with the model of jet formation due to black-hole spin energy extraction and accretion being magnetically arrested. We calculate the ...

  5. CORE SHAPES AND ORIENTATIONS OF CORE-SÉRSIC GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dullo, Bililign T.; Graham, Alister W., E-mail: Bdullo@astro.swin.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The inner and outer shapes and orientations of core-Sérsic galaxies may hold important clues to their formation and evolution. We have therefore measured the central and outer ellipticities and position angles for a sample of 24 core-Sérsic galaxies using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images and data. By selecting galaxies with core-Sérsic break radii R{sub b} —a measure of the size of their partially depleted core—that are ≳ 0.''2, we find that the ellipticities and position angles are quite robust against HST seeing. For the bulk of the galaxies, there is a good agreement between the ellipticities and position angles at the break radii and the average outer ellipticities and position angles determined over R {sub e}/2 < R < R {sub e}, where R {sub e} is the spheroids' effective half light radius. However there are some interesting differences. We find a median ''inner'' ellipticity at R{sub b} of ε{sub med} = 0.13 ± 0.01, rounder than the median ellipticity of the ''outer'' regions ε{sub med} = 0.20 ± 0.01, which is thought to reflect the influence of the central supermassive black hole at small radii. In addition, for the first time we find a trend, albeit weak (2σ significance), such that galaxies with larger (stellar deficit-to-supermassive black hole) mass ratios—thought to be a measure of the number of major dry merger events—tend to have rounder inner and outer isophotes, suggesting a connection between the galaxy shapes and their merger histories. We show that this finding is not simply reflecting the well known result that more luminous galaxies are rounder, but it is no doubt related.

  6. High Efficiency Solar Furnace Core Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop a high efficiency solar furnace core that greatly lessens the heat losses from the furnace core, either greatly reducing the amount of...

  7. Evaluation of core distortion in FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analyses of FBR's core distortion are mainly performed in order to evaluate the following items: 1) Change of reactivity; 2) Force at pads on core assemblies; 3) Withdrawal force at refueling; 4) Loading, refueling and residual deviations of wrapper tubes (core assemblies) at the top; 5) Bowing modes of guide tubes for control rods. The analysis of core distortion are performed by using computer program for two-dimensional row deformation analysis or three-dimensional core deformation if necessary, considering these evaluated items which become design conditions. This report shows the relationship between core deformation analysis and component design, a point of view of choosing an analysis program for design considering core characteristics, and computing examples of core deformation of prototype class reactor by the above code. (author)

  8. Core Processes: Earth's eccentric magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause.......Earth’s magnetic field is characterized by a puzzling hemispheric asymmetry. Calculations of core dynamo processes suggest that lopsided growth of the planet’s inner core may be part of the cause....

  9. Fluency Instruction in Contemporary Core Reading Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Brady E.

    2011-01-01

    Core reading programs (CRPs) provide the curriculum and guide reading instruction for many classroom teachers. The purpose of this study was to conduct a content analysis of reading fluency instruction in current (2008-2011 copyright) grade 2 and 3 top-selling core reading program lessons to answer the following two research questions: (1) How do core reading programs recommend that fluency skills be taught? (2) How do reading fluency instructional practices in core programs compare to eviden...

  10. Identifying Domestic and Imported Core Inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørnland, Hilde C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper estimates core inflation in Norway, identified as that component of inflation that has no long-run effect on GDP. The model distinguishes explicitly between domestic and imported core inflation. The results show that (domestic) core inflation is the main component of CPI inflation. CPI inflation, however, misrepresents core inflation in some periods. The differences are well explained by the other shocks identified in the model, in particular the oil price shocks of the 1970s when ...

  11. The Fluxgate Ring-Core Internal Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Brauer, Peter; Merayo, José M.G.;

    2002-01-01

    A large number of measured demagnetizing factors for fluxgate ring cores of a wide range of cross section shapes have been compiled from the literature and plotted against the core cross-sectional area over the squared mean core diameter. The points group close to a straight line through the orig...

  12. Core Journal Lists: Classic Tool, New Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Robin A.; Jackson, Rose M.; Mullen, Laura Bowering

    2010-01-01

    Reviews the historical context of core journal lists, current uses in collection assessment, and existing methodologies for creating lists. Outlines two next generation core list projects developing new methodologies and integrating novel information/data sources to improve precision: a national-level core psychology list and the other a local…

  13. Core Competencies in Information Management Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, G. E.; Corbitt, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses core competencies in library and information science and in information systems to use as a background for an examination of core competencies in information management. Suggests a set of core competencies and educational outcomes that might be applied to curricula in both developed and developing countries. (Author/LRW)

  14. Simplifying the ELA Common Core; Demystifying Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoker, Mike; Jago, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core State Standards ([CCSS], 2010) could have a transformational effect on American education. Though the process seems daunting, one can begin immediately integrating the essence of the ELA Common Core in every subject area. This article shows how one could implement the Common Core and create coherent,…

  15. The core health science library in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J L

    1974-04-01

    Core lists in Canada are characterized by regional differences. The lists of current importance are: (1) the British Columbia acquisitions guide for hospital libraries, (2) three Saskatchewan lists for hospitals of different sizes, (3) a core list recommended for Ontario hospitals, (4) Quebec core lists, including French language lists.

  16. The Core Health Science Library in Canada *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, June Leath

    1974-01-01

    Core lists in Canada are characterized by regional differences. The lists of current importance are: (1) the British Columbia acquisitions guide for hospital libraries, (2) three Saskatchewan lists for hospitals of different sizes, (3) a core list recommended for Ontario hospitals, (4) Quebec core lists, including French language lists. PMID:4826482

  17. Development of coring, consolidating, subterrene penetrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, H.D.; Neudecker, J.W.; Cort, G.E.; Turner, W.C.; McFarland, R.D.; Griggs, J.E.

    1976-02-01

    Coring penetrators offer two advantages over full face-melting penetrators, i.e., formation of larger boreholes with no increase in power and the production of glass-lined, structurally undisturbed cores which can be recovered with conventional core-retrieval systems. These cores are of significant value in geological exploratory drilling programs. The initial design details and fabrication features of a 114-mm-diam coring penetrator are discussed; significant factors for design optimization are also presented. Results of laboratory testing are reported and compared with performance predictions, and an initial field trial is described.

  18. Rapidly changing flows in the Earth's core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Mandea, M.

    2008-01-01

    A large part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by fluid motion in the molten outer core(1). As a result of continuous satellite measurements since 1999, the core magnetic field and its recent variations can now be described with a high resolution in space and time(2). These data have...... field occurring over only a few months, indicative of fluid flow at the top of the core, can in fact be resolved. Using nine years of magnetic field data obtained by satellites as well as Earth-based observatories, we determine the temporal changes in the core magnetic field and flow in the core. We...

  19. Hydrophobic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophobic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates a hydrophobic substance with a core substance, such as dye, corrosion indicator, corrosion inhibitor, and/or healing agent, dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophobic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophobic-phase droplets, e.g., containing the core substance and shell-forming compound, dispersed in a hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  20. Hydrophilic-Core Microcapsules and Their Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M. (Inventor); Li, Wenyan (Inventor); Buhrow, Jerry W. (Inventor); Jolley, Scott T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophilic-core microcapsules and methods of their formation are provided. A hydrophilic-core microcapsule may include a shell that encapsulates water with the core substance dissolved or dispersed therein. The hydrophilic-core microcapsules may be formed from an emulsion having hydrophilic-phase droplets dispersed in a hydrophobic phase, with shell-forming compound contained in the hydrophilic phase or the hydrophobic phase and the core substance contained in the hydrophilic phase. The shells of the microcapsules may be capable of being broken down in response to being contacted by an alkali, e.g., produced during corrosion, contacting the shell.

  1. HD depletion in starless cores

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O; Harju, J

    2013-01-01

    Aims: We aim to investigate the abundances of light deuterium-bearing species such as HD, H2D+ and D2H+ in a gas-grain chemical model including an extensive description of deuterium and spin state chemistry, in physical conditions appropriate to the very centers of starless cores. Methods: We combine a gas-grain chemical model with radiative transfer calculations to simulate density and temperature structure in starless cores. The chemical model includes deuterated forms of species with up to 4 atoms and the spin states of the light species H2, H2+ and H3+ and their deuterated forms. Results: We find that HD eventually depletes from the gas phase because deuterium is efficiently incorporated to grain-surface HDO, resulting in inefficient HD production on grains. HD depletion has consequences not only on the abundances of e.g. H2D+ and D2H+, whose production depends on the abundance of HD, but also on the spin state abundance ratios of the various light species, when compared with the complete depletion model ...

  2. Drilling history core hole DC-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-10-01

    Core hole DC-8 was completed in August, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Scisson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the core drilling activities, and geologic core logging for hole DC-8. Core hole DC-8 is located on the Hanford Site near the Wye Barricade and 50 feet northwest of rotary hole DC-7. The Hanford Site vation coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 coordinates for DC-8 are North 14,955.94 feet and West 14,861.92 mean sea level. The purpose of core hole DC-8 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing and cross-hole seismic shear and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-7. The total depth of core hole DC-8 was 4100.5 feet. Core recovery exceeded 97 percent of the total footage cored.

  3. Structural safety analysis of HTGR core supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, F.; Bennett, J.G.; Anderson, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    In the current design of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), the core is made up of stacked columns of graphite fuel blocks. Structural support for the core takes the form of graphite columns beneath the core together with lateral springs, which position and restrain the core from contact with the sides of the reactor containment vessel. Each individual support column carries the dead load of several fuel columns together with the equivalent load caused by the coolant pressure drop through the core. The adequacy of the support structure to provide torsional stability of the core for both static and seismic loadings as well as long term stability of the core support structure itself is discussed. Analysis for long term stability of the core support columns involves consideration of eccentric loading (caused by damaged spherical seats) and imperfections in the form of surface cracks. Nonlinear graphite behavior must also be taken into consideration. For predictions of the core torsional seismic response, the core was represented as a right circular cylinder supported on elastic posts; the lateral support was represented by a single torsional spring. Energy losses from friction and material hysteresis were represented by viscous dampers. The coupled equations for vertical and rotational motions were integrated numerically and dynamic core response was computed fromtorsional acceleration time-histories obtained by differentiating a horizontal accelerogram and dividing by the shear wave speed for hard and soft soil conditions.

  4. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance Parameter for Radio Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. J. Nie; J. H. Yang

    2014-09-01

    Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investigated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, but it is not correlated with the extended flux density. When the core dominance parameter is higher than unity, it is not correlated with the core flux density, but it is linearly correlated with the extended flux density. Therefore, there are different results from different samples. The results can be explained using a relativistic beaming model.

  5. Core power distribution methodology in the BEACON PWR [pressurized water reactor] core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse has developed an advanced operational core support package called BEACON which uses a fully analytical methodology for on-line prediction of 3-D [three-dimensional] power distributions. The system provides core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. The heart of the system is a very fast and accurate three dimensional nodal code which is used for core simulation and predictions. The system uses a new methodology with the existing core instrumentation to infer the current measured power distribution. This methodology has been qualified and yields excellent results

  6. Thermohydraulics of LMFBR core catchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turland, B. D.

    Characterization of the likely form of fuel debris after an accident, following interaction with sodium in the primary vessel and mechanisms controlling the location of the debris in the primary system is discussed. Heat transfer from particulate to liquid sodium and the development of models predicting the amount of debris that may be retained in a coolable form on a structure are considered. The evaluation of the coolability of the structure itself in post accident conditions, particularly the cooling provided by natural convection alone is treated. The response of structures at elevated temperatures and under high thermal loads is considered. The potential for vessel failure if significant quantities of debris accumulate at the bottom of the vessel is shown. The performance of a flat plate core catcher, or similar structure with good cooling from underneath is evaluated.

  7. Final Report - BRER Core Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan B. Douple

    2007-01-09

    This contract provided core support for activities of the advisory committee of experts comprising the Board on Radiation Effects Research (BRER), in The National Academies' Division on Earth and Life Studies. That committee met two times during the funding period. The committee members provided oversight and advice regarding ongoing BRER projects and also assisted in the identification of potential committee members for new studies and the development of proposals for projects in the radiation sciences worthy for future study. In addition, funding provided support for the planning, advertisement, and invited speakers' travel-expense reimbursement for the Third and Fourth Gilbert W. Beebe Symposia held at The National Academies on December 1, 2004 and on November 30, 2005, respectively.

  8. Inner Core Rotation from Geomagnetic Westward Drift and a Stationary Spherical Vortex in Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, C. V.

    1999-01-01

    The idea that geomagnetic westward drift indicates convective leveling of the planetary momentum gradient within Earth's core is pursued in search of a differentially rotating mean state, upon which various oscillations and secular effects might be superimposed. The desired state conforms to roughly spherical boundary conditions, minimizes dissipative interference with convective cooling in the bulk of the core, yet may aide core cooling by depositing heat in the uppermost core and lower mantle. The variational calculus of stationary dissipation applied to a spherical vortex within the core yields an interesting differential rotation profile akin to spherical Couette flow bounded by thin Hartmann layers. Four boundary conditions are required. To concentrate shear induced dissipation near the core-mantle boundary, these are taken to be: (i) no-slip at the core-mantle interface; (ii) geomagnetically estimated bulk westward flow at the base of the core-mantle boundary layer; (iii) no-slip at the inner-outer core interface; and, to describe magnetic locking of the inner core to the deep outer core, (iv) hydrodynamically stress-free at the inner-outer core boundary. By boldly assuming the axial core angular momentum anomaly to be zero, the super-rotation of the inner core is calculated to be at most 1.5 degrees per year.

  9. 75 FR 52596 - Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request AGENCY: Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice... proposed set of financial education core competencies (``Core Competencies''). Comments are requested specifically on whether the list of Core Competencies referenced in the Supplementary Section is complete...

  10. Installation of JMTR core management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to carry out the core management after the reoperation of JMTR quickly and accurately, the authors took up the Standard Reactor Analysis Code (SRAC) system and core management support programs that are operating in a general-purpose large computer and transferred them to PC (OS: Linux), and newly established a JMTR core management system. As for the core analysis, this measure enabled an increase in the processing speed from the check of core arrangement to the result display of nuclear restriction values to about 60 times, compared with the conventional method. It was confirmed that the differences of calculation results originated from the difference of internal display of computers, associated with the transfer of each analysis code from GS21-400 system to PC-Linux, were within practically allowable level. In the future, this system will be applied to the core analysis of JMTR, as well as to the preparation of operation plans. (A.O.)

  11. Managing water addition to a degraded core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors present an approach to the development of an accident management plan for adding water to a degraded core. Under certain degraded core conditions, adding water may lead to enhanced hydrogen production, changes in core geometry that would complicate recovery, steam explosions, or recriticality of the reactor core if unborated water is used. Therefore, a primary requisite for the development of an accident management plan for adding water to a degraded core is to ensure that undesirable consequences of water addition are understood so that: (1) their effects can be minimized and an accident can be terminated at the earliest possible stage, and (2) plant personnel can be better prepared to deal with plant responses that appear contrary to desired outcomes when water is added during a core degradation transient. The approach presented here addresses these concerns in the development of an accident management plan

  12. Cool Core Clusters from Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rasia, E; Murante, G; Planelles, S; Beck, A M; Biffi, V; Ragone-Figueroa, C; Granato, G L; Steinborn, L K; Dolag, K

    2015-01-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core and non-cool-core clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and AGN feedback and are based on an improved version of the Smoothed-Particle-Hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, our primary diagnostic to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and on the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of cool-core systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of non cool-core systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of...

  13. Investigating the translation of Earth's inner core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Elizabeth A; Cormier, Vernon F; Geballe, Zachary M;

    2012-01-01

    The Earth’s inner core provides unique insights into processes that are occurring deep within our Earth today, as well as processes that occurred in the past. The seismic structure of the inner core is complex, and is dominated by anisotropic and isotropic differences between the Eastern......; and a complex hemispherical and radial dependence of anisotropy, attenuation, and scattering in the uppermost inner core. We explore the compatibility of geodynamic models of a translating inner core with seismic observations. Using a relatively simple set of translation models we map the age of material...... times consisting of paths that sample the core near to the proposed hemisphere boundaries. This combination of body wave data samples a range of depths (and consequently ages) in the inner core, and provides an insight into the nature of hemispheres and their compatibility with our predictions...

  14. BN-600 full MOX core benchmark analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a follow-up of the BN-600 hybrid core benchmark, a full MOX core benchmark was performed within the framework of the IAEA co-ordinated research project. Discrepancies between the values of main reactivity coefficients obtained by the participants for the BN-600 full MOX core benchmark appear to be larger than those in the previous hybrid core benchmarks on traditional core configurations. This arises due to uncertainties in the proper modelling of the axial sodium plenum above the core. It was recognized that the sodium density coefficient strongly depends on the core model configuration of interest (hybrid core vs. fully MOX fuelled core with sodium plenum above the core) in conjunction with the calculation method (diffusion vs. transport theory). The effects of the discrepancies revealed between the participants results on the ULOF and UTOP transient behaviours of the BN-600 full MOX core were investigated in simplified transient analyses. Generally the diffusion approximation predicts more benign consequences for the ULOF accident but more hazardous ones for the UTOP accident when compared with the transport theory results. The heterogeneity effect does not have any significant effect on the simulation of the transient. The comparison of the transient analyses results concluded that the fuel Doppler coefficient and the sodium density coefficient are the two most important coefficients in understanding the ULOF transient behaviour. In particular, the uncertainty in evaluating the sodium density coefficient distribution has the largest impact on the description of reactor dynamics. This is because the maximum sodium temperature rise takes place at the top of the core and in the sodium plenum.

  15. Why Do Some Cores Remain Starless?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Prestellar cores, by definition, are gravitationally bound but starless pockets of dense gas. Physical conditions that could render a core starless (in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end, we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. We demonstrate: (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of ~ 105 yr. Those that remained starless briefly acquired a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the profile of a unstable BonnorEbert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16, and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. By contrast, B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other starless cores viz. B68, L694-2, L1517B, and L1689 could also be similarly induced to collapse. The temperature-profile of starless cores and those that collapsed was found to be radically different. While in the former type, only very close to the centre of a core was there any evidence of decline in gas temperature, by contrast, a core of the latter type developed a more uniformly cold interior. Our principle conclusions are: (a) thermal super-criticality of a core is insufficient to ensure it will become protostellar, (b) potential star-forming cores (the VeLLO L1521F here), could be experiencing dust-coagulation that must enhance gasdust coupling and in turn lower gas temperature, thereby assisting collapse. This also suggests, mere gravitational/virial boundedness of a core is insufficient to ensure it will form stars.

  16. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies proposes to develop a unique structural cellular core material to improve mechanical performance, reduce platform weight and lower...

  17. Recent Problems of Transformer Core Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkovic, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The paper describes the result of the investigations of the efficiency of power loss reduction in transformer cores made with high-permeability (HGO) and laser scribed (LS) grain-oriented electrical steels, and also the phenomena in three-limb three-phase cores with the so-called staggered T-joint design. The efficiency of the HGO material depends on core form and core induction. The efficiency is better for single-phase than for three-phase cores and also for higher induction. The localised efficiency of HGO material is not uniform and it is significantly lower in the yoke than in other parts. The efficiency of LS material (grade ZDKH) is better than that of the HGO material and also somewhat higher for single-phase than for three-phase cores. The localised flux distribution in the central limb of the core with staggered T-joint is more uniform and the content of higher harmonics is smaller than in the core with conventional V-45° T-joint. This results in a 13% loss reduction in the central limb and in a 4-5% reduction of total core loss.

  18. Design Principles for Synthesizable Processor Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleuniger, Pascal; McKee, Sally A.; Karlsson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    As FPGAs get more competitive, synthesizable processor cores become an attractive choice for embedded computing. Currently popular commercial processor cores do not fully exploit current FPGA architectures. In this paper, we propose general design principles to increase instruction throughput...... through the use of micro-benchmarks that our principles guide the design of a processor core that improves performance by an average of 38% over a similar Xilinx MicroBlaze configuration....... on FPGA-based processor cores: first, superpipelining enables higher-frequency system clocks, and second, predicated instructions circumvent costly pipeline stalls due to branches. To evaluate their effects, we develop Tinuso, a processor architecture optimized for FPGA implementation. We demonstrate...

  19. Reinventing the Platform Core Through Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toppenberg, Gustav; Henningsson, Stefan; Eaton, Ben

    2016-01-01

    the acquisition and integration of companies presenting innovative technologies of relevance to the platform core. Using a revelatory case study of Cisco Systems, we develop the explanatory notion of ‘coring acquisition’. In this type of acquisition value is created through the acquisition of companies...... that provide products external to the acquirer that can be assimilated into the platform core. This creates value through the transformational process that we term ‘coring’. We also analyze how the benefits of coring acquisitions are contingent on challenges concerning the integration of acquisitions offering...

  20. More on core instabilities of magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Striet, J

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on the core instability of the 't Hooft Polyakov monopoles we reported on before. This instability, where the spherical core decays in a toroidal one, typically occurs in models in which charge conjugation is gauged. In this paper we also discuss a third conceivable configuration denoted as ``split core'', which brings us to some details of the numerical methods we employed. We argue that a core instability of 't Hooft Polyakov type monopoles is quite a generic feature of models with charged Higgs particles.

  1. Method of evaluating the reactor core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable exact evaluation for the core performance in a short period. Constitution: A reactor core is equally divided into 2, 4 or 8 sections considering the structure of the symmetricalness and calculation for the evaluation the core performance is carried out to at least one region of the divided core. However, the reactor core can not be said to be completely symmetrical and there is a difference more or less, because if identical type fuels are loaded the way of burning is different depending on the positions, thereby causing difference in the total heat calorie generated. Accordingly, the performance evaluation is conducted for the entire core at a predetermined time interval, the compensation value for each of the fuels is calculated based on the result of the calculation for the entire core and the corresponding result of the calculation in each of the divided cores and the compensated values are added to the calculation result for the divided cores to compensate the calculated evaluation value. This enables to shorten the calculation time and improve the calculation accuracy. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  3. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  4. Core Forensics: Earth's Accretion and Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, J.; Brodholt, J. P.; Siebert, J.; Piet, H.; Ryerson, F. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's accretion and its primitive differentiation are intimately interlinked processes. One way to constrain accretionary processes is by looking at the major differentiation event that took place during accretion: core formation. Understanding core formation and core composition can certainly shed a new light on early and late accretionary processes. On the other hand, testing certain accretionary models and hypothesis (fluxes, chemistries, timing) allows -short of validating them- at the very least to unambiguously refute them, through the 'filter'' of core formation and composition. Earth's core formed during accretion as a result of melting, phase-separation, and segregation of accretionary building blocks (from meteorites to planetesimals). The bulk composition of the core and mantle depends on the evolution (pressure, temperature, composition) of core extraction during accretion. The entire process left a compositional imprint on both reservoirs: (1) in the silicate Earth, in terms of siderophile trace-element (Ni, Co, V, Cr, among others) concentrations and isotopic fractionation (Si, Cu, among others), a record that is observed in present-day mantle rocks; and (2) on the core, in terms of major element composition and light elements dissolved in the metal, a record that is observed by seismology through the core density-deficit. This imprint constitutes actually a fairly impressive set of evidence (siderophile element concentration and fractionation, volatile and siderophile element isotopic fractionation), can be used today to trace back the primordial processes that occurred 4.5 billion years ago. We are seeking to provide an overhaul of the standard core formation/composition models, by using a new rationale that bridges geophysics and geochemistry. The new ingredients are (1) new laser-heated diamond anvil cell partitioning data, dramatically extending the previous P-T conditions for experimental work, (2) ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to

  5. Double-diffusive inner core convective translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguen, Renaud; Alboussière, Thierry; Labrosse, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    The hemispherical asymmetry of the inner core has been interpreted as resulting form a high-viscosity mode of inner core convection, consisting in a translation of the inner core. With melting on one hemisphere and crystallization on the other one, inner core translation would impose a strongly asymmetric buoyancy flux at the bottom of the outer core, with likely strong implications for the dynamics of the outer core and the geodynamo. The main requirement for convective instability in the inner core is an adverse radial density gradient. While older estimates of the inner core thermal conductivity favored a superadiabatic temperature gradient and the existence of thermal convection, the much higher values recently proposed makes thermal convection very unlikely. Compositional convection might be a viable alternative to thermal convection: an unstable compositional gradient may arise in the inner core either because the light elements present in the core are predicted to become increasingly incompatible as the inner core grows (Gubbins et al. 2013), or because of a possibly positive feedback of the development of the F-layer on inner core convection. Though the magnitude of the destabilizing effect of the compositional field is predicted to be similar to or smaller than the stabilizing effect of the thermal field, the huge difference between thermal and chemical diffusivities implies that double-diffusive instabilities can still arise even if the net density decreases upward. We propose here a theoretical and numerical study of double diffusive convection in the inner core that demonstrate that a translation mode can indeed exist if the compositional field is destabilizing, even if the temperature profile is subadiabatic, and irrespectively of the relative magnitude of the destabilizing compositional gradient and stabilizing temperature field. The predicted inner core translation rate is similar to the mean inner core growth rate, which is more consistent with

  6. Drilling history core hole DC-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    Core hole DC-4 was completed at a depth of 3998 feet in December, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Sicsson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the cable tool and core drilling activities, and geological core logging for DC-4. Core hole DC-4 is located on the Hanford Site about 3 miles east of the Yakima Barricade and approximately 103 feet southwest of rotary hole DC-5, which was completed to 3990 feet in February, 1978. Hanford Site coordinates reported for hole DC-4 are north 49,385.62 feet and west 85,207.63 feet, and Washington State coordinates are north 454,468.73 feet and east 2,209,990.87 feet. No elevation survey is available for hole DC-4, but it is approximately 745 feet above mean sea level based upon the survey of hole DC-5, which has a reported elevation of 745.16 feet on the top of the 3-inch flange. The purpose of core hole DC-4 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing, cross-hole seismic shear, and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-5. Hole DC-4 was drilled through the overburden into basalt bedrock by cable tool methods (0-623 feet) and continuously cored through the final interval (623 to 3998 feet).Core recovery was 95.8 percent of the total footage cored.

  7. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Lee, Chang Won; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-06-01

    We present results of our study of eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3–160 μm) imaging observations with the AKARI telescope and molecular line (HCN and N2H+) mapping observations with the KVN telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to millimeter continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosities of ∼0.3–4.4 L ⊙. The other six cores are found to remain starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3–6 K toward the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an overdominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory motion, probably due to the external heating. Most of the starless cores show a coreshine effect due to the scattering of light by the micron-sized dust grains. This may imply that the age of the cores is of the order of ∼105 years, which is consistent with the timescale required for the cores to evolve into an oscillatory stage due to external perturbation. Our observational results support the idea that the external feedback from nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields may play an important role in the dynamical evolution of the cores.

  8. Drilling history core hole DC-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core hole DC-4 was completed at a depth of 3998 feet in December, 1978 by Boyles Brothers Drilling Company, Spokane, Washington, under subcontract to Fenix and Scission, Inc. The hole was cored for the US Department of Energy and the Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Program. Fenix and Sicsson, Inc. furnished the engineering, daily supervision of the cable tool and core drilling activities, and geological core logging for DC-4. Core hole DC-4 is located on the Hanford Site about 3 miles east of the Yakima Barricade and approximately 103 feet southwest of rotary hole DC-5, which was completed to 3990 feet in February, 1978. Hanford Site coordinates reported for hole DC-4 are north 49,385.62 feet and west 85,207.63 feet, and Washington State coordinates are north 454,468.73 feet and east 2,209,990.87 feet. No elevation survey is available for hole DC-4, but it is approximately 745 feet above mean sea level based upon the survey of hole DC-5, which has a reported elevation of 745.16 feet on the top of the 3-inch flange. The purpose of core hole DC-4 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection, and to provide a borehole for hydrologic testing, cross-hole seismic shear, and pressure wave velocity studies with rotary hole DC-5. Hole DC-4 was drilled through the overburden into basalt bedrock by cable tool methods (0-623 feet) and continuously cored through the final interval (623 to 3998 feet).Core recovery was 95.8 percent of the total footage cored

  9. CoreDevRec:Automatic Core Member Recommendation for Contribution Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋竞; 贺佳欢; 陈学渊

    2015-01-01

    The pull-based software development helps developers make contributions flexibly and effciently. Core members evaluate code changes submitted by contributors, and decide whether to merge these code changes into repositories or not. Ideally, code changes are assigned to core members and evaluated within a short time after their submission. However, in reality, some popular projects receive many pull requests, and core members have di昋culties in choosing pull requests which are to be evaluated. Therefore, there is a growing need for automatic core member recommendation, which improves the evaluation process. In this paper, we investigate pull requests with manual assignment. Results show that 3.2%∼40.6% of pull requests are manually assigned to specific core members. To assist with the manual assignment, we propose CoreDevRec to recommend core members for contribution evaluation in GitHub. CoreDevRec uses support vector machines to analyze different kinds of features, including file paths of modified codes, relationships between contributors and core members, and activeness of core members. We evaluate CoreDevRec on 18 651 pull requests of five popular projects in GitHub. Results show that CoreDevRec achieves accuracy from 72.9% to 93.5% for top 3 recommendation. In comparison with a baseline approach, CoreDevRec improves the accuracy from 18.7% to 81.3% for top 3 recommendation. Moreover, CoreDevRec even has higher accuracy than manual assignment in the project TrinityCore. We believe that CoreDevRec can improve the assignment of pull requests.

  10. Overview of core designs and requirements/criteria for core restraint systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The requirements and lifetime criteria for the design of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Core Restraint System are presented. A discussion of the three types of core restraint systems used in LMFBR core design is given. Details of the core restraint system selected for FFTF are presented and the reasons for this selection given. Structural analysis procedures being used to manage the FFTF assembly irradiations are discussed. Efforts that are ongoing to validate the calculational methods and lifetime criteria are presented

  11. Analysis of circuits including magnetic cores (MTRAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzen, G. R.; Nitzan, D.; Herndon, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Development of automated circuit analysis computer program to provide transient analysis of circuits with magnetic cores is discussed. Allowance is made for complications caused by nonlinearity of switching core model and magnetic coupling among loop currents. Computer program is conducted on Univac 1108 computer using FORTRAN IV.

  12. Shape-tunable core-shell microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthias K; Saenger, Nicolai R; Schuetter, Stefan; Pfleiderer, Patrick; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2014-10-28

    Colloidal polymer particles are an important class of materials finding use in both everyday and basic research applications. Tailoring their composition, shape, and functionality is of key importance. In this article, we describe a new class of shape-tunable core-shell microparticles. They are composed of a cross-linked polystyrene (PS) core and a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell of varying thickness. In the first step, we prepared highly cross-linked PS cores, which are subsequently transferred into a nonpolar dispersant. They serve as the seed dispersion for a nonaqueous dispersion polymerization to generate the PMMA shell. The shape of the particles can subsequently be manipulated. After the shell growth stage, the spherical PS/PMMA core-shell colloids exhibit an uneven and wrinkled surface. An additional tempering procedure allows for smoothing the surface of the core-shell colloids. This results in polymer core-shell particles with a perfectly spherical shape. In addition to this thermal smoothing of the PMMA shell, we generated a selection of shape-anisotropic core-shell particles using a thermomechanical stretching procedure. Because of the unique constitution, we can selectively interrogate molecular vibrations in the PS core or the PMMA shell of the colloids using nonlinear optical microscopy techniques. This is of great interest because no photobleaching occurs, such that the particles can be tracked in real space over long times.

  13. UV Defined Nanoporous Liquid Core Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ndoni, Sokol;

    2011-01-01

    Nanoporous liquid core waveguides, where both core and cladding are made from the same material, are presented. The nanoporous polymer used is intrinsically hydrophobic, but selective UV exposure enables it to infiltrate with an aqueous solution, thus raising the refractive index from 1.26 to 1...

  14. Community College Presidents' Core Internal Metaphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBraak, LaRonna S.

    2011-01-01

    This study identified the core internal metaphors of 8 community college presidents, 4 females and 4 males. The participants of this study resided in both rural and metropolitan communities. Core internal metaphors were adopted due to a strong association to a primary conceptual metaphor, which the participants had internalized as a result of…

  15. Core Knowledge Confusions among University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Marjaana; Svedholm, Annika M.; Takada, Mikito; Lonnqvist, Jan-Erik; Verkasalo, Markku

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that university students hold several paranormal beliefs and that paranormal beliefs can be best explained with core knowledge confusions. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent university students confuse the core ontological attributes of lifeless material objects (e.g. a house, a stone), living…

  16. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  17. After Common Core, States Set Rigorous Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Paul E.; Barrows, Samuel; Gift, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In spite of Tea Party criticism, union skepticism, and anti-testing outcries, the campaign to implement Common Core State Standards (otherwise known as Common Core) has achieved phenomenal success in statehouses across the country. Since 2011, 45 states have raised their standards for student proficiency in reading and math, with the greatest…

  18. Common Core in the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Frederick M.; McShane, Michael Q.

    2013-01-01

    There are at least four key places where the Common Core intersects with current efforts to improve education in the United States--testing, professional development, expectations, and accountability. Understanding them can help educators, parents, and policymakers maximize the chance that the Common Core is helpful to these efforts and, perhaps…

  19. The most massive core collapse supernova progenitors

    OpenAIRE

    Waldman, Roni

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of the extremely luminous supernova SN 2006gy, possibly interpreted as a pair instability supernova, renewed the interest in very massive stars. We explore the evolution of these objects, which end their life as pair instability supernovae or as core collapse supernovae with relatively massive iron cores, up to about $3 M_\\odot$.

  20. Development of core design technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim Young In; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. J.; Song, H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, W. S.; Hwang, W.; Lee, B. O.; Park, C. K.; Joo, H. K.; Yoo, J. W.; Kang, H. Y.; Park, W. S

    2000-05-01

    For the development of KALIMER (150 MWe) core conceptual design, design evolution and optimization for improved economics and safety enhancement was performed in the uranium metallic fueled equilibrium core design which uses U-Zr binary fuel not in excess of 20 percent enrichment. Utilizing results of the uranium ,metallic fueled core design, the breeder equilibrium core design with breeding ratio being over 1.1 was developed. In addition, utilizing LMR's excellent neutron economy, various core concepts for minor actinide burnup, inherent safety, economics and non-proliferation were realized and its optimization studies were performed. A code system for the LMR core conceptual design has been established through the implementation of needed functions into the existing codes and development of codes. To improve the accuracy of the core design, a multi-dimensional nodal transport code SOLTRAN, a three-dimensional transient code analysis code STEP, MATRA-LMR and ASSY-P for T/H analysis are under development. Through the automation of design calculations for efficient core design, an input generator and several interface codes have been developed. (author)

  1. Stable isotope analysis in ice core paleoclimatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice cores from New Zealand and the Antarctic margin provide an excellent means of addressing the lack of longer-term climate observations in the Southern Hemisphere with near instrumental quality. Ice core records provide an annual-scale, 'instrumental-quality' baseline of atmospheric temperature and circulation changes back many thousands of years. (author).

  2. Overview of the Core Commitments Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTighe Musil, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the Core Commitments Initiative conducted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U). Core Commitments was intended to reinvigorate the conversation about personal and social responsibility within higher education, and served as the impetus for this "New Directions" volume.

  3. Future Directions for Research on Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Guerra, Nancy G.

    2008-01-01

    This concluding commentary highlights common themes that emerged across the chapters in this volume. We identify strengths and limitations of the core competencies framework and discuss the importance of context, culture, and development for understanding the role of the core competencies in preventing risk behavior in adolescence. We also outline…

  4. The Core Journal Concept in Black Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissinger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Black Studies scholars have shown interest in the core journal concept. Indeed, the idea of core journals for the study of the Black experience has changed several times since 1940. While Black Studies scholars are citing Black Studies journals with frequency, they also cite traditional disciplinary journals a great deal of the time. However,…

  5. Linking Core Competence, Innovation and Firm Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Öznur Gökkaya; Gönül Kaya Özbağ

    2015-01-01

    Organizational resources and capabilities realized by business practitioners and researchershave significant importanceas they support firmperformance and competitive advantage. However, what exactly core competence is not clearly understood since terms such as resource, capability and compe tence are used interchangeably by researchers. From this point forth, this article provides a framework for separating organization's core...

  6. The EPOS Integrated Core Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Keith; Michelini, Alberto; Bailo, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    EPOS also including other work packages in EPOS such as those concerned with legalistics and financing; (c) a prototype based on the woodman architecture in one domain (seismology) to provide assurance that the architecture is valid. The key aspect is the metadata catalog. In one dimension this is described in 3 levels: (1) discovery metadata using well-known and commonly used standards such as DC (Dublin Core) to enable users (via an intelligent user interface) to search for objects within the EPOS environment relevant to their needs; (2) contextual metadata providing the context of the object described in the catalog to enable a user or the system to determine the relevance of the discovered object(s) to their requirement - the context includes projects, funding, organisations involved, persons involved, related publications, facilities, equipment etc and utilises CERIF (Common European Research Information Format) see www.eurocris.org ; (3) detailed metadata which is specific to a domain or to a particular object and includes the schema describing the object to processing software. The other dimension of the metadata concerns the objects described. These are classified into users, services (including software), data and resources (computing, data storage, instruments and scientific equipment). The core services include not only user access to data, software, services, equipment and associated processing but also facilities for interaction and cooperative working between users and storage of history and experience. EPOS will operate a full e-Science environment including metadata and persistent identifiers.

  7. Core formation and core composition from coupled geochemical and geophysical constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Brodholt, John P; Piet, Hélène; Siebert, Julien; Ryerson, Frederick J

    2015-10-01

    The formation of Earth's core left behind geophysical and geochemical signatures in both the core and mantle that remain to this day. Seismology requires that the core be lighter than pure iron and therefore must contain light elements, and the geochemistry of mantle-derived rocks reveals extensive siderophile element depletion and fractionation. Both features are inherited from metal-silicate differentiation in primitive Earth and depend upon the nature of physiochemical conditions that prevailed during core formation. To date, core formation models have only attempted to address the evolution of core and mantle compositional signatures separately, rather than seeking a joint solution. Here we combine experimental petrology, geochemistry, mineral physics and seismology to constrain a range of core formation conditions that satisfy both constraints. We find that core formation occurred in a hot (liquidus) yet moderately deep magma ocean not exceeding 1,800 km depth, under redox conditions more oxidized than present-day Earth. This new scenario, at odds with the current belief that core formation occurred under reducing conditions, proposes that Earth's magma ocean started oxidized and has become reduced through time, by oxygen incorporation into the core. This core formation model produces a core that contains 2.7-5% oxygen along with 2-3.6% silicon, with densities and velocities in accord with radial seismic models, and leaves behind a silicate mantle that matches the observed mantle abundances of nickel, cobalt, chromium, and vanadium. PMID:26392555

  8. Controlled Release of Ciprofloxacin from Core-Shell Nanofibers with Monolithic or Blended Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Špela; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Kristl, Julijana; Yarin, Alexander L

    2016-04-01

    Sustained controlled drug release is one of the prominent contributions for more successful treatment outcomes in the case of several diseases. However, the incorporation of hydrophilic drugs into nanofibers, a promising novel delivery system, and achieving a long-term sustained release still pose a challenging task. In this work we demonstrated a robust method of avoiding burst release of drugs and achieving a sustained drug release from 2 to 4 weeks using core-shell nanofibers with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) shell and monolithic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) core or a novel type of core-shell nanofibers with blended (PVA and PMMA) core loaded with ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CIP). It is also shown that, for core-shell nanofibers with monolithic core, drug release can be manipulated by varying flow rate of the core PVA solution, whereas for core-shell nanofibers with blended core, drug release can be manipulated by varying the ratios between PMMA and PVA in the core. During coaxial electrospinning, when the solvent from the core evaporates in concert with the solvent from the shell, the interconnected pores spanning the core and the shell are formed. The release process is found to be desorption-limited and agrees with the two-stage desorption model. Ciprofloxacin-loaded nanofiber mats developed in the present work could be potentially used as local drug delivery systems for treatment of several medical conditions, including periodontal disease and skin, bone, and joint infections.

  9. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference betwe

  10. Beyond the Core: Peer Observation Brings Common Core to Vocational and Electives Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber Rasmussen, Harriette

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how a Washington State School District increased professional learning around the Common Core State Standards. The challenge was how to establish a way for career and technical education and electives teachers to learn and apply Common Core in their classes. Weaving Common Core literacy standards into vocational and…

  11. Further investigation of core sampling recovery history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, P.M.

    1995-04-12

    Review committee evaluations of the tank characterization program at WHC have called for a radical rethinking of the strategies currently in place. One possibility is that the tank core sampling systems may not be able to provide the required sample quality in all cases, and alternative sampling methods should be sought to compliment the push-mode and rotary-mode systems. This report addresses the need for additional historical review of past core sampling performance, to help improve tank characterization methods. Past experiences from core sampling were compiled and analyzed by individual cores and by groupings. The information showed that the most prominent causes of poor recovery were plugging of the bit and misjudging the top segment. Methods to alleviate these problems have been incorporated into present core sampling strategies, although alternative equipment may be necessary under some circumstances.

  12. Core seismic study on experimental VHTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) core consists of about 1700 blocks (fuel blocks, replaceable reflectors, permanent reflectors, and core support blocks) and other structures surrounding the blocks. A major research and development effort was initiated in 1975 to study the dynamic response of the experimental VHTR core arrangement to seismic excitation. First, a VHTR core seismic test program was prepared. Next, basic tests and analysis were carried out according to the program. Tests and apparatus and test results are described for one-column and one-region tests, vertical two-dimensional test, and horizontal two-dimensional test. Many data on the response characteristics of columns and the effect of the side support stiffness on the core vibration characteristics were derived from the basic tests

  13. Fast fossil rotation of neutron star cores

    CERN Document Server

    Melatos, A

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that the superfluid core of a neutron star super-rotates relative to the crust, because stratification prevents the core from responding to the electromagnetic braking torque, until the relevant dissipative (viscous or Eddington-Sweet) time-scale, which can exceed ~ 10^3 yr and is much longer than the Ekman timescale, has elapsed. Hence, in some young pulsars, the rotation of the core today is a fossil record of its rotation at birth, provided that magnetic crust-core coupling is inhibited, e.g. by buoyancy, field-line topology, or the presence of uncondensed neutral components in the superfluid. Persistent core super-rotation alters our picture of neutron stars in several ways, allowing for magnetic field generation by ongoing dynamo action and enhanced gravitational wave emission from hydrodynamic instabilities.

  14. Core rotational dynamics and geological events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greff-Lefftz; Legros

    1999-11-26

    A study of Earth's fluid core oscillations induced by lunar-solar tidal forces, together with tidal secular deceleration of Earth's axial rotation, shows that the rotational eigenfrequency of the fluid core and some solar tidal waves were in resonance around 3.0 x 10(9), 1.8 x 10(9), and 3 x 10(8) years ago. The associated viscomagnetic frictional power at the core boundaries may be converted into heat and would destabilize the D" thermal layer, leading to the generation of deep-mantle plumes, and would also increase the temperature at the fluid core boundaries, perturbing the core dynamo process. Such phenomena could account for large-scale episodes of continental crust formation, the generation of flood basalts, and abrupt changes in geomagnetic reversal frequency. PMID:10576731

  15. Drought rewires the cores of food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xueke; Gray, Clare; Brown, Lee E.; Ledger, Mark E.; Milner, Alexander M.; Mondragón, Raúl J.; Woodward, Guy; Ma, Athen

    2016-09-01

    Droughts are intensifying across the globe, with potentially devastating implications for freshwater ecosystems. We used new network science approaches to investigate drought impacts on stream food webs and explored potential consequences for web robustness to future perturbations. The substructure of the webs was characterized by a core of richly connected species surrounded by poorly connected peripheral species. Although drought caused the partial collapse of the food webs, the loss of the most extinction-prone peripheral species triggered a substantial rewiring of interactions within the networks’ cores. These shifts in species interactions in the core conserved the underlying core/periphery substructure and stability of the drought-impacted webs. When we subsequently perturbed the webs by simulating species loss in silico, the rewired drought webs were as robust as the larger, undisturbed webs. Our research unearths previously unknown compensatory dynamics arising from within the core that could underpin food web stability in the face of environmental perturbations.

  16. Evidence of Historical Supernovae in Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Donna

    2011-05-01

    Within the framework of the U.S. Greenland Ice Core Science Project (GISP2), an ice core, known as the GISP H-Core, was collected in June, 1992 adjacent to the GISP2 summit drill site. The project scientists, Gisela A.M. Dreschhoff and Edward J. Zeller, were interested in dating solar proton events with volcanic eruptions. The GISP2-H 122-meter firn and ice core is a record of 415 years of liquid electrical conductivity (LEC) and nitrate concentrations, spanning the years 1992 at the surface through 1577 at the bottom. At the National Ice Core Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, the core (beneath the 12-meter firn) was sliced into 1.5 cm sections and analyzed. The resulting data set consisted of 7,776 individual analyses. The ultrahigh resolution sampling technique resulted in a time resolution of one week near the surface and one month at depth. The liquid electrical conductivity (LEC) sequence contains signals from a number of known volcanic eruptions and provides a dating system at specific locations along the core. The terrestrial and solar background nitrate records show seasonal and annual variations, respectively. However, major nitrate anomalies within the record do not correspond to any known terrestrial or solar events. There is evidence that these nitrate anomalies could be a record of supernovae events. Cosmic X-rays ionize atmospheric nitrogen, producing excess nitrate that is then deposited in the Polar Regions. The GISP2-H ice core has revealed nitrate anomalies at the times of the Tycho and Kepler supernovae. The Cassiopeia A supernova event may be documented in the core as well. We have developed a classroom activity for high school and college students, in which they examine several lines of evidence in the Greenland ice core, discriminating among nearby and mid-latitude volcanic activity, solar proton events, and supernovae. Students infer the date of the Cassiopeia A supernova.

  17. Pre-supernova neutrino emissions from ONe cores in the progenitors of core-collapse supernovae: are they distinguishable from those of Fe cores?

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Chinami; Yamada, Shoichi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi; Ishidoshiro, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Aiming to distinguish two types of progenitors of core collapse supernovae, i.e., one with a core composed mainly of oxygen and neon (abbreviated as ONe core) and the other with an iron core (or Fe core), we calculated the luminosities and spectra of neutrinos emitted from these cores prior to gravitational collapse, taking neutrino oscillation into account. We found that the total energies emitted as $\\bar{\

  18. Hole history core hole DC-2 Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of core hole DC-2 was to core drill vertically through the basalt and interbed units for stratigraphic depth determination and core collection and to provide a borehole for hydrological testing. The total depth of core hole DC-2 was 3,300 feet. Core recovery exceeded 99 percent of the total footage cores. The coring record is tabulated. 3 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)

  19. Impact of core cladding boundary shape on the waveguide properties of hollow core microstructured fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Pryamikov, A D; Biriukov, A S

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we consider an interaction between the air core modes of hollow core waveguide microstructures and core cladding boundary walls in various shapes. The analysis is based on well established models such as the anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguide model and on the models proposed for the first time. In particular, we consider the dynamics of light localization in the polygonalcore cladding boundary wall as dependant on the type of its discrete rotational symmetry. Based on our findings we analyze the mechanisms of light localization in the core cladding boundary walls of negative curvature hollow core microstructured fibers.

  20. Light localization in hollow core fibers with a complicated shape of the core cladding boundary

    CERN Document Server

    Pryamikov, A D; Alagashev, G K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a theoretical and numerical analysis of light localization in hollow core microstructured fibers (HCMFs) with a complicated shape of the core cladding boundary. The analysis is based on well established models (for example, the ARROW model) and also on the models proposed for the first time. In particular, we consider local and nonlocal mechanisms of light localization in the waveguide structures with a determined type of discrete rotational symmetry of the core cladding boundary. We interpret and analyze mechanisms of light localization in negative curvature hollow core microstructured fibers (NC HCMFs) and simplified HC PCFs with a polygonal shape of the core cladding boundary.

  1. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, J O; Gantner, B; Motl, P M; Norman, M L; Burns, Jack O.; Hallman, Eric J.; Gantner, Brennan; Motl, Patrick M.; Norman, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  2. Beyond the Cool Core: The Formation of Cool Core Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. O.; Hallman, E. J.; Gantner, B.; Motl, P. M.; Norman, M. L.

    Why do some clusters have cool cores while others do not? In this paper, cosmological simulations, including radiative cooling and heating, are used to examine the formation and evolution of cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. Numerical CC clusters at z=0 accreted mass more slowly over time and grew enhanced cool cores via hierarchical mergers; when late major mergers occurred, the CCs survived the collisions. By contrast, NCC clusters of similar mass experienced major mergers early in their evolution that destroyed embryonic cool cores and produced conditions that prevent CC re-formation. We discuss observational consequences.

  3. Synchronizing ice cores from the Renland and Agassiz ice caps to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Fischer, D. A.;

    2008-01-01

    Four ice cores from the Agassiz ice cap in the Canadian high arctic and one ice core from the Renland ice cap in eastern Greenland have been synchronized to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) which is based on annual layer counts in the DYE-3, GRIP and NGRIP ice cores. Volcanic...... reference horizons, seen in electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) have been used to carry out the synchronization throughout the Holocene. The Agassiz ice cores have been matched to the NGRIP ice core ECM signal, while the Renland core has been matched to the GRIP ice core ECM signal, thus tying...... the cores to GICC05. Furthermore, it has been possible to synchronize the Renland ice core to NGRIP-GICC05 in the glacial period back to 60,000 years b2k (years before A.D. 2000), on the basis of a matching of transitions between stadials and interstadials. This work brings the total number of ice core...

  4. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  5. Why do some cores remain starless ?

    CERN Document Server

    Anathpindika, S

    2016-01-01

    Physical conditions that could render a core starless(in the local Universe) is the subject of investigation in this work. To this end we studied the evolution of four starless cores, B68, L694-2, L1517B, L1689, and L1521F, a VeLLO. The density profile of a typical core extracted from an earlier simulation developed to study core-formation in a molecular cloud was used for the purpose. We demonstrate - (i) cores contracted in quasistatic manner over a timescale on the order of $\\sim 10^{5}$ years. Those that remained starless did briefly acquire a centrally concentrated density configuration that mimicked the density profile of a unstable Bonnor Ebert sphere before rebounding, (ii) three of our test cores viz. L694-2, L1689-SMM16 and L1521F remained starless despite becoming thermally super-critical. On the contrary B68 and L1517B remained sub-critical; L1521F collapsed to become a VeLLO only when gas-cooling was enhanced by increasing the size of dust-grains. This result is robust, for other cores viz. B68, ...

  6. Dense Molecular Cores Being Externally Heated

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Gwanjeong; Gopinathan, Maheswar; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Kim, Mi-Ryang

    2016-01-01

    We present results of our study on eight dense cores, previously classified as starless, using infrared (3-160 {\\micron}) imaging observations with \\textit{AKARI} telescope and molecular line (HCN and N$_2$H$^+$) mapping observations with \\textit{KVN} telescope. Combining our results with the archival IR to mm continuum data, we examined the starless nature of these eight cores. Two of the eight cores are found to harbor faint protostars having luminosity of $\\sim0.3-4.4$ L$_{\\odot}$. The other six cores are found to remain as starless and probably are in a dynamically transitional state. The temperature maps produced using multi-wavelength images show an enhancement of about 3-6 K towards the outer boundary of these cores, suggesting that they are most likely being heated externally by nearby stars and/or interstellar radiation fields. Large virial parameters and an over-dominance of red asymmetric line profiles over the cores may indicate that the cores are set into either an expansion or an oscillatory mot...

  7. Core merging and stratification following giant impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter; Deguen, Renaud; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2016-10-01

    A stratified layer below the core-mantle boundary has long been suspected on the basis of geomagnetic and seismic observations. It has been suggested that the outermost core has a stratified layer about 100 km thick that could be due to the diffusion of light elements. Recent seismological evidence, however, supports a layer exceeding 300 km in thickness of enigmatic origin. Here we show from turbulent mixing experiments that merging between projectile and planetary core following a giant impact can lead to a stratified layer at the top of the core. Scaling relationships between post-impact core structure and projectile properties suggest that merging between Earth's protocore and a projectile core that is enriched in light elements and 20 times less massive can produce the thick stratification inferred from seismic data. Our experiments favour Moon-forming impact scenarios involving a projectile smaller than the proto-Earth and suggest that entrainment of mantle silicates into the protocore led to metal-silicate equilibration under extreme pressure-temperature conditions. We conclude that the thick stratified layer detected at the top of Earth's core can be explained as a vestige of the Moon-forming giant impact during the late stages of planetary accretion.

  8. Coolability of severely degraded CANDU cores. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneley, D.A.; Blahnik, C.; Rogers, J.T.; Snell, V.G.; Nijhawan, S

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies have shown that the separately cooled moderator in a CANDU reactor provides an effective heat sink in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) accompanied by total failure of the emergency core cooling system (ECCS). The moderator heat sink prevents fuel melting and maintains the integrity of the fuel channels, therefore terminating this severe accident short of severe core damage. Nevertheless, there is a probability, however low, that the moderator heat sink could fail in such an accident. The pioneering work of Rogers (1984) for such a severe accident using simplified models showed that the fuel channels would fail and a bed of dry, solid debris would be formed at the bottom of the calandria which would heat up and eventually melt. However, the molten pool of core material would be retained in the calandria vessel, cooled by the independently cooled shield-tank water, and would eventually resolidify. Thus, the calandria vessel would act inherently as a 'core-catcher' as long as the shield tank integrity is maintained. The present paper reviews subsequent work on the damage to a CANDU core under severe accident conditions and describes an empirically based mechanistic model of this process. It is shown that, for such severe accident sequences in a CANDU reactor, the end state following core disassembly consists of a porous bed of dry solid, coarse debris, irrespective of the initiating event and the core disassembly process. (author)

  9. British Columbia natural gas: Core market policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core market for natural gas in British Columbia is defined as all natural gas consumers in the residential, institutional, commercial, and industrial sectors not currently purchasing natural gas directly and not exempted from the core market by the British Columbia Utilities Commission (BCUC). The intent of the definition is to include all customers who must be protected by contracts which ensure long-term security of supply and stable prices. Core market customers are excluded from direct natural gas purchase and will be served by distribution utilities. A customer may apply to BCUC to leave the core market; such an application may be approved if it is demonstrated that the customer has adequate long-term natural gas supplies or alternative fuel supplies to protect him from supply interruptions. The non-core market is defined as all large industrial customers who elect to make their own natural gas supply arrangements and who can demonstrate to the BCUC sufficient long-term natural gas supply protection or alternative fuel capability to ensure security of the industry. Non-core market customers have full and open access to the competitive natural gas market. The British Columbia government will not apply its core market policy to other jurisdictions through Energy Removal Certificates

  10. A Hunt for Massive Starless Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Shuo; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Liu, Mengyao; Butler, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We carry out an ALMA $\\rm N_2D^+$(3-2) and 1.3~mm continuum survey towards 32 high mass surface density regions in seven Infrared Dark Clouds with the aim of finding massive starless cores, which may be the initial conditions for the formation of massive stars. Cores showing strong $\\rm N_2D^+$(3-2) emission are expected to be highly deuterated and indicative of early, potentially pre-stellar stages of star formation. We also present maps of these regions in ancillary line tracers, including C$^{18}$O(2-1), DCN(3-2) and DCO$^+$(3-2). Over 100 $\\rm N_2D^+$ cores are identified with our newly developed core-finding algorithm based on connected structures in position-velocity space. The most massive core has $\\gtrsim70\\:M_\\odot$ (potentially $\\sim170\\:M_\\odot$) and so may be representative of the initial conditions for massive star formation. The existence and dynamical properties of such cores constrain massive star formation theories. We measure the line widths and thus velocity dispersion of six of the cores ...

  11. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  12. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Core Competencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, J.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Berven, B.A.; Hildebrand, S.G.; Hartman, F.C.; Honea, R.B.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Moon, R.M. Jr.; Saltmarsh, M.J.; Shelton, R.B. [and others

    1994-12-01

    A core competency is a distinguishing integration of capabilities which enables an organization to deliver mission results. Core competencies represent the collective learning of an organization and provide the capacity to perform present and future missions. Core competencies are distinguishing characteristics which offer comparative advantage and are difficult to reproduce. They exhibit customer focus, mission relevance, and vertical integration from research through applications. They are demonstrable by metrics such as level of investment, uniqueness of facilities and expertise, and national impact. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has identified four core competencies which satisfy the above criteria. Each core competency represents an annual investment of at least $100M and is characterized by an integration of Laboratory technical foundations in physical, chemical, and materials sciences; biological, environmental, and social sciences; engineering sciences; and computational sciences and informatics. The ability to integrate broad technical foundations to develop and sustain core competencies in support of national R&D goals is a distinguishing strength of the national laboratories. The ORNL core competencies are: 9 Energy Production and End-Use Technologies o Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technology o Advanced Materials Synthesis, Processing, and Characterization & Neutron-Based Science and Technology. The distinguishing characteristics of each ORNL core competency are described. In addition, written material is provided for two emerging competencies: Manufacturing Technologies and Computational Science and Advanced Computing. Distinguishing institutional competencies in the Development and Operation of National Research Facilities, R&D Integration and Partnerships, Technology Transfer, and Science Education are also described. Finally, financial data for the ORNL core competencies are summarized in the appendices.

  14. Influence of core box vents distribution on flow dynamics of core shooting process based on experiment and numerical simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-jiang Ni; Gao-chun Lu; Qing-dong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Core shooting process plays a decisive role in the quality of sand cores, and core box vents distribution is one of the most important factor determining the effectiveness of core shooting process. In this paper, the influence of core box vents distribution on the flow dynamics of core shooting process was investigated based on in situ experimental observations with transparent core box, high-speed camera and pressure measuring system. Attention was focused on the variation of both the flow b...

  15. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, M.P.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Heylmun, N.F.

    1977-07-19

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures.

  16. Lattice points and simultaneous core partitions

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We observe that for a and b relatively prime, the "abacus construction" identifies the set of simultaneous (a,b)-core partitions with lattice points in a rational simplex. Furthermore, many statistics on (a,b)-cores are piecewise polynomial functions on this simplex. We apply these results to rational Catalan combinatorics. Using Ehrhart theory, we reprove Anderson's theorem that there are (a+b-1)!/a!b! simultaneous (a,b)-cores, and using Euler-Maclaurin theory we prove Armstrong's conjecture...

  17. Anti-resonant hexagram hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R; Poletti, Francesco; Abokhamis, Mousavi S; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Richardson, David J

    2015-01-26

    Various simple anti-resonant, single cladding layer, hollow core fiber structures are examined. We show that the spacing between core and jacket glass and the shape of the support struts can be used to optimize confinement loss. We demonstrate the detrimental effect on confinement loss of thick nodes at the strut intersections and present a fabricated hexagram fiber that mitigates this effect in both straight and bent condition by presenting thin and radially elongated nodes. This fiber has loss comparable to published results for a first generation, multi-cladding ring, Kagome fiber with negative core curvature and has tolerable bend loss for many practical applications.

  18. SIMILARITY SOLUTIONS FOR VISCOUS CAVITATING VORTEX CORES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the dynamic behavior of cavitating vortices requires knowledge of the velocity distribution in the vortex core. For that reason an existing similarity model for slender axisymmetric non-cavitating vortex cores has been extended with the viscous boundary conditions for a cavitating vortex. Cavitating similarity solutions exist for a vortex of which both core diameter and circulation grow with the square root of the axial coordinate. Results for this model are presented for varying cavitation numbers and Reynolds numbers. It is shown that viscosity may have a significant influence on the velocity distribution around a cavitating vortex.

  19. Multi-core processors - An overview

    CERN Document Server

    Venu, Balaji

    2011-01-01

    Microprocessors have revolutionized the world we live in and continuous efforts are being made to manufacture not only faster chips but also smarter ones. A number of techniques such as data level parallelism, instruction level parallelism and hyper threading (Intel's HT) already exists which have dramatically improved the performance of microprocessor cores. This paper briefs on evolution of multi-core processors followed by introducing the technology and its advantages in today's world. The paper concludes by detailing on the challenges currently faced by multi-core processors and how the industry is trying to address these issues.

  20. Hollow Core, Whispering Gallery Resonator Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2014-01-01

    A review of hollow core whispering gallery resonators (WGRs)is given. After a short introduction to the topic of whispering gallery resonators we provide a description of whispering gallery modes in hollow or liquid core WGRs. Next, whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensing mechanisms are outlined and some fabrication methods for microbubbles, microcapillaries and other tubular WGM devices are discussed. We then focus on the most common applications of hollow core WGRs, namely refractive index and temperature sensing, gas sensing, force sensing, biosensing, and lasing. The review highlights some of the key papers in this field and gives the reader a general overview of the current state-of-the-art.

  1. Processor core model for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Benjamin, Simon C; Bose, Sougato

    2006-06-01

    We describe an architecture based on a processing "core," where multiple qubits interact perpetually, and a separate "store," where qubits exist in isolation. Computation consists of single qubit operations, swaps between the store and the core, and free evolution of the core. This enables computation using physical systems where the entangling interactions are "always on." Alternatively, for switchable systems, our model constitutes a prescription for optimizing many-qubit gates. We discuss implementations of the quantum Fourier transform, Hamiltonian simulation, and quantum error correction.

  2. Apparatus for controlling molten core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is an apparatus for containing, cooling, diluting, dispersing and maintaining subcritical the molten core debris assumed to melt through the bottom of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel in the unlikely event of a core meltdown. The apparatus is basically a sacrificial bed system which includes an inverted conical funnel, a core debris receptacle including a spherical dome, a spherically layered bed of primarily magnesia bricks, a cooling system of zig-zag piping in graphite blocks about and below the bed and a cylindrical liner surrounding the graphite blocks including a steel shell surrounded by firebrick. Tantalum absorber rods are used in the receptacle and bed. 9 claims, 22 figures

  3. Preliminaries on core image analysis using fault drilling samples; Core image kaiseki kotohajime (danso kussaku core kaisekirei)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, T.; Ito, H. [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper introduces examples of image data analysis on fault drilling samples. The paper describes the following matters: core samples used in the analysis are those obtained from wells drilled piercing the Nojima fault which has moved in the Hygoken-Nanbu Earthquake; the CORESCAN system made by DMT Corporation, Germany, used in acquiring the image data consists of a CCD camera, a light source and core rotation mechanism, and a personal computer, its resolution being about 5 pixels/mm in both axial and circumferential directions, and 24-bit full color; with respect to the opening fractures in core samples collected by using a constant azimuth coring, it was possible to derive values of the opening width, inclination angle, and travel from the image data by using a commercially available software for the personal computer; and comparison of this core image with the BHTV record and the hydrophone VSP record (travel and inclination obtained from the BHTV record agree well with those obtained from the core image). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization régime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumberry, M.; Rivoldini, A.

    2014-04-01

    Geodetic observations provide insights about the interior structure of Mercury. In particular, they constrain the radius of the core-mantle boundary and on the bulk densities of the core and mantle [5, 3]. Here, we show that they also yield information about the radius of the inner core and on the crystallization regime in the liquid core. Recently, the MESSENGER spacecraft has measured Mercury's internally generated magnetic field and shown that the magnetic field is about two orders of magnitude smaller than Earth's [4]. Dynamo models that agree with those observations require a magnetic field that is driven by chemical convection and generated in a thin spherical shell located deep inside the fluid core that is overlain by a stable thermallystratified layer [1]. We have build models of Mercury that include a sub-adiabatic temperature profile in the upper part of the liquid core. In those models, the dominant light element inside the core is sulfur. Unlike the Earth, upon cooling the core adiabat may first cross the liquidus near the core-mantle boundary resulting in the precipitation of solid iron snow from the liquid Fe - FeS liquid alloy. Cooling extends the precipitation zone to greater depth and produces a stable compositional gradient [2]. Depending on the thermal state of the core the snow zone could extent to the inner core boundary. In that case the inner core would grow through the sedimentation of solid iron snow. If, somewhere below the snow layer, the temperature crosses the liquidus, then inner core growth will proceed in an Earth-like manner. Our study shows that models that best agree with recently measured geodesy observations (88 - day libration and polar moment of inertia) require an inner core that is not larger than 1325 ± 250km. If the inner core radius is smaller than about 650km they have an iron snow layer in the upper part of the fluid core, consistent with a deep seated dynamo. However, if the inner core radius is larger than about 650

  5. Investigating the relationship between k-core and s-core network decompositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidsaa, Marius; Almaas, Eivind

    2016-05-01

    Network decomposition methods, such as the much used k-core analysis, are able to identify globally central regions of networks. The decomposition approaches are hierarchical and identify nested sets of nodes with increasing centrality properties. While most studies have been concerned with unweighted networks, i.e. k-core analysis, recent works have introduced network decomposition methods that apply to weighted networks. Here, we investigate the relationship between k-core decomposition for unweighted networks and s-core decomposition for weighted networks by systematically employing a link-weight scheme that gradually discretizes the link weights. We applied this approach to the Erdős-Rényi model and the scale-free configuration model for five different weight distributions, and two empirical networks, the US air traffic network and a Facebook network. We find that (1) both uniformly random and positively correlated link-weight distributions give rise to highly stable s-core decompositions with respect to discretization levels. (2) For negatively correlated link-weight distributions, the resulting s-core decomposition has no similarity to the k-cores. Since several combinations of network topology and link-weight distributions give rise to a core-structure that is highly similar to the full s-core for a large range of link-discretization levels, it is possible to significantly speed up the numerical s-core analysis for these situations.

  6. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion: Dichotomy in the Dynamical Status of Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Goldsmith, P. F.; Li, D.; Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.; Peng, R.

    2009-01-01

    To study the evolution of high mass cores we have searched for evidence of collapse motions in a large sample of starless cores in the Orion molecular cloud. We used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain spectra of the optically thin (H13CO+) and optically thick (HCO+) high density tracer molecules in 27 cores with masses > 1 MO. The red- and blue-asymmetries seen in the line profiles of the optically thick line with respect to the optically thin line indicate that 2/3 of these cores are not static and we interpret these as evidence for inward or outward motions in 19 cores. We present RATRAN radiative transfer models of these cores that support the interpretation of inward and outward motion consistent with the observed spectral asymmetries. Thus we detect infall (inward motions) in 9 cores and outward motions for 10 cores, suggesting a dichotomy in the kinematic state in this sample. This population of massive molecular cloud cores is in general likely to be dynamic, out-of-equilibrium structures, rather than quasi-hydro/magneto-static structures. Our results provide an important observational constraint on the fraction of collapsing (inward motions) versus non-collapsing (re-expanding) cores for comparison with model simulations. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Research at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is supported by NSF grant AST-0229008.

  7. Burnup dependent core neutronic analysis for PBMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for core neutronics modeling is based on SCALE4.4 code KENOV.a module that uses Monte Carlo calculational methods. The calculations are based on detailed unit cell and detailed core modeling. The fuel pebble is thoroughly modeled by introducing unit cell modeling for the graphite matrix and the fuel kernels in the pebble. The core is then modeled by placing these pebbles randomly throughout the core, yet not loosing track of any one of them. For the burnup model, a cyclic manner is adopted by coupling the KENOV.a and ORIGEN-S modules. Shifting down one slice at each discrete time step, and inserting fresh fuel from the top, this cyclic calculation model continues until equilibrium burnup cycle is achieved. (author)

  8. Power peakings in mixed TRIGA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka; Ravnik, Matjaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division F-8, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si

    2006-07-01

    Power distribution in the reactor core is normally calculated by the diffusion codes (e.g. TRIGLAV package) in 2-D approximation. Diffusion codes normally treat the fuel rods and surrounding water as homogeneous regions called unit cells. Modern Monte-Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of the power density distribution in 3-D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. The power density distribution (and its maximum value - the peaking) can be calculated 'point-wise' with the resolution of approximately 1 mm. Results of the detailed power density distribution calculated by MCNP are presented for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor, assuming various realistic and hypothetical core loading patterns with focus on the mixed cores. Combinations of 8.5 w/o, 12 w/o and 20 w/o low enriched (20 %) TRIGA fuel elements are systematically treated in the mixed cores. (author)

  9. NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Core Facility was created under the auspices of the Office of the Scientific Director to provide high-end mass-spectrometric...

  10. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply...

  11. Core graduate courses: A missed learning opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha; Maries, Alexandru

    2013-01-01

    An important goal of graduate physics core courses is to help students develop expertise in problem solving and improve their reasoning and meta-cognitive skills. We explore the conceptual difficulties of physics graduate students by administering conceptual problems on topics covered in undergraduate physics courses before and after instruction in related first year core graduate courses. Here, we focus on physics graduate students' difficulties manifested by their performance on two qualitative problems involving diagrammatic representation of vector fields. Some graduate students had great difficulty in recognizing whether the diagrams of the vector fields had divergence and/or curl but they had no difficulty computing the divergence and curl of the vector fields mathematically. We also conducted individual discussions with various faculty members who regularly teach first year graduate physics core courses about the goals of these courses and the performance of graduate students on the conceptual problems after related instruction in core courses.

  12. Inquiry, New Literacies, and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Bridget

    2014-01-01

    For 21st century learning, students need to be well versed in techniques for inquiry using new literacies. Developing these skills also will meet the rigorous expectations of the Common Core State Standards.

  13. Microprocessor-based integrated LMFBR core surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report results from a joint study of KfK and INTERATOM. The aim of this study is to explore the advantages of microprocessors and microelectronics for a more sophisticated core surveillance, which is based on the integration of separate surveillance techniques. Due to new developments in microelectronics and related software an approach to LMFBR core surveillance can be conceived that combines a number of measurements into a more intelligent decision-making data processing system. The following techniques are considered to contribute essentially to an integrated core surveillance system: - subassembly state and thermal hydraulics performance monitoring, - temperature noise analysis, - acoustic core surveillance, - failure characterization and failure prediction based on DND- and cover gas signals, and - flux tilting techniques. Starting from a description of these techniques it is shown that by combination and correlation of these individual techniques a higher degree of cost-effectiveness, reliability and accuracy can be achieved. (orig./GL)

  14. Bioinformatics and Computational Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE COMPUTER CORE FACILITY Evaluation, purchase, set up, and maintenance of the computer hardware and network for the 170 users in the research...

  15. Continuous greenhouse gas measurements from ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stowasser, Christopher

    -consuming and labor-intensive. This PhD thesis presents the development of a new method for measurements of greenhouse gas mixing ratios from ice cores based on a melting device of a continuous flow analysis (CFA) system. The coupling to a CFA melting device enables time-efficient measurements of high resolution......Ice cores offer the unique possibility to study the history of past atmospheric greenhouse gases over the last 800,000 years, since past atmospheric air is trapped in bubbles in the ice. Since the 1950s, paleo-scientists have developed a variety of techniques to extract the trapped air from...... several applications of the new continuous data sets: (1) Past atmospheric mixing ratios of methane were measured along ca. 800 m of the deep ice core from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Core Drilling project (NEEM) covering almost the complete last glaciation and deglaciation. The record reveals new sub...

  16. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  17. Extracting the Cores of Implicit Communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Nan; LIN Songxiang; GAO Qiang

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we improve the trawling and point out some communities missed by trawling. We use the DBG (Dense Bipartite Graph) to identify a structure of a potential community instead of CBG (Complete Bipartite Graph). Based on DBG, we proposed a new method based on edge removal to extract cores from a web graph. Moreover, we improve the crawler to save only potential pages as fans of a core and save a lot of disk storage space. To evaluate the set of cores whether or not belong to a community, the statistics of term frequency is used. In the paper,the dataset of experiment were crawled under domain ".cn". The result show that the our algorithm works properly and some new cores can be found by our method.

  18. A core alternative[Heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, R.H. [Chart Heat Exchangers, Wisconsin (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The development of the efficient Core-in-kettle heat exchangers by Chart Heat Exchangers as an alternative to shell and tube exchangers is reported, and its use as condensers and reboilers in ethylene plants and refrigerant condensers and chillers in natural gas processing and liquid natural gas (LNG) plants are discussed. The novel technology is described with details given of the replacement of the tube bundle with a Chart brazed aluminium plate-fin heat exchanger core, the operation of the exchanger, the savings achieved by installing these heat exchangers in new or existing plants, and Core-in-Kettle retrofits of existing shell and tube heat exchangers. The limitations of the use of Core-in-Kettle heat exchangers to clean fluids typical of hydrocarbon processing, and temperature and pressure limitations are noted.

  19. Emergence of core-peripheries in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Verma, T; Araújo, N A M; Nagler, J; Herrmann, H J

    2016-01-01

    A number of important transport networks, such as the airline and trade networks of the world, exhibit a characteristic core-periphery structure, wherein a few nodes are highly interconnected and the rest of the network frays into a tree. Mechanisms underlying the emergence of core-peripheries, however, remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that a simple pruning process based on removal of underutilized links and redistribution of loads can lead to the emergence of core-peripheries. Links are assumed beneficial if they either carry a sufficiently large load or are essential for global connectivity. This incentivized redistribution process is controlled by a single parameter which balances connectivity and profit. The obtained networks exhibit a highly resilient and connected core with a frayed periphery. The balanced network shows a higher resilience than the World Airline Network or the World Trade Network, revealing a pathway towards robust structural features through pruning.

  20. Ferrofluid-based Stretchable Magnetic Core Inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic materials are commonly used in inductor and transformer cores to increase inductance density. The emerging field of stretchable electronics poses a new challenge since typical magnetic cores are bulky, rigid and often brittle. This paper presents, for the first time, stretchable inductors incorporating ferrofluid as a liquid magnetic core. Ferrofluids, suspensions of nanoscale magnetic particles in a carrier liquid, provide enhanced magnetic permeability without changing the mechanical properties of the surrounding elastomer. The inductor tested in this work consisted of a liquid metal solenoid wrapped around a ferrofluid core in separate channels. The low frequency inductance was found to increase from 255 nH before fill to 390 nH after fill with ferrofluid, an increase of 52%. The inductor was also shown to survive uniaxial strains of up to 100%.

  1. Geophysical implications of a decentered inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Vamos, Calin

    2014-01-01

    In a first approximation, the Earth's interior has an isotropic structure with a spherical symmetry. Over the last decades the geophysical observations have revealed, at different spatial scales, the existence of several perturbations from this basic structure. In this paper we discuss the hemispheric perturbations induced to this basic structure if the inner core is displaced from the center of mass of the Earth. Using numerical simulations of the observed hemispheric asymmetry of the seismic waves traveling through the upper inner core, with faster arrival times and higher attenuation in the Eastern Hemisphere, we estimate that the present position of the inner core is shifted by tens of kilometers from the Earth's center eastward in the equatorial plane. If the only forces acting on the inner core were the gravitational forces, then its equilibrium position would be at the Earth's center and the estimated displacement would not be possible. We conjecture that, due to interactions with the flow and the magn...

  2. Core inflation indicators for Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhareif Ryadh M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs and analyzes core inflation indicators for Saudi Arabia for the period of March 2012 to May 2014 using two alternative approaches: the exclusion method (ex food and housing/rent and the statistical method. The findings of the analysis suggest that the ex food and housing/ rent inflation is more volatile than the overall CPI inflation over the sample period. In contrast, the statistical core inflation is relatively more stable and less volatile. Moreover, the ex food and housing/rent inflation is only weakly correlated with headline inflation, whereas the statistical core inflation exhibits a stronger correlation. This combination of lower volatility and higher correlation with headline inflation makes the statistical method a much better choice for policymakers. From a monetary policy standpoint, using a bundle of core inflation measures, including both properly constructed exclusion and statistical methods, is more desirable, especially when variation across measures is widespread, as is the case in Saudi Arabia.

  3. NICHD Microscopy and Imaging Core (MIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NICHD Microscopy and Imaging Core (MIC) is designed as a multi-user research facility providing training and instrumentation for high resolution microscopy and...

  4. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A; Labis, Joselito Puzon; ALOthman, Zeid A; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  5. Design, synthesis and applications of core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle multifunctional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Toni, Ahmed Mohamed; Habila, Mohamed A.; Labis, Joselito Puzon; Alothman, Zeid A.; Alhoshan, Mansour; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    With the evolution of nanoscience and nanotechnology, studies have been focused on manipulating nanoparticle properties through the control of their size, composition, and morphology. As nanomaterial research has progressed, the foremost focus has gradually shifted from synthesis, morphology control, and characterization of properties to the investigation of function and the utility of integrating these materials and chemical sciences with the physical, biological, and medical fields, which therefore necessitates the development of novel materials that are capable of performing multiple tasks and functions. The construction of multifunctional nanomaterials that integrate two or more functions into a single geometry has been achieved through the surface-coating technique, which created a new class of substances designated as core-shell nanoparticles. Core-shell materials have growing and expanding applications due to the multifunctionality that is achieved through the formation of multiple shells as well as the manipulation of core/shell materials. Moreover, core removal from core-shell-based structures offers excellent opportunities to construct multifunctional hollow core architectures that possess huge storage capacities, low densities, and tunable optical properties. Furthermore, the fabrication of nanomaterials that have the combined properties of a core-shell structure with that of a hollow one has resulted in the creation of a new and important class of substances, known as the rattle core-shell nanoparticles, or nanorattles. The design strategies of these new multifunctional nanostructures (core-shell, hollow core, and nanorattle) are discussed in the first part of this review. In the second part, different synthesis and fabrication approaches for multifunctional core-shell, hollow core-shell and rattle core-shell architectures are highlighted. Finally, in the last part of the article, the versatile and diverse applications of these nanoarchitectures in

  6. Theories and core principles of Dutch democracy

    OpenAIRE

    Michels, Ank

    2007-01-01

    Democracies in Europe differ in what they see as being at the core of the democratic system. In some countries, citizen participation constitutes the fundamental tenet of democracy; in others, democracy is closely linked to pluralism and the protection of minorities. This paper tries to identify certain core principles of the Dutch democratic system that are reflected in the institutions and political culture that have to come to define the democratic system and are derived from the intellect...

  7. Multi-core processors - An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Venu, Balaji

    2011-01-01

    Microprocessors have revolutionized the world we live in and continuous efforts are being made to manufacture not only faster chips but also smarter ones. A number of techniques such as data level parallelism, instruction level parallelism and hyper threading (Intel's HT) already exists which have dramatically improved the performance of microprocessor cores. This paper briefs on evolution of multi-core processors followed by introducing the technology and its advantages in today's world. The...

  8. Porous-core honeycomb bandgap THz fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Jepsen, Peter Uhd;

    2011-01-01

    In this Letter we propose a novel (to our knowledge) porous-core honeycomb bandgap design. The holes of the porous core are the same size as the holes in the surrounding cladding, thereby giving the proposed fiber important manufacturing benefits. The fiber is shown to have a 0:35-THz......-wide fundamental bandgap centered at 1:05 THz. The calculated minimum loss of the fiber is 0:25 dB=cm....

  9. Promoting Diversity in the Core Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Person, M.

    2011-01-01

    Diversity is encouraged to counter historical bias against a variety of groups and has emerged as a positive attribute of the workplace. However, among pressing economic and scientific outcome pressures, issues not tied to measurable rewards are often overlooked in the core facility. This poster will present an overview of diversity issues and strategies relevant to core facilities. The variety of types of diversity is discussed, including sex, race, ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic back...

  10. Turbofan engine core noise source diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchmer, Allen M.

    1987-01-01

    The paper describes a turbofan-engine measurement program utilizing a variety of diagnostic techniques to identify a source of core-generated noise which contributes to the overall external engine noise characteristics. Included in the turbofan engine diagnostics are data examination, time domain correlation, and frequency domain analysis. It is found that the turbulent pressure fluctuations within the combustor are a source for core noise which propagates through the nozzle and radiates to the far-field.

  11. Distributed Memory Programming on Many-Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthold, Jost; Dieterle, Mischa; Lobachev, Oleg;

    2009-01-01

    is tailored to networks of workstations. Recent work has shown that this implementation shows surprisingly competitive performance on many-core machines, compared to dedicated shared-memory implementations of parallel Haskell. In the paper we describe a case study with different Eden divide......-and-conquer skeletons. We analyse their performance comparing example applications implemented using these Eden skeletons against parallel Haskell implementations using shared memory on many-core machines...

  12. Core biopsies of the breast: Diagnostic pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Megha Joshi; Sriharshan J Reddy; Manjiri Nanavidekar; John P Russo; Armand V Russo; Ram Pathak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In this review article, the authors compare and contrast the incidence of breast cancer, and the inherent differences in the United States (US) and India in screening techniques used for diagnosing breast cancer. In spite of these differences, core biopsies of the breast are common for diagnosis of breast cancer in both countries. The authors describe "Best Practices" in the reporting and processing of core biopsies and in the analysis o...

  13. Mode characteristics of hollow core Bragg fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minning Ji; Zhidong Shi; Qiang Guo

    2005-01-01

    Analytical expression to calculate propagation constant and mode field of the hollow core Bragg fiber is derived. Numerical results are presented. It is shown that the fundamental mode of the hollow core Bragg fiber is circularly symmetric TE01 mode with no polarization degeneracy, while the higher order mode may be HE11, TM01, or TE02 etc.. This property is different from conventional optical fiber that its fundamental mode is the linearly polarized HE11 mode and is polarization degeneracy.

  14. Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gat, U.; Grindell, A.G.

    1979-01-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) is the out-of-pile thermohydraulic and structural test bed for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies. The assemblies are simulated with appropriately configured bundles of electrically heated rods called fuel and blanket rod simulators (FRS and BRS). The FRS and BRS which simulate accurately the GCFR fuel and blanket rods from the cladding outward have internal thermocouples to measure the cladding temperaure.

  15. LMFR core thermohydraulics: Status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the fundamental steps for a successful reactor core thermohydraulic design is the capability to predict, reliably and accurately, the temperature distribution in the core assemblies. A detailed knowledge of the assembly and fuel pin thermohydraulic behaviour in the steady state and transient conditions is an indispensable prerequisite to safe and stable operation of the reactor. Considerable experimental and theoretical studies on various aspects of LMFR core thermohydraulics are necessary to acquire such knowledge. During the last decade, there have been substantial advances in fast reactor core thermohydraulic design and operation in several countries with fast reactor programmes (notably in France, the Russian Federation, Japan, the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States of America). Chief among these has been the demonstration of reliable operation of reactor cores at a high burnup. During the last years, some additional countries such as China, India and the Republic of Korea have launched new fast reactor programmes. International exchange of information and experience on LMFR development including core thermohydraulic design is becoming of increasing importance to these countries. It is with this focus that the IAEA convened the Technical Committee on 'Methods and Codes for Calculations of Thermohydraulic Parameters for Fuel, Absorber Pins and Assemblies of LMFR's with Traditional and Burner Cores'. This meeting, attended by participants from seven countries, brought together a group of international experts to review and discuss the thermohydraulic advances and design approaches providing a reliable, safe and robust reactor core, as well as to exchange the experience accumulated in different countries of using the codes for thermohydraulic calculations and to discuss the issues requiring further research and development. A total of thirty technical papers presented covered theoretical and computational issues as well as experiments under

  16. Engineered inorganic core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mélinon, Patrice, E-mail: patrice.melinon@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Léon Brillouin, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Begin-Colin, Sylvie [IPCMS et OMNT, 23 rue du Loess BP 43, 67034 STRASBOURG Cedex 2 (France); Duvail, Jean Luc [IMN UMR 6502 et OMNT Campus Sciences : 2 rue de la Houssinire, BP32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex3 (France); Gauffre, Fabienne [SPM et OMNT : Institut des sciences chimiques de Rennes - UMR 6226, 263 Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 74205, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Boime, Nathalie Herlin [IRAMIS-NIMBE, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (CEA CNRS URA 2453) et OMNT, Bat 522, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Ledoux, Gilles [Institut Lumière Matière Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 et CNRS et OMNT, Domaine Scientifique de la Doua, Bâtiment Alfred Kastler 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918 F 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Plain, Jérôme [Universit de technologie de Troyes LNIO-ICD, CNRS et OMNT 12 rue Marie Curie - CS 42060 - 10004 Troyes cedex (France); Reiss, Peter [CEA Grenoble, INAC-SPrAM, UMR 5819 CEA-CNRS-UJF et OMNT, Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Silly, Fabien [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, TITANS, CNRS 2464 et OMNT, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [CEMES-CNRS, Université de Toulouse et OMNT, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig F 31055 Toulouse (France)

    2014-10-20

    It has been for a long time recognized that nanoparticles are of great scientific interest as they are effectively a bridge between bulk materials and atomic structures. At first, size effects occurring in single elements have been studied. More recently, progress in chemical and physical synthesis routes permitted the preparation of more complex structures. Such structures take advantages of new adjustable parameters including stoichiometry, chemical ordering, shape and segregation opening new fields with tailored materials for biology, mechanics, optics magnetism, chemistry catalysis, solar cells and microelectronics. Among them, core/shell structures are a particular class of nanoparticles made with an inorganic core and one or several inorganic shell layer(s). In earlier work, the shell was merely used as a protective coating for the core. More recently, it has been shown that it is possible to tune the physical properties in a larger range than that of each material taken separately. The goal of the present review is to discuss the basic properties of the different types of core/shell nanoparticles including a large variety of heterostructures. We restrict ourselves on all inorganic (on inorganic/inorganic) core/shell structures. In the light of recent developments, the applications of inorganic core/shell particles are found in many fields including biology, chemistry, physics and engineering. In addition to a representative overview of the properties, general concepts based on solid state physics are considered for material selection and for identifying criteria linking the core/shell structure and its resulting properties. Chemical and physical routes for the synthesis and specific methods for the study of core/shell nanoparticle are briefly discussed.

  17. Calculation of mixed core safety parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this presentation is the reactor physics explanation of the most important nuclear safety parameters in mixed TRIGA cores as well as their calculation methods and appropriate computer codes. Nuclear core parameters, such as power density peaking factors and temperature reactivity coefficients are considered. The computer codes adapted, tested and widely available for TRIGA nuclear calculations are presented. Thermal-hydraulics aspects of safety analysis are not treated

  18. Synthesis of dehydrobenzoannulenes with pyrene core

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Antony Joseph; Gandikota Venkataramana; Sethuraman Sankararaman

    2012-05-01

    Synthesis of dehydrobenzoannulenes (DBAs) with pyrene core from 1,8-diethynylpyrene and 1,3,6,8-tetraethynylpyrene as building blocks is reported. A sequence involving Sonogashira coupling, Corey- Fuchs reaction and oxidative coupling (Eglinton coupling) is used for the synthesis of pyrene-based dehydrobenzoannulenes. Due to the presence of pyrenechromophore these DBAs and their precursors are highly fluorescent and emit in the visible region, due to extended conjugation of the acetylenic units with the pyrene core.

  19. Ultrafast nanomagnetic toggle switching of vortex cores

    OpenAIRE

    Hertel, R.; Gliga, S.; Fähnle, M.; Schneider, C. M.

    2007-01-01

    We present an ultrafast route for a controlled, toggle switching of magnetic vortex cores with ultrashort unipolar magnetic field pulses. The switching process is found to be largely insensitive to extrinsic parameters, like sample size and shape, and it is faster than any field-driven magnetization reversal process previously known from micromagnetic theory. Micromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the vortex core reversal is mediated by a rapid sequence of vortex-antivortex pair creation ...

  20. Power peakings in mixed TRIGA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka [Reactor Physics Division, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si; Ravnik, Matjaz [Reactor Physics Division, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-09-15

    Modern Monte-Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of the power density distribution in 3D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. The power density distribution (and its maximum value-the peaking) can be calculated 'point-wise' with the resolution of approximately 1 mm. Results of the detailed power density distribution calculated by MCNP are presented for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor, assuming various realistic and hypothetical core-loading patterns with focus on the mixed cores. Combinations of 8.5 w/o, 12 w/o, 20 w/o and 30 w/o low-enriched (20%) fresh TRIGA fuel rods are systematically treated in the mixed cores. The power peaking factor value and position strongly depends on the core configuration. Power peakings are usually found in fuel rods with higher uranium content especially if they are inserted near the core centre. The results are conservative and can be applied in planning realistic mixed core-loading patterns.

  1. Power Peaking Factors in Mixed TRIGA cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka; Ravnik, Matjaz [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-10-29

    Modern Monte-Carlo codes (e.g. MCNP) allow calculation of the power density distribution in 3-D geometry assuming detailed geometry without unit-cell homogenization. The power density distribution (and its maximum value - the peaking) can be calculated 'point-wise' with the resolution of approximately 1 mm. Results of the detailed power density distribution calculated by MCNP are presented for 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor, assuming various realistic and hypothetical core loading patterns with focus on the mixed cores. Combinations of 8.5 w/o, 12 w/o, 20 w/o and 30 w/o low enriched (20 %) fresh TRIGA fuel rods are systematically treated in the mixed cores. The power peaking factor value and position strongly depends on the core configuration. Power peaking are usually found in fuel rods with higher uranium content especially if they are inserted near the core centre. The results are conservative and can be applied in planning realistic mixed core loading patterns. (authors)

  2. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are ext.} = 0.70 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{ext.} = 1.70). Some discussions are also presented.

  3. Relaxed core projector-augmented-wave method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, M.; Kresse, G.

    2006-09-01

    We extend the full-potential projector-augmented-wave method beyond the frozen core approximation, i.e., include the self-consistent optimization of the core charge density, in such a manner that the valence wave functions remain orthogonal to the core. The method consists of an on-the-fly repseudization of the all-electron problem, solving for the self-consistent core charge density within a spherical approximation. The key ideas in our procedure are to keep the projector functions fixed throughout the electronic minimization and to derive the new pseudopartial waves from these original projector functions, at each step of the electronic minimization procedure. Results of relaxed core calculations for atomic interconfigurational energies, structural energy differences between bulk phases of Fe, atomization energies of a subset of Pople's G2-1 set, and the Rh 3d surface core level shifts for the (√3 ×√3 )-Rh(111) surface at 1/3 CO coverage are presented.

  4. Hybrid Analysis of Engine Core Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jeffrey; Kim, Jeonglae; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Core noise, or the noise generated within an aircraft engine, is becoming an increasing concern for the aviation industry as other noise sources are progressively reduced. The prediction of core noise generation and propagation is especially challenging for computationalists since it involves extensive multiphysics including chemical reaction and moving blades in addition to the aerothermochemical effects of heated jets. In this work, a representative engine flow path is constructed using experimentally verified geometries to simulate the physics of core noise. A combustor, single-stage turbine, nozzle and jet are modeled in separate calculations using appropriate high fidelity techniques including LES, actuator disk theory and Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings surfaces. A one way coupling procedure is developed for passing fluctuations downstream through the flowpath. This method effectively isolates the core noise from other acoustic sources, enables straightforward study of the interaction between core noise and jet exhaust, and allows for simple distinction between direct and indirect noise. The impact of core noise on the farfield jet acoustics is studied extensively and the relative efficiency of different disturbance types and shapes is examined in detail.

  5. ACGME core competencies: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaszay, Burt; Kubiak, Erik; Agel, Julie; Hanel, Douglas P

    2009-03-01

    Beginning in July 2002, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) instructed all residency programs to require their residents to demonstrate competency in 6 core areas: patient care, interpersonal and communication skills, medical knowledge, professionalism, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice. The goal was to have objective markers of performance that would serve as a gauge to determine a program's accreditation. To determine the experiences of orthopedic residency programs with regard to the ACGME's core competencies, a national survey was administered to orthopedic program directors and selected orthopedic residents. Of those orthopedic programs that responded, most appeared to be complying with the ACGME requirements. Both directors and residents thought patient care and medical knowledge ranked most important, while practice-based learning and systems-based practice were assigned the lowest ranks. Barriers to implementation of the core competencies included low priority compared with clinical duties, lack of faculty or resident education, and lack of formal orthopedic core competencies. Residents and program directors agreed that their programs would benefit from a definition of each of the core competencies, including a greater commitment to the processes involved in surgical procedures. This study demonstrated a commitment to the core competencies by the programs that responded. The survey also suggested this commitment would be aided by improved definitions of some of the competencies for the orthopedic resident.

  6. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  7. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant. PMID:27174910

  8. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training. PMID:25416701

  9. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training.

  10. An innovative optical and chemical drill core scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Sjöqvist, A. S. L.; M. Arthursson; A. Lundström; Calderón Estrada, E.; Inerfeldt, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a new innovative drill core scanner that semi-automatedly analyses drill cores directly in drill core trays with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, without the need for much sample preparation or operator intervention. The instrument is fed with entire core trays, which are photographed at high resolution and scanned by a 3-D profiling laser. Algorithms recognise the geometry of the core tray, number of slots, location of the drill cores, calculate the optimal scanning path, and exe...

  11. EFFECT OF DIVIDED CORE ON THE BENDING PERFORMANCES OF TEXTILE REINFORCED FOAM CORE SANDWICH COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALPYILDIZ Tuba

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich composites are generally used in marine applications, wind turbines, space and aircraft vehicles due to their high bending rigidities in addition to their lighter weights. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of divided foam core and interlayer sheet of glass fabric on the bending performances of sandwich composites which are manufactured with glass fabrics as the facesheets/interlayer sheets and PVC foam as the core material. Sandwich composites with single and divided core are manufactured and compared in terms of flexural behavious via three point bending tests. It is found that the bending performance is enhanced with the use of divided core and using divided core does not affect the behaviour of the sandwich composite against bending deformations. In the case of the plain core sandwich composite, dividing the core is advised for certain applications rather than perforating the core to increase the bending stiffness and strength of the textile reinforced sandwich composites because it is possible to purchase core with any thickness and there is no need for additional process such as perforation. The proposed application could enhance the bending performances without altering the weight and cost of the sandwich composites, which are preferred due to their higher bending rigidities in relation to their lighter weights.

  12. Hollow-core tapered coupler for large inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiyao Zhou(周桂耀); Zhiyun Hou(侯峙云); Lantian Hou(侯蓝田); Jigang Liu(刘继刚)

    2003-01-01

    A novel hollow-core tapered coupler has been theoretically designed and fabricated by fiber drawing machine. The coupler's inner wall is coated with a polycrystalline GeO2 film. The coupling loss of hollow-core tapered coupler is about 0.2 dB. Hollow-core tapered coupler reduces the transmission loss of hollow-core optical fiber (HCOF) by 0.5 dB/m, therefore the coupler is suitable for coupling high power CO2 laser in industrial application.

  13. The Effect of Inner Core Translation on Outer Core Flow and the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mound, J. E.; Davies, C. J.; Silva, L.

    2015-12-01

    Bulk translation of the inner core has been proposed to explain quasi-hemispheric patterns of seismic heterogeneity. Such a translation would result in differential melting and freezing at the inner core boundary (ICB) and hence a heterogeneous pattern of buoyancy flux that could influence convection in the outer core. This heterogeneous flux at the ICB will tend to promote upwelling on the trailing hemisphere, where enhanced inner core growth results in increased latent heat and light element release, and inhibit upwelling on the leading hemisphere, where melting of the inner core occurs. If this difference in convective driving between the two hemispheres propagated across the thickness of the outer core, then flows near the surface of the core could be linked to the ICB heterogeneity and result in a hemispheric imbalance in the geomagnetic field. We have investigated the influence of such ICB boundary conditions on core flows and magnetic field structure in numerical geodynamo models and analysed the resultant hemispheric imbalance relative to the hemispheric structure in models constructed from observations of Earth's field. Inner core translation at rates consistent with estimates for the Earth produce a strong hemispheric bias in the field, one that should be readily apparent in averages of the field over tens of thousands of years. Current models of the field over the Holocene may be able to rule out the most extreme ICB forcing scenarios, but more information on the dynamic structure of the field over these time scales will be needed to adequately test all cases.

  14. Experience with the BEACON core monitoring and support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse has developed an advanced operational core monitoring and support package called BEACON which uses current instrumentation in conjunction with a fully analytical methodology for on-line generation of 3-D power distributions. The system provides core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. The heart of the system is a very fast and accurate three dimensional nodal code which is used for core monitoring, simulation, and predictions. The system has been installed at several sites, and extensive feedback has been obtained. A number of tests have been performed for the validation of the BEACON system for core monitoring and core predictions

  15. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the one-twelfth grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  16. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato; Richard R. Schultz

    2010-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is exploring the potential for the VHTR which will be either of a prismatic or a pebble-bed type. One important design consideration for the reactor core of a prismatic VHTR is coolant bypass flow which occurs in the interstitial regions between fuel blocks. Such gaps are an inherent presence in the reactor core because of tolerances in manufacturing the blocks and the inexact nature of their installation. Furthermore, the geometry of the graphite blocks changes over the lifetime of the reactor because of thermal expansion and irradiation damage. The existence of the gaps induces a flow bias in the fuel blocks and results in unexpected increase of maximum fuel temperature. Traditionally, simplified methods such as flow network calculations employing experimental correlations are used to estimate flow and temperature distributions in the core design. However, the distribution of temperature in the fuel pins and graphite blocks as well as coolant outlet temperatures are strongly coupled with the local heat generation rate within fuel blocks which is not uniformly distributed in the core. Hence, it is crucial to establish mechanistic based methods which can be applied to the reactor core thermal hydraulic design and safety analysis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes, which have a capability of local physics based simulation, are widely used in various industrial fields. This study investigates core bypass flow phenomena with the assistance of commercial CFD codes and establishes a baseline for evaluation methods. A one-twelfth sector of the hexagonal block surface is modeled and extruded down to whole core length of 10.704m. The computational domain is divided vertically with an upper reflector, a fuel section and a lower reflector. Each side of the sector grid can be set as a symmetry boundary

  17. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  18. The Earth's Inner Core: a Black Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's inner core continues to provoke interest and interaction among various disciplines within the deep Earth scientific community for many reasons, including the following: i) The phase diagram of iron and its alloys at high pressures and temperatures is still in a state of investigation, and several crystalographic phases of iron and/or their aggregates have been proposed to be stable at inner core conditions. Seismological datasets have increased in size, but there is a serious trade-off between isotropic and anisotropic velocity structure. This is further exacerbated by the non-uniqueness of the inverse problem in which travel time data are modeled by volumetric changes in isotropic/anisotropic structure. These datasets are nevertheless invaluable, and their further growth through receiver installations in remote regions will further constrain this problem. ii) Radial and lateral variations in inner core structure have been intensively studied and confirmed, both in terms of velocity and attenuation. Studying the latter is complicated since another trade-off exists - that between the viscoelastic and scattering origin of attenuation. There is an ongoing debate about the existence of the innermost inner core and the geodynamical mechanism responsible for the seismologically observed east-west dichotomy in isotropic velocity. The growing travel time and waveform datasets, both from individual stations and arrays, hold the key to solving these problems. iii) The growth mechanism of the inner core is in dispute; its age is still unknown, and it is not completely understood how its growing front crystallizes. The seismological datasets are arguably less potent in providing direct answers to this question. Nonetheless, there is some potential in studying the texture present in the outermost inner core, the velocity gradient at the bottom of the outer core, and the nature of the inner core boundary using waveform simulations and the coda of the seismic phases

  19. Water Abundance in Molecular Cloud Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Snell, R L; Ashby, M L N; Bergin, E A; Chin, G; Erickson, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Harwit, M; Kleiner, S C; Koch, D G; Neufeld, D A; Patten, B M; Plume, R; Schieder, R; Stauffer, J R; Tolls, V; Wang, Z; Winnewisser, G; Zhang, Y F; Melnick, G J

    2000-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS) observations of the 1_{10}-1_{01} transition of ortho-water at 557 GHz toward 12 molecular cloud cores. The water emission was detected in NGC 7538, Rho Oph A, NGC 2024, CRL 2591, W3, W3(OH), Mon R2, and W33, and was not detected in TMC-1, L134N, and B335. We also present a small map of the water emission in S140. Observations of the H_2^{18}O line were obtained toward S140 and NGC 7538, but no emission was detected. The abundance of ortho-water relative to H_2 in the giant molecular cloud cores was found to vary between 6x10^{-10} and 1x10^{-8}. Five of the cloud cores in our sample have previous water detections; however, in all cases the emission is thought to arise from hot cores with small angular extents. The water abundance estimated for the hot core gas is at least 100 times larger than in the gas probed by SWAS. The most stringent upper limit on the ortho-water abundance in dark clouds is provided in TMC-1, where the 3-sigma upper limit on the ...

  20. Simulating an Exploding Fission-Bomb Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Cameron

    2016-03-01

    A time-dependent desktop-computer simulation of the core of an exploding fission bomb (nuclear weapon) has been developed. The simulation models a core comprising a mixture of two isotopes: a fissile one (such as U-235) and an inert one (such as U-238) that captures neutrons and removes them from circulation. The user sets the enrichment percentage and scattering and fission cross-sections of the fissile isotope, the capture cross-section of the inert isotope, the number of neutrons liberated per fission, the number of ``initiator'' neutrons, the radius of the core, and the neutron-reflection efficiency of a surrounding tamper. The simulation, which is predicated on ordinary kinematics, follows the three-dimensional motions and fates of neutrons as they travel through the core. Limitations of time and computer memory render it impossible to model a real-life core, but results of numerous runs clearly demonstrate the existence of a critical mass for a given set of parameters and the dramatic effects of enrichment and tamper efficiency on the growth (or decay) of the neutron population. The logic of the simulation will be described and results of typical runs will be presented and discussed.

  1. Dark matter cores all the way down

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Collins, M L M

    2015-01-01

    We use high resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformation at the edge of galaxy formation (Mvir = 10^7 - 10^9 Msun). We work at a resolution (4 pc) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical 'sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the half light radius r_1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyrs for the Mvir =10^8 Msun and 14 Gyrs for the 10^9 Msun dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter 'coreNFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected half light radius. Our results have se...

  2. Blue straggler formation at core collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2016-01-01

    Among the most striking feature of blue straggler stars (BSS) is the presence of multiple sequences of BSSs in the colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of several globular clusters. It is often envisaged that such a multiple BSS sequence would arise due a recent core collapse of the host cluster, triggering a number of stellar collisions and binary mass transfers simultaneously over a brief episode of time. Here we examine this scenario using direct N-body computations of moderately massive star clusters (of order 10^4 Msun ). As a preliminary attempt, these models are initiated with approx. 8-10 Gyr old stellar population and King profiles of high concentrations, being "tuned" to undergo core collapse quickly. BSSs are indeed found to form in a "burst" at the onset of the core collapse and several of such BS-bursts occur during the post-core-collapse phase. In those models that include a few percent primordial binaries, both collisional and binary BSSs form after the onset of the (near) core-collapse. However, t...

  3. Advanced Core Monitoring Framework: An overview description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant developments in nuclear power plant operations in recent years is the application of digital computers to monitor and manage power plant process. The introduction of this technology, moreover is not without its problems. At present each of these advanced core monitoring systems as GE's MONICORE, EXXON's POWERPLEX, EPRI's PSMS, etc., works only by itself in an operating configuration which makes it difficult to compare, benchmark or replace with alternative core monitoring packages. The Advanced Core Monitoring Framework (ACMF) was conceived to provide one standard software framework in a number of different virtual-memory mini-computers within which modules from any of the core monitoring systems (both BWR and PWR) could be installed. The primary theme of ACMF is to build a framework that allows software plug-in compatibility for a variety of core monitoring functional packages by carefully controlling (standardizing) module interfaces to a well-defined database and requiring a common man-machine interface to be installed

  4. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  5. Novel Fe-based amorphous magnetic powder cores with ultra-low core losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous magnetic alloy powders were prepared from bulk metallic glasses Fe74Cr2Mo2Sn2P10Si4B4C2 with supercooled liq-uid region of 32 K by water atomization.Amorphous magnetic powder core precursor was produced from a mixture of the amorphous alloy powder with addition of insulation and bonding materials by mold compacting at room temperature.After annealing the core precursor,the amorphous magnetic core exhibits superior magnetic properties as compared with molypermalloy powder core.The initial permeability up to 1 MHz was about 80,the flux density at 300 Oe was 1.06 T and the core loss at 100 kHz for Bm=0.1 T was only 329 kW/m3.The ultra-low core loss is attributed to the combination of relatively high resistivity and the amorphous structure of the Fe-based amorphous powder.Besides the outstanding magnetic properties,the Fe-based amorphous magnetic powder core had a much lower cost which renders the powder cores a potential candidate for a variety of industrial applications.

  6. 78 FR 56174 - In-Core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... the Federal Register (FR) on May 23, 2012 (77 FR 30435). The petitioner requested that the NRC amend...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 In-Core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Petition for...

  7. 77 FR 30435 - In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... assigned Docket ID PRM-50-84 (73 FR 71564; November 25, 2008). In addition, the petition states that the... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core... ``require all holders of operating licenses for nuclear power plants (``NPP'') to operate NPPs with...

  8. Wavelength-Dependence of Inter-Core Crosstalk in Homogeneous Multi-Core Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Takenaga, Katsuhiro;

    2016-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of inter-core crosstalk in homogeneous multi-core fibers (MCFs) is investigated, and the corresponding analytical expressions are derived. The derived analytical expressions can be used to determine the crosstalk at any wavelength necessary for designing future MCF...... wavelengthdivision multiplexing (MCF-WDM) networks and transmission systems....

  9. Optimal core acquisition and remanufacturing policies under uncertain core quality fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, Ruud H.; Flapper, Simme Douwe P.

    2011-01-01

    Cores acquired by a remanufacturer are typically highly variable in quality. Even if the expected fractions of the various quality levels are known, then the exact fractions when acquiring cores are still uncertain. Our model incorporates this uncertainty in determining optimal acquisition decisions

  10. Apple-CORE: harnessing general-purpose many-cores with hardware concurrency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Poss; M. Lankamp; Q. Yang; J. Fu; M.W. van Tol; I. Uddin; C. Jesshope

    2013-01-01

    To harness the potential of CMPs for scalable, energy-efficient performance in general-purpose computers, the Apple-CORE project has co-designed a general machine model and concurrency control interface with dedicated hardware support for concurrency management across multiple cores. Its SVP interfa

  11. Electromagnetically driven westward drift and inner-core superrotation in Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W.; Hollerbach, Rainer; Jackson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    A 3D numerical model of the earth’s core with a viscosity two orders of magnitude lower than the state of the art suggests a link between the observed westward drift of the magnetic field and superrotation of the inner core. In our model, the axial electromagnetic torque has a dominant influence only at the surface and in the deepest reaches of the core, where it respectively drives a broad westward flow rising to an axisymmetric equatorial jet and imparts an eastward-directed torque on the solid inner core. Subtle changes in the structure of the internal magnetic field may alter not just the magnitude but the direction of these torques. This not only suggests that the quasi-oscillatory nature of inner-core superrotation [Tkalčić H, Young M, Bodin T, Ngo S, Sambridge M (2013) The shuffling rotation of the earth’s inner core revealed by earthquake doublets. Nat Geosci 6:497–502.] may be driven by decadal changes in the magnetic field, but further that historical periods in which the field exhibited eastward drift were contemporaneous with a westward inner-core rotation. The model further indicates a strong internal shear layer on the tangent cylinder that may be a source of torsional waves inside the core. PMID:24043841

  12. Core Graduate Courses: A Missed Learning Opportunity?

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    An important goal of graduate physics core courses is to help students develop expertise in problem solving and improve their reasoning and meta-cognitive skills. We explore the conceptual difficulties of physics graduate students by administering conceptual problems on topics covered in undergraduate physics courses before and after instruction in related first year core graduate courses. Here, we focus on physics graduate students' difficulties manifested by their performance on two qualitative problems involving diagrammatic representation of vector fields. Some graduate students had great difficulty in recognizing whether the diagrams of the vector fields had divergence and/or curl but they had no difficulty computing the divergence and curl of the vector fields mathematically. We also conducted individual discussions with various faculty members who regularly teach first year graduate physics core courses about the goals of these courses and the performance of graduate students on the conceptual problems...

  13. Remanent magnetization stratigraphy of lunar cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S. K.; Gingrich, D.; Marvin, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Depth dependent fluctuations have been observed in the natural remanent magnetizations (NRM) of drive cores and drill strings from Apollo 16 and 17 missions. Partial demagnetization of unstable secondary magnetizations and identification of characteristic error signals from a core which is known to have been recently disturbed allow us to identify and isolate the stable NRM stratigraphy in double drive core 60010/60009 and drill strings 60002-60004. The observed magnetization fluctuations persist after normalization to take into account depth dependent variations in the carriers of stable NRM. We tentatively ascribe the stable NRM stratigraphy to instantaneous records of past magnetic fields at the lunar surface and suggest that the stable NRM stratigraphy technique could develop as a new relative time-stratigraphic tool, to be used with other physical measurements such as relative intensity of ferromagnetic resonance and charged particle track density to study the evolution of the lunar regolith.

  14. Tracing magnetic field orientation in starless cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswar, G.; Ramaprakash, A. N.; Lee, C. W.; Dib, S.

    It is now well understood that stars are formed in the interiors of dense, gravitationally bound molecular cloud cores that are both magnetized and turbulent. But the relative role played by the magnetic field and the turbulence in cloud formation and evolution and in the subsequent star formation is a matter of debate. In a magnetically dominated scenario, the magnetic field geometry of the cores is expected to be inherited unchanged from their low-density envelope, even for an hour glass geometry of the field, unless the action of turbulence disturbs it. We carried out polarimetry of stars projected on starless molecular clouds, LDN 183 and LDN 1544, in R-filter. The comparison of these fields with those in the interiors of the cloud cores inferred from the sub-mm polarization shows that both magnetic field and turbulence are important in the cloud formation and evolution of star formation.

  15. BWR core stability analysis with RETRAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A RETRAN model was developed for determining the stability of boiling water reactor. This model was benchmarked against plant data from stability tests conducted during plant operations. The stability analysis with RETRAN is demonstrated using best estimate RETRAN input data representative of the NSSS. All of the important neutronic and thermal hydraulic feedback mechanisms are taken into account through the modeling of the reactor vessel, recirculation loops and core neutronics. The analysis was performed with the RETRAN02 MOD003 computer code. The transient is initialized by a small step decrease in the steam dome pressure. The core exit (upper plenum) pressure and core power transient responses to this perturbation are transformed into frequency data and a system transfer function is then obtained. The system transfer function is fitted to a second order equation from which the decay ratio and natural frequency can be determined

  16. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  17. From DeepCore to PINGU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yáñez J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Very large volume neutrino telescopes (VLVNTs observe atmospheric neutrinos over a wide energy range (GeV to TeV, after they travel distances as large as the Earth's diameter. DeepCore, the low energy extension of IceCube, has started making meaningful measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters θ23 and | Δm232| by analyzing the atmospheric flux at energies above 10 GeV. PINGU, a proposed project to lower DeepCore's energy threshold, aims to use the same flux to further increase the precision with which these parameters are known, and eventually determine the sign of Δm232. The latest results from DeepCore, and the planned transition to PINGU, are discussed here.

  18. Stretchable inductor with liquid magnetic core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Adding magnetic materials is a well-established method for improving performance of inductors. However, traditional magnetic cores are rigid and poorly suited for the emerging field of stretchable electronics, where highly deformable inductors are used to wirelessly couple power and data signals. In this work, stretchable inductors are demonstrated based on the use of ferrofluids, magnetic liquids based on distributed magnetic particles, to create a compliant magnetic core. Using a silicone molding technique to create multi-layer fluidic channels, a liquid metal solenoid is fabricated around a ferrofluid channel. An analytical model is developed for the effects of mechanical strain, followed by experimental verification using two different ferrofluids with different permeabilities. Adding ferrofluid was found to increase the unstrained inductance by up to 280% relative to a similar inductor with a non-magnetic silicone core, while retaining the ability to survive uniaxial strains up to 100%.

  19. LANMAS core: Update and current directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local Area Network Material Accountability System (LANMAS) core software will provide the framework of a material accountability system. LANMAS is a network-based nuclear material accountability system. It tracks the movement of material throughout a site and generates the required reports on material accountability. LANMAS will run in a client/server mode. The database of material type and location will reside on the server, while the user interface runs on the client. The user interface accesses the server via a network. The LANMAS core can be used as the foundation for building required Materials Control and Accountability (MC ampersand A) functionality at any site requiring a new MC ampersand A system. An individual site will build on the LANMAS core by supplying site-specific software. This paper will provide an update on the current LANMAS development activities and discuss the current direction of the LANMAS project

  20. The Deuteration Clock for Massive Starless Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, S.; Tan, J. C.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2016-05-01

    To understand massive star formation requires study of its initial conditions. Two massive starless core candidates, C1-N & C1-S, have been detected in IRDC G028.37+00.07 in N2D+(3-2) with ALMA. From their line widths, either the cores are subvirial and are thus young structures on the verge of near free-fall collapse, or they are threaded by ˜1 mG B-fields that help support them in near virial equilibrium and potentially have older ages. We modeled the deuteration rate of N2H+ to constrain collapse rates of the cores. First, to measure their current deuterium fraction, D≡ [N2D+]/[N2H+], we observed multiple transitions of N2H+ and N2D+ with CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45 m and IRAM 30 m, to complement the ALMA data. For both cores we derived D ˜ 0.3, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. We then carried out chemodynamical modeling, exploring how collapse rate relative to free-fall, αff, affects the level of D that is achieved from a given initial condition. To reach the observed D, most models require slow collapse with αff˜0.1, i.e., ˜1/10th of free-fall. This makes it more likely that the cores have been able to reach a near virial equilibrium state and we predict that strong B-fields will eventually be detected. The methods developed here will be useful for measurement of the pre-stellar core mass function.

  1. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This

  2. Ice Chemistry in Starless Molecular Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvāns, J.

    2015-06-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during the core-collapse period is responsible for the high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of COMs. The observed abundance of methyl formate HCOOCH3 could be reproduced with a 1 kyr, 20 K temperature spike. Possible desorption mechanisms, relevant for COMs, are gas turbulence (ice exposure to interstellar photons) or a weak shock within the cloud core (grain collisions). To reproduce the observed COM abundances with the present 0D model, 1%-10% of ice mass needs to be sublimated. We estimate that the lifetime for starless cores likely does not exceed 1 Myr. Taurus cores are likely to be younger than their counterparts in most other clouds.

  3. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be

  4. Core 2 Duo与Core Duo处理器的比试

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    huhu

    2006-01-01

    Intel最新推出的Core2 Duo桌面处理器已经成为目前市场上关注率最高的产品,对应的移动处理器,同样采用Core 2 Duo命名。移动Core 2 Duo显然不如它的桌面兄弟知名度高,有两个因素:Core Duo的Yonah已经很强;没有来自AMD同类产品的竞争,Intel对这款移动用途Core 2 Duo的宣传力度不大。

  5. The comparison of warm-core and cold-core designs of iron-cored HTS inductors for electric power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An iron-cored high-temperature superconductor (HTS) inductor has to be cooled for superconducting operation. By design, it can be either warm-cored or cold-cored. A warm cored HTS inductor has only the winding cooled in the cryostat, while a cold-cored one has both the winding and the iron-core cooled in the cryostat. Each design has its own advantages and disadvantages. By analysing the advantages and disadvantages, this paper provides some guidelines for those who are designing a practical HTS inductor for electric power applications

  6. SproutCore web application development

    CERN Document Server

    Keating, Tyler

    2013-01-01

    Written as a practical, step-by-step tutorial, Creating HTML5 Apps with SproutCore is full of engaging examples to help you learn in a practical context.This book is for any person looking to write software for the Web or already writing software for the Web. Whether your background is in web development or in software development, Creating HTML5 Apps with SproutCore will help you expand your skills so that you will be ready to apply the software development principles in the web development space.

  7. Creating Brand for CoreFinland Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri, Santosh; Neupane, Khem Raj

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to build brand for a small-sized company namely CoreFinland Ltd. Herein, the main objective of this research is to create CoreFinland as a brand in b-to-b customers’ context. This broader milestone is achieved by studying the case company’s brand identity and brand image issues. The first part of this research makes a comparative study of varieties of relevant litera-ture from different writers. The theories discuss b-to-b brand relevance and extend to the major study ar...

  8. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide species in the core upon fiber cooling, which results from partial dissolution of the cladding glass by the core melt, and (c) polycrystallinity; all of which lead to scattering and increased transmission losses. This dissertation systematically studies each of these effects and develops both a fundamental scientific understanding of and practical engineering methods for reducing their impact. With respect to the thermal expansion mismatch and, in part, the dissolution of oxides, for the first time to our knowledge, oxide and non-oxide glass compositions are developed for a series of semiconductor cores based on two main design criteria: (1) matching the thermal expansion coefficient between semiconductor core and glass cladding to minimize cracking and (2) matching the viscosity-temperature dependences, such that the cladding glass draws into fiber at a temperature slightly above the melting point of the semiconductor in order to minimize dissolution and improve the fiber draw process. The x[Na 2O:Al2O3] + (100 - 2x)SiO2 glass compositional family was selected due to the ability to tailor the glass properties to match the aforementioned targets through slight variations in composition and adjusting the ratios of bridging and non-bridging oxygen

  9. Activation of Selected Core Muscles during Pressing

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas W. Nesser; Neil Fleming; Matthew J. Gage

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Unstable surface training is often used to activate core musculature during resistance training. Unfortunately, unstable surface training is risky and leads to detraining. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine core muscle activation during stable surface ground-based lifts. Methods: Fourteen recreational trained and former NCAA DI athletes (weight 84.2 ± 13.3 kg; height 176.0 ± 9.5 cm; age 20.9 ± 2.0 years) volunteered for participation. Subjects completed two grou...

  10. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... hierarchical dependencies between variation points via copying and flattening. Thus, we reduce a model with intricate dependencies to a flat executable model transformation consisting of simple unconditional local variation points. The core semantics is extremely concise: it boils down to two operational rules...

  11. Beacon core monitoring system: load follow qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BEACON operational core monitoring and support system was used to analyze a load swing maneuver. This analysis showed the ability of BEACON to predict and monitor these conditions and serves as the basis for the qualification of BEACON in load swing operation. The results demonstrate the capability to predict the reactivity transients as a result of the xenon depletion, power defect and control rod position. They also show the reliability of using the core exit thermocouples to predict the radial power distribution throughout the transient

  12. Practicing on the Core Graphics System

    OpenAIRE

    Faconti, Giorgio; Palamidese, Patrizia

    1982-01-01

    The system described in this paper is intended to be of assistence to those people who would benefit in their works from computer graphics but do not have the necessary knoWledge or familiarity with its methodological principles. This system consist of an APL implementation of the CORE Graphies System and of a user interface giving the opportunity of learning and practicing on the CORE concepts. The system is nighly interactive, being ready to give expinations to tue usar at any time, and to ...

  13. ABSTRACTS Preliminary Study of Strategic Inner Cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    When a strategic entity attempts to make a dicision, first the project must be m accoroance wlm its strategic framework as well as make the strategic inner cores prominent. The existing theories of development strategy indicate that the formation of the framework can be divided into the following parts: inside and outside environments, purpose, goal, key points, and countermeasures. The strategic inner cores that put forward by this paper is the intensification and advancement for the theory of strategic framework, strategic orientation, strategic vision and main line are inciuded. Appearance of these ideas have improved the theory and enhanced strategic practice.

  14. Study on pure silica core optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An optimal refractive index profile of pure silica core optical fiber (PSCF) was de- signed, in combination with the characters of the modified chemical vapor deposi- tion (MCVD) process. Techniques of preform fabrication by a new furnace round heating MCVD process and fiber drawing process were reviewed. Difficulties in doping fluorine in silica, widening the depressed-index cladding and maintaining the index of fiber core were discussed. Methods used to overcome these difficulties were given at the same time. Additionally, the optimal refractive index profiles of PSCF were presented.

  15. EEA core set of indicators. Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This guide provides information on the quality of the 37 indicators in the EEA core set. Its primary role is to support improved implementation of the core set in the EEA, European topic centres and the European environment information and observation network (Eionet). In parallel, it is aimed at helping users outside the EEA/Eionet system make best use of the indicators in their own work. It is hoped that the guide will promote cooperation on improving indicator methodologies and data quality as part of the wider process to streamline and improve environmental reporting in the European Union and beyond. (au)

  16. Study on pure silica core optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An optimal refractive index profile of pure silica core optical fiber (PSCF) was designed, in combination with the characters of the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process. Techniques of preform fabrication by a new furnace round heating MCVD process and fiber drawing process were reviewed. Difficulties in doping fluorine in silica, widening the depressed-index cladding and maintaining the index of fiber core were discussed. Methods used to overcome these difficulties were given at the same time. Additionally, the optimal refractive index profiles of PSCF were presented.

  17. Neural simulations on multi-core architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Eichner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscience is witnessing increasing knowledge about the anatomy and electrophysiological properties of neurons and their connectivity, leading to an ever increasing computational complexity of neural simulations. At the same time, a rather radical change in personal computer technology emerges with the establishment of multi-cores: high-density, explicitly parallel processor architectures for both high performance as well as standard desktop computers. This work introduces strategies for the parallelization of biophysically realistic neural simulations based on the compartmental modeling technique and results of such an implementation, with a strong focus on multi-core architectures and automation, i. e. user-transparent load balancing.

  18. Multiphoton core ionization dynamics of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-photon core ionization dynamics of gas-phase methane, carbon monoxide and nitrogen have been studied with a recent implementation of the lowest order perturbation theory in the framework of density functional theory and a multicentric basis set expansion of bound and scattering states. Ionization cross sections and angular asymmetry parameters have been calculated for the case of a single radiation beam and for both linear and circular light polarizations in the fixed nuclei approximation. Expected resonances due to core valence excitations enhance the cross section by several orders of magnitude. (paper)

  19. Core Competencies: What They Are and How To Use Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Describes characteristics of core competencies. Examines the competencies a librarian should possess. Discusses types of competence and reviews advantages of developing and improving core competencies. Looks at core competencies in terms of the major service areas of public libraries. Presents several steps for building core competencies.…

  20. Detectability of deuterated water in prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Quénard, David; Vastel, Charlotte; Caselli, Paola; Ceccarelli, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Water is an important molecule in the chemical and thermal balance of dense molecular gas, but knowing its history through-out the various stages of the star formation is a fundamental problem. Its molecular deuteration provides us with a crucial clue to its formation history. H$_2$O has recently been detected for the first time towards the prestellar core L1544 with the Herschel Space Observatory with a high spectral resolution (HIFI instrument). Prestellar cores provide the original reservoir of material from which future planetary systems are built, but few observational constraints exist on the formation of water and none on its deuteration before the collapse starts and a protostar forms at the centre. We report on new APEX observations of the ground state 1$_{0,1}$-0$_{0,0}$ HDO transition at 464 GHz towards the prestellar core L1544. The line is undetected, and we present an extensive study of the conditions for its detectability in cold and dense cloud cores. The water and deuterated water abundances ...

  1. Introducing Mechanics by Tapping Core Causal Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Kees; Westra, Axel; Emmett, Katrina; Eijkelhof, Harrie; Lijnse, Piet

    2008-01-01

    This article concerns an outline of an introductory mechanics course. It is based on the argument that various uses of the concept of force (e.g. from Kepler, Newton and everyday life) share an explanatory strategy based on core causal knowledge. The strategy consists of (a) the idea that a force causes a deviation from how an object would move of…

  2. Translating the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Orlich, Donald C.

    2013-01-01

    As the authors describe in Chapter 7 of their new book, "The School Reform Landscape: Fraud, Myth, and Lies," the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative continues to ramble on, without evidence to support its efficacy. That is because education reform in the United States is being driven largely by ideology, rhetoric, and dogma instead of…

  3. Lesson Planning with the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Linda A.; McDuffie, Amy Roth; Tate, Cathie

    2014-01-01

    Planning a lesson can be similar to planning a road trip--a metaphor the authors use to describe how they applied research and theory to their lesson planning process. A map and mode of transportation, the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) and textbooks as resources, can lead to desired destinations, such as students engaging in…

  4. Magnetic core-shell silica particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claesson, E.M.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis deals with magnetic silica core-shell colloids and related functionalized silica structures. Synthesis routes have been developed and optimized. The physical properties of these colloids have been investigated, such as the magnetic dipole moment, dipolar structure formation and rotationa

  5. The Lisbon Strategy's Empowerment of Core Executives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Peters, B. Guy

    2011-01-01

    advancing (further) centralization and politicization in national patterns of EU policy co-ordination, empowering core executives. The Lisbon Strategy's ideational elements (‘grand’ goals and politically visible targets) as well as organizational requirements (Spring Council, national programming and annual...

  6. Core science: Stratified by a sunken impactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Miki

    2016-10-01

    There is potential evidence for a stratified layer at the top of the Earth's core, but its origin is not well understood. Laboratory experiments suggest that the stratified layer could be a sunken remnant of the giant impact that formed the Moon.

  7. What Should Common Core Assessments Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kayla; Fortune, Nicholas; Lovett, Jennifer N.; Scherrer, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for mathematics promote ideals about learning mathematics by providing specific standards focused on conceptual understanding and incorporating practices in which students must participate to develop conceptual understanding. Thus, how we define learning is pivotal because our current definition isn't aligned with…

  8. Critical Social Theory: Core Tenets, Inherent Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Melissa; Vasconcelos, Erika Franca S.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter outlines the core tenets of critical social theory and describes inherent issues facing evaluators conducting critical theory evaluation. Using critical pedagogy as an example, the authors describe the issues facing evaluators by developing four of the subtheories that comprise a critical social theory: (a) a theory of false…

  9. JDIP Genomics, Antibodies, and Proteomics Core Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JDIP Genomics, Proteomics, and Antibodies Core has developed several resources that are available for use by JDIP researchers. Five tasks have been completed or are in progress: Task 1 – Transposon mutants: Nearly 24,000 gene disruption M. paratuberculosis mutants are now available for JDIP re...

  10. Core Ideas of Engineering and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneider, Cary

    2012-01-01

    Last month, Rodger Bybee's article, "Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms," provided an overview of Chapter 3 in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). Chapter 3 describes the practices of science and engineering that students are expected to develop during 13 years…

  11. Rigid polyurethane and kenaf core composite foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigid polyurethane foams are valuable in many construction applications. Kenaf is a bast fiber plant where the surface stem skin provides bast fibers whose strength-to-weight ratio competes with glass fiber. The higher volume product of the kenaf core is an under-investigated area in composite appli...

  12. Community core evolution in mobile social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Xiao, Weidong; Tang, Daquan; Tang, Jiuyang; Wang, Zhenwen

    2013-01-01

    Community detection in social networks attracts a lot of attention in the recent years. Existing methods always depict the relationship of two nodes using the temporary connection. However, these temporary connections cannot be fully recognized as the real relationships when the history connections among nodes are considered. For example, a casual visit in Facebook cannot be seen as an establishment of friendship. Hence, our question is the following: how to cluster the real friends in mobile social networks? In this paper, we study the problem of detecting the stable community core in mobile social networks. The cumulative stable contact is proposed to depict the relationship among nodes. The whole process is divided into timestamps. Nodes and their connections can be added or removed at each timestamp, and historical contacts are considered when detecting the community core. Also, community cores can be tracked through the incremental computing, which can help to recognize the evolving of community structure. Empirical studies on real-world social networks demonstrate that our proposed method can effectively detect stable community cores in mobile social networks.

  13. How ASCD Supports the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Efrain; Britt, Sherida

    2013-01-01

    As the Common Core State Standards Initiative moved from the development and adoption of the standards to their implementation, ASCD embarked on a multifaceted program to help educators understand and implement the new standards. With support from a $3 million grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, ASCD has enacted a three-pronged…

  14. CopperCore 2.2.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Changes in this version: great number of bug fixes with regard to notifcation handling, allowed empty items in order to be more compatible with Reload, added QTI content type for CopperCore Service Integration, improved error handling, improved Clicc and fixed a bug regarding the else operation in a

  15. CopperCore 2.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Harrie; Vogten, Hubert; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Changes in this release: repackaged the source code classes, split coppercore archive packages in smaller packages, added a coppercore.ear archive for easy deployment of CopperCore on the application server, updated the build scripts for accommodating these changes, fixed some bugs.

  16. Requirements for transporting the TMI-2 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the requirements associated with the actual transport of core debris from the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The requirements are discussed under six headings: accountability, security, quality, safety, environment, and transportation

  17. Satcom access in the evolved packet core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cano, M.D.; Norp, A.H.J.; Popova, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite communications (Satcom) networks are increasingly integrating with terrestrial communications networks, namely Next Generation Networks (NGN). In the area of NGN the Evolved Packet Core (EPC) is a new network architecture that can support multiple access technologies. When Satcom is consid

  18. Core Strategies to Support English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sheldon; Eslami, Zohreh R.; Joshi, R. Malatesha

    2012-01-01

    Reading and vocabulary instruction can serve as an instructional process to respond to English language learner (ELL) needs. The purpose of this review of literature was to determine whether reading and vocabulary instruction should be used as core strategies for supporting ELLs requiring interventions as a response to the Texas English Language…

  19. Modeling in the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Kai Chung

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of modeling and applications into the mathematics curriculum has proven to be a challenging task over the last fifty years. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) has made mathematical modeling both one of its Standards for Mathematical Practice and one of its Conceptual Categories. This article discusses the need for mathematical…

  20. Intracluster stars in the Virgo Cluster core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguerri, JAL; Gerhard, OE; Arnaboldi, M; Napolitano, NR; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Freeman, KC

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the properties of the diffuse light in the Virgo Cluster core region, based on the detection of intracluster planetary nebulae (PNs) in four fields. We eliminate the bias from misclassified faint continuum objects, using improved Monte Carlo simulations, and the contaminations b

  1. CopperCore 3.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogten, Hubert; Martens, Harrie

    2008-01-01

    CopperCore version 3.1 release notes (2006-20-09) ================================================= 2007-27-03 ADDED: added support for MySQL 2006-12-12 FIXED: referencing to a global personal property from within the unit of earning defining it caused a class cast execption. 2006-12-05 FIXED: evalu

  2. Common Core State Standards and Adaptive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the issues of how Common Core State Standards (CCSS) will impact adaptive teaching. It focuses on 2 of the major differences between conventional standards and CCSS: the increased complexity of text and the addition of disciplinary literacy standards to reading instruction. The article argues that adaptive teaching under CCSS…

  3. Core biopsies of the breast: Diagnostic pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Joshi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of breast cancer is increasing worldwide. In this review article, the authors compare and contrast the incidence of breast cancer, and the inherent differences in the United States (US and India in screening techniques used for diagnosing breast cancer. In spite of these differences, core biopsies of the breast are common for diagnosis of breast cancer in both countries. The authors describe "Best Practices" in the reporting and processing of core biopsies and in the analysis of estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR, and human epidermal growth factor Receptor 2 (Her2/neu. The pitfalls in the diagnosis of fibroepithelial lesions of the breast on core biopsy are discussed, as also the significance of pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia of the breast (PASH is discussed in core biopsy. In this review, the management and diagnosis of flat epithelial atypia and radiation atypia are elaborated and the use of immunohistochemistry (IHC in papillary lesions, phyllodes tumor, and complex sclerosing lesions (radial scars is illustrated. Rarer lesions such as mucinous and histiocytoid carcinoma are also discussed.

  4. Vegetables and other core food groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, Astrid A.M.; Delahunty, Conor M.; Graaf, de Kees

    2017-01-01

    Vegetables are the food category least liked by children. This research investigated the sensory properties of vegetables vis-a-vis other core foods that comprise children's diets, to determine to what degree low acceptance of vegetables can be attributed to sensory properties. Vegetables (n = 34

  5. English Learners, Writing, and the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carol Booth; Scarcella, Robin; Matuchniak, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Adopted by 46 states, the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) present a vision of what it means to be literate in the twenty-first century and call for all students, including English learners, to develop critical reading skills necessary for a deep understanding of complex texts, and critical writing skills to write about those texts. This article…

  6. Common Core Poses Challenges for Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycki, Jaclyn

    2011-01-01

    Although the common-core standards are calibrated to ensure that students leave K-12 schools ready for work and college, they are also posing challenges for the educators who work with children just starting out their school careers. As 46 states and the District of Columbia work this year to put the new curricular guidelines in place, preschool…

  7. Hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash

    CERN Document Server

    Mocak, M; Weiss, A; Kifonidis, K; 10.1017/S1743921308022813

    2009-01-01

    We describe and discuss hydrodynamic simulations of the core helium flash using an initial model of a 1.25 M_sol star with a metallicity of 0.02 near at its peak. Past research concerned with the dynamics of the core helium flash is inconclusive. Its results range from a confirmation of the standard picture, where the star remains in hydrostatic equilibrium during the flash (Deupree 1996), to a disruption or a significant mass loss of the star (Edwards 1969; Cole & Deupree 1980). However, the most recent multidimensional hydrodynamic study (Dearborn 2006) suggests a quiescent behavior of the core helium flash and seems to rule out an explosive scenario. Here we present partial results of a new comprehensive study of the core helium flash, which seem to confirm this qualitative behavior and give a better insight into operation of the convection zone powered by helium burning during the flash. The hydrodynamic evolution is followed on a computational grid in spherical coordinates using our new version of th...

  8. The Core Archetype of The Lottery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢梦昕

    2012-01-01

    Shirley Jackson's famous work The Lottery is an archetypal tragedy, with Sin as the core. This essay explains Sin in The Lottery and analyzes the story from an archetypal approach, finding collective violence is a kind of Sin which should be extinct in modem age.

  9. Core Requirements for the Economics Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkus, Marie; Perry, John J.; Johnson, Bruce K.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors are the first to describe the core economics curriculum requirements for economics majors at all American colleges and universities, as opposed to a sample of institutions. Not surprisingly, principles of economics is nearly universally required and implemented as a two-semester course in 85 percent of economics major…

  10. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  11. A lock circuit for a multi-core processor

    OpenAIRE

    Strøm, Torur Biskopstø

    2015-01-01

    An integrated circuit comprising a multiple processor cores and a lock circuit that comprises a queue register with respective bits set or reset via respective, connections dedicated to respective processor cores, whereby the queue register identifies those among the multiple processor cores that are enqueued in the queue register. Furthermore, the integrated circuit comprises a current register and a selector circuit configured to select a processor core and identify that processor core by a...

  12. Improving the calculated core stability by the core nuclear design optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different equilibrium core loadings for TVO II reactor have been generated in order to improve the core stability properties at uprated power level. The reactor thermal power is assumed to be uprated from 2160 MWth to 2500 MWth, which moves the operating point after a rapid pump rundown where the core stability has been calculated from 1340 MWth and 3200 kg/s to 1675 MWth and 4000 kg/s. The core has been refuelled with ABB Atom Svea-100 -fuel, which has 3,64% w/o U-235 average enrichment in the highly enriched zone. PHOENIX lattice code has been used to provide the homogenized nuclear constants. POLCA4 static core simulator has been used for core loadings and cycle simulations and RAMONA-3B program for simulating the dynamic response to the disturbance for which the stability behaviour has been evaluated. The core decay ratio has been successfully reduced from 0,83 to 0,55 mainly by reducing the power peaking factors. (orig.) (7 figs., 1 tab.)

  13. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slessarev, Igor [29, Res. Tivoli, Allee des Peupliers, 13090 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: igor.slessarev@free.fr

    2007-11-15

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: {center_dot}Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. {center_dot}Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total

  14. Conceptual study of advanced PWR core design. Development of advanced PWR core neutronics analysis system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Hyo; Kim, Seung Cho; Kim, Taek Kyum; Cho, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Jung Hun; Jung, Gu Young [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-01

    The neutronics design system of the advanced PWR consists of (i) hexagonal cell and fuel assembly code for generation of homogenized few-group cross sections and (ii) global core neutronics analysis code for computations of steady-state pin-wise or assembly-wise core power distribution, core reactivity with fuel burnup, control rod worth and reactivity coefficients, transient core power, etc.. The major research target of the first year is to establish the numerical method and solution of multi-group diffusion equations for neutronics code development. Specifically, the following studies are planned; (i) Formulation of various numerical methods such as finite element method(FEM), analytical nodal method(ANM), analytic function expansion nodal(AFEN) method, polynomial expansion nodal(PEN) method that can be applicable for the hexagonal core geometry. (ii) Comparative evaluation of the numerical effectiveness of these methods based on numerical solutions to various hexagonal core neutronics benchmark problems. Results are follows: (i) Formulation of numerical solutions to multi-group diffusion equations based on numerical methods. (ii) Numerical computations by above methods for the hexagonal neutronics benchmark problems such as -VVER-1000 Problem Without Reflector -VVER-440 Problem I With Reflector -Modified IAEA PWR Problem Without Reflector -Modified IAEA PWR Problem With Reflector -ANL Large Heavy Water Reactor Problem -Small HTGR Problem -VVER-440 Problem II With Reactor (iii) Comparative evaluation on the numerical effectiveness of various numerical methods. (iv) Development of HEXFEM code, a multi-dimensional hexagonal core neutronics analysis code based on FEM. In the target year of this research, the spatial neutronics analysis code for hexagonal core geometry(called NEMSNAP-H temporarily) will be completed. Combination of NEMSNAP-H with hexagonal cell and assembly code will then equip us with hexagonal core neutronics design system. (Abstract Truncated)

  15. Palaeointensity, core thermal conductivity and the unknown age of the inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Tarduno, John A.; Kulakov, Evgeniy V.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Bono, Richard K.

    2016-05-01

    Data on the evolution of Earth's magnetic field intensity are important for understanding the geodynamo and planetary evolution. However, the paleomagnetic record in rocks may be adversely affected by many physical processes, which must be taken into account when analysing the palaeointensity database. This is especially important in the light of an ongoing debate regarding core thermal conductivity values, and how these relate to the Precambrian geodynamo. Here, we demonstrate that several data sets in the Precambrian palaeointensity database overestimate the true paleofield strength due to the presence of non-ideal carriers of palaeointensity signals and/or viscous re-magnetizations. When the palaeointensity overestimates are removed, the Precambrian database does not indicate a robust change in geomagnetic field intensity during the Mesoproterozoic. These findings call into question the recent claim that the solid inner core formed in the Mesoproterozoic, hence constraining the thermal conductivity in the core to `moderate' values. Instead, our analyses indicate that the presently available palaeointensity data are insufficient in number and quality to constrain the timing of solid inner core formation, or the outstanding problem of core thermal conductivity. Very young or very old inner core ages (and attendant high or low core thermal conductivity values) are consistent with the presently known history of Earth's field strength. More promising available data sets that reflect long-term core structure are geomagnetic reversal rate and field morphology. The latter suggests changes that may reflect differences in Archean to Proterozoic core stratification, whereas the former suggest an interval of geodynamo hyperactivity at ca. 550 Ma.

  16. COOL CORE CLUSTERS FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasia, E.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.; Planelles, S.; Biffi, V.; Granato, G. L. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Beck, A. M.; Steinborn, L. K.; Dolag, K. [Universitäts-Sternwarte München, Scheinerstr.1, D-81679 München (Germany); Ragone-Figueroa, C., E-mail: rasia@oats.inaf.it [Instituto de Astronomá Teórica y Experimental (IATE), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientiíficas y Técnicas de la República Argentina (CONICET), Observatorio Astronómico, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Laprida 854, X5000BGR, Córdoba (Argentina)

    2015-11-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback and are based on an improved version of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, the primary diagnostic we used to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of CC systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of NCC systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of objects, we find that they occur in similar proportions in both simulations and observations. Furthermore, we also find that simulated CC clusters have profiles of iron abundance that are steeper than those of NCC clusters, which is also in agreement with observational results. We show that the capability of our simulations to generate a realistic CC structure in the cluster population is due to AGN feedback and artificial thermal diffusion: their combined action allows us to naturally distribute the energy extracted from super-massive black holes and to compensate for the radiative losses of low-entropy gas with short cooling time residing in the cluster core.

  17. Focus on sulfur count rates along marine sediment cores acquired by XRF Core Scanner

    OpenAIRE

    Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Bayon, Germain; Garziglia, Sebastien; Boissier, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the information provided by sulfur count rates obtained by X-ray fluorescence core scanner (XRF-CS) along sedimentary records. The analysis of two marine sediment cores from the Niger Delta margin shows that XRF-CS sulfur count rates obtained at the surface of split core sections with XRF-CS correlate with both direct quantitative pyrite concentrations, as inferred from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and sulfur determination by wavelength dispersive X-r...

  18. High performance carbon nanotube-Si core-shell wires with a rationally structured core for lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Congxiang; Xiao, Qizhen; Wang, Xinghui; Tay, Beng Kang

    2013-02-21

    Core-shell Si nanowires are very promising anode materials. Here, we synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with relatively large diameters and large inter-wire spacing as core wires and demonstrate a CNT-Si core-shell wire composite as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode. Owing to the rationally engineered core structure, the composite shows good capacity retention and rate performance. The excellent performance is superior to most core-shell nanowires previously reported.

  19. The new properties of core inverse of matrices%Core 逆的一些新特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗高骏; 左可正; 周良

    2015-01-01

    利用矩阵的Σ-K-L 分解,研究了 Core 逆的性质,得到了 Core 逆的一些新特征,给出了 Core 逆的一些充要条件。%Several new properties and characteristics of core inverse,the necessary and sufficient conditions of core in-verse are given by the decomposition of Σ-K-L of the matrix.

  20. cFE/CFS (Core Flight Executive/Core Flight System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildermann, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes in detail the requirements and goals of the Core Flight Executive (cFE) and the Core Flight System (CFS). The Core Flight Software System is a mission independent, platform-independent, Flight Software (FSW) environment integrating a reusable core flight executive (cFE). The CFS goals include: 1) Reduce time to deploy high quality flight software; 2) Reduce project schedule and cost uncertainty; 3) Directly facilitate formalized software reuse; 4) Enable collaboration across organizations; 5) Simplify sustaining engineering (AKA. FSW maintenance); 6) Scale from small instruments to System of Systems; 7) Platform for advanced concepts and prototyping; and 7) Common standards and tools across the branch and NASA wide.

  1. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  2. Thermal and compositional stratification of the inner core

    CERN Document Server

    Labrosse, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    The improvements on the knowledge of the seismic structure of the inner core and the complexities thereby revealed ask for a dynamical origin. Sub-solidus convection was one of the early suggestions to explain the seismic anisotropy but requires an unstable density gradient either from thermal or compositional origin, or both. Temperature and composition profiles in the inner core are computed using a unidimensional model of core evolution including diffusion in the inner core and fractional crystallization at the the inner core boundary (ICB). The thermal conductivity of the core has been recently revised upwardly and, moreover, found increasing with depth. Values of the heat flow across the core mantle boundary (CMB) sufficient to maintain convection in the whole outer core are not sufficient to make the temperature in the inner core super-isentropic and therefore prone to thermal instability. An unreasonably high CMB heat flow is necessary to this end. The compositional stratification results from a compet...

  3. Evolution characteristics of the network core in the Facebook.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Guo Liu

    Full Text Available Statistical properties of the static networks have been extensively studied. However, online social networks are evolving dynamically, understanding the evolving characteristics of the core is one of major concerns in online social networks. In this paper, we empirically investigate the evolving characteristics of the Facebook core. Firstly, we separate the Facebook-link(FL and Facebook-wall(FW datasets into 28 snapshots in terms of timestamps. By employing the k-core decomposition method to identify the core of each snapshot, we find that the core sizes of the FL and FW networks approximately contain about 672 and 373 nodes regardless of the exponential growth of the network sizes. Secondly, we analyze evolving topological properties of the core, including the k-core value, assortative coefficient, clustering coefficient and the average shortest path length. Empirical results show that nodes in the core are getting more interconnected in the evolving process. Thirdly, we investigate the life span of nodes belonging to the core. More than 50% nodes stay in the core for more than one year, and 19% nodes always stay in the core from the first snapshot. Finally, we analyze the connections between the core and the whole network, and find that nodes belonging to the core prefer to connect nodes with high k-core values, rather than the high degrees ones. This work could provide new insights into the online social network analysis.

  4. Low loss broadband transmission in hypocycloid-core Kagome hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Wheeler, N V; Couny, F; Roberts, P J; Benabid, F

    2011-03-01

    We report on the fabrication of a seven-cell-core and three-ring-cladding large-pitch Kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) with a hypocycloid-shaped core structure. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the design of this core shape enhances the coupling inhibition between the core and cladding modes and offers optical attenuation with a baseline of ∼180 dB/km over a transmission bandwidth larger than 200 THz. This loss figure rivals the state-of-the-art photonic bandgap HC-PCF while offering an approximately three times larger bandwidth and larger mode areas. Also, it beats the conventional circular-core-shaped Kagome HC-PCF in terms of the loss. The development of this novel (to our knowledge) HC-PCF has potential for a number of applications in which the combination of a large optical bandwidth and a low loss is a prerequisite.

  5. Application Service Providers (ASP Adoption in Core and Non-Core Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Y.M. Chan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available With the further improvement in internet bandwidth, connection stability and data transmission security, a new wave of Application Service Providers (ASP is on his way. The recent booming on some models such as Software Application as Service (SaaS and On-Demand in 2008, has led to emergence of ASP model in core business functions. The traditional IS outsourcing covers the non-core business functions that are not critical to business performance and competitive advantages. Comparing with traditional IS outsourcing, ASP is a new phenomenon that can be considered as an emerging innovation as it covers both core and non-core business functions. Most of the executives do not comprehend the difference and similarity between traditional IS outsourcing and ASP mode. Hence, we propose to conduct a research so as to identify the determinants (cost benefit, gap in IS capability complementing the company's strategic goal, and trust to ASP's service and security level and moderating factors (management's attitude in ownership & control, and company aggressiveness of ASP adoption decision in both core and non-core business functions.

  6. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Nikolai; Semrau, Stefan; Airoldi, Edoardo; Budnik, Bogdan; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Summary Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs), some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC) and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function. PMID:26565899

  7. Differential Stoichiometry among Core Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai Slavov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation and structure of ribosomes is essential to understanding protein synthesis and its dysregulation in disease. While ribosomes are believed to have a fixed stoichiometry among their core ribosomal proteins (RPs, some experiments suggest a more variable composition. Testing such variability requires direct and precise quantification of RPs. We used mass spectrometry to directly quantify RPs across monosomes and polysomes of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESC and budding yeast. Our data show that the stoichiometry among core RPs in wild-type yeast cells and ESC depends both on the growth conditions and on the number of ribosomes bound per mRNA. Furthermore, we find that the fitness of cells with a deleted RP-gene is inversely proportional to the enrichment of the corresponding RP in polysomes. Together, our findings support the existence of ribosomes with distinct protein composition and physiological function.

  8. Does Mercury have a molten core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is stated that the discovery by Mariner 10 that Mercury has an intrinsic magnetic field, together with the hypothesis that its source is an internal dynamo, imply the existence of a conducting molten core. An experiment is here proposed to determine the existence and extent of such a molten core. The results would be important for calculations of the thermal history of the planet and in connection with dynamo field generation. The experimental work would require rather sophisticated instrumentation on the surface of the planet, and precise tracking of artificial satellites would be involved. The design of instrumentation that is within weight limitations and that will survive the possibility of hard landing of any spacecraft sent to Mercury's surface would be a severe challenge, but it is thought that a scientific return that could be realised means that attempts at the design should be made. (U.K.)

  9. Geomagnetic Core Field Secular Variation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Lesur, V.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    highlight the difficulty of resolving the time variability of the high degree secular variation coefficients (i.e. the secular acceleration), arising for instance from the challenge to properly separate sources of internal and of external origin. In addition, the regularisation process may also result......We analyse models describing time changes of the Earth’s core magnetic field (secular variation) covering the historical period (several centuries) and the more recent satellite era (previous decade), and we illustrate how both the information contained in the data and the a priori information...... (regularisation) affect the result of the ill-posed geomagnetic inverse problem. We show how data quality, frequency and selection procedures govern part of the temporal changes in the secular variation norms and spectra, which are sometimes difficult to dissociate from true changes of the core state. We...

  10. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly

  11. How chameleons core dwarfs with cusps

    CERN Document Server

    Lombriser, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    The presence of a scalar field that couples nonminimally and universally to matter can enhance gravitational forces on cosmological scales while restoring general relativity in the Solar neighborhood. In the intermediate regime, kinematically inferred masses experience an additional radial dependence with respect to the underlying distribution of matter, which is caused by the increment of gravitational forces with increasing distance from the Milky Way center. The same effect can influence the internal kinematics of subhalos and cause cuspy matter distributions to appear core-like. Specializing to the chameleon model as a worked example, we demonstrate this effect by tracing the scalar field from the outskirts of the Milky Way halo to its interior, simultaneously fitting observed velocity dispersions of chemo-dynamically discriminated red giant populations in the Fornax and Sculptor dwarf spheroidals. Whereas in standard gravity these observations suggest that the matter distribution of the dwarfs is cored, ...

  12. The solar core as never seen before

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eff-Darwich, A; Korzennik, S G, E-mail: adarwich@iac.es, E-mail: skorzennik@cfa.harvard.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Department de Edafologia y Geologia, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA, 02138 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    One of the main drawbacks in the analysis of the dynamics of the solar core comes from the lack of consistent data sets that cover the low and intermediate degree range (l = 1,200). It is usually necessary to merge data obtained from different instruments and/or fitting methodologies and hence one introduces undesired systematic errors. In contrast, we present the results of analyzing MDI rotational splittings derived by a single fitting methodology applied to 4608-, 2304-, etc..., down to 182-day long time series. The direct comparison of these data sets and the analysis of the numerical inversion results have allowed us to constrain the dynamics of the solar core and to establish the accuracy of these data as a function of the length of the time-series.

  13. Axion dark matter: strings and their cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleury, Leesa [McGill University, Department of Physics,3600 rue University, Montréal QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Moore, Guy D. [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt,Schlossgartenstraße 2, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-01-04

    Axions constitute a well-motivated dark matter candidate, and if PQ symmetry breaking occurred after inflation, it should be possible to make a clean prediction for the relation between the axion mass and the axion dark matter density. We show that axion (or other global) string networks in 3D have a network density that depends logarithmically on the string separation-to-core ratio. This logarithm would be about 10 times larger in axion cosmology than what we can achieve in numerical simulations. We simulate axion production in the early Universe, finding that, for the separation-to-core ratios we can achieve, the changing density of the network has little impact on the axion production efficiency.

  14. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  15. Molecular Emission Line Formation in Prestellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Pavlyuchenkov, Ya; Shustov, B; Henning, T; Launhardt, R; Semenov, D

    2008-01-01

    We investigate general aspects of molecular line formation under conditions which are typical of prestellar cores. Focusing on simple linear molecules, we study formation of their rotational lines by radiative transfer simulations. We present a thermalization diagram to show the effects of collisions and radiation on the level excitation. We construct a detailed scheme (contribution chart) to illustrate the formation of emission line profiles. This chart can be used as an efficient tool to identify which parts of the cloud contribute to a specific line profile. We show how molecular line characteristics for uniform model clouds depend on hydrogen density, molecular column density, and kinetic temperature. The results are presented in a 2D plane to illustrate cooperative effects of the physical factors. We also use a core model with a non-uniform density distribution and chemical stratification to study the effects of cloud contraction and rotation on spectral line maps. We discuss the main issues that should ...

  16. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  17. CHARACTERISTIC OF NANOFIBERS EXTRACTED FROM KENAF CORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Joonobi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose nanofibers were isolated from kenaf core fibers by employing chemo-mechanical treatments. The morphologies and sizes of the fibers were explored with environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results of chemical analysis showed that the cellulose contents of the bleached pulp fibers and nanofibers increased from 46% to 92% and to 94%, respectively. Most of the produced nanofibers had diameters in the range of 20 to 25 nm, whereas kenaf nanofibers ranged in diameter diameters from 10 to 75 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis revealed the removal of lignin and the majority of the hemicelluloses from the kenaf core fibers. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, which was carried out to evaluate the thermal properties of the fibers, demonstrated that the thermal stabilities of these fibers were increased by the chemo-mechanical treatments. The results of X-ray analysis confirmed that chemical and mechanical treatments can improve the crystallinity of fibers.

  18. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holve Erin

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR. The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learning methods of academic HSR programs. This initial set of core competencies is published to generate further dialogue within and outside of the US about the most important learning objectives and methods for HSR training and to clarify the unique skills of HSR training program graduates.

  19. The core structure of presolar graphite onions

    CERN Document Server

    Fraundorf, P B; Wackenhut, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Of the ``presolar particles'' extracted from carbonaceous chondrite dissolution residues, i.e. of those particles which show isotopic evidence of solidification in the neighborhood of other stars prior to the origin of our solar system, one subset has an interesting concentric graphite-rim/graphene-core structure. We show here that single graphene sheet defects in the onion cores (e.g. cyclopentane loops) may be observable edge-on by HREM. This could allow a closer look at models for their formation, and in particular strengthen the possibility that growth of these assemblages proceeds atom-by-atom with the aid of such in-plane defects, under conditions of growth (e.g. radiation fluxes or grain temperature) which discourage the graphite layering that dominates subsequent formation of the rim.

  20. Evaluation of neutronic characteristic of irradiation field in MEU6-core. Comparison of neutron flux and neutron spectrum in MEU6-core and Mixed-core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, Yoshiharu; Komukai, Bunsaku; Tabata, Toshio; Takeda, Takashi; Fujiki, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1999-08-01

    In JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor, 50 MW), the core configuration has been changed from previously employed Mixed-core (25 LEUs(low enrichment uranium (19.8%) fuel elements) and 2 MEUs (medium enrichment uranium (45%) fuel elements)) to MEU6-core (21 LEUs and 6 MEUs), since 125th operating cycle (started in Nov. 17, 1998). In order to investigate the effect of core configuration change on the irradiation tests, neutron flux distribution and neutron spectrum of irradiation field in MEU6-core were calculated by diffusion code CITATION and Monte Carlo code MCNP. As the result, it was confirmed that irradiation field in the MEU6-core has the neutronic characteristics almost equivalent to the irradiation field in the Mixed-core. (author)

  1. Hydrodynamic simulations of shell convection in stellar cores

    OpenAIRE

    Mocak, Miroslav; Muller, Ewald; Siess, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    Shell convection driven by nuclear burning in a stellar core is a common hydrodynamic event in the evolution of many types of stars. We encounter and simulate this convection (i) in the helium core of a low-mass red giant during core helium flash leading to a dredge-down of protons across an entropy barrier, (ii) in a carbon-oxygen core of an intermediate-mass star during core carbon flash, and (iii) in the oxygen and carbon burning shell above the silicon-sulfur rich core of a massive star p...

  2. Multi-Core Processor Memory Contention Benchmark Analysis Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Tyler; McGalliard, James

    2009-01-01

    Multi-core processors dominate current mainframe, server, and high performance computing (HPC) systems. This paper provides synthetic kernel and natural benchmark results from an HPC system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center that illustrate the performance impacts of multi-core (dual- and quad-core) vs. single core processor systems. Analysis of processor design, application source code, and synthetic and natural test results all indicate that multi-core processors can suffer from significant memory subsystem contention compared to similar single-core processors.

  3. Making Mercury's Core with Light Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has low FeO abundances (less than 2 wt%) and high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%), suggesting the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials is somewhere between 3 to 7 log10 units below the IW buffer. The highly reducing nature of Mercury has resulted in a relatively thin mantle and a large core that has the potential to exhibit an exotic composition in comparison to the other terrestrial planets. This exotic composition may extend to include light elements (e.g., Si, C, S). Furthermore, has argued for a possible primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, which may require a core that is C-saturated. In order to investigate mercurian core compositions, we conducted piston cylinder experiments at 1 GPa, from 1300 C to 1700 C, using a range of starting compositions consisting of various Si-Fe metal mixtures (Si5Fe95, Si10Fe90, Si22Fe78, and Si35Fe65). All metals were loaded into graphite capsules used to ensure C-saturation during the duration of each experimental run. Our experiments show that Fe-Si metallic alloys exclude carbon relative to more Fe-rich metal. This exclusion of carbon commences within the range of 5 to 10 wt% Si. These results indicate that if Mercury has a Si-rich core (having more than approximately 5 wt% silicon), it would have saturated in carbon at low C abundances allowing for the possible formation of a graphite floatation crust as suggested by. These results have important implications for the thermal and magmatic evolution of Mercury.

  4. Magnetism near Vortex Cores of Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. C.; Prudchenko, K.; Launspach, B.; Ruiz, E. J.; Boekema, C.

    2005-03-01

    We examined muon-spin-resonance (μSR) vortex data of Bi2212, Tl2223, and YBCO to search for antiferromagnetism (AF) near the vortex cores. [1] Field distributions were obtained from μSR data using Maximum-Entropy analysis. The grainboundary and vortex signals were fitted by Gaussian and Lorentzian curves, the latter suggestive of extra AF ordering. Narrow Gaussians fit the grainboundary signals well, independent of temperature. For T B17 (2003) 3436.

  5. Core Dominance Parameter for -Ray Loud Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. H. Li; J. H. Fan; D. X. Wu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we compiled 572 blazars that have known core dominance parameter (log ), out of which 121 blazars are -ray loud blazars. We compared log between 121 blazars and the rest with non -ray detections, and found that -ray loud blazars showed a different distribution, and their average value of log is greater than that for non -ray blazars. Our analysis suggests that the -ray emissions are strongly beamed.

  6. Core Stabilization Exercise Prescription, Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Brumitt, Jason; Matheson, J. W.; Meira, Erik P.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injury to the low back can cause significant pain and dysfunction, which can affect an athlete’s performance and result in time lost from sport. A common conservative treatment is therapeutic core stabilization exercises, which can address pain and musculoskeletal dysfunction in patients with low back pathology. Evidence Acquisition: MEDLINE and CINAHL were searched (from 1966 to March 2013) to identify relevant research. Keywords and keyword combinations searched included motor cont...

  7. Community core detection in transportation networks

    OpenAIRE

    Leo, Vincenzo; Santoboni, Giovanni; Cerina, Federica; Mureddu, Mario; Secchi, Luca; Chessa, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    This work analyses methods for the identification and the stability under perturbation of a territorial community structure with specific reference to transportation networks. We considered networks of commuters for a city and an insular region. In both cases, we have studied the distribution of commuters' trips (i.e., home-to-work trips and viceversa). The identification and stability of the communities' cores are linked to the land-use distribution within the zone system, and therefore thei...

  8. Core curriculum illustration: necrotizing pneumonia and empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawley, Barbara; Smith, Melissa; Nickels, David

    2016-04-01

    This is the 18th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at: http://www.erad.org/?page=CCIP_TOC . PMID:26884402

  9. On the migration of protogiant solid cores

    OpenAIRE

    Masset, F. S.; D'Angelo, G.; Kley, W.

    2006-01-01

    The increase of computational resources has recently allowed high resolution, three dimensional calculations of planets embedded in gaseous protoplanetary disks. They provide estimates of the planet migration timescale that can be compared to analytical predictions. While these predictions can result in extremely short migration timescales for cores of a few Earth masses, recent numerical calculations have given an unexpected outcome: the torque acting on planets with masses between 5 M_Earth...

  10. Explicit Instruction Elements in Core Reading Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Child, Angela R.

    2012-01-01

    Classroom teachers are provided instructional recommendations for teaching reading from their adopted core reading programs (CRPs). Explicit instruction elements or what is also called instructional moves, including direct explanation, modeling, guided practice, independent practice, discussion, feedback, and monitoring, were examined within CRP reading lessons. This study sought to answer the question: What elements of explicit instruction or instructional moves are included in the five most...

  11. Neural Simulations on Multi-Core Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert Eichner; Tobias Klug

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience is witnessing increasing knowledge about the anatomy and electrophysiological properties of neurons and their connectivity, leading to an ever increasing computational complexity of neural simulations. At the same time, a rather radical change in personal computer technology emerges with the establishment of multi-cores: high-density, explicitly parallel processor architectures for both high performance as well as standard desktop computers. This work introduces strategies for th...

  12. Europlat Employability Survey: Core findings and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ježek Stanislav; Mareš Jan; Neusar Aleš

    2012-01-01

    Paper presents the core findings of the Europlat employability survey focusing on employability issues related to the post-Bologna transformations of psychology study programmes across the European Union. The objectives of the survey were to find out: (1) how relevant the employability/employment issue is; (2) what the current problems are in the employability/employment area; and (3) to explore the best practices in dealing with employability/employment issues. Findings cover both the nation...

  13. Peach palm core collection in Brazilian Amazonia

    OpenAIRE

    Michelly de Cristo-Araújo; Doriane Picanço Rodrigues; Spartaco Astolfi-Filho; Clement, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    The Peach palm Active Germplasm Bank has abundant genetic diversity in its holdings. Because it is a live collection, maintenance, characterization and evaluation are expensive, restricting its use. One way to promote more efficient use is to create a Core Collection, a set of accessions with at least 70% of the genetic diversity of the full collection with minimal repetition. The available geographic, molecular marker (RAPD) and morphometric information was systematized and the popu...

  14. The usefulness of core PCE inflation measures

    OpenAIRE

    Alan K. Detmeister

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines a number of alternative PCE price inflation measures including overall PCE inflation, PCE inflation excluding food and energy, trimmed mean PCE inflation, component-smoothed inflation, variance-weighted inflation, inflation with weights based on disaggregated regressions, and survey measures of inflation expectations. When averaging across a handful of specifications based on the primary uses of a core inflation measure three conclusions arise: 1. Inflation rates for nearl...

  15. Disk Instability vs. Core Accretion: Observable Discriminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang-Condell, H.

    2007-06-01

    I will discuss ways to distinguish between disk instability and core accretion, the two competing paradigms for giant planet formation. Disk instability happens when a massive disk fragments into planet-sized self-gravitating clumps. Scattered light from these disks will illuminate high altitude density variations that result from stirring of the disk by the forming planet. These variations will evolve quickly, within several years, but do not correlate with the position of the planet itself. Alternatively, core accretion happens when solid particles collide and coagulate into larger and larger bodies until a body large enough to accrete a gaseous envelope forms -- around 10-20 Earth masses. This process is thought to be more quiescent than gravitational instability, so the disk should appear smooth. Although a 10-20 Earth mass core is insufficiently massive to fully clear an annular gap in the disk, it does perturb the disk material immediately in its vicinity, creating shadows and brightenings at the protoplanet's location. The planet may also begin to clear a partial gap. Shadowing and illumination on this partial gap can alter the thermal structure at the upper layers of the disk on a sufficiently large scale to be observable. Observing the signatures of either disk instability or core accretion requires milliarcsecond resolution and high contrast imaging. Advances in coronography, adaptive optics, and interferometry are bringing us ever closer to begin able to make these detections. Observational confirmation of either process taking place in a young circumstellar disk will help resolve the long-standing debate over how giant planets form.

  16. Core Stabilization Exercise Prescription, Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    Brumitt, Jason; Matheson, J. W.; Meira, Erik P.

    2013-01-01

    Context Therapeutic exercises are frequently prescribed to patients with low back pain. Numerous exercise programs for patients with low back pain have been described. Many of these treatment programs are based on 1 of 2 popular rehabilitation strategies: a motor control exercise approach or a general exercise approach. Data Sources PubMed clinical queries from 1966 to March 2013 for keyword combinations including motor control exercise, core stability exercise, therapeutic exercise, general ...

  17. Core Competence Analysis--Toyota Production System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱璐宜

    2013-01-01

      Core competencies are the wel spring of new business development. It is the sharpest sword to penetrate the mature market, hold and enlarge the existing share. Toyota makes wel use of its TPS and form its own style which other car manufacturers hard to imitate.In contrast,the Chinese company---FAW only imitating the superficial aspects from Toyota and ignoring its own problems in manufacture line.

  18. GAMER with out-of-core computation

    OpenAIRE

    Schive, Hsi-Yu; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Chiueh, Tzihong

    2010-01-01

    GAMER is a GPU-accelerated Adaptive-MEsh-Refinement code for astrophysical simulations. In this work, two further extensions of the code are reported. First, we have implemented the MUSCL-Hancock method with the Roe's Riemann solver for the hydrodynamic evolution, by which the accuracy, overall performance and the GPU versus CPU speed-up factor are improved. Second, we have implemented the out-of-core computation, which utilizes the large storage space of multiple hard disks as the additional...

  19. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Holve Erin; Martin Diane P; Forrest Christopher B; Millman Anne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR). The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learn...

  20. [Essential professional core competencies for nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2010-10-01

    Core competency is vital to the nursing profession. Such helps guarantee the high quality and effectiveness of delivered care and maintains the social value and status of the nursing profession. This article introduces the definition of nursing core competency and its connotations. The core competency profile for the nursing profession embraces basic behavioral attributes as well as mastery of advanced practice skills. The former include such attributes as gentleness, willingness to serve, keen observation and judgment, efficiency, skillfulness, responsibility and accountability. The latter embraces skills in general care, communication and collaboration, management, self-development, innovation and research, and stress-adjustment. To cultivate competent nurses, academic education should emphasize critical thinking skills, integrate problem-based and evidence-based learning approaches into curricula, and use objective structured clinical examination to evaluate learning outcomes. In the healthcare sector, systematic professional training models such as the clinical ladder with multidiscipline rotation hold the potential to train novice nurses as expert professionals. Meanwhile, to advance the professional capabilities of nurses, nursing administrators should provide a positive work environment to fuel and maintain learning motivation. Education and healthcare systems should work closely together to promote the professional competence of nurses and to strengthen the value of the nursing profession. PMID:20878605

  1. Dynamic musical communication of core affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Nicole K; Large, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956) have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified "scene" that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that (1) neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that (2) music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience. PMID:24672492

  2. In-core instrument for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns, in particular, an improvement for in-core equipments in a nuclear reactor having sliding members. Deposition layers of particles of metal carbides and metal nitrides are formed at the sliding surface of members in the in-core eqiupments. The matrix materials constituting the members are melted under irradiation of laser beams to form a welded layer integrated with the deposition layer. In this way, since the thickness of the welded layer is remarkably thin as compared with of the substrate material, when the irradiation of the laser beams is interrupted, corrosion resistance in water at high temperature can be improved remarkably since the melted portion is quenched and no chromium carbide is deposited at the crystal boudary. Accordingly, due to excellent corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of the welded layer relative to the in-core equipments in the reactor having sliding surfaces, sliding incapability does not occur between each of the members under crevice conditions. Accordingly, no withdrawal incapability for equipments, for example, neutron monitors should occur upon periodical inspection. (I.S.)

  3. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  4. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hix, W. Raphael [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Lentz, Eric J.; Chertkow, M. Austin; Harris, J. Austin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Endeve, Eirik [Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Baird, Mark [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6003 (United States); Messer, O. E. Bronson [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6354 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831-6008 (United States); Mezzacappa, Anthony [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Joint Institute for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6173 (United States); Bruenn, Stephen [Department of Physics, Florida Atlantic University, 777 W Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991 (United States); Blondin, John [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Carrying 10{sup 44} joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  5. Dynamic Musical Communication of Core Affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eFlaig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956 have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified scene that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that 1 neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that 2 music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience.

  6. Mercury's Core Molten, Radar Study Shows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Scientists using a high-precision planetary radar technique for the first time have discovered that the innermost planet Mercury probably has a molten core, resolving a mystery of more than three decades. The discovery, which used the National Science Foundation's Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia and Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, and NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory antennas in California, is an important step toward a better understanding of how planets form and evolve. Planetary Radar High-precision planetary radar technique sent signal to Mercury, received reflection. CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (447 KB) "For a long time it was thought we'd have to land spacecraft on Mercury to learn if its core is solid or molten. Now we've answered that question using ground-based telescopes," said Jean-Luc Margot, of Cornell University, leader of the research team, which published its results in the May 4 issue of the journal Science. Mercury is one of the least-understood of the planets in our Solar System. Its distance from the Sun is just over one-third that of the Earth, and it contains a mass just 5½ percent that of Earth. Only about half of Mercury's surface has been photographed by a spacecraft, Mariner 10, back in 1974. Mariner 10 also discovered that Mercury has a weak magnetic field, about one percent as strong as Earth's. That discovery spurred a scientific debate about the planet's core. Scientists normally expect a rocky planet's magnetic field to be caused by an electromagnetic dynamo in a molten core. However, Mercury is so small that most scientists expected its core to have cooled and solidified long ago. Those scientists speculated that the magnetic field seen today may have been "frozen" into the planet when the core cooled. "Whether the core is molten or solid today depends greatly on the chemical composition of the core. That chemical composition can provide important clues about the

  7. Essential ingredients in core-collapse supernovae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Raphael Hix

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carrying 1044 joules of kinetic energy and a rich mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up our solar system and ourselves. Signaling the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae combine physics over a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (eventually growing to gigameter scale down to femtometer-scale nuclear reactions. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively-unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have recently motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of the births of neutron stars and the supernovae that result. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  8. Improved core physics test method at HZP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of 3 loop nuclear plants in Korea, the error of control rod worth measurement which is one item of core physics test at HZP is increased considerably compared with previous cycle data since loading of V5H. The cause of error increase of control rod worth and the reactivity effect according to flux and background level are analyzed. The root cause of error increment is that the flux level which is detected by excore detector is decreased by applying low-low leakage or ultra low leakage loading pattern and the background level is increased due to reduction of planned outage and longer fuel cycle length. In current test method, it is limited to decrease or eliminate the effect of background. This is confirmed based on the data of physics test for Ulchin 1 cycle 9. In order to perform credible core physics test at HZP at this circumstance, the elimination of such background effect is reviewed and setup by adjusting electrometer used in reactivity computer by compensating the amount of background level. Therefore the improved core physics test method to perform the credible test at HZP is setup by this study regardless of any kind of loading pattern and cycle scheme

  9. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  10. Activation of Selected Core Muscles during Pressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Nesser

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Unstable surface training is often used to activate core musculature during resistance training. Unfortunately, unstable surface training is risky and leads to detraining. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine core muscle activation during stable surface ground-based lifts. Methods: Fourteen recreational trained and former NCAA DI athletes (weight 84.2 ± 13.3 kg; height 176.0 ± 9.5 cm; age 20.9 ± 2.0 years volunteered for participation. Subjects completed two ground-based lifts: overhead press and push-press. Surface EMG was recorded from 4 muscles on the right side of the body (Rectus Abdominus (RA, External Oblique (EO, Transverse Abdominus (TA, and Erector Spinae (ES. Results: Paired sample T-tests identified significant muscle activation differences between the overhead press and the push-press included ES and EO. Average and peak EMG for ES was significantly greater in push-press (P<0.01. Anterior displacement of COP was significantly greater in push-press compared to overhead press during the eccentric phase. Conclusion: The push-press was identified as superior in core muscle activation when compared to the overhead pressing exercise.Keywords: torso, stability, weight lifting, resistance training

  11. Core skills assessment to improve mathematical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní

    2013-12-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these problems; instead, they struggle through their degree, carrying a serious handicap of poor core mathematical skills, as confirmed by exploratory testing of final year students. In order to improve these skills, a pilot project was set up in which a 'module' in core mathematics was developed. The course material was basic, but 90% or higher was required to pass. Students were allowed to repeat this module throughout the year by completing an automated examination on WebCT populated by a question bank. Subsequent to the success of this pilot with third-year mechanical engineering students, the project was extended to five different engineering programmes, across three different year-groups. Full results and analysis of this project are presented, including responses to interviews carried out with a selection of the students involved.

  12. The Core Competencies: a Roman Catholic critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Elliott Louis

    2011-09-01

    This article critically examines, from the perspective of a Roman Catholic Healthcare ethicist, the second edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation report recently published by the American Society for Humanities and Bioethics. The question is posed: can the competencies identified in the report serve as the core competencies for Roman Catholic ethical consultants and consultation services? I answer in the negative. This incongruence stems from divergent concepts of what it means to do ethics consultation, a divergence that is rooted in each perspective's very different visions of autonomy. Furthermore, because of the constitutive elements of Catholic ethics consultation, such as the Ethical and Religious Directives for Health Care Services, the tradition needed to apply those directives, and the Catholic facility's membership in the institutional Church, the competencies needed for its practice differ in kind from those identified by the report. While there are many practical points of convergence, the competencies identified by the report should not be adopted uncritically by Catholic healthcare institutions as core competencies for ethical consultation services.

  13. Overview of experimental program, REBUS, and experimental results of reference core and core analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) has been conducting an experimental program that aims to obtain a comprehensive data base for validation of core analysis methods applied to a full MOX ABWR and also for preparation of licensing of high burn-up MOX fuel expected in the future. As part of this program, JNES participated in an international physics experimental program REBUS, which was organized by Belgonucleaire and SCK/CEN in Belgium, and obtained the measured data. The REBUS program is aimed at directly measuring reactivity differences between fresh and irradiated fuels by implementing critical experiments of the cores that are loaded by fresh and irradiated MOX and UO2 test fuel bundles. The irradiated fuel bundles were fabricated from fuel rods irradiated in commercial reactors. The measured data in the program are useful in validation of nuclear design methods for high burn-up MOX and UO2 cores and critical safety analysis related to burnup credit. In the REBUS program, there are five experimental cores that each contain test fuel bundle fabricated by (1) irradiated MOX fuel rods of BR3 (PWR) and (2) fresh MOX fuel rods of the same plant, (3) irradiated MOX fuel rods of Gundremmingen (BWR), (4) irradiated UO2 fuel rods of Neckar GKN II and (5) corresponding fresh UO2 fuel rods, and one reference core. In the experiments, criticality mass, water level reactivity coefficients, fission distributions and neutron flux distributions were measured. In addition, burnup measurements were performed gamma-spectrometry and fuel composition measurement for actinide and fission product nuclides by radiochemical assay for the irradiated fuels used in core physics experiments. This report presents an overview of the REBUS program and describes the core configuration, the geometrical specification, the composition and the measured data in the core physics experiment of the reference core. Results of core analyses with a continuous energy Monte Carlo calculation

  14. Lightweight Low Force Rotary Percussive Coring Tool for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironaka, Ross; Stanley, Scott

    2010-01-01

    A prototype low-force rotary-percussive rock coring tool for use in acquiring samples for geological surveys in future planetary missions was developed. The coring tool could eventually enable a lightweight robotic system to operate from a relatively small (less than 200 kg) mobile or fixed platform to acquire and cache Mars or other planetary rock samples for eventual return to Earth for analysis. To gain insight needed to design an integrated coring tool, the coring ability of commercially available coring bits was evaluated for effectiveness of varying key parameters: weight-on-bit, rotation speed, percussive rate and force. Trade studies were performed for different methods of breaking a core at its base and for retaining the core in a sleeve to facilitate sample transfer. This led to a custom coring tool design which incorporated coring, core breakage, core retention, and core extraction functions. The coring tool was tested on several types of rock and demonstrated the overall feasibility of this approach for robotic rock sample acquisition.

  15. Fabric along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and its comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnat, M.; Azuma, N.; Dahl-Jensen, D.; Eichler, J.; Fujita, S.; Gillet-Chaulet, F.; Kipfstuhl, S.; Samyn, D.; Svensson, A.; Weikusat, I.

    2014-07-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland was measured in the field by an automatic ice texture analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening rate is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin (HW) climatic transition. From a simple model we estimate that this depth is located at a transition from a state dominated by vertical compression to a state dominated by vertical shear. Comparisons are made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core, drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. This comparison tends to demonstrate that the ice viscosity change with the HW climatic transition must be associated with the shear-dominated state to induce the abrupt fabric strengthening observed at NEEM. This comparison therefore reflects the increasing role of shear deformation on the coring site when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NGRIP. Further along the core, centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the observed folding layers in Dahl-Jensen et al. (2013).

  16. Fabric measurement along the NEEM ice core, Greenland, and comparison with GRIP and NGRIP ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Dahl Jensen, Dorthe; Eichler, Jan; Fujita, Shuji; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Samyn, Denis; Svensson, Anders; Weikusat, Ilka

    2014-05-01

    Fabric (distribution of crystallographic orientations) profile along the full NEEM ice core, Greenland, is presented in this work. Data were measured in the field by an Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer every 10 m, from 33 m down to 2461 m depth. The fabric evolves from a slightly anisotropic fabric at the top, toward a strong single maximum at about 2300 m, which is typical of a deformation pattern mostly driven by uniaxial compression and simple shearing. A sharp increase in the fabric strengthening is observed at the Holocene to Wisconsin climatic transition. A similar strengthening, toward an anisotropic single maximum-type fabric, has been observed in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and can be attributed to a positive feedback between changes in ice viscosity at the climatic transition, and the impact of a shear component of stress. Centimeter scale abrupt texture (fabric and microstructure) variations are observed in the bottom part of the core. Their positions are in good agreement with the folding hypothesis used for a climatic reconstruction by Dahl-Jensen and co authors (2013). Comparison is made to two others ice cores drilled along the same ridge; the GRIP ice core drilled at the summit of the ice sheet, and the NorthGRIP ice core, drilled 325 km to the NNW of the summit along the ridge, and 365 km upstream from NEEM. The fabric profile clearly reflects the increase in shear deformation when moving NW along the ridge from GRIP to NorthGRIP and NEEM. The difference in fabric profiles between NEEM and NorthGRIP also evidences a stronger lateral extension associated with a sharper ridge at NorthGRIP. References: Dahl-Jensen, D. and 120 co-authors. Eemian interglacial reconstructed from a Greenland folded ice core, Nature, 493, 489-493, 2013.

  17. Does a prestellar core always become protostellar? Tracing the evolution of cores from the prestellar to protostellar phase

    OpenAIRE

    Anathpindika, S.; Di Francesco, James

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a subset of starless cores whose thermal Jeans mass is apparently overwhelmed by the mass of the core has been identified, e.g., the core {\\small L183}. In literature, massive cores such as this one are often referred to as "super-Jeans cores". As starless cores are perhaps on the cusp of forming stars, a study of their dynamics will improve our understanding of the transition from the prestellar to the protostellar phase. In the present work we use non-magnetic polytropes belonging...

  18. Laser annealing of amorphous silicon core optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, N; Mailis, S.; Day, T. D.; Sazio, P.J.A.; Badding, J. V.; A.C. Peacock

    2012-01-01

    Laser annealing of an optical fiber with an amorphous silicon core is demonstrated. The annealing process produces a fiber that has a highly crystalline core, whilst reducing the optical transmission losses by ~3 orders of magnitude.

  19. Generation of core model data for Nuclear Power Plant simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yong Soo; Jung, Yil Sup; Kim, Yong Rae; Do, Man Seok; Chung, Jong Sung; Kim, Jae Sik; Kim, Yeong Baek [Korea Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    Nuclear power plant simulators currently operated in Korea have their own core models which are not updated with new one of current core cycle. This is because proper input constants for the core model cannot be provided in timely manner. The best workaround for this is the development of a new separate core analysis device with the real time calculation power and the development of the automatic procedure to generate input constants for core model more easily. In this research a new procedure is established for the generation of core model for NPP simulator. Therefore, with the development of core model implementation technology for NPP simulator, it is expected that core model of the simulator will be updated with ease and in timely manner.

  20. Core values: the pre-condition for Business Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Su Mi Park; Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Edgeman, Rick L.

    1998-01-01

    Japan and Denmark. The contents of the training package focus on a number of core values and competencies. Concluded from this comparison is that the core values identified from these two sources are in essential agreement, a testimony to core values immutable over many millenia and across cultures......Systemic leadership deployment for Business Excellence demands transformation of our mental models. This requires a profound understanding of so called core values (intangibles) and their relation to the traditional tangibles (goals and core competencies). Often these core values are not clearly...... identified and they are seldom deployed with the same enthusiasm as the goals and core competencies needed for Business Excellence. It is assumed herein that if core values are neglected in the policy deployment process that it will never be possible to achieve Business Excellence. The paper has been divided...

  1. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Cuttings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  2. Dichotomy in the Dynamical Status of Massive Cores in Orion

    CERN Document Server

    velusamy, T; Li, D; Goldsmith, P F; Langer, William D

    2008-01-01

    To study the evolution of high mass cores, we have searched for evidence of collapse motions in a large sample of starless cores in the Orion molecular cloud. We used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain spectra of the optically thin (\\H13CO+) and optically thick (\\HCO+) high density tracer molecules in 27 cores with masses $>$ 1 \\Ms. The red- and blue-asymmetries seen in the line profiles of the optically thick line with respect to the optically thin line indicate that 2/3 of these cores are not static. We detect evidence for infall (inward motions) in 9 cores and outward motions for 10 cores, suggesting a dichotomy in the kinematic state of the non-static cores in this sample. Our results provide an important observational constraint on the fraction of collapsing (inward motions) versus non-collapsing (re-expanding) cores for comparison with model simulations.

  3. High-density multicore fiber with heterogeneous core arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amma, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Takenaga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m....

  4. NanoDrill: 1 Actuator Core Acquisition System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design, build and test a 1 kg, single actuator, sample acquisition drill. The drill uses a novel method of core or powder acquisition. The core...

  5. Multi-core processing and scheduling performance in CMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, J. M.; Evans, D.; Foulkes, S.

    2012-12-01

    Commodity hardware is going many-core. We might soon not be able to satisfy the job memory needs per core in the current single-core processing model in High Energy Physics. In addition, an ever increasing number of independent and incoherent jobs running on the same physical hardware not sharing resources might significantly affect processing performance. It will be essential to effectively utilize the multi-core architecture. CMS has incorporated support for multi-core processing in the event processing framework and the workload management system. Multi-core processing jobs share common data in memory, such us the code libraries, detector geometry and conditions data, resulting in a much lower memory usage than standard single-core independent jobs. Exploiting this new processing model requires a new model in computing resource allocation, departing from the standard single-core allocation for a job. The experiment job management system needs to have control over a larger quantum of resource since multi-core aware jobs require the scheduling of multiples cores simultaneously. CMS is exploring the approach of using whole nodes as unit in the workload management system where all cores of a node are allocated to a multi-core job. Whole-node scheduling allows for optimization of the data/workflow management (e.g. I/O caching, local merging) but efficient utilization of all scheduled cores is challenging. Dedicated whole-node queues have been setup at all Tier-1 centers for exploring multi-core processing workflows in CMS. We present the evaluation of the performance scheduling and executing multi-core workflows in whole-node queues compared to the standard single-core processing workflows.

  6. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.;

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  7. PT phase control in circular multi-core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    We consider light dynamics in a circular multi-core fiber with balanced gain and loss core distribution, and show that transition from unbroken to broken PT phases can be conveniently controlled by geometric twist of the fiber. The twist introduces Peierls phases in the coupling constants and, thus, acts as an artificial gauge field. As an application, we discuss twist-induced tuning of optical transmission in a six-core fiber with one lossy core. PMID:27128033

  8. Greenland ice core evidence of the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption

    OpenAIRE

    C. Barbante; N. M. Kehrwald; P. Marianelli; B. M. Vinther; Steffensen, J. P.; Cozzi, G; C. U. Hammer; Clausen, H. B.; M.-L. Siggaard-Andersen

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic tephra are indepenent age horizons and can synchronize strata of various paleoclimate records including ice and sediment cores. Before such paleoclimate records can be synchronized, it is essential to first confidently identify individual independent marker horizons. The Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core from Central Greenland is often used as a "golden spike" to synchronize Northern Hemisphere paleoclimte records. The Holocene section of the GRIP ice core is dated by multi-...

  9. PMMA/PMMA core-shell particles with ellipsoidal, fluorescent cores: accessing rotational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthias K; Klinkenberg, Nele; Schuetter, Stefan; Saenger, Nicolai; Pfleiderer, Patrick; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2015-03-10

    For several decades, nonaqueous dispersions of PMMA particles have played an important role in colloid research. They have found application as colloidal model systems, which are used to probe glassy dynamics or to explore crystal nucleation. To date, most research has focused on spherical particles, in which only translational motion can be investigated. Recently, however, there has been a surge of interest in analyzing also rotational dynamics. In this contribution, we introduce a new class of core-shell particles, which can be used as rotational probes. The colloids described herein are composed of shape anisotropic, fluorescent cores covered with nonfluorescent PMMA shells. The core-shell particles are built up in four steps. In a first step, we produce fluorescent and photo-cross-linkable PMMA colloids. In the second step, these particles are thermomechanically elongated and fixed in defined ellipsoidal shapes by photo-cross-linking. Subsequently, we cover the cross-linked, fluorescent core with a nonfluorescent PMMA shell. The shape of the resulting core-shell colloids is tunable between the initial anisotropic and perfect spherical shape. For shaping, we apply a simple solvent swelling procedure. As one option, this method yields perfect PMMA spheres with ellipsoidal, fluorescent centers. We also report morphological particle characterization using various fluorescence microscopy techniques. Finally, we demonstrate that the rotational dynamics of individual colloids can be tracked and analyzed.

  10. Magnetic behavior of Joule-heated magnetic core-shell nanowires with positive magnetostrictive core material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Ioan; Astefanoaei, Iordana; Cimpoesu, Dorin; Stancu, Alexandru

    2015-10-01

    Temperature field is an important parameter to be known and controlled in the magnetization process of the core-shell nanowires. The paper analyzes the temperature dependence of hysteretic process in a core-shell nanowire subjected to a dc Joule heating process. An electrical current that passes through the wire induces a temperature and a thermal stress field in the system. Spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature in system was analyzed using a model based on time-dependent heat conduction equation. The stresses determined by thermal gradients and different expansion characteristics of core and shell materials were computed. The temperature and stress depend on the size parameters of the system, dc Joule current and the initial temperature of the system. The magnetic behavior of the nanowire was analyzed using the Micromag application. The magnetic state of the core is influenced by the temperature field induced by a dc current applied to the system. For core materials with positive magnetostriction coefficient the coercive field increases at the increase of dc current intensity passed through the system.

  11. A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM-NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH FOR PRICING CORES AND REMANUFACTURED CORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Seidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT:Sustainability has become a major issue in most economies, causing many leading companies to focus on product recovery and reverse logistics. Remanufacturing is an industrial process that makes used products reusable. One of the important aspects in both reverse logistics and remanufacturing is the pricing of returned and remanufactured products (called cores. In this paper, we focus on pricing the cores and remanufactured cores. First we present a mathematical model for this purpose. Since this model does not satisfy our requirements, we propose a simulation optimisation approach. This approach consists of a hybrid genetic algorithm based on a neural network employed as the fitness function. We use automata learning theory to obtain the learning rate required for training the neural network. Numerical results demonstrate that the optimal value of the acquisition price of cores and price of remanufactured cores is obtained by this approach.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Volhoubaarheid het ‘n belangrike saak geword in die meeste ekonomieë, wat verskeie maatskappye genoop het om produkherwinning en omgekeerde logistiek te onder oë te neem. Hervervaardiging is ‘n industriële proses wat gebruikte produkte weer bruikbaar maak. Een van die belangrike aspekte in beide omgekeerde logistiek en hervervaardiging is die prysbepaling van herwinne en hervervaardigde produkte. Hierdie artikel fokus op die prysbepalingsaspekte by wyse van ‘n wiskundige model.

  12. Experimental determination of LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, B.; Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Gantenbein, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-12-31

    The main phenomena which influence an LMFBR core seismic response are the fluid structure interaction and the impacts between subassemblies. To study the core behaviour seismic tests and calculations have been performed on the core mock-up RAPSODIE in air or in water and for different excitation levels. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs.

  13. A rapid and convergent synthesis of the integrastatin core

    KAUST Repository

    Tadross, Pamela M.

    2011-01-01

    The tetracyclic core of the integrastatin natural products has been prepared in a convergent and rapid manner. Our strategy relies upon a palladium(ii)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization to form the central [3.3.1]-dioxabicycle of the natural product core. Overall, the core has been completed in only 4 linear steps from known compounds. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Core concepts of law: taking common-sense seriously

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.P.J. Breuker; R.J. Hoekstra

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we present LRI-Core, a core ontology for covering domains of law. After a decade of developing many ontologies for legal domains and applications, the need for a unifying core ontology that covers the main concepts that are common to all legal domains became very apparent. It can be ar

  15. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  16. Geomagnetic Secular Variation and Its Applications to the Core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Andrew; Finlay, Chris

    2015-01-01

    of physical core processes. These divide themselves into processes associatedwith movement of core fluid, which is capable of advecting the field, and processes associated withthe finite resistivity of the core, commonly termed diffusive processes. We lay the foundations for some of the more theoretical...

  17. Core Stability: Inter- and Intraobserver Reliability of 6 Clinical Tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Weir; J. Darby; H. Inklaar; B. Koes; E. Bakker; J.L. Tol

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Core stability is a complex concept within sports medicine and is thought to play a role in sports injuries. There is a lack of reliable and valid clinical tests for core stability. The inter- and intraobserver reliability of 6 tests commonly used to assess core stability was determined.

  18. A lock circuit for a multi-core processor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    An integrated circuit comprising a multiple processor cores and a lock circuit that comprises a queue register with respective bits set or reset via respective, connections dedicated to respective processor cores, whereby the queue register identifies those among the multiple processor cores that...

  19. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to analyze and describe process and outcomes of two pilot assessments based on the HTA Core Model, discuss the applicability of the model, and explore areas of development. METHODS: Data were gathered from HTA Core Model and pilot Core HTA documents...

  20. Does the Center Hold? Reflections on a Sociological Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantine, Jeanne; Greenwood, Nancy; Howard, Jay R.; Kain, Edward L.; Pike, Diane; Schwartz, Michael; Smith, R. Tyson; Zipp, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Is there a distinct disciplinary core (or foundation of agreed on knowledge) in sociology? Should we define a core in our broad field to build consensus? If so, what should it look like? We address these questions by presenting three viewpoints that lean for and against identifying a core for department curricula, students, and the public face of…