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Sample records for cce faimbe facce

  1. 48 CFR 301.603-72 - FAC-C and HHS SAC certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FAC-C and HHS SAC... Responsibilities 301.603-72 FAC-C and HHS SAC certification requirements. (a) The FAC-C certification program is... thereunder are not required to re-take training courses, but shall follow FAC-C training requirements when...

  2. 48 CFR 301.603-74 - Requirement for retention of FAC-C and HHS SAC certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of FAC-C and HHS SAC certification. 301.603-74 Section 301.603-74 Federal Acquisition Regulations..., Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 301.603-74 Requirement for retention of FAC-C and HHS SAC certification. To maintain FAC-C certification, all warranted Contracting Officers, regardless of series, as...

  3. FACC: A Novel Finite Automaton Based on Cloud Computing for the Multiple Longest Common Subsequences Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanni Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the multiple longest common subsequences (MLCS has significant applications in the areas of bioinformatics, information processing, and data mining, and so forth, Although a few parallel MLCS algorithms have been proposed, the efficiency and effectiveness of the algorithms are not satisfactory with the increasing complexity and size of biologic data. To overcome the shortcomings of the existing MLCS algorithms, and considering that MapReduce parallel framework of cloud computing being a promising technology for cost-effective high performance parallel computing, a novel finite automaton (FA based on cloud computing called FACC is proposed under MapReduce parallel framework, so as to exploit a more efficient and effective general parallel MLCS algorithm. FACC adopts the ideas of matched pairs and finite automaton by preprocessing sequences, constructing successor tables, and common subsequences finite automaton to search for MLCS. Simulation experiments on a set of benchmarks from both real DNA and amino acid sequences have been conducted and the results show that the proposed FACC algorithm outperforms the current leading parallel MLCS algorithm FAST-MLCS.

  4. Consequence-driven cyber-informed engineering (CCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Sarah G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); St Michel, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Assante, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-18

    The Idaho National Lab (INL) is leading a high-impact, national security-level initiative to reprioritize the way the nation looks at high-consequence risk within the industrial control systems (ICS) environment of the country’s most critical infrastructure and other national assets. The Consequence-driven Cyber-informed Engineering (CCE) effort provides both private and public organizations with the steps required to examine their own environments for high-impact events/risks; identify implementation of key devices and components that facilitate that risk; illuminate specific, plausible cyber attack paths to manipulate these devices; and develop concrete mitigations, protections, and tripwires to address the high-consequence risk. The ultimate goal of the CCE effort is to help organizations take the steps necessary to thwart cyber attacks from even top-tier, highly resourced adversaries that would result in a catastrophic physical effect. CCE participants are encouraged to work collaboratively with each other and with key U.S. Government (USG) contributors to establish a coalition, maximizing the positive effect of lessons-learned and further contributing to the protection of critical infrastructure and other national assets.

  5. Analysis of the pattern of expression of the Fanconi anemia group C (Facc) gene during murine development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnoshtein, F.; Buchwald, M. [Hospital for sick children, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a variety of congenital and skeletal malformations, progressive pancytopanenia and predisposition to malignancies. FA cells display chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Both the human and the corresponding murine cDNAs have been cloned in our lab. Here we describe the expression of Facc during mouse development, using mRNA in situ hybridization. Our aim is to obtain clues on the possible function of the Facc gene product during development that may help elucidate basic defect(s) in FA. In addition, knowledge of the exact pattern of Facc expression will assist in interpreting the phenotypes of mutant mice, currently being developed. In embryos the gene is diffusely expressed over the entire embryo, with higher hybridization levels in the mesenchyme and in both upper and lower extremities. Specific expression of Facc is seen in the perichondrium and marrow of long bones of hind limbs/hip; long bones of front limbs/shoulder region; developing digits of front and hind paws; and ribs. The signal is also detected in the following regions: cranial/frontal; facial/periorbital and maxillary/mandibular, hair follicles, diaphragm and lung. In addition, generalized Facc expression is seen during these embryonic stages. The pattern of Facc expression is consistent with the known skeletal abnormalities in FA patients, which include radial ray deformities, metacarpal hypoplasia, and abnormalities of lower limbs, ribs, head and face. The signal in the lung is consistent with the lung lobe absence and abnormal pulmonary drainage that have been detected in some FA patients. The sloped forehead and microcephaly in FA patients may have some association with the signal seen in the frontal region of the mouse cranium. Taken together, our results suggest that Facc is directly involved in the development of various embryonic tissues, particularly bone.

  6. European critical loads: database, biodiversity and ecosystems at risk : CCE Final Report 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettelingh JP; Posch M; Slootweg J; M&E; DMG

    2017-01-01

    With this Final Report 2017 the Coordination Centre for Effects (CCE) located at the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM, Bilthoven, the Netherlands) is concluding its work. In 1990, tasks of the CCE were offered by the Netherlands to the Convention on Long-range

  7. An eastward propagating compressional Pc 5 wave observed by AMPTE/CCE in the postmidnight sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; McEntire, R.W.; Zanetti, L.J.; Lopez, R.E.; Kistler, L.M.; Ipavich, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Data from three instruments, the magnetometer, the charge-energy-mass spectrometer, and the medium-energy particle analyzer onboard the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft have been used to study a compressional Pc 5 wave observed at 1925-2200 UT on day 202 (July 21) of 1986 at a radial distance of ≅ 8 R E in the postmidnight sector near the beginning of minor geomagnetic activity. The wave exhibited harmonically related transverse and compressional magnetic oscillations, modulation of the flux of medium energy protons (E approx-gt 10 keV), and a large azimuthal wave number (m ∼ 65). These properties are similar to those of compressional Pc 5 waves observed previously at geostationary orbit. The unique observations associated with the CCE event are the occurrence in the postmidnight sector, the eastward (or sunward) propagation with respect to the spacecraft, and the left-handed polarization of the perturbed magnetic field. These are opposite to previous geostationary observations. The authors propose that the unique propagation and polarization are propagating westward in the plasma rest frame, appears to propagate eastward to the observer because the electric field drift velocity is larger than the wave phase velocity

  8. Validación del Cuestionario de Creencias Centrales de los Trastornos de la Personalidad (CCE-TP en población colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Helena Londoño A.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Se construyó un cuestionario para evaluar creencias centrales asociadas con los trastornos de la personalidad, fundamentadas en el Modelo de la Terapia Cognitiva. Se realizó el análisis estructural y la validez de contenido de la prueba en población universitaria de la ciudad de Medellín, Colombia. La muestra fue representativa y elegida al azar a través de un procedimiento polietápico. Un número de 809 estudiantes universitarios contestaron el cuestionario de creencias centrales de los trastornos de la personalidad (CCE-TP. Se realizó un análisis factorial exploratorio de la prueba, reagrupándose los ítems en 14 factores (F que representan el 61,3% de la varianza. F1: CCE-TP antisocial (8 ítems, a 0,839; F2: CCE-TP esquizotípico/límite (8 ítems, a 0,846; F3: CCE-TP histriónico/patrón seductor (6 ítems, a 0,833; F4: CCE-TP paranoide (6 ítems, a 0,836; F5: CCE-TP por evitación / autopercepción negativa (5 ítems, a 0,755; F6: CCE-TP por dependencia (5 ítems, a 0,797; F7: CCE-TP histriónico/ dependencia emocional (4 ítems, a 0,755; F8: CCETP obsesivo-compulsivo/perfeccionista (4 ítems, a 0,808; F9: CCE-TP por evitación/hipersensible (4 ítems, a 0,766; F10: CCE-TP obsesivo-compulsivo/ crítico frente a los demás (3 ítems, a 0,851; F11: CCE-TP narcisista (4 ítems, a 0,717; F12: CCE-TP pasivo-agresivo / temor a ser dominado (3 ítems, a 0,719; F13: CCE-TP pasivo-agresivo/crítico frente a la autoridad (3 ítems, a 0,685, y F14: CCE-TP esquizoide (2 ítems, a 0,774. El alfa de Cronbach de la prueba fue de 0,931.

  9. Validación del Cuestionario de Creencias Centrales de los Trastornos de la Personalidad (CCE-TP en población colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Castrillón M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Se construyó un cuestionario para evaluar creencias centrales asociadas con los trastornos de la personalidad, fundamentadas en el Modelo de la Terapia Cognitiva. Se realizó el análisis estructural y la validez de contenido de la prueba en población universitaria de la ciudad de Medellín, Colombia. La muestra fue representativa y elegida al azar a través de un procedimiento polietápico. Un número de 809 estudiantes universitarios contestaron el cuestionario de creencias centrales de los trastornos de la personalidad (CCE-TP. Se realizó un análisis factorial exploratorio de la prueba, reagrupándose los ítems en 14 factores (F que representan el 61,3% de la varianza. F1: CCE-TP antisocial (8 ítems, a 0,839; F2: CCE-TP esquizotípico/límite (8 ítems, a 0,846; F3: CCE-TP histriónico/patrón seductor (6 ítems, a 0,833; F4: CCE-TP paranoide (6 ítems, a 0,836; F5: CCE-TP por evitación / autopercepción negativa (5 ítems, a 0,755; F6: CCE-TP por dependencia (5 ítems, a 0,797; F7: CCE-TP histriónico/dependencia emocional (4 ítems, a 0,755; F8: CCETP obsesivo-compulsivo/perfeccionista (4 ítems, a 0,808; F9: CCE-TP por evitación/hipersensible (4 ítems, a 0,766; F10: CCE-TP obsesivo-compulsivo/ crítico frente a los demás (3 ítems, a 0,851; F11: CCE-TP narcisista (4 ítems, a 0,717; F12: CCE-TP pasivo-agresivo / temor a ser dominado (3 ítems, a 0,719; F13: CCE-TP pasivo-agresivo/crítico frente a la autoridad (3 ítems, a 0,685, y F14: CCE-TP esquizoide (2 ítems, a 0,774. El alfa de Cronbach de la prueba fue de 0,931.

  10. PENGARUH MODEL COOPERATIVE CLASS EXPERIMENT (CCE TIPE TEAM GAMES TOURNAMENT(TGT PADA KBK DAN HASIL BELAJAR SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Mahda Akhmad Sa'idun

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pembelajaran yang masih menggunakan metode konvensional menyebabkan pencapaian kompetensi matapelajaran kimia masih tergolong rendah. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh Model Cooperative Class Experiment (CCE tipe Team Games Tournament (TGT pada KBK dan Hasil Be/ajar siswa SMA topik reaksi redoks. Penentuan sampel menggunakan teknik cluster random sampling dan menghasikan siswa kelas X8 sebagai kelas eksperimen dan kelas X7 sebagai kelas kontrol. Metode yang digunakan dalam pengambilan data adalah dokumentasi, tes dalam bentuk pilihan ganda dan essay berupa open-ended questions serta observasi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan hasil analisis data tes KBK yaitu pencapaian kelima subindikator KBK pada kelas eksperimen mencapai rata-rata 73, 75% yang berarti siswa dapat mengembangkan KBK dengan kriteria baik, sedangkan kelas kontrol dengan rata-rata 64,68% dalam kriteria KBK cukup. Dari hasil analisis, diperoleh rb 0,51 dengan besarnya kontribusi 26,29%. Dari hasil penelitian dapat disimpulkan bahwa penerapan pembelajaran Model Cooperative Class Experiment (CCE Tipe Team Games Tournament (TGT berpengaruh pada KBK dan hasil be/ajar siswa suatu SMA di Semarang pada pokok materi redoks dengan kontribusi sebesar 26,29%.Learning with the conventional method make competency achievement in chemistry subject is still low. This study aimed to determine the effect of Model Cooperative Class Experiment (CCE type Team Games Tournament (TGT on CBC and Learning Outcomes on high school students in the topic of redox reactions. Sample determination was using cluster random sampling technique, class X8 grade students is as the experimental class and X7 class is as control class. The method used in data collection is documentation, in the form of multiple choice test and an essay in the form of open-ended questions and observations. The results showed that analysis of CBC data test achieved fifth subindikator CBC in the experimental class gained an

  11. PENGARUH MODEL COOPERATIVE CLASS EXPERIMENT (CCE TIPE TEAM GAMES TOURNAMENT (TGT PADA KBK DAN HASIL BELAJAR SISWA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Mahda Akhmad Sa’idun

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning with the conventional method make competency achievement in chemistry subject is still low. This study aimed to determine the effect of Model Cooperative Class Experiment (CCE type Team Games Tournament (TGT on CBC and Learning Outcomes on high school students in the topic of redox reactions. Sample determination was using cluster random sampling technique, class X8 grade students is as the experimental class and X7 class is as control class. The method used in data collection is documentation, in the form of multiple choice test and an essay in the form of open-ended questions and observations. The results showed that analysis of CBC data test achieved fifth subindikator CBC in the experimental class gained an average of 73.75%, which means that students can develop CBC with good criterion, while the control class with an average of 64.68% in the CBC is sufficient criteria. The analysis data obtained rb 0.51 with the contribution of 26.29%. The results of this study concluded that the implementation of Cooperative Learning Model Class Experi ment (CCE Study Team Games Tournament (TGT type have signiffican effect on CBC and student learning outcomes in high school in Semarang on the redox subject with the contribution of 26.29%.

  12. Backbone 1H, 13C, and 15N NMR assignments for the Cyanothece 51142 protein cce_0567: a protein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchko, Garry W; Sofia, Heidi J

    2008-06-01

    Cyanothece 51142 contains a 78-residue protein, cce_0567, that falls into the DUF683 family of proteins associated with nitrogen fixation. Here we report the assignment of most of the main chain and 13C(beta) side chain resonances of the approximately 40 kDa homo-tetramer.

  13. Structural characterization of the protein cce_0567 from Cyanothece 51142, a metalloprotein associated with nitrogen fixation in the DUF683 family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Robinson, Howard; Addlagatta, Anthony

    2009-03-11

    The genome of many cyanobacacteria contain the sequence for a small protein (<100 amino acids) with a commom "domain of unknown function" grouped into the DUF683 protein family. While the biological function of DUF683 is still not known, their genomic location within nitrogen fixation clusters suggests that DUF683 proteins may play a role in the process. The diurnal cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. PCC 51142 contains a gene for a protein that fall into the DUF683 family, cce_0567 (78 aa, 9.0 kDa). In an effort to elucidate the biochemical role DUF683 proteins may play in nitrogen fixation, we have determined the first crystal structure for a protein in this family, cce_0567, to 1.84 Å resolution. Cce_0567 crystallized in space group P21 with two protein molecules and one Ni2+ cation per asymmetric unit. The protein is composed of two α-helices from residues P11 to G41 (α1) and L49-E74 (α2) with the second α-helix containing a short 310-helix (Y46 - N48). A four-residue linker (L42 - D45) between the helices allows them to form an anti-parallel bundle that cross over each other towards their termini. In solution it is likely that two molecules of cce_0567 form a rod-like dimer by the stacking interactions of ~1/2 of the protein. Histidine-36 is highly conserved in all known DUF683 proteins and the N2 nitrogen of the H36 side chain of each molecule in the dimer coordinate with Ni2+ in the crystal structure. The divalent cation Ni2+ was titrated into 15N-labelled cce_0567 and chemical shift perturbations were observed only in the 1H-15N HSQC spectra for residues at, or near, the site of Ni2+ binding observed in the crystal structure. There was no evidence for an increase in the size of cce_0567 upon binding Ni2+, even in large molar excess of Ni2+, indicating that a metal was not required for dimer formation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that cce_0567 was extremely robust, with a melting temperature of ~62ºC that was reversible.

  14. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING CCE1_122W_33N and MOORING_CCE1_122W_33N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2008-11-11 to 2014-10-26 (NCEI Accession 0144245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144245 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING CCE1_122W_33N and MOORING_CCE1_122W_33N in the North...

  15. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, pH, salinity and other variables collected from time series observations using Bubble type equilibrator for autonomous carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement, Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas analyzer and other instruments from MOORING CCE2_121W_34N and MOORING_CCE2_121W_34N in the North Pacific Ocean from 2010-01-17 to 2015-04-30 (NODC Accession 0084099)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0084099 includes chemical, meteorological, physical and time series data collected from MOORING CCE2_121W_34N and MOORING_CCE2_121W_34N in the North...

  16. Application of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE to evaluate the whole gastrointestinal tract: a comparative study of single-camera and dual-camera analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remes-Troche JM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available José María Remes-Troche,1 Victoria Alejandra Jiménez-García,2 Josefa María García-Montes,2 Pedro Hergueta-Delgado,2 Federico Roesch-Dietlen,1 Juan Manuel Herrerías-Gutiérrez2 1Digestive Physiology and Motility Lab, Medical Biological Research Institute, Universidad Veracruzana, Veracruz, México; 2Gastroenterology Service, Virgen Macarena University Hospital, Seville, Spain Background and study aims: Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE was developed for the evaluation of colorectal pathology. In this study, our aim was to assess if a dual-camera analysis using CCE allows better evaluation of the whole gastrointestinal (GI tract compared to a single-camera analysis. Patients and methods: We included 21 patients (12 males, mean age 56.20 years submitted for a CCE examination. After standard colon preparation, the colon capsule endoscope (PillCam Colon™ was swallowed after reinitiation from its “sleep” mode. Four physicians performed the analysis: two reviewed both video streams at the same time (dual-camera analysis; one analyzed images from one side of the device (“camera 1”; and the other reviewed the opposite side (“camera 2”. We compared numbers of findings from different parts of the entire GI tract and level of agreement among reviewers. Results: A complete evaluation of the GI tract was possible in all patients. Dual-camera analysis provided 16% and 5% more findings compared to camera 1 and camera 2 analysis, respectively. Overall agreement was 62.7% (kappa = 0.44, 95% CI: 0.373–0.510. Esophageal (kappa = 0.611 and colorectal (kappa = 0.595 findings had a good level of agreement, while small bowel (kappa = 0.405 showed moderate agreement. Conclusion: The use of dual-camera analysis with CCE for the evaluation of the GI tract is feasible and detects more abnormalities when compared with single-camera analysis. Keywords: capsule endoscopy, colon, gastrointestinal tract, small bowel

  17. Charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon in the energy range 1 to 300 keV/e observed with AMPTE/CCE in the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, G.; Stuedemann, W.; Wilken, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Hamilton, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of charge state distributions of oxygen and carbon are presented that were obtained with the charge-energy-mass spectrometer onboard the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft. Data were selected for two different local time sectors (apogee at 1300 LT and 0300 LT, respectively), three L-ranges (4-6, 6-8, and greater than 8), and quiet to moderately disturbed days (Kp less than or equal to 4). The charge state distributions reveal the existence of all charge states of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere. The relative importance of the different charge states strongly depends on L and much less on local time. The observations confirm that the solar wind and the ionosphere contribute to the oxygen population, whereas carbon only originates from the solar wind. The L-dependence of the charge state distributions can be interpreted in terms of these different ion sources and of charge exchange and diffusion processes that largely influence the distribution of oxygen and carbon in the magnetosphere.

  18. Simultaneous quantitation of 5- and 7-hydroxyflavone antioxidants and their binding constants with BSA using dual chiral capillary electrophoresis (dCCE) and HPLC with fluorescent detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo Markeb, Ahmad; Abo El-Maali, Nagwa

    2014-02-01

    In this article we present two novel uses of the sensitive techniques HPLC fluorescence and dCCE for both the quantitation and binding studies of the 5- and 7-HFs extracted from the plant Alfalfa with Albumin. Ultrasonic extraction method as an extra energy source is used to enhance the extraction efficiency and speed up. The two antioxidants could be easily separated and quantified after a 10.0-min run time. Multiple calibration curves for their analysis exhibited consistent linearity and reproducibility in the range of 0.20-2.00 mg L(-1) for 5-HF (r >0.9979) and 0.01-0.10 mg L(-1) for 7-HF (r >0.9999). Limits of Detection were 0.500 µg L(-1) and 0.025 µg L(-1) for 5-HF and 7-HF respectively. Lower Limits of Quantification were 131.600 µg L(-1) for 5-HF and 6.579 µg L(-1) for 7-HF. Inter-assay imprecision was <10% for both flavones. Mean recovery was 104.76% (range 90%-110%) for 5-HF and 93.18% (range 90%-110%) for 7-HF. Since the intermolecular hydrogen atom transfer in the excited triplet state as well as in the excited singlet state might play an important role in the quenching process of photo-excited molecules in biological systems, the binding constants of these HFs with serum albumin have been also estimated to be 1.910 - 2.019 × 10(5) L mol(-1) and 2.390 - 2.500 × 10(5) L mol(-1) for 5-HF and 7-HF respectively. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Opinion of the Consultative Committee for the EURATOM Research and Training Programme in the Field of Nuclear Energy (Fusion) - CCE-FU - on the European domestic assessment of the ITER-FEAT outline design report. Brussels, 11 July 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The CCE-FU endorses the findings of the FTC on the European Domestic Assessment of the ITER-FEAT Outline Design Review, and expresses the opinion that: The machine, ITER-FEAT, the design of which is presented in the Outline Design Report and accompanying document (Technical Basis for the ITER-FEAT Outline Design) successfully responds, in broad terms, to the requirements set by the Special Working Group, established by the ITER Council, in response to Task No. 1 and adopted by the Council; The parameters chosen represent convergence towards a coherent design, based upon preserving adequate margins within the cost target against the new objectives and yet retaining flexibility to exploit advances in physics understanding; ITER-FEAT can meet its objectives of extended burn in induction operation with power amplification Q>10 at the reference operating values of Ip=15MA, Paux=40MW, thus providing 400 MW of fusion power. The margins to achieve this objective are in the range of 15-25%. The design also has sufficient flexibility to explore hybrid scenarios with long pulse capability (> 2000 seconds), and scenarios aiming at demonstrating steady state operation with the ratio of fusion power to input power for current drive of at least 5, provided further confinement enhancement can be achieved; Although most of the components of ITER-FEAT are still in a preliminary design state, the new design appears suitable to be developed into the final design stage, the new design appears suitable to be developed into the final design of a machine capable of achieving the objectives set by the ITER Council; The target cost for the realisation of ITER-FEAT was set by the ITER Council at about half of the 1998 ITER cost estimates. The present preliminary analysis provides confidence that this target will be reached. By the end of 2000, the detailed cost estimates will be provided from the detailed design specifications and manufacturing studies in the industries of the three Parties

  20. Ludovico il Moro nell’Ottocento. Le due facce del Rinascimento nel Risorgimento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asker Pelgrom

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ludovico il Moro in the Nineteenth Century The two faces of Renaissance during the Risorgimento   This contribution aims to illustrate the ambivalent attitude towards the Renaissance that characterized Italian Romanticism. The most eloquent example of this ambiguity is the reputation of the Milanese, late sixteenth-century duke Ludovico Sforza ‘Il Moro’ and his court. On the one hand, the new pantheon of great Italians which began to arise in the early nineteenth century, building on older cults of uomini illustri, and a growing European interest for Renaissance culture shed a positive light on Il Moro’s court. After all, he had been a most generous and sensitive patron to great artists like Leonardo da Vinci and Bramante, and could therefore serve as a timeless emblem of the ideal Maecenas through the eyes of various artists and their patrons, both in Milan as elsewhere. At the same time, however, his reign marked, as Guicciardini had already written, a turning point in Italian history, for cool calculation and sheer self interest had made him open the gates of the peninsula to the French king Charles VIII, a decision which proved fatal for Italian independence. In the increasingly black-and-white view of the Risorgimento, this behaviour would bring him the title of archtraitor. Due to the strongly politicized historical perspective that would dominate Italian historiography long after national unification, the European admiration for the Italian Renaissance following Burckhardt’s ideas would never be wholly embraced and the reputation of this crucial era in national history would remain problematic until well into the twentieth century.

  1. Le molteplici facce della polizia: Lucertolo, primo investigatore seriale della letteratura italiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Facchi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the study of the ‘prehistory’ of the Italian detective novel, the Tuscan journalist and writer Giulio Piccini, better known by his pseudonym Jarro, has played a pivotal role. Following his desire to create “il romanzo giudiziario d’impronta tutta italiana” (Piccini 1887: X, Piccini gave life to Lucertolo, the first serial detective of Italian literature, and the protagonist of four novels published between 1882 and 1884. This character triggers critical interest because his main features change with each text: from the birro of the first two novels – a Vidocqian figure somewhere between a policeman and a thief – to an almost infallible police commissioner in the third novel, doubling up in the fourth with two complementary characters, a retired commissioner and a young police delegate, i.e. Lucertolo senior and junior. The aim of this analysis of the different versions of Jarro’s detective, is to identify how each bears traces of the ‘fathers’ of the detective novel (Poe, Gaboriau, Vidocq and, at the same time, contributes to the foundation of an Italian interpretation of the genre.

  2. Whether Experience and Training of Teachers Affect Their Attitude towards Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahanowas, S. K.; Halder, Santoshi

    2016-01-01

    Teaching experience and training of the teachers are important variables for teaching and evaluating effectively having an immense impact to their inclination, attitude and perfection. West Bengal Board of Secondary Education (W.B.B.S.E), India, has taken the initiative to implement Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation system up to class VIII…

  3. SWFSC/MMTD/CCE: Tagging and Tracking of Physeter (T-TOP/T-TOP2) 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This research was devoted to studying sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) behavior. The principal study area for T-TOP and T-TOP2 was the Pioneer Seamount, 50...

  4. SWFSC/MMTD/CCE: Collaborative Survey of Cetacean Abundance and the Pelagic Ecosystem (CSCAPE) 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CSCAPE 2005 cruise was a collaboration between the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the National Marine Sanctuary (NMS) Program to assess the...

  5. Science Excursion As A One Of The Tool For CCE In Science Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhari, Dr. Priti

    2015-01-01

    The present world is a world of science and technology. Everything and every event happening around us demand some knowledge of simple scientific facts or principles. Learning by doing and learning by living are the two cardinal principles of teaching and same is true in case of teaching science. It is the natural urge in the children to make things, to break things and to handle things but the present curriculum does not provide ample opportunities for the students for self expression, indep...

  6. The effect of construction cost estimating (CCE software on job performance: An improvement plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Mukelas M.F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive statistical research on the effect of construction cost estimating software’s features towards estimating job performance. The objectives of this study are identification of cost estimating software features, analyzing the significant relation of cost estimating software’s features towards job performance, Explore the problem faced during the implementation and lastly propose a plan to improve the cost estimating software usage among contractors in Malaysia. The study statistically reveals four features of cost estimating software that significantly impact towards changes in cost estimating job performance. These features were refined by performing interview to focus group of respondent to observe the actual possible problems during the implementation. Eventually, the proposed improvement plan was validated by the focus group of respondents to enhance the cost estimating software implementation among contractors in Malaysia.

  7. SWFSC/MMTD/CCE: Leatherback Use of Temperate Habitat (LUTH) 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Leatherback Use of Temperate Habitat (LUTH) survey is an ecosystem assessment of temperate foraging habitats of endangered leatherback turtles off the coast of...

  8. Validación del Cuestionario de Creencias Centrales de los Trastornos de la Personalidad (CCE-TP) en población colombiana

    OpenAIRE

    Londoño A., Nora Helena; Maestre C., Katherine; Schnitter C., Mónica; Castrillón M., Diego; Ferrer B., Alberto; Chavez C., Liliana

    2010-01-01

    Se construyó un cuestionario para evaluar creencias centrales asociadas con los trastornos de la personalidad, fundamentadas en el Modelo de la Terapia Cognitiva. Se realizó el análisis estructural y la validez de contenido de la prueba en población universitaria de la ciudad de Medellín, Colombia. La muestra fue representativa y elegida al azar a través de un procedimiento polietápico. Un número de 809 estudiantes universitarios contestaron el cuestionario de creencias centrales de los trast...

  9. Validación del Cuestionario de Creencias Centrales de los Trastornos de la Personalidad (CCE-TP) en población colombiana

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Castrillón M.; Mónica Schnitter C.; Alberto Ferrer B.; Liliana Chaves C.; Nora Helena Londono A; Carlos Alberto Marín C.; Katherine Maestre C.

    2007-01-01

    Se construyó un cuestionario para evaluar creencias centrales asociadas con los trastornos de la personalidad, fundamentadas en el Modelo de la Terapia Cognitiva. Se realizó el análisis estructural y la validez de contenido de la prueba en población universitaria de la ciudad de Medellín, Colombia. La muestra fue representativa y elegida al azar a través de un procedimiento polietápico. Un número de 809 estudiantes universitarios contestaron el cuestionario de creencias centrales de los trast...

  10. 2013-2014 California Current Ecosystem (CCE14): Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Coastal Pelagic Fishes (Legs I and II); and Investigations of hake survey methods, life history, and associated ecosystem (Legs III and IV) (SH1405, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2014 acoustic-trawl method (ATM) project aboard Bell M. Shimada represents a joint effort between the SWFSC and the NWFSC in investigating elements of the...

  11. 2013-2014 California Current Ecosystem (CCE14): Acoustic-Trawl Survey of Coastal Pelagic Fishes (Legs I and II); and Investigations of hake survey methods, life history, and associated ecosystem (Legs III and IV) (SH1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2014 acoustic-trawl method (ATM) project aboard Bell M. Shimada represents a joint effort between the SWFSC and the NWFSC in investigating elements of the...

  12. Presenilin-mediated modulation of capacitative calcium entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, A S; Cheng, I; Chung, S; Grenfell, T Z; Lee, H; Pack-Chung, E; Handler, M; Shen, J; Xia, W; Tesco, G; Saunders, A J; Ding, K; Frosch, M P; Tanzi, R E; Kim, T W

    2000-09-01

    We studied a novel function of the presenilins (PS1 and PS2) in governing capacitative calcium entry (CCE), a refilling mechanism for depleted intracellular calcium stores. Abrogation of functional PS1, by either knocking out PS1 or expressing inactive PS1, markedly potentiated CCE, suggesting a role for PS1 in the modulation of CCE. In contrast, familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD)-linked mutant PS1 or PS2 significantly attenuated CCE and store depletion-activated currents. While inhibition of CCE selectively increased the amyloidogenic amyloid beta peptide (Abeta42), increased accumulation of the peptide had no effect on CCE. Thus, reduced CCE is most likely an early cellular event leading to increased Abeta42 generation associated with FAD mutant presenilins. Our data indicate that the CCE pathway is a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

  13. ORF Alignment: NC_001143 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yces cerevisiae] emb|CAA81846.1| CCE1 ... [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] sp|Q03702|CCE1_YEAST ... Cruciform cutting... ... [Saccharomyces cerevisiae] gb|AAB02883.1| cruciform ... cutting endon

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 145355221 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 436017:4609 distinct from photosynthetic electron transfer catalyst, CYC6, partial Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 RDLERNGVATKEDISNLIERGKGKMPGYGESCAPKGACTFGARLDAEEIDALATYVLDRAAVDW ...

  15. Dicty_cDB: AFM809 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available EL13642.b1_C04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 52 0.014 1 ( EL354988 ) CCEM11643.b1_F07.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium en... 52 0.014 1 ( EL349132 ) CCEL5548.b1_H19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive C

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11342-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14160.b1_P12.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 50 0.34 1 ( EL360326 ) CCEM5048.b1_O13.ab1 CCE(LMS) endiv...e Cichorium end... 50 0.34 1 ( EL349003 ) CCEL5428.b1_G13.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cicho

  17. Enhanced barrier functions and anti-inflammatory effect of cultured coconut extract on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soomin; Jang, Ji Eun; Kim, Jihee; Lee, Young In; Lee, Dong Won; Song, Seung Yong; Lee, Ju Hee

    2017-08-01

    Natural plant oils have been used as a translational alternative to modern medicine. Particularly, virgin coconut oil (VCO) has gained popularity because of its potential benefits in pharmaceutical, nutritional, and cosmetic applications. Cultured coconut extract (CCE) is an alternative end product of VCO, which undergoes a further bacterial fermentation process. This study aimed to investigate the effects of CCE on human skin. We analyzed the expression of skin barrier molecules and collagens after applying CCE on human explanted skin. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of CCE, the expression of inflammatory markers was analyzed after ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. The CCE-treated group showed increased expression of cornified cell envelope components, which contribute to protective barrier functions of the stratum corneum. Further, the expression of inflammatory markers was lower in the CCE-treated group after exposure to UVB radiation. These results suggest an anti-inflammatory effect of CCE against UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. Additionally, the CCE-treated group showed increased collagen and hyaluronan synthase-3 expression. In our study, CCE showed a barrier-enhancing effect and anti-inflammatory properties against ex vivo UVB irradiation-induced inflammation. The promising effect of CCE may be attributed to its high levels of polyphenols and fatty acid components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15464-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available B1 Xenopus (Silurana) tropicali... 46 3.7 1 ( EL370901 ) CCES7918.b1_K12.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 46 3.7 1 ( EL366798 ) CCES2909.b1_I08.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 46 3....7 1 ( EL364486 ) CCEM8999.b1_N17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 46 3.7 1 ( EL362629 ) CCEM7155.b1_E14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 46 3.7 1 ( EL358875 ) CCEM3709.b1_I16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en...d... 46 3.7 1 ( EL355805 ) CCEM12391.b1_N01.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 4

  19. Accuracy and safety of second-generation PillCam COLON capsule for colorectal polyp detection

    OpenAIRE

    Spada, Cristiano; De Vincentis, Fabio; Cesaro, Paola; Hassan, Cesare; Riccioni, Maria Elena; Minelli Grazioli, Leonardo; Bolivar, Santiago; Zurita, Andrade; Costamagna, Guido

    2012-01-01

    PillCam COLON capsule endoscopy (CCE) (Given Imaging Ltd, Yoqneam, Israel) is one of the most recent diagnostic, endoscopic technologies designed to explore the colon. CCE is a noninvasive, patient-friendly technique that is able to explore the colon without requiring sedation and air insufflation. The first generation of CCE was released onto the market in 2006 and although it generated great enthusiasm, it showed suboptimal accuracy. Recently, a second-generation system (PillCam COLON 2) (C...

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03756-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available yza sativa Indica Group cD... 38 7e-06 4 ( EL343907 ) CCEL11878.b1_L18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 4...FH Pichia stipitis aerobic dextrose... 60 2e-04 1 ( EL349040 ) CCEL5463.b1_M21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium...2 ) CCEL12544.b1_O16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 42 0.018 2 ( CT761734 ) Paramecium tetraurelia 3-PR

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06712-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available us... 44 2.5 1 ( EL358276 ) CCEM3106.b1_C09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 2.5 1 ( EL357660 ) CCEM2...477.b1_J19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 2.5 1 ( EL354952 ) CCEM11610.b1_C23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive C

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04044-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5675.b1_F04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 48 0.74 1 ( EL356895 ) CCEM1692.b1_H15.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive ...lueweed Helia... 46 2.9 1 ( EL363043 ) CCEM7538.b1_C14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 46 2.9 1 ( EC947

  3. Cumulative culture can emerge from collective intelligence in animal groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Takao; Biro, Dora

    2017-01-01

    Studies of collective intelligence in animal groups typically overlook potential improvement through learning. Although knowledge accumulation is recognised as a major advantage of group living within the framework of Cumulative Cultural Evolution (CCE), the interplay between CCE and collective intelligence has remained unexplored. Here, we use homing pigeons to investigate whether the repeated removal and replacement of individuals in experimental groups (a key method in testing for CCE) alt...

  4. Adaptive response to ionizing radiation in normal human skin fibroblasts. Enhancement of DNA repair rate and modulation of gene expression. Reponse adaptative au rayonnement ionisant des fibroblastes de peau humaine. Augmentation de la vitesse de reparation de l'ADN et variation de l'expression des genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledo, S.M. de; Mitchel, R.E.J. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.); Azzam, E. (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs. Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology); Raaphorst, G.P. (Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology)

    Low doses and dose rates of ionizing radiation enhance the rate of DNA repair in human fibroblasts and protect the cells against radiation-induced micronucleus formation. Chronic exposures reduce the mRNA levels of the genes topoisomerase II and FACC-1 (Fanconi's anemia, group C). (authors). 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  5. New Fellows and Honorary Fellow

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elected: 1966 Section: Medicine. Malhotra, Dr Sardari Lal M.B.B.S. (Panjab), FAMS, FRCP (London), FACP (USA), FACC (USA). Date of birth: 5 December 1919. Date of death: 10 September 2004. Specialization: Epidemiology and Internal Medicine Last known address: Embassy of Italy, Renweg, 27, 1030 Wien, Austria.

  6. patterns of knee, hip and hand osteoarthritis in kenyatta national

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PATTERNS OF KNEE, HIP AND HAND OSTEOARTHRITIS IN KENYATTA. NATIONAL HOSPITAL. H.A. Nour, MMed, G.O. Oyoo, FRCP (Edin), FACR, MBChB, MMed (Clin Rheum) Senior Lecturer, M.D. Joshi,. MBChB, MMed, Cert Clin Epid MPH-Epid, FACC, Associate Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine and.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03072-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9115.b1_E24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 68 2e-08 2 ( DR399444 ) TKN102B0...08 2 ( EL364252 ) CCEM8760.b1_P06.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 72 5e-08 1 ( EL362011 ) CCEM6588.b1_G15.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...1 ( EL513186 ) CHTZ580.b1_G02.ab1 CHT(XYZ) Jerusalem artichoke H... 48 0.75 1 ( EL359273 ) CCEM4086.b1_K14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U00692-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available telium discoideum cDNA clone:ddc2c05, 5' e... 137 4e-28 1 ( EL345169 ) CCEL13036.b1_H20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive ...Cichorium en... 62 9e-12 2 ( EL349817 ) CCEL6183.b1_M09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cicho.... 78 4e-10 1 ( EL346577 ) CCEL2731.b1_E11.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54... 2e-09 2 ( EL347066 ) CCEL3232.b1_P15.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54 2e-09 2 ( D88434 ) Malus domes

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15737-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CCEM3559.b1_N01.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 0.52 1 ( EL357358 ) CCEM2169.b1_A16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 50 0.52 1 ( EL350246 ) CCEL6574.b1_K11.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive ...Cichorium end... 50 0.52 1 ( EL342690 ) CCEL10299.b1_F08.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 50 0.52 1 ( EH6

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15677-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BB-aaa05f09.g1 Oxytricha_pSMART_OXBB Sterkiella... 78 1e-09 1 ( EL346067 ) CCEL2202.b1_C24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive..... 44 0.008 2 ( EL348829 ) CCEL4919.b1_N06.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 48 0.009 2 ( EL361978 ) CCEM...6558.b1_K07.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 48 0.009 2 ( AP008207 ) Oryza sa... apex + stem (H) ... 52 0.074 1 ( EL345928 ) CCEL2052.b1_H09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16556-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0.024 1 ( EL349521 ) CCEL591.b1_M04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium endi... 54 0.02...4 1 ( EL348221 ) CCEL4357.b1_J09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54 0.024 1 ( EL344642 ) CCEL12553.b1_A20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium en... 54 0.024 1 ( EL343958 ) CCEL11925.b1_I05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichoriu

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 364319 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 70447:641 ... 242159:190 ... 436017:190 predicted protein Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 MARETDPKKRVVITGMGLCS...VGDVAEVNAVRKVFKDVQNVKMNATKSMIGHCLGAAGGMEAIACIMAIKTGMLHPTLNQNELEPIVEGIDTCANEKKAHTVTAAISNSFGFGGHNSCVIFAPFED

  13. Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 in a cheese model system: a biochemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinich, M F; Perez-Díaz, I; Cai, H; Rankin, S A; Broadbent, J R; Steele, J L

    2011-11-01

    Growth of Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334, in a cheese-ripening model system based upon a medium prepared from ripening Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) was evaluated. Lactobacillus paracasei ATCC 334 grows in CCE made from cheese ripened for 2 (2mCCE), 6 (6mCCE), and 8 (8mCCE) mo, to final cell densities of 5.9×10(8), 1.2×10(8), and 2.1×10(7)cfu/mL, respectively. Biochemical analysis and mass balance equations were used to determine substrate consumption patterns and products formed in 2mCCE. The products formed included formate, acetate, and D-lactate. These data allowed us to identify the pathways likely used and to initiate metabolic flux analysis. The production of volatiles during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in 8mCCE was monitored to evaluate the metabolic pathways utilized by Lb. paracasei during the later stages of ripening Cheddar cheese. The 2 volatiles detected at high levels were ethanol and acetate. The remaining detected volatiles are present in significantly lower amounts and likely result from amino acid, pyruvate, and acetyl-coenzyme A metabolism. Carbon balance of galactose, lactose, citrate, and phosphoserine/phosphoserine-containing peptides in terms of D-lactate, acetate, and formate are in agreement with the amounts of substrates observed in 2mCCE; however, this was not the case for 6mCCE and 8mCCE, suggesting that additional energy sources are utilized during growth of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in these CCE. This study provides valuable information on the biochemistry and physiology of Lb. paracasei ATCC 334 in ripening cheese. Copyright © 2011 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, nutrients, and other variables collected from profile and discrete observations using CTD, Niskin bottle, and other instruments from R/V New Horizon and R/V Robert Gordon Sproul in the U.S. West Coast for calibration and validation of California Current Ecosystem (CCE) Moorings from 2009-12-15 to 2015-04-29 (NCEI Accession 0146024)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archive accession contains inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, nutrients, and other data collected from ships during servicing cruises to the California Current...

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06283-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available been constructed from cultivar ... 44 9.2 1 ( EL361821 ) CCEM6415.b1_M20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end...... 44 9.2 1 ( EL360639 ) CCEM5333.b1_J14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 9

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04549-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available stelium discoideum vegetative cDNA clone:VS... 359 e-115 3 ( EL369290 ) CCES5350.b1_L18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endiv...( EY135086 ) CBTH478.g1_K23.ab1:P Triphysaria pusilla root tip... 46 0.008 2 ( EL354181 ) CCEM10844.b1_G23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  17. Dicty_cDB: VHC275 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 8 EL371567 |EL371567.1 CCEL13585.b1_B13.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium endivia cDNA clone CCEL13585, mRNA s...equence. 48 0.26 1 EL360537 |EL360537.1 CCEM5240.b1_O14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cicho

  18. Dicty_cDB: VSD831 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available veloping leaf Medicago truncat... 42 3e-04 2 ( EL343426 ) CCEL11427.b1_F02.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en...... 38 4e-04 3 ( EL353306 ) CCEL9939.b1_F14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 3

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U05566-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available I(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 36 1.0 2 ( EL371607 ) CCEL13625.b1_B23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 36...m i... 36 1.0 2 ( EL343029 ) CCEL11023.b1_M20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en...

  20. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16149-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tis aerobic dextrose... 42 9e-05 4 ( EL365782 ) CCES1859.b1_F10.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 42 9e-0...OURT_58681901 NIH_ZGC_9 Danio rerio cDNA clo... 44 2e-04 3 ( EL354104 ) CCEM10767.b1_M03.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  1. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15102-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 2 ( AU074340 ) Dictyostelium discoideum slug cDNA, clone SSK426. 462 e-126 1 ( EL367947 ) CCES4102.b1_K18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 50 6e-06 2 ( EL366777 ) CCES2888.b1_O02.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  2. Dicty_cDB: SLB802 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ilur... 44 5e-04 2 ( EL364507 ) CCEM9020.b1_H23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 42 5e-04 2 ( DN097777 )...L11223.b1_M21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 42 5e-04 2 dna update 2009. 2.14 Homology vs Protein Score

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06478-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available es genomic clone ... 44 5.6 1 ( EL366763 ) CCES2873.b1_B23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 5.6 1 ( E...L358545 ) CCEM3376.b1_P04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 5.6 1 ( DC20065

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15852-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oryza brachyantha genomic ... 50 0.28 1 ( EL359888 ) CCEM4647.b1_M09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 50 0.28 1 ( EL345565 ) CCEL1682.b1_D13.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 0.2

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12556-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available post anthesis Go... 52 0.058 1 ( EL371413 ) CCEL13430.b1_L22.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 52 0.058 1... ( EL352526 ) CCEL9154.b1_D10.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 52 0.058 1 ( DW492411 ) GH_RMIRS_091_C12_

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13324-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NA, clone:LjB22e05_r. 44 1.6 1 ( EL367833 ) CCES3994.b1_D15.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 1.6 1 ( ...EL366385 ) CCES2478.b1_L19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 1.6 1 ( EH7014

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15010-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available chicory Cichorium i... 50 3e-10 3 ( EL348115 ) CCEL4259.b1_E09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 64 3e-10... 3 ( EL346721 ) CCEL2876.b1_H23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 64 3e-10 3 ( DY963701 ) CLSM13945.b1_B0

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11545-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GQ006: Cambium and phloem from matu... 40 2e-04 2 ( EL366554 ) CCES2655.b1_N16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichoriu...m end... 52 2e-04 2 ( EL367347 ) CCES3484.b1_G07.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 52 3e-04 2 ( EL404213

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15411-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available y Cichorium i... 32 3.7 2 ( EL351059 ) CCEL7673.b1_B24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichor...ium end... 32 3.7 2 ( EL345500 ) CCEL1616.b1_O19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 3.7 2 ( FC294716 )

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11746-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available L355141 ) CCEM11783.b1_M18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 40 0.005 3 ( EL368...574 ) CCES4687.b1_M19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 40 0.005 3 ( EH694634 ) CCIM6551.b1_M05.ab1 CCI(L

  11. Calculation and Mapping of Critical Thresholds in Europe: Status Report 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch M; Smet AMP de; Hettelingh J-P; Downing RJ 000; MNV

    1999-01-01

    This report is the fifth in a bi-annual series prepared by the Coordination Center for Effects (CCE) to document the progress made in calculating and mapping critical thresholds in Europe. The CCE, as part of the Mapping Programme under the UN/ECE Working Group on Effects (WGE), collects critical

  12. Information into Knowledge: Navigating the Complexity in the Campus Community Engagement Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Anne T.; Whitmore, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we draw on two case studies from a current research project investigating the impact of campus-community engagement (CCE) to examine how the fundamental functions for effective knowledge mobilisation were used. The K* spectrum provides a mapping framework for analysis. Both the types of CCE and the different relationships developed…

  13. Standardization of enterococci density estimates by EPA qPCR methods and comparison of beach action value exceedances in river waters with culture methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.EPA has published recommendations for calibrator cell equivalent (CCE) densities of enterococci in recreational waters determined by a qPCR method in its 2012 Recreational Water Quality Criteria (RWQC). The CCE quantification unit stems from the calibration model used to ...

  14. Social and Rational: The Presentation of Nature of Science and the Uptake of Change in Evolution Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselier, Linda C.; Jackson, J. Kasi; Stoiko, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    The nature of science (NOS) as described by education scholars is a critical component of scientific literacy and includes both rational and social aspects taught best in an explicit and reflective manner. NOS is frequently tied to a critical contextual empiricism (CCE) framework for knowledge production. Central to CCE is that objectivity is…

  15. A new mechanism of long-term period variations for W UMa-type contact binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Qian, S.-B.; Xiong, X.

    2018-03-01

    W UMa-type contact binaries belong to close binary systems whose components exactly overflow their Roche lobes and share a common convective envelope (CCE). In the last twenty years, the long-term variations of their orbital periods have been thought to depend on several mechanisms. Now, we suggest a new mechanism: CCE-dominated mechanism. The CCE-dominated mechanism is found based on our numerical result, especially at high mass ratios, that the orbital periods (P) of contact binaries change very much with their fill-out factors (f). Because f is taken as a measurement of the thickness of CCE, the physical cause for the variation of P is a mass transfer between CCE and components. Further, an f-dominated simplification model for this mechanism is introduced. According to it, P may change in a long-term oscillation way with a similar time scale of the thermal modulation, meanwhile q is decreasing slowly till the two components merge. It could be also applied to explain the presence of extremely short period, high mass ratio and deep contact binaries. Moreover, the CCE-dominated mechanism should always work due to mass transfer and mass loss both occurring via CCE. Therefor, the effect of CCE on the variations of orbital periods may have been underestimated before.

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-2190 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-2190 ref|XP_001422029.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00323.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001422029.1 1.9 39% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PMAR-01-0181 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PMAR-01-0181 ref|XP_001420417.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98710.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420417.1 0.60 32% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PVAM-01-1611 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PVAM-01-1611 ref|XP_001421332.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99625.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421332.1 0.091 32% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-05-0032 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-05-0032 ref|XP_001422399.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00716.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001422399.1 1e-18 24% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-02-0027 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-02-0027 ref|XP_001420287.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98580.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420287.1 0.0 57% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-04-0065 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-04-0065 ref|XP_001417012.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO95305.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001417012.1 3e-80 40% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0122 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 4e-25 32% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0178 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0178 ref|XP_001420897.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99190.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420897.1 3.0 43% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-03-0067 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-03-0067 ref|XP_001420774.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99067.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420774.1 3e-18 25% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0212 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0212 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 0.48 30% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-01-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-01-0040 ref|XP_001422370.1| Amt family transporter: ammonium [Ostreococcus lucima...rinus CCE9901] gb|ABP00687.1| Amt family transporter: ammonium [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001422370.1 2e-57 40% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-2469 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-2469 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 0.002 38% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DMEL-06-0040 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DMEL-06-0040 ref|XP_001420457.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98750.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420457.1 0.007 52% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-3360 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-3360 ref|XP_001420118.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98411.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420118.1 3e-07 37% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-02-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-02-0000 ref|XP_001420287.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98580.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420287.1 0.0 59% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-10-0022 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-10-0022 ref|XP_001416230.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94523.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001416230.1 1e-102 50% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OANA-01-1617 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OANA-01-1617 ref|XP_001421089.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99382.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421089.1 7e-08 37% ...

  13. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PCAP-01-1705 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PCAP-01-1705 ref|XP_001421089.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99382.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421089.1 2e-19 33% ...

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TBEL-01-0443 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TBEL-01-0443 ref|XP_001415961.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94253.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415961.1 9e-07 26% ...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-GGAL-35-0049 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-GGAL-35-0049 ref|XP_001421089.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99382.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421089.1 7e-09 45% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ACAR-01-0238 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ACAR-01-0238 ref|XP_001415560.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO93852.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415560.1 4e-06 28% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-PABE-09-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-PABE-09-0000 ref|XP_001421774.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00068.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421774.1 4e-08 31% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1984 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1984 ref|XP_001422544.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00861.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001422544.1 3e-10 31% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-05-0038 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-05-0038 ref|XP_001416574.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO94867.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001416574.1 6e-40 30% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-XTRO-01-1984 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-XTRO-01-1984 ref|XP_001422545.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00862.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001422545.1 4e-09 33% ...

  1. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-0166 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-0166 ref|XP_001419642.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO97935.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001419642.1 3.1 32% ...

  2. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-06-0035 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-06-0035 ref|XP_001421859.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00153.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421859.1 8e-37 38% ...

  3. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-ATHA-03-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-ATHA-03-0001 ref|XP_001419097.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO97390.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001419097.1 1e-100 34% ...

  4. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-AGAM-04-0113 ref|XP_001418476.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO96769.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001418476.1 2.9 25% ...

  5. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OPRI-01-0945 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OPRI-01-0945 ref|XP_001418541.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO96834.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001418541.1 1e-48 38% ...

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DDIS-05-0117 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DDIS-05-0117 ref|XP_001415649.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO93941.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001415649.1 2e-99 41% ...

  7. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OLAT-26-0138 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OLAT-26-0138 ref|XP_001421946.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABP00240.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001421946.1 0.055 28% ...

  8. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0158 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0158 ref|XP_001420897.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99190.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420897.1 2.0 36% ...

  9. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-0715 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-0715 ref|XP_001420897.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO99190.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420897.1 4.3 36% ...

  10. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CJAC-01-0263 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CJAC-01-0263 ref|XP_001419448.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO97741.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001419448.1 5e-13 50% ...

  11. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1108 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1108 ref|XP_001420562.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO98855.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001420562.1 1.3 25% ...

  12. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-OSAT-09-0000 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-OSAT-09-0000 ref|XP_001417737.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus C...CE9901] gb|ABO96030.1| predicted protein [Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901] XP_001417737.1 1e-04 27% ...

  13. Real Language Meets Real Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muirhead, Muirhead; Schechter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Real Business Language Challenge was a collaborative pilot project between Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) and Routes into Languages East for Year 9 and 10 pupils. It was based on CCE's award-winning Real Business Challenge, part of its highly acclaimed education programme. The Real Business Language Challenge transformed the project into a…

  14. Farelo de amêndoa da castanha de caju na alimentação de codornas japonesas na fase de postura Cashew nut meal in laying diets for Japanese quails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Borges Soares

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o efeito da inclusão de farelo de amêndoa da castanha de caju (FACC sobre a utilização dos nutrientes da dieta, o desempenho e as características dos ovos de codornas japonesas. Duzentos e setenta codornas com 17 semanas de idade foram pesadas e distribuídas em um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com seis dietas e nove repetições de cinco aves. Foram testadas uma dieta controle (sem FACC e cinco dietas com 4, 8, 12, 16 e 20% de FACC. A digestibilidade da MS e do nitrogênio reduziu linearmente, entretanto, apenas com o nível de 20% de FACC estes resultados foram menores que os obtidos com a dieta controle. A digestibilidade da gordura e da energia bruta e os valores de EM das dietas não foram influenciados pelos níveis de FACC na dieta. O consumo de ração não foi afetado pelos níveis desse alimento na dieta, mas a produção de ovos, o peso e a massa de ovo e a conversão alimentar decresceram linearmente com a inclusão de FACC na dieta. As porcentagens de albúmen e gema, assim como a coloração da gema, sofreram efeito quadrático dos níveis de FACC na dieta. A porcentagem de albúmen e a coloração da gema aumentaram e a porcentagem de gema reduziu com a inclusão de FACC em níveis superiores a 9%. Em comparação à dieta controle, apenas a dieta com 20% de FACC prejudicou a produção de ovos, o peso e a massa de ovo, a coloração da gema e a conversão alimentar. O farelo de amêndoa da castanha de caju pode ser incluído em níveis de até 16% em dietas para codornas japonesas em postura.This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of inclusion of cashew nut meal (CNM in diets on nutrient digestibility, bird performance and egg characteristics of Japanese quails. A total of 270 japanese quails with 17 weeks of age were weighed and distributed into a completely randomized design with six diets and nine replicates of five birds in each experimental unit. Treatments consisted of one diet without

  15. Geografilärares och niondeklassares syn på undervisningen om klimatförändringenClimate change education: Geography teachers’ and ninth-graders’ views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaela Hermans

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been increasingly recognised that education plays a key role in addressing human-induced climate change. The ultimate goal of climate change education (CCE is positive impacts on the climate through both individual and collective actions. The aim of this study is to investigate geography teachers’ and their ninth-graders’ views about CCE. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews with geography teachers (N = 13 and questionnaires for ninth-graders (N = 549 at eleven secondary schools from all parts of Swedish-speaking Finland. The results show that although the students’ attitudes to CCE is positive, it does not supply them with action competence. The geography teachers in this study largely miss the ultimate goal of CCE, pointing at the need for more effort to be made in the process of developing CCE at secondary school.

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U03911-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4 4 ( EL353004 ) CCEL9634.b1_C09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 76 6e-24 4 ( BU002128 ) QGG30E19.yg.ab...usilla root t... 64 4e-17 4 ( EL350623 ) CCEL705.b1_B10.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium endi... 56 5e-17 4 ( D...ke... 52 9e-10 4 ( EL348255 ) CCEL4388.b1_H17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 56 9e-10 2 ( BY991356 ) P...350988 ) CCEL7609.b1_B08.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54 1e-08 2 ( EH6752...S) chicory Cichorium in... 54 1e-08 2 ( EL351777 ) CCEL8400.b1_P12.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54 1

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16176-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 24 8 ( FF568224 ) TTBBD46TG Tetrahymena thermophila CU428 log phase... 60 6e-24 6 ( EL363505 ) CCEM7988.b1_H06.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...EL348376 ) CCEL450.b1_C17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium endi... 52 3e-16 4 ( EH67...7486 ) CCIL2487.b1_N21.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 52 3e-16 4 ( EL354343 ) CCEM11006.b1_K16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium en... 52 3e-16 4 ( EL350676 ) CCEL7324.b1_G07.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 52... 3e-16 4 ( EL350501 ) CCEL6813.b1_I24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 52 3e-

  18. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15636-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 30-182A20, WORKING DRA... 44 0.040 2 ( EL356663 ) CCEM1453.b1_J04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...b1 CHE(XYZ) serpentine sunflower ... 40 0.096 3 ( EL365580 ) CCES1656.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...661 ) CAWX9128.rev CAWX Helobdella robusta Primary Earl... 40 0.14 2 ( EL355060 ) CCEM11709.b1_J23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...ower RHA280 Heliant... 40 0.15 3 ( EL355349 ) CCEM11974.b1_K17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 44 0.15 2... ( EL357608 ) CCEM2424.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 44 0.15 2 ( EH

  19. Colon Capsule Endoscopy: Where Are We and Where Are We Going

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Min Han

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE is a noninvasive technique for diagnostic imaging of the colon. It does not require air inflation or sedation and allows minimally invasive and painless colonic evaluation. The role of CCE is rapidly evolving; for example, for colorectal screening (colorectal cancer [CRC] in average-risk patients, in patients with an incomplete colonoscopy, in patients refusing a conventional colonoscopy, and in patients with contraindications for conventional colonoscopy. In this paper, we comprehensively review the technical characteristics and procedure of CCE and compare CCE with conventional methods such as conventional colonoscopy or computed tomographic colonography. Future expansion of CCE in the area of CRC screening for the surveillance of polyps and adenomatous lesions and for assessment of inflammatory bowel disease is also discussed.

  20. Therapeutic impact of colon capsule endoscopy with PillCam™ COLON 2 after incomplete standard colonoscopy: a Spanish multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Óscar; García-Lledó, Javier; Luján, Marisol; Nicolás, David; Juanmartiñena, José Francisco; González-Suárez, Begoña; Sánchez Ceballos, Francisco; Couto, Ignacio; Olmedo, José; Garfia, Cristina; Carretero, Cristina; Fernández Urién, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Sarbelio; Asteinza, Matilde; Olivencia, Pilar; Masedo, Ángeles; Muñoz-Navas, Miguel; Merino, Beatriz; González Asanza, Cecilia

    2017-05-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an alternative approach for the examination of the colon in patients who refuse colonoscopy or after incomplete colonoscopy (IC). We conducted a study to determine the frequency of complete colonoscopy after IC, the diagnostic yield of CCE, the therapeutic impact of lesions found in CCE, the level of colon cleanliness and the safety of the procedure. We performed a prospective, multicenter study involving ten Spanish hospitals. Consecutive outpatients aged ≥ 18 years with previous IC were invited to participate. The latest version of the CCE device, PillCam™ COLON 2 (CCE-2), was administered to all patients according to the protocol. The study population comprised 96 patients. The most frequent cause of IC was the inability to move past a loop using standard maneuvers (75/96 patients, 78%). Complete visualization of the colon was obtained with CCE-2 in 69 patients (71.9%). Of the 27 patients in whom the CCE-2 did not reach the hemorrhoidal plexus, it passed the colonic segment explored with the previous colonoscopy in 20 cases; therefore, it could be inferred that a combined approach (CCE-2 plus colonoscopy) enabled complete visualization of the colonic mucosa in 92.7% of patients. CCE-2 revealed new lesions in 58 patients (60.4%). Polyps were the most frequent finding (41 patients; 42.7% of the total number of patients). In 43 of the 58 patients (44.8% of the total number of patients), the new lesions observed led to modification of therapy, which included a new colonoscopy for polyp resection or surgery in patients with colonic neoplasm. CCE-2 is a suitable diagnostic procedure that can lead to more frequent diagnosis of significant colonic lesions after IC.

  1. The significance of cortical cerebellar microbleeds and microinfarcts in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases. A post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance study with neuropathological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reuck, Jacques L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Devos, David; Defebvre, Luc; Moreau, Caroline; Capparos-Lefebvre, Dominique; Pasquier, Florence; Leys, Didier; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Bordet, Regis

    2015-01-01

    As cortical microbleeds and microinfarcts in neurodegenerative and cerebrovascular diseases have been studied predominantly at the level of the cerebral hemispheres and linked to the presence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), we aimed at determining with 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) whether the causes and the frequency of cortical cerebellar microbleeds (CCeMBs) and microinfarcts (CCeMIs) are the same. Hundred and four postmortem brains, composed of 29 with pure Alzheimer's disease (AD), 9 with AD associated to CAA, 10 with frontotemporal lobar degeneration, 9 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 10 with Lewy body disease, 12 with progressive supranuclear palsy, 9 with vascular dementia (VaD), and 16 controls, were examined. On a horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere examined with 7.0-tesla MRI, the number CCeMBs and CCeMIs were compared between the different disease groups and the control group. The MRI findings were also compared with the corresponding mean values observed on histological examination of a separate standard horizontal section of a cerebellar hemisphere, used for diagnostic purpose. CCeMBs and CCeMIs were only significantly increased in the VaD group. When comparing the diseased patients with and without CAA mutually and with those with arterial hypertension and severe atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease, only in the latter an increase of CCeMBs and CCeMIs was observed. There was an excellent correlation between the MRI and the neuropathological findings. CCeMBs and CCeMIs are mainly due to atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease and not due to CAA. Their increased presence cannot be included to the Boston diagnostic criteria for CAA. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Transrectal rigid-hybrid NOTES cholecystectomy can be performed without peritoneal contamination: a controlled porcine survival study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Philip C; Senft, Jonas D; Gath, Philip; Steinemann, Daniel C; Nickel, Felix; Billeter, Adrian T; Müller-Stich, Beat P; Linke, Georg R

    2018-01-01

    The risk of infectious complications due to peritoneal contamination is a major concern and inhibits the widespread use of transrectal NOTES. A standardized rectal washout with a reversible colon occlusion device in situ has previously shown potential in reducing peritoneal contamination. The aim of this study was to compare the peritoneal contamination rate and inflammatory reaction for transrectal cholecystectomy after ideal rectal preparation (trCCE) and standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy (lapCCE) in a porcine survival experiment. Twenty pigs were randomized to trCCE (n = 10) or lapCCE (n = 10). Before trCCE, rectal washout was performed with saline solution. A colon occlusion device was then inserted and a second washout with povidone-iodine was performed. The perioperative course and the inflammatory reaction (leukocytes, C-reactive protein) were compared. At necropsy, 14 days after surgery the abdominal cavity was screened for infectious complications and peritoneal swabs were obtained for comparison of peritoneal contamination. Peritoneal contamination was lower after trCCE than after lapCCE (0/10 vs. 6/10; p = 0.003). No infectious complications were found at necropsy in either group and postoperative complications did not differ (p = 1.0). Immediately after the procedure, leukocytes were higher after lapCCE (17.0 ± 2.7 vs. 14.6 ± 2.3; p = 0.047). Leukocytes and C-reactive protein showed no difference in the further postoperative course. Intraoperative complications and total operation time (trCCE 114 ± 32 vs. 111 ± 27 min; p = 0.921) did not differ, but wound closure took longer for trCCE (31.5 ± 19 vs. 13 ± 5 min; p = 0.002). After standardized rectal washout with a colon occlusion device in situ, trCCE was associated without peritoneal contamination and without access-related infectious complications. Based on the findings of this study, a randomized controlled clinical study comparing clinical outcomes of trCCE with

  3. Industrial collaborators honoured by ALICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Picture 01 : the winners gather after the ALICE Award ceremony (from left to right): Yuri Saveliev, Stanislav Burachas and Sergei Beloglovsky of North Crystals; Maximilian Metzger, CERN's secretary-general; Rang Cai of ATM; Jürgen Schukraft, ALICE spokesperson; Erich Pamminger and Daniel Gattinger of FACC; and Tiejun Wang of ATM. The ALICE collaboration has presented its second round of awards to three companies for their novel and remarkable contributions to major detector systems: Advance Technology and Materials (ATM), Fischer Advanced Composite Components (FACC) and North Crystals. The awards presented to these three leaders in advanced, modern materials were beautifully sculpted from one of the oldest materials used by mankind to manufacture tools - Mexican Obsidian

  4. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ]oshi, MBChB, MlVIed, MPH, FACC, Senior Lecturer and Director, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, I. Wala, MBChB, Senior. House Officer, KS. ... mg/L and a median of 2.53 mg/L. The majority (42%) of diabetics had hsCRP levels in the high-risk category (hsCRP>3 mg/L). .... active diabetic foot; were known to have Human.

  5. Functional modulation of cerebral gamma-aminobutyric acidA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex with ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate: Presence of independent binding site for ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, J.; Kuriyama, K. (Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan))

    1990-05-01

    Effect of ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCE) on the function of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex was studied. Beta-CCE noncompetitively and competitively inhibited (3H)flunitrazepam binding to benzodiazepine receptor, but not (3H)muscimol binding to GABAA receptor as well as t-(3H)butylbicycloorthobenzoate (( 3H) TBOB) binding to chloride ion channel, in particulate fraction of the mouse brain. Ro15-1788 also inhibited competitively (3H) flunitrazepam binding. On the other hand, the binding of beta-(3H)CCE was inhibited noncompetitively and competitively by clonazepam and competitively by Ro15-1788. In agreement with these results, benzodiazepines-stimulated (3H)muscimol binding was antagonized by beta-CCE and Ro15-1788. Gel column chromatography for the solubilized fraction from cerebral particulate fraction by 0.2% sodium deoxycholate (DOC-Na) in the presence of 1 M KCl indicated that beta-(3H)CCE binding site was eluted in the same fraction (molecular weight, 250,000) as the binding sites for (3H)flunitrazepam, (3H)muscimol and (3H)TBOB. GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx into membrane vesicles prepared from the bovine cerebral cortex was stimulated and attenuated by flunitrazepam and beta-CCE, respectively. These effects of flunitrazepam and beta-CCE on the GABA-stimulated 36Cl- influx were antagonized by Ro15-1788. The present results suggest that the binding site for beta-CCE, which resides on GABAA receptor/benzodiazepine receptor/chloride ion channel complex, may be different from that for benzodiazepine. Possible roles of beta-CCE binding site in the allosteric inhibitions on benzodiazepine binding site as well as on the functional coupling between chloride ion channel and GABAA receptor are also suggested.

  6. Acquisition of apoptotic resistance in cadmium-induced malignant transformation: specific perturbation of JNK signal transduction pathway and associated metallothionein overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Fuquay, Richard; Sakurai, Teruaki; Waalkes, Michael P

    2006-08-01

    Prior work has shown that chronic cadmium exposed rat liver epithelial cells (CCE-LE) become malignantly transformed after protracted low level cadmium exposure. Acquisition of apoptotic resistance is common in oncogenesis and the present work explores this possibility in CCE-LE cells. CCE-LE cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by etoposide or an acute high concentration of cadmium as assessed by flow cytometry with annexin/FITC. Three key mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), namely ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38, were phosphorylated in CCE-LE cells after acute cadmium exposure. However, the levels of phosphorylated JNK1/2 were markedly decreased in CCE-LE cells compared to control. JNK kinase activity was also suppressed in CCE-LE cells exposed to cadmium. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), used as a positive control for stimulating JNK phosphorylation, was much less effective in CCE-LE cells than control cells. Ro318220 (Ro), a strong activator of JNK, increased phosphorylated JNK1/2 to levels similar to the cadmium-treated control cells and also enhanced apoptosis in response to cadmium in CCE-LE cells. Metallothionein (MT), which is thought to potentially inhibit apoptosis, was strongly overexpressed in CCE-LE cells. Further, in MT knockout (MT-/-) fibroblasts, JNK1/2 phosphorylation was markedly increased after cadmium exposure compared with similarly treated wild-type (MT+/+) cells. These results indicate cadmium-transformed cells acquired apoptotic resistance, which may be linked to the specific suppression of the JNK pathway and is associated with MT overexpression, which, in turn, may impact this signal transduction pathway. The acquisition of apoptotic resistance may play an important role in cadmium carcinogenesis by contributing to both tumor initiation and malignant progression.

  7. Investigation on the charge collection properties of a 4H-SiC Schottky diode detector

    CERN Document Server

    Verzellesi, G; Nava, F; Canali, C

    2002-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical data on the charge collection properties of a 4H-SiC epitaxial Schottky diode exposed to 5.48- and 2.00-MeV alpha particles. Hundred percent Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) is, in particular, demonstrated for the 2.00-MeV alpha particles at reverse voltages higher than 40 V. By comparing measured CCE values with the outcomes of drift-diffusion simulations, a value of 500 ns is inferred for the hole lifetime within the lowly doped, active layer of virgin samples. The contributions of diffusion and funneling-assisted drift to CCE at low reverse voltages are pointed out.

  8. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U02963-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4740 ) CCEM11406.b1_K20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 48 2e-05 2 ( EE614759 ) CHWM2198.b1_K22.ab1 CHW(... silverleaf sunflower... 50 2e-05 2 ( EL356632 ) CCEM1420.b1_G20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 48 2e-...19.ab1 CLP(XYZ) lettuce perennis Lac... 48 2e-05 2 ( EL356196 ) CCEM12753.b1_A21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  9. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15578-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) Q064A05 Populus flower cDNA library Populus trich... 66 1e-11 3 ( EL344981 ) CCEL12864.b1_P23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...LS(LMS) lettuce sativa Lactu... 44 5e-07 3 ( EL359945 ) CCEM470.b1_K21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...236 ) CCEL9869.b1_I20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 7e-05 2 ( FE656280 ) CBYZ12515.b1 CBYZ Panicum

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01562-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rom clone DKEY-107I18 in ... 40 9.0 4 ( EL371388 ) CCEL13405.b1_J16.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 32 9...KING DRAFT SEQUE... 36 9.5 6 ( EL346664 ) CCEL2818.b1_D09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cic...54.b1_D13.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 8.0 3 ( CP000882 ) Hemiselmis a...... 30 7.9 13 ( AC149634 ) Medicago truncatula clone mth2-5i17, complete seq... 38 8.0 4 ( EL348650 ) CCEL47

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16250-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ium fa... 50 0.29 1 ( EL353306 ) CCEL9939.b1_F14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 0.29 1 ( EL343426 )... CCEL11427.b1_F02.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 50 0.29 1 ( EL342455 ) CCEL...10062.b1_K19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 50 0.29 1 ( EH686643 ) CCIM11452.b1_H08.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicor

  12. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15900-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNA clone pKV0-... 38 0.75 2 ( EL347768 ) CCEL3938.b1_D01.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 34 0.88 3 ( E...L348302 ) CCEL4431.b1_M04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 34 1.0 3 ( AP001711 ) Homo sapiens genomic DN... Naegleria gruberi amoeba stage ... 48 1.0 1 ( EL351269 ) CCEL7885.b1_I04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  13. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09876-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available J21.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 60 4e-12 3 ( EL342921 ) CCEL10914.b1_D17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichor...ium en... 60 4e-12 3 ( EL371213 ) CCEL13227.b1_F19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 60 4e-12 3 ( EH675422... 60 4e-12 3 ( EL361099 ) CCEM5755.b1_F24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 60 4e-12 3 ( EH681462 ) CCIL62...49.b1_B03.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 60 4e-12 3 ( EL344198 ) CCEL12146.b1_C14.ab1 CCE(LMS) endiv

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01437-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ytica Sheared DNA Entam... 34 5.5 2 ( EL359934 ) CCEM4689.b1_A21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 5.5...L357608 ) CCEM2424.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 32 5.6 2 ( EH698526 ) CCIS10356.b1_H22.ab1 CC...5.6 2 ( EH708513 ) CCIS7811.b1_F09.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium in... 32 5.6 2 ( EL355060 ) CCEM11709.b1_J23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...34 5.6 2 ( BJ325542 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:dda1g08, 5' e... 32 5.6 2 ( EL365580 ) CCES1656.b1_P05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06978-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CCES7990.b1_L06.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 58 2e-10 2 ( EH703844 ) CCIS2723.b1_E09.ab1 CCI(LMS) ch...icory Cichorium in... 58 2e-10 2 ( EL361988 ) CCEM6567.b1_M09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium end... 58 2e-10 2 ( EL355867 ) CCEM1245.b1_I23.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 58 2e-10 2 ( ... LEFL1073BH02, 5... 48 1e-08 3 ( EL363944 ) CCEM8434.b1_D22.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 4e-08 2

  16. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11344-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e-35 2 ( BJ367383 ) Dictyostelium discoideum cDNA clone:ddc42c16, 5' ... 101 4e-34 2 ( EL344956 ) CCEL12841.b1_B19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endiv... EL348295 ) CCEL4425.b1_A04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 68 3e-13 2 ( EA376311 ) Sequence 25134 from... EL372488 ) CCEL5298.b1_D06.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 48 9e-10 4 ( EL3...43912 ) CCEL11883.b1_F20.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 48 9e-10 4 ( X66467 ) C.albicans sec18 gene. 58

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16399-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available leaf... 66 2e-07 2 ( EL348453 ) CCEL457.b1_A19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium endi... 58 2e-07 2 ( EY083656 )... 1 ( EL373139 ) CFFM10363.b1_F24.ab1 CFF(LMS) safflower Carthamus... 58 0.001 1 ( EL371398 ) CCEL13415.b1_N18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium en... 58 0.001 1 ( EL343274 ) CCEL11271.b1_N09.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium...ower Carthamus... 56 0.004 1 ( EL371361 ) CCEL13378.b1_D10.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 56 0.004 1 (

  18. Explaining the convector effect in canopy turbulence by means of large-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tirtha; De Roo, Frederik; Mauder, Matthias

    2017-06-01

    Semi-arid forests are found to sustain a massive sensible heat flux in spite of having a low surface to air temperature difference by lowering the aerodynamic resistance to heat transfer (rH) - a property called the canopy convector effect (CCE). In this work large-eddy simulations are used to demonstrate that the CCE appears more generally in canopy turbulence. It is indeed a generic feature of canopy turbulence: rH of a canopy is found to reduce with increasing unstable stratification, which effectively increases the aerodynamic roughness for the same physical roughness of the canopy. This relation offers a sufficient condition to construct a general description of the CCE. In addition, we review existing parameterizations for rH from the evapotranspiration literature and test to what extent they are able to capture the CCE, thereby exploring the possibility of an improved parameterization.

  19. High permeable microporous structured carbon counter electrode assisted by polystyrene sphere for fully printable perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Haijun; Li, Yongtao; Zhang, Chuanxiang; Wang, Kang; Wang, Jiayue; Tan, Bin; Han, Linxuan; Tao, Jie

    2018-03-01

    The permeability of the carbon counter electrode (CCE) is critical to the HTM-free fully printable perovskite solar cells. In this work, we report a CCE assisted by polystyrene spheres (PS-spheres) as pore-forming agent to gain microporous structure for a better permeability. Due to its decomposition temperature at 400 °C, the porous structure is obtained in the carbon layer easily. By optimization towards the contents of PS-spheres in CCE, the filling rate of perovskite solution and the photovoltaic performance of the device have been significantly improved. Using this method, an average efficiency enhancement of 22% has been obtained for HTM-free fully printable perovskite solar cells, resulting in a better fill rate of CH3NH3PbI3 and an efficiency of 4.49%. This kind of CCE with the advantages of simple, easy preparation process and well performance, show excellent potential application in perovskite solar cells.

  20. Cholesterol Crystal Embolism and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhu; Bayliss, George; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-05-24

    Renal disease caused by cholesterol crystal embolism (CCE) occurs when cholesterol crystals become lodged in small renal arteries after small pieces of atheromatous plaques break off from the aorta or renal arteries and shower the downstream vascular bed. CCE is a multisystemic disease but kidneys are particularly vulnerable to atheroembolic disease, which can cause an acute, subacute, or chronic decline in renal function. This life-threatening disease may be underdiagnosed and overlooked as a cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with advanced atherosclerosis. CCE can result from vascular surgery, angiography, or administration of anticoagulants. Atheroembolic renal disease has various clinical features that resemble those found in other kidney disorders and systemic diseases. It is commonly misdiagnosed in clinic, but confirmed by characteristic renal biopsy findings. Therapeutic options are limited, and prognosis is considered to be poor. Expanding knowledge of atheroembolic renal disease due to CCE opens perspectives for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of this cause of progressive renal insufficiency.

  1. Caracterização de colágenos tipos I e III no estroma do carcinoma de células escamosas cutâneo em cães

    OpenAIRE

    Bedoya,S.A.O.; Conceição,L.G.; Viloria,M.I.V.; Loures,F.H.; Valente,F.L.; Amorim,R.L.; Silva,F.F.

    2016-01-01

    O carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE) é uma neoplasia epitelial maligna que acomete cães e diversas outras espécies, incluindo a humana. O CCE afeta vários sítios anatômicos e pode desenvolver metástase. O objetivo deste estudo foi a caracterização das fibras de colágenos tipos I e III no estroma do CCE cutâneo de cães. Para este trabalho, utilizaram-se 44 amostras de pele incluídas em parafina e que tiveram prévio diagnóstico de CCE. As amostras foram processadas histologicamente e coradas ...

  2. Colon capsule endoscopy: What we know and what we would like to know

    OpenAIRE

    Spada, Cristiano; Barbaro, Federico; Andrisani, Gianluca; Minelli Grazioli, Leonardo; Hassan, Cesare; Costamagna, Isabella; Campanale, Mariachiara; Costamagna, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopy is usually perceived as an invasive and potentially painful procedure, being also affected by a small, but definite, risk of major complications (cardiopulmonary complications, perforation, hemorrhage) and even mortality. To improve both acceptability and safety, PillCam Colon Capsule Endoscopy (CCE) (Given Imaging Ltd, Yoqneam, Israel) has been developed. CCE represents a non-invasive technique that is able to explore the colon without sedation and air insufflation. The Second Ge...

  3. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15074-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ng_GS-30-02-01-1... 50 0.29 1 ( EL359014 ) CCEM3849.b1_A03.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 0.29 1 ( ...EL348717 ) CCEL4815.b1_M04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 50 0.29 1 ( EH699910 ) CCIS12122.b1_C08.ab1

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U09330-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 92 ) CCEM3625.b1_B19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 62 3e-05 1 ( EH691297 ) CCIM3477.b1_I05.ab1 CCI(LM...50 0.006 2 ( EL360489 ) CCEM5197.b1_I04.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 54 0.008 1 ( EH705680 ) CCIS485

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16532-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nifera contig VV78X127711.9, whole genome... 52 0.043 1 ( EL342825 ) CCEL10818.b1_C17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Ci... 0.44 2 ( EX162633 ) MW_DP0642 Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus cDNA lib... 38 0.55 2 ( EL348548 ) CCEL466.b1_C21.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  6. Phytochemical, antioxidant and protective effect of cactus cladodes extract against lithium-induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, Anouar; Dalel, Brahmi; Rjeibi, Ilhem; Smida, Amani; Ncib, Sana; Zouari, Nacim; Zourgui, Lazhar

    2017-12-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (L.) Mill. (Castaceae) (cactus) is used in Tunisian medicine for the treatment of various diseases. This study determines phytochemical composition of cactus cladode extract (CCE). It also investigates antioxidant activity and hepatoprotective potential of CCE against lithium carbonate (Li 2 CO 3 )-induced liver injury in rats. Twenty-four Wistar male rats were divided into four groups of six each: a control group given distilled water (0.5 mL/100 g b.w.; i.p.), a group injected with Li 2 CO 3 (25 mg/kg b.w.; i.p.; corresponding to 30% of the LD 50 ) twice daily for 30 days, a group receiving only CCE at 100 mg/kg of b.w. for 60 days and then injected with distilled water during the last 30 days of CCE treatment, and a group receiving CCE and then injected with Li 2 CO 3 during the last 30 days of CCE treatment. The bioactive components containing the CCE were identified using chemical assays. Treatment with Li 2 CO 3 caused a significant change of some haematological parameters including red blood cells (RBC), white blood cells (WBC), haemoglobin content (Hb), haematocrit (Ht) and mean corpuscular volume (VCM) compared to the control group. Moreover, significant increases in the levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were observed in the blood of Li 2 CO 3 -treated rats. Furthermore, exposure to Li 2 CO 3 significantly increased the LPO level and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in the hepatic tissues. CCE possesses a significant hepatoprotective effect.

  7. Análisis de las estadísticas discriminantes en jugadores de baloncesto según su puesto específico, en las finales de las competiciones europeas (1988-2006. Diferencias entre jugadores titulares y suplentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sampaio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio ha sido identificar las diferencias que se observan en jugadores de baloncesto, en situación de juego, en función del puesto específico (bases, aleros y pivots, diferenciando entre jugadores titulares y suplentes. Los datos utilizados para el análisis fueron las variables estadísticas individuales de todas las finales de las tres competiciones europeas de clubes celebradas entre las temporadas 1987-88 y 2005-06. El análisis de los resultados se realizó a través de un análisis discriminante, obteniendo una función discriminante y unos coeficientes canónicos (CCE. Los jugadores titulares se diferenciaron por posición en los rebotes ofensivos (CCE = –0,57, tapones (CCE = –0,52, lanzamientos de 3 puntos convertidos (CCE = 0,51 y fallados (CCE = 0,37. Estos resultados señalan a los bases titulares como los jugadores titulares más importantes dentro de la estructura colectiva de un equipo. En el caso de los jugadores suplentes, las variables discriminantes encontradas fueron los tapones (CCE = 0,36, los rebotes defensivos (CCE = 0,31 y los lanzamientos de 2 puntos convertidos (CCE = 0,31. Dichos resultados permiten identificar a los pivots suplentes como los suplentes más importantes en la estructura colectiva del equipo. Los resultados presentados pueden ser utilizados como datos a tener en cuenta en el proceso de selección de jugadores en la formación de los equipos o bien en la dirección de los jugadores durante los entrenamientos y la competición.

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma in vaginal fundus in a Brahman cow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pimenta-Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available É descrito o carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE no fundo vaginal de uma vaca. O diagnóstico de CCE moderadamente diferenciado foi confirmado através do exame histopatológico. Os testes imunoistoquímicos com os marcadores p53 e Ki67 realizados em amostras do tumor confirmaram a mutação na p53 e aumento da proliferação celular.

  9. Hypoglycemic effects of Ganoderma applanatum and Collybia confluens exo-polymers in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Byung-Keun; Jung, Yu-Sun; Song, Chi-Hyun

    2007-11-01

    The hypoglycemic effects of Ganoderma applanatum exo-polymer (GAE) and Collybia confluens exo-polymer (CCE) produced by submerged mycelial cultures in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were investigated. Hypoglycemic effects were achieved in both the GAE- and CCE-treated groups by administration at a level of 100 mg/kg body weight (BW) daily for 3 weeks. The administration of GAE and CCE substantially reduced the plasma glucose levels by as much as 22.0% and 25.9%, respectively, when compared with the control group. The GAE and CCE also lowered the plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride levels by 20.3% and 22.5%, and by 22.7% and 25.5%, respectively. Furthermore, the activity of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) was decreased by 23.2% and 20.7% in the GAE-treated group, and it was also reduced by 28.7% and 23.6% in the CCE-treated group. The results strongly demonstrate the potential of GAE and CCE in combating diabetes in experimental animals. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U15955-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ) CCEL1698.b1_D17.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 62 6e-17 2 ( EL371825 ) CCEL13847.b1_M05.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive... Cichorium en... 62 6e-17 2 ( EL346889 ) CCEL3046.b1_L18.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium end... 62 6e-1...7 2 ( EL344768 ) CCEL12670.b1_L24.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive Cichorium en... 62 6e-17 2 ...( EH685871 ) CCIM10663.b1_N02.ab1 CCI(LMS) chicory Cichorium i... 68 6e-17 2 ( EL350945 ) CCEL757.b1_J22.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive...6 ( CD857717 ) DH0AG9ZB01RM1 HaDisDM710vsCt Helianthus annuus cD... 60 1e-14 3 ( EL371356 ) CCEL13372.b1_H08.ab1 CCE(LMS) endive

  11. Optimal growth of Lactobacillus casei in a Cheddar cheese ripening model system requires exogenous fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, W S; Budinich, M F; Ward, R; Broadbent, J R; Steele, J L

    2012-04-01

    Flavor development in ripening Cheddar cheese depends on complex microbial and biochemical processes that are difficult to study in natural cheese. Thus, our group has developed Cheddar cheese extract (CCE) as a model system to study these processes. In previous work, we found that CCE supported growth of Lactobacillus casei, one of the most prominent nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) species found in ripening Cheddar cheese, to a final cell density of 10(8) cfu/mL at 37°C. However, when similar growth experiments were performed at 8°C in CCE derived from 4-mo-old cheese (4mCCE), the final cell densities obtained were only about 10(6) cfu/mL, which is at the lower end of the range of the NSLAB population expected in ripening Cheddar cheese. Here, we report that addition of Tween 80 to CCE resulted in a significant increase in the final cell density of L. casei during growth at 8°C and produced concomitant changes in cytoplasmic membrane fatty acid (CMFA) composition. Although the effect was not as dramatic, addition of milk fat or a monoacylglycerol (MAG) mixture based on the MAG profile of milk fat to 4mCCE also led to an increased final cell density of L. casei in CCE at 8°C and changes in CMFA composition. These observations suggest that optimal growth of L. casei in CCE at low temperature requires supplementation with a source of fatty acids (FA). We hypothesize that L. casei incorporates environmental FA into its CMFA, thereby reducing its energy requirement for growth. The exogenous FA may then be modified or supplemented with FA from de novo synthesis to arrive at a CMFA composition that yields the functionality (i.e., viscosity) required for growth in specific conditions. Additional studies utilizing the CCE model to investigate microbial contributions to cheese ripening should be conducted in CCE supplemented with 1% milk fat. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Differential lead component pulling as a possible mechanism of inside-out abrasion and conductor cable externalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Ernest W

    2013-09-01

    Conductor cable externalization with protrusion (CCE*) is highly prevalent among the Riata 8F and ST 7F defibrillation (DF) leads and infrequently present in the QuickSite and the QuickFlex coronary sinus (CS) leads (St. Jude Medical, Sylmar, CA, USA). A model for CCE* based on differential lead component pulling and conjugate extension with reciprocal compression-bending was developed. Extension of a proximal lead body segment by pectoral or cardiac movements causes reciprocal compression-bending of a distal lead body segment mediated by inextensible conductor cables running down a lead body fixed at various points by fibrous adhesions. The "sawing" action of these cables under tension causes inside-out abrasion of insulation leading to CCE*. DF leads from different manufacturers and the QuickFlex and QuickFlex μ CS leads were subjected to simulated differential pulling. Restitution from differential pulling followed three patterns: complete, partial without escalation, and incomplete with escalation. Only the last pattern (only shown by the Riata 8F and ST 7F leads) was associated with an increased risk to CCE*. For CS leads, deformation concentrated on the more flexible segment when the lead body did not have a uniform construction. The Durata, Riata ST Optim, QuickFlex μ, and Quartet leads should be relatively immune to CCE*. The Durata leads are extremely resistant to longitudinal deformation and probably cause mediastinal displacement rather than differential pulling in response to pectoral movements in vivo. Implantation techniques and lead designs can be used to minimize the risk of CCE*. A bench test for CCE* can be constructed. ©2013, The Author. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Cinnamomum cassia extract on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by mite antigen in NC/Nga mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Yoon, Taesook; Jang, Ja Young; Park, Sang-Joon; Jeong, Gi-Hoon; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2011-01-27

    Cinnamomum cassia (C. cassia) has been traditionally used to treat allergic disease as well as dyspepsia, gastritis, and blood circulation disturbances. However, the antiallergic properties of C. cassia have not been fully verified using scientific tools. This study investigated the effectiveness of C. cassia extract (CCE) as an antiallergic agent in atopic dermatitis model and underlying mechanism. The effect of CCE on mite antigen-treated NC/Nga mice was evaluated by examining skin symptom severity, levels of serum IgE, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and histamine, skin histology, and mRNA expression of cytokines in the skin lesions. Moreover, the effect of CCE on TNF-α-and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced chemokine production in human keratinocytes was investigated using ELISA. CCE treatment of NC/Nga mice reduced the dermatitis score and the levels of serum IgE, histamine, and TNF-α. Histological examination showed inhibition of the thickening of the epidermis/dermis and reduced dermal infiltration of inflammatory cells. In skin lesions, mRNA expression of IL-4, TNF-α, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) was inhibited by CCE treatment. The production of TARC, macrophage-derived chemokine, and RANTES from IFN-γ-and TNF-α-stimulated human keratinocytes was suppressed by CCE treatment in a dose-dependent manner. CCE inhibits the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice by suppressing the T-helper 2 cell response. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Use of computer-based clinical examination to assess medical students in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shallaly, Gamal E H A; Mekki, Abdelrahman M

    2012-01-01

    To improve the viewing of the video-projected structured clinical examination (ViPSCE), we developed a computerized version; the computer-based clinical examination (CCE). This was used to assess medical students' higher knowledge and problem solving skills in surgery. We present how we did this, test score descriptive statistics, and the students' evaluation of the CCE. A CCE in surgery was administered to assess a class of 43 final year medical students at the end of their surgical clerkship. Like the ViPSCE, the exam was delivered as a slide show, using a PowerPoint computer program. However, instead of projecting it onto a screen, each student used a computer. There were 20 slides containing either still photos or short video clips of clinical situations in surgery. The students answered by hand writing on the exam papers. At the end, they completed evaluation forms. The exam papers were corrected manually. Test score descriptive statistics were calculated and correlated with the students' scores in other exams in surgery. Administration of the CCE was straightforward. The test scores were normally distributed (mean = median = 4.9). They correlated significantly with the total scores obtained by the students in surgery (r = 0.68), and with each of the other exam modalities in surgery, such as the multiple choice and structured essay questions. Acceptability of the CCE to the students was high and they recommended the use of the CCE in other departments. CCE is feasible and popular with students. It inherits the validity and reliability of the ViPSCE with the added advantage of improving the viewing of the slides.

  15. Projeto BEEHOPE 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, M. Alice; Neves, Cátia José Domingues das; Vilas-Boas, Miguel; Rodrigues, Pedro João; Ventura, Paulo; Garnery, Lionel; Legout, Helene; Douarre, Vincent; Houte, Sylvie; Odoux, Francois; Estonba, Andone; Miguel, Irati; Montes, Iratxe; Mallet, Noel; Grenier, Claude

    2015-01-01

    O projeto BEEHOPE, com o título original “Honeybee conservation centres in western Europe - an innovative strategy using sustainable beekeeping to reduce honeybee decline”, foi um dos 10 aprovados na área da biodiversidade do 5º concurso transnacional (2013-2014) BiodivErsA/FACCE-JPI (http://www.biodiversa.org/766), subordinado ao tema “Promover sinergias e reduzir o compromisso entre o abastecimento de alimentos, biodiversidade e serviços dos ecossistemas”. A diversidade nativa das populaçõe...

  16. Drought priming effects on alleviating later damages of heat and drought stress in different wheat cultivars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendanha, Thayna; Hyldgaard, Benita; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    The ongoing change is climate; in particular the increase of drought and heat waves episodes are a major challenge in the prospect of food safety. Under many field conditions, plants are usually exposed to mild intermittent stress episodes rather than a terminal stress event. Previous, but limited...... tolerant cultivar, while Paragon was perceived as heat and drought sensitive cultivar. TM acknowledges financial support from CAPES Scholarship and Science without Borders program, grant no. 002108/2015-01. Funded by the FP7 JPI-FACCE-ERANET + Modcarbo-stress, grant agreement n° 618105....

  17. PillCam© Colon Capsule for the study of colonic pathology in clinical practice: Study of agreement with colonoscopy Capsula colónica PillCam© para el estudio de la patología del colon en la práctica clínica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Herrerías-Gutiérrez

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: several studies have pointed out the effectiveness of the PillCam© colon capsule endoscopy (CCE compared with the colonoscopy in the study of the colonic pathology. Aims and methods: the objective of our study was to assess the agreement in the diagnosis of CCE with conventional colonoscopy as well as its sensitivity and specificity, and to describe the findings of the CCE in our clinical practice. Consecutive patients with abdominal symptoms were included in the study. The CCE was performed as previously reported (with PEG and sodium phosphate as laxative agents. The nature and location of the findings, colonic transit time, complications, cleanliness degree and consistency with diagnostic colonoscopy, when performed, were analyzed. Results: a total of 144 subjects (67 women and 77 men; (52.17±16.71 years with the following indications were included: screening of Colorectal cancer (88 patients, control after polipectomy (24, incomplete colonoscopy (7, rectal bleeding (10, anemia (8, diarrhea (7. The CCE exploration was complete in 134/144 cases (93%, with no case of retention. The preparation was good-very good in 88/134 (65,6%, fair in 26/134 (19,4% and poor in 20/134 (15% of the cases. The average colonic transit was of 140.76 min (9-603. Any adverse effect was notified. In 44 cases a colonoscopy was carried out after CCE (results were hidden from another endoscopist. Compared to colonoscopy, the rate of agreement was 75,6%, the sensitivity was 84% and the specificity 62,5%, PPV was 77,7% and NPV was 71,4 %. The colonic findings in 134 CCE were: in 34 cases CCE it did not show lesions, diverticulosis in 63 explorations, polyps in 43, angiodysplasias in 15, Crohn's Disease in 9 and ulcerative colitis in other 8 cases. Conclusions: the CCE is an effective and reliable technique for the detection of lesions in colon, and because of its high agree-ment with the colonoscopy, it could be useful in clinical practice. Further studies

  18. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  19. Effect of Swarna Jibanti (Coelogyne cristata Lindley) in alleviation of chronic fatigue syndrome in aged Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Achintya; Sur, Tapas Kumar; Upadhyay, Sachhidananda; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; Hazra, Jayram

    2017-11-01

    Swarna Jibanti scientifically known as Coelogyne cristata Lindley (Orchidaceae), an orchid mentioned in Ayurvedic medicine is used to promote healthy life span. The present work was planned to study the efficacy of hydro-alcoholic extract of pseudobulbs of C.cristata (CCE) to assess its role on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) induced behavioural and biochemical changes in aged Wistar rats compared to Panax ginseng (PG), a prototype anti-stress agent. CFS was induced by forced swimming for consecutive 21 days for fixed duration (15 min sessions). The criteria of CFS due to fatigue were counted using locomotor activity, depression and anxiety through automated photactometer, immobility time and plus maze activity respectively. Acute toxicity study of CCE (upto 2 g/kg, Limit test) was also performed. For CFS, animals were divided into five groups, naive control, control, CCE treated (25 mg/kg b.w., 250 mg/kg b.w.) and standard PG treated (100 mg/kg b.w.) groups. All drugs were given orally for consecutive 21 days along with CFS. After assessing behavioural parameters, all animals were sacrificed at day 21 and in vivo antioxidant potential of CCE was determined by lipid peroxides, nitrite, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in brain tissue. CCE was found to be non-toxic. CCE treated aged rats significantly improved (p < 0.001) the spontaneous locomotor movement with respect to control rats, while, decreased the mobility period or depression score. In CFS, CCE also enhanced the time spent (p < 0.001) in open arms while reducing the time spent in closed arm as compared to CFS control, indicating lowering anxiety score. Moreover, marked diminution in lipid peroxidation, nitrite and SOD level was exhibited after CCE treatment and significantly enhanced catalase level significantly (p < 0.01) with respect to CFS control. PG also showed similar actions. The results confirmed the potential therapeutic actions of CCE against experimentally induced CFS in

  20. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb{sup -1} corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the

  1. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. After an integrated luminosity of a few fb -1 corresponding to a few weeks of LHC operation, the CCE of the sCVD diamonds dropped by a factor of five or more and quickly approached the poor CCE of pCVD diamonds. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and recombination and hence reduces the CCE in a strongly non-linear way. A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate-dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the transient current technique (TCT), the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective deep trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model, the rate-dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software SILVACO TCAD. The simulation, tuned to rate-dependent measurements from a strong radioactive source, was able to predict the non-linear decrease of the CCE in

  2. Charge collection characteristics of Frisch collar CdZnTe gamma-ray spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Mark J.; Kargar, Alireza; McGregor, Douglas S.

    2007-01-01

    A collimated 198 Au source was used to determine the charge collection efficiency (CCE) at several locations along the length of a 3.4x3.4x5.5 mm 3 CdZnTe bar detector, both in planar configuration and with Frisch collars of varying length. For each configuration, a 0.50-mm-long region spanning the width of the device was irradiated with 411-keV gamma rays produced by a neutron-activated gold foil. Irradiation began at the cathode and stepped in 0.50-mm steps toward the anode, with a spectrum being collected at each location. By observing the channel location of the full-energy peak in each collected spectrum, an average CCE was determined for each irradiated region. The CCE was found to vary nearly linearly along the length of the device in the planar configuration, starting at a peak value of 89% and dropping to a minimum measured value of 26% near the anode. The addition of a Frisch collar covering the entire length of the crystal greatly altered the CCE profile, which remained near 87% for approximately two-thirds of the length, then sharply dropped near the anode. Results were confirmed by theoretical models. Further CCE mapping was also completed for devices with Frisch collars of various lengths. Those results are reported as well

  3. Ceramic carbon electrode-based anodes for use in the copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, S.; Easton, E.B.

    2009-01-01

    Sol-gel chemistry is becoming more popular for the synthesis of electrode materials. For example, the sol-gel reaction can be performed in the presence of a carbon black to form a ceramic carbon electrode (CCE). The resultant CCE structure contains electronically conductive carbon particle pathways that are bound together via the ceramic binder, which can also promote ion transport. Furthermore, the CCE structure has a high active surface area and is chemical and thermally robust. We have investigated CCE materials prepared using 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane. Electrochemical experiments (cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) were performed to characterize their suitability as anode electrode materials for use in the electrochemical step of the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle. Our initial results have shown that CCE-based electrodes vastly outperform a bare carbon electrode, and thus are highly promising and cost-effective electrode material. Subsequent experiments involved the manipulation of the relative ratio of organosilane carbon precursors to gauge its impact on electrode properties and performance. An overview of the materials characterization and electrochemical measurements will be presented. (author)

  4. Levels of Governance in Policy Innovation Cycles in Community Education: The Cases of Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kolleck

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While there is little doubt that social networks are essential for processes of implementing social innovations in community education such as Climate Change Education (CCE or Education for Sustainable Development (ESD, scholars have neglected to analyze these processes in the multilevel governance system using Social Network Analysis. In this article, we contribute to closing this research gap by exploring the implementation of CCE and ESD in education at the regional and global levels. We compare the way CCE is negotiated and implemented within and through the global conferences of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC with the way the UN Decade of ESD is put into practice through networks in five different German municipalities. We argue that the role of social networks is particularly strong in policy areas like CCE and ESD, which are best characterized as multi-level and multi-actor governance. Based on data derived from standardized surveys and from Twitter we analyze the complex interactions of public and private actors at different levels of governance in the two selected policy areas. We find, amongst others, that the implementation of CCE and ESD in community education depends in part on actors that had not been assumed to be influential at the outset. Furthermore, our analyses suggest the different levels of governance are not well integrated throughout the phases of the policy innovation cycle.

  5. Cell Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Hans Jørgen Birk; Alting, Leo

    1996-01-01

    The engineering process of creating cell control systems is described, and a Cell Control Engineering (CCE) concept is defined. The purpose is to assist people, representing different disciplines in the organisation, to implement cell controllers by addressing the complexity of having many systems...... in physically and logically different and changing manufacturing environments. The defined CCE concept combines state-of-the-art of commercially available enabling technologies for automation system software development, generic cell control models and guidelines for the complete engineering process....... It facilitates the understanding of the task and structure of cell controllers and uses this knowledge directly in the implementation of the system. By applying generic models CCE facilitates reuse of software components and maintenance of applications. In many enterprises, software makes up an increasing part...

  6. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...... wavelength. It is shown that it is possible to tune and modulate a DFB fiber laser with both strain from a piezoelectric transducer and by temperature through resistive heating of a methal film. Both a chemical deposited silver layer and an electron-beam evaporation technique has been investigated, to find...

  7. Do forests best mitigate CO2 emissions to the atmosphere by setting them aside for maximization of carbon storage or by management for fossil fuel substitution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeroe, Anders; Mustapha, Walid Fayez; Stupak, Inge; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten

    2017-07-15

    Forests' potential to mitigate carbon emissions to the atmosphere is heavily debated and a key question is if forests left unmanaged to store carbon in biomass and soil provide larger carbon emission reductions than forests kept under forest management for production of wood that can substitute fossil fuels and fossil fuel intensive materials. We defined a modelling framework for calculation of the carbon pools and fluxes along the forest energy and wood product supply chains over 200 years for three forest management alternatives (FMA): 1) a traditionally managed European beech forest, as a business-as-usual case, 2) an energy poplar plantation, and 3) a set-aside forest left unmanaged for long-term storage of carbon. We calculated the cumulative net carbon emissions (CCE) and carbon parity times (CPT) of the managed forests relative to the unmanaged forest. Energy poplar generally had the lowest CCE when using coal as the reference fossil fuel. With natural gas as the reference fossil fuel, the CCE of the business-as-usual and the energy poplar was nearly equal, with the unmanaged forest having the highest CCE after 40 years. CPTs ranged from 0 to 156 years, depending on the applied model assumptions. CCE and CPT were especially sensitive to the reference fossil fuel, material alternatives to wood, forest growth rates for the three FMAs, and energy conversion efficiencies. Assumptions about the long-term steady-state levels of carbon stored in the unmanaged forest had a limited effect on CCE after 200 years. Analyses also showed that CPT was not a robust measure for ranking of carbon mitigation benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Seizing market shaping opportunities for vaccine cold chain equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Tara; Franzel, Lauren; Probst, Nina

    2017-04-19

    Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, supports immunisation programmes in eligible countries to reach children with lifesaving vaccines. Dramatic improvement in the scale and performance of current cold chain systems is required to extend the reach of immunisation services - especially for children living in remote locations - to advance progress towards full vaccine coverage. Achieving these improvements will require a healthier market for cold chain equipment where the products meet user needs, are sustainably priced, and are available in sufficient quantities to meet demand. Yet evidence suggests that the cold chain market has suffered from several failures including limited demand visibility, fragmented procurement, and insufficient information exchange between manufacturers and buyers on needs and equipment performance. One of Gavi's strategic goals is to shape markets for vaccines and other immunisation products, including cold chain equipment and in 2015, Gavi created a new mechanism - the Cold Chain Equipment (CCE) Optimisation Platform - to strengthen country cold chain systems by offering financial support and incentives for higher performing CCE. The main objective of the CCE Platform is to get more equipment that is efficient, sustainable, and better performing deployed to every health facility where it is required at an affordable price. To achieve these objectives, Gavi is putting in place tested market shaping approaches and tools adapted for the CCE market: the development of market strategies or 'roadmaps'; improvement of product performance through the development of target product profiles (TPPs); strategic engagement with CCE manufacturers and countries to enhance information sharing; and tailoring procurement tactics to the CCE market. These approaches and tools will allow for increased demand and supply of higher-performing, cost-effective and quality products. By strengthening immunisation systems with improved cold chain equipment, Gavi countries can

  9. Infection with the oncogenic human papillomavirus type 59 alters protein components of the cornified cell envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, Elizabeth; Brown, Darron R.

    2003-01-01

    Infection of the genital tract with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to proliferative and dysplastic epithelial lesions. The mechanisms used by the virus to escape the infected keratinocyte are not well understood. Infection of keratinocytes with HPV does not cause lysis, the mechanism used by many viruses to release newly formed virions. For HPV 11, a type associated with a low risk of neoplastic disease, the cornified cell envelope (CCE) of infected keratinocytes is thin and fragile, and transcription of loricrin, the major CCE protein, is reduced. The effects of high-risk HPV infection on components of the CCE have not been previously reported. HPV 59, an oncogenic genital type related to HPV types 18 and 45 was identified in a condylomata acuminata lesion. An extract of this lesion was used to infect human foreskin fragments, which were grown in athymic mice as xenografts. Continued propagation using extracts of xenografts permitted growth of additional HPV 59-infected xenografts. CCEs purified from HPV 59-infected xenografts displayed subtle morphologic abnormalities compared to those derived from uninfected xenografts. HPV 59-infected xenografts revealed dysplastic-appearing cells with mitotic figures. Detection of loricrin, involucrin, and cytokeratin 10 was reduced in HPV 59-infected epithelium, while small proline-rich protein 3 (SPR3) was increased. Reduction in loricrin was most apparent in regions of epithelium containing abundant HPV 59 DNA. Compared to uninfected epithelium, loricrin transcription was decreased in HPV 59-infected epithelium. We conclude that HPV 59 shares with HPV 11 the ability to alter CCE components and to specifically reduce transcription of the loricrin gene. Because loricrin is the major CCE protein, a reduction in this component could alter the physical properties of the CCE, thus facilitating virion release

  10. A multisatellite case study of the expansion of a substorm current wedge in the near-Earth magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Lui, A.T.Y.

    1990-01-01

    This study presents observations made by four spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, GOES 5, and GOES 6) and two ground stations (San Juan and Tucson) during a substorm that occurred at ∼0830 UT on April 19, 1985. The spacecraft were arrayed in a configuration that allows for the examination of the spatial evolution of the substorm current wedge, CCE was located between the GOES spacecraft in longitude, but at a radial distance of 8.0 R E . IRM was located west of the other three spacecraft in the same sector as Tucson, but at a radial distance of 11.6 R E . The relative times at which the signature of the substorm current wedge was first observed at the GOES spacecraft and the ground stations are consistent with a simple longitudinally expanding current wedge. However, the times at which IRM and CCE observed the current wedge are not consistent with a current wedge that expanded only longitudinally, IRM first observed the signature of the current wedge at about the same time the signature was observed by GOES 6 and Tucson, and CCE observed the current wedge only after both GOES satellites and the ground stations had done so. Moreover, both GOES spacecraft observed signatures consistent with entry into the central plasma sheet before CCE and IRM did, even though we estimate that CCE was slightly closer to the neutral sheet than the geosynchronous spacecraft. The sequence of events suggests that during this substorm the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, the formation of the substorm current wedge, and the expansion of the plasma sheet began in the near-Earth region, and subsequently spread tailward as well as longitudinally

  11. Relación entre sobrepeso y obesidad materna con cardiopatías congénitas. Estudio retrospectivo caso-control en el área norte de Buenos Aires

    OpenAIRE

    S.M. Benítez; A.C.J. Barreto Paternina; E.A. Duro

    2017-01-01

    Antecedentes: Existen discrepancias sobre la relación sobrepeso/obesidad (S/O) materna pregestacional y cardiopatías congénitas estructurales (CCE). La prevalencia mundial de S/O se ha incrementado en las mujeres en edad reproductiva y esto podría tener efectos sobre los servicios de recién nacidos (RN). Objetivos: Estimar el riesgo de CCE asociadas a S/O materna preconcepcional en nuestra área de trabajo. Material y métodos: Estudio cuantitativo, observacional retrospectivo y analítico...

  12. Colon capsule endoscopy: Current status and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Andrea O; Vermehren, Johannes; Albert, Jörg G

    2014-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE; PillCam Colon; Given Imaging; Yoqneam, Israel) is a minimally invasive wireless technique for the visualization of the colon. With the recent introduction of the second generation colon capsule the diagnostic accuracy of CCE for polyp detection has significantly improved and preliminary data suggest it may be useful to monitor mucosal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Limitations include the inability to take biopsies and the procedural costs. However, given the potentially higher acceptance within an average risk colorectal cancer (CRC) screening population, its usefulness as a screening tool with regard to CRC prevention should be further evaluated. PMID:25469027

  13. Cerebellar clear cell ependymoma in a 10 year old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thinzar Aye Nyein; Moon, Ah Rim; Hwang, Sun Chul; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, A Leum; Chang, Kee Hyun; Kim, Hee Kyung; Chin, Su Sie [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Sang [Soonchunhyang University Gumi Hospital, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Clear cell ependymoma (CCE) is a histological rare variant (1–5%) of ependymoma, which is distinguished from other histological subtypes by the presence of fusiform cells arrayed radially around small blood vessels. These alleged perivascular pseudorosettes are significant characteristic features of ependymomas. About 95% of infratentorial ependymomas are found in the fourth ventricle and the remainder occurs as cerebellopontine angle lesions. In previous reports, the cerebellum is found to be a rare location for ependymoma. In this study we report one case of CCE originating from the cerebellar hemisphere, showing unusual morphology on 3T MRI.

  14. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus), Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Wally, Owen; Banskota, Arjun H.; Stefanova, Roumiana; Hafting, Jeff T.; Critchley, Alan T.; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE), delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW) was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG) that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:26492254

  15. Education for Sustainable Development and Climate Change Education in China: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qingqing

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing the significance of education in promoting sustainable development (SD), China has developed a number of policies and initiatives relating to education for sustainable development (ESD) and climate change education (CCE). The article first reviews China's national policies and initiatives with regard to SD, climate change, education,…

  16. Climate Change Education in the Context of Education for Sustainable Development: Rationale and Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yoko; Bryan, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of education in addressing the challenges of climate change is increasingly recognized, the education sector remains underutilized as a strategic resource to mitigate and adapt to climate change. Education stakeholders in many countries have yet to develop a coherent framework for climate change education (CCE). This article…

  17. Climate Change Education and Education for Sustainable Development in the Republic of Korea: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Junghee

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Korea (ROK) has officially declared its national vision of green growth, and actively develops and implements policies related to education for sustainable development (ESD), green growth education (GGE) and climate change education (CCE). Over the Decade of ESD, the ROK experienced three administrations which have taken different…

  18. Arachidonic acid mediates non-capacitative calcium entry evoked by CB1-cannabinoid receptor activation in DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demuth, D.G.; Gkoumassi, Effimia; Droge, M.J.; Dekkers, B.G.J.; Esselink, H.J.; van Ree, Rutger; Parsons, M.E.; Zaagsma, Hans; Molleman, A; Nelemans, Herman

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1-receptor stimulation in DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells induces a rise in [Ca2+](i), which is dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and modulated by thapsigargin-sensitive stores, suggesting capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE), and by MAP kinase. Non-capacitative Ca2+ entry (NCCE) stimulated by

  19. Combination of mechanical, alkaline and enzymatic treatments to upgrade paper-grade pulp to dissolving pulp with high reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Chao; Verma, Saurabh Kumar; Li, Jianguo; Ma, Xiaojuan; Ni, Yonghao

    2016-01-01

    A modified process consisting of an initial mechanical refining (R) followed by a low-alkali (5.5% NaOH) cold caustic extraction (CCE) and finally an endoglucanase (EG) treatment (R-5.5%CCE-EG) was investigated for upgrading paper-grade pulp to dissolving pulp. Results showed that compared to the conventional process (9%CCE-EG), the modified process can decrease the alkali concentration (from 9% to 5.5%) to achieve a similar hemicelluloses removal while simultaneously enhancing the Fock reactivity (from 62.2% to 81.0%). The improved results were due to the fact that the mechanical refining resulted in favorable fiber morphological changes, including increased pore volume/size, water retention value and specific surface area. Consequently, the hemicelluloses removal was enhanced even under the subsequent low-alkali CCE condition. A synergic effect of refining, low alkali concentration and enzymatic activation was responsible for the higher reactivity of resulting dissolving pulp. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wu

    Full Text Available Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST, cytochrome P450 (CYP and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J' and J" clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J' and J" clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis.

  1. Ionic liquid modified carbon paste electrode and investigation of its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This paper reports on the preparation and advantages of novel amperometric biosensors in the presence of ... nanoparticles, which exhibited many new characteristics and potential ..... branched chitosan; PEGDGE: polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether; SA, sodium alginate; CCE, carbon ceramic elec- trode; HRP ...

  2. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus), Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Jatinder Singh; Wally, Owen; Banskota, Arjun H; Stefanova, Roumiana; Hafting, Jeff T; Critchley, Alan T; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-10-20

    We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE), delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW) was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG) that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  3. A New Age of Implementation: Guiding Principles for Implementing Performance Assessment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Gary; Gagnon, Laurie; Hammonds, Virgel

    2017-01-01

    In an examination of the conditions required for the successful implementation of performance assessment, the authors draw on a range of personal experience and other insights to guide practitioners and policymakers. Building on the authentic assessment work of the Boston Pilot Schools (CCE 2004), in 2008 the Center for Collaborative Education…

  4. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11228-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4e-12 2 ( CN833314 ) AGENCOURT_24959954 NIH_MGC_169 Mus musculus cDNA ... 62 2e-11 2 ( EL344856 ) CCEL12750.b1_K19.ab1 CCE(LMS) endi...ve Cichorium en... 82 2e-11 2 ( AB030316 ) Mus musculus Pig-n gene for phosphatidyl

  5. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U16318-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 20034B21H10 Normalized and subtracted western ... 38 0.004 2 ( EL348068 ) CCEL4215.b1_N22.ab1 CCE(LMS) end...ive Cichorium end... 44 0.007 3 ( EL567395 ) Physarum14069 Physarum polycephalum st

  6. Effect of carbon nanofibre addition on the mechanical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since the obtained strength data is showing a quadratic trend as a function of fibre volume fraction, the flexural strength, ILSS and tensile strength of BCE and CCE com- posites are represented in quadratic equations, with Vf as a variant. Generalized second-degree quadriatic equation is shown below. Absolute strength (S) ...

  7. Marketing Continuing Education: A Study of Price Strategies. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Marvin E.

    The objective of the study conducted at the Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) at the University of British Columbia was to determine that threshold pricing not only existed for continuing education courses, but also was applicable to an administrative decision-making structure. The first part of the three-part investigation analyzed consumer…

  8. Curriculum enquiry about community engagement at a research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The curriculum should be paramount in the academic field since the university uses curricula to put its ideas into effect. The curriculum field and community engagement are both comprehensive at universities but research on curricular community engagement (CCE) is imperative. Curriculum theory was used as a ...

  9. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ATTAMAH C. O

    Creative commons User License: CC BY-NC-ND. Journal of Agricultural Extension. Abstracted by: EBSCOhost, Electronic Journals Service (EJS), ..... at the Foundation Day Lecture held at CCE Auditorium, Federal University of Technology,. Akure (FUTA) on 17th May, 2013. Anyadike, R.N.C. (2009). Climate change and ...

  10. arXiv Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; De Boer, Wim

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors poly-crystalline diamond sensors are used. Here high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the CCE. However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is so much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field, which in turn increases the trapping rate and hence reduces the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed ...

  11. Post-occupancy evaluation of office buildings in a Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questionnaires were sent to ten office blocks within the CCE complex. A total number of 126 questionnaires were sent out and 102 replies were received. Observations from the data led to the view that the satisfactory level of IEQ awareness is low among the occupants and that the employees have limited control over ...

  12. The effects of radiation on gallium arsenide radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bates, R L; D'Auria, S D; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Smith, K M

    1997-01-01

    Semi-insulating, undoped, Liquid Encapsulated Czochralski (SI-U LEC) GaAs detectors have been irradiated with 1MeV neutrons, 24GeV/c protons, and 300MeV/c pions. The maximum fluences used were 6, 3, and 1.8~10$^{14}$ particles/cm$^{2}$ respectively. For all three types of irradiation the charge collection efficiencies (cce) of the detector are reduced due to the reduction in the electron and hole mean free paths. Pion and proton irradiations produce a greater reduction in cce than neutron irradiation with the pions having the greatest effect. The effect of annealing the detectors at room temperature, at 200$^{o}$C and at 450$^{o}$C with a flash lamp have been shown to reduce the leakage current and increase the cce of the irradiated detectors. The flash-lamp anneal produced the greatest increase in the cce from 26% to 70% by increasing the mean free path of the electrons. Two indium-doped samples were irradiated with 24GeV/c protons and demonstrated no improvement over SI U GaAs with respect to post-irradiati...

  13. Enhanced sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs via suppression of Nrf2 by procyanidins from Cinnamomi Cortex extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Matsumoto, Takashi; Itoi, Ayano; Kawana, Ayako; Nishiyama, Takahito; Ogura, Kenichiro [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Hiratsuka, Akira, E-mail: hiratuka@toyaku.ac.jp [Department of Drug Metabolism and Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2011-10-07

    Highlights: {yields} We found a novel inhibitor of Nrf2 known as a chemoresistance factor. {yields} Overexpressed Nrf2 in lung cancer cells was suppressed by Cinnamomi Cortex extract. {yields} Cytotoxic action of anticancer drugs in cells treated with the extract was enhanced. {yields} Procyanidin tetramers and pentamers were active components in suppressing Nrf2. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an important cytoprotective transcription factor because Nrf2-regulated enzymes play a key role in antioxidant and detoxification processes. Recent studies have reported that lung cancer cells overexpressing Nrf2 exhibit increased resistance to chemotherapy. Suppression of overexpressed Nrf2 is needed for a new therapeutic approach against lung cancers. In the present study, we found that Cinnamomi Cortex extract (CCE) has an ability to suppress Nrf2-regulated enzyme activity and Nrf2 expression in human lung cancer A549 cells with high Nrf2 activity. Moreover, we demonstrated that CCE significantly enhances sensitivity of A549 cells to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin and etoposide as well as increasing the intracellular accumulation of both drugs. These results suggest that CCE might be an effective concomitant agent to reduce anticancer drug resistance derived from Nrf2 overexpression. Bioactivity-guided fractionation revealed that procyanidin tetramers and pentamers contained in CCE were active components in suppressing Nrf2.

  14. Simultaneous determination of codeine and caffeine using single-walled carbon nanotubes modified carbon-ceramic electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Biuck; Abazari, Mehri; Pournaghi-Azar, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-02-01

    In the present paper, the simultaneous determination of codeine (CO) and caffeine (CF) is described by the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes modified carbon-ceramic electrode (SWCNT/CCE); prepared via a simple and rapid method. The results show that the SWCNT/CCE exhibits excellent electrochemical catalytic activity toward the oxidation of these compounds with respect to the bare CCE and offers two anodic peaks at 1.05 and 1.38 V vs. saturated calomel electrode for oxidation of CO and CF, respectively. Differential pulse voltammetry was used for simultaneous determination of CO and CF at micromolar concentration level. In the optimum conditions, it is found that the calibration graphs for CO and CF are linear in the concentration ranges 0.2-230 and 0.4-300 μM with detection limits of 0.11 and 0.25 μM for CO and CF, respectively. The SWCNT/CCE presents good stability, reproducibility, and repeatability and the proposed method has been successfully applied for determination of CO and CF in some pharmaceutical, drinking and biological samples with high recovery rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Wireless capsule endoscopy of the large intestine: a review with future projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gossum, Andre

    2014-09-01

    Video capsule endoscopy, which was initially developed for exploring the small bowel, has been adapted for investigating the colon. This review summarizes recent developments in colon capsule technology as well as indications for its use. Second-generation PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE-2) has been recently developed and has significantly improved the sensitivity and specificity of colon capsules for detecting polyps and/or tumors in patients with suspected or known colonic lesions. The use of CCE-2 has been shown to be of value in patients with incomplete standard colonoscopy. The use of CCE-2 has also been investigated in patients with ulcerative colitis and in outpatient settings. Several trials have tried to simplify the colon preparation regimen. Colon capsule endoscopy is a novel technique for exploring the colon. CCE-2 has improved the diagnostic capability of this noninvasive method. There is still room for improvement and simplification of colon preparation regimens. Apart from detection of polyps or neoplasms, colon capsule endoscopy has also been assessed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of a chicken comb extract-containing supplement on cartilage and bone metabolism in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Masafumi; Aoba, Yukihiro; Watari, Taiji; Momomura, Rei; Watanabe, Keita; Tomonaga, Akihito; Matsunaga, Michitaka; Suda, Yoshimasa; Lee, Woo Young; Asai, Katsuhito; Yoshimura, Kaori; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Tetsuro; Yamaguchi, Hideyo; Nagaoka, Isao

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we revealed that a commercially available product of dietary supplement containing a chicken comb extract (CCE), which is rich in hyaluronan, not only relieves joint pain and other symptoms, but also potentially improves the balance of type II collagen degradation/synthesis in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Since soccer is one of the sports most likely to cause knee osteoarthritis (OA), we evaluated the effect of a CCE-containing supplement on cartilage and bone metabolism in athletes. Fourteen and 15 subjects (all midfielders) were randomly assigned to receive the test product (test group) and the dummy placebo containing only vehicle (placebo group), respectively, for 12 weeks. The daily oral intake of the CCE-containing test product clearly decreased the urinary levels of both C-terminal crosslinked telopeptides of cartilage-specific type II collagen (CTX-II) as a type II collagen degradation marker and the N-terminal telopeptides of bone-specific type I collagen (NTx) as a marker of bone resorption at 12 weeks after the initiation of the intervention. By contrast, no significant reduction was detected in the placebo group at any timepoint during the intervention. These observations indicate that the test product is effective in inhibiting, not only cartilage degradation, but also bone remodeling. Thus, the CCE-containing supplement may be useful for the management of joint health in athletes.

  17. African Journal of Library, Archives and Information Science - Vol 25 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Comparison of Cataloguing and Classification Education (CCE) in Library and Information Science in South Africa, Brazil and the USA (SOBUSA): An Overview. Dennis N. Ocholla, Lyudmila Ocholla, Hope A. Olson, Jeannette R. Glover, José Augusto Guimarães ...

  18. Low-cost monitoring of campylobacter in poultry houses by air sampling and quantitative PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mette Sofie Rousing; Josefsen, Mathilde Hasseldam; Löfström, Charlotta

    2014-01-01

    approximately 10(4) and 10(5) CCE per sample for boot swabs and air, respectively. In conclusion, using air samples combined with quantitative real-time PCR, Campylobacter contamination could be detected earlier than by boot swabs and was found to be a more convenient technique for monitoring and/or to obtain...

  19. Ionic liquid modified carbon paste electrode and investigation of its ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This paper reports on the preparation and advantages of novel amperometric biosensors in the presence of ... several disadvantages such as relative weaker fabrication reproducibility ..... branched chitosan; PEGDGE: polyethylene glycol diglycidyl ether; SA, sodium alginate; CCE, carbon ceramic elec- trode; HRP ...

  20. Grosor corneal central y conteo de células endoteliales en pacientes sometidos a cirugía de catarata asistida con láser de femtosegundos comparada con cirugía facoemulsificación tradicional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Givaudan Pedroza

    2016-09-01

    Conclusiones: Aunque se observó una diferencia estadísticamente significativa en cuanto al tiempo efectivo de faco, siendo menor en el grupo de femtosegundos, no se encontraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas en el CCE y grosor corneal central entre el grupo de facoemulsificación convencional y el asistido por láser de femtosegundos.

  1. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus, Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatinder Singh Sangha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE, delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS.

  2. Degradation of the charge collection efficiency of an n-type Fz silicon diode subjected to MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Nicolò; Forneris, Jacopo [Physics Department, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10250 Torino (Italy); Grilj, Veljko; Jakšić, Milko [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Räisänen, Jyrki [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Simon, Aliz [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Skukan, Natko [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruđer Bošković Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Vittone, Ettore, E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Physics Department, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10250 Torino (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: •Study of charge collection efficiency degradation (CCE) in Si diode due to MeV H irradiation. •CCE evaluated by micro-IBIC using 4.5 MeV Li ions to probe the damaged region. •Generation of H-donors, which perturb the electrostatic properties of the diode. -- Abstract: We present the analysis of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation of float zone grown n-type silicon detectors irradiated with 1.3, 2.0 and 3.0 MeV protons. The analysis was carried out by irradiating small regions (50 × 50 μm{sup 2}) with a proton microbeam at fluences ranging from 10{sup 11} to 4·10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} and probing the effect of irradiation by measuring the 4.5 MeV Li ion induced charge in full depletion conditions. The CCE degradation as function of the proton fluence shows an unexpected deviation from the linear behavior predicted by the Shockley–Read–Hall model of carrier recombination. The build-up of excess hydrogen related donors due to proton irradiations is suggested to be the cause of a significant perturbation of the electrostatic properties of the diode, which drastically change the electron trajectories and hence the induced charge mechanism.

  3. Regulation of capacitative and non-capacitative Ca2+ entry in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COLIN W TAYLOR

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE pathway, activated by depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores, is thought to mediate much of the Ca2+ entry evoked by receptors that stimulate phospholipase C (PLC. However, in A7r5 vascular smooth muscle cells, vasopressin, which stimulates PLC, empties intracellular Ca2+ stores but simultaneously inhibits their ability to activate CCE. The diacylglycerol produced with the IP3 that empties the stores is metabolized to arachidonic and this leads to activation of nitric oxide (NO synthase, production of NO and cyclic GMP, and consequent activation of protein kinase G. The latter inhibits CCE. In parallel, NO directly activates a non-capacitative Ca2+ entry (NCCE pathway, which is entirely responsible for the Ca2+ entry that occurs in the presence of vasopressin. This reciprocal regulation of two Ca2+ entry pathways ensures that there is sequential activation of first NCCE in the presence of vasopressin, and then a transient activation of CCE when vasopressin is removed. We suggest that the two routes for Ca2+ entry may selectively direct Ca2+ to processes that mediate activation and then recovery of the cell.

  4. Climate Change Education for Sustainability in Brazil: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajber, Rachel; Mochizuki, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This article maps and explains Brazil's policies, strategies, plans and initiatives related to Climate Change Education (CCE), in the overall context of Environmental Education (EE) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). The case of Brazil offers useful insights on how to enhance climate response through education because of its unique…

  5. Nutrient uplift in a cyclonic eddy increases diversity, primary productivity and iron demand of microbial communities relative to a western boundary current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina A. Doblin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intensification of western boundary currents in the global ocean will potentially influence meso-scale eddy generation, and redistribute microbes and their associated ecological and biogeochemical functions. To understand eddy-induced changes in microbial community composition as well as how they control growth, we targeted the East Australian Current (EAC region to sample microbes in a cyclonic (cold-core eddy (CCE and the adjacent EAC. Phototrophic and diazotrophic microbes were more diverse (2–10 times greater Shannon index in the CCE relative to the EAC, and the cell size distribution in the CCE was dominated (67% by larger micro-plankton $(\\geq 20\\lrm{\\mu }\\mathrm{m}$ ≥ 20 μ m , as opposed to pico- and nano-sized cells in the EAC. Nutrient addition experiments determined that nitrogen was the principal nutrient limiting growth in the EAC, while iron was a secondary limiting nutrient in the CCE. Among the diazotrophic community, heterotrophic NifH gene sequences dominated in the EAC and were attributable to members of the gamma-, beta-, and delta-proteobacteria, while the CCE contained both phototrophic and heterotrophic diazotrophs, including Trichodesmium, UCYN-A and gamma-proteobacteria. Daily sampling of incubation bottles following nutrient amendment captured a cascade of effects at the cellular, population and community level, indicating taxon-specific differences in the speed of response of microbes to nutrient supply. Nitrogen addition to the CCE community increased picoeukaryote chlorophyll a quotas within 24 h, suggesting that nutrient uplift by eddies causes a ‘greening’ effect as well as an increase in phytoplankton biomass. After three days in both the EAC and CCE, diatoms increased in abundance with macronutrient (N, P, Si and iron amendment, whereas haptophytes and phototrophic dinoflagellates declined. Our results indicate that cyclonic eddies increase delivery of nitrogen to the upper ocean to potentially

  6. Chemopreventive effect of cactus Opuntia ficus indica on oxidative stress and genotoxicity of aflatoxin B1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mansour Hédi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1 is potent hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic agent. In aflatoxicosis, oxidative stress is a common mechanism contributing to initiation and progression of hepatic damage. The aim of this work was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of cactus cladode extract (CCE on aflatoxin B1-induced liver damage in mice by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA level, the protein carbonyls generation and the heat shock proteins Hsp 70 and Hsp 27 expressions in liver. We also looked for an eventual protective effect against AFB1-induced genotoxicity as determined by chromosome aberrations test, SOS Chromotest and DNA fragmentation assay. We further evaluated the modulation of p53, bax and bcl2 protein expressions in liver. Methods Adult, healthy balbC (20-25 g male mice were pre-treated by intraperitonial administration of CCE (50 mg/Kg.b.w for 2 weeks. Control animals were treated 3 days a week for 4 weeks by intraperitonial administration of 250 μg/Kg.b.w AFB1. Animals treated by AFB1 and CCE were divided into two groups: the first group was administrated CCE 2 hours before each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The second group was administrated without pre-treatment with CCE but this extract was administrated 24 hours after each treatment with AFB1 3 days a week for 4 weeks. Results Our results clearly showed that AFB1 induced significant alterations in oxidative stress markers. In addition, it has a genotoxic potential and it increased the expression of pro apoptotic proteins p53 and bax and decreased the expression of bcl2. The treatment of CCE before or after treatment with AFB1, showed (i a total reduction of AFB1 induced oxidative damage markers, (ii an anti-genotoxic effect resulting in an efficient prevention of chromosomal aberrations and DNA fragmentation compared to the group treated with AFB1 alone (iii restriction of the effect of AFB1 by differential modulation of the expression of p53 which

  7. Root cause analysis underscores the importance of understanding, addressing, and communicating cold chain equipment failures to improve equipment performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennon, Pat; Atuhaire, Brian; Yavari, Shahrzad; Sampath, Vidya; Mvundura, Mercy; Ramanathan, Nithya; Robertson, Joanie

    2017-04-19

    Vaccine cold chain equipment (CCE) in developing countries is often exposed to harsh environmental conditions, such as extreme temperatures and humidity, and is subject to many additional challenges, including intermittent power supply, insufficient maintenance capacity, and a scarcity of replacement parts. Together, these challenges lead to high failure rates for refrigerators, potentially damaging vaccines and adversely affecting immunization coverage. Providing a sustainable solution for improving CCE performance requires an understanding of the root causes of failure. Project teams conducted small-scale studies to determine the root causes of CCE failure in selected locations in Uganda and Mozambique. The evaluations covered 59 failed refrigerators and freezers in Uganda and 27 refrigerators in Mozambique. In Uganda, the vast majority of failures were due to a cooling unit fault in one widely used refrigerator model. In Mozambique, 11 of the 27 problems were attributable to solar refrigerators with batteries that were unable to hold a charge, and another eight problems were associated with a need to adjust thermostat settings. The studies showed that tracking and evaluation of equipment performance and failure can yield important, actionable information for a range of stakeholders, including local CCE technicians, the ministry of health, equipment manufacturers, and international partners such as the United Nations Children's Fund, World Health Organization, and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Collaborative efforts to systematically collect and communicate data on CCE performance and causes of failure will help to improve the efficiency and reach of immunization programs in low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany); CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne [CERN, Meyrin (Switzerland); Boer, Wim de [Institute for Experimental Nuclear Physics (IEKP), KIT, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  9. Description of radiation damage in diamond sensors using an effective defect model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, Florian; Guthoff, Moritz; Dabrowski, Anne; Boer, Wim de

    2017-01-01

    The Beam Condition Monitoring Leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC consisting of 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors. The BCML sensors, located in rings around the beam, are exposed to high particle rates originating from the colliding beams. These particles cause lattice defects, which act as traps for the ionized charge carrier leading to a reduced charge collection efficiency (CCE). The radiation induced CCE degradation was, however, much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements. Measurement and simulations presented in this paper show that this discrepancy is related to the rate of incident particles. At high particle rates, the trapping rate of the ionization is strongly increased compared to the detrapping rate leading to an increased build-up of space charge. This space charge locally reduces the internal electric field increasing the trapping rate and hence reducing the CCE even further. In order to connect these macroscopic measurements with the microscopic defects acting as traps for the ionization charge, the TCAD simulation program SILVACO was used. It allows to introduce the defects as effective donor and acceptor levels, and can calculate the electric field from Transient Current Technique (TCT) signals and CCE as a function of the effective trap properties, like density, energy level, and trapping cross section. After each irradiation step, these properties were fitted to the data on the electric field from the TCT signals and CCE. Two effective acceptor and donor levels were needed to fit the data after each step. It turned out that the energy levels and cross sections could be kept constant and the trap density was proportional to the cumulative fluence of the irradiation steps. The highly non-linear rate dependent diamond polarization and the resulting signal loss can be simulated using this effective defect model and is in agreement with the measurement results

  10. Avanços na abordagem do carcinoma precoce de esôfago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Arantes

    Full Text Available Nos países ocidentais, o carcinoma de células escamosas de esôfago (CCE geralmente é detectado em estágio avançado, quando as possibilidades de cura são remotas e o prognóstico reservado. Entretanto, nos anos recentes, ocorreu uma série de avanços na abordagem do CCE de esôfago, tais como a identificação dos grupos de risco para o surgimento desta neoplasia; o uso da endoscopia de alta resolução e cromoendoscopia com lugol favorecendo o diagnóstico do CCE em estágios iniciais; e o desenvolvimento de técnicas endoscópicas de ressecção tumoral endoluminal em monobloco denominada dissecção endoscópica de submucosa. Este progresso tem possibilitado a aplicação do tratamento endoscópico minimamente invasivo com potencial curativo em pacientes selecionados com CCE superficial de esôfago. O presente artigo de revisão, elaborado por um grupo multicêntrico internacional, tem como objetivo primário contribuir para o entendimento dos principais avanços recentes ocorridos no manejo do CCE precoce de esôfago. Como objetivo secundário, pretende propiciar uma revisão detalhada e minuciosa da estratégia técnica de DES desenvolvida pelos experts japoneses, de forma a colaborar para a difusão deste conceito e a incorporação destas tecnologias na Medicina Brasileira e Latino-americana.

  11. Climate change adaptability of cropping and farming systems for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justes, Eric; Rossing, Walter; Vermue, Anthony

    Introduction: Prospective studies showed that the European agriculture will be impacted by climate change (CC) with different effects depending on the geographic region. The ERA-Net+ project Climate-CAFE (call of FACCE-JPI) aims to improve the “adaptive capacity” of arable and forage based farming...... systems to CC through a gradient of adaptation strategies. Methods: The adaptation strategies are evaluated at cropping and farming systems as well as regional levels for nine “Adaptation Pilots” along a North-South climate gradient in the EU. Three categories of strategies are evaluated: i) Resistance...... and possibilities for re-configuration of cropping and farming systems. The strategy evaluation will reveal synergies and trade-offs among objectives and their indicators at different scales under GIEC climatic scenarios. Since adaptation is context-specific, the project is based on “Adaptation Pilots” and local...

  12. The activity of the Italian Archaeological School of Carthage 2016-2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Mastino

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Resoconto dell'attività 2016-2017 della Scuola Archeologica Italiana di Cartagine. In allegato un modello 3D di Salvatore Ganga dell'altare della Gens Iulia conservato al Museo del bardo di Tunisi prodotto con tecnica fotogrammetrica del tipo structure from motion. Sono state utilizzate 149 foto realizzate con una macchina digitale Sony Nex-5 con obiettivo grandangolare 16 mm. Per l'elaborazione è stato impiegato il software "Agisoft Photoscan" che ha restituito una nuvola di punti densa costituita da 14 315 667 punti (medium quality. La mesh di 946 320 facce si appoggia su 478 375 vertici. La texture è contenuta in due immagini da 8192x8192 pixels.Il breve filmato di una rotazione completa dell'oggetto è stato realizzato col software Blender.

  13. Cadmium-induced malignant transformation in rat liver cells: role of aberrant oncogene expression and minimal role of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Diwan, Bhalchandra A; Reece, Jeffrey M; Bortner, Carl D; Pi, Jingbo; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P

    2005-04-10

    Our study examined the role of oxidative stress and aberrant gene expression in malignant transformation induced by chronic, low-level cadmium exposure in non-tumorigenic rat liver epithelial cell line, TRL 1215. Cells were cultured in 1.0 microM cadmium (as CdCl(2)) for up to 28 weeks and compared to passage-matched control cells. The level of cadmium used for transformation produced no evidence of increased superoxide (O(2) (-*.)) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels in the early stages of exposure (cadmium exposed liver epithelial cells (CCE-LE) were hyperproliferative with a growth rate about 3-fold higher than control cells. CCE-LE cells produced highly aggressive tumors upon inoculation into mice confirming malignant transformation. Analysis of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) showed that CCE-LE cells possessed markedly lower basal levels of intracellular O(2) (-*.)and H(2)O(2) and were very tolerant to high-dose (50 microM) cadmium-induced ROS. Time course studies showed the production of ROS by high-dose cadmium was abolished well in advance of malignant transformation. In contrast, marked overexpression of the oncogenes c-myc and c-jun occurred in transformed CCE-LE cells as evidenced by up to 10-fold increases in both transcript and protein. A significant increase in DNA-binding activity of the transcription factors AP-1 and NF-kappaB occurred in CCE-LE cells. Increases in oncogene expression and transcription factor activity occurred concurrently with malignant transformation. Thus, cadmium-induced ROS occurs as an early, high-dose event but is abolished well in advance of malignant transformation. Low-level chronic cadmium triggers oncogene overexpression possibly by altering critical transcription factor activity. Such changes in cellular gene expression likely culminate in the loss of growth control and cadmium-induced neoplastic transformation in CCE-LE cells, whereas generation of ROS by cadmium seemed to play a minimal role in this

  14. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  15. Test system for charge collection efficiency measurement (SYCOC) for neutron irradiated silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, L. S.; Pin, A.; Militaru, O.; Cortina, E.; De Callatay, B.; Cabrera, J.; Michotte, D. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    One of the constraints in using standard Float Zone silicon layer as base material for tracking in particle physics is its radiation hardness. The detection efficiency is degraded by the introduction of defects in the silicon crystal and charge trapping becomes the main problem. The Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) is a relevant parameter in order to determine the detection performance of such devices. A state-of-the-art test system named 'Systeme de mesure de collection de charge' (SYCOC) has been developed for the characterization of diode and microstrip silicon sensors before and after irradiation. The system is designed to perform Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) and Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurements with laser and radioactive sources in a controlled environment. Initial measurements on diodes are presented. (authors)

  16. Back-to-back colon capsule endoscopy and optical colonoscopy in colorectal cancer screening individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, Morten; Kroijer, Rasmus; Dyrvig, Anne-Kirstine

    2018-01-01

    mm polyps in colon capsule endoscopy (97%; 95% CI: 94-100) was superior to colonoscopy (89%; 95% CI: 84-94). A complete capsule endoscopy examination (N=134) could detect patients with intermediate or greater risk (according to the European guidelines) with an accuracy, sensitivity, specificity......AIM: To determine the polyp detection rate and per-patient sensitivity for polyps >9 mm of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) compared with colonoscopy as well as the diagnostic accuracy of CCE. METHOD: Individuals who had positive immunochemical faecal occult blood test during screening had...... investigator blinded colon capsule endoscopy and colonoscopy. Participants underwent repeat endoscopy if significant lesions detected by colon capsule endoscopy were considered to have been missed by colonoscopy. RESULTS: There were 253 participants. The polyp detection rate was significantly higher in colon...

  17. Evidence for plasma effect on charge collection efficiency in proton irradiated GaAs detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nava, F; Canali, C; Vittone, E; Polesello, P; Biggeri, U; Leroy, C

    1999-01-01

    The radiation damage in 100 mu m thick Schottky diodes made on semi-insulating undoped GaAs materials, were studied using alpha-, beta-, proton- and gamma-spectroscopy as well as I-V measurements. The results have been analysed within the framework of the Hecht model to investigate the influence of the plasma produced by short-range strongly ionising particles on the detector performance after 24 GeV proton irradiation. It has been found that with the mean free drift lengths for electrons and holes determined from alpha-spectra in overdepleted detectors, the charge collection efficiency for beta-particles, cce subbeta, is well predicted in the unirradiated detectors, while in the most irradiated ones, the cce subbeta is underestimated by more than 40%. The observed disagreement can be explained by assuming that the charge carrier recombination in the plasma region of such detectors, becomes significant.

  18. Baroreflex Coupling Assessed by Cross-Compression Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Schumann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Estimating interactions between physiological systems is an important challenge in modern biomedical research. Here, we explore a new concept for quantifying information common in two time series by cross-compressibility. Cross-compression entropy (CCE exploits the ZIP data compression algorithm extended to bivariate data analysis. First, time series are transformed into symbol vectors. Symbols of the target time series are coded by the symbols of the source series. Uncoupled and linearly coupled surrogates were derived from cardiovascular recordings of 36 healthy controls obtained during rest to demonstrate suitability of this method for assessing physiological coupling. CCE at rest was compared to that of isometric handgrip exercise. Finally, spontaneous baroreflex interaction assessed by CCEBRS was compared between 21 patients suffering from acute schizophrenia and 21 matched controls. The CCEBRS of original time series was significantly higher than in uncoupled surrogates in 89% of the subjects and higher than in linearly coupled surrogates in 47% of the subjects. Handgrip exercise led to sympathetic activation and vagal inhibition accompanied by reduced baroreflex sensitivity. CCEBRS decreased from 0.553 ± 0.030 at rest to 0.514 ± 0.035 during exercise (p < 0.001. In acute schizophrenia, heart rate, and blood pressure were elevated. Heart rate variability indicated a change of sympathovagal balance. The CCEBRS of patients with schizophrenia was reduced compared to healthy controls (0.546 ± 0.042 vs. 0.507 ± 0.046, p < 0.01 and revealed a decrease of blood pressure influence on heart rate in patients with schizophrenia. Our results indicate that CCE is suitable for the investigation of linear and non-linear coupling in cardiovascular time series. CCE can quantify causal interactions in short, noisy and non-stationary physiological time series.

  19. Bridging the Communication Gap (Combler les Lacunes dans le Domaine de la Communication)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    argon ion User* tangulaor quartz muate. The ell was rolled with 2.0 mL of5M (Setawater00 1020m ) a iiedb ~s as abiet tmpeatue. IM.wer mad, a reortd per...2920 Luxembourg The author describes the essential aspects of computer translation: design, funding, development, experimental use, evaluation and...Division, AGARD, 7 rue Ancelle, 92200 Neuilly-sur-Seine, France Mr L.ROLLINGt CCE, DG 13, Batiment Jean Monnet, Luxembourg 2920, Luxembourg Lt Rui

  20. Antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of callus culture and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The callus culture extract (CCE) gave the lowest MIC value of 0.78 mg/ mL for most of the bacteria and fungi and the lowest MBC values of 0.78 mg/ mL and 1.56 mg/ mL against bacteria and fungi, respectively. ... Keywords: Crotalaria retusa; In vitro propagation; Callus culture; Antimicrobial activity; Antioxidant activity ...

  1. Environmental conditions and prey-switching by a seabird predator impact juvenile salmon survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Brian K.; Santora, Jarrod A.; Henderson, Mark J.; Warzybok, Pete; Jahncke, Jaime; Bradley, Russell W.; Huff, David D.; Schroeder, Isaac D.; Nelson, Peter; Field, John C.; Ainley, David G.

    2017-10-01

    Due to spatio-temporal variability of lower trophic-level productivity along the California Current Ecosystem (CCE), predators must be capable of switching prey or foraging areas in response to changes in environmental conditions and available forage. The Gulf of the Farallones in central California represents a biodiversity hotspot and contains the largest common murre (Uria aalge) colonies along the CCE. During spring, one of the West Coast's most important Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations out-migrates into the Gulf of the Farallones. We quantify the effect of predation on juvenile Chinook salmon associated with ecosystem-level variability by integrating long-term time series of environmental conditions (upwelling, river discharge), forage species abundance within central CCE, and population size, at-sea distribution, and diet of the common murre. Our results demonstrate common murres typically forage in the vicinity of their offshore breeding sites, but in years in which their primary prey, pelagic young-of-year rockfish (Sebastes spp.), are less available they forage for adult northern anchovies (Engraulis mordax) nearshore. Incidentally, while foraging inshore, common murre consumption of out-migrating juvenile Chinook salmon, which are collocated with northern anchovy, increases and population survival of the salmon is significantly reduced. Results support earlier findings that show timing and strength of upwelling, and the resultant forage fish assemblage, is related to Chinook salmon recruitment variability in the CCE, but we extend those results by demonstrating the significance of top-down impacts associated with these bottom-up dynamics. Our results demonstrate the complexity of ecosystem interactions and impacts between higher trophic-level predators and their prey, complexities necessary to quantify in order to parameterize ecosystem models and evaluate likely outcomes of ecosystem management options.

  2. Effects of Unburned Lime on Soil pH and Base Cations in Acidic Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Nduwumuremyi, Athanase; Ruganzu, Vicky; Mugwe, Jayne Njeri; Cyamweshi Rusanganwa, Athanase

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture is threatened by the widespread soil acidity in many arable lands of Rwanda. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of unburned limes and their effects on soil acidity and base cations in acidic soils of high land of Buberuka. The lime materials used were agricultural burned lime and three unburned lime materials, Karongi, Musanze, and Rusizi. The test crop was Irish Potato. All lime materials were analyzed for Calcium Carbonate Equivalent (CCE) and Finenes...

  3. Sustaining Rocky Mountain landscapes: Science, policy and management for the Crown of the Continent ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prato, Tony; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    Prato and Fagre offer the first systematic, multi-disciplinary assessment of the challenges involved in managing the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem ( CCE), an area of the Rocky Mountains that includes northwestern Montana, southwestern Alberta, and southeastern British Columbia. The spectacular landscapes, extensive recreational options, and broad employment opportunities of the CCE have made it one of the fastest growing regions in the United States and Canada, and have lead to a shift in its economic base from extractive resource industries to service-oriented recreation and tourism industries. In the process, however, the amenities and attributes that draw people to this “New West” are under threat. Pastoral scenes are disappearing as agricultural lands and other open spaces are converted to residential uses, biodiversity is endangered by the fragmentation of fish and wildlife habitats, and many areas are experiencing a decline in air and water quality. Sustaining Rocky Mountain Landscapes provides a scientific basis for communities to develop policies for managing the growth and economic transformation of the CCE without sacrificing the quality of life and environment for which the land is renowned. This forthcoming edited volume focuses on five aspects of sustaining mountain landscapes in the CCE and similar regions in the Rocky Mountains. The five aspects are: 1) how social, economic, demo graphic and environmental forces are transforming ecosystem structure and function, 2) trends in use and conditions for human and environmental resources, 3) activating science, policy and education to enhance sustainable landscape management, 4) challenges to sustainable management of public and private lands, and 5) future prospects for achieving sustainable landscapes.

  4. Promotion demand forecast: A Case Study of Coca Cola Enterprise

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Hoi-Yin Cecilia

    2007-01-01

    In this highly competitive business environment, forecasting becomes one of the hot topics. Every business organization uses forecasts for decision marking. Forecasting can help companies to determine the market strategy. It also helps in production planning and resources allocation. A good forecast can help the management team to make the best decision. Nowadays, it is important to develop a collaborative partnership within the supply chain. Coca Cola Enterprise (CCE) is working with its cus...

  5. Similarities and differences of graduate entry-level competencies of chiropractic councils on education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Stanley I; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Walker, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Councils of Chiropractic Education (CCE) indirectly influence patient care and safety through their role of ensuring the standards of training delivered by chiropractic educational institutions. This is achieved by CCEs defining competence and creating lists of descriptive statements to establish the necessary standards for students to attain before graduating. A preliminary review suggested that these definitions and descriptive lists lacked consensus. This creates the potential for variations in standards between the CCE jurisdictions and may compromise patient care and safety and also inter-jurisdictional mutual recognition. The purposes of this study were 1) to investigate similarities and differences between the CCEs in their definitions of competence, domains of educational competencies, components of the domains of competencies, as represented by assessment and diagnosis, ethics, intellectual development, and 2) to make recommendations, if significant deficiencies were found. We undertook a systematic review of the similarities and differences between various CCEs definitions of competence and the descriptive lists of educational competencies they have adopted. CCEs were selected on the basis of WHO recommendations. Blinded investigators selected the data from CCE websites and direct contact with CCEs. This information was tabulated for a comparative analysis. All CCEs' definitions of competence included the elements of "knowledge", "skills" and "attitudes" whereas only one CCE included the expected "abilities" element. The educational application of the definition of competency among CCEs varied. A high level of similarity when comparing the domains of competence adopted by CCEs was found despite variations in the structure. Differences between CCEs became increasingly apparent when the three selected representative domains were compared. CCEs were found to stipulate varying levels of prescriptiveness for graduate entry level standards. A series of

  6. Caracterização de colágenos tipos I e III no estroma do carcinoma de células escamosas cutâneo em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A.O. Bedoya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE é uma neoplasia epitelial maligna que acomete cães e diversas outras espécies, incluindo a humana. O CCE afeta vários sítios anatômicos e pode desenvolver metástase. O objetivo deste estudo foi a caracterização das fibras de colágenos tipos I e III no estroma do CCE cutâneo de cães. Para este trabalho, utilizaram-se 44 amostras de pele incluídas em parafina e que tiveram prévio diagnóstico de CCE. As amostras foram processadas histologicamente e coradas com hematoxilina/eosina para confirmação do diagnóstico e classificação do grau de diferenciação tumoral e com a coloração histoquímica de picrosirius para observação dos colágenos tipos I e III. O colágeno tipo III mostrou maior expressão nos CCEs cutâneos bem diferenciados. O papel do colágeno do tipo III nas neoplasias não está bem esclarecido, e outros fatores além do grau de diferenciação celular podem estar envolvidos em sua expressão e determinar sua importância na biologia tumoral.

  7. Simultaneous Detection of Genetically Modified Organisms in a Mixture by Multiplex PCR-Chip Capillary Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Supriya; Dasari, Srikanth; Bhagavatula, Krishna; Mueller, Steffen; Deepak, Saligrama Adavigowda; Ghosh, Sudip; Basak, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    An efficient PCR-based method to trace genetically modified food and feed products is in demand due to regulatory requirements and contaminant issues in India. However, post-PCR detection with conventional methods has limited sensitivity in amplicon separation that is crucial in multiplexing. The study aimed to develop a sensitive post-PCR detection method by using PCR-chip capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CCE) to detect and identify specific genetically modified organisms in their genomic DNA mixture by targeting event-specific nucleotide sequences. Using the PCR-CCE approach, novel multiplex methods were developed to detect MON531 cotton, EH 92-527-1 potato, Bt176 maize, GT73 canola, or GA21 maize simultaneously when their genomic DNAs in mixtures were amplified using their primer mixture. The repeatability RSD (RSDr) of the peak migration time was 0.06 and 3.88% for the MON531 and Bt176, respectively. The RSD (RSDR) of the Cry1Ac peak ranged from 0.12 to 0.40% in multiplex methods. The method was sensitive in resolving amplicon of size difference up to 4 bp. The PCR-CCE method is suitable to detect multiple genetically modified events in a composite DNA sample by tagging their event specific sequences.

  8. Quantifying the co-benefits of energy-efficiency policies: a case study of the cement industry in Shandong Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanbeigi, Ali; Lobscheid, Agnes; Lu, Hongyou; Price, Lynn; Dai, Yue

    2013-08-01

    In 2010, China's cement industry accounted for more than half of the world's total cement production. The cement industry is one of the most energy-intensive and highest carbon dioxide (CO2)-emitting industries, and thus a key industrial contributor to air pollution in China. For example, it is the largest source of particulate matter (PM) emissions in China, accounting for 40% of industrial PM emissions and 27% of total national PM emissions. In this study, we quantify the co-benefits of PM10 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions that result from energy-saving measures in the cement industry in Shandong Province, China. We use a modified form of the cost of conserved energy (CCE) equation to incorporate the value of these co-benefits. The results show that more than 40% of the PM and SO2 emission reduction potential of the electricity-saving measures is cost effective even without taking into account the co-benefits for the electricity-saving measures. The results also show that including health benefits from PM10 and/or SO2 emission reductions reduces the CCE of the fuel-saving measures. Two measures that entail changing products (production of blended cement and limestone Portland cement) result in the largest reduction in CCE when co-benefits were included, since these measures can reduce both PM10 and SO2 emissions, whereas the other fuel-saving measures do not reduce PM10. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Semiconductor pixel detectors for digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelli, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Bisogni, M.G.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E.; Quattrocchi, M.; Rosso, V.; Stefanini, A.; Venturelli, L.; Zucca, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present some results obtained with silicon and gallium arsenide pixel detectors to be applied in the field of digital mammography. Even though GaAs is suitable for medical imaging applications thanks to its atomic number, which allows a very good detection efficiency, it often contains an high concentrations of traps which decrease the charge collection efficiency (CCE). So we have analysed both electrical and spectroscopic performance of different SI GaAs diodes as a function of concentrations of dopants in the substrate, in order to find a material by which we can obtain a CCE allowing the detection of all the photons that interact in the detector. Nevertheless to be able to detect low contrast details, efficiency and CCE are not the only parameters to be optimized; also the stability of the detection system is fundamental. In the past we have worked with Si pixel detectors; even if its atomic number does not allow a good detection efficiency at standard thickness, it has a very high stability. So keeping in mind the need to increase the Silicon detection efficiency we performed simulations to study the behaviour of the electrical potential in order to find a geometry to avoid the risk of electrical breakdown

  10. Preparation of graphene oxide doped eggshell membrane bioplatform modified Prussian blue nanoparticles as a sensitive hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad-Rezaei, Rahim; Razmi, Habib; Dehgan-Reyhan, Sajjad

    2014-06-01

    This study describes the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide doped eggshell membrane (GO-ESM) as a novel electrochemical bioplatform for electroanalytical purposes. The GO-ESM bioplatform was prepared by incorporation of GO nano-sheets into the ESM via a facile sonication procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction powder techniques were used to characterize the developed bioplatform. The electrochemistry of GO-ESM was investigated by decorating it on the surface of carbon ceramic electrode (CCE) by an O-ring. The GO-ESM platform was modified with Prussian blue (PB) via a facile dip-coating method. Then the resulted modified electrode (PB|GO-ESM|CCE) was used as a novel hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor. The fabricated electrode responds efficiently to H2O2 over the concentration range 125nM-195μM with a detection limit of 31nM (S/N=3) and sensitivity 8.8μAμM(-1)cm(-2). The PB|GO-ESM|CCE has been successfully applied to determination of H2O2 content in spiked milk samples. Due to good stability, environmental friendly, cheapness, nontoxic, well behaved electrochemical properties, and biocompatibility, the fabricated bioplatform has the promising future for practical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Severe signal loss in diamond beam loss monitors in high particle rate environments by charge trapping in radiation-induced defects

    CERN Document Server

    Kassel, Florian; Dabrowski, Anne; de Boer, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The beam condition monitoring leakage (BCML) system is a beam monitoring device in the compact muon solenoid (CMS) experiment at the large hadron collider (LHC). As detectors 32 poly-crystalline (pCVD) diamond sensors are positioned in rings around the beam pipe. Here, high particle rates occur from the colliding beams scattering particles outside the beam pipe. These particles cause defects, which act as traps for the ionization, thus reducing the charge collection efficiency (CCE). However, the loss in CCE was much more severe than expected from low rate laboratory measurements and simulations, especially in single-crystalline (sCVD) diamonds, which have a low initial concentration of defects. The reason why in real experiments the CCE is much worse than in laboratory experiments is related to the ionization rate. At high particle rates the trapping rate of the ionization is so high compared with the detrapping rate, that space charge builds up. This space charge reduces locally the internal electric field,...

  12. Electric field deformation in diamond sensors induced by radiation defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassel, Florian; Boer, Wim de; Boegelspacher, Felix; Dierlamm, Alexander; Mueller, Thomas; Steck, Pia [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik (IEKP), Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT) (Germany); Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz [CERN (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    The BCML system is a beam monitoring device in the CMS experiment at the LHC. As detectors 32 poly-crystalline CVD diamond sensors are positioned in a ring around the beam pipe at a distance of ±1.8 m and ±14.4 m from the interaction point. The radiation hardness of the diamond sensors in terms of measured signal during operation was significantly lower than expected from laboratory measurements. At high particle rates, such as those occurring during the operation of the LHC, a significant fraction of the defects act as traps for charge carriers. This space charge modifies the electrical field in the sensor bulk leading to a reduction of the charge collection efficiency (CCE). A diamond irradiation campaign was started to investigate the rate dependent electrical field deformation with respect to the radiation damage. Besides the electrical field measurements via the Transient Current Technique, the CCE was measured. The experimental results were used to create an effective trap model that takes the radiation damage into account. Using this trap model the rate dependent electrical field deformation and the CCE were simulated with the software ''SILVACO TCAD''. This talk compares the experimental measurement results with the simulations.

  13. Dynamic Testing of the NASA Hypersonic Project Combined Cycle Engine Testbed for Mode Transition Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    NASA is interested in developing technology that leads to more routine, safe, and affordable access to space. Access to space using airbreathing propulsion systems has potential to meet these objectives based on Airbreathing Access to Space (AAS) system studies. To this end, the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program (FAP) Hypersonic Project is conducting fundamental research on a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system. The TBCC being studied considers a dual flow-path inlet system. One flow-path includes variable geometry to regulate airflow to a turbine engine cycle. The turbine cycle provides propulsion from take-off to supersonic flight. The second flow-path supports a dual-mode scramjet (DMSJ) cycle which would be initiated at supersonic speed to further accelerate the vehicle to hypersonic speed. For a TBCC propulsion system to accelerate a vehicle from supersonic to hypersonic speed, a critical enabling technology is the ability to safely and effectively transition from the turbine to the DMSJ-referred to as mode transition. To experimentally test methods of mode transition, a Combined Cycle Engine (CCE) Large-scale Inlet testbed was designed with two flow paths-a low speed flow-path sized for a turbine cycle and a high speed flow-path designed for a DMSJ. This testbed system is identified as the CCE Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition studies (CCE-LIMX). The test plan for the CCE-LIMX in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) 10- by 10-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel (10x10 SWT) is segmented into multiple phases. The first phase is a matrix of inlet characterization (IC) tests to evaluate the inlet performance and establish the mode transition schedule. The second phase is a matrix of dynamic system identification (SysID) experiments designed to support closed-loop control development at mode transition schedule operating points for the CCE-LIMX. The third phase includes a direct demonstration of controlled mode transition using a closed loop control

  14. Drug-Free Approach To Study the Unusual Cell Cycle of Giardia intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlock-Roberts, Kathleen; Reaume, Chase; Dayer, Guillem; Ouellet, Christine; Cook, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Giardia intestinalis is a protozoan parasite that causes giardiasis, a form of severe and infectious diarrhea. Despite the importance of the cell cycle in the control of proliferation and differentiation during a giardia infection, it has been difficult to study this process due to the absence of a synchronization procedure that would not induce cellular damage resulting in artifacts. We utilized counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE), a size-based separation technique, to successfully obtain fractions of giardia cultures enriched in G1, S, and G2. Unlike drug-induced synchronization of giardia cultures, CCE did not induce double-stranded DNA damage or endoreplication. We observed increases in the appearance and size of the median body in the cells from elutriation fractions corresponding to the progression of the cell cycle from early G1 to late G2. Consequently, CCE could be used to examine the dynamics of the median body and other structures and organelles in the giardia cell cycle. For the cell cycle gene expression studies, the actin-related gene was identified by the program geNorm as the most suitable normalizer for reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of the CCE samples. Ten of 11 suspected cell cycle-regulated genes in the CCE fractions have expression profiles in giardia that resemble those of higher eukaryotes. However, the RNA levels of these genes during the cell cycle differ less than 4-fold to 5-fold, which might indicate that large changes in gene expression are not required by giardia to regulate the cell cycle. IMPORTANCE Giardias are among the most commonly reported intestinal protozoa in the world, with infections seen in humans and over 40 species of animals. The life cycle of giardia alternates between the motile trophozoite and the infectious cyst. The regulation of the cell cycle controls the proliferation of giardia trophozoites during an active infection and contains the restriction point for the

  15. Similarities and differences of a selection of key accreditation standards between chiropractic councils on education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Stanley I; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Walker, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Councils of Chiropractic Education (CCE) indirectly influence patient care and safety through their role of ensuring the standards of training delivered by chiropractic educational institutions. This is achieved by a process of accreditation where CCEs define and assess graduate competencies and educational standards. A previous study comparing CCE graduate competencies found variations between the CCE jurisdictions. It was proffered that variations in standards may potentially compromise patient care and safety and also inter-jurisdictional mutual recognition. This study continues the examination of CCEs by looking for similarities and differences in CCE accreditation standards. There were two purposes of this review. The first was to compare the accreditation standards, domains of accreditation standards, and components of the domains of accreditation standards as represented by the domains of "Mission, goals, vision, objectives", "Resources", "Faculty/Academic staff", "Educational program/curriculum". In addition, we compared the accreditation standards between CCEs and those of the widely accepted medical accreditation standards of the World Federation of Medical Education (WFME), in order to search for deficiencies and opportunities for improvements in these standards. The second purpose was to make recommendations, if significant deficiencies or variations were found. We undertook a systematic review of the similarities and differences between five CCEs' definitions of an accreditation standard and the descriptive lists of accreditation standards they have adopted. CCE selection criteria and data selection method were undertaken in a systematic manner. This information was tabulated for a comparative analysis and took place in April 2016. Only two CCEs had a definition of the term "accreditation / educational standard". At the domain level there was considerably more similarities than differences. The differences became more apparent when the comparisons were

  16. Preparation and electrocatalytic oxidation properties of a nickel pentacyanonitrosylferrate modified carbon composite electrode by two-step sol-gel technique: improvement of the catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Abdi, Kamaleddin; Khayatiyan, Gholam-Reza

    2004-01-01

    The sol-gel technique was used to construct nickel pentacyanonitrosylferrate (NiPCNF) modified composite ceramic carbon electrodes (CCEs). This involves two steps: forming a CCE containing Ni powder and then immersing the electrode into a sodium pentacyanonitrosyl-ferrate solution (electroless deposition). The cyclic voltammograms of the resulting surface modified CCE under optimum conditions show a well-defined redox couple due to the [Ni II Fe III/II (CN) 5 NO] 0/-1 system. The electrochemical properties and stability of the modified electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The apparent electron transfer rate constant (k s ) and transfer coefficient (α) were determined by cyclic voltammetry being about 1.1 s -1 and 0.55, respectively. Sulfite has been chosen as a model to elucidate the electrocatalytic ability of NiPCNF-modified CCE prepared by one- or two-step sol-gel technique. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the SO 3 2- electro oxidation in pH range 3-9 in comparison with CCE modified by homogeneous mixture of graphite powder, Ni(NO 3 ) 2 and Na 2 [Fe(CN) 5 NO] (one-step sol-gel technique). Sulfite was determined amperometrically at the surface of this modified electrode in pH 7. Under the optimized conditions the calibration curve is linear in the concentration range 2 μM to 2.0 mM. The detection limit (signal-to-noise is 3) and sensitivity are 0.5 μM and 13.5 nA/μM. The modified carbon ceramic electrode containing nickel pentacyanonitrosylferrate shows good repeatability, short response time, t (90%) 2 [Fe(CN) 5 NO] solution. The advantages of the SO 3 2- amperometrically detector based on the nickel pentacyanonitrosylferrate-doped CCE is high sensitivity, inherent stability at wide pH range, excellent catalytic activity and less expense and simplicity of preparation. This sensor can be used as amperometric detector in chromatographic instruments

  17. Short-term complexity of cardiac autonomic control during sleep: REM as a potential risk factor for cardiovascular system in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Antoine U; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Chellappa, Sarah L; Casali, Karina Rabello; Porta, Alberto; Montano, Nicola

    2011-04-22

    Sleep is a complex phenomenon characterized by important modifications throughout life and by changes of autonomic cardiovascular control. Aging is associated with a reduction of the overall heart rate variability (HRV) and a decrease of complexity of autonomic cardiac regulation. The aim of our study was to evaluate the HRV complexity using two entropy-derived measures, Shannon Entropy (SE) and Corrected Conditional Entropy (CCE), during sleep in young and older subjects. A polysomnographic study was performed in 12 healthy young (21.1±0.8 years) and 12 healthy older subjects (64.9±1.9 years). After the sleep scoring, heart period time series were divided into wake (W), Stage 1-2 (S1-2), Stage 3-4 (S3-4) and REM. Two complexity indexes were assessed: SE(3) measuring the complexity of a distribution of 3-beat patterns (SE(3) is higher when all the patterns are identically distributed and it is lower when some patterns are more likely) and CCE(min) measuring the minimum amount of information that cannot be derived from the knowledge of previous values. Across the different sleep stages, young subjects had similar RR interval, total variance, SE(3) and CCE(min). In the older group, SE(3) and CCE(min) were reduced during REM sleep compared to S1-2, S3-4 and W. Compared to young subjects, during W and sleep the older subjects showed a lower RR interval and reduced total variance as well as a significant reduction of SE(3) and CCE(min). This decrease of entropy measures was more evident during REM sleep. Our study indicates that aging is characterized by a reduction of entropy indices of cardiovascular variability during wake/sleep cycle, more evident during REM sleep. We conclude that during aging REM sleep is associated with a simplification of cardiac control mechanisms that could lead to an impaired ability of the cardiovascular system to react to cardiovascular adverse events.

  18. The 808 nm Laser-Assisted Surgery as an Adjunct to Orthodontic Treatment of Delayed Tooth Eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Massoud; Vahid-Dastjerdi, Elahe; Ameli, Nazila; Badiee, Mohammad-Reza; Younessian, Farnaz; Amdjadi, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Failure of teeth to erupt from gingival tissues at usual developmental time is called delayed tooth eruption (DTE). Delayed tooth eruption lead to prolonged fixed orthodontic treatment and its eventual complications. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of laser-assisted (808 nm) surgical uncovering, on the tooth emergence and orthodontic treatment of DTE. A total of 16 orthodontic patients were included in this study and were equally assigned to an experimental and a control group. Subjects for experiment consisted of eight patients (6 girls and 2 boys) with a mean age of 14±0.9 years. All patients exhibited delayed second premolar eruption. The laser wavelength was 810 nm and it was set in a continuous wave mode at a power output of 1.6 watt with a 0.3-mm diameter fiber tip. When the target tissue was sufficiently anesthetized, the tip was directed at an angle of 10 to 20 degrees to the tissue (light contact mode); and was applied continuously for approximately 12 Seconds until an acceptable tooth exposure area was visible. The facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) line represents the most prominent portion of the facial central lobe for premolars. All orthodontic brackets are aligned along this reference and are located on FA (Facial Axis) point. The standard for adequate tooth eruption was the accessibility of facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) for bonding the brackets. Data gathered from the patients were statistically surveyed and compared by means of Tukey's Test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). All patients showed good gingival status, no significant bleeding during or immediately after the surgery, and acceptable level of healing after laser surgery. The biologic width of the teeth was preserved and no violation of this important periodontal parameter was observed. The average time for accessing the FA point in experimental group was 11±1.1 weeks and the mentioned period was increased to 25±1.8 weeks in control group

  19. Cardiology in the young : where we have been. Where we are. Where we are going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-12-01

    , Jeffrey P. Jacobs, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCP, became Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young . Jeffrey P. Jacobs, MD, FACS, FACC, FCCP is Director of the Andrews/Daicoff Cardiovascular Program at Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute and Professor of Cardiac Surgery in the Division of Cardiac Surgery of the Department of Surgery at Johns Hopkins University. He is also Surgical Director of the Heart Transplantation Program and Director of the Extracorporeal Life Support Program at Johns Hopkins All Children's Heart Institute. Dr Jacobs has been a cardiothoracic surgeon at All Children's Hospital since 1998.

  20. 3D-black-blood 3T-MRI for the diagnosis of thoracic large vessel vasculitis: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treitl, Karla Maria; Saam, Tobias [Institute for Clinical Radiology, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Disease Research (DZHK e.V.), Munich (Germany); Maurus, Stefan; Sommer, Nora Narvina; Coppenrath, Eva; Treitl, Marcus [Institute for Clinical Radiology, LMU Munich, Munich (Germany); Kooijman-Kurfuerst, Hendrik [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Czihal, Michael; Hoffmann, Ulrich [LMU Munich, Division of Vascular Medicine, Medical Clinic and Policlinic IV, Munich (Germany); Dechant, Claudia; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik [LMU Munich, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Medical Clinic and Policlinic IV, Munich (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of T1w-3D black-blood turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence with variable flip angles for the diagnosis of thoracic large vessel vasculitis (LVV). Thirty-five patients with LVV, diagnosed according to the current standard of reference, and 35 controls were imaged at 3.0T using 1.2 x 1.3 x 2.0 mm{sup 3} fat-suppressed, T1w-3D, modified Volumetric Isotropic TSE Acquisition (mVISTA) pre- and post-contrast. Applying a navigator and peripheral pulse unit triggering (PPU), the total scan time was 10-12 min. Thoracic aorta and subclavian and pulmonary arteries were evaluated for image quality (IQ), flow artefact intensity, diagnostic confidence, concentric wall thickening and contrast enhancement (CWT, CCE) using a 4-point scale. IQ was good in all examinations (3.25 ± 0.72) and good to excellent in 342 of 408 evaluated segments (83.8 %), while 84.1 % showed no or minor flow artefacts. The interobserver reproducibility for the identification of CCE and CWT was 0.969 and 0.971 (p < 0.001) with an average diagnostic confidence of 3.47 ± 0.64. CCE and CWT were strongly correlated (Cohen's k = 0.87; P < 0.001) and significantly more frequent in the LVV-group (52.8 % vs. 1.0 %; 59.8 % vs. 2.4 %; P < 0.001). Navigated fat-suppressed T1w-3D black-blood MRI with PPU-triggering allows diagnosis of thoracic LVV. (orig.)

  1. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittone, E., E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Department of Physics, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pastuovic, Z. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Breese, M.B.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Sevilla University, J. Andalucia, CSIC, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jaksic, M. [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruder Boškovic Institute (RBI), P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Siegele, R. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Simon, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vizkelethy, G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • We study the electronic degradation of semiconductors induced by ion irradiation. • The experimental protocol is based on MeV ion microbeam irradiation. • The radiation induced damage is measured by IBIC. • The general model fits the experimental data in the low level damage regime. • Key parameters relevant to the intrinsic radiation hardness are extracted. - Abstract: This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  2. Interannual variations in snowpack in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, D.J.; Fagre, D.B.; Reardon, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Ecosystem changes such as glacier recession and alpine treeline advance have been documented over the previous 150 years in the Rocky Mountains of northern Montana and southern British Columbia and Alberta, a region known as the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE). Such changes are controlled, at least partially, by variations in snowpack. The CCE consists primarily of public lands, the majority of which is undeveloped or wilderness. Consequently, this region is well suited for an examination of long-term snowpack variation and associated ecosystem change. Data from nine SNOTEL sites provide an indication of the daily accumulation and ablation of snowpack over the period 1977-2001, as well as the relationship between precipitation, temperature and snowpack. 1 April data from 21 snow courses indicated the extent of regional snowpack variation and trends over the period 1950-2001, and 1 May data from three snow courses in Glacier National Park allow this record to be extended back to 1922. SNOTEL data suggest CCE snowpacks are larger and more persistent than in most regions of the western USA, and that water year precipitation is the primary control on 1 April snow water equivalent (SWE). Snow course data indicate that variations in both 1 April and 1 May mean SWE are closely tied to the Pacific decadal oscillation, an El Nino-southern oscillation-like interdecadal pattern of Pacific Ocean climate variability. Despite relatively stable snowpacks and summer temperatures since 1922, the glaciers in Glacier National Park have receded steadily during this period, implying a significant climatic shift between their Little Ice Age glacial maxima (ca 1860) and 1922. Published in 2002 by John Wiley and Sons, Ltd.

  3. Government control or low carbon lifestyle? – Analysis and application of a novel selective-constrained energy-saving and emission-reduction dynamic evolution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Guochang; Tian, Lixin; Fu, Min; Sun, Mei

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores a novel selective-constrained energy-saving and emission-reduction (ESER) dynamic evolution system, analyzing the impact of cost of conserved energy (CCE), government control, low carbon lifestyle and investment in new technology of ESER on energy intensity and economic growth. Based on artificial neural network, the quantitative coefficients of the actual system are identified. Taking the real situation in China for instance, an empirical study is undertaken by adjusting the parameters of the actual system. The dynamic evolution behavior of energy intensity and economic growth in reality are observed, with the results in perfect agreement with actual situation. The research shows that the introduction of CCE into ESER system will have certain restrictive effect on energy intensity in the earlier period. However, with the further development of the actual system, carbon emissions could be better controlled and energy intensity would decline. In the long run, the impacts of CCE on economic growth are positive. Government control and low carbon lifestyle play a decisive role in controlling ESER system and declining energy intensity. But the influence of government control on economic growth should be considered at the same time and the controlling effect of low carbon lifestyle on energy intensity should be strengthened gradually, while the investment in new technology of ESER can be neglected. Two different cases of ESER are proposed after a comprehensive analysis. The relations between variables and constraint conditions in the ESER system are harmonized remarkably. A better solution to carry out ESER is put forward at last, with numerical simulations being carried out to demonstrate the results. - Highlights: • Use of nonlinear dynamical method to model the selective-constrained ESER system. • Monotonic evolution curves of energy intensity and economic growth are obtained. • Detailed analysis of the game between government control and low

  4. Recurrent neural networks with specialized word embeddings for health-domain named-entity recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregi Unanue, Iñigo; Zare Borzeshi, Ehsan; Piccardi, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Previous state-of-the-art systems on Drug Name Recognition (DNR) and Clinical Concept Extraction (CCE) have focused on a combination of text "feature engineering" and conventional machine learning algorithms such as conditional random fields and support vector machines. However, developing good features is inherently heavily time-consuming. Conversely, more modern machine learning approaches such as recurrent neural networks (RNNs) have proved capable of automatically learning effective features from either random assignments or automated word "embeddings". (i) To create a highly accurate DNR and CCE system that avoids conventional, time-consuming feature engineering. (ii) To create richer, more specialized word embeddings by using health domain datasets such as MIMIC-III. (iii) To evaluate our systems over three contemporary datasets. Two deep learning methods, namely the Bidirectional LSTM and the Bidirectional LSTM-CRF, are evaluated. A CRF model is set as the baseline to compare the deep learning systems to a traditional machine learning approach. The same features are used for all the models. We have obtained the best results with the Bidirectional LSTM-CRF model, which has outperformed all previously proposed systems. The specialized embeddings have helped to cover unusual words in DrugBank and MedLine, but not in the i2b2/VA dataset. We present a state-of-the-art system for DNR and CCE. Automated word embeddings has allowed us to avoid costly feature engineering and achieve higher accuracy. Nevertheless, the embeddings need to be retrained over datasets that are adequate for the domain, in order to adequately cover the domain-specific vocabulary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multipoint observations of a small substorm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Luehr, H.; Anderson, B.J.; Newell, P.T.; McEntire, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors present multipoint observations of a small substorm which occurred just after 0110 UT on April 25, 1985. The observations were made by spacecraft (AMPTE CCE, AMPTE IRM, DMSP F6, and DMSP F7), ground auroral stations (EISCAT magnetometer cross, Syowa, Narssarssuaq, Great Whale River, and Fort Churchill), and mid-latitude stations (Furstenfeldbruck, Toledo, and Argentine Island). These data provide them with a broad range of observations, including the latitudinal extent of the polar cap, visual identification of substorm aurorae and the magnetic perturbations produced directly beneath them, in situ magnetic field and energetic particle observations of the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet, and observations concerning the spatial expansion of the current disruption region from two radially aligned spacecraft. The DMSP data indicate that the event took place during a period when the polar cap was relatively contracted, yet the disruption of the current sheet was observed by CCE at 8.56 R E . They have been able to infer a considerable amount of detail concerning the structure and westward expansion of the auroral features associated with the event, and they show that those auroral surges were located more than 10 degree equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. Moreover, they present evidence that the current sheet disruption observed by CCE in the neutral sheet was located on field lines which mapped to the westward traveling surge observed directly overhead of the ground station at Syowa. Furthermore, the observations strongly imply that disruption of the cross-tail current began in the near-Earth region and that it had a component of expansion which was radially antisunward

  6. Multisatellite and ground-based observations of transient ULF waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potemra, T.A.; Zanetti, L.J.; Takahashi, K.; Erlandson, R.E.; Luehr, H.; Marklund, G.T.; Block, L.P.; Blomberg, L.G.; Lepping, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    A unique alignment of the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) CCE and Viking satellites with respect to the EISCAT Magnetometer Cross has provided an opportunity to study transient ULF pulsations associated with variations in solar wind plasma density observed by the IMP 8 satellite. These observations were acquired during a relatively quiet period on April 24, 1986, during the Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study (PROMIS) period. An isolated 4-mHz (4-min period) pulsation was detected on the ground which was associated with transverse magnetic field oscillations observed by Viking at a ∼ 2-R E altitude above the auroral zone and by CCE at ∼ 8-R E in the equatorial plane on nearly the same flux tube. CCE detected a compressional oscillation in the magnetic field with twice the period (∼ 10 min) of the transverse waves, and with a waveform nearly identical to an isolated oscillation in the solar wind plasma density measured by IMP 8. The authors conclude that the isolated 10-min oscillation in solar wind plasma density produced magnetic field compression oscillations inside the magnetosphere at the same frequency which also enhanced resonant oscillations at approximately twice the frequency that were already present. The ground magnetic field variations are due to ionospheric Hall currents driven by the electric field of the standing Alfven waves. The time delay between surface and satellite data acquired at different local times supports the conclusion that the periodic solar wind density variation excites a tailward traveling large-scale magnetosphere wave train which excites local field line resonant oscillations. They conclude that these transient magnetic field variations are not associated with magnetic field reconnection or flux transfer events

  7. Low-cost monitoring of Campylobacter in poultry houses by air sampling and quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, M S R; Josefsen, M H; Löfström, C; Christensen, L S; Wieczorek, K; Osek, J; Hoorfar, J

    2014-02-01

    The present study describes the evaluation of a method for the quantification of Campylobacter by air sampling in poultry houses. Sampling was carried out in conventional chicken houses in Poland, in addition to a preliminary sampling in Denmark. Each measurement consisted of three air samples, two standard boot swab fecal samples, and one airborne particle count. Sampling was conducted over an 8-week period in three flocks, assessing the presence and levels of Campylobacter in boot swabs and air samples using quantitative real-time PCR. The detection limit for air sampling was approximately 100 Campylobacter cell equivalents (CCE)/m3. Airborne particle counts were used to analyze the size distribution of airborne particles (0.3 to 10 μm) in the chicken houses in relation to the level of airborne Campylobacter. No correlation was found. Using air sampling, Campylobacter was detected in the flocks right away, while boot swab samples were positive after 2 weeks. All samples collected were positive for Campylobacter from week 2 through the rest of the rearing period for both sampling techniques, although levels 1- to 2-log CCE higher were found with air sampling. At week 8, the levels were approximately 10(4) and 10(5) CCE per sample for boot swabs and air, respectively. In conclusion, using air samples combined with quantitative real-time PCR, Campylobacter contamination could be detected earlier than by boot swabs and was found to be a more convenient technique for monitoring and/or to obtain enumeration data useful for quantitative risk assessment of Campylobacter.

  8. Cytotoxicity of atropine to human corneal endothelial cells by inducing mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Qian; Fan, Ting-Jun; Tian, Cheng-Lei

    2016-07-01

    Atropine, a widely used topical anticholinergic drug, might have adverse effects on human corneas in vivo. However, its cytotoxic effect on human corneal endothelium (HCE) and its possible mechanisms are unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of atropine and its underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms using an in vitro model of HCE cells and verified the cytotoxicity using cat corneal endothelium (CCE) in vivo. Our results showed that atropine at concentrations above 0.3125 g/L could induce abnormal morphology and viability decline in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. The cytotoxicity of atropine was proven by the induced density decrease and abnormality of morphology and ultrastructure of CCE cells in vivo. Meanwhile, atropine could also induce dose- and time-dependent elevation of plasma membrane permeability, G1 phase arrest, phosphatidylserine externalization, DNA fragmentation, and apoptotic body formation of HCE cells. Moreover, 2.5 g/L atropine could also induce caspase-2/-3/-9 activation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential disruption, downregulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, upregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bad, and upregulation of cytoplasmic cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor. In conclusion, atropine above 1/128 of its clinical therapeutic dosage has a dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity to HCE cells in vitro which is confirmed by CCE cells in vivo, and its cytotoxicity is achieved by inducing HCE cell apoptosis via a death receptor-mediated mitochondrion-dependent signaling pathway. Our findings provide new insights into the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing effect of atropine which should be used with great caution in eye clinic. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  9. Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiments: System Identification Rack Hardware Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Randy; Stueber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The System Identification (SysID) Rack is a real-time hardware-in-the-loop data acquisition (DAQ) and control instrument rack that was designed and built to support inlet testing in the NASA Glenn Research Center 10- by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. This instrument rack is used to support experiments on the Combined-Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet for Mode Transition Experiment (CCE? LIMX). The CCE?LIMX is a testbed for an integrated dual flow-path inlet configuration with the two flow paths in an over-and-under arrangement such that the high-speed flow path is located below the lowspeed flow path. The CCE?LIMX includes multiple actuators that are designed to redirect airflow from one flow path to the other; this action is referred to as "inlet mode transition." Multiple phases of experiments have been planned to support research that investigates inlet mode transition: inlet characterization (Phase-1) and system identification (Phase-2). The SysID Rack hardware design met the following requirements to support Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments: safely and effectively move multiple actuators individually or synchronously; sample and save effector control and position sensor feedback signals; automate control of actuator positioning based on a mode transition schedule; sample and save pressure sensor signals; and perform DAQ and control processes operating at 2.5 KHz. This document describes the hardware components used to build the SysID Rack including their function, specifications, and system interface. Furthermore, provided in this document are a SysID Rack effectors signal list (signal flow); system identification experiment setup; illustrations indicating a typical SysID Rack experiment; and a SysID Rack performance overview for Phase-1 and Phase-2 experiments. The SysID Rack described in this document was a useful tool to meet the project objectives.

  10. Crafting biochars to reduce N2O and CO2 emissions while also improving soil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Jeff; Ippolito, Jim; Spokas, Kurt; Sigua, Gilbert; Kammann, Claudia; Wrage-Monnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils; Schirrmann, Michael; Estavillo, Jose Maria; Fuertes-Mendizabal, Teresa; Menendez, Sergio; Cayuela, Maria Luz

    2017-04-01

    Biochar used as an amendment has been linked to nitrous oxide (N2O) emission reductions, a decrease in nitrogen (N) leaching, and soil quality improvements (e.g., soil carbon sequestration, pH, etc.). While numerous articles will support these three facts, conversely, there are reports of no to marginal influences. One reason for the mixed biochar performance could be related to applying biochar with incorrect chemical and physical characteristics. As a means to increase biochar efficiency, we introduced the concept of crafting biochars with properties attuned to specific soil deficiencies. Implementing this concept requires a literature review to identify salient biochar characteristics that reduces N2O emissions, impacts N availability, while also improving soil quality. Thus, scientists from the USDA-ARS and through a coalition of European scientists under the FACCE-JPI umbrella have conceived the DesignChar4food (d4f) project. In this project, scientists are working collaboratively to further this concept to match the appropriate biochar for selective soil quality improvement, retain N for crops, and promote greenhouse gas reductions. This presentation will highlight results from the d4f team compromising a meta-analysis of articles on biochar:N2O dynamics, N availability, and how designer biochars can target specific soil quality improvements.

  11. [Tip and torque changes in maxillary buccal segment after orthodontic treatment: a three-dimensional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gui; Qin, Yi-fei; Xu, Tian-min

    2010-11-01

    To investigate three-dimensional imaging registration and superimposition techniques in measuring the tip and torque change of upper canine, premolar and first molar after orthodontic treatment. Twenty-eight subjects (14 extraction cases and 14 non-extraction cases) with full records were randomly selected from the Department of Orthodontics, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. The pre-and post-treatment upper dental casts were digitized with three-dimensional spot laser scanner and superimposed with reverse engineering software. The facial axis of the clinical crown (FACC) was transferred from post-treatment teeth to the pre-treatment teeth using three-dimensional imaging registration. The occlusal plane was constructed on the post-treatment upper digital cast and the tip and torque values were measured. In the non-extraction group, the tip of the second premolar decreased by 1.5° (P orthodontic treatment tended to tip the upper second premolar distally and increased the buccal crown torque of the upper premolars while extraction treatment increased the lingual crown torque of the upper canine.

  12. Xestospongin C, a novel blocker of IP3 receptor, attenuates the increase in cytosolic calcium level and degranulation that is induced by antigen in RBL-2H3 mast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oka, Tatsuya; Sato, Koichi; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Karaki, Hideaki

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the role of the cross-linking of FcεRI-mediated inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in the increase in cytosolic Ca2+ level ([Ca2+]i) using xestospongin C, a selective membrane permeable blocker of IP3 receptor, in RBL-2H3 mast cells. In the cells sensitized with anti-dinitrophenol (DNP) IgE, DNP-human serum albumin (DNP-HSA) and thapsigargin induced degranulation of β-hexosaminidase and a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i. Xestospongin C (3 – 10 μM) inhibited both of these changes that were induced by DNP-HSA without changing those induced by thapsigargin. In the absence of external Ca2+, DNP-HSA induced a transient increase in [Ca2+]i. Xestospongin C (3 – 10 μM) inhibited this increase in [Ca2+]i. In the cells permeabilized with β-escin, the application of IP3 decreased Ca2+ in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as evaluated by mag-fura-2. Xestospongin C (3 – 10 μM) inhibited the effect of IP3. After the depletion of Ca2+ stores due to stimulation with DNP-HSA or thapsigargin, the addition of Ca2+ induced capacitative calcium entry (CCE). Xestospongin C (3 – 10 μM) inhibited the DNP-HSA-induced CCE, whereas it did not affect the thapsigargin-induced CCE. These results suggest that FcεRI-mediated generation of IP3 contributes to Ca2+ release not only in the initial phase but also in the sustained phase of the increase in [Ca2+]i, resulting in prolonged Ca2+ depletion in the ER. The ER Ca2+ depletion may subsequently activate CCE to achieve a continuous [Ca2+]i increase, which is necessary for degranulation in the RBL-2H3 mast cells. Xestospongin C may inhibit Ca2+ release and consequently may attenuate degranulation. PMID:11959799

  13. Bibliography on Tidal Hydraulics. Report Number 2. Supplement Number 8. Supplementary Material Compiled from June 1974 to June 1980. Tidal Flows in Rivers and Harbors,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    California in the mid-40’s, Application of a Finite Element Diaper - the quality of inflows to the agricul- sion Model for Coastal Waters. Proceed- turally...Effest ha tiedal cyclwes (abut 10 1 . wetby epI v i ofL r HinderedI Se tI In on SAp edimn Cce it-Un vesIcii t-o del tiec flo byM\\Drgrapit at In lstI...and Computer Jun 1965 10 Significance of Clay Minerals in Shoaling Problems Sap 1966 11 Extracts from The Manual of Tides Sep 1966 12 Unpublished

  14. El carácter como predictor de trastornos de la personalidad en adictos: la tipología caracterial de Cloninger y su abordaje psicosocial

    OpenAIRE

    Pedrero Pérez, Eduardo J.; Olivar Arroyo, Álvaro; Puerta García, Carmen

    2007-01-01

    El presente estudio aborda las relaciones de las dimensiones caracteriales del modelo de Cloninger con los trastornos de la personalidad. Se obtiene una muestra de sujetos (N=565) que inician tratamiento por conductas adictivas en un centro ambulatorio (CAD 4 San Blas, Instituto de Adicciones, Madrid Salud), y cumplimentan el TCI-R, el MCMI-II, el VIP y el CCE-R. Según los criterios de Cloninger y, mediante análisis discriminante, son clasificados en los diferentes tipos caracteriales. Se com...

  15. Novel Type II and Monomeric NAD+ Specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenases: Phylogenetic Affinity, Enzymatic Characterization, and Evolutionary Implication

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Lv, Changqi; Zhu, Guoping

    2015-01-01

    NAD+ use is an ancestral trait of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH), and the NADP+ phenotype arose through evolution as an ancient adaptation event. However, no NAD+-specific IDHs have been found among type II IDHs and monomeric IDHs. In this study, novel type II homodimeric NAD-IDHs from Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 IDH (OlIDH) and Micromonas sp. RCC299 (MiIDH), and novel monomeric NAD-IDHs from Campylobacter sp. FOBRC14 IDH (CaIDH) and Campylobacter curvus (CcIDH) were reported for the fir...

  16. AFOSR (Air Force Office of Scientific Research) Technical Report Summaries, July-September 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    BOLLING AFB DC 20332-6448 N/A N/A N/A 11. TITLE (include Security Classification) AFOSR TECHICAL REPORT SUMMARIES 12 2~t~ A&UTHORMI 13tjXR9?LPORT...8217) ,- I-- 00, zo’ Z obo 0 0 C mCV I/I t- 0Z0 Z)a. Z N N N Ix0. ’xc 4- w >I) 0 -4 00 C’- 34’- ( 41 .’ 0 0. 0* m V) .- 1 n 0 U > E DCC o CCE jC .JE 13 - 1A

  17. GaN-based PIN alpha particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Guo [Peking University, Shenzhen Graduate School, Guangdong Shenzhen 518055 (China); Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Fu Kai; Yao Changsheng [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Science, Jiangsu Suzhou 215123 (China); Su Dan; Zhang Guoguang [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Wang Jinyan [Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Lu Min, E-mail: mlu2006@sinano.ac.cn [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Science, Jiangsu Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-01-21

    GaN-based PIN alpha particle detectors are studied in this article. The electrical properties of detectors have been investigated, such as current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V). The reverse current of all detectors is in nA range applied at 30 V, which is suitable for detector operation. The charge collection efficiency (CCE) is measured to be approximately 80% but the energy resolution is calculated to be about 40% mostly because the intrinsic layer is not sufficiently thick enough.

  18. Potenciální finanční nedostupnost nájemního bydlení po deregulaci nájemného – regionální perspektiva

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikeszová, Martina; Lux, Martin; Morisseau, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 2 (2009), s. 315-343 ISSN 0038-0288 R&D Projects: GA MMR WD-05-07-3 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70280505 Keywords : housing affordability * rental housing * social exclusion Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.562, year: 2009 http://sreview.soc.cas.cz/uploads/38eb91812a91d9a3d1cce947d7149f2802f8fa50_MikeszovaLux2009-2.pdf

  19. Capsule endoscopy compared with conventional colonoscopy for detection of colorectal neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Sieg, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) may be a means to overcome the low adherence to colorectal cancer screening. The device is an ingestible capsule with a video camera at both ends that can take photographs as it progresses through the gastrointestinal tract. PillCam colon (PCC1) may be used for structural evaluation of the large bowel following an adequate cleaning procedure. PCC1 measures 11 mm × 31 mm and has dual cameras that enable the device to acquire video images from both ends with a wide...

  20. Toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Yong Hum; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-01-01

    To exploit the potential dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), an in-depth approach is required to provide efficient computing methods. This needs to incorporate clinically related organ specific constraints, Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and large-scale plan optimization. This paper describes our first steps toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment (CCE). The Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) with a master node (named m2.xlarge containing 17.1 GB of memory, two virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each, 420 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used as the backbone of cloud computing for dose calculation and plan optimization. The master node is able to scale the workers on an ‘on-demand’ basis. MC dose calculation is employed to generate accurate beamlet dose kernels by parallel tasks. The intensity modulation optimization uses total-variation regularization (TVR) and generates piecewise constant fluence maps for each initial beam direction in a distributed manner over the CCE. The optimized fluence maps are segmented into deliverable apertures. The shape of each aperture is iteratively rectified to be a sequence of arcs using the manufacture’s constraints. The output plan file from the EC2 is sent to the simple storage service. Three de-identified clinical cancer treatment plans have been studied for evaluating the performance of the new planning platform with 6 MV flattening filter free beams (40 × 40 cm 2 ) from the Varian TrueBeam TM STx linear accelerator. A CCE leads to speed-ups of up to 14-fold for both dose kernel calculations and plan optimizations in the head and neck, lung, and prostate cancer cases considered in this study. The proposed system relies on a CCE that is able to provide an infrastructure for parallel and distributed computing. The resultant plans from the cloud computing are

  1. Toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yong Hum; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kapp, Daniel S; Xing, Lei

    2013-09-21

    To exploit the potential dosimetric advantages of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), an in-depth approach is required to provide efficient computing methods. This needs to incorporate clinically related organ specific constraints, Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations, and large-scale plan optimization. This paper describes our first steps toward a web-based real-time radiation treatment planning system in a cloud computing environment (CCE). The Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) with a master node (named m2.xlarge containing 17.1 GB of memory, two virtual cores with 3.25 EC2 Compute Units each, 420 GB of instance storage, 64-bit platform) is used as the backbone of cloud computing for dose calculation and plan optimization. The master node is able to scale the workers on an 'on-demand' basis. MC dose calculation is employed to generate accurate beamlet dose kernels by parallel tasks. The intensity modulation optimization uses total-variation regularization (TVR) and generates piecewise constant fluence maps for each initial beam direction in a distributed manner over the CCE. The optimized fluence maps are segmented into deliverable apertures. The shape of each aperture is iteratively rectified to be a sequence of arcs using the manufacture's constraints. The output plan file from the EC2 is sent to the simple storage service. Three de-identified clinical cancer treatment plans have been studied for evaluating the performance of the new planning platform with 6 MV flattening filter free beams (40 × 40 cm(2)) from the Varian TrueBeam(TM) STx linear accelerator. A CCE leads to speed-ups of up to 14-fold for both dose kernel calculations and plan optimizations in the head and neck, lung, and prostate cancer cases considered in this study. The proposed system relies on a CCE that is able to provide an infrastructure for parallel and distributed computing. The resultant plans from the cloud computing are

  2. The Cryogenic Transient Current Technique (C-TCT) measurement setup of CERN RD39 Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Härkönen, J; Verbitskaya, E; Czellar, S; Pusa, P; Li, Z; Niinikoski, T O

    2007-01-01

    The CERN RD39 Collaboration has constructed a Transient Current Technique (TCT) measurement setup, which is capable to operate below liquid nitrogen temperatures. By analyzing the current transients, it is possible to extract the full depletion voltage, effective trapping time, electric field distribution and the sign of the space charge in the silicon bulk. Our results show that the effective space charge and trapping can be manipulated by charge injection and temperature. This might allow significantly higher Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) compared to the detectors operating under normal reverse bias and at temperatures from 0 to .

  3. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blonde, G.; Poizat, F.; Triboulet, A.

    2008-02-01

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  4. The mechanism of contribution to the taxes of the electricity public service; Le mecanisme de contribution aux Charges de Service Public d'Electricite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blonde, G.; Poizat, F.; Triboulet, A. [IED, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2008-02-15

    This report presents the results of an expertise realized by the Institute of the Energy and development for the CCE of EDF. The CSPE is a mechanism of mutualization of taxes of the electricity public service. These taxes concern the impact of the tariffs adjustment, the assistance to systems of energy conservation, the solidarity to poor households. the document presents the historical aspects and the bases of the mechanism, the cost of the global compensation, the foundations of this mutualization system, the forecasts and some recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  5. Expressão do gene pten: avaliação imuno-histoquímica, sequenciamento genético e associação com p53, Ki-67 e CD31 em pacientes com carcinoma do colo do útero

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Fernandes Loures

    2012-01-01

    Introdução: O processo de carcinogênese do colo do útero compreende a inativação de genes supressores tumorais a partir da interação da célula afetada pelo o Papilomavírus humano (HPV). Este estudo analisa a expressão da proteína PTEN (Phosphataseandtensinhomolog) em pacientes com carcinoma invasor do colo uterino. Materiais e Métodos: Foram incluídas no estudo 20 mulheres com diagnóstico de Carcinoma de Células Escamosas (CCE) invasor de colo uterino em estágio IB (casos) submetidas a tr...

  6. Edge Detection,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  7. Aspects of Industrial Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-02-01

    Coagulation /Flocculation AI(OH)3, Fe(OE)3, Mn(OH) 2 , CaC12 !Chlorination ChloroalnesChlorinated organics 4 ’Boiler blowdown Phosphates, carbonates, tannin ...ad miteriag of water treatment operatious imould pro- vide the moesseery data te ea reesurcee to be coeerved sod to lower the cost of pellem aba*tmomt...Noncarbonate hardness as CsC0 3Odor Taste Trace organic defined by carbon chloroform extract (CCE) Boiler-feedvater and boiler water tests also include

  8. Drift of Zooplankton, Benthos, and Larval Fish and Distribution of Macrophytes and Larval Fish during Winter and Summer, 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    that lake herring is an abundant species which supports a major sport fishery in the St. Marys River. Goodyear et al. (1982) reported that lake...c00Cce CIa IX (Ne- -1-4 0-4-I (~)t - 100 4) V4-4 4 04 - 0 0p u . 0 L Co Al %lWjrA Iw%-U-l,.VI 0-"-6WL4L%,ll,~ u rlIw ,)M X U-’ 09 -’ vP- vmr mm% -10 N

  9. Carcinoma de células escamosas da cavidade oral em pacientes jovens e sua crescente incidência: revisão de literatura Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity in young patients and its increasing incidence: literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz R. M. Venturi

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A proposta deste estudo é rever o carcinoma de células escamosas oral na população jovem. A literatura mostra um comportamento diferente neste tipo de doença, que parece ser mais agressivo. Existe uma forte relação entre alguns hábitos (tabaco e consumo de álcool e o desenvolvimento do carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE oral, mas nestes casos os pacientes normalmente não relatam hábitos considerados de risco. Existe um pequeno número de relatos de casos de CCE oral em pacientes com menos de 40 anos de idade, então é difícil de provar o aumento da incidência do CCE da cavidade oral como dito na literatura. Outros estudos são necessários para entendermos melhor esta entidade. A identificação das características desta população jovem se faz necessária, pois pode refletir problemas no controle do câncer e pode possibilitar o desenvolvimento de um programa de prevenção primária para o CCE oral em pacientes jovens.The purpose of this study was to review the squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity in young population. The literature shows a different behavior in this type of disease; it seems to be more aggressive. There is a close relationship between some habits (tobacco and alcohol consumption and the development of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, but in this case the patients normally relate no risk factors. There is a little number of case report of squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity in patients under 40 years old, so it's difficult to prove the increasing of the squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity as said in the literature. Further studies are necessary to know better this entity. The identification of the characteristics of this young population is necessary, because it might reflect problems in cancer control and can enable the development of a primary prevention program for squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity in young patients.

  10. Challenging the premises of international policy review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feinstein, Noah Weeth; Læssøe, Jeppe; Blum, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, a think tank called the International Alliance of Leading Education Institutes (IALEI) announced the results of a study entitled Climate Change and Sustainable Development: The Response from Education. Intended for a policy audience, the study offered a glimpse into the status of Education...... for Sustainable Development (ESD) and an early look at the emergence of Climate Change Education (CCE), in 10 different nations. As with most international reports, the IALEI report provoked many questions, some of which are more broadly relevant to scholarship and practice. This paper introduces a review...

  11. Cytotoxic effects of betaxolol on healthy corneal endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Miao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of betaxolol and its underlying mechanism on human corneal endothelial cells(HCE cells in vitro and cat corneal endothelial cells(CCE cells in vivo, providing experimental basis for safety anti-glaucoma drug usage in clinic of ophthalmology.METHODS: In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to explore whether and how betaxolol participates in corneal endothelial cell injury. The in vitro morphology, growth status, plasma membrane permeability, DNA fragmentation, and ultrastructure of HCE cells treated with 0.021875-0.28g/L betaxolol were examined by light microscope, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT assay, acridine orange (AO/ethidium bromide (EB double-fluorescent staining, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The in vivo density, morphology, and ultrastructure of CCE cells, corneal thickness, and eye pressure of cat eyes treated with 0.28g/L betaxolol were investigated by specular microscopy, applanation tonometer, alizarin red staining, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and TEM.RESULTS: Exposure to betaxolol at doses from 0.0875g/L to 2.8g/L induced morphological and ultrastructural changes of in vitro cultured HCE cells such as cytoplasmic vacuolation, cellular shrinkage, structural disorganization, chromatin condensation, and apoptotic body appearance. Simultaneously, betaxolol elevated plasma membrane permeability and induced DNA fragmentation of these cells in a dose-dependent manner in AO/EB staining. Furthermore, betaxolol at a dose of 2.8g/L also induced decrease of density of CCE cells in vivo, and non-hexagonal and shrunk apoptotic cells were also found in betaxolol-treated cat corneal endothelia.CONCLUSION: Betaxolol has significant cytotoxicity on HCE cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis of these cells, and induced apoptosis of CCE cells in vivo as well. The findings help provide new insight into the apoptosis

  12. Carcinoma de células escamosas em bovinos, ovinos e eqüinos: estudo de 50 casos no sul do Rio Grande do Sul

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Tony Ramos; Diego Mollerke Norte; Fabiana Elias; Cristina Gevehr Fernandes

    2007-01-01

    O carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE) é um tumor maligno dos queratinócitos. O desenvolvimento desse tipo de tumor está associado a muitos fatores, incluindo a exposição prolongada à luz ultravioleta, falta de pigmento na epiderme, perda de pêlos ou cobertura de pêlos muito esparsa nos locais afetados. Realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos casos de carcinoma de células escamosas em animais de produção (bovinos, ovinos e eqüinos) de 1978 a 2002. O material foi obtido nos arquivos do Laborat...

  13. Computerized cognitive stimulation and engagement programs in older adults with mild cognitive impairment: comparing feasibility, acceptability, and cognitive and psychosocial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djabelkhir L

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Leila Djabelkhir,1,2 Ya-Huei Wu,1,2 Jean-Sébastien Vidal,1 Victoria Cristancho-Lacroix,1,2 Fabienne Marlats,1,2 Hermine Lenoir,1,2 Ariela Carno,1 Anne-Sophie Rigaud1,2 1Department of Clinical Gerontology, Broca Hospital, Public Assistance – Paris Hospitals (AP-HP, 2Research Team 4468, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France Purpose: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI is associated with a higher risk of dementia and is becoming a topic of interest for pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. With advances in technology, computer-based cognitive exercises are increasingly integrated into traditional cognitive interventions, such as cognitive training. Another type of cognitive intervention involving technology use is cognitive engagement, consisting of involving participants in highly motivational and mentally challenging activities, such as learning to use a form of new digital technology. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a computerized cognitive stimulation (CCS program and a computerized cognitive engagement (CCE program, and then compared their effects in older adults with MCI.Patients and methods: In this randomized study, data from 19 MCI patients were analyzed (n=9 in CCS and n=10 in CCE. The patients attended a group weekly session for a duration of 3 months. Assessments of cognitive and psychosocial variables were conducted at baseline (M0 and at the end of the programs (M3.Results: All of the participants attended the 12 sessions and showed a high level of motivation. Attrition rate was very low (one dropout at M3 assessment. At M3, the CCS participants displayed a significant improvement in part B of the Trail Making Test (TMT-B; p=0.03 and self-esteem (p=0.005, while the CCE participants showed a significant improvement in part A of the Trail Making Test (TMT-A; p=0.007 and a higher level of technology acceptance (p=0.006. The two groups did not differ significantly (p>0.05 in cognitive and

  14. Transcriptomic and phylogenetic analysis of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus for three detoxification gene families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The genomes of three major mosquito vectors of human diseases, Anopheles gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus, have been previously sequenced. C. p. quinquefasciatus has the largest number of predicted protein-coding genes, which partially results from the expansion of three detoxification gene families: cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450), glutathione S-transferases (GST), and carboxyl/cholinesterases (CCE). However, unlike An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti, which have large amounts of gene expression data, C. p. quinquefasciatus has limited transcriptomic resources. Knowledge of complete gene expression information is very important for the exploration of the functions of genes involved in specific biological processes. In the present study, the three detoxification gene families of C. p. quinquefasciatus were analyzed for phylogenetic classification and compared with those of three other dipteran insects. Gene expression during various developmental stages and the differential expression responsible for parathion resistance were profiled using the digital gene expression (DGE) technique. Results A total of 302 detoxification genes were found in C. p. quinquefasciatus, including 71 CCE, 196 P450, and 35 cytosolic GST genes. Compared with three other dipteran species, gene expansion in Culex mainly occurred in the CCE and P450 families, where the genes of α-esterases, juvenile hormone esterases, and CYP325 of the CYP4 subfamily showed the most pronounced expansion on the genome. For the five DGE libraries, 3.5-3.8 million raw tags were generated and mapped to 13314 reference genes. Among 302 detoxification genes, 225 (75%) were detected for expression in at least one DGE library. One fourth of the CCE and P450 genes were detected uniquely in one stage, indicating potential developmentally regulated expression. A total of 1511 genes showed different expression levels between a parathion-resistant and a susceptible strain. Fifteen

  15. Transactions of the All-Union Conference (2nd) on Charged Particle Accelerators, Moscow, 11-18 November 1970. Volume I,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-18

    bindings on the pcl% pieces. With their ail it is possible tc intzcduce horizontal and vert.ca’l dipole corrections in the supplement to tne 1sual dipoles ...GeV otf TI ef AS OkSSB.14 tonic energy", 196e, 214. 2. L I a cce I e ra te ur litaesire d’Oray et ses possibili- ties actuelles. L’Onde Electrique ...corresrcnos tc tke field of dipole , a2 - to field of quadrupole, coefficient o.. - tc field 2n - multipole. Page 134. The most important prctlem lies

  16. Pilot power optimization for AF relaying using maximum likelihood channel estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Kezhi

    2014-09-01

    Bit error rates (BERs) for amplify-and-forward (AF) relaying systems with two different pilot-symbol-aided channel estimation methods, disintegrated channel estimation (DCE) and cascaded channel estimation (CCE), are derived in Rayleigh fading channels. Based on these BERs, the pilot powers at the source and at the relay are optimized when their total transmitting powers are fixed. Numerical results show that the optimized system has a better performance than other conventional nonoptimized allocation systems. They also show that the optimal pilot power in variable gain is nearly the same as that in fixed gain for similar system settings. andcopy; 2014 IEEE.

  17. Transfer of maternal immunity to piglets is involved in early protection against Mycoplasma hyosynoviae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritsen, K Tølbøll; Hagedorn-Olsen, T; Jungersen, G; Riber, U; Stryhn, H; Friis, N F; Lind, P; Kristensen, B

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyosynoviae causes arthritis in pigs older than 12 weeks. The role of colostrum in protection of piglets against M. hyosynoviae infection is not clear. Our objective was therefore to investigate whether transfer of maternal immunity to piglets was involved in early protection against the infection. Experimental infections were carried out in three groups of weaners receiving different levels of M. hyosynoviae-specific colostrum components; Group NC derived from Mycoplasma free sows and possessed no specific immunity to M. hyosynoviae. Group CAb pigs, siblings of the NC group, received colostrum with M. hyosynoviae-specific antibodies immediately after birth. Group CCE pigs were born and raised by infected sows and presumably had the full set of colostrally transferred factors, including specific antibodies. When 4½ weeks old, all pigs were inoculated intranasally with M. hyosynoviae. The course of infection was measured through clinical observations of lameness, cultivation of M. hyosynoviae from tonsils, blood and synovial fluid and observation for gross pathological lesions in selected joints. Specific immune status in the pigs was evaluated through detection of antibodies by immunoblotting and measurement of M. hyosynoviae-specific T-cell proliferation. The latter analysis may possibly indicate that M. hyosynoviae infection induces a T-cell response. The CCE piglets were significantly protected against development of lameness and pathology, as well as infection with M. hyosynoviae in tonsils, blood and joints, when compared to the two other groups. Raising the CCE pigs in an infected environment until weaning, with carrier sows as mothers, apparently made them resistant to M. hyosynoviae-arthritis when challenge-infected at 4½ weeks of age. More pigs in group NC had M. hyosynoviae related pathological lesions than in group CAb, a difference that was significant for cubital joints when analysed on joint type level. This finding indicates a partially

  18. Acquisition Research: Creating Synergy for Informed Change. May 15-16 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    11 ALON USA L.P.  $111,102,800  296 ALJ 2911  11 COCA‐ COLA  ENTERPRISES INC  $93,991,833  343 CCE 2086  11 XEROX CORP.  $91,275,424  356 XRX 3577  11...space, or groups of people. His current and recent work includes a prostate cancer decision model, preference models for health decisions...occur over time, space, or groups of people. His current and recent work includes a prostate cancer decision model, preference models for health

  19. Identification of subpopulations in mesenchymal stem cell-like cultures from human umbilical cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majore Ingrida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of cell types can be identified in the adherent fraction of bone marrow mononuclear cells including more primitive and embryonic-like stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, lineage-committed progenitors as well as mature cells such as osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Different methods are described for the isolation of single bone marrow stem cell subpopulations – beginning from ordinary size sieving, long term cultivation under specific conditions to FACS-based approaches. Besides bone marrow-derived subpopulations, also other tissues including human umbilical cord (UC have been recently suggested to provide a potential source for MSC. Although of clinical importance, these UC-derived MSC populations remain to be characterized. It was thus the aim of the present study to identify possible subpopulations in cultures of MSC-like cells obtained from UC. We used counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE as a novel strategy to successfully address this question. Results UC-derived primary cells were separated by CCE and revealed differentially-sized populations in the fractions. Thus, a subpopulation with an average diameter of about 11 μm and a small flat cell body was compared to a large sized subpopulation of about 19 μm average diameter. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the expression of certain MSC stem cell markers including CD44, CD73, CD90 and CD105, respectively, although these markers were expressed at higher levels in the small-sized population. Moreover, this small-sized subpopulation exhibited a higher proliferative capacity as compared to the total UC-derived primary cultures and the large-sized cells and demonstrated a reduced amount of aging cells. Conclusion Using the CCE technique, we were the first to demonstrate a subpopulation of small-sized UC-derived primary cells carrying MSC-like characteristics according to the presence of various mesenchymal stem cell markers. This is also supported by the

  20. Characterisation of a monolithic active pixel sensor for electron detection in the energy range 10-20 keV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matheson, J.; Moldovan, G.; Clark, A.; Prydderch, M.; Turchetta, R.; Derbyshire, G.; Kirkland, A.; Allinson, N.

    2009-01-01

    As part of a feasibility study into the use of novel electron detectors for X-ray photoelectron emission microscopes (XPEEM), we have characterised the imaging performance of a back-illuminated monolithic active pixel sensor (MAPS) operating under both integrating and counting modes for electrons in the energy range 10-20 keV. For integrating mode, we present the detective quantum efficiency (DQE), which shows marked improvements over conventional indirect detectors based on microchannel plates. We also present the modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS), again demonstrating significantly improved performance. For counting mode, we present the quantum efficiency (QE) as a function of incident electron energy. We have evaluated the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and we thereby demonstrate the presence of a ∼200 nm thick dead layer that is linked with reduced CCE at low electron energies. Based on our findings, we believe that the MAPS technology is well matched to future XPEEM instruments using aberration correction.

  1. Detection performance study of SI-GaAs detectors with novel electrode metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubecky, F.; Zatko, B.; Gombia, E.; Sagatova, A.; Necas, V.

    2013-01-01

    The present work reports on the detection performance of α-particles observed with the novel electrode using Mg as low w f metal on SI-GaAs. Three types of structures with Pt and Mg full area contacts deposited on the same 'detector-grade' bulk SI-GaAs are investigated and compared: (i) Mg-Mg, (ii) Mg-Pt, and (iii) Pt-Pt. The prepared structures are characterized by the current-voltage (I-V) and 5.5 MeV α-particles pulse height spectra measurements using 241 Am source. It is shown, that the various structures give rise to characteristic I-V dependences, detected spectra and charge collection efficiency (CCE) versus bias dependences. The irradiated low w f contact (Mg-Mg structure) gives almost negligible CCE at zero bias voltage, while Pt contact detects α-particles about 10 x more effectively. A tentative explanation of the observed effects is discussed and possible applications, based on the obtained results, are proposed. (authors)

  2. Ciclo de convesrión de efectivo en las grandes empresas de comercio al detal en Colombia (1998-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néstor Moreno Meza

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo estudia las magnitudes y las implicaciones financieras del ciclo de conversión de efectivo (CCE, concepto desarrollado por Richards y Laughlin (1980 para integrar tres indicadores fundamentales del capital de trabajo y de la gestión del circulante en la empresa comercial, como son los días de inventario, los días de cartera y los días de crédito de proveedores. Estimado a partir de los estados financieros de una muestra de cinco grandes empresas del comercio minorista en Colombia (Almacenes Éxito-Cadenalco, Carulla- Vivero, Supertiendas y Droguerías Olímpica, Cacharrería La 14 y Carrefour, las cifras del CCE correspondientes al período 1998-2002 revelan la importancia del apalancamiento financiero basado en la cuenta de proveedores, así como sus implicaciones para el capital de trabajo y el equilibrio financiero de estas cadenas comerciales.

  3. Spatial and temporal snowpack variation in the crown of the continent ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, D.J.; Fagre, D.B.; Reardon, B.A.

    2002-01-01

    Snowpack related ecosystem changes such as glacier recession and alpine treeline advance have been documented in the Crown of the Continent Ecosystem (CCE) over the course of the previous 150 years. Using data from the Natural Resource Conservation Service's SNOTEL sites and snow course surveys, we examined the spatial and temporal variation in snowpack in the region. SNOTEL data suggest CCE snowpacks are larger and more persistent than in most regions of the Western U.S., and that water year precipitation, rather than mean temperature, is the primary control on April 1 snow water equivalent (SWE). Snow course data indicate a statistically significant downward trend in mean April 1 SWE for the period 1950-2001 but no statistically significant trend in mean May 1 SWE for the longer period 1922-2001. Further analysis reveals that variations in both April 1 and May 1 mean SWE are closely tied to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, an ENSO-like interdecadal pattern of Pacific Ocean climate variability. Despite no significant trend in mean May 1 SWE between 1922-2001, glaciers in Glacier National Park receded steadily during this period, implying changing climatic conditions crossed a threshold for glacier mass balance maintenace sometime between the Little Ice Age glacial maxima and 1922.

  4. Radiation hardness of n-type SiC Schottky barrier diodes irradiated with MeV He ion microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastuović, Željko, E-mail: zkp@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Capan, Ivana [Material Physics Division, Institute Rudjer Boskovic, PO Box 180, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Cohen, David D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Forneris, Jacopo [Physics Department and NIS Excellence Centre, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Iwamoto, Naoya; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Siegele, Rainer [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2232 (Australia); Hoshino, Norihiro; Tsuchida, Hidekazu [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    We studied the radiation hardness of 4H-SiC Schottky barrier diodes (SBD) for the light ion detection and spectroscopy in harsh radiation environments. n-Type SBD prepared on nitrogen-doped (∼4 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −3}) epitaxial grown 4H-SiC thin wafers have been irradiated by a raster scanning alpha particle microbeam (2 and 4 MeV He{sup 2+} ions separately) in order to create patterned damage structures at different depths within a sensitive volume of tested diodes. Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) analysis revealed the formation of two deep electron traps in the irradiated and not thermally treated 4H-SiC within the ion implantation range (E1 and E2). The E2 state resembles the well-known Z{sub 1/2} center, while the E1 state could not be assigned to any particular defect reported in the literature. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) microscopy with multiple He ion probe microbeams (1–6 MeV) having different penetration depths in tested partly damaged 4H-SiC SBD has been used to determine the degradation of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) over a wide fluence range of damaging alpha particle. A non-linear behavior of the CCE decrease and a significant degradation of the spectroscopic performance with increasing He ion fluence were observed above the value of 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}.

  5. The effectiveness of digital soil mapping to predict soil properties over low-relief areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosleh, Zohreh; Salehi, Mohammad Hassan; Jafari, Azam; Borujeni, Isa Esfandiarpoor; Mehnatkesh, Abdolmohammad

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the ability of different digital soil mapping (DSM) approaches to predict some of physical and chemical topsoil properties in the Shahrekord plain of Chaharmahal-Va-Bakhtiari province, Iran. According to a semi-detailed soil survey, 120 soil samples were collected from 0 to 30 cm depth with approximate distance of 750 m. Particle size distribution, coarse fragments (CFs), electrical conductivity (EC), pH, organic carbon (OC), and calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE) were determined. Four machine learning techniques, namely, artificial neural networks (ANNs), boosted regression tree (BRT), generalized linear model (GLM), and multiple linear regression (MLR), were used to identify the relationship between soil properties and auxiliary information (terrain attributes, remote sensing indices, geology map, existing soil map, and geomorphology map). Root-mean-square error (RMSE) and mean error (ME) were considered to determine the performance of the models. Among the studied models, GLM showed the highest performance to predict pH, EC, clay, silt, sand, and CCE, whereas the best model is not necessarily able to make accurate estimation. According to RMSE%, DSM has a good efficiency to predict soil properties with low and moderate variabilities. Terrain attributes were the main predictors among different studied auxiliary information. The accuracy of the estimations with more observations is recommended to give a better understanding about the performance of DSM approach over low-relief areas.

  6. The safety profile of perflutren microsphere contrast echocardiography during rest and stress imaging: results from an Australian multicentre cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, David G; Luis, Sushil A; Roper, Damian; Burstow, Darryl; Call, Tony; Forshaw, Anthony; Pascoe, Roess

    2013-12-01

    Contrast enhanced echocardiography (CEE) is utilised when sub-optimal image quality results in non-diagnostic echocardiograms. However, there have been numerous safety notices issued by regulatory authorities regarding rare but potentially serious adverse reactions (AR). This multi-centre, retrospective analysis was performed to assess the short-term safety of CEE in a broad range of indications. All CEE performed over 58 months at three institutions were assessed for AR within 30 min. A total of 5956 CEE were performed in 5576 patients. A total of 4903 were stress CEE and 1053 resting CCE. Bolus administration in 5719, infusion in 237 cases; 89.9% of CCE were outpatients. Commonest CEE indication was functional stress testing (82.3%). There were 16 AR related to CEE (0.27%). All AR were mild, transient and all patients made a full recovery. No cases of serious anaphylaxis or death within 30 min of contrast administration. Comparing those with and without an AR, there were no significant differences in age, gender, BMI, LVEF, patient location, exam type or RVSP. There was a slightly increased likelihood of an AR during infusion versus bolus dosing (p = 0.02). CEE is a safe investigation in a broad range of indications and clinical scenarios. AR are very rare, mild and transient. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Air gasification of rice husk in bubbling fluidized bed reactor with bed heating by conventional charcoal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makwana, J P; Joshi, Asim Kumar; Athawale, Gaurav; Singh, Dharminder; Mohanty, Pravakar

    2015-02-01

    An experimental study of air gasification of rice husk was conducted in a bench-scale fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) having 210 mm diameter and 1600 mm height. Heating of sand bed material was performed using conventional charcoal fuel. Different operating conditions like bed temperature, feeding rate and equivalence ratio (ER) varied in the range of 750-850 °C, 25-31.3 kg/h, and 0.3-0.38, respectively. Flow rate of air was kept constant (37 m(3)/h) during FBG experiments. The carbon conversion efficiencies (CCE), cold gas efficiency, and thermal efficiency were evaluated, where maximum CCE was found as 91%. By increasing ER, the carbon conversion efficiency was decreased. Drastic reduction in electric consumption for initial heating of gasifier bed with charcoal compared to ceramic heater was ∼45%. Hence rice husk is found as a potential candidate to use directly (without any processing) in FBG as an alternative renewable energy source from agricultural field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction of strain, news and gravitational radiation flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handmer, Casey J; Szilágyi, Béla; Winicour, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present a new approach for the Cauchy-characteristic extraction (CCE) of gravitational radiation strain, news function, and the flux of the energy–momentum, supermomentum and angular momentum associated with the Bondi–Metzner–Sachs asymptotic symmetries. In CCE, a characteristic evolution code takes numerical data on an inner worldtube supplied by a Cauchy evolution code, and propagates it outwards to obtain the space–time metric in a neighborhood of null infinity. The metric is first determined in a scrambled form in terms of coordinates determined by the Cauchy formalism. In prior treatments, the waveform is first extracted from this metric and then transformed into an asymptotic inertial coordinate system. This procedure provides the physically proper description of the waveform and the radiated energy but it does not generalize to determine the flux of angular momentum or supermomentum. Here we formulate and implement a new approach which transforms the full metric into an asymptotic inertial frame and provides a uniform treatment of all the radiation fluxes associated with the asymptotic symmetries. Computations are performed and calibrated using the spectral Einstein code. (paper)

  9. Ion burst event in the earth's dayside magnetosheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalidis, N.P.; Krimigis, S.M.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Zanetti, L.J.; Sarris, E.T.; Christon, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    The MEPA instrument on the AMPTE/CCE Spacecraft provided ion angular distributions as rapidly as every 6 sec for H, He, and O at energies of 10 keV to 2 MeV in the dayside magnetosheath within 8.75 R E , the CCE apogee. In this report the authors discuss a burst of energetic particles in the subsolar magnetosheath and its association with rapid changes in the local magnetic field direction in such a way that the magnetic field connected the spacecraft to the magnetopause during the enhancement. They find that magnetosheath angular distributions outside the burst peaked at 90 degree pitch angles, whereas during the burst they exhibited field aligned streaming either parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field combined with a clear earthward gradient. The clear earthward gradients at E ≥ 10 KeV, the streaming, and the slope change in the burst-time magnetosheath spectrum at ∼10 KeV suggest magnetospheric source for the burst-time ≥ 10 KeV ions and heated solar wind for E < 10 KeV

  10. Secure Testing for Genetic Diseases on Encrypted Genomes with Homomorphic Encryption Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Ping Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The decline in genome sequencing costs has widened the population that can afford its cost and has also raised concerns about genetic privacy. Kim et al. present a practical solution to the scenario of secure searching of gene data on a semitrusted business cloud. However, there are three errors in their scheme. We have made three improvements to solve these three errors. (1 They truncate the variation encodings of gene to 21 bits, which causes LPCE error and more than 5% of the entries in the database cannot be queried integrally. We decompose these large encodings by 44 bits and deal with the components, respectively, to avoid LPCE error. (2 We abandon the hash function used in Kim’s scheme, which may cause HCE error with a probability of 2-22 and decompose the position encoding of gene into three parts with the basis 211 to avoid HCE error. (3 We analyze the relationship between the parameters and the CCE error and specify the condition that parameters need to satisfy to avoid the CCE error. Experiments show that our scheme can search all entries, and the probability of searching error is reduced to less than 2-37.4.

  11. Carcinoma de células escamosas em bovinos, ovinos e eqüinos: estudo de 50 casos no sul do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Tony Ramos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE é um tumor maligno dos queratinócitos. O desenvolvimento desse tipo de tumor está associado a muitos fatores, incluindo a exposição prolongada à luz ultravioleta, falta de pigmento na epiderme, perda de pêlos ou cobertura de pêlos muito esparsa nos locais afetados. Realizou-se um estudo retrospectivo dos casos de carcinoma de células escamosas em animais de produção (bovinos, ovinos e eqüinos de 1978 a 2002. O material foi obtido nos arquivos do Laboratório Regional de Diagnóstico da Faculdade de Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Pelotas. Os 50 tumores do tipo carcinoma de células escamosas estavam distribuídos nas diferentes espécies (bovina: 30; ovina: sete e eqüina: 13. Dados como raça, sexo, idade e localização corpórea, dentro de cada espécie, foram tabulados. Classificaram-se os tumores segundo seu grau de malignidade em bem diferenciados a pobremente diferenciados, através de avaliação histológica. A etiologia multifatorial dos cce em animais de produção requer mais estudos retrospectivos e prospectivos, para determinar o papel de cada fator na patogênese desse neoplasma.

  12. A two-factor method for appraising building renovation and energy efficiency improvement projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinaitis, Vytautas; Kazakevicius, Eduardas; Vitkauskas, Aloyzas

    2007-01-01

    The renovation of residential buildings usually involves a variety of measures aiming at reducing energy and building maintenance bills, increasing safety and market value, and improving comfort and aesthetics. A significant number of project appraisal methods in current use-such as calculations of payback time, net present value, internal rate of return or cost of conserved energy (CCE)-only quantify energy efficiency gains. These approaches are relatively easy to use, but offer a distorted view of complex modernization projects. On the other hand, various methods using multiple criteria take a much wider perspective but are usually time-consuming, based on sometimes uncertain assumptions and require sophisticated tools. A 'two-factor' appraisal method offers a compromise between these two approaches. The main idea of the method is to separate investments into those related to energy efficiency improvements, and those related to building renovation. Costs and benefits of complex measures, which both influence energy consumption and improve building constructions, are separated by using a building rehabilitation coefficient. The CCE is used for the appraisal of energy efficiency investments, while investments in building renovation are appraised using standard tools for the assessment of investments in maintenance, repair and rehabilitation

  13. Uncertainty of measurement for summed masses: application to controlled substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jack

    2010-12-17

    Because sentences for drug possession depend on the mass of the seized drug, testing laboratories must often determine the summed mass of numerous items submitted under a single case. One common practice for this purpose is to continue analyzing and weighing samples until a legal threshold is passed, at which point it is important to inform the court whether the summed mass is significantly above the threshold, or only marginally so. This paper develops a means for estimating the uncertainty of the summed mass for the common situation where the readability, d, of the balance dominates the uncertainty. It is seen that for all sample sizes the uncertainty, UM, is given by the remarkable simple expression UM=(d/2)×[N+SQRT(3N)]+N×CCE, where N is the number of items and CCE is the absolute value of the calibration check error. In most instances, this can be further simplified to UM=N×d. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-Term Stable Surface Treatments on CdTe and CdZnTe Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekarek, Jakub; Belas, Eduard; Zazvorka, Jakub

    2017-04-01

    The spectral resolution and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) room-temperature x-ray and gamma-ray detectors are often limited by high surface leakage current due to conducting surface species created during detector fabrication. Surface treatments play a major role in reduction of this surface leakage current. The effect of various types of surface etching and passivation on the leakage current and thereby the spectral energy resolution, CCE, and internal electric field profile of CdTe/CZT detectors has been studied. The main aim of this work is preparation of long-term stable detectors with strongly reduced leakage current. The time stability of the current-voltage characteristic and spectral resolution was investigated during 21 days and 1 year, respectively, after performing surface treatments. Our results suggest that the optimal detector preparation method is chemomechanical polishing in bromine-ethylene glycol solution followed by chemical etching in bromine-methanol solution then surface passivation in potassium hydroxide or ammonium fluoride (NH4F/H2O2). Detectors prepared using this optimal treatment exhibited low leakage current, high spectral resolution, and long-term stability compared with those subjected to other surface preparation methods.

  15. Comparative study by IBIC of Si and SiC diodes irradiated with high energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Lopez, J., E-mail: fjgl@us.es [Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); CNA (U. Sevilla, J. Andalucia, CSIC), Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jimenez-Ramos, M.C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M. [CNA (U. Sevilla, J. Andalucia, CSIC), Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Ceballos, J. [Institute of Microelectronics of Seville, IMSE-CNM (CSIC/University of Seville), Seville 41092 (Spain); Linez, F. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University, 02150 Espoo (Finland); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland)

    2016-04-01

    The transport properties of a series of Si and SiC diodes have been studied using the Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique. Structural defects were induced into the samples during the irradiation with 17 MeV protons. The experimental values of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) vs bias voltages have been analyzed using a modified drift-diffusion model, which takes into account the recombination of carriers in the neutral and depletion regions. From these simulations, we have obtained the values of the carrier’s lifetime for pristine and irradiated diodes, which are found to degrade faster in the case of the SiC samples. However, the decrease of the CCE at high bias voltages is more important for the Si detectors, indicative of the lower radiation hardness of this material compared to SiC. The nature of the proton-induced defects on Si wafers has been studied by Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) and Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy (DBS). The results suggest that the main defect detected by the positrons in p-type samples is the divacancy while for n-type at least a fraction of the positron annihilate in another defect. The concentration of defects is much lower than the number of vacancies predicted by SRIM.

  16. The Nature and Origin of the Central Constant Emission Component of Eta Carinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, K.; Corcoran, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    The campaign observations of the evolved super massive binary system, η Car, revealed an apparently non-variable X-ray emission component, which was observable only around periastron when the wind-wind colliding (WWC) X-ray emission from the binary system dropped. This central constant emission (CCE) component originates from hot thermal plasma at >50 million degrees Kelvin confined within ˜0.2'' (˜460 AU at 2.3 kpc) of the binary system. The emission suffers weak X-ray absorption at NH˜3 - 5 × 1022 cm-2, so that the plasma should be in front of the binary system. These results suggest that the CCE plasma is thermalized by collision of the secondary wind with the primary wind shell ejected a few orbital cycles before and that it fills the foreground cavity carved by the wind of the secondary star. An apparent change of the line of sight absorption between 2003 and 2009 may suggest a change of the mass loss rate of the primary star around that time.

  17. Manipulable objects facilitate cross-modal integration in peripersonal space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elk, Michiel; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that tool use often modifies one's peripersonal space--i.e. the space directly surrounding our body. Given our profound experience with manipulable objects (e.g. a toothbrush, a comb or a teapot) in the present study we hypothesized that the observation of pictures representing manipulable objects would result in a remapping of peripersonal space as well. Subjects were required to report the location of vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the right hand, while ignoring visual distractors superimposed on pictures representing everyday objects. Pictures could represent objects that were of high manipulability (e.g. a cell phone), medium manipulability (e.g. a soap dispenser) and low manipulability (e.g. a computer screen). In the first experiment, when subjects attended to the action associated with the objects, a strong cross-modal congruency effect (CCE) was observed for pictures representing medium and high manipulability objects, reflected in faster reaction times if the vibrotactile stimulus and the visual distractor were in the same location, whereas no CCE was observed for low manipulability objects. This finding was replicated in a second experiment in which subjects attended to the visual properties of the objects. These findings suggest that the observation of manipulable objects facilitates cross-modal integration in peripersonal space.

  18. Manipulable objects facilitate cross-modal integration in peripersonal space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Elk

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that tool use often modifies one's peripersonal space--i.e. the space directly surrounding our body. Given our profound experience with manipulable objects (e.g. a toothbrush, a comb or a teapot in the present study we hypothesized that the observation of pictures representing manipulable objects would result in a remapping of peripersonal space as well. Subjects were required to report the location of vibrotactile stimuli delivered to the right hand, while ignoring visual distractors superimposed on pictures representing everyday objects. Pictures could represent objects that were of high manipulability (e.g. a cell phone, medium manipulability (e.g. a soap dispenser and low manipulability (e.g. a computer screen. In the first experiment, when subjects attended to the action associated with the objects, a strong cross-modal congruency effect (CCE was observed for pictures representing medium and high manipulability objects, reflected in faster reaction times if the vibrotactile stimulus and the visual distractor were in the same location, whereas no CCE was observed for low manipulability objects. This finding was replicated in a second experiment in which subjects attended to the visual properties of the objects. These findings suggest that the observation of manipulable objects facilitates cross-modal integration in peripersonal space.

  19. An upgraded drift–diffusion model for evaluating the carrier lifetimes in radiation-damaged semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Lopez, J., E-mail: fjgl@us.es [Dept of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Sevilla, Av. Reina Mercedes s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); CNA (U. Sevilla, J. Andalucia, CSIC), Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jimenez-Ramos, M.C.; Rodriguez-Ramos, M. [CNA (U. Sevilla, J. Andalucia, CSIC), Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Forneris, J. [Physics Dept./NIS Centre, University of Torino, INFN-Sez. di Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Ceballos, J. [Institute of Microelectronics of Seville, IMSE-CNM (CSIC/University of Seville), Seville 41092 (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    The transport properties of a series of n- and p-type Si diodes have been studied by the ion beam induced charge (IBIC) technique using a 4 MeV proton microbeam. The samples were irradiated with 17 MeV protons at fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 12} to 1 × 10{sup 13} p/cm{sup 2} in order to produce a uniform profile of defects with depth. The analysis of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) as a function of the reverse bias voltage has been carried out using an upgraded drift–diffusion (D–D) model which takes into account the possibility of carrier recombination not only in the neutral substrate, as the simple D–D model assumes, but also within the depletion region. This new approach for calculating the CCE is fundamental when the drift length of carriers cannot be considered as much greater that the thickness of the detector due to the ion induced damage. From our simulations, we have obtained the values of the carrier lifetimes for the pristine and irradiated diodes, which have allowed us to calculate the effective trapping cross sections using the one dimension Shockley–Read–Hall model. The results of our calculations have been compared to the data obtained using a recently developed Monte Carlo code for the simulation of IBIC analysis, based on the probabilistic interpretation of the excess carrier continuity equations.

  20. Learning to be a midwife in the clinical environment; tasks, clinical practicum hours or midwifery relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Lyn; Tierney, Olivia; Jones, Donovan

    2016-01-01

    Discussions continue within the midwifery profession around the number of and type of clinical experiences required to ensure competent midwifery graduates. Introduction of the three year Bachelor of Midwifery in Australia, almost two decades ago, was intended to reduce the pressure students were under to complete their academic requirements whilst ensuring students developed midwifery practice that encapsulates the philosophical values of midwifery. Currently, midwifery students are mandated to achieve a minimum number of clinical skills and Continuity of Care Experience (CCE) relationships in order to register upon completion of their degree. To achieve these experiences, universities require students to complete a number of clinical practicum hours. Furthermore students are required to demonstrate competent clinical performance of a number of clinical skills. However, there is no evidence to date that a set number of experiences or hours ensures professional competence in the clinical environment. The aim of this paper is to promote discussion regarding the mandated requirements for allocated clinical practicum hours, specified numbers of clinical-based skills and CCE relationships in the context of learning to be a midwife in Australia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluidized-Bed Gasification of Plastic Waste, Wood, and Their Blends with Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Zaccariello

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fuel composition on gasification process performance was investigated by performing mass and energy balances on a pre-pilot scale bubbling fluidized bed reactor fed with mixtures of plastic waste, wood, and coal. The fuels containing plastic waste produced less H2, CO, and CO2 and more light hydrocarbons than the fuels including biomass. The lower heating value (LHV progressively increased from 5.1 to 7.9 MJ/Nm3 when the plastic waste fraction was moved from 0% to 100%. Higher carbonaceous fines production was associated with the fuel containing a large fraction of coal (60%, producing 87.5 g/kgFuel compared to only 1.0 g/kgFuel obtained during the gasification test with just plastic waste. Conversely, plastic waste gasification produced the highest tar yield, 161.9 g/kgFuel, while woody biomass generated only 13.4 g/kgFuel. Wood gasification showed a carbon conversion efficiency (CCE of 0.93, while the tests with two fuels containing coal showed lowest CCE values (0.78 and 0.70, respectively. Plastic waste and wood gasification presented similar cold gas efficiency (CGE values (0.75 and 0.76, respectively, while that obtained during the co-gasification tests varied from 0.53 to 0.73.

  2. Safety Assessment of Multi Purpose Small Payload Rack(MSPR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Yoshinobu; Takada, Satomi; Murata, Kosei; Ozawa, Daisaku; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Nakamura, Yasuhiro

    2010-09-01

    We are reporting summary of preliminary safety assessment for Multi Purpose Small Payload Rack(MSPR), which is one of the micro gravity experiment facilities that are being developed for the 2nd phase JEM utilization(JEM: Japanese Experiment Module) that will be launched on H-II Transfer Vehicle(HTV) 2nd flight in 2011. MSPR is used for multi-purpose micro-g experiment providing experimental spaces and work stations. MSPR has three experimental spaces; first, there is a space called Work Volume(WV) with capacity volume of approximately 350 litters, in which multiple resources including electricity, communication, and moving image functions can be used. Within this space, installation of devices can be done by simple, prompt attachment by Velcro and pins with high degree of flexibility. Second, there is Small Experiment Area(SEA), with capacity volume of approximately 70 litters, in which electricity, communication, and moving image functions can also be used in the same way as WV. These spaces protect experiment devices and specimens from contingent loads by the crewmembers. Third, there is Work Bench with area of 0.5 square meters, on which can be used for maintenance, inspection and data operations of installed devices, etc. This bench can be stored in the rack during contingency. Chamber for Combustion Experiment(CCE) that is planned to be installed in WV is a pressure-resistant experimental container that can be used to seal hazardous materials from combustion experiments. This CCE has double sealing design in chamber itself, which resist gas leakage under normal the temperature and pressure. Electricity, communication, moving image function can be used in the same way as WV. JAXA Phase 2 Safety Review Panel(SRP) has been held in April, 2010. For safety analysis of MSPR, hazards were identified based on Fault Tree Analysis methodology and then these hazards were classified into either eight ISS standard-type hazards or eight unique-type hazards that requires

  3. Influence of 13 different biochars on N2O production and its sources during rewetting-drying cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Fiedler, Sebastian; Fuertes-Mendizábal, Teresa; Estavillo, José-Maria; Ippolito, Jim A.; Borchard, Nils; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Spokas, Kurt; Novak, Jeff; Kammann, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    biochars and was greatest for the grape wood and Kontiki biochars. The results indicate that NO3- was an important source for N2O emissions under the conditions of the study, probably by denitrification. The addition of biochars changed not only the amount of emissions, but also the N source of emissions. In this study, N2O production from labelled NO3- was a smaller source of emissions after addition of biochars (especially produced at high temperatures) than in control treatments. This indicates that the 15N-NO3- source was diluted by (accelerated) mineralization-nitrification or that microbial sources using other substrates but added NO3- contributed more to N2O production. Whether potential capture of NO3- by biochars could contribute to this, needs to be further investigated. Acknowledgements: This contribution was made possible by the 'DesignChar4Food' project (D4F) funded by the BLE and FACCE-JPI (German partners), by FACCE-CSA n° 276610/MIT04-DESIGN-UPVASC and IT-932-16 (Spanish partners), and the USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture (Project # 2014-35615-21971; US colleagues) plus USDA-ARS CHARnet and GRACENetprograms. CK gratefully acknowledges funding by DFG grant KA3442/1-1 and "OptiChar4EcoVin" (Hessian Ministry for Higher Education, Research and the Arts).

  4. Charge losses in silicon sensors and electric-field studies at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poehlsen, Thomas

    2013-07-15

    added to the accumulation layer and when the accumulation layer returns to steady state is investigated. Irradiated silicon pad sensors are used to study the charge-collection efficiency (CCE) of charge carriers generated using laser light of 1063 nm wavelength, as a function of bulk material, active sensor thickness, voltage, temperature, particle type (for the irradiation) and fluence. As a cross check the CCE is also determined for charge carriers generated by electrons from a {sup 90}Sr-source. A precision of 3 % in the CCE is achieved. Sensors of n-doped and p-doped silicon are compared, as well as sensors of different crystal-growing methods (magnetic Czochralski (MCz) and float zone (FZ)). The sensor thickness varies from 200 {mu}m (MCz and FZ) to 320 {mu}m (FZ). The 320 {mu}m thick FZ sensors underwent a dopant-diffusion process (dd-FZ) to reduce the active sensor thickness. For the irradiation both protons of different energies (23 MeV and 23 GeV) and reactor neutrons ({proportional_to}1 MeV) are used. The achieved fluences are between 3.10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and 1.3.10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} 1 MeV-neutron equivalent. The CCE is used to calculate the signal corresponding to a minimum-ionising particle (mip) traversing the sensor and to calculate the effective distance the generated charge carriers drift. While little difference in CCE between the 200 m thick MCz and FZ materials is found, the dd-FZ materials of both {proportional_to}200 {mu}m and {proportional_to}300 {mu}m active thickness have a lower CCE, corresponding also to a shorter effective drift distance. The CCE and the effective drift distance are also calculated for eh pairs generated close to the sensor surface using laser light of 660 nm wavelength. The measurements are not compatible with a position-independent trapping probability, and qualitative agreement with a position-dependent occupation of radiation-induced trapping centres due to the dark current is found.

  5. Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Richard Bond

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Givcn the nature of the process of education, the human groups for whom education is designed and with whom educating is, to a great degree, an intimate, social interaction, even the most superficial examination of the elements involved reveals a diversity of components which span most, if not all, aspects of human life. Some time ago it was recognized that our own education and the education of our fellow humans extends in length and breadth far outside the formal classrooms of primary, secondary, and postsecondary education. This said, it is not at all difficult to identify components of education such as life-long learning, social responsibilities, citizenship, gender based issues, and helping people develop their potential. What a contr8st these postmodern concepts of education make when compared with traditionally espoused notions of "back to basics" and "the three Rs", which, even as I write, are still perceived by many in the community to be by far the most suitable concepts by which wc may cope with the present and try to facc;; the future. This edition presents articles on education which are widely varied in nature, but nonetheless have application to the profession as manifest in its many forms. They have relevance, also, to important aspects of the ways in which we socialize and are socialized within the context of education and educating. These articles, then, are presented to encourage the examination of education through somewhat different lenses and to invite questions pertaining to where we are and where we are going.

  6. Pythagoras on the rocks. A proof with bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cagol

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this short paper a practical and simple proof of the Pythagorean theorem is proposed. It uses colourful interlocking plastic bricks with two shapes: a cube that measures two centimeters on each side and a right prism where the base is a right-angled isosceles triangle and the two equal rectangular faces are the same as those of the cubic brick. The proof is designed for primary school children (but also for preschool children and begins by telling the legend of Pythagoras, who discovered his theorem by looking at the floor tile pattern of Polycrates’ palace. This proof takes into account only right-angled isosceles triangle but it is possible to show the validity of Pythagorean theorem for all right-angled triangles by building a simple proof by rearrangement. Pitagora on the rocks. Una dimostrazione con i mattonciniIn questo breve contributo viene proposta una semplice dimostrazione pratica del teorema di Pitagora, utilizzando mattoncini a incastro di plastica colorata di due forme: un cubo di due centimetri per lato e un prisma retto la cui base è un triangolo isoscele rettangolo e nel quale le due facce equivalenti sono uguali a quelle del mattoncino cubico. La dimostrazione è rivolta a bambini della scuola primaria (ma, eventualmente, anche in età prescolare e prende le mosse dalla leggenda secondo la quale Pitagora avrebbe scoperto il suo teorema mentre stava osservando il pavimento piastrellato del palazzo di Policrate, tiranno di Samo. Da questa dimostrazione – che prende in considerazione solo triangoli rettangoli isosceli – è poi possibile passare a una dimostrazione del teorema di Pitagora per tutti i triangoli rettangoli.

  7. Topography of the complete corticopontine projection: From experiments to principal maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve B Leergaard

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian brain is characterized by orderly spatial distribution of its cellular components, commonly referred to as topographical organization. The topography of cortical and subcortical maps is thought to represent functional or computational properties. In the present investigation, we have studied map transformations and organizing principles in the projections from the cerebral cortex to the pontine nuclei, with emphasis on the mapping of the cortex as a whole onto the pontine nuclei. Following single or multiple axonal tracer injections into different cortical regions, three-dimensional (3-D distributions of anterogradely labeled axons in the pontine nuclei were mapped. All 3-D reconstructed data sets were normalized to a standardized local coordinate system for the pontine nuclei and uploaded in a database application (FACCS, Functional Anatomy of the Cerebro-Cerebellar System, available via The Rodent Brain Workbench, http://www.rbwb.org. The database application allowed flexible use of the data in novel combinations, and use of a previously published data sets. Visualization of different combinations of data was used to explore alternative principles of organization. As a result of these analyses, a principal map of the topography of corticopontine projections was developed. This map followed the organization of early spatiotemporal gradients present in the cerebral cortex and the pontine nuclei. With the principal map for corticopontine projections, a fairly accurate prediction of pontine target area can be made for any site of origin in the cerebral cortex. The map and the underlying shared data sets represent a basis for modeling of topographical organization and structure-function relationships in this system.

  8. Evaluation of the DayCent model to predict carbon fluxes in French crop sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Kenji; Martin, Manuel P.; Zhang, Yao; Bernoux, Martial; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie

    2017-04-01

    Croplands in temperate regions are an important component of the carbon balance and can act as a sink or a source of carbon, depending on pedoclimatic conditions and management practices. Therefore the evaluation of carbon fluxes in croplands by modelling approach is relevant in the context of global change. This study was part of the Comete-Global project funded by the multi-Partner call FACCE JPI. Carbon fluxes, net ecosystem exchange (NEE), leaf area index (LAI), biomass, and grain production were simulated at the site level in three French crop experiments from the CarboEurope project. Several crops were studied, like winter wheat, rapeseed, barley, maize, and sunflower. Daily NEE was measured with eddy covariance and could be partitioned between gross primary production (GPP) and total ecosystem respiration (TER). Measurements were compared to DayCent simulations, a process-based model predicting plant production and soil organic matter turnover at daily time step. We compared two versions of the model: the original one with a simplified plant module and a newer version that simulates LAI. Input data for modelling were soil properties, climate, and management practices. Simulations of grain yields and biomass production were acceptable when using optimized crop parameters. Simulation of NEE was also acceptable. GPP predictions were improved with the newer version of the model, eliminating temporal shifts that could be observed with the original model. TER was underestimated by the model. Predicted NEE was more sensitive to soil tillage and nitrogen applications than measured NEE. DayCent was therefore a relevant tool to predict carbon fluxes in French crops at the site level. The introduction of LAI in the model improved its performance.

  9. Hematologia e bioquímica sérica de equinos de concurso completo de equitação em treinamento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Santiago

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avaliaram-se a hematologia e a bioquímica sérica em equinos de concurso completo de equitação (CCE em treinamento durante testes de esforço incremental em esteira ergométrica de alta velocidade. Foram utilizados 16 equinos em delineamento experimental inteiramente ao acaso com quatro tratamentos e quatro repetições em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, utilizando-se como fontes de variação nos tratamentos a idade e o histórico de treinamento em CCE. As parcelas foram constituídas pelos testes incrementais realizados nas fases inicial e final do treinamento. As subparcelas foram representadas pelos tempos de avaliação e coletas. Os equinos do grupo experimental novos iniciantes apresentaram valor médio do hematócrito de 43,24%, sendo inferior ao hematócrito do grupo adultos iniciantes, 45,63%, novos experientes, 46,39%, e competidores, 47,74%. Houve diferença (P<0,05 entre os testes físicos realizados nas fases inicial e final do treinamento, com redução na concentração plasmática de glicose, de 112 para 98,88mg/dL, nas concentrações séricas de creatinina, de 1,41 para 1,29mg/dL, e de proteínas totais, de 6,52 para 6,38g/dL, na contagem de monócitos, de 0,54 para 0,48 10³/mm³, e com aumento na concentração plasmática de lactato, de 3,31 para 3,79mmol/L, na concentração sérica de ácido úrico, de 1,44 para 1,77mg/dL, no hematócrito, de 44,19 para 46,90%, na concentração de hemoglobina, de 14,33 para 15,10g/dL, e na contagem de leucócitos totais, de 9,26 para 9,61 10³/mm³. O treinamento dos equinos de CCE aumentou o condicionamento físico dos equinos, com maior capacidade de metabolização do lactato após o exercício e aumento nos valores basais do hematócrito e da concentração de hemoglobina.

  10. New technological developments provide deep-sea sediment density flow insights: the Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, T. C.; Kieft, B.; Chaffey, M. R.; Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Herlien, R.; Bird, L.; Klimov, D.; Paull, C. K.; Gwiazda, R.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Caress, D. W.; Sumner, E. J.; Simmons, S.; Parsons, D. R.; Talling, P.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Xu, J.; Maier, K. L.; Gales, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Monterey Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) deployed an array of instruments along the Monterey Canyon floor to characterize the structure, velocity and frequency of sediment flows. CCE utilized novel technologies developed at MBARI to capture sediment flow data in unprecedented detail. 1. The Seafloor Instrument Node (SIN) at 1850 meters depth housed 3 ADCPs at 3 different frequencies, CTD, current meter, oxygen optode, fluorometer/backscatter sensor, and logged data at 10 second intervals or faster. The SIN included an acoustic modem for communication with shore through a Wave Glider relay, and provided high-resolution measurements of three flow events during three successive deployments over 1.5 years. 2. Beachball-sized Benthic Event Detectors (BEDs) were deployed on or under the seafloor to measure the characteristics of sediment density flows. Each BED recorded data from a pressure sensor and a 3-axis accelerometer and gyro to characterize motions during transport events (e.g. tumble vs rotation). An acoustic modem capable of operating through more than a meter of sediment enabled communications with a ship or autonomous surface vehicle. Multiple BEDs were deployed at various depths in the canyon during CCE, detecting and measuring many transport events; one BED moved 9 km down canyon in 50 minutes during one event. 3. Wave Glider Hot Spot (HS), equipped with acoustic and RF modems, acted as data relay between SIN, BEDs and shore, and acoustically located BEDs after sediment density flows.. In some cases HS relayed BED motion data to shore within a few hours of the event. HS provided an acoustic console to the SIN, allowing shore-based users to check SIN health and status, perform maintenance, etc. 4. Mapping operations were conducted 4 times at the SIN site to quantify depositional and erosional patterns, utilizing a prototype ultra-high-resolution mapping system on the ROV Doc Ricketts. The system consists of a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar, a 3

  11. Building a Community Infrastructure for Scalable On-Line Performance Analysis Tools around Open|SpeedShop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galarowicz, James E. [Krell Institute, Ames, IA (United States); Miller, Barton P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Computer Sciences Dept.; Hollingsworth, Jeffrey K. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Computer Sciences Dept.; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Future Technologies Group, Computer Science and Math Division; Schulz, Martin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC)

    2013-12-19

    laboratories Los Alamos and Sandia leveraging co-funding for Krell by ASC’s Common Computing Environment (CCE) program as laid out in the original proposal. The ASC CCE co-funding, coordinated through LLNL, was for 50% of the total project funding, with the ASC CCE portion of the funding going entirely to Krell, while the ASCR funding itself was split between Krell and the funded partners. This report covers the entire project from both funding sources. Additionally, the team leveraged the expertise of software engineering researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, who specialize in software framework design, in order to achieve a broadly acceptable component framework. The Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) software has been released to the community. Information related to the project and the released software can be found on the CBTF wiki page at: http://sourceforge.net/p/cbtf/wiki/Home.

  12. Effect of kisspeptin on in vitro maturation of sheep oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Byri

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of kisspeptin (KP on in vitro maturation (IVM of sheep oocytes aspirated from the ovaries collected from slaughterhouse. Materials and Methods: Two different experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of KP (5, 10 and 15 μg/ml alone (experiment 1 or in combination with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH, luteinizing hormone (LH, and Estradiol (E2 (experiment 2 on IVM of sheep oocytes. Tissue culture medium 199 supplemented with Gentamicin was used as control medium. Good quality oocytes were randomly allocated into different IVM media and cultured at 38.5°C in 5% CO2 under humidified atmosphere for 24 h. The oocytes were evaluated for their cumulus cell expansion (CCE and extrusion of the 1st polar body (PB at the end of maturation. Results: The proportion of oocytes showing CCE and extrusion of PB was highest when the oocytes were matured in the medium supplemented with 10 μg/ml of KP. In experiment 2, oocytes were matured in 12 different maturation media (G1-G12: G1: Control, G2: KP alone, G3: FSH, G4: FSH+KP, G5: LH, G6: LH+KP, G7: E2, G8: E2+KP, G9: FSH+LH+E2, G10: FSH+LH+E2+KP, G11: FSH+LH+E2+fetal bovine serum (FBS, G12: FSH+LH+E2+FBS+KP. The proportion of oocytes showing cumulus expansion and PB extrusion was highest (98.33±1.05 and 89.17±2.38 when they were matured in FSH+LH+E2+FBS+KP (G12 and was significantly higher than other groups. The proportion of CCE and extrusion of PB was significantly increased when KP was supplemented to FSH and E2, but no effect was observed with LH. The maturation rates were significantly increased when FSH, LH, and E2 (G9 containing media were additionally supplemented with KP (G10. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the addition of KP (10 μg/ml to the FSH, LH, and E2 supplemented media would enhance the sheep oocyte maturation in vitro.

  13. Drift-shell splitting of energetic ions injected at pseudo-substorm onsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, K.; Anderson, B.J.; Ohtani, S.; Reeves, G.D.; Takahashi, S.; Sarris, T.E.; Mursula, K.

    1997-01-01

    One feature of a magnetospheric substorm is the injection of energetic particles into closed drift orbits. Injections are routinely observed by geosynchronous satellites and have been used to identify the occurrence of substorms and the local time of particle energization. In this study we examine pitch angle distributions of ion injections in the 50-to 300-keV energy range observed by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE) satellite, hereinafter CCE. In a dipole field, all pitch angles follow the same drift shell, but the day night asymmetry of the magnetospheric magnetic field introduces a pitch angle dependence in particle drift orbits, so that particles with different pitch angles disperse radially as they drift. The effect is known as drift-shell splitting. For satellite observations near noon at a fixed geocentric distance, the guiding center orbits of ions detected at small pitch angles intersect the midnight meridian at larger geocentric distances than do ions with near-90 degree pitch angles. The ion pitch angle distributions detected on the dayside therefore provide information about the radial distance of the nightside acceleration region. We apply this principle to study ion injection events observed on September 17 - 18, 1984, in association with pseudo-substorm onsets. CCE was at 13 hours local time near its apogee (8.8R E ) and observed a series of ion flux enhancements. Energy dispersion of the timing of the flux increases assures that they are due to injections on the nightside. The flux increases were observed only at pitch angles from 0 degree to 60 degree. We calculate drift orbits of protons using the Tsyganenko 89c magnetic field model and find that the drift orbits for 60 degree pitch angle protons observed at the satellite pass through midnight at 9R E , well outside of geostationary orbit, indicating that the ion injections occurred tailward of 9R E . Energetic ion data from geostationary

  14. Rickettsia hoogstraalii sp. nov., isolated from hard- and soft-bodied ticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duh, Darja; Punda-Polic, Volga; Avsic-Zupanc, Tatjana; Bouyer, Donald; Walker, David H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Jelovsek, Mateja; Gracner, Maja; Trilar, Tomi; Bradaric, Nikola; Kurtti, Timothy J; Strus, Jasna

    2010-04-01

    A novel spotted fever group Rickettsia was found in Haemaphysalis sulcata ticks collected from sheep and goats in Croatia in 2006. At the same time, a genetically identical organism was co-isolated with the embryonic cell line CCE3 obtained from the soft tick Carios capensis in Georgia, USA. In this study, further phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of the novel rickettsial strain present in H. sulcata ticks were investigated. Based on the cultivation of bacteria in mosquito and Vero cell cultures, the presence of rickettsiae in tick tissues and cell cultures [confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM)] and the amplification and sequencing of five rickettsial genes, it was demonstrated that the novel Rickettsia strain fulfils the criteria to be classified as a novel species. The name Rickettsia hoogstraalii sp. nov. is proposed for the new strain. Rickettsia hoogstraalii sp. nov., an obligately intracellular bacterium, was grown in Vero cells and arthropod CCE3, ISE6 and C6/36 cell lines. The morphology of the cells of the novel species was typical of SFG rickettsiae. The small coccobacillary appearance of the bacteria was apparent with light microscopy. A Gram-negative bacterial cell wall and a cytoplasmic membrane separated by a narrow periplasmic space were visible by TEM. To date, Rickettsia hoogstraalii sp. nov. has been isolated from two species of ticks, H. sulcata and C. capensis. The novel species appears to be geographically widely distributed, having been detected in Croatia, Spain and Georgia, USA. Although no information is available regarding the possible pathogenicity of the novel species for vertebrate hosts, R. hoogstraalii sp. nov. has a cytopathic effect in Vero, CCE3 and ISE6 cells. Sequence analyses of the 16S rRNA, 17 kDa, gltA, ompA and ompB genes indicated that even though R. hoogstraalii sp. nov. was closely related to Rickettsia felis, it represents a separate species within the spotted fever group. The type strain of R

  15. Control Activity in Support of NASA Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.; Le, Dzu K.; Ouzts, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Control research for a Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion system is the current focus of the Hypersonic Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) discipline team. The ongoing work at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) supports the Hypersonic GN&C effort in developing tools to aid the design of control algorithms to manage a TBCC airbreathing propulsion system during a critical operating period. The critical operating period being addressed in this paper is the span when the propulsion system transitions from one cycle to another, referred to as mode transition. One such tool, that is a basic need for control system design activities, is computational models (hereto forth referred to as models) of the propulsion system. The models of interest for designing and testing controllers are Control Development Models (CDMs) and Control Validation Models (CVMs). CDMs and CVMs are needed for each of the following propulsion system elements: inlet, turbine engine, ram/scram dual-mode combustor, and nozzle. This paper presents an overall architecture for a TBCC propulsion system model that includes all of the propulsion system elements. Efforts are under way, focusing on one of the propulsion system elements, to develop CDMs and CVMs for a TBCC propulsion system inlet. The TBCC inlet aerodynamic design being modeled is that of the Combined-Cycle Engine (CCE) Testbed. The CCE Testbed is a large-scale model of an aerodynamic design that was verified in a small-scale screening experiment. The modeling approach includes employing existing state-of-the-art simulation codes, developing new dynamic simulations, and performing system identification experiments on the hardware in the NASA GRC 10 by10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The developed CDMs and CVMs will be available for control studies prior to hardware buildup. The system identification experiments on the CCE Testbed will characterize the necessary dynamics to be represented in CDMs for control design. These

  16. Aportes a la caracterización del comportamiento emprendedor de los estudiantes de la Konrad Lorenz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Pulgarín

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Entrepreneurship in Higher Education is a national and local concern. This article aims to characterize the entrepreneurial behavior of undergraduates from all faculties in Konrad Lorenz University, through an internationally approved tool to diagnose the Entrepreneur Profile, known as CCE or Entrepreneur Behavioral Characteristics in the scientific context of entrepreneurship, and designed by the United Nations through the EMPRETEC program for research and promotion of entrepreneurship. This research follows the theoretical constructs originally developed by McClelland, about motivational factors and his theory of needs, which have been linked directly to entrepreneurial behavior by the author as he developed his research with business people from different sectors as study subjects. The methodology characterizes the behavior of entrepreneurs by assessing 10 factors associated with the need for achievement, affiliation and power. Results: Students show an emphasis towards achievement as a priority in their higher education.

  17. Correlation of β-catenin expresssion and metastasis in tongue squamous cell carcinoma Correlação da expressão da β-catenina e presença de metástases em carcinoma de células escamosas de língua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseana de Almeida Freitas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It has been reported that the oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC in tongue shows a more infiltrative profile, aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis, which may be related to a higher metastatic potencial. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of β-catenin in OSCC of the tongue and its correlation with tumor metastasis. METHODS: Twenty four cases were selected and divided in two groups: metastatic group (n=12 and non-metastatic group (n=12. A semi-quantitative analysis of the β-catenin expression was performed in the invasive tumor front and cases were graded as follows: negative (score 0, positive (score +, and strongly positive (score ++. RESULTS: It was detected that 33%, 50% and 17% of the cases in metastatic group were scored 0, + and ++, respectively, and the non-metastatic group showed that 42% were scored "0", 33% scored + and 25% scored ++. Statistical analysis showed no diference between the studied groups. CONCLUSIONS: Based on these results, it can be concluded that the immunoexpression of β-catenin does not represent a valuable tool to predict metastatic potencial of OSCC in tongue.OBJETIVO: O carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE quando presente em língua exibe aspecto mais infiltrativo, curso clínico agressivo e prognóstico desfavorável. Tais características podem associar-se com maior potencial metastático. O presente trabalho teve como meta investigar a expressão de β-catenina em CCE de língua e sua relação com o desenvolvimento de metástases. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados 24 casos de CCE em língua e divididos em dois grupos: grupo metastático (n=12 e grupo sem metástase (n=12. Realizou-se uma análise semi-quantitativa da imunoexpressão da β-catenina no fronte invasivo tumoral e sendo considerada como negativa, positiva e fortemente positiva, atribuindo-se os escores, "0", "+" e "++", respectivamente. RESULTADOS: A expressão de β-catenina apresentou, no grupo metast

  18. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebebrand, J.; Hofmann, D.; Reichelt, R.; Schnarr, S.; Knapp, M.; Propping, P.; Foedisch, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist ..beta..-CCE. Additionally, /sup 3/H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values.

  19. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor using an electrode modified with iron pentacyanonitrosylferrate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razmi, H.; Mohammad-Rezaei, R.

    2010-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor was developed for determination of hydrogen peroxide (HP) based on a carbon ceramic electrode modified with iron pentacyanonitrosylferrate (FePCNF). The surface of an iron-doped CCE was derivatized in a solution of PCNF by cycling the electrode potential between -0. 2 and +1. 3 V for about 60 times. The morphology and the composition of the resulting electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared techniques. The electrode displayed excellent response to the electro-oxidation of HP which is linearly related to its concentration in the range from 0. 5 μM to 1300 μM. The detection limit is 0. 4 μM, and the sensitivity is 849 A M -1 cm -2 . The modified electrode was used to determination of HP in hair coloring creams as real samples. (author)

  20. Superconducting microstrip detectors Addendum to proposal DRDC-P-53

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, K; Palmieri, V G; Pretzl, Klaus P; Li, Z; Heijne, Erik H M; Lourenço, C; Niinikoski, T O; Ropotar, I; Sonderegger, P; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, Mara; Pirollo, S; Chapuy, S; Dimcovski, Zlatomir; Bell, W; Smith, K; Berglund, P; Koivuniemi, J H; Valtonen, M J; Mukhanov, O; de Boer, Wim; Grigoriev, E; Heising, S; Casagrande, L; Cindro, V; Mikuz, M; Zavrtanik, M; Da Vià, C; Konorov, I; Paul, S; Buontempo, S; D'Ambrosio, N; Granata, V; Pagano, S; Ruggiero, G; Takada, S; Esposito, A P; Salmi, J; Seppä, H; Suni, I; CERN. Geneva. Detector Research and Development Committee

    1999-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result. Several CERN experiments are potential users of cold radiation hard tracking devices. The first goal of the proposed extension of the RD39 programme is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particu...

  1. Social capital between family businesses and business associations in Celaya, Guanajuato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Contreras Soto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of a comprehensive study on family businesses held in Celaya, Guanajuato Mexico (year 2011 with a sample of 343 interviews with owners or managers responsible. This study examines the specific relationship capital with family businesses with various business associations, as is supposedly the social purpose of these associations. The analysis is based on the open question: Does your business communication with business associations (CCE, COPARMEX, CANACINTRA ...and how they perceive the relationship (positive and / or negative? With it, you want to know what they think micro, small and medium-sized family relationships If there are business associations?, Who or who have such relationships? And do you think of these relationships?. The analysis is based primarily on social capital theory of Bourdieu. The study is mixed, predominantly qualitative and exploratory. An analysis of the various testimonies to quantify and represent the descriptive factors of these relationships.

  2. The CMV early enhancer/chicken beta actin (CAG) promoter can be used to drive transgene expression during the differentiation of murine embryonic stem cells into vascular progenitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexopoulou, Annika N; Couchman, John R; Whiteford, James

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mouse embryonic stem cells cultured in vitro have the ability to differentiate into cells of the three germ layers as well as germ cells. The differentiation mimics early developmental events, including vasculogenesis and early angiogenesis and several differentiation systems are being...... used to identify factors that are important during the formation of the vascular system. Embryonic stem cells are difficult to transfect, while downregulation of promoter activity upon selection of stable transfectants has been reported, rendering the study of proteins by overexpression difficult....... RESULTS: CCE mouse embryonic stem cells were differentiated on collagen type IV for 4-5 days, Flk1+ mesodermal cells were sorted and replated either on collagen type IV in the presence of VEGFA to give rise to endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells or in collagen type I gels for the formation...

  3. Development of cryogenic Si detectors by CERN RD39 Collaboration for ultra radiation hardness in SLHC environment

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Anbinderis, P; Anbinderis, T; D’Ambrosio, N; de Boer, Wim; Borchi, E; Borer, K; Bruzzi, M; Buontempo, S; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Dierlamm, A; Eremin, V; Gaubas, E; Gorbatenko, V; Grigoriev, E; Hauler, F; Heijne, Erik H M; Heising, S; Hempel, O; Herzog, R; Härkönen, J; Ilyashenko, I; Janos, S; Jungermann, L; Kalesinskas, V; Kapturauskas, J; Laiho, R; Luukka, P; Mandic, I; De Masi, R; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Niinikosky, T O; O’Shea, V; Pagano, S; Paul, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Pretzl, K; Rato-Mendes, P; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Smith, K; Sonderegger, P; Sousa, P; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Verbitskaya, E; Vaitkus, J; Wobst, E; Zavrtanik, M

    2007-01-01

    There are two key approaches in our CERN RD 39 Collaboration efforts to obtain ultra-radiation-hard Si detectors: (1) use of the charge/current injection to manipulate the detector internal electric field in such a way that it can be depleted at a modest bias voltage at cryogenic temperature range (150 K), and (2) freezing out of the trapping centers that affects the CCE at cryogenic temperatures lower than that of the liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In our first approach, we have developed the advanced radiation hard detectors using charge or current injection, the current injected diodes (CID). In a CID, the electric field is controlled by injected current, which is limited by the space charge, yielding a nearly uniform electric field in the detector, independent of the radiation fluence. In our second approach, we have developed models of radiation-induced trapping levels and the physics of their freezing out at cryogenic temperatures.

  4. Transforming cold chain performance and management in lower-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brison, Mike; LeTallec, Yann

    2017-04-19

    In many countries, one of the common factors limiting full and equitable access to effective immunization is the existence of gaps in cold chain and logistics (CCL) systems. This article focuses on the critical contribution that better management of CCL performance can make in addressing these barriers, as well as some essential practices needed to achieve and sustain these gains. These include (i) an emphasis on continuous improvement in CCL performance indicators, (ii) strong coordination and accountability across multiple stakeholders, and (iii) making the most of limited financial resources. This article is informed by the Clinton Health Access Initiative's (CHAI's) experience working with National Immunization Programs (NIPs) and immunization partners to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of CCL systems (including CCE deployment and maintenance, temperature monitoring and control, stock management and distribution) across ten Gavi-supported "focus" countries. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from cellulosic fibers during the cold caustic extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Hu, Huichao; Li, Hailong; Huang, Liulian; Chen, Lihui; Ni, Yonghao

    2017-06-01

    The effective separation of hemicelluloses and cellulose is desirable for the production of high-purity cellulose, which is a sustainable raw material for many value-added applications. For this purpose, the kinetics and mechanism of hemicelluloses removal from the cold caustic extraction (CCE) were investigated in the present study. The hemicelluloses removal process consists of: 1) the bulk phase, characteristic of significant hemicelluloses removal; 2) the transition phase, hemicelluloses transferring from the inner to the outer region of the fiber wall, with negligible overall hemicelluloses removal; 3) the residual phase, presenting a weak but continuing hemicelluloses removal. Furthermore, the enzymatic peeling method was adopted to study the fundamentals of hemicelluloses removal. The results showed that the molecular weight of hemicelluloses is the main parameter governing their diffusion/dissolution processes, and that the low molecular weight hemicelluloses are preferentially removed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic pulsations from 0.1 to 4.0 Hz and associated plasma properties in the earth's subsolar magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    AMPTE CCE magnetic field data acquired during periods of magnetospheric compressions when the spacecraft sampled the magnetosheath are analyzed on the basis of a dynamic spectral analysis covering frequencies 0.1 to 4.0 Hz. Ion and electron data are used to identify regions, to monitor the upstream shock geometry, and to evaluate moments of the proton distribution. Fourteen encounters representing 46 hr of observations are analyzed. A compilation of the temporal sequence of spectral structures shows that electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves occur next to the magnetopause, while mirror waves occur outside the region of EMIC waves. It is concluded that there is a close relationship between EMIC waves in the sheath and the plasma depletion layer. For quasi-parallel upstream conditions, the magnetic field power spectra often exhibit no band limited structures but only broadband noise.

  7. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U13391-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 587_82( CP000587 |pid:none) Ostreococcus lucimarinus CCE9901 ... 43 0.004 AY092033_1( AY092033 |pid:none) Homo sapiens NALP3 interm...3015498109 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-35-01-01-1... 46 0.91 1 ( DU327579 ) 1098473610927 CHORI-243 Ovis aries ...018 2 ( AC188370 ) Glycine max clone gmp1-120k16, complete sequence. 50 0.058 1 ( ER548246 ) 1093016198016 Global-Ocean-Sampli... DKEY-258P11 in ... 38 0.97 3 ( EJ508572 ) 1095407031867 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-28-01-01-1... 40 1.0 2 ( E...R418890 ) 1092963689437 Global-Ocean-Sampling_GS-35-01-01-1... 36 1.1 3 ( CR450742 ) Zebrafish DNA sequence

  8. Trip Report of Field Search for Exercise Desert Rock Documentation Conducted by Representatives of The Adjutant General 18 June 1978 to 14 July 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-04

    2 Army Field Forces Doard Number 2 2 Army Field Forces Board Number 3 2 Army Field Forces Board Nutbor 4 2 A" Liaison Orficur, Sandia Base, Neav ...FORD WILLIAM 0 CCIE58572 AF %_COCCCOO2gC FOX RICt-ARC K CCE74191C ti P _COCCCOOe62 FCX RICh-ARC K CC’,74191C N’ ICOCCCOOE63 FRASER CONALU M CCC33...eC44 N v cocoCCS0G~8 FRASER Mi~AL1 M CCC33044N .~ It OCCCOOS07_.- FRtSER CIONALE 14 CCIC39912 rhP vCCCCCOO0O-1 UFRASER CONALC_4 M CC7C3992 N viP

  9. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Lei; Miller, Don

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  10. Cryogenic Tracking Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Luukka, P R; Tuominen, E M; Mikuz, M

    2002-01-01

    The recent advances in Si and diamond detector technology give hope of a simple solution to the radiation hardness problem for vertex trackers at the LHC. In particular, we have recently demonstrated that operating a heavily irradiated Si detector at liquid nitrogen (LN$_2$) temperature results in significant recovery of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE). Among other potential benefits of operation at cryogenic temperatures are the use of large low-resistivity wafers, simple processing, higher and faster electrical signal because of higher mobility and drift velocity of carriers, and lower noise of the readout circuit. A substantial reduction in sensor cost could result The first goal of the approved extension of the RD39 program is to demonstrate that irradiation at low temperature in situ during operation does not affect the results obtained so far by cooling detectors which were irradiated at room temperature. In particular we shall concentrate on processes and materials that could significantly reduce th...

  11. Coupling of CORINAIR Data to Cost-effective Emission Reduction Strategies Based on Critical Thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, M.; Guardans, R.; Lindstrom, M.

    1999-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop held by the participants in the EU/LIFE project: Coupling of CORINAIR data to cost-effective emission reduction strategies based on critical thresholds. The project participants include FEI, Filand, NERI, Denmark, CIEMAT, Spain, Lund Univ. Sweden. EMEP/MSC-W, UN/ECE/WGE/CCE and IIASA. The main objective of the project is to support national activities in assessing the spatial and temporal details of emissions of sulphur, nitrogen oxides, ammonium and volatile organic compounds and the impacts of acidification, eutrophication and ground level ozone. The reproject workshop enabled participants to report preliminary results of the two main tasks, emissions and impacts and to agree on common solutions for the final results. (Author) 11 refs

  12. Determination and Distribution of Critical Loads: Application to the Forest Soils in the Autonomous Region of Madrid; Determinacion y Distribucion de Cargas Criticas: Aplicacion a los Suelos forestales de la comunidad Autonoma de Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, M.; Schmid, T.; Rabago, I. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The critical loads of acidity and sulphur have been determined for forest soils within the north and north-west of the Autonomous Region of Madrid. The SMB-CCE and SMB-PROFILE Steady state models have been applied using a 1 km x 1 km resolution. the forest ecosystems have been characterised according to the soil and forest type, slope and climatic data using a Geographic Information System. In order to estimate the critical loads, processes such as weathering rate of the parent material, atmospheric deposition, critical alkalinity leaching rate and nutrients absorbed by the vegetation have been considered. In general the forest soils present high critical load values for acidity and sulphur. The more sensitive zones are found in the north of the Sierra of Guadarrama. Independent of the applied methods, the results are associated to the types of soils where Leptosols have the lowest. Cambisoles and Regosoles intermediate and luvisoles the most elevated values. (Author) 40 refs.

  13. MELODIE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Mejon-Goula, M.J.; Cernes, A.; Goblet, P.

    1989-01-01

    In order to perform the safety evaluation of nuclear waste repositories, a global model, called MELODIE, is currently being developed at the CEA/IPSN, in collaboration with other CEA teams and ENSMP (Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris). The version now in operation allows the assessment of the radiological consequences due to a repository located in a granitic formation for a period of several hundred thousands of years. After a general description of MELODIE, the authors present what has been done with it, mainly the calculations performed in the PAGIS (CCE) exercise: global dose calculations and ranking of the most important parameters through the sensitivity analysis. They also note the studies performed with the geosphere module of MELODIE (METIS), especially the participation to the HYDROCOIN (OECD/NEA) exercise. In addition, the main future development axes of MELODIE are outlined

  14. Determination and Distribution of Critical Loads: Application to the Forest Soils in the Autonomous Region of Madrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, M.; Schmid, T.; Rabago, I.

    2000-01-01

    The critical loads of acidity and sulphur have been determined for forest soils within the north and northwest of the Autonomous Region of Madrid. The SMB-CCE and SMB-PROFILE steady state models have been applied using a 1 km x 1 km resolution. The forest ecosystems have been characterised according to the soil and forest type, slope and climatic data using a Geographic Information System. In order to estimate the critical loads, processes such as weathering rate of the parent material, atmospheric deposition. critical alkalinity leaching rate and nutrients absorbed by the vegetation have been considered. In general the forest soils present high critical load values for acidity and sulphur. The more sensitive zones are found in the north of the Sierra of Guadarrama. Independent of the applied methods, the results are associated to the types of soils where Leptosols have the lowest, Cambisoles and Regosoles intermediate and Luvisoles the most elevated values. (Author) 40 refs

  15. A systematic workflow process for heavy oil characterization : experimental techniques and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memon, A.I.; Gao, J.; Taylor, S.D.; Davies, T.L.; Jia, N. [Schlumberger, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Fluid characterization of heavy oil and bitumen is necessary when choosing the best extraction, production, and processing methods. High viscosity, low API, low saturation pressure, and low gas to oil ratios impose challenges in measuring fluid properties of heavy oil. This paper summarized the heavy oil fluid characterization technique that includes fluid sample handling, PVT analysis, fluid viscosity, emulsion and rheology, slow kinetics of gas evolution during constant composition expansion (CCE) experiments, solvent solubility, steam stripping, and high temperature vapor-liquid equilibrium of oil-solvent-steam systems. The paper also proposed a heavy oil characterization workflow to address a broad range of heavy oil production scenarios, including cold depletion, steam flow and heavy oil flow assurance. The workflow was based on various experimental techniques and challenges facing heavy oil sample preparation. Fluid property measurement requirements for each production technique were also compiled. 16 refs., 13 figs.

  16. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for rapid diagnosis and differentiation of parapoxvirus and orthopoxvirus infections in camels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalafalla, A.I.; Buettner, M.; Rziha, H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Rapid identification and differentiation of camel pox (CMP) and camel contagious ecthyma (CCE) were achieved by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers that distinguish Orthopoxvirus (OPV) and Parapovirus (PPV). Forty scab specimens collected from sick camels and sheep were treated by 3 different DNA extraction procedures and examined by PCR. The sensitivity of the PCR was compared with that of electron microscopy and virus isolation in cell culture. Procedure 1, in which viral DNA was extracted directly from scab specimens followed by PCR, proved to be superior and more sensitive. Procedure 2 enables a fast specific diagnosis of PPV and OPV infections directly from scab materials without the need for DNA extraction. These assays provide a rapid and feasible alternative to electron microscopy and virus isolation. (author)

  17. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  18. Application of advanced computing techniques to the analysis and display of space science measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpar, D. M.; Lapolla, M. V.; Horblit, B.

    1995-01-01

    A prototype system has been developed to aid the experimental space scientist in the display and analysis of spaceborne data acquired from direct measurement sensors in orbit. We explored the implementation of a rule-based environment for semi-automatic generation of visualizations that assist the domain scientist in exploring one's data. The goal has been to enable rapid generation of visualizations which enhance the scientist's ability to thoroughly mine his data. Transferring the task of visualization generation from the human programmer to the computer produced a rapid prototyping environment for visualizations. The visualization and analysis environment has been tested against a set of data obtained from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment on the AMPTE/CCE satellite creating new visualizations which provided new insight into the data.

  19. Transcriptome Profiling and Genetic Study Reveal Amplified Carboxylesterase Genes Implicated in Temephos Resistance, in the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Grigoraki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of Aedes albopictus, a major vector for viral diseases, such as dengue fever and chikungunya, has been largely reliant on the use of the larvicide temephos for many decades. This insecticide remains a primary control tool for several countries and it is a potential reliable reserve, for emergency epidemics or new invasion cases, in regions such as Europe which have banned its use. Resistance to temephos has been detected in some regions, but the mechanism responsible for the trait has not been investigated.Temephos resistance was identified in an Aedes albopictus population isolated from Greece, and subsequently selected in the laboratory for a few generations. Biochemical assays suggested the association of elevated carboxylesterases (CCE, but not target site resistance (altered AChE, with this phenotype. Illumina transcriptomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of three transcripts encoding CCE genes in the temephos resistant strain. CCEae3a and CCEae6a showed the most striking up-regulation (27- and 12-folds respectively, compared to the reference susceptible strain; these genes have been previously shown to be involved in temephos resistance also in Ae. aegypti. Gene amplification was associated with elevated transcription levels of both CCEae6a and CCEae3a genes. Genetic crosses confirmed the genetic link between CCEae6a and CCEae3a amplification and temephos resistance, by demonstrating a strong association between survival to temephos exposure and gene copy numbers in the F2 generation. Other transcripts, encoding cytochrome P450s, UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs, cuticle and lipid biosynthesis proteins, were upregulated in resistant mosquitoes, indicating that the co-evolution of multiple mechanisms might contribute to resistance.The identification of specific genes associated with insecticide resistance in Ae. albopictus for the first time is an important pre-requirement for insecticide resistance management. The genomic

  20. Background-Oriented Schlieren used in a hypersonic inlet test at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle; Woike, Mark; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Oriented Schlieren (BOS) is a derivative of the classical schlieren technology, which is used to visualize density gradients, such as shock wave structures in a wind tunnel. Changes in refractive index resulting from density gradients cause light rays to bend, resulting in apparent motion of a random background pattern. The apparent motion of the pattern is determined using cross-correlation algorithms (between no-flow and with-flow image pairs) producing a schlieren-like image. One advantage of BOS is its simplified setup which enables a larger field-of-view (FOV) than traditional schlieren systems. In the present study, BOS was implemented into the Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LIMX) in the 10x10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. The model hardware for the CCE LIMX accommodates a fully integrated turbine based combined cycle propulsion system. To date, inlet mode transition between turbine and ramjet operation has been successfully demonstrated. High-speed BOS was used to visualize the behavior of the flow structures shock waves during unsteady inlet unstarts, a phenomenon known as buzz. Transient video images of inlet buzz were recorded for both the ramjet flow path (high speed inlet) and turbine flow path (low speed inlet). To understand the stability limits of the inlet, operation was pushed to the point of unstart and buzz. BOS was implemented in order to view both inlets simultaneously, since the required FOV was beyond the capability of the current traditional schlieren system. An example of BOS data (Images 1-6) capturing inlet buzz are presented.

  1. Induction of hepatocyte-like cells from mouse embryonic stem cells by lentivirus-mediated constitutive expression of Foxa2/Hnf4a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Shichang; Xiang, Dedong; Wang, Yingjie

    2013-11-01

    Hepatocytes can be generated from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) using inducers such as chemical compounds and cytokines, but issues related to low differentiation efficiencies remain to be resolved. Recent work has shown that overexpression of lineage-specific transcription factors can directly cause cells phenotypic changes, including differentiation, trans-differentiation, and de-differentiation. We hypothesized that lentivirus-mediated constitutive expression of forkhead box A2 (Foxa2) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (Hnf4a) could promote inducing mouse ESCs to hepatocyte-likes cells. First, ESC lines that stably expressed Foxa2, Hnf4a, or Foxa2/Hnf4a were constructed via lentiviral expression vectors. Second, observations of cell morphology changes were made during the cell culture process, followed by experiments examining teratoma formation. Then, the effects of constitutive expression of Foxa2 and Hnf4a on hepatic differentiation and maturation were determined by measuring the marker gene expression levels of Albumin, α-fetoprotein, Cytokeratin18, and α1-antitrypsin. The results indicate that constitutive expression of Foxa2 and Hnf4a does not affect ESCs culture, teratoma formation, or the expression levels of the specific hepatocyte genes under autonomous differentiation. However, with some assistance from inducing factors, Foxa2 significantly increased the hepatic differentiation of ESCs, whereas the expression of Hnf4a alone or Foxa2/Hnf4a could not. Differentiated CCE-Foxa2 cells were more superior in expressing several liver-specific markers and protein, storing glycogen than differentiated CCE cells. Therefore, our method employing the transduction of Foxa2 would be a valuable tool for the efficient generation of functional hepatocytes derived from ESCs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hypoxia in high-resolution sediment records: reconstructing the California Current Oxygen Minimum Zone on multi-decadal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, S. E.; Hill, T. M.

    2012-12-01

    The recent deglaciation event is an ideal laboratory to study the rapid expansion of Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) and the ecological ramifications of such events. Santa Barbara Basin (SBB) sediments are high-resolution archives of seafloor ecosystems, recording both global-scale climate and regional-scale hydrographic events. Seafloor hypoxia in the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) is caused by OMZs in intermediate water depths (300-1200 m), and produces striking evidence in SBB sediment archives. We construct a vertical transect of proxies across SBB (34° 15'N, 119° 45'W) using a core from 418 m water depth (MV0811-15JC), and previously investigated cores from 440 m (MD02-2504) and 570 m (MD02-2503) water depths. Benthic foraminiferal assemblages and planktonic δ18O proxies were quantified at all three depths, while benthic invertebrate communities were quantified in the shallowest core at a 1-cm resolution (~10 years). This high-resolution invertebrate record provides a window into rapid, decadal-scale environmental change in continental margin ecosystems. Seafloor biodiversity is highly variable on 10-10^4 year timescales (across Protist, Mollusc, Arthropod and Echinoderm taxonomic groups), and is tightly coupled to both regional-scale environmental change and global-scale climate events. Additionally, we provide evidence that strongly hypoxic waters shoaled to 150 m on multi-decadal timescales. These data confirm that OMZs have rapidly expanded in the CCE during previous events of global-scale warming, and that continental margin seafloor biodiversity is variable on previously undescribed timescales.

  3. A new method to determine the water activity and the net isosteric heats of sorption for low moisture foods at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadapaneni, Ravi Kiran; Yang, Ren; Carter, Brady; Tang, Juming

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, research studies have shown that the thermal resistance of foodborne pathogens in the low moisture foods is greatly influenced by the water activity (a w ) at temperatures relevant to thermal treatments for pathogen control. Yet, there has been a lack of an effective method for accurate measurement of a w at those temperatures. Thus, the main aim of this study was to evaluate a new method for measuring a w of food samples at elevated temperatures. An improved thermal cell with a relative humidity and temperature sensor was used to measure the a w of the three different food samples, namely, organic wheat flour, almond flour, and non-fat milk powder, over the temperature range between 20 and 80°C. For a constant moisture content, the a w data was used to estimate the net isosteric heat of sorption (q st ). The q st values were then used in the Clausius Clapeyron equation (CCE) equation to estimate the moisture sorption isotherm for all test food samples at different temperatures. For all the tested samples of any fixed moisture content, a w value generally increased with the temperature. The energy for sorption decreased with increasing moisture content. With the experimentally determined q st value, CCE describes well about the changes in a w of the food samples between 20 and 80°C. This study presents a method to obtain a w of a food sample for a specific moisture content at different temperatures which could be extended to obtain q st values for different moisture contents and hence, the moisture sorption isotherm of a food sample at different temperatures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Restoration Science in New York Harbor: It takes a (large, diverse and engaged) village

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, R.; Birney, L.; Janis, S.; Groome, M.; Palmer, M.; Bone, E.; O'Neil, J. M.; Hill, J.; Dennison, W.; Malinowski, P.; Kohne, L.; Molina, M.; Moore, G.; Woods, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Curriculum + Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (CCE-RS) facilitates partnerships between scientists and middle school educators on ecological restoration and environmental monitoring projects. The educational model is designed to wrap around the student, including classroom instruction, field science, after-school programs and engagement with the student's community. Its pillars include: a teacher training fellowship at Pace University, student curriculum, a digital platform, afterschool and summer mentoring, and community exhibits. The digital platform includes a tablet app tailored to the project's field protocols and linked to a database shared across schools and partnering institutions. Through the digital platform, data is integrated into a single citizen-science monitoring project, teachers share curriculum and best practices, and students link directly to their peers at other schools. Curriculum development has been collaborative between scientists, science education specialists, and secondary school teachers. The CCE-RS is rooted in project-based learning: the New York Harbor School has engaged high school students in environmental monitoring and oyster restoration in the Harbor for about the last decade. The science partners (U. of Maryland and Columbia) have been working with students and other citizen scientists in outdoor science over about the last decade. Local partners in outside-the-classroom education include the New York Academy of Sciences, The River Project, which will provide field education services, and Good Shepherd Services, which provides after-school programming in schools serving primarily poor families. Scientists on the project engage directly with teachers and informal educators in curriculum development and citizen-science outreach. We present the lessons learned from our first cohort of Fellows, the pedagogical model, and the digital platform, which is extensible to other ecological restoration settings.

  5. Little evidence of a role for the α1GABAA subunit-containing receptor in a rhesus monkey model of alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Eileen K; Moran, Casey; Sirbu, Madelynn H; Szafir, Melissa; Van Linn, Michael; Namjoshi, Ojas; Phani Babu Tiruveedhula, V V N; Cook, James M; Platt, Donna M

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol potentiates GABAergic neurotransmission via action at the GABAA receptor. α1 subunit-containing GABAA receptors have been implicated as mediators, in part, of the behavioral and abuse-related effects of alcohol in rodents. We systematically investigated the effects of 1 α1-preferring benzodiazepine agonist, zolpidem, and 2 antagonists, β-carboline-3-carboxylate-tert-butyl ester (βCCT) and 3-propoxy-β-carboline hydrochloride (3-PBC), on oral self-administration of alcohol (2% w/v) or sucrose solution and observable behavior in rhesus macaques. We compared these effects to those of the nonselective benzodiazepine agonist triazolam, antagonist flumazenil, and inverse agonist β-carboline carboxylate (βCCE). Alcohol and sucrose solutions maintained reliable baseline drinking behavior across the study. The α1-preferring compounds did not affect intake, number of sipper extensions, or blood alcohol levels (BALs) at any of the doses tested. Zolpidem, βCCT, and 3-PBC increased latency to first sipper extension in animals self-administering alcohol, but not sucrose, solution. Triazolam exerted biphasic effects on alcohol-drinking behavior, increasing intake at low doses but decreasing BAL and increasing latency at higher doses. At doses higher than those effective in alcohol-drinking animals, triazolam increased sucrose intake and latency. Flumazenil nonsystematically increased number of extensions for alcohol but decreased BAL, with no effects on sucrose drinking. βCCE decreased sipper extensions for alcohol and increased latency for first sucrose sipper extension, but full dose-effect relationships could not be determined due to seizures at higher doses. Alcohol-drinking animals appeared more sensitive to the effects of GABAergic compounds on drinking behavior. However, these results do not support a strong contribution of α1GABAA receptors to the reinforcing effects of alcohol in primates. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  6. Calibration of a liquid scintillation counter for alpha, beta and Cerenkov counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarpitta, S.C.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1996-07-01

    Calibration data are presented for 25 radionuclides that were individually measured in a Packard Tri-Carb 2250CA liquid scintillation (LS) counter by both conventional and Cerenkov detection techniques. The relationships and regression data between the quench indicating parameters and the LS counting efficiencies were determined using microliter amounts of tracer added to low 40 K borosilicate glass vials containing 15 mL of Insta-Gel XF scintillation cocktail. Using 40 K, the detection efficiencies were linear over a three order of magnitude range (10 - 10,000 mBq) in beta activity for both LS and Cerenkov counting. The Cerenkov counting efficiency (CCE) increased linearly (42% per MeV) from 0.30 to 2.0 MeV, whereas the LS efficiency was >90% for betas with energy in excess of 0.30 MeV. The CCE was 20 - 50% less than the LS counting efficiency for beta particles with maximum energies in excess of 1 MeV. Based on replicate background measurements, the lower limit of detection (LLD) for a 1-h count at the 95% confidence level, using water as a solvent, was 0.024 counts sec- -1 and 0.028 counts sec-1 for plastic and glass vials, respectively. The LLD for a 1-h-count ranged from 46 to 56 mBq (2.8 - 3.4 dpm) for both Cerenkov and conventional LS counting. This assumes: (1) a 100% counting efficiency, (2) a 50% yield of the nuclide of interest, (3) a 1-h measurement time using low background plastic vials, and (4) a 0-50 keV region of interest. The LLD is reduced an order of magnitude when the yield recovery exceeds 90% and a lower background region is used (i.e., 100 - 500 keV alpha region of interest). Examples and applications of both Cerenkov and LS counting techniques are given in the text and appendices

  7. Metabolic regulation analysis of an ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain based on RT-PCR and enzymatic activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A metabolic regulation study was performed, based upon measurements of enzymatic activities, fermentation performance, and RT-PCR analysis of pathways related to central carbon metabolism, in an ethanologenic Escherichia coli strain (CCE14 derived from lineage C. In comparison with previous engineered strains, this E coli derivative has a higher ethanol production rate in mineral medium, as a result of the elevated heterologous expression of the chromosomally integrated genes encoding PDCZm and ADHZm (pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase from Zymomonas mobilis. It is suggested that this behavior might be due to lineage differences between E. coli W and C. Results This study demonstrated that the glycolytic flux is controlled, in this case, by reactions outside glycolysis, i.e., the fermentative pathways. Changes in ethanol production rate in this ethanologenic strain result in low organic acid production rates, and high glycolytic and ethanologenic fluxes, that correlate with enhanced transcription and enzymatic activity levels of PDCZm and ADHZm. Furthermore, a higher ethanol yield (90% of the theoretical in glucose-mineral media was obtained with CCE14 in comparison with previous engineered E. coli strains, such as KO11, that produces a 70% yield under the same conditions. Conclusion Results suggest that a higher ethanol formation rate, caused by ahigher PDCZm and ADHZm activities induces a metabolic state that cells compensate through enhanced glucose transport, ATP synthesis, and NAD-NADH+H turnover rates. These results show that glycolytic enzymatic activities, present in E. coli W and C under fermentative conditions, are sufficient to contend with increases in glucose consumption and product formation rates.

  8. EFFECTS OF XYLAN IN EUCALYPTUS PULP PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Moreira Barbosa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The search for a better use of wood in the pulp industry has fuelled interest in a more rational use of its components, particularly xylans. The impact of xylans removal and of xylans redeposition on pulp properties for tissue and P&W paper grades are discussed in this paper. Kraft pulp (15.6% xylans treatment with 10-70 g.L-1 NaOH resulted in pulps of 14.5-5.9% xylans. The treatments decreased pulp lignin and HexA contents and caused significant positive impact on subsequent oxygen delignification and ECF bleaching. Xylan removal decreased pulp beatability, water retention value and tensile index but increased drainability, water absorption capacity, capillarity Klemm and bulk. Overall, xylan depleted pulps showed almost ideal properties for tissue paper grade pulps. In a second step of the research, xylans extracted from unbleached (BXL and bleached eucalyptus pulps (WXL by cold caustic extraction (CCE were added to a commercial brown pulp in the oxygen delignification (O-stage and further bleached. Xylans deposition occurred at variable degree (up to 7% on pulp weight depending upon the O-stage reaction pH. Pulp bleachability was not impaired by WXL xylan deposition but slightly negatively affected by BXL xylans. Pulp beatability was improved by xylan deposition. The deposited xylans were quite stable across bleaching and beating, with the WXL xylans being more stable than the BXL ones. At low energy consumption, the deposited xylans improved pulp physical and mechanical properties. Xylans extraction by CCE with subsequent deposition onto pulp in the O-stage proved attractive for manufacturing high xylan P&W paper grades.

  9. Characteristics of oral squamous cell carcinoma in users or non users of tobacco and alcohol = Características do carcinoma bucal de células escamosas em usuários ou não usuários de tabaco e álcool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheidt, Juliana Hintz Germanos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available O tabaco e o álcool são os principais fatores etiológicos extrínsecos associados à gênese do carcinoma bucal de células escamosas (CCE, mas não está claro se estes fatores interferem nas características clínico-patológicas, moleculares ou no prognóstico da doença. No presente estudo, essas características foram revisadas, estabelecendo-se comparações entre as lesões de pacientes usuários ou não de tabaco e álcool. Observou-se que carcinomas bucais de não fumantes e não etilistas ocorrem, preferencialmente, em pacientes do sexo feminino, em faixa etária inferior a 50 ou superior 70 anos. Neste grupo de indivíduos, as lesões tendem a ser menos agressivas e apresentam melhor prognóstico. O tabagismo e o etilismo também parecem influenciar as características moleculares do carcinoma bucal, uma vez que mutações da proteína p53 nas lesões têm sido associadas a esses fatores de risco. A compreensão das diferenças entre os CCE bucais desses dois grupos de pacientes pode contribuir para uma melhor abordagem e avanços no desenvolvimento de medidas terapêuticas mais adequadas frente a esta neoplasia

  10. Characterization of an antennal carboxylesterase from the pest moth Spodoptera littoralis degrading a host plant odorant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Durand

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Carboxyl/cholinesterases (CCEs are highly diversified in insects. These enzymes have a broad range of proposed functions, in neuro/developmental processes, dietary detoxification, insecticide resistance or hormone/pheromone degradation. As few functional data are available on purified or recombinant CCEs, the physiological role of most of these enzymes is unknown. Concerning their role in olfaction, only two CCEs able to metabolize sex pheromones have been functionally characterized in insects. These enzymes are only expressed in the male antennae, and secreted into the lumen of the pheromone-sensitive sensilla. CCEs able to hydrolyze other odorants than sex pheromones, such as plant volatiles, have not been identified.In Spodoptera littoralis, a major crop pest, a diversity of antennal CCEs has been previously identified. We have employed here a combination of molecular biology, biochemistry and electrophysiology approaches to functionally characterize an intracellular CCE, SlCXE10, whose predominant expression in the olfactory sensilla suggested a role in olfaction. A recombinant protein was produced using the baculovirus system and we tested its catabolic properties towards a plant volatile and the sex pheromone components.We showed that SlCXE10 could efficiently hydrolyze a green leaf volatile and to a lesser extent the sex pheromone components. The transcript level in male antennae was also strongly induced by exposure to this plant odorant. In antennae, SlCXE10 expression was associated with sensilla responding to the sex pheromones and to plant odours. These results suggest that a CCE-based intracellular metabolism of odorants could occur in insect antennae, in addition to the extracellular metabolism occurring within the sensillar lumen. This is the first functional characterization of an Odorant-Degrading Enzyme active towards a host plant volatile.

  11. Isolation of hemopoietic stem cell subsets from murine bone marrow: II. Evidence for an early precursor of day-12 CFU-S and cells associated with radioprotective ability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploemacher, R.E.; Brons, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with plastic adherence and fluorescence-activated cell sorting were used consecutively to enrich functionally different subpopulations of pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) from mouse bone marrow. The nonadherent CCE fractions were labeled with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and sorted according to differences in fluorescence within various windows on the basis of forward (FLS) and perpendicular (PLS) light scatter. The sorted cells were then assayed for their (1) in vivo colony-forming ability (day-7 and day-12 spleen colony-forming units [CFU-S]), (2) radioprotective ability (RPA; 30-day survival), and (3) their ability to repopulate the bone marrow or spleen over a 13-day period with day-12 CFU-S, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM), nucleated cells, or cells associated with RPA. The highest incidence of day-12 CFU-S and cells with RPA was obtained by sorting the most WGA-positive cells with relatively high PLS (enrichment, 50- to 200-fold), lowering the effective dose (ED 50/30) to an average of 80 cells. The separative procedure enabled hemopoietic stem cells that repopulate both bone marrow and spleen with secondary RPA cells, CFU-S-12, and CFU-GM to be enriched and separated from part of the RPA cells, CFU-S-12, and cells that reconstitute the cellularity of bone marrow and spleen. These data suggest that cells generating both day-12 CFU-S and RPA cells differ from day-12 CFU-S and RPA cells themselves on the basis of PLS characteristics and affinity for WGA. Such early stem cells have also been detected in sorted fractions meeting the FLS/PLS characteristics of lymphocytes

  12. Bulk enrichment of transplantable hemopoietic stem cell subsets from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated murine spleen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploemacher, R.E.; Brons, R.H.; Leenen, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Counterflow centrifugal elutriation (CCE) in combination with density flotation centrifugation and fluorescence-activated cell sorting on wheat-germ agglutinin-FITC(WGA)-binding cells within the light-scatter ''blast window'' were used consecutively to enrich pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) in bulk from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated mouse spleen. The medium-to-strong WGA + ve fraction contained 3.10(6) cells isolated from 3-4 X 10(9) spleen cells, with an average of 126% day-12 CFU-S and 65% day-8 CFU-S as calculated on the basis of their seeding fraction, suggesting that virtually all cells represented in vivo macroscopic colony formers. In view of the large differences reported elsewhere between stem cell subsets differing in reconstitutive capacity and secondary stem cell generation ability, we also studied various isolated cell fractions with respect to spleen colony formation, radioprotective ability, and spleen- and marrow- repopulating ability. Day-8 and day-12 CFU-S copurified when isolated by CCE. Cells from a fraction with high affinity for WGA were most highly enriched for their radioprotective ability (RPA) and their ability to repopulate the cellularity of the spleen and femur of irradiated recipients. This fraction contained virtually pure day-12 CFU-S. However, the ability to generate secondary day-12 CFU-S and CFU-GM in irradiated organs was enriched most in the medium WGA + ve cell fraction. MRA and SRA, according to the latter criteria, could therefore be partly separated from day-12 CFU-S and RPA on the basis of affinity for WGA. The data strongly suggest that at least part of all day-12 CFU-S have a high potential to proliferate and differentiate into mature progeny, but a relatively low self-renewal ability, and may therefore not be representative of the genuine stem cell

  13. Review and analysis of strengths and weaknesses of agro-ecosystem models for simulating C and N fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilli, Lorenzo; Bechini, Luca; Bindi, Marco; Carozzi, Marco; Cavalli, Daniele; Conant, Richard; Dorich, Cristopher D; Doro, Luca; Ehrhardt, Fiona; Farina, Roberta; Ferrise, Roberto; Fitton, Nuala; Francaviglia, Rosa; Grace, Peter; Iocola, Ileana; Klumpp, Katja; Léonard, Joël; Martin, Raphaël; Massad, Raia Silvia; Recous, Sylvie; Seddaiu, Giovanna; Sharp, Joanna; Smith, Pete; Smith, Ward N; Soussana, Jean-Francois; Bellocchi, Gianni

    2017-11-15

    Biogeochemical simulation models are important tools for describing and quantifying the contribution of agricultural systems to C sequestration and GHG source/sink status. The abundance of simulation tools developed over recent decades, however, creates a difficulty because predictions from different models show large variability. Discrepancies between the conclusions of different modelling studies are often ascribed to differences in the physical and biogeochemical processes incorporated in equations of C and N cycles and their interactions. Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modelling agricultural (crop and grassland) systems. In order to carry out this study, we selected the range of biogeochemical models used by the CN-MIP consortium of FACCE-JPI (http://www.faccejpi.com): APSIM, CERES-EGC, DayCent, DNDC, DSSAT, EPIC, PaSim, RothC and STICS. In our analysis, these models were assessed for the quality and comprehensiveness of underlying processes related to pedo-climatic conditions and management practices, but also with respect to time and space of application, and for their accuracy in multiple contexts. Overall, it emerged that there is a possible impact of ill-defined pedo-climatic conditions in the unsatisfactory performance of the models (46.2%), followed by limitations in the algorithms simulating the effects of management practices (33.1%). The multiplicity of scales in both time and space is a fundamental feature, which explains the remaining weaknesses (i.e. 20.7%). Innovative aspects have been identified for future development of C and N models. They include the explicit representation of soil microbial biomass to drive soil organic matter turnover, the effect of N shortage on SOM decomposition, the improvements related to the production and consumption of gases and an adequate simulations of gas transport in soil. On these bases, the assessment of trends and gaps in the modelling approaches currently employed to

  14. Seasonal herbicide monitoring in soil, runoff and sediments of an olive orchard under conventional tillage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Maria Jesus; de Luna, Elena; Gómez, José Alfonso; Cornejo, Juan; Hermosín, M. Carmen

    2015-04-01

    Acknowledgments: P08-AGR-03643, P11-AGR-7400, JA (AGR-264) partially finnanced with FEDER-FSE (OP 2007-13).and FACCE-JPI (Designchar4food).

  15. Biochar reduces efficiency of nitrification inhibitor 3,4-dymethylpyrazole phospate (DMPP) mitigating N2O emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes-Mendizábal, Teresa; Huérfano, Ximena; Menéndez, Sergio; González-Murua, Carmen; Begoña González-Moro, Mª; Ippolito, James; Kamann, Claudia; Wrage-Mönnig, Nicole; Borchard, Nils; Cayuela, Maria Luz; Spokas, Kurt; Sigua, Gilbert; Novak, Jeff; Estavillo, José Mª

    2017-04-01

    induced by DMPP was less than without biochar. This study demonstrates that the biochar amendment diminishes the efficiency of the nitrification inhibitor DMPP both at low and high soil water contents. Aknowledgements: FACCE-CSA n° 276610/MIT04-DESIGN-UPVASC; AGL2015-64582-C3-2-R MINECO/FEDER; IT-932-16.

  16. Climate Change Education on Public Health Consequences and Impacts to the Human System - An Interdisciplinary Approach to Promoting Climate Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella Novak, M.; Paxton, L. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this talk we will discuss our approach to translating an abstract, difficult to internalize idea ("climate change") into knowledge that speaks to people directly in terms of their own lives. Recent research suggests that communicating climate change in the context of public health impacts, and even national security risks, is a more effective method of reaching communities that are currently disengaged or nonresponsive to climate change science than the approaches currently being used. Understanding that these new perspectives might reach a broader audience, the Global Assimilation of Information for Action (GAIA) project has proposed implementing a suite of education activities that focus on the public health consequences that will arise and/or becoming exacerbated by climate change. Reaching the disparate communities that must be brought together to create a workable approach is challenging. GAIA has developed a novel framework for sharing information and developing communities of interest that cross boundaries in what is otherwise a highly disciplinary approach to climate change studies. Members of the GAIA community include climate change, environmental and public health experts, as well as relevant stakeholders, policy makers and decision makers. By leveraging the existing expertise within the GAIA community, an opportunity exists to present climate change education (CCE) in a way that emphasizes how climate change will affect public health, and utilizes an approach that has been shown to engage a broader and more diverse audience. Focusing CCE on public health effects is a new and potentially transformative method since it makes the results more tangible and less "random". When CCE is focused on what will happen to the Earth's climate and associated meteorological hazards one might be tempted to view this as something that can be coped with thus enabling the individualist entrepreneur point of view. Weather disasters always seem to happen to someone else

  17. Cost-Benefit of the energy saving in the bioclimatic designs; Costo-Beneficio del ahorro de energia en los disenos bioclimaticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez P, J. Manuel A. [Doble Dos Soluciones de Negocios, S.A. de C.V., Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Morillon G, David; Rodriguez V, Luis [Instituto de Ingenieria de la UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    Tools and criteria for the Cost-Benefit analysis from the energy saving in bioclimatic designs (BD) are presented, for which, a reference project is established and the costs and benefits of energy saving in BD with base in that project are evaluated. A case study is presented taking as reference the traditional design of the air conditioning of a building and with this base the estimation of cost-benefit of the same building is made, but with passive systems. The tools used are those that allow to consider related resources such as time and money; in that sense, are used criteria such as: Present value (PV), Equivalent Annual Cost (EAC) and the Cost of the Conserved Energy (CCE). The costs related to the construction, maintenance and operation of the design are taken into account. The differences between the reference design and the BD, established from the application of these criteria, allow to evaluate the economic margin of the BD as far as operation and maintenance is concerned. Finally the CCE of the bioclimatic measures is evaluated as an initiative of energy saving and the present value is calculated of the energy saving in the entire useful life of a bioclimatic design. [Spanish] Se presentan herramientas y criterios para el analisis Costo-Beneficio del ahorro de energia en disenos bioclimaticos (DB), para lo cual, se establece un proyecto de referencia y se evaluan los costos y beneficios del ahorro de energia en DB con base en ese proyecto. Se presenta el estudio de un caso tomando como referencia el dise tradicional de la climatizacion de un edificio y con base en este, se realiza la estimacion de costos y beneficios del mismo edificio, pero con sistemas pasivos. Las herramientas usadas, son aquellas que permiten considerar recursos relacionados como son tiempo y dinero; en ese sentido, se usan criterios como: Valor Presente (VP), Costo Anual Equivalente (CAE) y el Costo de la Energia Conservada (CEC). Se toman en consideracion los costos relacionados

  18. Direct Measurements of the Evolution and Impact of Sediment Density Flows as they Pass Through Monterey Submarine Canyon, Offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C. K.; Talling, P.; Maier, K. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Xu, J.; Caress, D. W.; Gwiazda, R.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Barry, J.; Chaffey, M. R.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Gales, J. A.; McGann, M.; McCann, M. P.; Simmons, S.; Sumner, E.

    2017-12-01

    Sediment density flows flushing through submarine canyons carry globally significant amounts of material into the deep sea to form many of the largest sediment accumulations on Earth. Despite their global significance, these flows remain poorly understood because they have rarely been directly measured. Here we provide an initial overview of the recently completed Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE), which was undertaken specifically to provide detailed measurements of sediment density flows and their impact on seafloor morphology and sedimentology. No previous study has deployed as extensive an array of monitoring sensors along a turbidity current pathway. During the 18 months of the CCE, at least 15 sediment density flows were recorded within the axis of Monterey Canyon. Because no external triggers (i.e., earthquakes or floods) correlate with these flows, they must have originated as failures in the canyon floor or canyon flanks. Three flows ignited and ran out for > 50 km from water depths of 1,860 m, reaching velocities up to 8.1 m/s. The rest of the flows died out within the array. During these events, large objects on or in the canyon floor were displaced substantial distances downslope, including a 7.1 km downslope movement of an entire mooring; a 4.6 km displacement of an 860 kg instrument frame followed by repeated down canyon displacements of this same frame after it was entombed in sediment; and multiple depth changes of man-made boulders containing acceleration and pressure sensors. During this same time interval the canyon floor was mapped six times with autonomous underwater vehicles covering the canyon thalweg at the upper and lower end of the instrument array (200-540 and 1350-1880 m water depths). The repeated mapping surveys reveal that flows caused +3 to -3 m bathymetric changes within a continuous clearly defined 200 m wide swath running along the canyon axis in 540 m water depth. This study shows that sediment density flows caused massive

  19. Impaired intravascular triglyceride lipolysis constitutes a marker of clinical outcome in patients with stable angina undergoing secondary prevention treatment: a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Andrei C; Lemos, Pedro A; Santos, Raul D; Hueb, Whady; Vinagre, Carmen G C; Quintella, Edgard; Carneiro, Otavio; Chapman, M John; Ramires, Jose A F; Maranhão, Raul C

    2004-06-16

    We sought to verify whether the intravascular metabolism of chylomicron-like emulsion may predict the clinical evolution of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing secondary prevention therapy of CAD. Case-control studies have suggested an association between impaired intravascular catabolism of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins and CAD. However, evidence is lacking with respect to the potential clinical relevance of this metabolic disorder in CAD patients. During a period of 4.5 +/- 0.9 years, we followed up 63 stable CAD patients (mean age 60 +/- 10 years) undergoing secondary prevention therapy (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <100 mg/dl) in whom kinetic studies of the in vivo catabolism of chylomicron-like emulsions were performed. At enrollment into the study, fasting patients were injected intravenously with a chylomicron-like emulsion labeled with radioactive triglyceride (3H-TG) and cholesteryl esters (14C-CE) to evaluate the efficacy of intravascular TG lipolysis. At baseline, CAD patients displayed a diminished fractional clearance rate (FCR) for 3H-TG (-26%; p = 0.027), for 14C-CE (-37%; p = 0.015), and for delipidation index (DI) (-26%; p = 0.02) as compared with 35 control subjects. During follow-up of secondary prevention therapy, 33% of CAD patients (n = 21) presented with clinically refractory angina and aggravated coronary angiographic severity. The FCR for 3H-TG (-44%; p = 0.005) and DI (-41%; p = 0.006) in those patients with refractory angina was significantly lower than that observed in those with stable evolution. Moreover, in a Cox multivariate regression analysis, the presence of a DI less than the median value was an independent predictor of an unfavorable clinical evolution (adjusted hazard ratio 3.32; 95% confidence interval 1.21 to 9.14; p = 0.020). The current study establishes that delayed intravascular TG lipolysis is a strong and independent predictor of evolution to severe angina among patients undergoing

  20. Integrated Web-Based Immersive Exploration of the Coordinated Canyon Experiment Data using Open Source STOQS Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, M. P.; Gwiazda, R.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Maier, K. L.; Lundsten, E. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Paull, C. K.

    2017-12-01

    The Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) in Monterey Submarine Canyon has produced a wealth of oceanographic measurements whose analysis will improve understanding of turbidity current processes. Exploration of this data set, consisting of over 60 parameters from 15 platforms, is facilitated by using the open source Spatial Temporal Oceanographic Query System (STOQS) software (https://github.com/stoqs/stoqs). The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) originally developed STOQS to help manage and visualize upper water column oceanographic measurements, but the generality of its data model permits effective use for any kind of spatial/temporal measurement data. STOQS consists of a PostgreSQL database and server-side Python/Django software; the client-side is jQuery JavaScript supporting AJAX requests to update a single page web application. The User Interface (UI) is optimized to provide a quick overview of data in spatial and temporal dimensions, as well as in parameter, platform, and data value space. A user may zoom into any feature of interest and select it, initiating a filter operation that updates the UI with an overview of all the data in the new filtered selection. When details are desired, radio buttons and checkboxes are selected to generate a number of different types of visualizations. These include color-filled temporal section and line plots, parameter-parameter plots, 2D map plots, and interactive 3D spatial visualizations. The Extensible 3D (X3D) standard and X3DOM JavaScript library provide the technology for presenting animated 3D data directly within the web browser. Most of the oceanographic measurements from the CCE (e.g. mooring mounted ADCP and CTD data) are easily visualized using established methods. However, unified integration and multiparameter display of several concurrently deployed sensors across a network of platforms is a challenge we hope to solve. Moreover, STOQS also allows display of data from a new instrument - the

  1. Ensonifying Change: Repeat Ultra-High-Resolution Surveys in Monterey Canyon before and after Passage of a Turbidity Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson-Schwehr, M.; Paull, C. K.; Caress, D. W.; Carvajal, C.; Thomas, H. J.; Maier, K. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents are one of the primary means of global sediment transport, yet our understanding of how they interact with the seafloor is hindered by the limited number of direct measurements. The Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE; October 2015 - April 2017) has made great strides in addressing this issue by providing direct measurements of turbidity currents and detailed observations of the resulting seafloor change in Monterey Canyon, offshore California. Here we focus on a section of the canyon at 1850-m water depth, where a Seafloor Instrument Node (SIN) recorded passage of three turbidity currents using a range of sensors, including three upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers. The fastest event at this site had a maximum velocity of 2.8 m/s, and dragged the 430-Kg SIN 26 m down-canyon. Repeat mapping surveys were conducted four times during the CCE, utilizing a prototype ultra-high-resolution mapping system mounted on the ROV Doc Ricketts. The survey platform hosts a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar, a 3DatDepth SL1 subsea LiDAR, two stereo color cameras, and a Kearfott SeaDevil INS. At a survey altitude of 2.5 m above the bed, the system provides remarkable 5-cm resolution multibeam bathymetry, 1-cm resolution LiDAR bathymetry, and 2-mm resolution photomosaics, and can cover a 100-m2 survey area. Surveys of the SIN site prior to and after the fastest event show areas of net deposition/erosion of 60 cm and 20 cm, respectively. Net deposition occurred in the topographic lows between bedforms, while erosion was focused on the bedform crests. At the end of the experiment, transects of sediment cores were taken by ROV within areas of net deposition. The cores show a variety of sedimentary facies, including muds, sands, gravel, and organic rich layers. Gravel layers have sharp erosive bases. The repeat surveys document the dynamic nature of flute-like scours as the flow events erode and deposit material along the canyon floor, as well as the

  2. Can Network Linkage Effects Determine Return? Evidence from Chinese Stock Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Haishu; Xia, Yue; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study used the dynamic conditional correlations (DCC) method to identify the linkage effects of Chinese stock market, and further detected the influence of network linkage effects on magnitude of security returns across different industries. Applying two physics-derived techniques, the minimum spanning tree and the hierarchical tree, we analyzed the stock interdependence within the network of the China Securities Index (CSI) industry index basket. We observed that that obvious linkage effects existed among stock networks. CII and CCE, CAG and ITH as well as COU, CHA and REI were confirmed as the core nodes in the three different networks respectively. We also investigated the stability of linkage effects by estimating the mean correlations and mean distances, as well as the normalized tree length of these indices. In addition, using the GMM model approach, we found inter-node influence within the stock network had a pronounced effect on stock returns. Our results generally suggested that there appeared to be greater clustering effect among the indexes belonging to related industrial sectors than those of diverse sectors, and network comovement was significantly affected by impactive financial events in the reality. Besides, stocks that were more central within the network of stock market usually had higher returns for compensation because they endured greater exposure to correlation risk.

  3. submitter Test strategies for industrial testers for converter controls equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Oleniuk, P; Kasampalis, V; Nisbet, D; Todd, B; Uznański, S

    2017-01-01

    Power converters and their controls electronics are key elements for the operation of the CERN accelerator complex, having a direct impact on its availability. To prevent early-life failures and provide means to verify electronics, a set of industrial testers is used throughout the converters controls electronics' life cycle. The roles of the testers are to validate mass production during the manufacturing phase and to provide means to diagnose and repair failed modules that are brought back from operation. In the converter controls electronics section of the power converters group in the technology department of CERN (TE/EPC/CCE), two main test platforms have been adopted: a PXI platform for mixed analogue-digital functional tests and a JTAG Boundary-Scan platform for digital interconnection and functional tests. Depending on the functionality of the device under test, the appropriate test platforms are chosen. This paper is a follow-up to results presented at the TWEPP 2015 conference, adding the boundary s...

  4. Test strategies for industrial testers for converter controls equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleniuk, P.; Kasampalis, V.; Cosmo, M. Di; Nisbet, D.; Todd, B.; Uznański, S.

    2017-01-01

    Power converters and their controls electronics are key elements for the operation of the CERN accelerator complex, having a direct impact on its availability. To prevent early-life failures and provide means to verify electronics, a set of industrial testers is used throughout the converters controls electronics' life cycle. The roles of the testers are to validate mass production during the manufacturing phase and to provide means to diagnose and repair failed modules that are brought back from operation. In the converter controls electronics section of the power converters group in the technology department of CERN (TE/EPC/CCE), two main test platforms have been adopted: a PXI platform for mixed analogue-digital functional tests and a JTAG Boundary-Scan platform for digital interconnection and functional tests. Depending on the functionality of the device under test, the appropriate test platforms are chosen. This paper is a follow-up to results presented at the TWEPP 2015 conference, adding the boundary scan test platform and the first results from exploitation of the test system. This paper reports on the test software, hardware design and test strategy applied for a number of devices that has resulted in maximizing test coverage and minimizing test design effort.

  5. Response of thermal ions to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves generated by 10 - 50 keV protons in the Earth's equatorial magnetosphere will interact with the ambient low-energy ions also found in this region. We examine H(+) and He(+) distribution functions from approx. equals 1 to 160 eV using the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment instrument on AMPTE/CCE to investigate the thermal ion response to the waves. A total of 48 intervals were chosen on the basis of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave activity: 24 with prevalent EMIC waves and 24 with no EMIC waves observed on the orbit. There is a close correlation between EMIC waves and perpendicular heated ion distributions. For protons the perpendicular temperature increase is modest, about 5 eV, and is always observed at 90 deg pitch angles. This is consistent with a nonresonant interaction near the equator. By contrast, He(+) temperatures during EMIC wave events averaged 35 eV and sometimes exceeded 100 eV, indicating stronger interaction with the waves. Furthermore, heated He(+) ions have X-type distributions with maximum fluxes occurring at pitch angles intermediate between field-aligned and perpendicular directions. The X-type He(+) distributions are consistent with a gyroresonant interaction off the equator. The concentration of He(+) relative to H(+) is found to correlate with EMIC wave activity, but it is suggested that the preferential heating of He(+) accounts for the apparent increase in relative He(+) concentration by increasing the proportion of He(+) detected by the ion instrument.

  6. (--Catechin in Cocoa and Chocolate: Occurence and Analysis of an Atypical Flavan-3-ol Enantiomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Galensa

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Cocoa contains high levels of different flavonoids. In the present study, the enantioseparation of catechin and epicatechin in cocoa and cocoa products by chiral capillary electrophoresis (CCE was performed. A baseline separation of the catechin and epicatechin enantiomers was achieved by using 0.1 mol·L−1 borate buffer (pH 8.5 with 12 mmol·L-1 (2-hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin as chiral selector, a fused-silica capillary with 50 cm effective length (75 μm I.D., +18 kV applied voltage, a temperature of 20°C and direct UV detection at 280 nm. To avoid comigration or coelution of other similar substances, the flavan-3-ols were isolated and purified using polyamide-solid-phase-extraction and LC-MS analysis. As expected, we found (--epicatechin and (+-catechin inunfermented, dried, unroasted cocoa beans. In contrast, roasted cocoa beans and cocoa products additionally contained the atypical flavan-3-ol (--catechin. This is generally formed during the manufacturing process by an epimerization which converts (--epicatechin to its epimer (--catechin. High temperatures during the cocoa bean roasting process and particularly the alkalization of the cocoa powder are the main factors inducing the epimerization reaction. In addition to the analysis of cocoa and cocoa products, peak ratios were calculated for a better differentiation of the cocoa products.

  7. Relationship and variation of qPCR and culturable enterococci estimates in ambient surface waters are predictable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Richard L.; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith B.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Chern, Eunice C.; Haugland, Richard A.; Lukasik, Ashley M.; Molina, Marirosa; Przybyla-Kelly, Kasia; Shively, Dawn A.; White, Emily M.; Zepp, Richard G.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.

    2010-01-01

    The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method provides rapid estimates of fecal indicator bacteria densities that have been indicated to be useful in the assessment of water quality. Primarily because this method provides faster results than standard culture-based methods, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is currently considering its use as a basis for revised ambient water quality criteria. In anticipation of this possibility, we sought to examine the relationship between qPCR-based and culture-based estimates of enterococci in surface waters. Using data from several research groups, we compared enterococci estimates by the two methods in water samples collected from 37 sites across the United States. A consistent linear pattern in the relationship between cell equivalents (CCE), based on the qPCR method, and colony-forming units (CFU), based on the traditional culturable method, was significant (P 10CFU > 2.0/100 mL) while uncertainty increases at lower CFU values. It was further noted that the relative error in replicated qPCR estimates was generally higher than that in replicated culture counts even at relatively high target levels, suggesting a greater need for replicated analyses in the qPCR method to reduce relative error. Further studies evaluating the relationship between culture and qPCR should take into account analytical uncertainty as well as potential differences in results of these methods that may arise from sample variability, different sources of pollution, and environmental factors.

  8. 23. Symposium On Fusion Technology (SOFT), Venice - A personal view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    This conference, examining the advances in our leading-edge technology, took place on 22-24 September 2004 against the wonderful and historic backdrop of Venice, at a monastery of the Cini Foundation, on the Island of St. Giorgio, directly opposite St. Marks. The strong connection between the ancient and modern was brought home to us in the very first talk, from the Mayor of Venice and MEP Prof. P. Costa, who reminded us of Venice's particular problem with global warming, and urged us to do our part to develop an energy source that should help to avoid it drowning. Prof. Sir C. Llewellyn-Smith, head of the UK Fusion Programme and Chairman of Euratom CCE-FU, took up this theme and elaborated how we should reach our goal, showing in particular the urgency of pursuing a fast track, proceeding with ITER and the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) without further delay, and envisaging that the subsequent machine would be prototypical of future commercial fusion power plants. The conference proceeded through plenary and oral sessions, and through poster sessions, covering plasma heating, fuelling, control and diagnostics, magnets and power supplies, plasma-facing components, blanket and vessel, remote handling, materials technology, the experiences gained on existing experiments, and projections for future experiments and fusion power plants. There were 570 participants, from 25 countries, of whom a third came from outside Europe

  9. Del régimen de inhabilidades e incompatibilidades al de prohibiciones y conflictos de interés en la contratación estatal, un proyecto de reforma con objetivos sancionatorios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alejandro Barreto Moreno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Este documento evidencia la tendencia del constituyente y legislador de inclinarse por un modelo sancionatorio en el régimen de inhabilidades e incompatibilidades de la contratación estatal, y destaca su interés por castigar a través del derecho administrativo, siguiendo una tendencia dura legislativa que busca nutrir de medidas punitivas el ordenamiento legal, como reacción al clamor social que se expresa por medios de comunicación, redes sociales y que exigen resultados eficaces del Estado, particularmente en contra de actos de corrupción. Adicionalmente, es indudable que esta lógica legislativa está orientada por organismos internacionales a los cuales Colombia desea adherir de forma definitiva, como la Organización para la Cooperación y Desarrollo Económico ( OCDE ; situación que explica las reformas en la materia que se han aprobado recientemente y proyectos de revisión estructural al mercado de contratación pública como el presentado por la Agencia de Contratación Colombia Compra Eficiente ( CCE , que sigue la misma línea al pretender modificar el régimen de inhabilidades e incompatibilidades por un modelo de prohibiciones y conflicto de intereses.

  10. Gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) with CO2/H2O/O2in a circulating fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abdol Ghaffar; Hisoriev, Hikmat

    2017-11-28

    Gasification is one of the most important thermochemical routes to produce both synthesis gas (syngas) and chars. The quality of produced syngas wieldy depends on the operating conditions (temperature, residence time, heating rate, and gasifying agent), hydrodynamic properties of gasifier (particle size, minimum fluidization velocity, and gasifier size), and type of feedstock (coal, biomass, oil, and municipal solid wastes). In the present study, simulation of syngas production via circulating fluidized bed (CFB) gasification of algal biomass (Cladophora glomerata L.) at different gasifying agents and particle sizes was carried out, using Aspen Plus simulator. The model which has been validated by using experimental data of the technical literature was used to evaluate the influence of operating conditions on gas composition and performance parameters. The results show that biomass gasification using pure oxygen as the gasification agent has great potential to improve the caloric value of produced gas and performance indicators. It was also found that the produced gas caloric value, syngas yield, and performance parameters (CCE and CGE) increase with reaction temperature but are inversely proportional to the biomass particle size.

  11. muestra colombiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Helena Londoño Arredondo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue identificar las creencias centrales de los trastornos de la personalidad en pacientes diagnosticados con trastornos del estado de ánimo depresivos, comparado con un grupo control en la ciudad de Medellín (Colombia. La investigación es de tipo analítico comparativo de casos y controles de corte transversal. Muestra: 87 personas, 43 conformaron el grupo casos (30 mujeres y 14 hombres y 44 el grupo controles (36 mujeres y 7 hombres. Variables de análisis: creencias centrales de los trastornos de la personalidad obsesivo-compulsivo, pasivo-agresivo, histriónico, narcisista, esquizoide, límite y paranoide. Instrumentos: Entrevista estructurada M.I.N.I. y CCE-TP. Resultados: se identificaron diferencias significativas entre los grupos de estudio en las creencias centrales correspondientes a los trastornos de la personalidad obsesivo compulsivo (p=0,000, pasivo agresivo (p=0,044, límite (p=0,020, esquizoide (p=0,036 y paranoide (p=0,016, con puntajes superiores en las medias aritméticas obtenidas en las personas diagnosticadas con trastornos del estado de ánimo depresivo

  12. Rethinking the Thinking on Democracy in Education: What Are Educators Thinking (and Doing About Democracy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zyngier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines perspectives and perceptions of democracy of pre- and in-service teachers as well as teacher-education academics in Australia in order to develop a robust and critical democratic education. Using data from an on-line survey the paper presents the quantitative analyses, and the qualitative responses of contrasting understandings of democracy, citizenship and the role of education in the promotion and development of an active and thick democracy the paper critiques the neo-liberal (thin democratic discourse of contemporary Australian academic research that suggests that the Civics and Citizenship Education project only requires some augmentation highlighting issues like sustainability and globalization while ignoring social justice issues. It begins by outlining the concepts of thick and thin democracy, and revisits the state of civics and citizenship education (CCE in Australia. It is argued that while the pre-service teachers in this study may have a more critical and thicker understanding of democracy that is mirrored in the views of their teacher-education professors, the practicing teachers, on the other hand, have largely adopted the mainstream neo-liberal discourse, presenting a tendency to view democracy in a very narrow or thin way that may impact on their classroom practice. The paper concludes with recommendations related to what a thick democracy might actually look like in school education.

  13. Differential physiological effects of neonicotinoid insecticides on honey bees: A comparison between Apis mellifera and Apis cerana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguo; Li, Meng; He, Jingfang; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chaimanee, Veeranan; Huang, Wei-Fone; Nie, Hongyi; Zhao, Yazhou; Su, Songkun

    2017-08-01

    Acute toxicities (LD50s) of imidacloprid and clothianidin to Apis mellifera and A. cerana were investigated. Changing patterns of immune-related gene expressions and the activities of four enzymes between the two bee species were compared and analyzed after exposure to sublethal doses of insecticides. Results indicated that A. cerana was more sensitive to imidacloprid and clothianidin than A. mellifera. The acute oral LD50 values of imidacloprid and clothianidin for A. mellifera were 8.6 and 2.0ng/bee, respectively, whereas the corresponding values for A. cerana were 2.7 and 0.5ng/bee. The two bee species possessed distinct abilities to mount innate immune response against neonicotinoids. After 48h of imidacloprid treatment, carboxylesterase (CCE), prophenol oxidase (PPO), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities were significantly downregulated in A. mellifera but were upregulated in A. cerana. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity was significantly elevated in A. mellifera at 48h after exposure to imidacloprid, but no significant change was observed in A. cerana. AChE was downregulated in both bee species at three different time points during clothianidin exposure, and GST activities were upregulated in both species exposed to clothianidin. Different patterns of immune-related gene expression and enzymatic activities implied distinct detoxification and immune responses of A. cerana and A. mellifera to imidacloprid and clothianidin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Conversion of dependability deterministic requirements into probabilistic requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgade, E.; Le, P.

    1993-02-01

    This report concerns the on-going survey conducted jointly by the DAM/CCE and NRE/SR branches on the inclusion of dependability requirements in control and instrumentation projects. Its purpose is to enable a customer (the prime contractor) to convert into probabilistic terms dependability deterministic requirements expressed in the form ''a maximum permissible number of failures, of maximum duration d in a period t''. The customer shall select a confidence level for each previously defined undesirable event, by assigning a maximum probability of occurrence. Using the formulae we propose for two repair policies - constant rate or constant time - these probabilized requirements can then be transformed into equivalent failure rates. It is shown that the same formula can be used for both policies, providing certain realistic assumptions are confirmed, and that for a constant time repair policy, the correct result can always be obtained. The equivalent failure rates thus determined can be included in the specifications supplied to the contractors, who will then be able to proceed to their previsional justification. (author), 8 refs., 3 annexes

  15. The Mais Médicos (More Doctors) Program in Mato Grosso State, Brazil: implementation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Reinaldo Gaspar da; Barros, Nelson Filice

    2016-09-01

    Although the 224 health professionals engaged by the More Doctors for Brazil Project (Projeto Mais Médicos para o Brazil, PMMB) to strengthen the National Primary Health Care Policy (Política Nacional de Atenção Básica, PNab) in 104 municipalities of Mato Grosso (MT) State have encountered significant problems in the work process, important advances have resulted in the health of populations served by the More Doctors Programme (Programa Mais Médicos, PMM). This article analyses the implementation and development of the PMM in MT, from 2013 to 2015, on the basis of primary data from focus groups and interviews of social stakeholders at the institutions involved and secondary data from reports by supervisors, tutors, managers and institutions on the MT State Coordinating Committee (CCE) of the PMM. Despite political difficulties in managing implementation, the results show that the endeavour was beneficial in that it surmounted previous obstacles, afforded users greater access, prompted discussion of the problem and proposed and experimented with ways to strengthen primary health care. We conclude that there is a need for broader academic discussion of the provision and training of doctors, of the model of care and of human resource capacity-building by continuing professional development with integration among teaching, service and community.

  16. Integration & Validation of LCU with Different Sub-systems for Diacrode based amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnish, Kumar; Verma, Sriprakash; Soni, Dipal; Patel, Hriday; Suthar, Gajendra; Dalicha, Hrushikesh; Dhola, Hitesh; Patel, Amit; Upadhayay, Dishang; Jha, Akhil; Patel, Manoj; Trivedi, Rajesh; Machchhar, Harsha; Singh, Raghuraj; Mukherjee, Aparajita

    2017-04-01

    ITER-India is responsible to deliver nine (8+1 spare) ICH & CD Power Sources to ITER. Each power source is capable to deliver 2.5 MW at 35 to 65 MHz frequency range with a load condition up to VSWR 2:1. For remote operation of different subsystems, Local Control Unit (LCU) is developed. LCU is developed using PXI hardware and Schneider PLC with Lab VIEW-RT developmental environment. All the protection function of the amplifier is running on PXI 7841 R module that ensures hard wired protection logic. There are three level of protection function- first by power supply itself that detects overcurrent/overvoltage and trips itself and generate trip signal for further action. There are some direct hardwired signal interfaces between power supplies to protect the amplifier. Second level of protection is generated through integrated controller of amplifier i.e. Command Control Embedded (CCE) against arc and Anode over current. Third level of Protection is through LCU where different fault signals are received and processed to generate off command for different sub-systems. Before connecting different subsystem with High power RF amplifiers (Driver & Final stage), each subsystem is individually tested through LCU. All protection functions are tested before hooking up the subsystems with main amplifier and initiating RF operation.

  17. Can Network Linkage Effects Determine Return? Evidence from Chinese Stock Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Haishu; Xia, Yue; Li, Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study used the dynamic conditional correlations (DCC) method to identify the linkage effects of Chinese stock market, and further detected the influence of network linkage effects on magnitude of security returns across different industries. Applying two physics-derived techniques, the minimum spanning tree and the hierarchical tree, we analyzed the stock interdependence within the network of the China Securities Index (CSI) industry index basket. We observed that that obvious linkage effects existed among stock networks. CII and CCE, CAG and ITH as well as COU, CHA and REI were confirmed as the core nodes in the three different networks respectively. We also investigated the stability of linkage effects by estimating the mean correlations and mean distances, as well as the normalized tree length of these indices. In addition, using the GMM model approach, we found inter-node influence within the stock network had a pronounced effect on stock returns. Our results generally suggested that there appeared to be greater clustering effect among the indexes belonging to related industrial sectors than those of diverse sectors, and network comovement was significantly affected by impactive financial events in the reality. Besides, stocks that were more central within the network of stock market usually had higher returns for compensation because they endured greater exposure to correlation risk. PMID:27257816

  18. Study on the chemical stability of catalyst counter electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells using a simple X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy-based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Dong-Jin; Kim, Jungmin; Chung, Jongwon; Park, SungHoon; Baek, WoonJoong; Kim, Yongsu; Kim, Seongheon; Kwon, Young-Nam; Chung, JaeGwan; Kyoung, Yongkoo; Kim, Ki-Hong; Heo, Sung

    2014-12-01

    Since the chemical/electrical stability and catalytic activity are essential conditions for catalyst counter electrodes (CCEs) in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), a simple dipping method is employed for evaluating the chemical stability of CCE candidates in an iodine-based liquid electrolyte (I-electrolyte). The chemical stabilities and transition mechanisms of the CCEs are successfully analyzed by studying the chemical transitions in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) core levels after dipping in the I-electrolyte. All films including the Pt film undergo degradation depending on the type of material. While dipping in the I-electrolyte, Cu and Au films scarcely dissolves as their respective metal sulfides, and the Al film gradually loss its metallic properties owing to Al2O3 growth. On the other hand, a previously unknown transition mechanism of organic conducting CCEs is determined based on the proposed method. Compared to the other metal films, the poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and multi wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/PEDOT:PSS films undergo an entirely unique transition mechanism, which results from the chemical adsorption of organic molecules onto PEDOT:PSS molecules in the I-electrolyte. Consequently, these chemical structure transitions correspond well to the degrees of alternation in the electrical properties of DSSCs with all the investigated CCEs.

  19. The Continuity of Care Experience in Australian midwifery education-What have we achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Olivia; Sweet, Linda; Houston, Don; Ebert, Lyn

    2017-06-01

    The Continuity of Care Experience is a mandated workplace based component of midwifery education in Australia. Since its inclusion in midwifery clinical education, the pedagogical approaches used across Australia have varied. The purpose of this integrative review is to determine the outcomes of the Continuity of Care Experience as an educational model. A search for relevant research literature was undertaken in 2015 using a range of databases and by examining relevant bibliographies. Articles published in English, which provided information about the outcomes of Continuity of Care Experiences for midwifery education were included. A total of 20 studies were selected. The included studies were primarily exploratory and descriptive. Studies reported the value that both students and women place on the relationship they developed. This relationship resulted in opportunities that enhanced student learning by providing a context in which clinical practice learning was optimized. Challenges identified included managing time and workload pressures for students in relation to the CCE, inconsistencies in academic use of the experience, and variations in how the healthcare system influences the continuity experience. No research was found that reports on the educational model in terms of defining learning objectives and assessment of outcomes. This represents an important omission in mandating this clinical practice model in midwifery curricula without sufficient guidance to unify and maximize learning for students. Research is required to explore the educational intent and assessment methods of the Continuity of Care Experience as an educational model. Copyright © 2016 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. New developments in undergraduate education in public health: implications for health education and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael D; Wykoff, Randy; King, Laura Rasar; Petersen, Donna J

    2012-12-01

    The article provides an overview of efforts to improve public health and health education training and on the potential use of Critical Component Elements (CCEs) for undergraduate health education programs toward more consistent quality assurance across programs. Considered in the context of the Galway Consensus Conference, the authors discuss the need for consistency in health education and public health quality assurance and curricular development. They discuss emerging quality assurance trends in relation to newly approved CCEs by the Association of Schools of Public Health after being developed by the Framing the Future Task Force: The Second 100 Years for Public Health. The CCE development process is discussed including its consideration as a tool program, which can be used to develop or refine undergraduate health education professional preparation programs. The authors suggest that CCEs should be "cross-walked" against existing health education undergraduate-level competencies. The authors conclude that CCEs may serve the long-term health education goal of accreditation for undergraduate health education and promote the tradition of strong undergraduate health education within a broader framework of public health and health promotion.

  1. Patterns of phytoplankton diversity and mortality due to grazing across trophic gradients in the Southern California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freibott, A.; Moustafa, A.; Rabines, A.; Allen, A. E.; Landry, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    The dilution method is a widely used technique to determine rates of community phytoplankton growth and mortality due to grazing in pelagic communities. Here, we present results of microscopy and metagenomic analysis of 16S and 18S rRNA genes from dilution experiments conducted as part of the California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE LTER) program. Samples from experiments conducted in the mixed layer and deep chlorophyll maxima were analyzed from coastal vs. offshore sites, an ephemeral frontal site, and during the anomalously warm conditions of summer 2014. Distinct patterns of community biomass (µg C L-1) and diversity (Shannon index) with respect to sampling depth (surface versus chlorophyll max) and distance to shore (coastal versus offshore) emerged. Eukaryotic diversity was negatively correlated with chlorophyll a concentration, likely due to the dominance of a few diatom species, and was highest in spring 2007 during declining diatom bloom conditions. Relative phytoplankton growth and mortality rates estimated from metagenomic data indicate unique patterns of growth and mortality among diatoms, dinoflagellates, prymnesiophytes, and prasinophytes, which diverge from overall community rates determined through pigment analysis. Trends in the diversity, biomass, and mortality rates of plankton taxa across trophic gradients highlight the complex trophic interactions that would otherwise be hidden in overall mean rates of community growth and grazing.

  2. Estimation of Minimum Miscibility Pressure for 〖CO〗_2 Flood Based on EOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameera Hamd-allah

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available CO2 Gas is considered one of the unfavorable gases and it causes great air pollution. It’s possible to decrease this pollution by injecting gas in the oil reservoirs to provide a good miscibility and to increase the oil recovery factor. MMP was estimated by Peng Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS. South Rumila-63 (SULIAY is involved for which the miscible displacement by is achievable based on the standard criteria for success EOR processes. A PVT report was available for the reservoir under study. It contains deferential liberation (DL and constant composition expansion (CCE tests. PVTi software is one of the (Eclipse V.2010 software’s packages, it has been used to achieve the goal. Many trials have been done to match the data of DL test by tuning some of the PR-EOS parameters through the regression analysis process, but no acceptable match was obtained especially for saturation pressure. However; splitting the mole fraction of (C6+ to many pseudo components was carried out, and then a regression analysis process was made again to improve the matching by tuning some of the PR-EOS parameters. A good estimate of saturation pressure and a good match of PVT properties was noted. Ternary diagram has been constructed to represent the phase behavior of -Oil and to calculate MMP for the South Rumila-63 (SULIAY oil well.

  3. A module concept for the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel system using the novel SLID-ICV vertical integration technology

    CERN Document Server

    Beimforde, M; Macchiolo, A; Moser, H G; Nisius, R; Richter, R H; Weigell, P; 10.1088/1748-0221/5/12/C12025

    2010-01-01

    The presented R&D activity is focused on the development of a new pixel module concept for the foreseen upgrades of the ATLAS detector towards the Super LHC employing thin n-in-p silicon sensors together with a novel vertical integration technology. A first set of pixel sensors with active thicknesses of 75 μm and 150 μm has been produced using a thinning technique developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (MPP) and the MPI Semiconductor Laboratory (HLL). Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements of these sensors irradiated with 26 MeV protons up to a particle fluence of 1016neqcm−2 have been performed, yielding higher values than expected from the present radiation damage models. The novel integration technology, developed by the Fraunhofer Institut EMFT, consists of the Solid-Liquid InterDiffusion (SLID) interconnection, being an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding, and Inter-Chip Vias (ICVs) for routing signals vertically through electronics. This allows for extracting the ...

  4. Document of standardization of enteral nutrition access in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arribas, Lorena; Frías, Laura; Creus, Gloria; Parejo, Juana; Urzola, Carmen; Ashbaugh, Rosana; Pérez-Portabella, Cleofé; Cuerda, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The group of standardization and protocols of the Spanish Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (SENPE) published in 2011 a consensus document SENPE/SEGHNP/ANECIPN/SECP on enteral access for paediatric nutritional support. Along the lines of this document, we have developed another document on adult patients to homogenize the clinical practice and improve the quality of care in enteral access in this age group. The working group included health professionals (nurses, dietitians and doctor) with extensive experience in enteral nutrition and access. We tried to find scientific evidence through a literature review and we used the criteria of the Agency for Health-care Research and Quality (AHRQ) to classify the evidence (Grade of Recommendation A, B or C). Later the document was reviewed by external experts to the group and requested the endorsement of the Scientific and Educational Committee (CCE) and the group of home artificial nutrition (NADYA) of the SENPE. The full text will be published as a monograph number in this journal. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Origins of energetic ions in the Earth's magnetosheath. Final Report, 8 May 1991 - 5 Jun. 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuselter, S.A.; Shelley, E.G.; Klumpar, D.M.

    1992-06-01

    The analysis and interpretation of the combined scientific data from the Hot Plasma Composition Experiment (HPCE) and the Charge Energy Mass (CHEM) spectrometer on the Active Mesospheric Particle Tracer Experiment (AMPTE) Charge Composition Explorer (CCE) spacecraft are discussed. These combined data sets have and will be used to survey the energetic ion environment in the Earth's magnetosheath to determine the origins and relative strengths of the energetic ion populations found there. A computer code was developed to analyze and interpret the data sets. The focus of the first year was on the determination of the contribution of leaked magnetospheric protons to the total energetic proton population. Emphasis was placed on intervals when the AMPTE spacecraft was in the plasma depletion layer because it was argued that in this region, only the leaked population contributes to the energetic ion population. Manipulation of the CHEM data and comparison of the CHEM and HPCE data over their common energy range near the magnetopause also contributed directly to a second study of that region

  6. Hydrogen-bridge Si(μ-H)3CeH and inserted H3SiCeH molecules: Matrix infrared spectra and DFT calculations for reaction products of silane with Ce atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Shi, Peipei; Huang, Tengfei; Wang, Xuefeng

    2017-10-01

    Reactions of laser-ablated cerium atoms with silane were investigated by matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The reaction products, Si(μ-H)3CeH, H3SiCeH, H2Si(μ-H)CeH and HSi(μ-H)2CeH were identified on the basis of the SiD4 isotopic substitutions and DFT frequency calculations. In the solid argon or krypton matrix, the inserted H3SiCeH molecule was observed as initial product on deposition, which rearranged to hydrogen bridge species Si(μ-H)3CeH on follow-up annealing through H2Si(μ-H)CeH and HSi(μ-H)2CeH species. The Sisbnd Hsbnd Ce hydrogen bridge was investigated by NBO and ELF analysis. Calculation suggested that in Si(μ-H)3CeH molecule Ce atom donated one electron to Si atom, resulting in electron-rich SiH3 subunit, which was confirmed by ESP and AIM analysis. The increased basicity of Sisbnd H bond facilitates the formation of hydrogen bridge bond between Si and Ce. For comparison only insertion H3CCeH structure was obtained from the reaction of Ce atoms with CH4.

  7. The energetic ion substorm injection boundary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, R.E.; Sibeck, D.G.; McEntire, R.W.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The substorm injection boundary model has enjoyed considerable success in explaining plasma signatures in the near-geosynchronous region. However, the injection boundary has remained primarily a phenomenological model. In this paper the authors examine 167 dispersionless energetic ion injections which were observed by AMPTE CCE. The radial and local time distribution of the events as a function of Kp is qualitatively similar to that envisioned in the injection boundary model of Mauk and McIlwain (1974). They argue that particles observed during dispersionless injections are locally energized during the disruption of the cross-tail current sheet. Therefore they identify the injection boundary, as derived from the spatial distribution of dispersionless injections, with the earthward edge of the region of the magnetotail which undergoes current sheet disruption during the substorm expansion phase. The authors show that this qualitative model for the generation of the injection boundary can provide an explanation for the dispersionless nature, the double spiral shape, and the Kp dependence of the boundary

  8. Energy time dispersion of a new class of magnetospheric ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. C. Anagnostopoulos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed high time resolution (\\geq6 s data during the onset and the decay phase of several energetic (\\geq35 keV ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock by the CCE/AMPTE and IMP-7/8 spacecraft, during times of intense substorm/geomagnetic activity. We found that forward energy dispersion at the onset of events (earlier increase of middle energy ions and/or a delayed fall of the middle energy ion fluxes at the end of events are often evident in high time resolution data. The energy spectra at the onset and the decay of this kind of events show a characteristic hump at middle (50-120 keV energies and the angular distributions display either anisotropic or broad forms. The time scale of energy dispersion in the ion events examined was found to range from several seconds to \\sim1 h depending on the ion energies compared and on the rate of variation of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF direction. Several canditate processes are discussed to explain the observations and it is suggested that a rigidity dependent transport process of magnetospheric particles within the magnetosheath is most probably responsible for the detection of this new type of near bow shock magnetospheric ion events. The new class of ion events was observed within both the magnetosheath and the upstream region.Key words. Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; planetary bow shocks

  9. Coverage Performance of Common/Shared Control Signals Using Transmit Diversity in Evolved UTRA Downlink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taoka, Hidekazu; Morimoto, Akihito; Kawai, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Kenichi; Sawahashi, Mamoru

    This paper presents the best transmit diversity schemes for three types of common/shared control signals from the viewpoint of the block error rate (BLER) performance in the Evolved UTRA downlink employing OFDM radio access. This paper also presents the coverage performance of the common/shared control signals using transmit diversity with respect to the outage probability that satisfies the required BLER performance, which is a major factor determining the cell configuration. Simulation results clarify that Space-Frequency Block Code (SFBC) and the combination of SFBC and Frequency Switched Transmit Diversity (FSTD) are the best transmit diversity schemes among the open-loop type transmit diversity candidates for two-antenna and four-antenna transmission cases, respectively. Furthermore, we show through system-level simulations that SFBC is very effective in reducing the outage probability at the required BLER for the physical broadcast channel (PBCH), for the common control signal with resource block (RB)-level assignment such as the dynamic broadcast channel (D-BCH) and paging channel (PCH), and in increasing the number of accommodated L1/L2 control signals over one transmission time interval duration, using mini-control channel element (CCE)-level assignment.

  10. Consequence Prioritization Process for Potential High Consequence Events (HCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Sarah G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-31

    This document describes the process for Consequence Prioritization, the first phase of the Consequence-Driven Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE) framework. The primary goal of Consequence Prioritization is to identify potential disruptive events that would significantly inhibit an organization’s ability to provide the critical services and functions deemed fundamental to their business mission. These disruptive events, defined as High Consequence Events (HCE), include both events that have occurred or could be realized through an attack of critical infrastructure owner assets. While other efforts have been initiated to identify and mitigate disruptive events at the national security level, such as Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41), this process is intended to be used by individual organizations to evaluate events that fall below the threshold for a national security. Described another way, Consequence Prioritization considers threats greater than those addressable by standard cyber-hygiene and includes the consideration of events that go beyond a traditional continuity of operations (COOP) perspective. Finally, Consequence Prioritization is most successful when organizations adopt a multi-disciplinary approach, engaging both cyber security and engineering expertise, as in-depth engineering perspectives are required to recognize and characterize and mitigate HCEs. Figure 1 provides a high-level overview of the prioritization process.

  11. Strangvac: A recombinant fusion protein vaccine that protects against strangles, caused by Streptococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carl; Frykberg, Lars; Flock, Margareta; Guss, Bengt; Waller, Andrew S; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2018-03-07

    The host-restricted pathogen Streptococcus equi causes strangles in the horse, which is characterised by abscessation of the lymph nodes of the head and neck. The disease is endemic throughout the world causing considerable welfare and economic cost to the horse industry. Here we report the results of three studies where ponies were vaccinated with combinations of recombinant fusion proteins to optimise vaccine production and the level of protection conferred. Optimal protection was conferred by a prototype multicomponent subunit vaccine, Strangvac 4, which contained eight proteins CNE, SclC, SclF, SclI, EAG (fused as CCE), SEQ_402, SEQ_0256 (fused as Eq85) and IdeE. Across the three experiments only three of 16 ponies vaccinated with Strangvac 4 became pyretic compared to all 16 placebo-vaccinated control ponies (P equi was recovered from the lymph nodes of eight Strangvac 4-vaccinated and 15 control ponies (P = .016). None of the ponies vaccinated with Strangvac 4, or the other prototype vaccines developed adverse reactions following vaccination. Our data provide evidence in support of the further clinical development of the Strangvac 4 vaccine. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of freestanding GaN as an alpha and neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulligan, Padhraic; Wang, Jinghui; Cao, Lei, E-mail: cao.152@osu.edu

    2013-08-11

    The wide bandgap (3.39) eV and large dislocation energy of the III–V semiconductor gallium nitride (GaN) make this a desirable material for charged particle spectroscopy in high temperature, high radiation environments. While other research groups have established that charged particle detectors can be fabricated from high quality, thin films of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown GaN, this work demonstrates the feasibility of ionizing radiation detectors created from significantly thicker freestanding n-type GaN, grown via hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). Detectors were fabricated by depositing Ni/Au pads on n-type GaN, forming a Schottky barrier diode. Capacitance–voltage measurements on the detectors showed an intrinsic carrier concentration in the range of 10{sup −16} cm{sup −3}–10{sup –15} cm{sup −3}, and indicated an inhomogeneous distribution between diodes on the same wafer. The radiation sensitivity of the fabricated detectors was analyzed using alpha particles from an {sup 241}Am source. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) calculations from these experiments indicate an efficiency of 100 percent. The detectors were also successfully used to detect neutron induced charged particles using a Li{sub 2}O foil in a neutron beam.

  13. Ultra-compact high-performance MCT MWIR engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, H.; Breiter, R.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Oelmaier, R.; Rutzinger, S.; Schenk, H.; Wendler, J.

    2017-02-01

    Size, weight and power (SWaP) reduction is highly desired by applications such as sights for the dismounted soldier or small gimbals for UAVs. But why have high performance and small size of IR systems inevitably exclude each other? Namely, recent development progress in the fields of miniature cryocoolers, short dewars and high operating temperature (HOT) FPAs combined with pitch size reduction opens the door for very compact MWIR-modules while keeping high electro-optical performance. Now, AIM has realized first prototypes of an ultra-compact high-performance MWIR engine in a total volume of only 18cl (60mm length x 60mm height x 50mm width). Impressive SWaP characteristics are completed by a total weight below 400g and a power consumption Camera Link. Optionally, a small image processing board can be stacked on top of the CCE to gain access to basic functions such as BPR, 2- point NUC and dynamic reduction. This paper will present the design, functionalities and performance data of the ultra-compact MCT MWIR engine operated at HOT.

  14. The Effects of Real Exchange Rates and Income on International Tourism Demand for the USA from Some European Union Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Ongan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the effects of real exchange rates and income on inbound tourism demand (tourist arrivals from Germany, France, the UK, the Netherlands, Italy, Spain, and Sweden to the USA over the period 1996Q3–2015Q1. To achieve this aim, the Harmonized Index of Consumer Prices (HICP for Restaurants and Hotels was used for the first time—instead of using the general Consumer Price Index (CPI—to transform the nominal exchange rate into the real exchange rate as an independent variable in tourism demand analysis models. Panel co-integration analysis under the cross-sectional dependence (CD test and common correlated effects (CCE approach was applied. Empirical results show that tourists visiting the USA are more sensitive to changes in the real exchange rate than changes in GDP. While French tourists respond highly to the GDP, British tourists respond highly to the real exchange rate. It should also be noted that the UK, having the highest responsiveness to the real exchange rate, is a country outside the Eurozone and also intends to leave the European Union.

  15. Plasma lipids, lipoprotein metabolism and HDL lipid transfers are equally altered in metabolic syndrome and in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa M; Vinagre, Carmen G C; Dallan, Luis A O; Chacra, Ana P M; Maranhão, Raul C

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) refers to states of insulin resistance that predispose to development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim was to investigate whether plasma lipids and lipid metabolism differ in MetS patients compared to those with T2DM with poor glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin > 7.0). Eighteen patients with T2DM, 18 with MetS and 14 controls, paired for age (40-70 years) and body mass index (BMI), were studied. Plasma lipids and the kinetics of a triacylglycerol-rich emulsion labeled with [(3)H]-triolein ([(3)H]-TAG) and [(14)C]-cholesteryl esters ([(14)C]-CE) injected intravenously followed by one-hour blood sampling were determined. Lipid transfers from an artificial nanoemulsion donor to high-density lipoprotien (HDL) were assayed in vitro. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL cholesterol (mg/dl) were not different in T2DM (128 ± 7; 42 ± 7) and MetS (142 ± 6; 39 ± 3), but triacylglycerols were even higher in MetS (215 ± 13) than in T2DM (161 ±11, p lipid metabolism examined here, and suggest that there are different thresholds for the insulin action on glucose and lipids. These findings highlight the magnitude of the lipid disturbances in MetS, and may have implications in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Improving the radiation hardness properties of silicon detectors using oxygenated n-type and p-type silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Casse, G L; Hanlon, M

    2000-01-01

    The degradation of the electrical properties of silicon detectors exposed to 24 GeV/c protons were studied using pad diodes made from different silicon materials. Standard high-grade p-type and n-type substrates and oxygenated n-type substrates have been used. The diodes were studied in terms of reverse current (I/sub r/) and full depletion voltage (V/sub fd/) as a function of fluence. The oxygenated devices from different suppliers with a variety of starting materials and techniques, all show a consistent improvement of the degradation rate of V/sub fd/ and CCE compared to un- oxygenated substrate devices. Radiation damage of n-type detectors introduces stable defects acting as effective p-type doping and leads to the change of the conductivity type of the silicon bulk (type inversion) at a neutron equivalent fluence of a few 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -2/. The diode junction after inversion migrates from the original side to the back plane of the detector. The migration of the junction is avoided using silicon detec...

  17. Updraft gasification of poultry litter at farm-scale--A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupe, N C; Lynch, D; Wnetrzak, R; Kwapinska, M; Kwapinski, W; Leahy, J J

    2016-04-01

    Farm and animal wastes are increasingly being investigated for thermochemical conversion, such as gasification, due to the urgent necessity of finding new waste treatment options. We report on an investigation of the use of a farm-scale, auto-thermal gasification system for the production of a heating gas using poultry litter (PL) as a feedstock. The gasification process was robust and reliable. The PL's ash melting temperature was 639°C, therefore the reactor temperature was kept around this value. As a result of the low reactor temperature the process performance parameters were low, with a cold gas efficiency (CGE) of 0.26 and a carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) of 0.44. The calorific value of the clean product gas was 3.39 MJ m(-3)N (LHV). The tar was collected as an emulsion containing 87 wt.% water and the extracted organic compounds were identified. The residual char exceeds thresholds for Zn and Cu to obtain European biochar certification; however, has potential to be classified as a pyrogenic carbonaceous material (PCM), which resembles a high nutrient biochar. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND EMOTIONS: A STUDY BASED ON ACTED SPEECH IN BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mara de Oliveira VASSOLER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Fundamental Frequency (F0 in emotional and neutral speech in Brazilian Portuguese was analyzed. Methods: Three professional actresses participated in the survey reading a text in two conditions: neutral speech and acted emotion speech. Four emotions were taken into account for this study: joy, anger, fear and sadness. For each situation, actresses repeated five times, totaling 75 recordings. Speech sample recording took place in the Multimedia Lab Studio Electronic Computing Center of the University of São Paulo (USP-CCE through specific equipment. A sentence was selected to be segmented and analyzed in smaller units (syllables. In order to obtain F0 values, the software PRAAT and some of its scripts were used. Results: Analyzing F0 average of each emotion, we found that joy shows higher frequency bands than sadness that has very low values of F0. Variation of F0 in anger remained similar among the actresses speech. On the other hand, fear did not offer any F0 range pattern. Conclusion: F0 values , both mean and variation, show to be important in the differentiation of emotions: joy, anger and sadness. Fear seems to suffer other acoustic and physiological influences – a those could be analyzed in a more broad study – other than F0.

  19. FUNDAMENTAL FREQUENCY AND EMOTIONS: A STUDY BASED ON ACTED SPEECH IN BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Mara de Oliveira Vassoler

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Fundamental Frequency (F0 in emotional and neutral speech in Brazilian Portuguese was analyzed. Methods: Three professional actresses participated in the survey reading a text in two conditions: neutral speech and acted emotion speech. Four emotions were taken into account for this study: joy, anger, fear and sadness. For each situation, actresses repeated five times, totaling 75 recordings. Speech sample recording took place in the Multimedia Lab Studio Electronic Computing Center of the University of São Paulo (USP-CCE through specific equipment. A sentence was selected to be segmented and analyzed in smaller units (syllables. In order to obtain F0 values, the software PRAAT and some of its scripts were used. Results: Analyzing F0 average of each emotion, we found that joy shows higher frequency bands than sadness that has very low values of F0 . Variation of F0 in anger remained similar among the actresses speech. On the other hand, fear did not offer any F0 range pattern. Conclusion: F0 values , both mean and variation, show to be important in the differentiation of emotions: joy, anger and sadness. Fear seems to suffer other acoustic and physiological influences – a those could be analyzed in a more broad study – other than F

  20. Automated identification system for seizure EEG signals using tunable-Q wavelet transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ravi Shankar Reddy

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, EEG signals of different classes are analysed in tunable-Q wavelet transform (TQWT framework. The TQWT decomposes the EEG signals into subbands and arrange them into decreasing order of frequency. The nonlinearity of the EEG signals is assessed by computing the centered correntropy (CCE from the obtained subbands, which is further used as a feature for classifying the different categories of EEG signals. In this work, EEG signals are categorised in two different classification problems. First category is seizure free and seizure (NF-S classes, and the other one is the normal, seizure free and seizure (ZO-NF-S classes. Features obtained from the EEG signals of these classes are fed to the input of three different classifiers namely, random forest classifier (RF, multilayer perceptron (MLP classifier, and logistic regression (LR classifier. For NF-S classes, we achieved 98.3% classification accuracy with RF classifier for signal length of 1000 samples. The obtained accuracy of classification is 98.2% for ZO-NF-S classes using MLP classifier when features are extracted from signal length of 1000 samples.

  1. Monitoring radiation damage in the LHCb Silicon Tracker

    CERN Multimedia

    Graverini, Elena

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of LHCb is to search for indirect evidence of new physics in decays of heavy hadrons. The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer with precise silicon-strip detectors in the regions with highest particle occupancies. The non-uniform exposure of the LHCb sensors makes it an ideal laboratory to study radiation damage effects in silicon detectors. The LHCb Silicon Tracker is composed of an upstream tracker, the TT, and of the inner part of the downstream tracker (IT). Dedicated scans are regularly taken, which allow a precise measurement of the charge collection efficiency (CCE) and the calibration of the operational voltages. The measured evolution of the effective depletion voltage $V_{depl}$ is shown, and compared with the Hamburg model prediction. The magnitudes of the sensor leakage current are also analysed and compared to their expected evolution according to phenomenological models. Our results prove that both the TT and the IT will withstand normal operation until the end of the L...

  2. Representation of micrometeorological and physiological parameters with numerical models influencing the vineyard ecosystem: the case of Piemonte (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Valentina; Cassardo, Claudio; Cavalletto, Silvia; Ferrarese, Silvia; Guidoni, Silvia; Mania, Elena; Spanna, Federico

    2017-04-01

    Grapevine represents worldwide key economic activities, with Europe representing the largest vineyard area in the world (38%). This is also true both for Italy and for its Piemonte region, in which famous and renowned wines (such as Barolo and Barbaresco) are produced. Grapevine productivity depends on several factors including soil fertility, management practices, climate and meteorology. In particular, concerning the latter, there is a need for a reliable assessment of the effects of a changing climate on its yield and quality. However, in this respect, it is essential to understand how and how much climate and meteorology affect grape productivity and quality, since only few studies related to few regions in the world have been produced. In this context, crop models are essential tools for investigating the effects of climate change on crop development and growth via the integration of existing knowledge of crop physiology relating to changing environmental conditions. Nevertheless, crop models were developed and applied mainly for studying the responses to climate change of annual crops (e.g. cereals); whilst appropriate crop models and application of these are still limited for tree crops such as grapevine. The rationale of the study, included in the MACSUR2 JPI FACCE project, is to use the third generation land surface model UTOPIA (University of TOrino model of land Process Interaction with Atmosphere) [1], in order to evaluate all components of hydrological and energy budget, as well as soil and canopy parameters, on a specific subset of land use, the vineyards. A preliminary step of this work has been to compare the datasets resulted from the calculations made by the UTOPIA and some experimental datasets acquired within vineyards by our team in the past experiments. The reason for such control is to ensure that UTOPIA outputs could be considered as sufficiently representative of the climatology of vineyards. Thus, some Piedmontese vineyards were selected

  3. Quantifying the effect of Tmax extreme events on local adaptation to climate change of maize crop in Andalusia for the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldon, Clara; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Ines Minguez, M.; Lizaso, Jon; Dosio, Alessandro; Sanchez, Enrique; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change (FACCE - JPI) of EU and is financed by MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) and IFAPA project AGR6126 from Junta de Andalucía, Spain. References Dosio A. and Paruolo P., 2011. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high-resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Evaluation on the present climate. Journal of Geophysical Research, VOL. 116, D16106, doi:10.1029/2011JD015934 Dosio A., Paruolo P. and Rojas R., 2012. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Analysis of the climate change signal. Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 117, D17, doi: 0.1029/2012JD017968 Gabaldón C, Lorite IJ, Mínguez MI, Dosio A, Sánchez-Sánchez E and Ruiz-Ramos M, 2013. Evaluation of local adaptation strategies to climate change of maize crop in Andalusia for the first half of 21st century. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Vol. 15, EGU2013-13625, 2013. EGU General Assembly 2013, April 2013, Vienna, Austria. Jones C.A. and J.R. Kiniry. 1986. CERES-Maize: A simulation model of maize growth and development. Texas A&M Univ. Press, College Station. Ruiz-Ramos M., E. Sanchez, C. Galllardo, and M.I. Minguez. 2011. Impacts of projected maximum temperature extremes for C21 by an ensemble of regional climate models on cereal cropping systems in the Iberian Peninsula. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science 11: 3275-3291. Teixeira EI, Fischer G, van Velthuizen H, Walter C, Ewert F. Global hotspots of heat stress on agricultural crops due to climate change. Agric For Meteorol. 2013;170(15):206-215.

  4. The Climate Change Education Evidence Base: Lessons Learned from NOAA's Monitoring and Evaluation Framework Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, J.

    2012-12-01

    Federal science mission agencies are under increased pressure to ensure that their STEM education investments accomplish several objectives, including the identification and use of evidence-based approaches. Climate change education and climate literacy programs fall under these broader STEM initiatives. This paper is designed as a primer for climate change education evaluators and researchers to understand the policy context on the use of evidence. Recent initiatives, that include the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), point to a need for shared goals and measurements amongst the climate change education community. The Tri-agency Climate Change Education (CCE) collaboration, which includes NSF, NASA, and NOAA, developed the Tri-Agency Climate Change Education Common Evaluation Framework Initiative Stakeholder Statement (2012). An excerpt: From the perspective of the tri-agency collaboration, and its individual agency members, the goal of the common framework is not to build a required evaluation scheme or a set of new requirements for our funded climate change education initiatives. Rather, the collaboration would be strengthened by the development of a framework that includes tools, instruments, and/or documentation to: ● Help the agencies see and articulate the relationships between the individual pieces of the tri-agency CCE portfolio; ● Guide the agencies in reporting on the progress, lessons learned, and impacts of the collaboration between the three agencies in developing a coordinated portfolio of climate education initiatives; and ● Help the individual projects, as part of this broader portfolio, understand where they fit into a larger picture. The accomplishments of this initiative to date have been based on the collaborative nature of evaluators the climate change education community within the tri-agency portfolio. While this

  5. Impact of irradiations by protons with different energies on silicon sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubueser, Coralie

    2013-06-01

    In the frame of the CMS tracker upgrade campaign the radiation damage of oxygenrich n-type silicon pad diodes induced by 23 MeV and 23 GeV protons was investigated. The diodes were manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics. After irradiation with 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences between 1 x 10 11 cm -2 and 1.5 x 10 15 cm -2 , the sensors were electrically characterized by means of capacitance-voltage (CV) and current-voltage (IV) measurements. Current pulses recorded by the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements show a dependence of the bulk damage on the proton energy. At a fluence of Φ eq ∼3 x 10 14 cm -2 oxygen-rich n-type diodes demonstrate clear Space Charge Sign Inversion (SCSI) after 23 MeV proton irradiation. This effect does not appear after the irradiation with 23 GeV protons. Moreover, RD50 pad diodes were irradiated with 23 MeV protons, electrically characterized and compared to results obtained after 23 GeV irradiations. Our previous observation on the energy dependence of the radiation damage could be confirmed. In order to get a deeper understanding of the differences of the radiation induced defects, the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current Technique (TSC) were utilized. Defects with impact on the space charge could be identified and characterized and it was possible to find some hints for the reason of the SCSI after 23 MeV proton irradiation. Moreover, a dependence on the oxygen concentration of the sensors could be observed.

  6. Estimating the Prevalence of Potential Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and Intimin Gene Diversity in a Human Community by Monitoring Sanitary Sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Pagaling, Eulyn

    2014-01-01

    Presently, the understanding of bacterial enteric diseases in the community and their virulence factors relies almost exclusively on clinical disease reporting and examination of clinical pathogen isolates. This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of an alternative approach that monitors potential enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) prevalence and intimin gene (eae) diversity in a community by directly quantifying and characterizing target virulence genes in the sanitary sewage. The quantitative PCR (qPCR) quantification of the eae, stx1, and stx2 genes in sanitary sewage samples collected over a 13-month period detected eae in all 13 monthly sewage samples at significantly higher abundance (93 to 7,240 calibrator cell equivalents [CCE]/100 ml) than stx1 and stx2, which were detected sporadically. The prevalence level of potential EPEC in the sanitary sewage was estimated by calculating the ratio of eae to uidA, which averaged 1.0% (σ = 0.4%) over the 13-month period. Cloning and sequencing of the eae gene directly from the sewage samples covered the majority of the eae diversity in the sewage and detected 17 unique eae alleles belonging to 14 subtypes. Among them, eae-β2 was identified to be the most prevalent subtype in the sewage, with the highest detection frequency in the clone libraries (41.2%) and within the different sampling months (85.7%). Additionally, sewage and environmental E. coli isolates were also obtained and used to determine the detection frequencies of the virulence genes as well as eae genetic diversity for comparison. PMID:24141131

  7. Highlights from a Mach 4 Experimental Demonstration of Inlet Mode Transition for Turbine-Based Combined Cycle Hypersonic Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Lancert E.; Saunders, John D., Jr.; Sanders, Bobby W.; Weir, Lois J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA is focused on technologies for combined cycle, air-breathing propulsion systems to enable reusable launch systems for access to space. Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems offer specific impulse (Isp) improvements over rocket-based propulsion systems in the subsonic takeoff and return mission segments along with improved safety. Among the most critical TBCC enabling technologies are: 1) mode transition from the low speed propulsion system to the high speed propulsion system, 2) high Mach turbine engine development and 3) innovative turbine based combined cycle integration. To address these challenges, NASA initiated an experimental mode transition task including analytical methods to assess the state-of-the-art of propulsion system performance and design codes. One effort has been the Combined-Cycle Engine Large Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE-LIMX) which is a fully integrated TBCC propulsion system with flowpath sizing consistent with previous NASA and DoD proposed Hypersonic experimental flight test plans. This experiment was tested in the NASA GRC 10 by 10-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) Facility. The goal of this activity is to address key hypersonic combined-cycle engine issues including: (1) dual integrated inlet operability and performance issues-unstart constraints, distortion constraints, bleed requirements, and controls, (2) mode-transition sequence elements caused by switching between the turbine and the ramjet/scramjet flowpaths (imposed variable geometry requirements), and (3) turbine engine transients (and associated time scales) during transition. Testing of the initial inlet and dynamic characterization phases were completed and smooth mode transition was demonstrated. A database focused on a Mach 4 transition speed with limited off-design elements was developed and will serve to guide future TBCC system studies and to validate higher level analyses.

  8. Gallium Nitride Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Min; Zhang Guoguang; Fu Kai; Yu Guohao; Su Dan; Hu Jifeng

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Gallium Nitride nuclear batteries with Ni-63 are demonstrated for the first time. → Open circuit voltage of 0.1 V and conversion efficiency of 0.32% have been obtained. → The limited performance is due to thin effective energy deposition layer. → The output power is expected to greatly increase with growing thick GaN films. -- Abstract: Gallium Nitride (GaN) Schottky betavoltaic nuclear batteries (GNBB) are demonstrated in our work for the first time. GaN films are grown on sapphire substrates by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), and then GaN Schottky diodes are fabricated by normal micro-fabrication process. Nickel with mass number of 63 ( 63 Ni), which emits β particles, is loaded on the GaN Schottky diodes to achieve GNBB. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) are carried out to investigate the crystal quality for the GaN films as grown. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics shows that the GaN Schottky diodes are not jet broken down at -200 V due to consummate fabrication processes, and the open circuit voltage of the GNBB is 0.1 V and the short circuit current density is 1.2 nA cm -2 . The limited performance of the GNBB is due to thin effective energy deposition layer, which is only 206 nm to absorb very small partial energy of the β particles because of the relatively high dislocation density and carrier concentration. However, the conversion efficiency of 0.32% and charge collection efficiency (CCE) of 29% for the GNBB have been obtained. Therefore, the output power of the GNBB are expected to greatly increase with growing high quality thick GaN films.

  9. Those are Your Legs: The Effect of Visuo-Spatial Viewpoint on Visuo-Tactile Integration and Body Ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozeg, Polona; Galli, Giulia; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Experiencing a body part as one's own, i.e., body ownership, depends on the integration of multisensory bodily signals (including visual, tactile, and proprioceptive information) with the visual top-down signals from peripersonal space. Although it has been shown that the visuo-spatial viewpoint from where the body is seen is an important visual top-down factor for body ownership, different studies have reported diverging results. Furthermore, the role of visuo-spatial viewpoint (sometime also called first-person perspective) has only been studied for hands or the whole body, but not for the lower limbs. We thus investigated whether and how leg visuo-tactile integration and leg ownership depended on the visuo-spatial viewpoint from which the legs were seen and the anatomical similarity of the visual leg stimuli. Using a virtual leg illusion, we tested the strength of visuo-tactile integration of leg stimuli using the crossmodal congruency effect (CCE) as well as the subjective sense of leg ownership (assessed by a questionnaire). Fifteen participants viewed virtual legs or non-corporeal control objects, presented either from their habitual first-person viewpoint or from a viewpoint that was rotated by 90°(third-person viewpoint), while applying visuo-tactile stroking between the participants legs and the virtual legs shown on a head-mounted display. The data show that the first-person visuo-spatial viewpoint significantly boosts the visuo-tactile integration as well as the sense of leg ownership. Moreover, the viewpoint-dependent increment of the visuo-tactile integration was only found in the conditions when participants viewed the virtual legs (absent for control objects). These results confirm the importance of first person visuo-spatial viewpoint for the integration of visuo-tactile stimuli and extend findings from the upper extremity and the trunk to visuo-tactile integration and ownership for the legs.

  10. Development of beam halo monitors for the European XFEL using radiation hard sensors and demonstration of the technology at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatenko, Alexandr

    2015-05-01

    The European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (E-XFEL), currently under construction in Hamburg, Germany, is intended to be an international linear accelerator (linac) based user facility. Its electron beam can carry maximal average power of 600 kW. A beam with such a high power needs to be carefully transmitted through the machine and safely dumped after utilization. This is supported by various diagnostics tools. A Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) based on synthetic diamond and sapphire sensors has been designed. Diamond sensors are developed by the company element6 for the detection of ionizing radiation and used previously elsewhere. Sapphire sensors are in this thesis applied for the first time. The BHM concept has been applied already at the Free-electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH). A module with four diamond and four sapphire sensors was designed, installed inside the beam pipe, commissioned, calibrated and has been successfully operated for 4 years. The system contributed significantly to safe and efficient operation of FLASH. Both types of the sensors for the BHM were characterized. Measurements of radiation tolerance are done in a 10 MeV electron beam for polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamond sensors for the first time up to a dose of 10 MGy and for sapphire sensors up to 5 MGy. The charge collection efficiency (CCE) drops as a function of the absorbed dose, is however still sufficient for application as a BHM. To improve a main sensor characteristic, the charge collection efficiency, for sapphire sensors the impurity concentration was reduced and different growth techniques were compared. Finally, charge collection efficiency of about 5 % for a bias voltage of 500 V was reached. The BHM concept for the XFEL is designed and in the construction phase.

  11. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.

    2007-09-01

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a 55 Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 μm x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 μW) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 μm OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  12. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Rie [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Akimoto, Takayuki, E-mail: akimoto@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Hong, Zhang [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Ushida, Takashi [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of 'stemness' was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  13. Computational analysis of storage synthesis in developing Brassica napus L. (oilseed rape) embryos: Flux variability analysis in relation to 13C-metabolic flux analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, J.; Schwender, J.

    2011-08-01

    Plant oils are an important renewable resource, and seed oil content is a key agronomical trait that is in part controlled by the metabolic processes within developing seeds. A large-scale model of cellular metabolism in developing embryos of Brassica napus (bna572) was used to predict biomass formation and to analyze metabolic steady states by flux variability analysis under different physiological conditions. Predicted flux patterns are highly correlated with results from prior 13C metabolic flux analysis of B. napus developing embryos. Minor differences from the experimental results arose because bna572 always selected only one sugar and one nitrogen source from the available alternatives, and failed to predict the use of the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Flux variability, indicative of alternative optimal solutions, revealed alternative pathways that can provide pyruvate and NADPH to plastidic fatty acid synthesis. The nutritional values of different medium substrates were compared based on the overall carbon conversion efficiency (CCE) for the biosynthesis of biomass. Although bna572 has a functional nitrogen assimilation pathway via glutamate synthase, the simulations predict an unexpected role of glycine decarboxylase operating in the direction of NH4+ assimilation. Analysis of the light-dependent improvement of carbon economy predicted two metabolic phases. At very low light levels small reductions in CO2 efflux can be attributed to enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (oxoglutarate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase) and glycine decarboxylase. At higher light levels relevant to the 13C flux studies, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity is predicted to account fully for the light-dependent changes in carbon balance.

  14. Factores psicosociales, cognitivos y de personalidad asociados a la adherencia al tratamiento en comunidades terapéuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Hernández Serrano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes investigaciones han relacionado la adherencia al tratamiento con el éxito y no éxito en la terapia, junto con características tales como el tiempo de permanencia, la motivación previa y estilos de afrontamiento más eficaces. Este estudio identificó factores psicosociales, cognitivos y de personalidad asociados a la adherencia al tratamiento en comunidades terapéuticas en Colombia. Muestra: 443 participantes (373 hombres y 70 mujeres, edad media de 18 años (D.E. 5.9; rango 11-50 años. Instrumentos: Escala de adherencia CMRS, Escala de acontecimientos vitales, Cuestionario de esquema YSQ, Cuestionario de creencias de trastornos de la personalidad CCE-TP, Escala de estrategias de afrontamiento EEC-M, Cuadro Toxicológico. Procedimiento: para el análisis estadístico se dividió el grupo en dos: alta adherencia y menor adherencia. Resultados: alta asociación de adherencia y tiempo de permanencia. La función discriminante predictora para alta adherencia estuvo compuesta por las siguientes variables: estrategia de búsqueda de apoyo profesional, personalidad obsesivo-compulsiva, reevaluación positiva, la edad, vulnerabilidad al daño y la enfermedad, solución de problemas y de manera negativa la autonomía.El porcentaje de pronóstico de la función discriminante fue del 67,72%.

  15. Contribution des TIC à la durabilité des organisations logistiques et de transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Blanquart

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La récente révision du livre Blanc des transports en 2006 prône comme option de transport durable la co-modalité, autrement dit « le recours efficace à différents modes de transport isolément ou en combinaison » (CCE, 2006. La maîtrise de l’information, rendue possible grâce à de nouveaux systèmes de gestion, est au cœur du développement de la co-modalité. C’est en tout cas le pari du fret intelligent, qui soutient l’application aux infrastructures et aux matériels des nouvelles technologies. De fait, l’offre de services logistiques et de transport a évolué, et intègre de plus en plus d’opérations de nature « informationnelle ». Toutefois, leur mobilisation par les firmes dans le cadre de leurs stratégies logistiques dépend d’autres facteurs, parmi lesquels : (1 les contraintes tenant à l’optimisation micro-économique en termes de coûts et de temps pour la firme ; (2 les contraintes imposées au niveau méso-économique par les relations avec les autres acteurs du système productif (et notamment les clients. C’est pourquoi il existe une diversité de stratégies logistiques et de transport, qui vont appeler des besoins de services différents. De même, les choix en faveur de la durabilité pourront être très différents et mobiliser des leviers spécifiques. Dès lors, l’influence des systèmes de transport intelligents sera très variable.

  16. Deltamethrin Resistance Mechanisms in Aedes aegypti Populations from Three French Overseas Territories Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Dusfour

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aedes aegypti is a cosmopolite mosquito, vector of arboviruses. The worldwide studies of its insecticide resistance have demonstrated a strong loss of susceptibility to pyrethroids, the major class of insecticide used for vector control. French overseas territories such as French Guiana (South America, Guadeloupe islands (Lesser Antilles as well as New Caledonia (Pacific Ocean, have encountered such resistance.We initiated a research program on the pyrethroid resistance in French Guiana, Guadeloupe and New Caledonia. Aedes aegypti populations were tested for their deltamethrin resistance level then screened by an improved microarray developed to specifically study metabolic resistance mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 genes were implicated in conferring resistance. CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, CYP6N12, CYP9J9, CYP9J10 and CCE3 genes were upregulated in the resistant populations and were common to other populations at a regional scale. The implication of these genes in resistance phenomenon is therefore strongly suggested. Other genes from detoxification pathways were also differentially regulated. Screening for target site mutations on the voltage-gated sodium channel gene demonstrated the presence of I1016 and C1534.This study highlighted the presence of a common set of differentially up-regulated detoxifying genes, mainly cytochrome P450 genes in all three populations. GUA and GUY populations shared a higher number of those genes compared to CAL. Two kdr mutations well known to be associated to pyrethroid resistance were also detected in those two populations but not in CAL. Different selective pressures and genetic backgrounds can explain such differences. These results are also compared with those obtained from other parts of the world and are discussed in the context of integrative research on vector competence.

  17. De novo assembly, gene annotation, and marker discovery in stored-product pest Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein using transcriptome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a major stored-product pest insect, Liposcelis entomophila has developed high levels of resistance to various insecticides in grain storage systems. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance and environmental stress have not been characterized. To date, there is a lack of genomic information for this species. Therefore, studies aimed at profiling the L. entomophila transcriptome would provide a better understanding of the biological functions at the molecular levels. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied Illumina sequencing technology to sequence the transcriptome of L. entomophila. A total of 54,406,328 clean reads were obtained and that de novo assembled into 54,220 unigenes, with an average length of 571 bp. Through a similarity search, 33,404 (61.61% unigenes were matched to known proteins in the NCBI non-redundant (Nr protein database. These unigenes were further functionally annotated with gene ontology (GO, cluster of orthologous groups of proteins (COG, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG databases. A large number of genes potentially involved in insecticide resistance were manually curated, including 68 putative cytochrome P450 genes, 37 putative glutathione S-transferase (GST genes, 19 putative carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE genes, and other 126 transcripts to contain target site sequences or encoding detoxification genes representing eight types of resistance enzymes. Furthermore, to gain insight into the molecular basis of the L. entomophila toward thermal stresses, 25 heat shock protein (Hsp genes were identified. In addition, 1,100 SSRs and 57,757 SNPs were detected and 231 pairs of SSR primes were designed for investigating the genetic diversity in future. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed a comprehensive transcriptomic database for L. entomophila. These sequences and putative molecular markers would further promote our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying

  18. Silicon microstrip detectors in 3D technology for the sLHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David; Ronchin, Sabina; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    The projected luminosity upgrade of the large hadron collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Massive improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. In the layout for the new ATLAS tracker, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSDs will be exposed to fluences up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , hence radiation resistance is the major concern. It is advantageous to fuse the superior radiation hardness of the 3D design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the well-known planar technology for strip detectors. This is achieved by ganging rows of 3D columns together to form strips. Several prototype sLHC detector modules using 3D SSD with short strips, processed on p-type silicon, and LHC-speed front-end electronics from the present ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) were built. The modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency (CCE), a Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particles (MIPs), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the performance of these 3D modules, and draws conclusions about options for using 3D strip sensors as tracking detectors at the sLHC.

  19. Silicon microstrip detectors in 3D technology for the sLHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris; Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-08-01

    The projected luminosity upgrade of the large hadron collider (LHC), the sLHC, will constitute a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors. Massive improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. In the layout for the new ATLAS tracker, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSDs will be exposed to fluences up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, hence radiation resistance is the major concern. It is advantageous to fuse the superior radiation hardness of the 3D design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the well-known planar technology for strip detectors. This is achieved by ganging rows of 3D columns together to form strips. Several prototype sLHC detector modules using 3D SSD with short strips, processed on p-type silicon, and LHC-speed front-end electronics from the present ATLAS semi-conductor tracker (SCT) were built. The modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency (CCE), a Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particles (MIPs), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the performance of these 3D modules, and draws conclusions about options for using 3D strip sensors as tracking detectors at the sLHC.

  20. Progress on MCT SWIR modules for passive and active imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiter, R.; Benecke, M.; Eich, D.; Figgemeier, H.; Weber, A.; Wendler, J.; Sieck, A.

    2017-02-01

    For SWIR imaging applications, based on AIM's state-of-the-art MCT IR technology specific detector designs for either low light level imaging or laser illuminated active imaging are under development. For imaging under low-light conditions a low-noise 640x512 15μm pitch ROIC with CTIA input stages and correlated double sampling was designed. The ROIC provides rolling shutter and snapshot integration. To reduce size, weight, power and cost (SWaP-C) a 640x512 format detector in a 10μm pitch is been realized. While LPE grown MCT FPAs with extended 2.5μm cut-off have been fabricated and integrated also MBE grown MCT on GaAs is considered for future production. The module makes use of the extended SWIR (eSWIR) spectral cut-off up to 2.5μm to allow combination of emissive and reflective imaging by already detecting thermal radiation in the eSWIR band. A demonstrator imager was built to allow field testing of this concept. A resulting product will be a small, compact clip-on weapon sight. For active imaging a detector module was designed providing gating capability. SWIR MCT avalanche photodiodes have been implemented and characterized on FPA level in a 640x512 15μm pitch format. The specific ROIC provides also the necessary functions for range gate control and triggering by the laser illumination. The FPAs are integrated in a compact dewar cooler configuration using AIM's split linear cooler. A command and control electronics (CCE) provides supply voltages, biasing, clocks, control and video digitization for easy system interfacing. First lab and field tests of a gated viewing demonstrator have been carried out and the module has been further improved.

  1. Capacidad de carga turÍstica como base para el manejo sustentable de actividades ecoturísticas en Unidades de Manejo Ambiental (UMA de Baja California Sur (BCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna Ibañez Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existen zonas ejidales con UMA ́s, que desean incursionar en el turismo alternativo; tal es el caso del Nuevo Centro Poblacional Ejidal (NCPE, Ley Federal de Aguas Número 3, que se extiende a tres municipios de Baja California Sur (BCS, posee una UMA y se destaca por buscar opciones para reactivar su economía. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados de un estudio de Capacidad de Carga Turística (CCT, realizada en dos senderos de ese ejido, mediante la aplicación de la metodología de Cifuentes, que busca establecer el número máximo de visitas que puede recibir un área con base en sus condiciones físicas, biológicas y de manejo; cuya estimación, requirió de la revisión de censos de flora y fauna, de información geológica, climatológica, geográfica, ambiental, social, económica, turística, así como trabajo de campo. Los resultados indican que, en el NCPE, Ley Federal de Aguas Número 3, existen dos senderos con potencialidad turística para los cuales, se ha estimado una Capacidad de Carga Efectiva (CCE de 18 visitantes/día para el sendero del arroyo El Camarón y de 10 visitantes/día sendero del arroyo El Saucito. Las cifras anteriores, son un referente para el establecimiento de medidas de control de las visitas en ambos senderos

  2. El uso de las TIC como herramienta fundamental en los programas de la Universalización en la asignatura Rectora Gimnasia Básica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Ramón Sánchez Linares

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Según lo establecido en reglamento metodológico en su artículo Nº 79 El sistema de información científico-técnica y docente es el componente del modelo pedagógico que se ofrece en las Sedes, o en otras instalaciones apropiadas, como complemento a la auto preparación de los estudiantes, en dependencia de los recursos informativos disponibles en el territorio. Teniendo presente lo ante expuesto y producto de la carencia de los recursos y materiales necesarios tanto para profesores y estudiantes que desarrollan la técnica por encuentro en las Sedes. Nuestro trabajo fue dirigido a conocer si existía en nuestra provincia esa carencias, después de conocida la misma nos dimos a la tarea de aportar dos sito Web elaborado por profesores y estudiantes de los CCE los cuales fueron realizados en las asignaturas de Gimnasia Básica y Ajedrez, el primero se aplicó en todas las sedes de nuestra provincia el pasado curso con resultados muy positivos, en la actualidad se trabaja con el en las Sedes de las provincias de Guantánamo ,Santiago de Cuba, Las Tunas, Cienfuegos, Villa clara, Matanza y en algunas Sedes de Ciudad Habana, este es novedoso y de fácil manejo para profesores y estudiante , aporta al país un ahorro considerable de divisa. Por su importancia en la forma en que se trata los contenidos y la actualidad de ellos, ha trascendido las fronteras de las Sedes de Cultura física y se utiliza como forma de consultas en las escuelas comunitarias y otras instituciones. El segundo se valida en estos momentos en nuestra Sede con muy buenos resultados.

  3. Impact of irradiations by protons with different energies on silicon sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubueser, Coralie

    2013-06-15

    In the frame of the CMS tracker upgrade campaign the radiation damage of oxygenrich n-type silicon pad diodes induced by 23 MeV and 23 GeV protons was investigated. The diodes were manufactured by Hamamatsu Photonics. After irradiation with 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences between 1 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and 1.5 x 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, the sensors were electrically characterized by means of capacitance-voltage (CV) and current-voltage (IV) measurements. Current pulses recorded by the Transient Current Technique (TCT) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) measurements show a dependence of the bulk damage on the proton energy. At a fluence of {Phi}{sub eq}{approx}3 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} oxygen-rich n-type diodes demonstrate clear Space Charge Sign Inversion (SCSI) after 23 MeV proton irradiation. This effect does not appear after the irradiation with 23 GeV protons. Moreover, RD50 pad diodes were irradiated with 23 MeV protons, electrically characterized and compared to results obtained after 23 GeV irradiations. Our previous observation on the energy dependence of the radiation damage could be confirmed. In order to get a deeper understanding of the differences of the radiation induced defects, the Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) and Thermally Stimulated Current Technique (TSC) were utilized. Defects with impact on the space charge could be identified and characterized and it was possible to find some hints for the reason of the SCSI after 23 MeV proton irradiation. Moreover, a dependence on the oxygen concentration of the sensors could be observed.

  4. Linking phytoplankton and bacterioplankton community dynamics to iron-binding ligand production in a microcosm experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogle, S. L.; Bundy, R.; Barbeau, K.

    2016-02-01

    Several significant lines of evidence implicate heterotrophic bacterioplankton as agents of iron cycling and sources of iron-binding ligands in seawater, but direct and mechanistic linkages have mostly remained elusive. Currently, it is unknown how microbial community composition varies during the course of biogenic particle remineralization and how shifts in community structure are related to sources and sinks of Fe-binding ligands. In order to simulate the rise, decline, and ultimate remineralization of a phytoplankton bloom, we followed the production of different classes of Fe-binding ligands as measured by electrochemical techniques, Fe concentrations, and macronutrient concentrations in a series of iron-amended whole seawater incubations over a period of six days during a California Current Ecosystem Long Term Ecological Research (CCE-LTER) process cruise. At the termination of the experiment phytoplankton communities were similar across iron treatments, but high iron conditions generated greater phytoplankton biomass and increased nutrient drawdown suggesting that phytoplankton communities were in different phases of bloom development. Strikingly, L1 ligands akin to siderophores in binding strength were only observed in high iron treatments implicating phytoplankton bloom phase as an important control. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene surveys, we observed that the abundance of transiently dominant copiotroph bacteria were strongly correlated with L1 concentrations. However, incubations with similar L1 concentrations and binding strengths produced distinct copiotroph community profiles dominated by a few strains. We suggest that phytoplankton bloom maturity influences algal-associated heterotrophic community succession, and that L1 production is either directly or indirectly tied to the appearance and eventual dominance of rarely abundant copiotroph bacterial strains.

  5. Program Development Tools and Infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M.

    2012-01-01

    Exascale class machines will exhibit a new level of complexity: they will feature an unprecedented number of cores and threads, will most likely be heterogeneous and deeply hierarchical, and offer a range of new hardware techniques (such as speculative threading, transactional memory, programmable prefetching, and programmable accelerators), which all have to be utilized for an application to realize the full potential of the machine. Additionally, users will be faced with less memory per core, fixed total power budgets, and sharply reduced MTBFs. At the same time, it is expected that the complexity of applications will rise sharply for exascale systems, both to implement new science possible at exascale and to exploit the new hardware features necessary to achieve exascale performance. This is particularly true for many of the NNSA codes, which are large and often highly complex integrated simulation codes that push the limits of everything in the system including language features. To overcome these limitations and to enable users to reach exascale performance, users will expect a new generation of tools that address the bottlenecks of exascale machines, that work seamlessly with the (set of) programming models on the target machines, that scale with the machine, that provide automatic analysis capabilities, and that are flexible and modular enough to overcome the complexities and changing demands of the exascale architectures. Further, any tool must be robust enough to handle the complexity of large integrated codes while keeping the user's learning curve low. With the ASC program, in particular the CSSE (Computational Systems and Software Engineering) and CCE (Common Compute Environment) projects, we are working towards a new generation of tools that fulfill these requirements and that provide our users as well as the larger HPC community with the necessary tools, techniques, and methodologies required to make exascale performance a reality.

  6. Analysis of the Olive Fruit Fly Bactrocera oleae Transcriptome and Phylogenetic Classification of the Major Detoxification Gene Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nena Pavlidi

    Full Text Available The olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae has a unique ability to cope with olive flesh, and is the most destructive pest of olives worldwide. Its control has been largely based on the use of chemical insecticides, however, the selection of insecticide resistance against several insecticides has evolved. The study of detoxification mechanisms, which allow the olive fruit fly to defend against insecticides, and/or phytotoxins possibly present in the mesocarp, has been hampered by the lack of genomic information in this species. In the NCBI database less than 1,000 nucleotide sequences have been deposited, with less than 10 detoxification gene homologues in total. We used 454 pyrosequencing to produce, for the first time, a large transcriptome dataset for B. oleae. A total of 482,790 reads were assembled into 14,204 contigs. More than 60% of those contigs (8,630 were larger than 500 base pairs, and almost half of them matched with genes of the order of the Diptera. Analysis of the Gene Ontology (GO distribution of unique contigs, suggests that, compared to other insects, the assembly is broadly representative for the B. oleae transcriptome. Furthermore, the transcriptome was found to contain 55 P450, 43 GST-, 15 CCE- and 18 ABC transporter-genes. Several of those detoxification genes, may putatively be involved in the ability of the olive fruit fly to deal with xenobiotics, such as plant phytotoxins and insecticides. In summary, our study has generated new data and genomic resources, which will substantially facilitate molecular studies in B. oleae, including elucidation of detoxification mechanisms of xenobiotic, as well as other important aspects of olive fruit fly biology.

  7. Deltamethrin Resistance Mechanisms in Aedes aegypti Populations from Three French Overseas Territories Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusfour, Isabelle; Zorrilla, Pilar; Guidez, Amandine; Issaly, Jean; Girod, Romain; Guillaumot, Laurent; Robello, Carlos; Strode, Clare

    2015-11-01

    Aedes aegypti is a cosmopolite mosquito, vector of arboviruses. The worldwide studies of its insecticide resistance have demonstrated a strong loss of susceptibility to pyrethroids, the major class of insecticide used for vector control. French overseas territories such as French Guiana (South America), Guadeloupe islands (Lesser Antilles) as well as New Caledonia (Pacific Ocean), have encountered such resistance. We initiated a research program on the pyrethroid resistance in French Guiana, Guadeloupe and New Caledonia. Aedes aegypti populations were tested for their deltamethrin resistance level then screened by an improved microarray developed to specifically study metabolic resistance mechanisms. Cytochrome P450 genes were implicated in conferring resistance. CYP6BB2, CYP6M11, CYP6N12, CYP9J9, CYP9J10 and CCE3 genes were upregulated in the resistant populations and were common to other populations at a regional scale. The implication of these genes in resistance phenomenon is therefore strongly suggested. Other genes from detoxification pathways were also differentially regulated. Screening for target site mutations on the voltage-gated sodium channel gene demonstrated the presence of I1016 and C1534. This study highlighted the presence of a common set of differentially up-regulated detoxifying genes, mainly cytochrome P450 genes in all three populations. GUA and GUY populations shared a higher number of those genes compared to CAL. Two kdr mutations well known to be associated to pyrethroid resistance were also detected in those two populations but not in CAL. Different selective pressures and genetic backgrounds can explain such differences. These results are also compared with those obtained from other parts of the world and are discussed in the context of integrative research on vector competence.

  8. The down canyon evolution of submarine sediment density flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Barry, J.; Clare, M. A.; Cartigny, M.; Chaffey, M. R.; Gales, J. A.; Gwiazda, R.; Maier, K. L.; McGann, M.; Paull, C. K.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Simmons, S.; Sumner, E. J.; Talling, P.; Xu, J.

    2017-12-01

    Submarine density flows, known as turbidity currents, transfer globally significant volumes of terrestrial and shelf sediments, organic carbon, nutrients and fresher-water into the deep ocean. Understanding such flows has wide implications for global organic carbon cycling, the functioning of deep-sea ecosystems, seabed infrastructure hazard assessments, and interpreting geological archives of Earth history. Only river systems transport comparable volumes of sediment over such large areas of the globe. Despite their clear importance, there are remarkably few direct measurements of these oceanic turbidity currents in action. Here we present results from the multi-institution Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) which deployed multiple moorings along the axis of Monterey Canyon (offshore California). An array of six moorings, with downward looking acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) were positioned along the canyon axis from 290 m to 1850 m water depth. The ADCPs reveal the internal flow structure of submarine density flows at each site. We use a novel inversion method to reconstruct the suspended sediment concentration and flow stratification field during each event. Together the six moorings provide the first ever views of the internal structural evolution of turbidity current events as they evolve down system. Across the total 18-month period of deployment at least 15 submarine sediment density flows were measured with velocities up to 8.1 m/sec, with three of these flows extending 50 kms down the canyon beyond the 1850 m water depth mooring. We use these novel data to highlight the controls on ignition, interval structure and collapse of individual events and discuss the implications for the functioning and deposits produced by these enigmatic flows.

  9. Short-term moderate intensive high volume training program provides aerobic endurance benefit in wheelchair basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skucas, Kestutis; Pokvytyte, Vaida

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the effect of short-term period, moderate intensity and high volume endurance training on physiological variables in elite wheelchair basketball players. Eight wheelchair basketball players were examined. The subjects participated in a two-week intervention program of mainly two training types: wheelchair basketball and wheelchair driving endurance training. The subjects performed the continuously increasing cycling exercise (CCE) at the constant 60 rpm arm cranking speed at the beginning of the program and after two weeks of the program. The initial workload was 20 W, then the workload was increased by 2 W every 5 seconds until fatigue. The post training of the wheelchair basketball group in the study showed a significant improvement in the peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and the peak power output (POpeak). VO2peak increased by 9% from 2.32±0.16 L/min to 2.53±0.2 L/min (Ptraining and post training test power output (PO [w]), relative power output (PO [w/kg]) increased significantly in all zones of energy production. In conclusion, this study indicated that the wheelchair basketball squad had relatively high levels of aerobic fitness prior to participating in the endurance training program. Nevertheless, the high-volume, moderate-intensity, short-term training program, which evolved over the two-weeks period, resulted in the improvement of the athlete's aerobic endurance. The ventilatory threshold (VT) and the second ventilatory threshold (VT2) are good markers for aerobic capacity of wheelchair athletes.

  10. Physics of Substorm Growth Phase, Onset, and Dipolarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.Z. Cheng

    2003-10-22

    A new scenario of substorm growth phase, onset, and depolarization during expansion phase and the corresponding physical processes are presented. During the growth phase, as a result of enhanced plasma convection, the plasma pressure and its gradient are continued to be enhanced over the quiet-time values in the plasma sheet. Toward the late growth phase, a strong cross-tail current sheet is formed in the near-Earth plasma sheet region, where a local magnetic well is formed, the plasma beta can reach a local maximum with value larger than 50 and the cross-tail current density can be enhanced to over 10nA/m{sup 2} as obtained from 3D quasi-static magnetospheric equilibrium solutions for the growth phase. The most unstable kinetic ballooning instabilities (KBI) are expected to be located in the tailward side of the strong cross-tail current sheet region. The field lines in the most unstable KBI region map to the transition region between the region-1 and region-2 currents in the ionosphere, which is consistent with the observed initial brightening location of the breakup arc in the intense proton precipitation region. The KBI explains the AMPTE/CCE observations that a low-frequency instability with a wave period of 50-75 seconds is excited about 2-3 minutes prior to substorm onset and grows exponentially to a large amplitude at the onset of current disruption (or current reduction). At the current disruption onset higher frequency instabilities are excited so that the plasma and electromagnetic field fluctuations form a strong turbulent state. Plasma transport takes place due to the strong turbulence to relax the ambient plasma pressure profile so that the plasma pressure and current density are reduced and the ambient magnetic field intensity increases by more than a factor of 2 in the high-beta(sub)eq region and the field line geometry recovers from tail-like to dipole-like dipolarization.

  11. Research and Development of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors for the Detection of the Elementary Particles; Recherche et developpement de capteurs actifs monolithiques CMOS pour la detection de particules elementaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y

    2007-09-15

    In order to develop high spatial resolution and readout speed vertex detectors for the future International Linear Collider (ILC), fast CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are studied on this work. Two prototypes of MAPS, MIMOSA 8 and MIMOSA 16, based on the same micro-electronic architecture were developed in CMOS processes with different thickness of epitaxial layer. The size of pixel matrix is 32 x 128: 8 columns of the pixel array are readout directly with analog outputs and the other 24 columns are connected to the column level auto-zero discriminators. The Correlated Double Sampling (CDS) structures are successfully implemented inside pixel and discriminator. The photo diode type pixels with different diode sizes are used in these prototypes. With a {sup 55}Fe X-ray radioactive source, the important parameters, such as Temporal Noise, Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN), Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR), Charge-to-Voltage conversion Factor (CVF) and Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE), are studied as function of readout speed and diode size. For MIMOSA 8, the effect of fast neutrons irradiation is also. Two beam tests campaigns were made: at DESY with a 5 GeV electrons beam and at CERN with a 180 GeV pions beam. Detection Efficiency and Spatial Resolution are studied in function of the discriminator threshold. For these two parameters, the influences of diode size and SNR of the central pixel of a cluster are also discussed. In order to improve the spatial resolution of the digital outputs, a very compact (25 {mu}m x 1 mm) and low consumption (300 {mu}W) column level ADC is designed in AMS 0.35 {mu}m OPTO process. Based on successive approximation architecture, the auto-offset cancellation structure is integrated. A new column level auto-zero discriminator using static latch is also designed. (author)

  12. Technical support document: Energy conservation standards for consumer products: Dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers including: Environmental impacts; regulatory impact analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act as amended (P.L. 94-163), establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of standards on dishwashers, clothes washers, and clothes dryers. The economic impact analysis is performed in five major areas: An Engineering Analysis, which establishes technical feasibility and product attributes including costs of design options to improve appliance efficiency. A Consumer Analysis at two levels: national aggregate impacts, and impacts on individuals. The national aggregate impacts include forecasts of appliance sales, efficiencies, energy use, and consumer expenditures. The individual impacts are analyzed by Life-Cycle Cost (LCC), Payback Periods, and Cost of Conserved Energy (CCE), which evaluate the savings in operating expenses relative to increases in purchase price; A Manufacturer Analysis, which provides an estimate of manufacturers' response to the proposed standards. Their response is quantified by changes in several measures of financial performance for a firm. An Industry Impact Analysis shows financial and competitive impacts on the appliance industry. A Utility Analysis that measures the impacts of the altered energy-consumption patterns on electric utilities. A Environmental Effects analysis, which estimates changes in emissions of carbon dioxide, sulfur oxides, and nitrogen oxides, due to reduced energy consumption in the home and at the power plant. A Regulatory Impact Analysis collects the results of all the analyses into the net benefits and costs from a national perspective. 47 figs., 171 tabs. (JF)

  13. Simulation study of signal formation in position sensitive planar p-on-n silicon detectors after short range charge injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, T.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Härkönen, J.

    2017-09-01

    Segmented silicon detectors (micropixel and microstrip) are the main type of detectors used in the inner trackers of Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments at CERN. Due to the high luminosity and eventual high fluence of energetic particles, detectors with fast response to fit the short shaping time of 20-25 ns and sufficient radiation hardness are required. Charge collection measurements carried out at the Ioffe Institute have shown a reversal of the pulse polarity in the detector response to short-range charge injection. Since the measured negative signal is about 30-60% of the peak positive signal, the effect strongly reduces the CCE even in non-irradiated detectors. For further investigation of the phenomenon the measurements have been reproduced by TCAD simulations. As for the measurements, the simulation study was applied for the p-on-n strip detectors similar in geometry to those developed for the ATLAS experiment and for the Ioffe Institute designed p-on-n strip detectors with each strip having a window in the metallization covering the p+ implant, allowing the generation of electron-hole pairs under the strip implant. Red laser scans across the strips and the interstrip gap with varying laser diameters and Si-SiO2 interface charge densities (Qf) were carried out. The results verify the experimentally observed negative response along the scan in the interstrip gap. When the laser spot is positioned on the strip p+ implant the negative response vanishes and the collected charge at the active strip increases respectively. The simulation results offer a further insight and understanding of the influence of the oxide charge density in the signal formation. The main result of the study is that a threshold value of Qf, that enables negligible losses of collected charges, is defined. The observed effects and details of the detector response for different charge injection positions are discussed in the context of Ramo's theorem.

  14. Caracterización del comportamiento emprendedor para los estudiantes de administración de la Universidad Nacional = Characterization of the enterpreneurial behavior of business administration students at Universidad del Rosario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Andrés Pulgarín Molina

    2011-08-01

    L’entrepreneuriat a acquis en tant que champ d’étude, une importance croissante dans les universités et les programmes gouvernementaux de ces cinq dernières années pour sa capacité à améliorer le développement économique et les processus d’innovation des pays. Un exemple clair en est la Colombie, où l’impact de l’entrepreneuriat a été si fort qu’il a été officialisé dans le cadre réglementaire avec la Loi 1014 de 2006 pour la promotion de la culture entrepreneuriale, mais aussi dans différentes institutions pour la promotion de l’entreprise. Toutefois, les efforts pour structurer les espaces de stimulation del’esprit d’entreprise doivent aller au-delà de la simple assistance mais plutôt mettre en place des plans stratégiques permettant la formation des entrepreneurs de manière articulée et conforment aux objectifs et politiques établies. Pour cette raison, une étude permettant la caractérisation des forces et faiblesses du profil des étudiants–entrepreneurs a été entreprise par le Centre de Gestion de l’Université de Rosario. Cette étude prend comme base les caractéristiques du comportement entrepreneurial ou CCE pour étudier les élèves de premier cycle de la Faculté de Gestion dans chacun de ses trois programmes. Finalement et avec l’aide de ces résultats, le Centre de Gestion pourra mettre en oeuvre ses programmes et projets, ainsi que les politiques liées au développement des qualités requises pour former de meilleurs entrepreneurs.

  15. The role of the ionosphere in coupling upstream ULF wave power into the dayside magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engebretson, M.J.; Cahill, L.J. Jr.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Anderson, B.J.; Rosenberg, T.J.; Carpenter, D.L.; Inan, U.S.; Eather, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    A series of recent studies of Pc 3 magnetic pulsations in the dayside outer magnetosphere has given new insights into the possible mechanisms of entry of ULF wave power into the magnetosphere from a bow shock related upstream source. In this paper, the authors first review many of these new observational results by presenting a comparison of data from two 10-hour intervals on successive days in April 1986 and then present a possible model for transmission of pulsation signals from the magnetosheath into the dayside magnetosphere. Simultaneous multi-instrument observations at South Pole Station, located below the cusp/cleft ionosphere near local noon, magnetic field observations by the AMPTE CCE satellite in the dayside outer magnetosphere, and upstream magnetic field observations by the IMP 8 satellite show clear interplanetary magnetic field field magnitude control of dayside resonant harmonic pulsations and band-limited very high latitude pulsations, as well as pulsation-modulated precipitation of what appear to be magnetosheath/boundary layer electrons. They believe that this modulated precipitation may be responsible for the propagation of upstream wave power in the Pc 3 frequency band into the high-latitude ionosphere, from whence it may be transported throughout the dayside outer magnetosphere by means of an ionospheric transistor. In this model, modulations in ionospheric conductivity caused by cusp/cleft precipitation cause varying ionospheric currents with frequency spectra determined by the upstream waves; these modulations will be superimposed on the Birkeland currents, which close via these ionospheric currents. Modulated region 2 Birkeland currents will in turn provide a narrow-band source of wave energy to a wide range of dayside local times in the outer magnetosphere

  16. Evaluation of acute radiation effects on mandibular movements of patients with head and neck cancer Avaliação dos efeitos agudos da radioterapia sobre os movimentos mandibulares de pacientes com câncer de cabeça e pescoço

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karoline C. Bragante

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate radiotherapy effects (RT on mandibular movements of patients with head and neck cancer (H&NC and associate them to the variables: functional capacity, radiation field, disease staging, type of feeding, concomitant chemotherapy and total dose of RT. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with H&NC were followed up at the RT service. Physical examination was performed in 3 follow up time points: before the beginning of RT (T0, between 14th and 17th session of RT (T1 and after the last session of RT (T2. The physical examination consisted of the assessment of the following variables: mouth opening without pain (MO, maximum mouth opening (MMO, right lateral excursion (RLE, left lateral excursion (LLE and protrusion (PR of the jaw. The feeding type and the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS were evaluated in each follow up time point. Data with regards to the tumor lesion and the RT were collected from the patient's clinical notes. RESULTS: There was a statistical significant reduction in the values of MO (p=0.006, MMO (p=0.001, LLE (p=0.006 and KPS (p=0.001. There was significant a statistical association among the reduction in KPS and decreased measure of MO (r=0.390, p=0.048 and MMO (r=0.435, p=0.026. The mouth and oropharynx radiation fields when combined showed a significant reduction for both the measure of MO (p=0.005 and for MMO (p=0.004. Patients who used nasoenteric tube feeding (NTF had greater reduction in the measurement of MMO (p=0.031. The remaining variables showed no statistically significant difference. CONCLUSION: Patients with H&NC present reduction of the measures of MO and MMO during the RT, especially if they present reduced functional capacity, have radiation in the mouth and oropharynx fields and used NTF.OBJETIVOS: Avaliar os efeitos da radioterapia (RT sobre os movimentos mandibulares de pacientes com câncer de cabeça e pescoço (CCeP e associá-los às variáveis: capacidade funcional, campo de radia

  17. Effects of Land Use Changes on Some Soil Chemical Properties in Khoy, West Azerbaijan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arezoo Taghipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intensified agriculture over a long-term is an important factor in soil change phenomena that can cause some unwanted effects on soil properties. To examine this hypothesis, chemical properties of the soils under sunflower cultivation over five decades and adjoining virgin lands were investigated in order to monitor changes caused by long-term cropping. The studied soils are influenced by continuous sunflower cultivation along with flooding irrigation and using chemical fertilizers for over five decades Materials and Methods: This research was undertaken at Khoy area (38o 10′ to 38o 40′ N latitude and 44o 15′ to 45o 10′ E latitude as the northern part of western-Azarbaijan province in the north-west Iran. The Khoy area is characterized by a semi-arid climate (mean annual rainfall of 300 mm linked with soil moisture and temperature regimes of xeric and mesic, respectively. Agriculturally, the studied area is cropped continuously by sunflower-wheat or barley rotations for over five decades and has received irrigation water from rainfall, groundwater, or seasonal river water. Forty soil surface samples (0-30 cm belonging to 10 soil series from the cultivated soils and the adjoining uncultivated soils were samplied and analyzed for the different chemical properties. In each soil serie, the samples (cultivated soil and adjacent virgin land were selected in similar slope, aspect, drainage condition, and parent materials. Soil analyses were involved soil pH and electrical conductivity (EC, soil organic carbon (SOC, Calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE, cation exchange capacity (CEC, total N, soluble K, exchangeable K, and available K. Potassium absorption ration (PAR was calculated by the concentration of solution K, Ca, Mg and exchangeable potassium percentage (EPP was calculated by exchangeable Na and CEC values Results and Discussion: This study illustrate that long-term continuous sunflower cropping had considerable effects on

  18. Evaluation of local adaptation strategies to climate change of maize crop in Andalusia for the first half of 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldón, Clara; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Inés Mínguez, M.; Dosio, Alessandro; Sánchez-Sánchez, Enrique; Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita

    2013-04-01

    grain filling period with the consequent reduction in yield (Ruiz-Ramos et al., 2011) and with the supraoptimal temperatures in pollination. Finally, results of simulated impacts and adaptations were compared to previous studies done without bias correction of climatic projections, at low resolution and with previous versions of crop models (Mínguez et al., 2007). This study will contribute to MACSUR knowledge Hub within the Joint Programming Initiative on Agriculture, Food Security and Climate Change (FACCE - JPI) of EU and is financed by MULCLIVAR project (CGL2012-38923-C02-02) and IFAPA project AGR6126 from Junta de Andalucía, Spain. References Dosio A. and Paruolo P., 2011. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high-resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Evaluation on the present climate. Journal of Geophysical Research, VOL. 116, D16106, doi:10.1029/2011JD015934 Dosio A., Paruolo P. and Rojas R., 2012. Bias correction of the ENSEMBLES high resolution climate change projections for use by impact models: Analysis of the climate change signal. Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 117, D17, doi: 0.1029/2012JD017968 Jones, C.A., and J.R. Kiniry. 1986. CERES-Maize: A simulation model of maize growth and development. Texas A&M Univ. Press, College Station. Mínguez, M.I., M. Ruiz-ramos, C.H. Díaz-Ambrona, and M. Quemada. 2007. First-order impacts on winter and summer crops assessed with various high-resolution climate models in the Iberian Peninsula. Climatic Change 81: 343-355. Ruiz-Ramos, M., E. Sanchez, C. Galllardo, and M.I. Minguez. 2011. Impacts of projected maximum temperature extremes for C21 by an ensemble of regional climate models on cereal cropping systems in the Iberian Peninsula. Natural Hazards and Earth System Science 11: 3275-3291. Stockle, C.O., M. Donatelli, and R. Nelson. 2003. CropSyst , a cropping systems simulation model. European Journal of Agronomy18: 289-307.

  19. Adaptation response surfaces from an ensemble of wheat projections under climate change in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Ferrise, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    preliminary ARSs show some adaptation options allow recover up to ca. 2000 kg/ha. Compared to the historical yields recorded at Lleida province (2550 kg/ha in 1981-2010) our results indicate that adaptation is feasible and may help to reduce detrimental effects of CC. Our analysis evaluates if the explored adaptations fulfill the biophysical requirements to become a practical adaptive solution. This study exemplifies how adaptation options and their impacts can be analyzed, evaluated and communicated in a context of high regional uncertainty for current and future conditions and for short to long-term perspective. This work was funded by MACSUR project within FACCE-JPI. References Abeledo, L.G., R. Savin and G.A. Slafer (2008). European Journal of Agronomy 28:541-550. Cartelle, J., A. Pedró, R. Savin, G.A. Slafer (2006) European Journal of Agronomy 25:365-371. Pirttioja, N., T. Carter, S. Fronzek, M. Bindi, H. Hoffmann, T. Palosuo, M. Ruiz-Ramos, F. Tao, M. Acutis, S. Asseng, P. Baranowski, B. Basso, P. Bodin, S. Buis, D. Cammarano, P. Deligios, M.-F. Destain, B. Dumont, R. Ewert, R. Ferrise, L. François, T. Gaiser, P. Hlavinka, I. Jacquemin, K.C. Kersebaum, C. Kollas, J. Krzyszczak, I.J. Lorite, J. Minet, M.I. Minguez, M. Montesino, M. Moriondo, C. Müller, C. Nendel, I. Öztürk, A. Perego, A. Rodríguez, A.C. Ruane, F. Ruget, M. Sanna, M.A. Semenov, C. Slawinski, P. Stratonovitch, I. Supit, K. Waha, E. Wang, L. Wu, Z. Zhao, and R.P. Rötter, 2015: A crop model ensemble analysis of temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect using impact response surfaces. Clim. Res., 65, 87-105, doi:10.3354/cr01322. IRS2 TEAM: Alfredo Rodríguez(1), Ignacio J. Lorite(3), Fulu Tao(4), Nina Pirttioja(5), Stefan Fronzek(5), Taru Palosuo(4), Timothy R. Carter(5), Marco Bindi(2), Jukka G Höhn(4), Kurt Christian Kersebaum(6), Miroslav Trnka(7,8), Holger Hoffmann(9), Piotr Baranowski(10), Samuel Buis(11), Davide Cammarano(12), Yi Chen(13,4), Paola Deligios

  20. Transcription analysis of neonicotinoid resistance in Mediterranean (MED) populations of B. tabaci reveal novel cytochrome P450s, but no nAChR mutations associated with the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilias, Aris; Lagnel, Jacques; Kapantaidaki, Despoina E; Roditakis, Emmanouil; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S; Vontas, John; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia

    2015-11-14

    Bemisia tabaci is one of the most damaging agricultural pests world-wide. Although its control is based on insecticides, B. tabaci has developed resistance against almost all classes of insecticides, including neonicotinoids. We employed an RNA-seq approach to generate genome wide expression data and identify genes associated with neonicotinoid resistance in Mediterranean (MED) B. tabaci (Q1 biotype). Twelve libraries from insecticide resistant and susceptible whitefly populations were sequenced on an Illumina Next-generation sequencing platform, and genomic sequence information of approximately 73 Gbp was generated. A reference transcriptome was built by de novo assembly and functionally annotated. A total of 146 P450s, 18 GSTs and 23 CCEs enzymes (unigenes) potentially involved in the detoxification of xenobiotics were identified, along with 78 contigs encoding putative target proteins of six different insecticide classes. Ten unigenes encoding nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors (nAChR), the target of neoinicotinoids, were identified and phylogenetically classified. No nAChR polymorphism potentially related with the resistant phenotypes, was observed among the studied strains. DE analysis revealed that among the 550 differentially (logFC > 1) over-transcribed unigenes, 52 detoxification enzymes were over expressed including unigenes with orthologues in P450s, GSTs, CCE and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. Eight P450 unigenes belonging to clades CYP2, CYP3 and CYP4 were highly up-regulated (logFC > 2) including CYP6CM1, a gene already known to confer imidacloprid resistance in B. tabaci. Using quantitative qPCRs, a larger screening of field MED B. tabaci from Crete with known neonicotinoid phenotype was performed to associate expression levels of P450s with resistance levels. Expression levels of five P450s, including CYP6CM1, were found associated with neonicotinoid resistance. However, a significant correlation was found only in CYP303 and CYP6CX3, with imidacloprid

  1. Comparative and functional triatomine genomics reveals reductions and expansions in insecticide resistance-related gene families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucila Traverso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Triatomine insects are vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of Chagas' disease. This is a neglected disease affecting approximately 8 million people in Latin America. The existence of diverse pyrethroid resistant populations of at least two species demonstrates the potential of triatomines to develop high levels of insecticide resistance. Therefore, the incorporation of strategies for resistance management is a main concern for vector control programs. Three enzymatic superfamilies are thought to mediate xenobiotic detoxification and resistance: Glutathione Transferases (GSTs, Cytochromes P450 (CYPs and Carboxyl/Cholinesterases (CCEs. Improving our knowledge of key triatomine detoxification enzymes will strengthen our understanding of insecticide resistance processes in vectors of Chagas' disease.The discovery and description of detoxification gene superfamilies in normalized transcriptomes of three triatomine species: Triatoma dimidiata, Triatoma infestans and Triatoma pallidipennis is presented. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of these superfamilies among the triatomine transcriptomes and the genome of Rhodnius prolixus, also a triatomine vector of Chagas' disease, and other well-studied insect genomes was performed. The expression pattern of detoxification genes in R. prolixus transcriptomes from key organs was analyzed. The comparisons reveal gene expansions in Sigma class GSTs, CYP3 in CYP superfamily and clade E in CCE superfamily. Moreover, several CYP families identified in these triatomines have not yet been described in other insects. Conversely, several groups of insecticide resistance related enzymes within each enzyme superfamily are reduced or lacking in triatomines. Furthermore, our qRT-PCR results showed an increase in the expression of a CYP4 gene in a T. infestans population resistant to pyrethroids. These results could point to an involvement of metabolic detoxification mechanisms

  2. Cultivo do cogumelo Pleurotus sajor-caju em diferentes resíduos agrícolas Cultivation of the mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju in different agricultural residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eustáquio Souza Dias

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes resíduos agrícolas disponíveis na região sul de Minas Gerais foram testados para o cultivo do cogumelo Pleurotus sajor-caju. Foram avaliados os seguintes substratos: palha de feijão pura (PFP, palha de milho pura (PMP, casca de café pura (CCP, palha de feijão enriquecida com 2% de calcário, 2% de gesso e 10% de farelo de trigo (PFE, palha de milho enriquecida (PME e casca de café enriquecida (CCE. Todos os substratos receberam 2% de inoculante e foram incubados a 24°C. Após a colonização, os sacos foram mantidos abertos em ambiente a 24°C e umidade a 80%. PFP, PFE e PME apresentaram os melhores resultados na produção de cogumelos, com uma eficiência biológica de 85,7; 81,4 e 83,4%, respectivamente. A palha de feijão foi considerada o melhor resíduo para a produção do cogumelo P. sajor-caju, porque apresentou a melhor eficiência biológica sem necessidade de enriquecimento.Several agricultural residues available in the South of Minas Gerais were tested for cultivation of the mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju. The following substrates were investigated: Bean (BS, Corn (CS straws and Coffee husk (CH without nutrient supplementation and straws of bean (BSS, corn (CSS and coffee husk (CHS supplemented with 2% of CaCO3, 2% of gypsum and 10% of wheat flour. All the substrates were inoculated with 2% of spawn and incubated at 24ºC. After the fungi had colonized the substrate, the plastic bags were open and maintained at room temperature with 80% of humidity. BS, BSS and CSS showed higher mushroom production than the others, showing a biological efficiency of 85.7, 81.4 and 83.6% respectively. The beans straw (BS without nutrient supplementation was considered the best residue for the growth and cultivation of the mushroom Pleurotus sajor-caju. This substrate showed higher levels of biological efficiency than the others substrates analysed.

  3. WE-G-303-01: Physical Bases for Gold Nanoparticle Applications in Radiation Oncology and X-Ray Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  4. WE-G-303-04: Intrinsically Radiolabeled Nanoparticles: An Emerging Paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  5. WE-G-303-02: Gold Nanoparticles as Radiosensitizers - What Does It Take To Go From the Bench to the Bedside?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  6. Relação entre a linfopenia e a persistência da papilomatose alimentar em bovinos intoxicados crônica e espontaneamente por samambaia (Pteridium aquilinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo K Masuda

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Papilomavírus bovino tipo 4 (BPV-4 é responsável pelo desenvolvimento de papilomas no trato alimentar superior (TAS de bovinos. Os passos necessários para o crescimento, o desenvolvimento e a regressão dos papilomas estão intimamente relacionados com o estado imunológico do animal. A ingestão de samambaia (Pteridium aquilinum tem sido relacionada como o principal fator envolvido na persistência da infecção pelo BPV-4 no TAS. A teoria que estabelece a relação entre papilomatose alimentar e a formação de CCEs sugere a produção de um estado imunossupressivo crônico pela planta, permitindo a persistência dos papilomas no TAS. Os papilomas serviriam então como sítios de desenvolvimento dos CCEs através da interação entre as proteínas do BPV-4 e os carcinógenos da samambaia. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a relação entre a quantidade de linfócitos circulantes e a papilomatose alimentar em casos de intoxicação espontânea crônica por P. aquilinum em bovinos com CCE no TAS. Quarenta bovinos com CCEs no TAS foram avaliados quanto à idade, à intensidade da papilomatose alimentar no TAS e ao leucograma. Três bovinos tinham leucopenia e um apresentava neutrofilia. A média de linfócitos foi de 5.395 (±1.696 na papilomatose leve, 4.560 (±1.561 na moderada e 5.007 (±1.786 na acentuada. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre o grau de papilomatose, a idade e a quantidade de linfócitos circulantes. Imunossupressão por linfopenia foi um achado esporádico (três casos neste estudo. Os resultados indicam que a persistência da papilomatose alimentar em casos espontâneos de intoxicação crônica por samambaia em bovinos não tem relação com a quantidade de linfócitos circulantes e que talvez esteja relacionada a outros fatores imunológicos.

  7. How well do basic models describe the turbidity currents coming down Monterey and Congo Canyon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartigny, M.; Simmons, S.; Heerema, C.; Xu, J. P.; Azpiroz, M.; Clare, M. A.; Cooper, C.; Gales, J. A.; Maier, K. L.; Parsons, D. R.; Paull, C. K.; Sumner, E. J.; Talling, P.

    2017-12-01

    Turbidity currents rival rivers in their global capacity to transport sediment and organic carbon. Furthermore, turbidity currents break submarine cables that now transport >95% of our global data traffic. Accurate turbidity current models are thus needed to quantify their transport capacity and to predict the forces exerted on seafloor structures. Despite this need, existing numerical models are typically only calibrated with scaled-down laboratory measurements due to the paucity of direct measurements of field-scale turbidity currents. This lack of calibration thus leaves much uncertainty in the validity of existing models. Here we use the most detailed observations of turbidity currents yet acquired to validate one of the most fundamental models proposed for turbidity currents, the modified Chézy model. Direct measurements on which the validation is based come from two sites that feature distinctly different flow modes and grain sizes. The first are from the multi-institution Coordinated Canyon Experiment (CCE) in Monterey Canyon, California. An array of six moorings along the canyon axis captured at least 15 flow events that lasted up to hours. The second is the deep-sea Congo Canyon, where 10 finer grained flows were measured by a single mooring, each lasting several days. Moorings captured depth-resolved velocity and suspended sediment concentration at high resolution (<30 second) for each of the 25 events. We use both datasets to test the most basic model available for turbidity currents; the modified Chézy model. This basic model has been very useful for river studies over the past 200 years, as it provides a rapid estimate of how flow velocity varies with changes in river level and energy slope. Chézy-type models assume that the gravitational force of the flow equals the friction of the river-bed. Modified Chézy models have been proposed for turbidity currents. However, the absence of detailed measurements of friction and sediment concentration within

  8. WE-G-303-00: Nanotechnology for Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  9. SU-F-J-177: A Novel Image Analysis Technique (center Pixel Method) to Quantify End-To-End Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Snyder, K [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States); Scheib, S [Varian Medical System, Barton (Switzerland); Qin, Y; Li, H [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To implement a novel image analysis technique, “center pixel method”, to quantify end-to-end tests accuracy of a frameless, image guided stereotactic radiosurgery system. Methods: The localization accuracy was determined by delivering radiation to an end-to-end prototype phantom. The phantom was scanned with 0.8 mm slice thickness. The treatment isocenter was placed at the center of the phantom. In the treatment room, CBCT images of the phantom (kVp=77, mAs=1022, slice thickness 1 mm) were acquired to register to the reference CT images. 6D couch correction were applied based on the registration results. Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)-based Winston Lutz (WL) tests were performed to quantify the errors of the targeting accuracy of the system at 15 combinations of gantry, collimator and couch positions. The images were analyzed using two different methods. a) The classic method. The deviation was calculated by measuring the radial distance between the center of the central BB and the full width at half maximum of the radiation field. b) The center pixel method. Since the imager projection offset from the treatment isocenter was known from the IsoCal calibration, the deviation was determined between the center of the BB and the central pixel of the imager panel. Results: Using the automatic registration method to localize the phantom and the classic method of measuring the deviation of the BB center, the mean and standard deviation of the radial distance was 0.44 ± 0.25, 0.47 ± 0.26, and 0.43 ± 0.13 mm for the jaw, MLC and cone defined field sizes respectively. When the center pixel method was used, the mean and standard deviation was 0.32 ± 0.18, 0.32 ± 0.17, and 0.32 ± 0.19 mm respectively. Conclusion: Our results demonstrated that the center pixel method accurately analyzes the WL images to evaluate the targeting accuracy of the radiosurgery system. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American

  10. Discriminative stimulus properties of the benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (DMCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, L G; Rowan, G A; Smith, R L; Lucki, I

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether rats could be trained to discriminate the stimulus properties of the benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor inverse agonist DMCM from saline in a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. On a drug trial, water-deprived rats were injected with DMCM (0.55-0.6 mg/kg IP), allowed access to a 0.25% saccharin solution for 30 min, and then injected with LiCl. On non-drug trials, saline injections bracketed the drinking period. Conditioned controls were treated similarly with DMCM and saline on drug and non-drug trials, but received injections of saline instead of LiCl. At the completion of training, CMCM produced a 69% reduction of saccharin consumption on drug trials, compared with 23% for conditioned controls. The stimulus properties of DMCM were then measured by its ability to reduce the preference for saccharin over water in a two-bottle choice test. DMCM reduced saccharin preference in rats that received discrimination training from 68% to 19%, but did not alter saccharin preference in conditioned controls. Other compounds with varying activity at BZ receptors were evaluated for their ability to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of DMCM. Two BZ receptor inverse agonists, beta-CCE (10-18 mg/kg) and FG 7142 (3.2-18 mg/kg), substituted completely for DMCM. Partial substitution for DMCM was shown by the BZ receptor antagonist CGS 8216 (3.2-10 mg/kg) and the non-BZ convulsant pentylenetetrazol (10-20 mg/kg). The BZ receptor agonists chlordiazepoxide (0.32-5.0 mg/kg), diazepam (0.32-10 mg/kg), and alprazolam (0.1-3.2 mg/kg) and the BZ receptor antagonist flumazenil (1.0-32 mg/kg) failed to substitute for the DMCM stimulus. Pretreatment with flumazenil (1.0 mg/kg) blocked the stimulus effects of the training dose of DMCM and produced a shift to the right of the DMCM generalization curve. The pattern of compounds that substituted for the DMCM stimulus and the blockade of that stimulus by flumazenil indicate that the

  11. Benzodiazepine-induced shaking behavior in the rat: structure-activity and relation to serotonin and benzodiazepine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranzatelli, M R

    1989-06-01

    In studying the role of serotonin (5-HT) in the mechanism of action of benzodiazepine (BDZ)-induced wet-dog shakes (WDS), only certain 1,4-substituted BDZ agonists were found to induce WDS at doses up to 60 mg/kg in the rat with the rank order of potency at peak dose effect clonazepam greater than nitrazepam = flunitrazepam much greater than nimetazepam = lorazepam. BDZs evoking WDS at lowest doses contained an R7 nitro group on the A ring. Non-BDZ agonists (CL 218,872), inverse agonists (beta-CCE), peripheral type receptor agonists (Ro 5-4864), and BDZ antagonists (Ro 15-1788) did not induce shaking behavior. Several 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 agonists and antagonists were tested as blockers, but only putative 5-HT1A agonists reduced WDS, 8-OH-DPAT and ipsapirone but not PAPP and 5-MeO-DMT having a significant effect. The effect of 8-OH-DPAT was dose dependent, with an ID50 of 0.86 mg/kg, but it was not reversed by 5-HT or adrenergic antagonists at the doses studied. Intracisternal 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine lesions did not alter frequency, latency, or time course of BDZ-induced WDS. BDZ-evoked WDS were enhanced by Ro 15-1788 (which inhibited ataxia) but were unaffected by the various types of BDZ agonists. Several BDZ agonists induced both WDS and ataxia, but ataxia was not blocked by serotonergic drugs. No significant correlation with ataxia, BDZ radioligand binding, antipentylenetetrazol activity, or other BDZ property was found. BDZ-evoked WDS may relate to the unique predominance of BDZ II and 5-HT1A receptors in the hippocampus, an important site for WDS, but 5-HT1A agonists appear to modulate WDS by opposing pharmacologic actions rather than by direct receptor antagonism. These data indicate a species difference in the shakes induced by BDZs in rats (5-HT2 independent) and in mice (5-HT2 related).

  12. SU-F-T-566: Absolute Film Dosimetry for Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Quality Assurance Using Gafchromic EBT3 Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Lu, S; Qin, Y; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Liu, C; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric uncertainty associated with Gafchromic (EBT3) films and establish an absolute dosimetry protocol for Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods: EBT3 films were irradiated at each of seven different dose levels between 1 and 15 Gy with open fields, and standard deviations of dose maps were calculated at each color channel for evaluation. A scanner non-uniform response correction map was built by registering and comparing film doses to the reference diode array-based dose map delivered with the same doses. To determine the temporal dependence of EBT3 films, the average correction factors of different dose levels as a function of time were evaluated up to four days after irradiation. An integrated film dosimetry protocol was developed for dose calibration, calibration curve fitting, dose mapping, and profile/gamma analysis. Patient specific quality assurance (PSQA) was performed for 93 SRS/SBRT treatment plans. Results: The scanner response varied within 1% for the field sizes less than 5 × 5 cm{sup 2}, and up to 5% for the field sizes of 10 × 10 cm{sup 2}. The scanner correction method was able to remove visually evident, irregular detector responses found for larger field sizes. The dose response of the film changed rapidly (∼10%) in the first two hours and plateaued afterwards, ∼3% change between 2 and 24 hours. The mean uncertainties (mean of the standard deviations) were <0.5% over the dose range 1∼15Gy for all color channels for the OD response curves. The percentage of points passing the 3%/1mm gamma criteria based on absolute dose analysis, averaged over all tests, was 95.0 ± 4.2. Conclusion: We have developed an absolute film dose dosimetry protocol using EBT3 films. The overall uncertainty has been established to be approximately 1% for SRS and SBRT PSQA. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American Cancer Society.

  13. SU-D-BRA-03: Analysis of Systematic Errors with 2D/3D Image Registration for Target Localization and Treatment Delivery in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Edge radiosurgery 6DOF-based system, can perform 2D/3D image registration with high accuracy for target localization in image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American Cancer Society.

  14. SU-D-BRA-03: Analysis of Systematic Errors with 2D/3D Image Registration for Target Localization and Treatment Delivery in Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2016-01-01

    Edge radiosurgery 6DOF-based system, can perform 2D/3D image registration with high accuracy for target localization in image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery. The work was supported by a Research Scholar Grant, RSG-15-137-01-CCE from the American Cancer Society.

  15. WE-G-303-00: Nanotechnology for Imaging and Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  16. Solar wind contribution to the average population of energetic He+ and He++ ions in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kremser

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements with the ion charge-energy-mass spectrometer CHEM on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft were used to investigate the origin of energetic He+ and He++ ions observed in the equatorial plane at 3 ≤ L ≤ 9. Special emphasis was laid on the dependence of long-term average distributions on magnetic local time (MLT and the geomagnetic activity index Kp. The observations are described in terms of the phase space densities f1 (for He+ and f2 (for He++. They confirm preliminary results from a previous study: f1 is independent of MLT, whereas f2 is much larger on the nightside than on the dayside. They show, furthermore, that f1 increases slightly with Kp on intermediate drift shells, but decreases on high drift shells (L ≥ 7. f2 increases with Kp on all drift shells outside the premidnight sector. Within this sector a decrease is observed on high drift shells. A simple ion tracing code was developed to determine how and from where the ions move into the region of observations. It provides ion trajectories as a function of the ion charge, the magnetic moment and Kp. The ion tracing enables a distinction between regions of closed drift orbits (ring current and open convection trajectories (plasma sheet. It also indicates how the outer part of the observation region is connected to different parts of the more distant plasma sheet. Observations and tracing show that He++ ions are effectively transported from the plasma sheet on convection trajectories. Their distribution in the observation region corresponds to the distribution of solar wind ions in the plasma sheet. Thus, energetic He++ ions most likely originate in the solar wind. On the other hand, the plasma sheet is not an important source of energetic He+ ions. Convection trajectories more likely constitute a sink for He+ ions, which may diffuse onto them from closed drift orbits and then get lost through the magnetopause. An ionospheric origin of energetic He+ ions is unlikely as well, since

  17. WE-G-303-03: Advances in in Vivo Magnetic NanoparticleSensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  18. MO-FG-CAMPUS-IeP2-04: Multiple Penalties with Different Orders for Structure Adaptive CBCT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Q; Cheng, P; Tan, S; Tan, S; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Grant Nos.60971112 and 61375018 grants from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (RP130109 and RP110562-P2) National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (R01 EB020366) and a grant from the American Cancer Society (RSG-13-326-01-CCE).

  19. The active site of a carbohydrate esterase displays divergent catalytic and noncatalytic binding functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Montanier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional proteins, which play a critical role in many biological processes, have typically evolved through the recruitment of different domains that have the required functional diversity. Thus the different activities displayed by these proteins are mediated by spatially distinct domains, consistent with the specific chemical requirements of each activity. Indeed, current evolutionary theory argues that the colocalization of diverse activities within an enzyme is likely to be a rare event, because it would compromise the existing activity of the protein. In contrast to this view, a potential example of multifunctional recruitment into a single protein domain is provided by CtCel5C-CE2, which contains an N-terminal module that displays cellulase activity and a C-terminal module, CtCE2, which exhibits a noncatalytic cellulose-binding function but also shares sequence identity with the CE2 family of esterases. Here we show that, unlike other CE2 members, the CtCE2 domain displays divergent catalytic esterase and noncatalytic carbohydrate binding functions. Intriguingly, these diverse activities are housed within the same site on the protein. Thus, a critical component of the active site of CtCE2, the catalytic Ser-His dyad, in harness with inserted aromatic residues, confers noncatalytic binding to cellulose whilst the active site of the domain retains its esterase activity. CtCE2 catalyses deacetylation of noncellulosic plant structural polysaccharides to deprotect these substrates for attack by other enzymes. Yet it also acts as a cellulose-binding domain, which promotes the activity of the appended cellulase on recalcitrant substrates. The CE2 family encapsulates the requirement for multiple activities by biocatalysts that attack challenging macromolecular substrates, including the grafting of a second, powerful and discrete noncatalytic binding functionality into the active site of an enzyme. This article provides a rare example of

  20. Overview of the Turbine Based Combined Cycle Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.; Walker, James F.; Pittman, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Hypersonics project is focused on technologies for combined cycle, airbreathing propulsions systems to enable reusable launch systems for access to space. Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC) propulsion systems offer specific impulse (Isp) improvements over rocket-based propulsion systems in the subsonic takeoff and return mission segments and offer improved safety. The potential to realize more aircraft-like operations with expanded launch site capability and reduced system maintenance are additional benefits. The most critical TBCC enabling technologies as identified in the National Aeronautics Institute (NAI) study were: 1) mode transition from the low speed propulsion system to the high speed propulsion system, 2) high Mach turbine engine development, 3) transonic aero-propulsion performance, 4) low-Mach-number dual-mode scramjet operation, 5) innovative 3-D flowpath concepts and 6) innovative turbine based combined cycle integration. To address several of these key TBCC challenges, NASA s Hypersonics project (TBCC Discipline) initiated an experimental mode transition task that includes an analytic research endeavor to assess the state-of-the-art of propulsion system performance and design codes. This initiative includes inlet fluid and turbine performance codes and engineering-level algorithms. This effort has been focused on the Combined Cycle Engine Large-Scale Inlet Mode Transition Experiment (CCE LIMX) which is a fully integrated TBCC propulsion system with flow path sizing consistent with previous NASA and DoD proposed Hypersonic experimental flight test plans. This experiment is being tested in the NASA-GRC 10 x 10 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) Facility. The goal of this activity is to address key hypersonic combined-cycle-engine issues: (1) dual integrated inlet operability and performance issues unstart constraints, distortion constraints, bleed requirements, controls, and operability margins, (2) mode

  1. Mapping Soil hydrologic features in a semi-arid irrigated area in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Aguirre, M.° Teresa; Isidoro, Daniel; Usón, Asunción

    2016-04-01

    Haploxerept (C), Typic Xerorthent (D), and Typic Xerofluvent (E)] and six particle size families [Fine (1), Fine-silty (2), Fine-loamy (3), Coarse-loamy (4), Loamy Superficial (5) and Loamy-skeletal (6)]. Two great soil zones were defined: the more calcic glacis (A and B subgroups) dominated by coarse textures (4-6); and the more gypsic, fine textured valley floors (C, D and E) (1-2-3) with the exception of the superficial gypsic high lands (D5). In all the soils in VID Calcium Carbonate Equivalent (CCE) was high (though lower in the valleys) and silt was the main textural fraction. The coarser textured glacis had low Gypsum Content (GC), lower WHC and higher Ks while the valley bottoms had high GC, fine textures and lower Ks. The soil water retention properties (FC and WP) could be calculated from textural properties (clay, and fine silt fractions) and the Ks could be related to sand and GC by means of meaningful PTF's. The use of disaggregated soil information (combined with distributed irrigation data) may lead to improved water balance calculations and suggest management options for a better water use in VID.

  2. Magnetic spectral signatures in the Earth's magnetosheath and plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian J.; Fuselier, Stephen A.; Gary, S. Peter; Denton, Richard E.

    1994-01-01

    Correlations between plasma properties and magnetic fluctuations in the sub-solar magnetosheath downstream of a quasi-perpendicular shock have been found and indicate that mirror and ion cyclotronlike fluctuations correlate with the magnetosheath proper and plasma depletion layer, respectively (Anderson and Fueselier, 1993). We explore the entire range of magnetic spectral signatures observed from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Charge Composition Explorer (AMPTE/CCE)spacecraft in the magnetosheath downstream of a quasi-perpendicular shock. The magnetic spectral signatures typically progress from predominantly compressional fluctuations,delta B(sub parallel)/delta B perpendicular to approximately 3, with F/F (sub p) less than 0.2 (F and F (sub p) are the wave frequency and proton gyrofrequency, respectively) to predominantly transverse fluctuations, delta B(sub parallel)/delta B perpendicular to approximately 0.3, extending up to F(sub p). The compressional fluctuations are characterized by anticorrelation between the field magnitude and electron density, n(sub e), and by a small compressibility, C(sub e) identically equal to (delta n(sub e)/n(sub e)) (exp 2) (B/delta B(sub parallel)) (exp 2) approximately 0.13, indicative of mirror waves. The spectral characteristics of the transverse fluctuations are in agreement with predictions of linear Vlasov theory for the H(+) and He(2+) cyclotron modes. The power spectra and local plasma parameters are found to vary in concert: mirror waves occur for beta(s ub parallel p) (beta (sub parallel p) identically = 2 mu(sub zero) n(sub p) kT (sub parallel p) / B(exp 2) approximately = 2, A(sub p) indentically = T(sub perpendicular to p)/T(sub parallel p) - 1 approximately = 0.4, whereas cyclotron waves occur for beta (sub parallel p) approximately = 0.2 and A(sub p) approximately = 2. The transition from mirror to cyclotron modes is predicted by linear theory. The spectral characteristics overlap for

  3. Clay Mineralogy Relationships with Potassium Forms in Different Physiographic Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Alamdari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Potassium is an essential element for plant growth and its importance in agriculture is well known. Total soil potassium reserves are generally large; although the distribution of K forms differs from soil to soil as a function of the dominant soil clay minerals present. The objectives of the present study were: (i the content, forms, and distribution of K as a function of clay mineralogy in different physiographic units; (ii to investigate the relationship between K fractions and their physiographic units. Materials and Methods: The study area is located in south of eastern Azarbaijan province, north of Iran. The region stands between 37° 45' and 38° 00' N latitudes and 46° 00' and 46° 15' E longitudes. The present climate of the region has dry and hot summers, cold and wet winters; with an average rainfall of 334 mm. soil moisture and temperature regimes of study area are xeric and mesic, respectively. Site selection for studied pedons was based on a reconnaissance survey from different physiographic units, namely, pedons 1, 2 and 3 located on Piedmont Plain (PP, pedons 4, 5 and 6 on Rivera Alluvial Plain (RAP and pedons 7, 8 and 9 on Low Lands (LL. Soils were described and classified based on soil survey manual and keys to soil taxonomy. Samples were air dried, crushed and passed through a 2mm sieve. Particle size distribution, organic matter, Calcium Carbonate Equivalent (CCE, pH, Electrical Conductivity (EC and Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC and different forms of K (total, soluble, exchangeable and nonexchangeable were determined. X-ray diffractograms were obtained through a Shimadzu XRD 6000 defractometer employing a Ni-filtered CuKa radiation source from oriented clay (40 kV, 30 mA. The content of clay minerals was estimated according to Biscaye method. Results and Discussion: All soil samples were calcareous, calcium carbonate content was between 10 and 17%, with relatively high clay content, ranging from 18 to 36

  4. 3D geophysical insights into the Ciomadu volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besutiu, Lucian; Zlagnean, Luminita

    2017-04-01

    in the numerical model through the presence of a liquid phase in the underground failed due to the relatively shallow position of the gravity source (approx 2 km beneath the Sf. Ana lake) which should imply significant thermal manifestations at the surface (e.g. geysers), not known in the area. Consequently, the unusual lowering of density in the inner part of the magmatic body might be due to the fissuring and late circulation of hot hydrothermal solutions. Located within geothermal fields volcanic rocks (like andesites and dacites that dominate the Ciomadu structure) interact with thermal water and intensity of alteration depends on the water temperature. The development of smectite-filled micro-cracks may decrease density from 2.6 to 2.1 g/cm3, and the total transformation may provide a significant density change, especially in the inner (hotter) part of the assumed intrusive body, in full agreement with figures provided by numerical modelling: from 2.5-2.6 g/cm3 (fresh andesites) down to 1.1-1.0 g/cm3 (clays). The assumption is strongly supported by the geothermal setting of the area. Temperature determinations in some wells laterally located have indicated high value geothermal gradients (up to 250-400 °C/km). Acknowledgement. Data processing and modelling benefited the IT infrastructure CYBERDYN achieved through the grant POS CCE O 2.1.2. ID 593 (contract 182/2010)

  5. Solar wind contribution to the average population of energetic He+ and He++ ions in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kremser

    Full Text Available Measurements with the ion charge-energy-mass spectrometer CHEM on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft were used to investigate the origin of energetic He+ and He++ ions observed in the equatorial plane at 3 ≤ L ≤ 9. Special emphasis was laid on the dependence of long-term average distributions on magnetic local time (MLT and the geomagnetic activity index Kp. The observations are described in terms of the phase space densities f1 (for He+ and f2 (for He++. They confirm preliminary results from a previous study: f1 is independent of MLT, whereas f2 is much larger on the nightside than on the dayside. They show, furthermore, that f1 increases slightly with Kp on intermediate drift shells, but decreases on high drift shells (L ≥ 7. f2 increases with Kp on all drift shells outside the premidnight sector. Within this sector a decrease is observed on high drift shells. A simple ion tracing code was developed to determine how and from where the ions move into the region of observations. It provides ion trajectories as a function of the ion charge, the magnetic moment and Kp. The ion tracing enables a distinction between regions of closed drift orbits (ring current and open convection trajectories (plasma sheet. It also indicates how the outer part of the observation region is connected to different parts of the more distant plasma sheet. Observations and tracing show that He++ ions are effectively transported from the plasma sheet on convection trajectories. Their distribution in the observation region corresponds to the distribution of solar wind ions in the plasma sheet. Thus, energetic He++ ions most likely originate in the solar wind. On the other hand, the plasma sheet is not an

  6. Solar wind contribution to the average population of energetic He(+) and He(++) ions in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, G.; Rasinkangas, R.; Tanskanen, P.; Wilken, B.; Gloeckler, G.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements with the ion charge-energy-mass spectrometer CHEM on the AMPTE/CCE spacecraft were used to investigate the origin of energetic He(+) and He(++) ions observed in the equatorial plane at 3 less than or equal to L less than or equal to 9. Special emphasis was laid on the dependence of long-term average distributions on magnetic local time (MLT) and the geomagnetic activity index K(sup p). The observations are described in terms of the phase space densities f(sub 1) (for He(+)) and f(sub 2) (for He(++)). They confirm preliminary results from a previous study f(sub 1) is independent of MLT, whereas f(sub 2) is much larger on the nightside than on the dayside. They show, furthermore, that f(sub 1) increases slightly with K(sub p) on intermediate drift shells, but decreases on high drift shells (L greater than or equal to 7). f(sub 2) increases with K(sub p) on all drift shells outside the premidnight sector. Within this sector a decrease is observed on high drift shells. A simple ion tracing code was developed to determine how and from where the ions move into the region of observations. It provides ion trajectories as a function of the ion charge, the magnetic moment and K(sub p). The ion tracing enables a distinction between regions of closed drift orbits (ring current) and open convection trajectories (plasma sheet). It also indicates how the outer part of the observation region is connected to different parts of the more distant plasma sheet. Observations and tracing show that He(++) ions are effectively transported from the plasma sheet on convection trajectories. Their distribution in the observation region corresponds to the distribution of solar wind ions in the plasma sheet. Thus, energetic He(++) ions most likely originate in the solar wind. On the other hand, the plasma sheet is not an important source of energetic He(+) ions. Convection trajectories more likely constitute a sink for He(+) ions, which may diffuse onto them from closed drift orbits

  7. Low Cost Remediation of Mining Sites with Biosolids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Walter; Evanylo, Gregory; Stuczynski, Tomasz

    2010-05-01

    ) sites in eastern Virginia indicated that non C-amended biosolids could be applied at loading rates of up to 75 Mg/ha without significant local ground-water effects, but that significant elevation of nitrate-N in shallow root-zone (75 cm) percolates was observed the first winter after application. Addition of palatable C (as sawdust) to adjust the applied biosolids C:N ratio to 25:1 significantly reduced nitrate-N in root-zone percolates and would allow for higher loading rates where indicated. Lime-stabilized biosolids (100 Mg/ha; 15 to 25% CCE) have also been used to permanently stabilize and revegetate large areas (> 100 ha) acid-sulfate (pH Katowice, Poland, indicate that high rates (> 250 Mg/ha) of biosolids co-applied with waste limes can be utilized to permanently stabilize and revegetate a wide range of phytotoxic and heavily contaminated Pb/Zn smelter slags and processing tailings. Biosolids are generally available at very low cost for land rehabilitation since their cost of transport and application is usually born by the producer or source municipality. Their use is particularly cost-effective when lime-stabilized materials are applied to strongly acidic or metalliferous sites.

  8. Development of Bottom-up Representation of Industrial Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment Models for the Iron and Steel Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, T.T.; Sathaye, J.; Galitsky, C.

    2010-09-30

    measures are available over time, which allows an estimation of technological change over a decade-long historical period. In particular, the report will describe new treatment of technological change in energy-climate modeling for this industry sector, i.e., assessing the changes in costs and energy-savings potentials via comparing 1994 and 2002 conservation supply curves. In this study, we compared the same set of mitigation measures for both 1994 and 2002 -- no additional mitigation measure for year 2002 was included due to unavailability of such data. Therefore, the estimated potentials in total energy savings and carbon reduction would most likely be more conservative for year 2002 in this study. Based upon the cost curves, the rate of change in the savings potential at a given cost can be evaluated and be used to estimate future rates of change that can be the input for energy-climate models. Through characterizing energy-efficiency technology costs and improvement potentials, we have developed and presented energy cost curves for energy efficiency measures applicable to the U.S. iron and steel industry for the years 1994 and 2002. The cost curves can change significantly under various scenarios: the baseline year, discount rate, energy intensity, production, industry structure (e.g., integrated versus secondary steel making and number of plants), efficiency (or mitigation) measures, share of iron and steel production to which the individual measures can be applied, and inclusion of other non-energy benefits. Inclusion of other non-energy benefits from implementing mitigation measures can reduce the costs of conserved energy significantly. In addition, costs of conserved energy (CCE) for individual mitigation measures increase with the increases in discount rates, resulting in a general increase in total cost of mitigation measures for implementation and operation with a higher discount rate. In 1994, integrated steel mills in the U.S. produced 55.

  9. Imaging of Archaeological Remains at Barcombe Roman Villa using Microwave Tomographic Depictions of Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, F.; Utsi, E.; Alani, A.; Persico, R.

    2012-04-01

    The site of the Barcombe Romano-British villa lies in a field on the perimeter of Barcombe village in East Sussex, England. The site came to the attention of the Mid Sussex Field Archaeological Team (MSFAT) and the University College London Field Archaeological Unit (UCL, subsequently replaced by the Centre for Continuing Education of the University of Sussex, CCE) because it was in danger of disappearing altogether without being adequately recorded [1]. In common with many other UK sites of the period, the villa had been extensively robbed out in the centuries following its demise in order to provide building material for the adjacent village and its associated farms, a common problem with Romano-British sites in the UK [2]. In addition, the site is positioned on the ridge of a field in agricultural use and has therefore been extensively ploughed out. As a result, the archaeological evidence was sparse and the little that remained was being rapidly eroded. In April 2001, a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) survey was carried out jointly by the Department of Engineering, Portsmouth and Utsi Electronics Ltd on behalf of the archaeological team in order to investigate the possibility of mapping both the villa and earlier prehistoric remains on the same ridge. Using a 40m by 60m grid laid out by the archaeological team, a Groundvue 1, with antennas of central frequency 400MHz, was used to survey along a series of parallel transects at intervals of 50cm. The sampling interval along the line of survey was 5cm and probing was carried out to 40ns. The results of the GPR survey, including a comparison with the evidence from the resistivity work, were published in 2002 [3]. The original GPR data were processed (using the ReflexW package) by applying background removal, adding time based gain, averaging over 2 traces in order to reduce noise resulting from the relative movement of the antennas across the ploughed field and finally applying a Bandpass Butterworth filter of 200

  10. Effects of Long-term and Continius Horticatural Practices on Distribution of Potassium Forms and their Adsorption Properties in Urmia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra amirpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple biological and physiological processes in the plant, including carbohydrates and proteins formation, activation of 50 enzymes for energy transmission as well as reducing water losses from leaf pores, are mostly affected by the presence of potassium in the plant. In order to test this hypothesis, five soil subgroups (TypicCalcixerepts, FluventicHaploxerepts, TypicEndoaquepts, TypicHalaquepts and VerticEndoaquepts belonging 15 series of gardened and adjoining virgin soils were described and sampled. The studied soils had been influenced under horticultural practices for over five decades. Materials and Methods: The soil samples were analyzed for different K forms, K adsorption and physico- chemical properties after air drying and grinding to pass through a 2 mm-sieve. The particle-size distribution was determined by the hydrometer method (Bouyoucos, 1962. The total carbonate in the soil expressed as the calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE was determined by a rapid titration method (Nelson, 1982. Organic matter (OM was measuredby the Walkley and Black (1934 dichromate oxidation method. The pH of the soil was analyzed in 2:1 CaCl2/soil suspension using glass electrode pH meter (Crockford and Norwell, 1956 and EC was detected in a saturated extract. The cation exchange capacity (CEC was measured using sodium acetate (1 M NaOAc at pH 8.2 (Chapman, 1965. Water soluble K was extracted with deionized water (1: 5 w/v after shaking for 30 minutes on a mechanical shaker and later contents were centrifuged to separate clear extract (Jackson 1973. Exchangeable K was determined by extracting the soil with neutral normal ammonium acetate, Non-exchangeable K was estimated as the difference between boiling 1N HNO3 –K and neutral normal ammonium acetate K (Thomas 1982. Results and Discussion: The result showed that for most of the studied soils, long-terms horticultural practices decreased the amount of different K forms as a result of

  11. Inorganic Phosphorus Fractions and Their Relationships with Soil Characteristics of Selected Calcareous Soils of Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abolfazl azadi

    2017-01-01

    sequential fractionation scheme was preformed according to the method described by Jiang and Gu (1989. Olsen-P fraction that was extracted by NaHCO3 (Olsen and Sommers 1982 was regarded as P-availability index. Also, Total-P by perchloric acid (HClO4 digestion (Sparks; 1996 and organic P were determined.. All of the extraction procedures were performed in duplicate and the amounts of P were colorimetrically measured in the supernatants by the ascorbic acid method of Murphy and Riley (1962.The relationships between forms of P and some of the soil properties were established using correlation method. Results and Discussion: The chemical data of the soils showed that soils were calcareous with CCE range between 9.94 to 74.27 % ( average 51.10% and pH range between 7.02 to 8.36 (average 7.85. Also, the amounts of CEC were between 5.35 to 29.39 cmol (+ kg-1(average 16.68 cmol (+ kg-1. The results showed a wide range in content of Phosphorus fractions. The amount of total Phosphate ranged from 301.87 to 1458.68 mg kg-1 with an average of 626.63 mg kg-1 . Calcium Phosphate ranged from 147.83 to 666.90 mg kg-1 with an average of 324.79 mg kg-1, that comprised 85 and 52 percent of inorganic and total Phosphorus, respectively. The amount of Fe-P ranged from 0.38 to 59.18 mg kg-1 with an average of 7.56 mg kg-1 that comprised 13.64 and 8.34 percent of inorganic and total Phosphorus, respectively. Also, the amount of Al-P ranged from 20.49 to 123.09 mg kg-1 with an average of 52.28 mg kg-1that comprised 1.97 and 1.21 percent of inorganic and total Phosphorus, respectively. The results of correlation study showed that available Phosphorus was significantly correlated with Ca2-P, Ca8-P, Al-P, Ca10-P, and Pt (total phosphorus. So, in calcareous soils, awareness of soil properties and phosphorus fractions and their relationships are important for evaluation of phosphorous status in soil and understanding of soil chemistry that influence soil fertility. Conclusion: The relative abundance of

  12. Stream conversion technology and gas condensate field development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntadi, Arif

    2012-07-01

    In the last few years, integrated modeling has become a preferred tool in the petroleum industry to manage the value chain of different assets. It is slowly replacing the traditional modeling approach that treats each petroleum asset model separately. Having different discipline models and applications in a single platform will ensure more consistency of the value chain from one asset to another. Integrated modeling also enables engineers to optimize assets, both locally and globally, using an automatic approach. Coupling of different petroleum assets entails transferring and combining petroleum streams from one asset to the others. Stream conversion is a key requirement in integrated modeling because petroleum assets usually have their own fluid model, and it is rare to have a single common fluid model in both the subsurface and surface simulation models. This thesis investigates different stream conversion methods and provides important technologies for integrating different petroleum assets into an integrated asset model. These stream conversions are expected to have highly accurate results and reduce the computational time. Reservoir engineers have utilized both compositional and black-oil reservoir simulations for many years. Due to the CPU-time consideration, the EOS model used in a compositional simulation is normally limited to 6-10 components, a so-called lumped EOS model. We propose a delumping method to generate detailed compositional streams from either black-oil or compositional (lumped-EOS) reservoir simulations, performed as a simple post-processing step. These methods are based on a set of phase-specific and pressure-dependent split factors. The reservoir simulation phase behavior can be approximated by a PVT depletion experiment, such as the CCE depletion experiment. We have used this approach to develop the blackoil and compositional delumping method applied to the reservoir simulation output. The split factors are generated from simulated

  13. Les reseaux de politique publique comme facteur d'influence du choix des instruments de politique energetique canadienne a des fins environnementales de 1993 a nos jours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy El Dessouky, Naglaa

    l'agenda politique du pays. Notre projet de recherche, par le truchement de l'approche des reseaux de politique publique, s'attarde a decrire et a expliquer le processus de la formulation d'une politique particuliere, soit la politique energetique a des fins de protection de l'environnement, elaboree en 1993. Il s'agit de mettre en evidence les facteurs affectant le choix des instruments de ces politiques publiques dans leur contexte national. Ainsi, la question generale de cette recherche est: Comment les phases evolutives de la formation d'un reseau de politique, en l'occurrence le Conseil canadien de l'energie (CCE), menent a des caracteristiques particulieres a ce reseau; et comment celles-ci determinent-elles les types des instruments de politique publique choisis, particulierement ceux de la recente orientation des politiques energetiques canadiennes a des fins environnementales elaborees en 1993? Afin d'atteindre l'objectif de notre recherche, deux facteurs primordiaux sont utilises, soit la circulation de l'information et l'exercice du controle sur les ressources des acteurs. L'analyse des caracteristiques du reseau en fonction des liens forts et des liens faibles autant que la presence ou l'absence des trous structuraux nous permettent de bien identifier les positions des differents acteurs, etatiques et non etatiques, sur le plan de l'information et du controle, qui a leur tour, nous semble-t-il, constituent des facteurs affectant les types des instruments des politiques publiques choisis: instruments substantifs, qui indiquent le degre de l'intervention du gouvernement, et instruments proceduraux, qui mettent plutot l'accent sur le degre de l'influence du gouvernement sur les acteurs non etatiques. L'etude soutient que l'approche des reseaux se distingue notamment par son potentiel a expliquer l'interrelation relative entre idees, interets et institutions, ce qui a son tour est susceptible de permettre une meilleure comprehension des processus de l

  14. Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts impregnated in N-doped graphene for simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid, acetaminophen and dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianlan [School of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharmaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhang, Guowei; Shi, Ling; Pan, Shanqing [School of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharmaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuwei4728@126.com [School of Science, Honghe University, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharmaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province, Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Pan, Hiabo [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2016-08-01

    The formation of nitrogen-doped (N-doped) graphene uses hydrothermal method with urea as reducing agent and nitrogen source. The surface elemental composition of the catalyst was analyzed through XPS, which showed a high content of a total N species (7.12 at.%), indicative of the effective N-doping, present in the form of pyridinic N, pyrrolic N and graphitic N groups. Moreover, Au nanoparticles deposited on ZnO nanocrystals surface, forming Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts, undergo a super-hydrophobic to super-hydrophilic conversion. Herein, we present Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts impregnated in N-doped graphene sheets through sonication technique of the Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene hybrid nanostructures. The as-prepared Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene hybrid nanostructure modified glassy carbon electrode (Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene/GCE) was first employed for the simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA), dopamine (DA) and acetaminophen (AC). The oxidation over-potentials of AA, DA and AC decreased dramatically, and their oxidation peak currents increased significantly at Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene/GCE compared to those obtained at the N-doped graphene/GCE and bare CCE. The peak separations between AA and DA, DA and AC, and AC and AA are large up to 195, 198 and 393 mV, respectively. The calibration curves for AA, DA and AC were obtained in the range of 30.00–13.00 × 10{sup 3}, 2.00–0.18 × 10{sup 3} and 5.00–3.10 × 10{sup 3} μM, respectively. The detection limits (S/N = 3) were 5.00, 0.40 and 0.80 μM for AA, DA and AC, respectively. - Graphical abstract: A novel Au/ZnO/N-doped graphene hybrid nanostructure was synthesized for the electrochemical evaluation of AA, DA and AC. The formation of N-doped graphene uses hydrothermal method with urea as reducing agent and nitrogen source. Moreover, Au nanoparticles deposited on ZnO nanocrystals surface, forming Au/ZnO hybrid nanocatalysts, undergo a super-hydrophobic to superhydrophilic conversion. We present Au/ZnO hybrid

  15. Modeling of Soil Aggregate Stability using Support Vector Machines and Multiple Linear Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Besalatpour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil aggregate stability is a key factor in soil resistivity to mechanical stresses, including the impacts of rainfall and surface runoff, and thus to water erosion (Canasveras et al., 2010. Various indicators have been proposed to characterize and quantify soil aggregate stability, for example percentage of water-stable aggregates (WSA, mean weight diameter (MWD, geometric mean diameter (GMD of aggregates, and water-dispersible clay (WDC content (Calero et al., 2008. Unfortunately, the experimental methods available to determine these indicators are laborious, time-consuming and difficult to standardize (Canasveras et al., 2010. Therefore, it would be advantageous if aggregate stability could be predicted indirectly from more easily available data (Besalatpour et al., 2014. The main objective of this study is to investigate the potential use of support vector machines (SVMs method for estimating soil aggregate stability (as quantified by GMD as compared to multiple linear regression approach. Materials and Methods: The study area was part of the Bazoft watershed (31° 37′ to 32° 39′ N and 49° 34′ to 50° 32′ E, which is located in the Northern part of the Karun river basin in central Iran. A total of 160 soil samples were collected from the top 5 cm of soil surface. Some easily available characteristics including topographic, vegetation, and soil properties were used as inputs. Soil organic matter (SOM content was determined by the Walkley-Black method (Nelson & Sommers, 1986. Particle size distribution in the soil samples (clay, silt, sand, fine sand, and very fine sand were measured using the procedure described by Gee & Bauder (1986 and calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE content was determined by the back-titration method (Nelson, 1982. The modified Kemper & Rosenau (1986 method was used to determine wet-aggregate stability (GMD. The topographic attributes of elevation, slope, and aspect were characterized using a 20-m

  16. Neoplasias do trato alimentar superior de bovinos associadas ao consumo espontâneo de samambaia (Pteridium aquilinum Neoplasms of the upper digestive tract of cattle associated with spontaneous ingestion of bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marione A. Moreira Souto

    2006-06-01

    /orofaringe, epiglote, média (terços cranial, médio e caudal do esôfago e caudal (entrada do rúmen e rúmen do TAS, observou-se que a localização era cranial em 39% dos casos, média em 16%, e caudal em 45%. Utilizando-se esse mesmo critério de agrupamento, porém considerando o número total de vezes em que CCEs (de tamanhos variados foram diagnosticados nas regiões cranial, média e caudal, os números alteraram-se para 34, 26 e 40%, respectivamente. As evidências epidemiológicas e histomorfológicas relatadas neste estudo reforçam as observações de uma estreita correlação entre a infecção pelo papiloma-vírus bovino tipo 4, causador da papilomatose digestiva, e a co-carcinogênese química dos princípios tóxicos da samambaia na patogênese dos CCEs do TAS de bovinos. Entretanto, a presença de alterações pré-neoplásicas (áreas de displasia, áreas de CCE in situ ou CCEs em estágios iniciais de desenvolvimento, independentemente da presença de papilomas no local, mostram claramente ser possível o desenvolvimento de CCEs diretamente do epitélio normal, possivelmente por uma ação direta dos carcinó-genos químicos da samambaia.Thirty bovine with neoplasms of the upper digestive tract (UDT associated with spontaneous ingestion of bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum were studied. They were from 27 farms, located in the municipalities of Jaguari (23 and Nova Esperança do Sul (4, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The total cattle population in those farms was 1,090 and large amounts of bracken fern were found in the pastures. Twenty-six of the affected cattle were cows and four were castrated males, 3-13 years of age; most of them were 7-8 years old (46,6%. Clinical signs observed in the affected animals were progressive weight loss, absence of ruminal movements, cough, dysphagia, regurgitation, halitosis, diarrhea, and bloat. Less frequent signs were selective appetite, dyspnea, and salivation. Two bovine died and 28 were submitted to euthanasia in advanced stage

  17. Aspectos clínico-hematológicos e lesões vesicais na intoxicação crônica espontânea por Pteridium aquilinum em bovinos Clinical and hematological aspects and urinary bladder lesions in chronic spontaneous poisoning by Pteridium aquilinum in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane L. Gabriel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados casos espontâneos de intoxicação crônica por samambaia (Pteridium aquilinum em bovinos nas formas clinicopatológicas de carcinoma de células escamosas (CCE no trato alimentar superior (TAS e de hematúria enzoótica bovina (HEB, provenientes da Mesorregião Centro Ocidental Rio-Grandense e encaminhados ao Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria. Para o estudo clínico foram avaliados os sinais clínicos de bovinos com CCEs no TAS e com HEB e realizados hemogramas na fase terminal da doença. Os principais sinais clínicos nos bovinos com CCEs no TAS foram emagrecimento progressivo, atonia ruminal, tosse, disfagia, timpanismo e regurgitação. Nos bovinos com HEB, hematúria foi o principal sinal, observado em todos os casos, seguido de emagrecimento progressivo. No exame hematológico, 33,33% dos bovinos com CCEs no TAS e 66,67% dos bovinos com HEB apresentaram anemia arregenerativa. Alterações no leucograma ocorreram em alguns casos, mas linfopenia foi um achado infreqüente em ambas as formas de intoxicação. Para o estudo morfológico, foram avaliadas as bexigas de 46 bovinos com CCEs no TAS e de 11 bovinos com HEB. Macroscopicamente, 16/46 bexigas dos casos de CCEs no TAS apresentaram alterações macroscópicas, que consistiam nódulos vermelhos ou pálidos, hemorragia e papilomas; urina vermelha foi observada na necropsia de apenas três casos. Nos casos de HEB, os achados macroscópicos vesicais foram nódulos vermelhos, massas neoplásicas focalmente extensas, urina vermelha, papilomas, hemorragias e ruptura de bexiga; pielonefrite e hidronefrose foram observados em poucos casos. Histologicamente, 44/46 (95,65% bexigas de bovinos com CCEs no TAS apresentaram 22 tipos diferentes de alterações morfológicas, que foram classificadas em alterações neoplásicas (5/22 e alterações não-neoplásicas (17/22; essas últimas foram divididas em alterações epiteliais n